WorldWideScience

Sample records for community-level communicable disease

  1. A Coordinated Approach to Communicating Pediatric-Related Information on Pandemic Influenza at the Community Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2009-12-16

    The purpose of this document is to provide a suggested approach, based on input from pediatric stakeholders, to communicating pediatric-related information on pandemic influenza at the community level in a step-by-step manner.

  2. ‘We do not do any activity until there is an outbreak’: barriers to disease prevention and health promotion at the community level in Kongwa District, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamhanga, Tumaini; Frumence, Gasto; Mwangu, Mughwira; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the barriers to disease prevention and health promotion at the community level – within a decentralized health system. Objective This paper, therefore, presents and discusses findings on barriers (and opportunities) for instituting disease prevention and health promotion activities. Design The study was conducted in Kongwa District, Tanzania, using an explorative case study approach. Data were collected through document reviews and in-depth interviews with key informants at district, ward, and village levels. A thematic approach was used in the analysis of the data. Results This study has identified several barriers, namely decision-makers at the national and district levels lack the necessary political will in prioritizing prevention and health promotion; the gravity of prevention and health promotion stated in the national health policy is not reflected in the district health plans; gross underfunding of community-level disease prevention and health promotion activities; and limited community participation. Conclusion In this era, when Tanzania is burdened with both communicable and non-communicable diseases, prevention and health promotion should be at the top of the health care agenda. Despite operating in a neoliberal climate, a stronger role of the state is called for. Accordingly, the government should prioritize higher health-protecting physical, social, and economic environments. This will require a national health promotion policy that will clearly chart out how multisectoral collaboration can be put into practice. PMID:25084832

  3. Regional Variations in Medication Usage for Cardiovascular Diseases at the Community Level in China (PURE-China Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin Gang; Gu, Hong Qiu; Bo, Jian; Wang, Yang; Li, Wei

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the usage of secondary prevention drugs and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) products in individuals with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) at the community level in China. Among 2,407 participants with self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) and 872 with stroke, nearly 80% of individuals with CHD and 73% of individuals with stroke were not taking any proven secondary prevention drug. However, 32.9% of them took TCM products. Patients with CVDs in rural areas used less secondary prevention treatment, but more TCM products than their counterparts in the urban regions. After adjusting for confounding factors, lower rates of secondary prevention treatment were evident in Western China compared with Eastern China, which was more developed. Systematic change is needed to promote the development of evidence-based medicine at the community level in China. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  4. Communicable behavior of non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Shukla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Communicability of non- communicable diseases can be explained using the prototype of non- communicable diseases. The concept can be further extended to other non- communicable diseases. Diabetes mellitus (DM is regarded as the prototype of non-communicable diseases. Its subtype, type 2 DM is usually associated with obesity. Obesity, in turn, can be attributed to deranged eating habits and lack of physical activity. Eating habits of a person bears a close resemblance to the parental eating habits. Other factors contributing to obesity like alcoholism can also be transmitted from parents to child. Smoking, another factor implicated in DM, can be picked as a habit from peer group as well as family. All these factors implicated directly or indirectly in the pathogenesis of DM are actually components of lifestyle. These lifestyle components can be transmitted both in an inter-generation and intra-generation fashion. And so the chances of transmission of DM (a lifestyle disease in the same fashion cannot be ruled out. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1711-1714

  5. Communicable Diseases in Childhood Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Networks, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter addresses managing the spread of communicable diseases in childhood settings as well as educational program concerns for children who are HIV infected. Noting that communicable diseases are a source of concern no matter how minor they might appear, the newsletter suggests that it is important for individuals who work with the…

  6. International law and communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aginam, Obijiofor

    2002-01-01

    Historically, international law has played a key role in global communicable disease surveillance. Throughout the nineteenth century, international law played a dominant role in harmonizing the inconsistent national quarantine regulations of European nation-states; facilitating the exchange of epidemiological information on infectious diseases; establishing international health organizations; and standardization of surveillance. Today, communicable diseases have continued to re-shape the boundaries of global health governance through legally binding and "soft-law" regimes negotiated and adopted within the mandate of multilateral institutions - the World Health Organization, the World Trade Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the Office International des Epizooties. The globalization of public health has employed international law as an indispensable tool in global health governance aimed at diminishing human vulnerability to the mortality and morbidity burdens of communicable diseases.

  7. Enhancing Disease Surveillance Event Communication Among Jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Nathaniel R; Loschen, Wayne A; Jorgensen, Joel; Suereth, Joshua; Coberly, Jacqueline S; Holtry, Rekha S; Sikes, Marvin L; Babin, Steven M; Lewis, Sheryl L Happel

    2009-01-01

    Automated disease surveillance systems are becoming widely used by the public health community. However, communication among non-collocated and widely dispersed users still needs improvement. A web-based software tool for enhancing user communications was completely integrated into an existing automated disease surveillance system and was tested during two simulated exercises and operational use involving multiple jurisdictions. Evaluation of this tool was conducted by user meetings, anonymous surveys, and web logs. Public health officials found this tool to be useful, and the tool has been modified further to incorporate features suggested by user responses. Features of the automated disease surveillance system, such as alerts and time series plots, can be specifically referenced by user comments. The user may also indicate the alert response being considered by adding a color indicator to their comment. The web-based event communication tool described in this article provides a common ground for collaboration and communication among public health officials at different locations.

  8. Tuberculosis comorbidity with communicable and non-communicable diseases: integrating health services and control efforts.

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, BJ; Lönnroth, K.; Lawn, SD; Migliori, GB; Mwaba, P.; Glaziou, P; Bates, M; Colagiuri, R; Zijenah, L; Swaminathan, S; Memish, ZA; Pletschette, M; Hoelscher, M; Abubakar, I; Hasan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent data for the global burden of disease reflect major demographic and lifestyle changes, leading to a rise in non-communicable diseases. Most countries with high levels of tuberculosis face a large comorbidity burden from both non-communicable and communicable diseases. Traditional disease-specific approaches typically fail to recognise common features and potential synergies in integration of care, management, and control of non-communicable and communicable diseases. In resource-limite...

  9. Pragmatic communication is impaired in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah; Ouyang, Bichun; Lonnquist, Eryn; Newcombe, Jill

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether severity of disease, cognitive function, age, gender, or amount of social interaction were associated with pragmatic dysfunction in Parkinson disease. No studies have previously been done to investigate variables that may be associated with pragmatic dysfunction in Parkinson disease. A case-control study was conducted with 17 Parkinson disease patients and 17 convenience controls. Each Parkinson disease patient and a control were interviewed, and their pragmatic skills were evaluated using a scale of pragmatic communication skills. Correlation analysis was used to determine what factors were associated with pragmatic dysfunction in the Parkinson disease patients. Cases scored lower on the pragmatic scale with a mean of 29.7 compared with 38.9 in the controls (p pragmatic communication skills had moderate to strong correlations with the MMSE (r = .81, p = .002), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (r = -.71, p = .002), and duration of disease (r = -.53, p = .03). These results show that Parkinson disease patients have impaired pragmatic function compared with controls on both verbal and nonverbal sections, and this impairment correlates with mental state, duration, and severity of disease.

  10. Digital communication support and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Anna; Ferm, Ulrika; Samuelsson, Christina

    2015-12-06

    Communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of possibilities and pitfalls of using personalized communication applications installed on tablet computers to support communication for people with dementia and their conversational partners. The study is based on video recordings of a woman, 52 years old, with Alzheimer's disease interacting with her husband in their home. The couple was recorded interacting with and without a tablet computer including a personalized communication application. The results from the present study reveal both significant possibilities and potential difficulties in introducing a digital communication device to people with dementia and their conversational partners. For the woman in the present study, the amount of interactive actions and the number of communicative actions seem to increase with the use of the communication application. The results also indicate that problems associated with dementia are foregrounded in interaction where the tablet computer is used.

  11. Bacteria without borders: communicable disease politics in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Scott L; Mätzke, Margitta

    2012-12-01

    Communicable disease control might be one of the oldest and most important functions of the modern state, but it receives very little attention today. This article introduces a special issue on the Europeanization of communicable disease control politics in Europe. The Europeanization of communicable disease control is a case of both European integration and communicable disease politics. We first analyze the problems and tensions in communicable disease control as a problem of overlapping interprofessional, interorganizational, intergovernmental, and international tensions. We then present the European Union, a new and understudied actor in communicable disease politics, sketching the theoretical background for Europeanization of the field and introducing the articles in the special issue.

  12. Tuberculosis Comorbidity with Communicable and Noncommunicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew; Marais, Ben J; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-02-06

    The 18th WHO Global Tuberculosis Annual Report indicates that there were an estimated 8.6 million incident cases of tuberculosis (TB) in 2012, which included 2.9 million women and 530,000 children. TB caused 1.3 million deaths including 320,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people; three-quarters of deaths occurred in Africa and Southeast Asia. With one-third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), active TB disease is primarily associated with a break down in immune surveillance. This explains the strong link between active TB disease and other communicable diseases (CDs) or noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) that exert a toll on the immune system. Comorbid NCD risk factors include diabetes, smoking, malnutrition, and chronic lung disease, all of which have increased relentlessly over the past decade in developing countries. The huge overlap between killer infections such as TB, HIV, malaria, and severe viral infections with NCDs, results in a "double burden of disease" in developing countries. The current focus on vertical disease programs fails to recognize comorbidities or to encourage joint management approaches. This review highlights major disease overlaps and discusses the rationale for better integration of tuberculosis care with services for NCDs and other infectious diseases to enhance the overall efficiency of the public health responses. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. 42 CFR 70.3 - All communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false All communicable diseases. 70.3 Section 70.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.3 All communicable diseases. A person who has a communicable disease in...

  14. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Mello Vigoder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound “signatures” may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

  15. [Non-verbal communication in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaratura, Loris Tamara

    2008-09-01

    This review underlines the importance of non-verbal communication in Alzheimer's disease. A social psychological perspective of communication is privileged. Non-verbal behaviors such as looks, head nods, hand gestures, body posture or facial expression provide a lot of information about interpersonal attitudes, behavioral intentions, and emotional experiences. Therefore they play an important role in the regulation of interaction between individuals. Non-verbal communication is effective in Alzheimer's disease even in the late stages. Patients still produce non-verbal signals and are responsive to others. Nevertheless, few studies have been devoted to the social factors influencing the non-verbal exchange. Misidentification and misinterpretation of behaviors may have negative consequences for the patients. Thus, improving the comprehension of and the response to non-verbal behavior would increase first the quality of the interaction, then the physical and psychological well-being of patients and that of caregivers. The role of non-verbal behavior in social interactions should be approached from an integrative and functional point of view.

  16. Community-level consequences of cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlberger, Jan; Langangen, Oystein; Stenseth, Nils C; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2012-12-01

    Ecological interactions determine the structure and dynamics of communities and their responses to the environment. Understanding the community-level effects of ecological interactions, such as intra- and interspecifc competition, predation, and cannibalism, is therefore central to ecological theory and ecosystem management. Here, we investigate the community-level consequences of cannibalism in populations with density-dependent maturation and reproduction. We model a stage-structured consumer population with an ontogenetic diet shift to analyze how cannibalism alters the conditions for the invasion and persistence of stage-specific predators and competitors. Our results demonstrate that cannibalistic interactions can facilitate coexistence with other species at both trophic levels. This effect of cannibalism critically depends on the food dependence of the demographic processes. The underlying mechanism is a cannibalism-induced shift in the biomass distribution between the consumer life stages. These findings suggest that cannibalism may alter the structure of ecological communities through its effects on species coexistence.

  17. Association between periodontal disease and non-communicable diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Oh, Jin-Young; Youk, Tae-Mi; Jeong, Seong-Nyum; Kim, Young-Taek; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The National Health Insurance Service–Health Examinee Cohort during 2002 to 2013 was used to investigate the associations between periodontal disease (PD) and the following non-communicable diseases (NCDs): hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, cerebral infarction, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and obesity. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders during the follow-up period—including age, sex, household income, insurance status, residence area, health status, and comorbidities—were used to estimated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in order to assess the associations between PD and NCDs. We enrolled 200,026 patients with PD and 154,824 subjects with a healthy oral status. Statistically, significant associations were found between PD and the investigated NCDs except for cerebral and myocardial infarction after adjusting for sociodemographic and comorbidity factors (P periodontitis pathogenesis as a triggering and mediating mechanism. PMID:28658175

  18. Some Aspects of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Pacific Island Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Azmat

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the incidence of the communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pacific Island countries. Available health statistics confirms that children continue to die annually due to neonatal causes, diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and measles. The adult population in several countries reveals presence and emergence of…

  19. Some Aspects of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Pacific Island Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Azmat

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the incidence of the communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pacific Island countries. Available health statistics confirms that children continue to die annually due to neonatal causes, diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and measles. The adult population in several countries reveals presence and emergence of…

  20. Tuberculosis comorbidity with communicable and non-communicable diseases: integrating health services and control efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Ben J; Lönnroth, Knut; Lawn, Stephen D; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mwaba, Peter; Glaziou, Philippe; Bates, Matthew; Colagiuri, Ruth; Zijenah, Lynn; Swaminathan, Soumya; Memish, Ziad A; Pletschette, Michel; Hoelscher, Michael; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Hasan, Rumina; Zafar, Afia; Pantaleo, Guiseppe; Craig, Gill; Kim, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Schito, Marco; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2013-05-01

    Recent data for the global burden of disease reflect major demographic and lifestyle changes, leading to a rise in non-communicable diseases. Most countries with high levels of tuberculosis face a large comorbidity burden from both non-communicable and communicable diseases. Traditional disease-specific approaches typically fail to recognise common features and potential synergies in integration of care, management, and control of non-communicable and communicable diseases. In resource-limited countries, the need to tackle a broader range of overlapping comorbid diseases is growing. Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS persist as global emergencies. The lethal interaction between tuberculosis and HIV coinfection in adults, children, and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa exemplifies the need for well integrated approaches to disease management and control. Furthermore, links between diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcoholism, chronic lung diseases, cancer, immunosuppressive treatment, malnutrition, and tuberculosis are well recognised. Here, we focus on interactions, synergies, and challenges of integration of tuberculosis care with management strategies for non-communicable and communicable diseases without eroding the functionality of existing national programmes for tuberculosis. The need for sustained and increased funding for these initiatives is greater than ever and requires increased political and funder commitment. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preventing the Epidemic of Non-Communicable Diseases: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Anthony,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Diet, lifestyle and environment do not just affect a person's health, they also determine the health of their children and possibly the health of their grandchildren. Non-communicable disease is a global epidemic because of the combined effect of the modern diet (including drug abuse) and a sedentary lifestyle. A low energy dense, drug-free diet rich in bioavailable nutrients-plus-exercise is most effective for preventing non-communicable disease throughout life. Nanoc...

  2. Preventing the Epidemic of Non-Communicable Diseases: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Diet, lifestyle and environment do not just affect a person's health, they also determine the health of their children and possibly the health of their grandchildren. Non-communicable disease is a global epidemic because of the combined effect of the modern diet (including drug abuse) and a sedentary lifestyle. A low energy dense, drug-free diet rich in bioavailable nutrients-plus-exercise is most effective for preventing non-communicable disease throughout life. Nanoc...

  3. Non-communicable diseases in the Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Hanan F Abdul; Sibai, Abla; Khader, Yousef; Hwalla, Nahla; Fadhil, Ibtihal; Alsiyabi, Huda; Mataria, Awad; Mendis, Shanthi; Mokdad, Ali H; Husseini, Abdullatif

    2014-01-25

    According to the results of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, the burden of non-communicable diseases (cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes) in the Arab world has increased, with variations between countries of different income levels. Behavioural risk factors, including tobacco use, unhealthy diets, and physical inactivity are prevalent, and obesity in adults and children has reached an alarming level. Despite epidemiological evidence, the policy response to non-communicable diseases has been weak. So far, Arab governments have not placed a sufficiently high priority on addressing the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases, with variations in policies between countries and overall weak implementation. Cost-effective and evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions have already been identified. The implementation of these interventions, beginning with immediate action on salt reduction and stricter implementation of tobacco control measures, will address the rise in major risk factors. Implementation of an effective response to the non-communicable-disease crisis will need political commitment, multisectoral action, strengthened health systems, and continuous monitoring and assessment of progress. Arab governments should be held accountable for their UN commitments to address the crisis. Engagement in the global monitoring framework for non-communicable diseases should promote accountability for effective action. The human and economic burden leaves no room for inaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. "Boring" family routines reduce non-communicable diseases: a commentary and call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tomlinson, Mark; Davis, Emily

    2015-01-01

    As global donors shift their efforts from infectious diseases to non-communicable diseases (NCD), it is critical to capitalize on our prior mistakes and successes. Policy makers and public health administrators are often looking for magic bullets: drugs or treatments to eradicate disease. Yet, each potential magic bullet requires consistent, daily implementation and adherence to a new set of habits to actually work. Families' and communities' daily, interlocking routines will be the battlefield on which scientific and technological breakthroughs will be implemented and succeed or not. Currently, there are many evidence-based interventions (EBI) which have been demonstrated to shift specific habits which account for most NCD (eating, drinking, moving, and smoking). Yet, securing sustained uptake of these programs is rare - suggesting different intervention strategies are needed. Structural changes, policy nudges, and partnerships with private enterprise may be able to shift the health behaviors of more citizens faster and at a lower cost than existing EBI. Addressing concurrent risk and protective factors at the community level and intervening to shape new cultural routines may be useful to reduce NCD.

  5. The Role of Gender in Chagas Disease Prevention and Control in Honduras: An Analysis of Communication and Collaboration Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Diana Rocío Rodríguez; Mertens, Frédéric; Zúniga, Concepción Valeriano; Mendoza, Yolanda; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio; Monroy, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In Honduras, where Chagas disease is a serious health and environmental concern, prevention measures face the challenge of achieving widespread and long-term sustainable adoption by communities. The article integrates social network analysis and a gender-sensitive approach to understand the role of men and women in the implementation of a community-level intervention, based on the adoption of housing improvements to reduce the presence of the insect vector. A total of 108 people in the community of El Salitre were interviewed. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, participation in project activities, communication and collaboration networks related to Chagas disease prevention, knowledge of Chagas disease, and adoption of housing improvements techniques. Communication mostly occurred between the same gender individuals and was associated with knowledge of Chagas disease. Socioeconomic status, Chagas disease knowledge, and collaboration with men were associated with women adopting housing improvements. For men, however, participation in project activities, formal education, and collaboration with women were associated with adoption. These findings suggest that men and women were driven by distinct concerns, interests, and motivations when adopting new Chagas disease prevention strategies. Participatory community interventions that seek to generate health knowledge and foster collaborations to reduce health risk should address gender differences.

  6. Non-communicable diseases in emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demaio, Alessandro; Jamieson, Jennifer; Horn, Rebecca;

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have demonstrated the devastating health consequences of complex emergencies and natural disasters and thereby highlighted the importance of comprehensive and collaborative approaches to humanitarian responses and risk reduction. Simultaneously, noncommunicable diseases are now...... recognised as a real and growing threat to population health and development; a threat that is magnified by and during emergencies. Noncommunicable diseases, however, continue to receive little attention from humanitarian organisations in the acute phase of disaster and emergency response. This paper calls...... on all sectors to recognise and address the specific health challenges posed by noncommunicable diseases in emergencies and disaster situations. This publication aims to highlight the need for: • Increased research on morbidity and mortality patterns due to noncommunicable diseases during and following...

  7. Communicable diseases in complex emergencies: impact and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Máire A; Gayer, Michelle; Ryan, Michael J; Salama, Peter; Spiegel, Paul; Heymann, David L

    Communicable diseases, alone or in combination with malnutrition, account for most deaths in complex emergencies. Factors promoting disease transmission interact synergistically leading to high incidence rates of diarrhoea, respiratory infection, malaria, and measles. This excess morbidity and mortality is avoidable as effective interventions are available. Adequate shelter, water, food, and sanitation linked to effective case management, immunisation, health education, and disease surveillance are crucial. However, delivery mechanisms are often compromised by loss of health staff, damage to infrastructure, insecurity, and poor co-ordination. Although progress has been made in the control of specific communicable diseases in camp settings, complex emergencies affecting large geographical areas or entire countries pose a greater challenge. Available interventions need to be implemented more systematically in complex emergencies with higher levels of coordination between governments, UN agencies, and non-governmental organisations. In addition, further research is needed to adapt and simplify interventions, and to explore novel diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies.

  8. Non-communicable diseases – harnessing the current opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jane Brandt; Demaio, Alessandro Rhyll; Østergaard, Lise Rosendal

    2012-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) receive growing attention, which brings a unique opportunity to utilise solutions available to address them. These diseases are largely preventable; proven, cost-effective interventions are available; and when NCDs have emerged, means exist to treat them, prevent...... complications, and to improve quality of life. Yet, there is a lack in progress in responding effectively to NCDs, and the current discussion and research focus predominantly on challenges rather than the opportunities, which this paper outlines....

  9. Outbreaks: Sources of Epidemiological Knowledge in Communicable Disease Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L.J.M. Mertens (Paulus Leonardus Johannes Marie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPublic health has been defined as the science and art of disease prevention, prolonging life, and promoting health and well-being through organized community effort for the sanitation of the environment, the control of communicable infections, the organization of medical and nursing serv

  10. Outbreaks: Sources of Epidemiological Knowledge in Communicable Disease Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L.J.M. Mertens (Paulus Leonardus Johannes Marie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPublic health has been defined as the science and art of disease prevention, prolonging life, and promoting health and well-being through organized community effort for the sanitation of the environment, the control of communicable infections, the organization of medical and nursing

  11. When Are High-Tech Communicators Effective in Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Caligari, Marco; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Franchignoni, Franco

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a 63-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease showing loss of intelligibility of speech and severely impaired handwriting, despite undergoing physical and speech therapies. As the patient had sufficient residual motor abilities and adequate cognitive function and motivation, a computer-based communication aid with a software…

  12. Functional communication ability in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Albuquerque M. de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional communication is crucial for independent and efficient communicative behavior in response to every day activities. In the course of dementia progression, cognitive losses may impair these abilities. For this reason, functional communication assessment should be part of a formal assessment to quantify and qualify the impact of deficiency on patients' lives. Objective: To compare functional communication abilities in fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FLTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods: Six AD patients (mean age: 82.50±2.66 years; mean education: 5.67±3.61 years, and eight FTLD patients (mean age: 57.13±9.63 years; mean education: 10.86±6.91 years had their close relatives answer the Functional Assessment of Communication Skills for Adults (Asha-facs . Statistical analyses correlated the performance on each of the Asha-facs domains (social communication, communication of basic needs; reading, writing, number concept and daily planning between both groups. Results: Analyses showed that functional communication was similar for AD and FTLD patients. Only two items had statistical difference, namely 'Comprehension of inference' (AD 6.7±1.33; FTLD 2.43±2.30, p=0.017 and 'capacity to make basic money transactions' (AD 2.17±2.04; FTLD 4.00±0.90, p=0.044. Comparison among the four domains' mean scores revealed no significant difference. Conclusion: The Asha-facs is a useful instrument to characterize functional communication abilities in both FTLD and AD. Nevertheless, the analysis presented for this sample showed that the Asha-facs could not discriminate which aspects of the FTLD and AD differed.

  13. Organelle communication: signaling crossroads between homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Chiong, Mario; Hill, Joseph A; Simmen, Thomas; Quest, Andrew F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Cellular organelles do not function as isolated or static units, but rather form dynamic contacts between one another that can be modulated according to cellular needs. The physical interfaces between organelles are important for Ca2+ and lipid homeostasis, and serve as platforms for the control of many essential functions including metabolism, signaling, organelle integrity and execution of the apoptotic program. Emerging evidence also highlights the importance of organelle communication in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cancer, skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction. Here, we provide an overview of the current literature on organelle communication and the link to human pathologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Chronic non-communicable diseases in Brazil: priorities for disease management and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Chor, Dóra; Aquino, Estela M L; Bensenor, Isabela M; Mill, José Geraldo; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Vigo, Alvaro; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2012-12-01

    Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases are the main source of disease burden in Brazil. In 2011, the Brazilian Ministry of Health launched the Strategic Plan of Action for Management of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases focusing on population-based interventions to manage cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory diseases mainly through fighting tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and the harmful use of alcohol. Although a significant number of scientific studies on chronic diseases and their risk factors have been undertaken in Brazil, few are of cohort design. In this context, the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), a cohort study of 15,105 Brazilian public servants reflects the reality of high prevalences of diabetes, hypertension and the main chronic diseases risk factors. The diversity of information that the Study will produce can provide important input to better understand the causes of chronic diseases and to support public policies for fighting them.

  15. A new perspective on John Snow's communicable disease theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelstein, W

    1995-11-01

    When John Snow undertook the studies of the cholera epidemic of 1854 in London, he was testing his theory of communicable disease, which had been enunciated in an oration delivered at the 80th anniversary of the Medical Society of London. Snow had been elected orator of the year for 1853 and, according to his biographer, had spent the better part of a year in preparation. The oration was titled, "On Continuous Molecular Changes, More Particularly in Their Relation to Epidemic Diseases." Although the text of this oration is readily available in the 1936 Commonwealth Fund facsimile reprint of Snow's more famous cholera studies, few modern epidemiologists are familiar with the work. In it, Snow lays out a theory which includes recognition that for each communicable disease there is a distinct and specific cause, that the causal agent is a living organism which is stable over many generations of propagation, that infection is necessary for communication to occur, and that the quantity of infectious material transmitted is increased by multiplication after infection to produce disease manifestations. Although Snow's theory is similar to Jacob Henle's formulations of a decade earlier, it is more precise, more comprehensive, and more explicit. On the basis of this work alone, Snow deserves broader recognition than he has received.

  16. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships.

  17. Exploring family communication about sickle cell disease in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, J Carolyn; Hankins, Jane; Graves, Rebecca J; Robitaille, Kimberly Y; Roberts, Ruth; Cejda, Katherine; Hardy, Belinda T; Johnson, Margery; Porter, Jerlym S

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a lifelong disorder that involves progressive organ damage and requires ongoing medical attention to prevent and treat episodic acute complications. Children with SCD need ongoing monitoring and extra attention that may be stressful to family members. Communication within families can help resolve family stress and may be associated with medical follow-up and management of SCD. Focus groups were conducted with 12 African American families to explore the communication that occurred within and outside of the family from the perspectives of adolescents with SCD, siblings, and parents. Factors that influence family communication were explored. The extended family was an important social network and resource to adolescents, siblings, and parents. Family member knowledge of SCD was an important factor that influenced communication about SCD; adolescents and parents communicated more easily than siblings and also reported having more knowledge of SCD than siblings. Future research focusing on the knowledge of immediate and extended family members and their recognition of their contribution to the child with SCD is recommended.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids and non-communicable diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铎

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review the relation between dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) and non-communicable diseases. Method Data were collected from scientific journals and conference publications, MEDLINE (1979-2002) and current content which included 68 prospective, cross-sectional, case control and dietary-intervention studies. Scientific paper selections were based on the association between ω-3 PUFA and non-communicable diseases. Results ω-3 PUFA has beneficial effects on increasing heart rate variability, decreasing the risk of stroke, reducing both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, insulin resistance and glucose metabolism. Long chain ω-3 PUFA has anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. ω-3 PUFA has also been reported to have a beneficial effect on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia, and may be effective in managing depression in adults. Conclusions Results from epidemiological and dietary intervention studies have shown that ω-3 PUFA represent powerfully a class of bioactive compounds and that dietary intake of ω-3 PUFA plays a critical role in human health in relation to non-communicable diseases.

  19. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-04-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

  20. Addressing the growing burden of non–communicable disease by leveraging lessons from infectious disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Piot 1

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in decreasing morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases and poor maternal– and child–health low– and middle–income countries now face an additional burden with the inexorable rise of non–communicable diseases.

  1. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases.

  2. Communicable disease control in England; recommendations from an American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detels, R

    1994-12-01

    The problems associated with the Wakefield salmonella and the Stafford Legionnaires' disease outbreaks and the recommendations of the Acheson Committee formed in response led to the creation of the position of Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC) within the District Health Authorities. The reality of the position as implemented differs from that envisaged by the Acheson Committee and has resulted in ambiguities about the role of the CsCDC, the source of their support, and the range of their responsibilities. This paper, by an American invited to review the position, outlines the history of the position, the current status of CsCDC, and the barriers to effective performance of the position. It ends with a series of recommendations for improving disease control within England by solidifying the position, establishing its role in disease control within the National Health Service and recommending an educational/training pathway to attract and prepare physicians for the position.

  3. Herd Immunity: A Realistic Goal for Elimination of Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of immunization programs are beyond prevention of specific diseases in individuals. Efficacious vaccine not only protects the immunized, but also extends their benefits to unimmunized individuals of the community through and #8220;herd protection and #8221; or and #8220;herd immunity and #8221;. Herd immunity is the basis on which all national immunization programs are designed. It is defined as the resistance of a group of people to an attack by a disease to which a large proportion of the members of the group are immune. The percentage of the population that must however be immunized depends on three factors: the infectivity of the disease, the vulnerability of the population, and environmental factors. The aim of herd immunity is to reduce effective reproduction rate to less than 1 for each disease thus barring the disease propagation in community. Herd immunity has been found to be effective in multiple respiratory and diarrheal diseases. To conclude, no vaccine offers complete protection, but the spread of disease from person-to-person is much higher in those who remain unvaccinated. Herd immunity can definitely protect the susceptible individuals from acquiring the infection if the numbers of immunized individual are above the threshold level. It is an achievable goal for majority of the communicable diseases and all efforts should be taken by the program managers to amplify it in the community. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(2.000: 187-188

  4. Effect of the vegetarian diet on non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo

    2014-01-30

    A vegetarian diet generally includes plenty of vegetables and fruits, which are rich in phytochemicals, antioxidants, fiber, magnesium, vitamins C and E, Fe³⁺, folic acid and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and is low in cholesterol, total fat and saturated fatty acid, sodium, Fe²⁺, zinc, vitamin A, B₁₂ and D, and especially n-3 PUFA. Mortality from all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and circulatory and cerebrovascular diseases was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivorous populations. Compared with omnivores, the incidence of cancer and type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower in vegetarians. However, vegetarians have a number of increased risk factors for non-communicable diseases such as increased plasma homocysteine, mean platelet volume and platelet aggregability compared with omnivores, which are associated with low intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA. Based on the present data, it would seem appropriate for vegetarians to carefully design their diet, specifically focusing on increasing their intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA to further reduce already low mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Physiotherapists` knowledge of the transmission and prevention of communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Grobler

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available With the world-wide increase of communicable diseases, adequate knowledge by health professionals of the transmission and prevention of these diseases is essential to ensure effective protection.  The aim of this study was to determine whether practising physiotherapists’ knowledge of the transmission and prevention of tuberculosis, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV/AIDS was adequate to ensure effective protection.A descriptive study was conducted.  One hundred and forty six practising physiotherapists in the Free State received questionnaires on which they had to indicate the relevant transmission and preventative measures for each disease. One hundred and three (70.5% questionnaires were returned.  Points were allocated for the knowledge of transmission and preventative measures.  The medians with respect to transmission were: tuberculosis 83%, hepatitis A 58%, hepatitis B 67%, hepatitis C 75% and HIV/AIDS 92%.  The medians with respect to preventative measures were: tuberculosis 57%, hepatitis A 58%, hepatitis B 77%, hepatitis C 67% and HIV/AIDS 71%.  The knowledge of transmission was better than the knowledge of preventative measures.  An increase in the knowledge of practising physiotherapists in the Free State is needed to ensure their maximal protection against communicable diseases.

  6. Communicative aspects and coping strategies in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Pereira da Costa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, which are the coping strategies used and the relation between type of coping, voice symptoms and communicative aspects. Method: 73 subjects, 33 in the experimental group, with diagnosis of PD, and 40 subjects in the control group, healthy and without vocal complaints. They underwent the following procedures: application of the Voice Symptons Scale – VoiSS – Brazilian Version, Voice Disability Coping Questionnaire – VDCQ – Brazilian Version, and the questionnaire Living with Dysarthria – LwD. Results: The experimental group showed deviations in all protocols: VDCQ (p<0.001, VoiSS (p<0.001, LwD (p<0.001. The most frequently used coping strategy was self-control (p<0.001. The correlation between vocal symptoms and communicative aspects showed that the greater the impairment in communication, the greater the VoiSS emotional scores and the greater will be the amount of voice symptoms and signs. However, the vocal signs and symptoms and communicative aspects showed no correlation with coping. Conclusion: Patients with PD have a high amount of vocal signs and symptoms and the higher the occurrence, the more the patient reports being difficult to live with dysarthria, particularly when there are deviations in the emotional domain.

  7. Community-level socioeconomic status and parental smoking in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kenji; Aida, Jun; Morita, Manabu; Ando, Yuichi; Osaka, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Community-level social environment has been considered to be associated with smoking behavior. However, no study has examined the association between community-level environmental factors and parental smoking behavior in families with young children. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between community-level socioeconomic status (SES) and parental smoking behavior. We used data from a cross-sectional study conducted from 2005 to 2006. We randomly selected 44 Japanese municipalities, 39 of which municipalities agreed to participate in this survey. The study subjects were participants in health check-ups for three-year-old children. Smoking status and individual demographic characteristics were obtained using self-administered questionnaires. Community-level variables were obtained from national census data for 2005. The prevalence of employment in tertiary industries and of unemployment was used to measure community-level SES. Multilevel Poisson regression models were used to calculate prevalence ratios (PRs) for smoking. Of 4143 subjects, a total of 3301 parents in 39 municipalities participated in our survey. Among the 2975 participants (71.8%) included in our analysis, 59.0% were smokers. There was no association between the job of the head of the household considered as an indicator of individual-level SES and smoking. By contrast, when we examined the relationship between prevalence of employment in tertiary industries as community-level SES and smoking, parents living in low middle SES municipalities had a significantly higher prevalence ratio for smoking, compared to parents living in the highest SES municipalities. This result suggested that those with lower community-level SES tended to have a higher prevalence of parental smoking regardless of individual-level SES. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment and seasonal variations of communicable diseases: 3 year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kalyani

    2016-04-01

    Results: Results showed that a total of 34,981 had been treated at the inpatient departments from the year 2011 to 2013. It was observed that communicable diseases constituted about 85% (30,082 of the total disease burden with viral infections being the commonest. Most of the diseases were observed to have a seasonal variation. The most common disease identified was viral fever 8713 (28.96%, secondly acute diarrheal diseases 7965(26.52% followed by enteric fever 2958 (9.83% and malaria 2443(8.12%. The least common were Rabies 80 (0.26 % and pertussis 37 (0.12%. Outbreaks of Measles and Diphtheria were also noted in this study. Conclusions: Many diseases have a seasonal variation and the burden of these diseases could be reduced if we device measures to detect the changes in their trend through the implementation of surveillance programs. The knowledge of the burden of these would also assist the health administrators in allocation of the resources. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1186-1192

  9. Reputation, relationships, risk communication, and the role of trust in the prevention and control of communicable disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Georgina; de Andrade, Marisa; MacDonald, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Population-level compliance with health protective behavioral advice to prevent and control communicable disease is essential to optimal effectiveness. Multiple factors affect perceptions of trustworthiness, and trust in advice providers is a significant predeterminant of compliance. While competency in assessment and management of communicable disease risks is critical, communications competency may be equally important. Organizational reputation, quality of stakeholder relationships and risk information provision strategies are trust moderating factors, whose impact is strongly influenced by the content, timing and coordination of communications. This article synthesizes the findings of 2 literature reviews on trust moderating communications and communicable disease prevention and control. We find a substantial evidence base on risk communication, but limited research on other trust building communications. We note that awareness of good practice historically has been limited although interest and the availability of supporting resources is growing. Good practice and policy elements are identified: recognition that crisis and risk communications require different strategies; preemptive dialogue and planning; evidence-based approaches to media relations and messaging; and building credibility for information sources. Priority areas for future research include process and cost-effectiveness evaluation and the development of frameworks that integrate communication and biomedical disease control and prevention functions, conceptually and at scale.

  10. The visibility of non-communicable diseases in northern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds; Park, Sung-Joon; Odong, George;

    2015-01-01

    Background : WHO and Uganda’s Ministry of Health emphasize the need to address the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Treatment for these conditions is urgent in northern Uganda where war has negatively affected both health and the public health care system. Objectives : We aimed......, diabetes, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We checked the availability of diagnostic instruments and medicines, and interviewed health workers. Results : The four conditions were rarely diagnosed in the outpatient population. Hypertension was the most common, but still constituted...

  11. Using Talking Mats to Support Communication in Persons with Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferm, Ulrika; Sahlin, Anna; Sundin, Linda; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many individuals with Huntington's disease experience reduced functioning in cognition, language and communication. Talking Mats is a visually based low technological augmentative communication framework that supports communication in people with different cognitive and communicative disabilities. Aims: To evaluate Talking Mats as a…

  12. Advancing digital methods in the fight against communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Seaman, Vincent Y; Wenger, Jay; Moonen, Bruno; Magill, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Important advances are being made in the fight against communicable diseases by using new digital tools. While they can be a challenge to deploy at-scale, GPS-enabled smartphones, electronic dashboards and computer models have multiple benefits. They can facilitate program operations, lead to new insights about the disease transmission and support strategic planning. Today, tools such as these are used to vaccinate more children against polio in Nigeria, reduce the malaria burden in Zambia and help predict the spread of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Event communication in a regional disease surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschen, Wayne; Coberly, Jacqueline; Sniegoski, Carol; Holtry, Rekha; Sikes, Marvin; Happel Lewis, Sheryl

    2007-10-11

    When real-time disease surveillance is practiced in neighboring states within a region, public health users may benefit from easily sharing their concerns and findings regarding potential health threats. To better understand the need for this capability, an event communications component (ECC) was added to the National Capital Region Disease Surveillance System, an operational biosurveillance system employed in the District of Columbia and in surrounding Maryland and Virginia counties. Through usage analysis and user survey methods, we assessed the value of the enhanced system in daily operational use and during two simulated exercises. Results suggest that the system has utility for regular users of the system as well as suggesting several refinements for future implementations.

  14. Communicable disease in the South Pacific Islands, 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshman, J H

    1976-11-13

    An outline is given of the pattern of communicable disease in the South Pacific, as far as it is known. Surveillance and research are imcomplete and the World Health Organization is assisting in carrying these out. Reporting and laboratory diagnosis of communicable disease are inadequate and sometimes inaccurate. This is being improved. Medical checks for intending migrants from the South Pacific are, in a number of cases, inadequately performed in the country of origin and this situation should be altered. The risks to surrounding developed countries from migrants, temporary workers and returning travellers are not tremendous but they cannot be neglected and vigilance has to be maintained. Tuberculosis importation does present risks, as does that of typhoid. Malaria importation carries risks for Northern Australia. Leprosy poses little real risk to Australia or New Zealand and neither does filariasis. Cholera would have to be watched for closely should there ever be a South Pacific outbreak, but the developed countries around the South Pacific which are cholera-non-receptive can control occasional cases. Other than malaria, tuberculosis, typhoid and possibly dengue, problems are thus mainly in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals.

  15. Agricultural policy, food policy, and communicable disease policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Wyn

    2012-12-01

    Food and agricultural policy is an essential element of a communicable disease policy. The European Union has developed a more systematic and broadly based interest in questions of food safety and animal health and welfare linked to modernization of the Common Agricultural Policy, reflected in a new treaty obligation on animal welfare. Following the bovine spongiform encephalopathy crisis, moves were made to create a European competency, but implementation and enforcement resources reside with the member states. The European Animal Health Strategy is meant to lead to an EU animal health law, but this has already been constrained by fiscal austerity. The development of such a law may lead to a lowest common denominator formula that does little to enhance consumer protection or improve animal welfare. This is an inherent risk with top-down forms of Europeanization; more attention should be paid to lessons to be learned from bottom-up initiatives of the type used to counteract the bovine diarrhea virus. There will always be a tension among what is good policy for reducing the incidence of communicable disease, policy that is popular with EU citizens, and policy that is acceptable to member states.

  16. Presymptomatic risk assessment for chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri Padhukasahasram

    Full Text Available The prevalence of common chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs far overshadows the prevalence of both monogenic and infectious diseases combined. All CNCDs, also called complex genetic diseases, have a heritable genetic component that can be used for pre-symptomatic risk assessment. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that tag risk haplotypes across the genome currently account for a non-trivial portion of the germ-line genetic risk and we will likely continue to identify the remaining missing heritability in the form of rare variants, copy number variants and epigenetic modifications. Here, we describe a novel measure for calculating the lifetime risk of a disease, called the genetic composite index (GCI, and demonstrate its predictive value as a clinical classifier. The GCI only considers summary statistics of the effects of genetic variation and hence does not require the results of large-scale studies simultaneously assessing multiple risk factors. Combining GCI scores with environmental risk information provides an additional tool for clinical decision-making. The GCI can be populated with heritable risk information of any type, and thus represents a framework for CNCD pre-symptomatic risk assessment that can be populated as additional risk information is identified through next-generation technologies.

  17. Steal phenomenon through the anterior communicating artery in Moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Mee [Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Mok-dong Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Chae, Eun Jin; Kim, Min Yeong; Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Choong Gon; Pyun, Hae Wook; Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jae Kyun [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Ahn, Jae Sung; Ra, Young-Shin [University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jong-Uk; Hahm, Kyung Don [University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-01-15

    Branch occlusion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is regarded as a part of Moyamoya disease. The purpose of this study is to define the ACA steal phenomenon (SP) in Moyamoya disease and to evaluate temporal changes according to the disease progression. From 139 Moyamoya patients we defined ACASP as narrowing of the ipsilateral A1-2 junction while preserving the anterior communicating artery and supplying the contralateral ACA cortical branches with the development of leptomeningeal collaterals by the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery into the hypoperfused ipsilateral ACA territory. Direction of the steal related to the stage in both hemispheres by Suzuki classification was statistically analyzed using the binomial test based on binomial distribution. Follow-ups of ACASP were evaluated in five patients. We identified ACASP in 13 (9%) patients (male:female=7:6, mean age 18 years, range: 2-58 years) of the 139 study patients. The presenting pattern was ischemic in 12 and hemorrhagic in one. The direction of SP occurred from the hemisphere in the lower to the higher stage of Suzuki classification (two-tail P value=0.0002). After revascularization surgery, ACASP disappeared or diminished. ACASP may occur in bilaterally different stages of Moyamoya disease as a transient self-adaptive process. It regresses after revascularization surgery. (orig.)

  18. Preventing & Managing Communicable Diseases. Training Guides for the Head Start Learning Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman (James) Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This training guide is intended to improve the skills of Head Start staff and families in dealing with communicable diseases. The guide addresses attitudes toward communicable diseases, how to reduce the spread of disease, and how to recognize and manage illnesses more effectively. The guide consists of six working sections. The first three are…

  19. Making sense of climate change risks and responses at the community level: A cultural-political lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainka A. Granderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to better assess, communicate and respond to risks from climate change at the community level have emerged as key questions within climate risk management. Recent research to address these questions centres largely on psychological factors, exploring how cognition and emotion lead to biases in risk assessment. Yet, making sense of climate change and its responses at the community level demands attention to the cultural and political processes that shape how risk is conceived, prioritized and managed. I review the emergent literature on risk perceptions and responses to climate change using a cultural-political lens. This lens highlights how knowledge, meaning and power are produced and negotiated across multiple stakeholders at the community level. It draws attention to the different ways of constructing climate change risks and suggests an array of responses at the community level. It further illustrates how different constructions of risk intersect with agency and power to shape the capacity for response and collective action. What matters are whose constructions of risk, and whose responses, count in decision-making. I argue for greater engagement with the interpretive social sciences in research, practice and policy. The interpretive social sciences offer theories and tools for capturing and problematising the ways of knowing, sense-making and mobilising around risks from climate change. I also highlight the importance of participatory approaches in incorporating the multiplicity of interests at the community level into climate risk management in fair, transparent and culturally appropriate ways.

  20. Targeting mitochondrial phenotypes for non-communicable diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengtang Qi; Shuzhe Ding

    2016-01-01

    The concept that“Exercise is Medicine”has been challenged by the rising prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs). This is partly due to the fact that the underlying mechanisms of how exercise influences energy homeostasis and counteracts high-fat diets and physical inactivity is complex and remains relatively poorly understood on a molecular level. In addition to genetic polymorphisms in humans that lead to gross variations in responsiveness to exercise, adaptation in mitochondrial networks is central to physical activity, inactivity, and diet. To harness the benefits of exercise for NCDs, much work still needs to be done to improve health effectively on a societal level such as developing personalized exercise interventions aided by advances in high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. We propose that understanding the mitochondrial phenotype according to the molecular information of genotypes, lifestyles, and exercise responsiveness in individuals will optimize exercise effects for prevention of NCDs.

  1. Community level risk factors for maternal mortality in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Julio C; Moser, Christine M

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores the effect of risk and socioeconomic factors on maternal mortality at the community level in Madagascar using a unique, nationwide panel of communes (i.e., counties). Previous work in this area uses individual or cross-country data to study maternal mortality, however, studying maternal mortality at the community level is imperative because this is the level at which most policy is implemented. The results show that longer travel time from the community to the hospital leads to a high level of maternal mortality. The findings suggest that improvement to transportation systems and access to hospitals with surgery rooms are needed to deal with obstetric complications and reduce maternal mortality.

  2. Communicable disease control in China: From Mao to now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipgrave, David

    2011-01-01

    China’s progress on communicable disease control (CDC) in the 30 years after establishment of the People’s Republic in 1949 is widely regarded as remarkable. Life expectancy soared by around 30 years, infant mortality plummeted and smallpox, sexually transmitted diseases and many other infections were either eliminated or decreased massively in incidence, largely as a result of CDC. By the mid-1970s, China was already undergoing the epidemiologic transition, years ahead of other nations of similar economic status. These early successes can be attributed to population mobilization, mass campaigns and a focus on sanitation, hygiene, clean water and clean delivery, and occurred despite political instability and slow economic progress. The 10-year Cultural Revolution from 1966 brought many hardships, but also clinical care and continuing public health programs to the masses through community-funded medical schemes and the establishment of community-based health workers. These people-focused approaches broke down with China’s market reforms from 1980. Village doctors turned to private practice as community funding ceased, and the attention paid to rural public health declined. CDC relied on vertical programs, some of them successful (such as elimination of lymphatic filariasis and child immunisation), but others (such as control of schistosomiasis and tuberculosis) demonstrating only intermittent progress due to failed strategies or reliance on support by the poorest governments and health workers, who could not or would not collaborate. In addition, China’s laissez-faire approach to public health placed it at great risk, as evidenced by the outbreak in 2003 of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Since then, major changes to disease reporting, the priority given to CDC including through major new domestic resources and reform of China’s health system offer encouragement for CDC. While decentralized funding and varying quality diagnosis, reporting and

  3. Communicable disease control in China: From Mao to now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hipgrave

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available China’s progress on communicable disease control (CDC in the 30 years after establishment of the People’s Republic in 1949 is widely regarded as remarkable. Life expectancy soared by around 30 years, infant mortality plummeted and smallpox, sexually transmitted diseases and many other infections were either eliminated or decreased massively in incidence, largely as a result of CDC. By the mid-1970s, China was already undergoing the epidemiologic transition, years ahead of other nations of similar economic status. These early successes can be attributed initially to population mobilization, mass campaigns and a focus on sanitation, hygiene, clean water and clean delivery, and occurred despite political instability and slow economic progress. The 10-year Cultural Revolution from 1966 brought many hardships, but also clinical care and continuing public health programs to the masses through community-funded medical schemes and the establishment of community-based health workers. These people-focused approaches broke down with China’s market reforms from 1980. Village doctors turned to private practice as community funding ceased, and the attention paid to rural public health declined. CDC relied on vertical programs, some of them successful (such as elimination of lymphatic filariasis and child immunisation, but others (such as control of schistosomiasis and tuberculosis demonstrating only intermittent progress due to failed strategies or reliance on support by the poorest governments and health workers, who could not or would not collaborate. In addition, China’s laissez-faire approach to public health placed it at great risk, as evidenced by the outbreak in 2003 of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Since then, major changes to disease reporting, the priority given to CDC including through major new domestic resources and reform of China’s health system offer encouragement for CDC. While decentralized funding and varying quality

  4. Communication and Huntington's Disease: Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups with Persons with Huntington's Disease, Family Members, and Carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartelius, Lena; Jonsson, Maria; Rickeberg, Anneli; Laakso, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Background: As an effect of the cognitive, emotional and motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, communicative interaction is often dramatically changed. No study has previously included the subjective reports on this subject from individuals with Huntington's disease. Aims: To explore the qualitative aspects of how communication is…

  5. Disease, communication, and the ethics of (in) visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak-Franger, Monika Monika; Holmes, Martha Stoddard

    2014-12-01

    As the recent Ebola outbreak demonstrates, visibility is central to the shaping of political, medical, and socioeconomic decisions. The symposium in this issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry explores the uneasy relationship between the necessity of making diseases visible, the mechanisms of legal and visual censorship, and the overall ethics of viewing and spectatorship, including the effects of media visibility on the perception of particular "marked" bodies. Scholarship across the disciplines of communication, anthropology, gender studies, and visual studies, as well as a photographer's visual essay and memorial reflection, throw light on various strategies of visualization and (de)legitimation and link these to broader socioeconomic concerns. Questions of the ethics of spectatorship, such as how to evoke empathy in the representation of individuals' suffering without perpetuating social and economic inequalities, are explored in individual, (trans-)national, and global contexts, demonstrating how disease (in)visibility intersects with a complex nexus of health, sexuality, and global/national politics. A sensible management of visibility--an "ecology of the visible"--can be productive of more viable ways of individual and collective engagement with those who suffer.

  6. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Khang, Young-Ho; Asaria, Perviz; Blakely, Tony; Cowan, Melanie J; Farzadfar, Farshad; Guerrero, Ramiro; Ikeda, Nayu; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Msyamboza, Kelias P; Oum, Sophal; Lynch, John W; Marmot, Michael G; Ezzati, Majid

    2013-02-16

    In most countries, people who have a low socioeconomic status and those who live in poor or marginalised communities have a higher risk of dying from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) than do more advantaged groups and communities. Smoking rates, blood pressure, and several other NCD risk factors are often higher in groups with low socioeconomic status than in those with high socioeconomic status; the social gradient also depends on the country's stage of economic development, cultural factors, and social and health policies. Social inequalities in risk factors account for more than half of inequalities in major NCDs, especially for cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. People in low-income countries and those with low socioeconomic status also have worse access to health care for timely diagnosis and treatment of NCDs than do those in high-income countries or those with higher socioeconomic status. Reduction of NCDs in disadvantaged groups is necessary to achieve substantial decreases in the total NCD burden, making them mutually reinforcing priorities. Effective actions to reduce NCD inequalities include equitable early childhood development programmes and education; removal of barriers to secure employment in disadvantaged groups; comprehensive strategies for tobacco and alcohol control and for dietary salt reduction that target low socioeconomic status groups; universal, financially and physically accessible, high-quality primary care for delivery of preventive interventions and for early detection and treatment of NCDs; and universal insurance and other mechanisms to remove financial barriers to health care.

  7. Communicative competence in Alzheimer's disease: metaphor and sarcasm comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yohko; Yamaguchi, Tomoharu; Koeda, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deficits of metaphor and sarcasm comprehension in Alzheimer's disease (AD), as pragmatic interpretation such as metaphor and sarcasm comprehension is required in social communication. A total of 31 young normal controls, 104 aged normal controls (ANC), 42 patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 30 patients with mild AD were evaluated by Metaphoric and Sarcastic Scenario Test, which consists of 5 metaphoric and 5 sarcastic questions with 5 answer choices. Scores were analyzed using the repeated measures analysis of variance (metaphor/sarcasm vs 4 participant groups). Sarcasm comprehension, which requires second-order Theory of Mind (ToM), started to deteriorate in ANC, and metaphor comprehension, which requires first-order ToM, started to deteriorate in aMCI, and both deteriorated as disease progressed. Literal interpretation of pragmatic language is characteristic in patients with mild AD. Such misinterpretation would result in social miscommunication, even if they still retained semantic-lexical competence.

  8. Non-Communicable Disease Preventive Screening by HIV Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Corinne M; Chang, Yuchiao; Regan, Susan; Triant, Virginia A

    2017-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic has evolved, with an increasing non-communicable disease (NCD) burden emerging and need for long-term management, yet there are limited data to help delineate the optimal care model to screen for NCDs for this patient population. The primary aim was to compare rates of NCD preventive screening in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) by type of HIV care model, focusing on metabolic/cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer screening. We hypothesized that primary care models that included generalists would have higher preventive screening rates. Prospective observational cohort study. Partners HealthCare System (PHS) encompassing Brigham & Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and affiliated community health centers. PLWHA age >18 engaged in active primary care at PHS. HIV care model categorized as infectious disease (ID) providers only, generalist providers only, or ID plus generalist providers. Odds of screening for metabolic/CVD outcomes including hypertension (HTN), obesity, hyperlipidemia (HL), and diabetes (DM) and cancer including colorectal cancer (CRC), cervical cancer, and breast cancer. In a cohort of 1565 PLWHA, distribution by HIV care model was 875 ID (56%), 90 generalists (6%), and 600 ID plus generalists (38%). Patients in the generalist group had lower odds of viral suppression but similar CD4 counts and ART exposure as compared with ID and ID plus generalist groups. In analyses adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical covariates and clustering within provider, there were no significant differences in metabolic/CVD or cancer screening rates among the three HIV care models. There were no notable differences in metabolic/CVD or cancer screening rates by HIV care model after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors. These findings suggest that HIV patients receive similar preventive health care for NCDs independent of HIV care model.

  9. Communicative strategies used by spouses of individuals with communication disorders related to stroke-induced aphasia and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Emilia; Hartelius, Lena; Saldert, Charlotta

    2014-11-01

    A communicative disability interferes with the affected person's ability to take active part in social interaction, but non-disabled communication partners may use different strategies to support communication. However, it is not known whether similar strategies can be used to compensate for different types of communicative disabilities, nor what factors contribute to the development of a particular approach by communication partners. To develop a set of categories to describe the strategies used by communication partners of adults who have problems expressing themselves due to neurogenic communicative disabilities. The reliability of assessment was a particular focus. The material explored consisted of 21 video-recorded everyday conversations involving seven couples where one spouse had a communicative disability. Three of the dyads included a person with dysarthria and anomia related to later stages of Parkinson's disease, while four of them included a person with stroke-induced aphasia involving anomia. First a qualitative interaction analysis was performed to explore the strategies used by the communication partners when their spouses had problems expressing themselves. The strategies were then categorized, the reliability of the categorizations was explored and the relative frequency of the various strategies was examined. The analysis of the conversational interactions resulted in a set of nine different strategies used by the communication partners without a communicative disability. Each of these categories belonged to one of three overall themes: No participation in repair; Request for clarification or modification; and Providing candidate solutions. The reliability of the categorization was satisfactory. There were no statistically significant differences between diagnoses in the frequency of use of strategies, but the spouses of the persons with Parkinson's disease tended to use open-class initiations of repair more often than the spouses of the persons

  10. Random Assignment to Illness: Teaching Illness and Disease in the Introductory Health Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer B.; Riley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A key concept in health communication is the difference between disease and illness: disease refers to the physical manifestations of a condition, while illness encompasses the physical, emotional, social, communicative, and psychological experience of living with a condition. The individual illness experience takes into account the full story of…

  11. Random Assignment to Illness: Teaching Illness and Disease in the Introductory Health Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer B.; Riley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A key concept in health communication is the difference between disease and illness: disease refers to the physical manifestations of a condition, while illness encompasses the physical, emotional, social, communicative, and psychological experience of living with a condition. The individual illness experience takes into account the full story of…

  12. Safety Measures with Communicable Diseases. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Stephen

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Safety Measures with Communicable Diseases" program developed by Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon. (This program--not contained in this document--is designed to teach means of preventing the spread of communicable respiratory diseases and ways of protecting oneself.) Part A describes the program in…

  13. Concussions in Community-Level Rugby: Risk, Knowledge, and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R Kyle; Hrubeniuk, Travis J; Witiw, Christopher D; MacDonald, Peter; Leiter, Jeff

    Rugby is a popular collision sport where participants are at risk of sustaining concussions. Most research focuses on elite-level or youth divisions. Comparatively, little is known about adult community rugby. The aim of this research was to estimate the risk of sustaining a concussion during participation in community-level rugby and summarize the collective knowledge and attitudes toward concussions. Concussion symptoms will be reported frequently among community-level rugby players and a substantial proportion will report a willingness to continue participation despite the risk. Cross-sectional analysis. Level 3. An anonymous, voluntary survey was administered to all 464 senior rugby players registered in the province of Manitoba in 2015. Two primary domains were assessed: (1) concussion history from the preceding season including occurrence, symptomatology, and impact on daily activities and (2) knowledge and attitudes toward concussion risks and management. In total, 284 (61.2%) rugby players responded. Concussive symptoms were reported by 106 (37.3%). Of those, 87% were formally diagnosed with a concussion and 27% missed school and/or work as a result. The danger of playing while symptomatic was recognized by 93.7% of participants, yet 29% indicated they would continue while symptomatic. Furthermore, 39% felt they were letting others down if they stopped playing due to a concussion. Concussive symptoms were common among the study cohort and had a notable impact on daily activities. A high proportion of players were willing to continue while experiencing symptoms despite recognizing the danger. The observed discord between knowledge and attitudes implicates a culture of "playing injured." Understanding the risk of injury may affect an individual's decision to participate in community-level rugby. Moreover, evidence of discord between the knowledge and attitudes of players may direct future research initiatives and league governance.

  14. Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Singh, N.N.; Didden, H.C.M.; Green, V.A.; Marschik, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication disorders are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Consequently, enhancing the communication skills of such individuals is a major intervention priority. This chapter reviews the nature and prevalence of the speech, language, and communication problems associated with

  15. [Epidemic trend on notifiable communicable diseases from 2010 to 2015 in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J H; Huang, R G

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the trends and epidemiological characteristics of notifiable communicable diseases from 2010 to 2015 in Beijing so as to provide reliable reference data. Data on the epidemiological characteristics was gathered and analyzed through the monitoring programs on notifiable diseases, reported by the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention, from 2010 to 2015. A total of 764 290 cases of notifiable communicable diseases were reported from 2010 to 2015 in Beijing. The annual reported incidence on notifiable communicable diseases showed an annual downward (χ(2)=1.25×10(4), Pdiseases and respiratory infectious diseases also showed an annual downward (χ(2)=1.25×10(4), Pchildren under 7 years old appeared higher than that of the other age groups that accounted for 47.79% of the total reported cases. High incidence mainly appeared in children that living scattering around which accounted for 31.64% of the total reported cases. The first three leading incidence rates seen in other infectious diseases were infectious diarrhea, hand-foot-and-mouth disease and dysentery for the last consecutive 6 years. The laboratory diagnosed rate on notifiable disease was 16.67%, but with a trend of annual increase. Intestinal infective diseases kept the highest incidence among all the notifiable communicable diseases, suggesting the necessity of improving the prevention and control programs on notifiable communicable diseases in preschool, especially in those children with their houses scattered around. Programs on laboratory diagnosis also need to be strengthened.

  16. Men's health: non-communicable chronic diseases and social vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidinotto, Daniele Natália Pacharone Bertolini; Simonetti, Janete Pessuto; Bocchi, Silvia Cristina Mangini

    2016-08-15

    to evaluate the relationship between absences in scheduled appointments and the number of non-communicable chronic diseases and to investigate the relationship between spatial distribution of these diseases and social vulnerability, using geoprocessing. a quantitative study of sequential mixed approach by analyzing 158 medical records of male users to relate the absences and 1250 medical records for geoprocessing. the higher the number of absences in the scheduled medical appointments, the less were the number of non-communicable chronic diseases and the ones listed in the International Classification of Diseases in single men. There were 21 significant geostatistically cases of glucose intolerance in the urban area. Of these, 62% lived in a region with a social vulnerability rating of Very Low, Medium 19%, 14% Low and 5% High. it was observed that the older the men, the greater is the number of chronic diseases and the less they miss scheduled appointments. Regarding the use of geoprocessing, we obtained a significant number of cases of glucose intolerance in urban areas, the majority classified as Very Low social vulnerability. It was possible to relate the spatial distribution of these diseases with the social vulnerability classification; however, it was not possible to perceive a relationship of them with the higher rates of social vulnerability. avaliar a relação entre as faltas em consultas agendadas e o número de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis e averiguar a relação entre distribuição espacial dessas doenças e vulnerabilidade social, utilizando-se o geoprocessamento. estudo quantitativo, de abordagem mista sequencial, sendo analisados 158 prontuários de usuários do sexo masculino para se relacionar as faltas e 1250 prontuários para o geoprocessamento. quanto maior o número de faltas nas consultas médicas agendadas, menores foram a quantidade de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis e as listadas na Classificação Internacional de

  17. Migration and child immunization in Nigeria: individual- and community-level contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antai Diddy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine-preventable diseases are responsible for severe rates of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Despite the availability of appropriate vaccines for routine use on infants, vaccine-preventable diseases are highly endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Widespread disparities in the coverage of immunization programmes persist between and within rural and urban areas, regions and communities in Nigeria. This study assessed the individual- and community-level explanatory factors associated with child immunization differentials between migrant and non-migrant groups. Methods The proportion of children that received each of the eight vaccines in the routine immunization schedule in Nigeria was estimated. Multilevel multivariable regression analysis was performed using a nationally representative sample of 6029 children from 2735 mothers aged 15-49 years and nested within 365 communities. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to express measures of association between the characteristics. Variance partition coefficients and Wald statistic i.e. the ratio of the estimate to its standard error were used to express measures of variation. Results Individual- and community contexts are strongly associated with the likelihood of receiving full immunization among migrant groups. The likelihood of full immunization was higher for children of rural non-migrant mothers compared to children of rural-urban migrant mothers. Findings provide support for the traditional migration perspectives, and show that individual-level characteristics, such as, migrant disruption (migration itself, selectivity (demographic and socio-economic characteristics, and adaptation (health care utilization, as well as community-level characteristics (region of residence, and proportion of mothers who had hospital delivery are important in explaining the differentials in full immunization among the children. Conclusion Migration is an important

  18. Physiotherapy in the management of non-communicable diseases: facing the challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Frantz

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence of the rising incidence and prevalence of non-communicable diseases in developing countries. Governments are facing serious challenges in health care due to the rising trends in non-communicable diseases as a result of demographic and epidemiological changes, as well as economic globalization. Cardiovascular disease, cancers, diabetes, respiratory disease, obesity andother non-communicable conditions now account for 59 percent of the 56.5 million global deaths annually, and almost half, or 46 percent, of the global burden of disease. It is estimated that by 2020, non-communicable diseases will account for 60% of the global burden of disease. The burden of non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa is already substantial, and patients with these conditions make significant demands on health resources. How do these changes affect physiotherapists? This paper aims to highlight the need for physiotherapists to shift their focus from curative to preventive care in order to face the challenge of non-communicable diseases.

  19. National mortality burden due to communicable, non-communicable, and other diseases in Ethiopia, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misganaw, Awoke; Haregu, Tilahun N; Deribe, Kebede; Tessema, Gizachew Assefa; Deribew, Amare; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Amare, Azmeraw T; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Gedefaw, Molla; Dessalegn, Muluken; Lakew, Yihunie; Bekele, Tolesa; Mohammed, Mesoud; Yirsaw, Biruck Desalegn; Damtew, Solomon Abrha; Krohn, Kristopher J; Achoki, Tom; Blore, Jed; Assefa, Yibeltal; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Ethiopia lacks a complete vital registration system that would assist in measuring disease burden and risk factors. We used the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) estimates to describe the mortality burden from communicable, non-communicable, and other diseases in Ethiopia over the last 25 years. GBD 2015 mainly used cause of death ensemble modeling to measure causes of death by age, sex, and year for 195 countries. We report numbers of deaths and rates of years of life lost (YLL) for communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional (CMNN) disorders, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and injuries with 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) for Ethiopia from 1990 to 2015. CMNN causes of death have declined by 65% in the last two-and-a-half decades. Injury-related causes of death have also decreased by 70%. Deaths due to NCDs declined by 37% during the same period. Ethiopia showed a faster decline in the burden of four out of the five leading causes of age-standardized premature mortality rates when compared to the overall sub-Saharan African region and the Eastern sub-Saharan African region: lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and diarrheal diseases; however, the same could not be said for ischemic heart disease and other NCDs. Non-communicable diseases, together, were the leading causes of age-standardized mortality rates, whereas CMNN diseases were leading causes of premature mortality in 2015. Although lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease were the leading causes of age-standardized death rates, they showed major declines from 1990 to 2015. Neonatal encephalopathy, iron-deficiency anemia, protein-energy malnutrition, and preterm birth complications also showed more than a 50% reduction in burden. HIV/AIDS-related deaths have also decreased by 70% since 2005. Ischemic heart disease, hemorrhagic stroke, and ischemic stroke were among the top causes of premature mortality and age

  20. Tourism and Sustainable Development. Implications at Local Community Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Ioan Nechifor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism represents an economic activity with a special growth potential and rate that, managed in a proper way, can represent an important means for ensuring a sustainable development and to promote and sustain local communities. During the past period, the development of tourism raised awareness among policy makers, local governments, tourists, etc. about the effect of tourism on the environment, this way the development of a sustainable tourism being a necessity. The present paper aims to outline a series of implications at communities' level that the relationship between tourism and sustainable development may generate, focusing on one of the most representative and important components of sustainable tourism, respectively ecotourism and its particular forms of rural and agrotourism.

  1. Health Seeking Behaviour of Non Communicable Disease in Sulaho Village, Lasusua Sub District, North Kolaka Regency

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    Cati Martiyana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non communicable diseases is a chronic disease that is not spread from person to person. Public knowledge about type of non communicable disease is quite good, but generally they don’t understand about effect of non communicable disease risk factors, impacts and consider non communicable disease due to genetic factors, disease ofolder or rich people. This research to describe the fi ndings of non communicable diseases and health seeking behavior for these types of disease. Method: This study is a qualitative study used ethnographic methods. The research location at Sulaho village, Lasusua sub district, North Kolaka regency. Informants selected with snowball sampling methods. Participant observation and indepth interviews supported with documentation as data collection methods. Analysis of qualitative data with domain analysis, taxonomic analysis, komponensial analysis and analysis of the cultural theme supported with triangulation of sources and data collection methods. Results: Non communicable disease founded at Sulaho were cases of hypertension, stroke, diseases caused by workplace accidents and iodine defi ciency disorders (IDD. Informan knows name of diseases, but they did not know good knowledge of caused, impact and prevention of it. Traditional healer (sanro is still the main reference before went to the health worker when someone sick, this indicates that people still have the will to take advantage of health care of health seeking behaviour. Conclusion: Traditional healer (sanro generally become the main reference for health seeking behaviour of non communicable diseases before someone went to the health workers.Recommendation: Health workers has to be practice to approach the community through community leaders or kinship based.

  2. Extralinguistic Communication Compensates for the Loss of Verbal Fluency: A Case Study of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Steven R.; Cagigas, Xavier E.

    1997-01-01

    The case study of an older woman with Alzheimer's disease shows that while her command of words and syntax had deteriorated, her ability to use other forms of communication had not. Her alternative forms of communication included use of gesture, facial expression, posture, and tone of voice. (MSE)

  3. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  4. Burgeoning burden of non-communicable diseases in Nepal: a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Neupane, Dinesh; Bhandari, Parash Mani; Khanal, Vishnu; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has escalated in Nepal. This study reviews existing evidence on the burden of non-communicable diseases in Nepal using the framework developed by Arksey and O’Malley for scoping reviews. A total of 110 articles were identified from database searches, and four from additional searches. The titles and abstracts were reviewed using predetermined screening criteria. We limited our search to existing literature in English language...

  5. Survey of Communicable Diseases Surveillance System in Hospitals of Iran: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehcheshmeh, Nayeb Fadaei; Arab, Mohammad; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Farzianpour, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Communicable Disease Surveillance and reporting is one of the key elements to combat against diseases and their control. Fast and timely recognition of communicable diseases can be helpful in controlling of epidemics. One of the main sources of management of communicable diseases reporting is hospitals that collect communicable diseases’ reports and send them to health authorities. One of the focal problems and challenges in this regard is incomplete and imprecise reports from hospitals. In this study, while examining the implementation processes of the communicable diseases surveillance in hospitals, non-medical people who were related to the program have been studied by a qualitative approach. Methods: This study was conducted using qualitative content analysis method. Participants in the study included 36 informants, managers, experts associated with health and surveillance of communicable diseases that were selected using targeted sampling and with diverse backgrounds and work experience (different experiences in primary health surveillance and treatment, Ministry levels, university staff and operations (hospitals and health centers) and sampling was continued until arrive to data saturation. Results: Interviews were analyzed after the elimination of duplicate codes and integration of them. Finally, 73 codes were acquired and categorized in 6 major themes and 21 levels. The main themes included: policy making and planning, development of resources, organizing, collaboration and participation, surveillance process, and monitoring and evaluation of the surveillance system. In point of interviewees, attention to these themes is necessary to develop effective and efficient surveillance system for communicable diseases. Conclusion: Surveillance system in hospitals is important in developing proper macro - policies in health sector, adoption of health related decisions and preventive plans appropriate to the existing situation. Compilation, changing

  6. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  7. Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, I-Min; Shiroma, Eric J; Lobelo, Felipe;

    2012-01-01

    Strong evidence shows that physical inactivity increases the risk of many adverse health conditions, including major non-communicable diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers, and shortens life expectancy. Because much of the world's population...... is inactive, this link presents a major public health issue. We aimed to quantify the eff ect of physical inactivity on these major non-communicable diseases by estimating how much disease could be averted if inactive people were to become active and to estimate gain in life expectancy at the population level....

  8. Available data sources for monitoring non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandai, M.; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens; Day, C.

    2017-01-01

    mortality owing to exposure to risk factors arising from obesity that include physical inactivity and accessible, cheap but unhealthy diets. The National Strategic Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases 2013 - 17 developed by the SA National Department of Health outlines targets......Background. Health information systems for monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa (SA) are relatively less advanced than those for infectious diseases (particularly tuberculosis and HIV) and for maternal and child health. NCDs are now the largest cause of premature......, categories used, timeliness, disease coverage and biomarker measurement....

  9. Communicating risk and promoting disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Renata; May Leung, May; Brown, Mason

    2014-03-01

    This review aims to identify and assess evidence on interventions to communicate risk and promote disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease outbreak settings. The study focuses on data that are relevant to low and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. We conducted a comprehensive literature search using five major electronic databases (Pubmed Medline, Biomed Central, EMBASE, Science of Citation Index, and Cochrane Library) and other sources to identify relevant studies published from January 2002 to July 2013. The review was guided by the socio-ecological model/perspective of public health and the ideation theory and focused on interventions at the community, healthcare, and multi-sectoral settings, which also reflect key intervention levels of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Eligible quantitative studies were selected according to specific study criteria and assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) framework. Conversely, qualitative studies, reviews, case studies, and editorials were not included. Studies were selected by two independent reviewers. Twenty-nine relevant studies from 16 countries were included. Most studies focused on a single intervention or intervention level, rather than multi-sectoral interventions. The majority of the evidence relates to programs aimed at behavioral and social results (or relevant intermediate steps) within a specific population group. Two studies included implications for improvements in health service delivery, two studies examined the intervention's impact on health systems-related outcomes, and three had also implications for environmental health outcomes. Cost- and health equity-related implications for select evidence were also discussed. The paucity of well-designed quantitative evaluations of interventions to communicate health risk and promote disease control measures in LMICs does not allow for any definitive conclusions. Yet, the review identified several promising

  10. Completeness of Communicable Disease Reporting, North Carolina, USA, 1995–1997 and 2000–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David J.; Poole, Charles; MacDonald, Pia D.M.; Maillard, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread use of communicable disease surveillance data to inform public health intervention and control measures, the reporting completeness of the notifiable disease surveillance system remains incompletely assessed. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive study of reporting completeness with an analysis of 53 diseases reported by 8 health care systems across North Carolina, USA, during 1995–1997 and 2000–2006. All patients who were assigned an International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, diagnosis code for a state-required reportable communicable disease were matched to surveillance records. We used logistic regression techniques to estimate reporting completeness by disease, year, and health care system. The completeness of reporting varied among the health care systems from 2% to 30% and improved over time. Disease-specific reporting completeness proportions ranged from 0% to 82%, but were generally low even for diseases with great public health importance and opportunity for interventions. PMID:21192850

  11. Community Level Disadvantage and the Likelihood of First Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Boden-Albala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Residing in “disadvantaged” communities may increase morbidity and mortality independent of individual social resources and biological factors. This study evaluates the impact of population-level disadvantage on incident ischemic stroke likelihood in a multiethnic urban population. Methods. A population based case-control study was conducted in an ethnically diverse community of New York. First ischemic stroke cases and community controls were enrolled and a stroke risk assessment performed. Data regarding population level economic indicators for each census tract was assembled using geocoding. Census variables were also grouped together to define a broader measure of collective disadvantage. We evaluated the likelihood of stroke for population-level variables controlling for individual social (education, social isolation, and insurance and vascular risk factors. Results. We age-, sex-, and race-ethnicity-matched 687 incident ischemic stroke cases to 1153 community controls. The mean age was 69 years: 60% women; 22% white, 28% black, and 50% Hispanic. After adjustment, the index of community level disadvantage (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7–2.1 was associated with increased stroke likelihood overall and among all three race-ethnic groups. Conclusion. Social inequalities measured by census tract data including indices of community disadvantage confer a significant likelihood of ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors.

  12. Community-Level Impacts Projection System (CLIPS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monts, J.K.; Bareiss, E.R.

    1979-02-01

    The Community-Level Impacts Projection System includes a set of techniques for providing detailed advance information required for rational planning. The computerized system generates reports which enable the user: to describe the energy development activity in terms of its employment demands and spatial location; to estimate how many in-migrating workers will be required; to estimate the demographic characteristics of the in-migrating workers (e.g., how many elementary school children they will bring); to estimate how many additional secondary employment opportunities (e.g., employment in eating and drinking establishments and grocery stores) will be generated; to estimate what the local area's population levels in various age groups would be both with the project and without it; to estimate community population levels for both the impact case and the baseline case; and to estimate the approximate resource requirements and costs for providing additional municipal facilities and services (e.g., water treatment and distribution, wastewater treatment and collection, gas and electric distribution, police and fire protection, etc.)

  13. Medium Range Ensembles Flood Forecasts for Community Level Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhruddin, S.; Kawasaki, A.; Babel, M. S.; AIT

    2013-05-01

    Early warning is a key element for disaster risk reduction. In recent decades, there has been a major advancement in medium range and seasonal forecasting. These could provide a great opportunity to improve early warning systems and advisories for early action for strategic and long term planning. This could result in increasing emphasis on proactive rather than reactive management of adverse consequences of flood events. This can be also very helpful for the agricultural sector by providing a diversity of options to farmers (e.g. changing cropping pattern, planting timing, etc.). An experimental medium range (1-10 days) flood forecasting model has been developed for Bangladesh which provides 51 set of discharge ensembles forecasts of one to ten days with significant persistence and high certainty. This could help communities (i.e. farmer) for gain/lost estimation as well as crop savings. This paper describe the application of ensembles probabilistic flood forecast at the community level for differential decision making focused on agriculture. The framework allows users to interactively specify the objectives and criteria that are germane to a particular situation, and obtain the management options that are possible, and the exogenous influences that should be taken into account before planning and decision making. risk and vulnerability assessment was conducted through community consultation. The forecast lead time requirement, users' needs, impact and management options for crops, livestock and fisheries sectors were identified through focus group discussions, informal interviews and questionnaire survey.

  14. Public communication, risk perception, and the viability of preventive vaccination against communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Because of the nature of preventive vaccination programs, the viability of these public health interventions is particularly susceptible to public perceptions. This is because vaccination relies on a concept of 'herd immunity', achievement of which requires rational public behavior that can only be obtained through full and accurate communication about risks and benefits. This paper describes how irrational behavior that threatens the effectiveness of vaccination programs--both in crisis and non-crisis situations--can be tied to public perceptions created by media portrayals of health risks. I concentrate on childhood vaccination as an exemplar of 'non-crisis' preventive vaccination, and on the recent flu vaccine shortage as a 'crisis' situation. The paper concludes with an examination of the steps necessary to resolve these threats through better public communication.

  15. Developmental determinants in non-communicable chronic diseases and ageing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Berkouk, K; Gergen, P; Antunes, J Pinto; Augé, P; Camuzat, T; Bringer, J; Mercier, J; Best, N; Bourret, R; Akdis, M; Arshad, S H; Bedbrook, A; Berr, C; Bush, A; Cavalli, G; Charles, M A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Gillman, M; Gold, D R; Goldberg, M; Holloway, J W; Iozzo, P; Jacquemin, S; Jeandel, C; Kauffmann, F; Keil, T; Koppelman, G H; Krauss-Etschmann, S; Kuh, D; Lehmann, S; Carlsen, K C Lodrup; Maier, D; Méchali, M; Melén, E; Moatti, J P; Momas, I; Nérin, P; Postma, D S; Ritchie, K; Robine, J M; Samolinski, B; Siroux, V; Slagboom, P E; Smit, H A; Sunyer, J; Valenta, R; Van de Perre, P; Verdier, J M; Vrijheid, M; Wickman, M; Yiallouros, P; Zins, M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and peri-natal events play a fundamental role in health, development of diseases and ageing (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)). Research on the determinants of active and healthy ageing is a priority to: (i) inform strategies for reducing societal and individual costs of

  16. State model for partly undetected non-communicable diseases (NCDs)

    OpenAIRE

    Brinks, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes an age-structured compartment model for irreversible diseases with a pre-clinical state of undiagnosed cases that precedes the diagnosis. The model is able to cope with mortality rates differing between the pre-clinical and the clinical state (differential mortality). Applicability is tested in a hypothetical disease with realistic incidence and mortality rates.

  17. Comparing seed dispersal effectiveness by frugivores at the community level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castro, Aarón; Calviño-Cancela, Marĺa; Nogales, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Seed dispersal effectiveness (SDE) is the contribution of dispersers to plant recruitment and is estimated as the product of the number of seeds dispersed (quantity) and the probability of recruitment of each dispersed seed (quality). Although SDE is a key concept in seed dispersal ecology, few studies estimate SDE and none has a community approach. Oceanic islands, with simple communities, are ideal for this purpose. In this study, we compared the SDE of the main types of dispersers (lizards and passerine birds) at the community level in a given habitat. We estimated SDE using a stochastic simulation model parameterized with empirical data on quantity and quality components measured throughout the recruitment process. Although lizards are highly frugivorous and their density was approximately 20 times higher than that of birds, lizards and birds dispersed a similar quantity of seeds. This may be due to lower intake of seeds by lizards due to their slower metabolism (approximately 20 times lower than birds). This low metabolic rate limits the importance of lizards as seed dispersers, but it is compensated by extraordinarily high lizard densities in the study area (approximately 9600 individuals/km2). High densities of lizards are typical of islands, and this helps to explain why dispersal by lizards seems mainly an island phenomenon. Birds and lizards showed functional complementarity, especially regarding seed dispersal distribution patterns. In fact, lizards dispersed more seeds in shrublands and open sites, and birds in woodlands and beneath canopies, with their joint contribution helping to maximize recruitment. Lizards provided higher SDE than birds for 7 out of 11 plant species. The disperser with a higher quantity for a given plant generally had the higher quality, and plants could be classified as bird- or lizard-dependent for dispersal. This dependence increased when considering SDE instead of dispersal quantity only. Moreover, quality was a better

  18. Shelters for Battered Women and Their Children: An Under-Recognized Source of Communicable Disease Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas P.; Rosenberg, Mark L.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study of various aspects of communicable disease occurrence (focusing on diarrheal illness) in shelters for battered women and their children, the extent and methods of screening for disease, training of staff in health care principles, resources available for health care needs, and the health regulations governing these shelters. (PS)

  19. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on macro-economic productivity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Chaker (Layal); A. Falla (Abby); S. van der Lee (Sven); T. Muka (Taulant); D. Imo (David); L. Jaspers (Loes); V. Colpani (Veronica); S. Mendis (Shanthi); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); W.M. Bramer (Wichor M); R. Pazoki (Raha); O.H. Franco (Oscar)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractNon-communicable diseases (NCDs) have large economic impact at multiple levels. To systematically review the literature investigating the economic impact of NCDs [including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chr

  20. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on macro-economic productivity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Chaker (Layal); A. Falla (Abby); S. van der Lee (Sven); T. Muka (Taulant); D. Imo (David); L. Jaspers (Loes); V. Colpani (Veronica); S. Mendis (Shanthi); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); W.M. Bramer (Wichor); R. Pazoki (Raha); O.H. Franco (Oscar)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractNon-communicable diseases (NCDs) have large economic impact at multiple levels. To systematically review the literature investigating the economic impact of NCDs [including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chr

  1. Using online health communication to manage chronic sorrow: mothers of children with rare diseases speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Adriana D

    2015-01-01

    Families affected by rare disease experience psychosocial reactions similar to families with prevalent chronic diseases. The ability to respond and manage the condition depends on psychosocial factors. This phenomenological study of 16 mothers of children with Alagille syndrome explored their lived experience in using online health communications to manage their chronic sorrow. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews analyzed using techniques described by van Manen. Analysis yielded four essential themes: connectedness, online triggers, empowerment, and seasons of online use contributed to online communication essential to a rare disease community. Findings suggest mothers need emotional support and help accessing appropriate online resources.

  2. Rising Health Expenditure due to Non-communicable Diseases in India: An Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Barik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: With ongoing demographic transition, epidemiological transition in India has been emerged as a growing concern in India. The share of non-communicable disease in total disease burden has increased from 31 per cent in 1990 to 45 per cent in 2010. This paper seeks to explore the health scenario of India in the wake of the growing pace of non-communicable diseases like diabetes, hypertension among Indian population using data from health and morbidity survey of the National Sample Survey Organisation (2004 and notifies about the resource needed to tackle this growing health risk. Given the share of private players (70 per cent in Indian health system, results indicate a higher private expenditure, mostly out-of-pocket expense, on account of non-communicable diseases. A timely look into the matter may tackle a more dreadful situation in near future.

  3. Rising Health Expenditure Due to Non-Communicable Diseases in India: An Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debasis; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    2016-01-01

    With ongoing demographic transition, epidemiological transition has been emerged as a growing concern in India. The share of non-communicable disease in total disease burden has increased from 31% in 1990 to 45% in 2010. This paper seeks to explore the health scenario of India in the wake of the growing pace of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension among Indian population using data from health and morbidity survey of the National Sample Survey Organisation (2004) and notifies about the resource needed to tackle this growing health risk. Given the share of private players (70%) in Indian health system, results indicate a higher private expenditure, mostly out-of-pocket expense, on account of non-communicable diseases. A timely look into the matter may tackle a more dreadful situation in near future.

  4. Impact of information and communication technology on interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Neil; Vania, Diana; Randall, Glen; Mulvale, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Information and communication technology is often lauded as the key to enhancing communication among health care providers. However, its impact on interprofessional collaboration is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which it improves communication and, subsequently, enhances interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management. Methods A systematic review of academic literature using two electronic platforms: HealthSTAR and Web of Science (core collection and MEDLINE). To be eligible for inclusion in the review, articles needed to be peer-reviewed; accessible in English and focused on how technology supports, or might support, collaboration (through enhanced communication) in chronic disease management. Studies were assessed for quality and a narrative synthesis conducted. Results The searches identified 289 articles of which six were included in the final analysis (three used qualitative methods, two were descriptive and one used mixed methods). Various forms of information and communication technology were described including electronic health records, online communities/learning resources and telehealth/telecare. Three themes emerged from the studies that may provide insights into how communication that facilitates collaboration in chronic disease management might be enhanced: professional conflict, collective engagement and continuous learning. Conclusions The success of technology in enhancing collaboration for chronic disease management depends upon supporting the social relationships and organization in which the technology will be placed. Decision-makers should take into account and work toward balancing the impact of technology together with the professional and cultural characteristics of health care teams.

  5. Monitoring Heart Disease and Diabetes with Mobile Internet Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mulvaney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A telemedicine system is described for monitoring vital signs and general health indicators of patients with cardiac and diabetic conditions. Telemetry from wireless sensors and readings from other instruments are combined into a comprehensive set of measured patient parameters. Using a combination of mobile device applications and web browser, the data can be stored, accessed, and displayed using mobile internet communications to the central server. As an extra layer of security in the data transmission, information embedded in the data is used in its verification. The paper highlights features that could be enhanced from previous systems by using alternative components or methods.

  6. Online Communication and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per; Lindgren, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    -eases, as well as the lack of financial resources. There is an assumption that welfare technology can provide cost effective solutions to the benefit of future citizens despite the strained economy. The technology used is based on an online encrypted connection with synchronous video communication. Via......In 2013 Slagelse Municipality implemented an online rehabili-tation program, “Online Viva” with respiratory training and district nursing consultancy for elderly people (aged 61-90) with COPD. In September 2014, 20 citizens with moderate (50%) to severe (15%) reduced lung function were included...

  7. Communication partner training of enrolled nurses working in nursing homes with people with communication disorders caused by stroke or Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Karin; Forsgren, Emma; Hartelius, Lena; Saldert, Charlotta

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a communication partner training programme directed to enrolled nurses working with people with communication disorders in nursing homes, using an individualised approach. Five dyads consisting of a person with stroke-induced aphasia (n = 4) or Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 1) living in different nursing homes and his/her enrolled nurse participated in the study, which had a replicated single-subject design with multiple baselines across individuals. The main element of the intervention was supervised analysis of video-recorded natural interaction in everyday nursing situations and the formulation of individual goals to change particular communicative strategies. Outcome was measured via blinded assessments of filmed natural interaction obtained at baseline, intervention and follow-up and showed an increased use of the target communicative strategies. Subjective measures of goal attainment by the enrolled nurses were consistent with these results. Measures of perceived functional communication on behalf of the persons with communication disorders were mostly positive; four of five participants with communication disorders and two of five enrolled nurses reported improved functional communication after intervention. The use of an individualised communication partner training programme led to significant changes in natural interaction, which contributes importantly to a growing body of knowledge regarding communication partner training. Communication partner training can improve the communicative environment of people with communication disorders. For people with communication disorders who live in institutions, the main conversation partner is likely to be a professional caretaker. An individualised approach for communication partner training that focussed on specific communication patterns was successful in increasing the use of supportive strategies that enrolled nurses used in natural interaction with persons with communication disorders

  8. Dopamine depletion affects communicative intentionality in Parkinson's disease patients: Evidence from action kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate communication is at the heart of successful, healthy social interactions in humans. Deficits in social communication are a hallmark of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Yet, very little research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying these issues. It has been suggested that dopamine is a candidate neurotransmitter system involved in stimulating communication in individuals that are not highly motivated to communicate. A typical model to study dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans is represented by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, who show motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of social communication on actions in non-demented PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the communicative intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. In two main conditions, participants were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either simply lift it (individual condition) or lift it with the intent to communicate a meaning to a partner (communicative condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to communicative intention and that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating communicative intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients. Although the to-be-grasped object remained the same both the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'individual' and the 'communication' conditions. The PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. We contend that social and communicative impairments are associated with abnormalities in

  9. First Italian Ebola virus disease case: management of hospital internal and external communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salce, Lorella; Barbato, Simona; Renna, Daniela; Bianchini, Francesco; Vaccaro, Paola; Mazzeo, Fabio; Gasparini, Annunziatina; Rizza, Claudio; Lanfranchi, Emanuele; Petrosillo, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Di Caro, Antonino; Capobianchi, Maria R; Puro, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    On November 25, 2014, an Italian physician infected by Ebola virus in Sierra Leone was admitted to the "Lazzaro Spallanzani" National Institute for Infectious Diseases in Rome, Italy. He was the first Italian case and was successfully cured in 38 days. The staff responsible for communication had a critical role ensuring that this challenging mission went smoothly. The Institutional Press Office working together with the press offices of the Ministry of Health was able to provide the high level of expertise necessary within both medical and communication contexts. Communication strategy, tools and procedures adopted before and after the arrival of the patient are summarized.

  10. Epidemiology of major non-communicable diseases in Ethiopia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misganaw, Awoke; Mariam, Damen Haile; Ali, Ahmed; Araya, Tekebash

    2014-03-01

    Impact of non-communicable diseases is not well-documented in Ethiopia. We aimed to document the prevalence and mortality associated with four major non-communicable diseases in Ethiopia: cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Associated risk factors: hypertension, tobacco-use, harmful use of alcohol, overweight/obesity, and khat-chewing were also studied. Systematic review of peer-reviewed and grey literature between 1960 and 2011 was done using PubMed search engines and local libraries to identify prevalence studies on the four diseases. In total, 32 studies were found, and half of these studies were from Addis Ababa. Two hospital-based studies reviewed the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and found a prevalence of 7.2% and 24%; a hospital-based study reviewed cancer prevalence and found a prevalence of 0.3%; two hospital-based studies reviewed diabetes prevalence and found a prevalence of 0.5% and 1.2%; and two hospital-based studies reviewed prevalence of asthma and found a prevalence of 1% and 3.5%. Few community-based studies were done on the prevalence of diabetes and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease among the population. Several studies reviewed the impact of these diseases on mortality: cardiovascular disease accounts for 24% of deaths in Addis Ababa, cancer causes 10% of deaths in the urban settings and 2% deaths in rural setting, and diabetes causes 5% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causes 3% of deaths. Several studies reviewed the impact of these diseases on hospital admissions: cardiovascular disease accounts for 3%-12.6% and found to have increased between 1970s and 2000s; cancer accounts for 1.1%-2.8%, diabetes accounts for 0.5%-1.2%, and chronic obstructive diseases account for 2.7%-4.3% of morbidity. Overall, the major non-communicable diseases and related risk factors are highly prevalent, and evidence-based interventions should be designed.

  11. Communicable Disease Reporting Systems in the World: A System­atic Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali JANATI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Communicable disease reporting and surveillance system has poor infrastructure and supporters in most of countries. Its quality improvement is a challenge and requires an accurate and efficient care and reporting systems at all levels to achieve new and simple models. This study evaluates reporting systems of communicable diseases using systematic review.Methods: This was a systematic review study. For data collection, we used the following database and search engines: Proquest, Science direct, Pub MED, Scopes, Springer, and EBESCO. For Persian databases, we used SID, Iranmedex and Magiran. Our key words were "Communicable Diseases", "Notifiable Disease", "Disease Notification", "Reporting System"," Surveillance Systems" and "evaluation". Two independent researchers reviewed the resources and the results were classified in different domains.Results: From 1889 cases, only 66 resources were studied. The results were classified in several domains, including those who were reporting, reporting methods and procedures, responsibilities and reporting system characteristics, problems and solutions of the report, the reporting process, and receptor level.Conclusion: Disease-reporting system has similar problems in all parts of the world. Change, improve, update and continuous monitoring of the reporting system are very important. Although the reporting process can vary in different regions, but being perfect and timely are important principles in system design. Detailed explanations of tasks and providing appropriate instructions are the most important points to integrate an efficient reporting system. Keywords: Reporting, Diseases surveillance system, Disease control

  12. Helminth infections on Flores Island, Indonesia : associations with communicable and non-communicable diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiria, Aprilianto Eddy

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we reported our investigations of the relationship between soil-transmitted helminths (STH) and a number of outcomes, in particular malaria, insulin resistance (a marker for type-2 diabetes (T2D)) and atherosclerosis (a marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVD)) on Flores island, Indon

  13. Legal aspects of public health: how law frames communicable disease control in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianastasiou, Sophia; Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena C

    2011-11-01

    We reviewed Greek law (legislation, historic Royal Decrees, and modern Presidential ones, 1833-2010) pertinent to control of communicable diseases and compared this body of Greek law with the revised International Health Regulations. Greece authorizes and regulates communicable disease control commensurate with public health risks, and integrates the principles of equality, objectivity, and respect for human rights. Despite strength at the level of principles, Greek law lacks coherence, clarity, and systematization. An inadequate body of regulations means legislation falls short of adequate implementing authority and guidelines; public health authorities often cannot find or understand the laws, nor are they certain about allocation of jurisdictional authority. We identified areas for improvement.

  14. Chronic Non-communicable Diseases in Health Care Workers: a Multidisciplinary Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Rodríguez Rodríguez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: the rise of chronic non-communicable diseases requires urgent attention within the projections of the health system in order to contribute to the control and better management of the multiple risk factors that accompany them. Objective: to determine major chronic non-communicable diseases and risk factors in health care workers. Methods: a correlational, case series study including workers of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos was conducted from January 2009 through July 2012. A two-stage sampling design was used. The sample consisted of 187 subjects. Selected variables were: sex, age, occupation, educational level, chronic diseases, behavioural risk factors and emotional risk factors. Results: women (61 % and subjects who completed studies beyond 12th grade (48.6 % were more commonly affected by non-communicable diseases, as well as nurses (31 % and physicians (27.8 % in terms of occupation. Most frequent chronic diseases were hypertension (33.69 %, diabetes mellitus (19.78 % and ischemic heart disease (13 %. Major emotional risk factors included: stress (79.82 %, followed by anxiety (64.16 % and depression (35.29 %. Smoking predominated in 28.87 % of the subjects. Conclusions: professionals, women and workers aged 40 to 50 years predominated. It was demonstrated that chronic conditions studied and risk factors are most common in women. Over 50 % of the workers suffer from chronic diseases. Risk factors are present in subjects both with and without chronic conditions.

  15. Communicable disease among displaced Afghans: refuge without shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabali, Alefiyah; Moin, Omer; Ansari, Amna S; Khanani, Mohammad R; Ali, Syed H

    2009-08-01

    More than 23 years of warfare in Afghanistan has caused over 6 million Afghans to seek asylum in approximately 70 different countries, with most Afghan refugees settling in the developing countries of Pakistan and Iran. In a developing host country, poor sanitation and nutrition, overcrowding and inaccessibility to health care facilities act synergistically to influence morbidity and mortality from infectious disease in the refugee population. In this Science and Society article we discuss the prevalence of transmissible infection, modes of transmission, associated risk factors, and the state of health and health care in the displaced Afghan population.

  16. [Verbal and gestural communication in interpersonal interaction with Alzheimer's disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaratura, Loris Tamara; Di Pastena, Angela; Askevis-Leherpeux, Françoise; Clément, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    Communication can be defined as a verbal and non verbal exchange of thoughts and emotions. While verbal communication deficit in Alzheimer's disease is well documented, very little is known about gestural communication, especially in interpersonal situations. This study examines the production of gestures and its relations with verbal aspects of communication. Three patients suffering from moderately severe Alzheimer's disease were compared to three healthy adults. Each one were given a series of pictures and asked to explain which one she preferred and why. The interpersonal interaction was video recorded. Analyses concerned verbal production (quantity and quality) and gestures. Gestures were either non representational (i.e., gestures of small amplitude punctuating speech or accentuating some parts of utterance) or representational (i.e., referring to the object of the speech). Representational gestures were coded as iconic (depicting of concrete aspects), metaphoric (depicting of abstract meaning) or deictic (pointing toward an object). In comparison with healthy participants, patients revealed a decrease in quantity and quality of speech. Nevertheless, their production of gestures was always present. This pattern is in line with the conception that gestures and speech depend on different communicational systems and look inconsistent with the assumption of a parallel dissolution of gesture and speech. Moreover, analyzing the articulation between verbal and gestural dimensions suggests that representational gestures may compensate for speech deficits. It underlines the importance for the role of gestures in maintaining interpersonal communication.

  17. Brain-gut-microbe communication in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenham, Sue; Clarke, Gerard; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G

    2011-01-01

    Bidirectional signalling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is regulated at neural, hormonal, and immunological levels. This construct is known as the brain-gut axis and is vital for maintaining homeostasis. Bacterial colonization of the intestine plays a major role in the post-natal development and maturation of the immune and endocrine systems. These processes are key factors underpinning central nervous system (CNS) signaling. Recent research advances have seen a tremendous improvement in our understanding of the scale, diversity, and importance of the gut microbiome. This has been reflected in the form of a revised nomenclature to the more inclusive brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis and a sustained research effort to establish how communication along this axis contributes to both normal and pathological conditions. In this review, we will briefly discuss the critical components of this axis and the methodological challenges that have been presented in attempts to define what constitutes a normal microbiota and chart its temporal development. Emphasis is placed on the new research narrative that confirms the critical influence of the microbiota on mood and behavior. Mechanistic insights are provided with examples of both neural and humoral routes through which these effects can be mediated. The evidence supporting a role for the enteric flora in brain-gut axis disorders is explored with the spotlight on the clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome, a stress-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. We also critically evaluate the therapeutic opportunities arising from this research and consider in particular whether targeting the microbiome might represent a valid strategy for the management of CNS disorders and ponder the pitfalls inherent in such an approach. Despite the considerable challenges that lie ahead, this is an exciting area of research and one that is destined to remain the center of focus for some time to come.

  18. Brain-Gut-Microbe Communication in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eGrenham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional signalling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is regulated at neural, hormonal and immunological levels. This construct is known as the brain-gut axis and is vital for maintaining homeostasis. Bacterial colonisation of the intestine plays a major role in the post-natal development and maturation of the immune and endocrine systems. These processes are key factors underpinning central nervous system (CNS signalling. Recent research advances have seen a tremendous improvement in our understanding of the scale, diversity and importance of the gut microbiome. This has been reflected in the form of a revised nomenclature to the more inclusive brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis and a sustained research effort to establish how communication along this axis contributes to both normal and pathological conditions. In this review, we will briefly discuss the critical components of this axis and the methodological challenges that have been presented in attempts to define what constitutes a normal microbiota and chart its temporal development. Emphasis is placed on the new research narrative that confirms the critical influence of the microbiota on mood and behaviour. Mechanistic insights are provided with examples of both neural and humoral routes through which these effects can be mediated. The evidence supporting a role for the enteric flora in brain-gut axis disorders is explored with the spotlight on the clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a stress-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. We also critically evaluate the therapeutic opportunities arising from this research and consider in particular whether targeting the microbiome might represent a valid strategy for the management of CNS disorders and ponder the pitfalls inherent in such an approach. Despite the considerable challenges that lie ahead, this is an exciting area of research and one that is destined to remain the centre of focus for some

  19. TOWARDS A 'GLOBAL' STRATEGY FOR TACKLING THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF COMMUNICABLE AND NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN RESOURSE LIMITED SETTINGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesina, Adekunle; Hiruye, Abiy; Berhe, Ephrem; Haile, Amanuel; Akinloye, Olugbenga; Abreha, Hagos; Tesfaye, Hagazi; Klaus, Kimberly; Enquselassie, Fikre

    2014-10-01

    The global burden of communicable diseases (CD) and non-communicable diseases (NCD) in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) likely stems from a common substratum of societal and system inadequacies. In order to appropriately control these conditions and to manage the determinants and deterrents of both CDs and NCDs related deaths and disabilities, joint strategies aimed at both systemic and population levels are warranted. Although deficiencies exist within the health systems of LMICs, assets which could be leveraged efficiently to produce desirable outcomes also abound. Significant changes are already taking place through health initiatives within LMICs, opening up opportunities for further success through the involvement of international agencies. The role of these agencies, including donor countries and LMICs' Diaspora, is to strengthen and support the opportunities offered by on-going changes at the country level. There is a need to better understand and support the drivers and processes of positive change within LMICs in order to harness them for more widespread benefit through scale-up efforts. Strategies for addressing CDs and NCDs should be devised and implemented as complementary rather than competing 'sides of the same coin'.

  20. Development of an observer rating scale for caregiver communication in persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L; Parker, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    There have been few reported studies of communication between spouses with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementia. An observer rating scale for verbal and nonverbal behavior, Verbal-Nonverbal Interaction Scale for Caregivers (VNVIS-CG), was developed to study caregiver communication in couples affected by AD. Preliminary psychometric testing showed that the VNVIS-CG evidenced good reliability and validity. Researchers observed both common caregiver communication strategies and novel strategies that have not been reported in the literature. In future studies, researchers can examine the relationship between caregiver communication and indicators of mental health. Everyday conversations provide fertile ground for nurses to influence family relationships. Nurses can teach caregivers to use strategies that promote engagement and avoid those that discourage participation.

  1. Taipei's use of a multi-channel mass risk communication program to rapidly reverse an epidemic of highly communicable disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh-Yong Yen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In September 2007, an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC occurred in Keelung City and spread to Taipei City. In response to the epidemic, a new crisis management program was implemented and tested in Taipei. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Having noticed that transmission surged on weekends during the Keelung epidemic, Taipei City launched a multi-channel mass risk communications program that included short message service (SMS messages sent directly to approximately 2.2 million Taipei residents on Friday, October 12th, 2007. The public was told to keep symptomatic students from schools and was provided guidelines for preventing the spread of the disease at home. Epidemiological characteristics of Taipei's outbreak were analyzed from 461 sampled AHC cases. Median time from exposure to onset of the disease was 1 day. This was significantly shorter for cases occurring in family clusters than in class clusters (mean+/-SD: 2.6+/-3.2 vs. 4.39+/-4.82 days, p = 0.03, as well as for cases occurring in larger family clusters as opposed to smaller ones (1.2+/-1.7 days vs. 3.9+/-4.0 days, p<0.01. Taipei's program had a significant impact on patient compliance. Home confinement of symptomatic children increased from 10% to 60% (p<0.05 and helped curb the spread of AHC. Taipei experienced a rapid decrease in AHC cases between the Friday of the SMS announcement and the following Monday, October 15, (0.70% vs. 0.36%. By October 26, AHC cases reduced to 0.01%. The success of this risk communication program in Taipei (as compared to Keelung is further reflected through rapid improvements in three epidemic indicators: (1 significantly lower crude attack rates (1.95% vs. 14.92%, p<0.001, (2 a short epidemic period of AHC (13 vs. 34 days, and (3 a quick drop in risk level (1 approximately 2 weeks in Taipei districts that border Keelung (the original domestic epicenter. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The timely launch of this systematic

  2. Molecular communications between plant heat shock responses and disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yun, Hye Sup; Kwon, Chian

    2012-08-01

    As sessile, plants are continuously exposed to potential dangers including various abiotic stresses and pathogen attack. Although most studies focus on plant responses under an ideal condition to a specific stimulus, plants in nature must cope with a variety of stimuli at the same time. This indicates that it is critical for plants to fine-control distinct signaling pathways temporally and spatially for simultaneous and effective responses to various stresses. Global warming is currently a big issue threatening the future of humans. Reponses to high temperature affect many physiological processes in plants including growth and disease resistance, resulting in decrease of crop yield. Although plant heat stress and defense responses share important mediators such as calcium ions and heat shock proteins, it is thought that high temperature generally suppresses plant immunity. We therefore specifically discuss on interactions between plant heat and defense responses in this review hopefully for an integrated understanding of these responses in plants.

  3. Communicable disease surveillance and control in the context of conflict and mass displacement in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif A. Ismail

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Five years into the crisis, some progress has been made in disease surveillance, but governance and coordination problems, variable immunization coverage, and the dynamic and indiscriminate nature of the conflict continue to pose a serious threat to population health in Syria and surrounding countries. The risk of major cross-border communicable disease outbreaks is high, and challenges for health in a post-conflict Syria are formidable.

  4. Patient Health Communication Mediating Effects Between Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Gastrointestinal Worry in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varni, James W; Shulman, Robert J; Self, Mariella M; Saeed, Shehzad A; Patel, Ashish S; Nurko, Samuel; Neigut, Deborah A; Saps, Miguel; Zacur, George M; Dark, Chelsea V; Bendo, Cristiane B; Pohl, John F

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Gastrointestinal Worry, and Communication Scales, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 252 pediatric patients with IBD. Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales measuring stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea and patient communication were tested for bivariate and multivariate linear associations with Gastrointestinal Worry Scales specific to patient worry about stomach pain or bowel movements. Mediational analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized mediating effects of patient health communication as an intervening variable in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry. The predictive effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on gastrointestinal worry were mediated in part by patient health communication with health care providers/significant others in their daily life. In predictive models using multiple regression analyses, the full conceptual model of demographic variables, gastrointestinal symptoms (stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea), and patient communication significantly accounted for 46, 43, and 54 percent of the variance in gastrointestinal worry (all Ps < 0.001), respectively, reflecting large effect sizes. Patient health communication explains in part the effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients with IBD. Supporting patient disease-specific communication to their health care providers and significant others may improve health-related quality of life for pediatric patients with IBD.

  5. Formulaic Language as a Barrier to Effective Communication with People with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Carers recognize that the linguistic problems associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be detrimental to effective communication, but they are often not sure what they can do to help. This article examines the use of formulaic language in AD, including routines, repetitions, and fillers, through the lens of a model of how cognitive and social…

  6. 21 CFR 1271.145 - Prevention of the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prevention of the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases. 1271.145 Section 1271.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good...

  7. Non-communicable disease training for public health workers in low- and middle-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davila, Evelyn P; Suleiman, Zubeda; Mghamba, Janneth;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing worldwide. A lack of training and experience in NCDs among public health workers is evident in low- and middle- income countries. METHODS: We describe the design and outcomes of applied training in NCD epidemiology and control piloted in...

  8. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  9. Formulaic Language as a Barrier to Effective Communication with People with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Carers recognize that the linguistic problems associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be detrimental to effective communication, but they are often not sure what they can do to help. This article examines the use of formulaic language in AD, including routines, repetitions, and fillers, through the lens of a model of how cognitive and social…

  10. Patients’ Perceptions of Cholesterol, Cardiovascular Disease Risk, and Risk Communication Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Parker, Donna R.; Eaton, Charles B.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Gramling, Robert; Cover, Rebecca T.; Ahern, David K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite some recent improvement in knowledge about cholesterol in the United States, patient adherence to cholesterol treatment recommendations remains suboptimal. We undertook a qualitative study that explored patients’ perceptions of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and their reactions to 3 strategies for communicating CVD risk.

  11. Country actions to meet UN commitments on non-communicable diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonita, Ruth; Magnusson, Roger; Bovet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Strong leadership from heads of state is needed to meet national commitments to the UN political declaration on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and to achieve the goal of a 25% reduction in premature NCD mortality by 2025 (the 25 by 25 goal). A simple, phased, national response to the political ...

  12. Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  13. Below the poverty line and non-communicable diseases in Kerala: The Epidemiology of Non-communicable Diseases in Rural Areas (ENDIRA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Jaideep; Vijayakumar, N; Joseph, Joseph K; David, P C; Menon, M N; Mukundan, Shyam; Dorphy, P D; Banerjee, Amitava

    2015-01-01

    India carries the greatest burden of global non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Poverty is strongly associated with NCDs but there are few prevalence studies which have measured poverty in India, particularly in rural settings. In Kerala, India, a population of 113,462 individuals was identified. The "Epidemiology of Non-communicable Diseases in Rural Areas" (ENDIRA) study was conducted via ASHAs (Accredited Social Health Activists). Standardised questionnaires were used in household interviews of individuals ≥18years during 2012 to gather sociodemographic, lifestyle and medical data for this population. The Government of Kerala definition of "the poverty line" was used. The association between below poverty line (BPL) status, NCDs and risk factors was analysed in multivariable regression models. 84,456 adults were included in the analyses (25.4% below the poverty line). The prevalence of NCDs was relatively common: myocardial infarction (MI) 1.4%, stroke 0.3%, respiratory diseases 5.0%, and cancer 1.1%. BPL status was not associated with age (p=0.96) or gender (p=0.26). Compared with those above the poverty line (APL), the BPL group was less likely to have diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidaemia (ppoverty line status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Globalisation and the prevention and control of non-communicable disease: the neglected chronic diseases of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, R; Yach, D

    2003-09-13

    The growing global burden of non-communicable diseases in poor countries and poor populations has been neglected by policy makers, major multilateral and bilateral aid donors, and academics. Despite strong evidence for the magnitude of this burden, the preventability of its causes, and the threat it poses to already strained health care systems, national and global actions have been inadequate. Globalisation is an important determinant of non-communicable disease epidemics since it has direct effects on risks to populations and indirect effects on national economies and health systems. The globalisation of the production and marketing campaigns of the tobacco and alcohol industries exemplify the challenges to policy makers and public health practitioners. A full range of policy responses is required from government and non-governmental agencies; unfortunately the capacity and resources for this response are insufficient, and governments need to respond appropriately. The progress made in controlling the tobacco industry is a modest cause for optimism.

  15. Information and communication technology in disease surveillance, India: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Sampath K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract India has made appreciable progress and continues to demonstrate a strong commitment for establishing and operating a disease surveillance programme responsive to the requirements of the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]. Within five years of its launch, India has effectively used modern information and communication technology for collection, storage, transmission and management of data related to disease surveillance and effective response. Terrestrial and/or satellite based linkages are being established within all states, districts, state-run medical colleges, infectious disease hospitals, and public health laboratories. This network enables speedy data transfer, video conferencing, training and e-learning for outbreaks and programme monitoring. A 24x7 call centre is in operation to receive disease alerts. To complement these efforts, a media scanning and verification cell functions to receive reports of early warning signals. During the 2009 H1N1 outbreak, the usefulness of the information and communication technology (ICT network was well appreciated. India is using ICT as part of its Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP to help overcome the challenges in further expansion in hard-to-reach populations, to increase the involvement of the private sector, and to increase the use of other modes of communication like e-mail and voicemail.

  16. Information and communication technology in disease surveillance, India: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Lalit; Krishnan, Sampath K

    2010-12-03

    India has made appreciable progress and continues to demonstrate a strong commitment for establishing and operating a disease surveillance programme responsive to the requirements of the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]). Within five years of its launch, India has effectively used modern information and communication technology for collection, storage, transmission and management of data related to disease surveillance and effective response. Terrestrial and/or satellite based linkages are being established within all states, districts, state-run medical colleges, infectious disease hospitals, and public health laboratories. This network enables speedy data transfer, video conferencing, training and e-learning for outbreaks and programme monitoring. A 24x7 call centre is in operation to receive disease alerts. To complement these efforts, a media scanning and verification cell functions to receive reports of early warning signals. During the 2009 H1N1 outbreak, the usefulness of the information and communication technology (ICT) network was well appreciated. India is using ICT as part of its Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP) to help overcome the challenges in further expansion in hard-to-reach populations, to increase the involvement of the private sector, and to increase the use of other modes of communication like e-mail and voicemail.

  17. Prevention of non-communicable diseases in Australia: What role should public health law play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvany, Kate

    2015-09-01

    This article explores the role of public health law in the prevention of non-communicable diseases in Australia. The growing urgency to address these diseases is acknowledged and the definition of public health law explored. It is argued that a broad definition of public health law would allow greater recognition of the numerous ways that law can positively influence health outcomes at the population level. Far from substantiating claims of over-reaching state intervention, public health law in the 21st century in Australia should be viewed as a more nuanced and protective strategy in promoting better public health. Adopting this approach offers a way forward towards addressing rising rates of non-communicable diseases, as well as significant health inequities, but it will require greater political will and leadership.

  18. Communicable diseases in rural and remote Australia: the need for improved understanding and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Emma K; Massey, Peter D; Speare, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Rural and remote communities of Australia, particularly those including Aboriginal people, experience greater morbidity and mortality across a range of health outcomes compared to urban communities. Previous national data have demonstrated that rural and remote communities experience a disproportionate burden of communicable diseases compared to their urban counterparts. This systematic review was undertaken to describe the types of research that have explored the epidemiology of communicable diseases in rural and remote communities in Australia, with particular reference to the social determinants of health. We conducted a keyword search of several databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE/PubMed, RURAL, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Database, Web of Science Core Collection, and Google and Google Scholar websites) for peer-reviewed and grey literature that described or analysed the epidemiology of communicable diseases in rural and/or remote communities of Australia from 2004 to 2013. Exclusion criteria were applied to keep the review focused on rural and/or remote communities and the population-level epidemiological analysis of communicable diseases. From 2287 retrieved articles, a total of 50 remained after applying exclusion criteria. The majority of included articles were descriptive studies (41/50). Seven of the total 50 articles contained analytical studies; one systematic literature review and one experimental study were also identified. Due to the diversity of approaches in measuring disease burden, we performed a narrative synthesis of the articles according to the review objectives. Most of the articles investigated the disease burden in remote (n=37/50) and Aboriginal communities only (n=21/50). The studies highlighted a high prevalence or incidence of skin, eye and respiratory infections for remote Aboriginal communities, particularly children over the past decade. There was emerging evidence to suggest that housing and social conditions play an

  19. Framing Strategies to Avoid Mother-Blame in Communicating the Origins of Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winett, Liana B; Wulf, Alyssa B; Wallack, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    Evolving research in epigenetics and the developmental origins of health and disease offers tremendous promise in explaining how the social environment, place, and resources available to us have enduring effects on our health. Troubling from a communications perspective, however, is the tendency in framing the science to hold mothers almost uniquely culpable for their offspring's later disease risk. The purpose of this article is to add to the conversation about avoiding this unintended outcome by (1) discussing the importance of cognitive processing and issue frames, (2) describing framing challenges associated with communicating about developmental origins of health and disease and offering principles to address them, and (3) providing examples of conceptual metaphors that may be helpful in telling this complex and contextual story for public health.

  20. Adolescent alcohol use reflects community-level alcohol consumption irrespective of parental drinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Pernille; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann;

    2013-01-01

    Risk factors for adolescent alcohol use are typically conceptualized at the individual level, and school- and community-level risk factors have received little attention. Based on the theoretical understanding of youth alcohol consumption as a reflection of community social practice, we analyzed...... whether adolescent drunkenness was related to community-level adult alcohol use (AAC), when taking individual and school-level risk factors for drunkenness into account. Furthermore, we investigated whether the association between community-level AAC and adolescent drunkenness was attenuated after...

  1. General practitioners role in the notification of communicable diseases - study in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, C; Gilles, H; O'Brien, S; Mamo, J; Calleja, N

    2007-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) have an essential role in notification of communicable diseases. The main aim of the study described here was to assess the GPs' awareness of and attitudes towards the notification system in Malta, with special focus on infectious intestinal disease (IID). A questionnaire collecting demographic data, information on reporting practices, opinions on the existing notification system and suggestions for improvement was sent to 256 GPs working in either private or public health sector. In all, 150 GPs took part in the survey (response rate 58.6%). The responses revealed that Maltese GPs were aware of their obligations to notify communicable diseases but often did not report them, relying on the hospitals or laboratories to do so. The Disease Surveillance Unit (DSU) website and medical school training were the main sources of information on notification. Notification forms were obtained from health centres and usually kept at the place of work. Most GPs reported filling in the forms during the patients' visits. Private GPs tended to notify earlier than GPs working in public health centers. Among IID, food-borne illness was reported more frequently than person-to-person transmitted gastroenteritis and was considered to be of a higher priority with regard to public health importance (p<0.001). The survey highlighted also some areas for improvement, including need of feedback especially by direct communication or a newsletter.

  2. Communicable Disease Reporting Systems in the World: A Systematic Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    JANATI, Ali; HOSSEINY, Mozhgan; GOUYA, Mohammad Mehdi; MORADI, Ghobad; GHADERI, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Communicable disease reporting and surveillance system has poor infrastructure and supporters in most of countries. Its quality improvement is a challenge and requires an accurate and efficient care and reporting systems at all levels to achieve new and simple models. This study evaluates reporting systems of communicable diseases using systematic review. Methods: This was a systematic review study. For data collection, we used the following database and search engines: Proquest, Science direct, Pub MED, Scopes, Springer, and EBESCO. For Persian databases, we used SID, Iranmedex and Magiran. Our key words were “Communicable Diseases”, “Notifiable Disease”, “Disease Notification”, “Reporting System”,” Surveillance Systems” and “evaluation”. Two independent researchers reviewed the resources and the results were classified in different domains. Results: From 1889 cases, only 66 resources were studied. The results were classified in several domains, including those who were reporting, reporting methods and procedures, responsibilities and reporting system characteristics, problems and solutions of the report, the reporting process, and receptor level. Conclusion: Disease-reporting system has similar problems in all parts of the world. Change, improve, update and continuous monitoring of the reporting system are very important. Although the reporting process can vary in different regions, but being perfect and timely are important principles in system design. Detailed explanations of tasks and providing appropriate instructions are the most important points to integrate an efficient reporting system. PMID:26744702

  3. Communicable disease control programmes and health systems: an analytical approach to sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigayeva, Altynay; Coker, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    There is renewed concern over the sustainability of disease control programmes, and re-emergence of policy recommendations to integrate programmes with general health systems. However, the conceptualization of this issue has remarkably received little critical attention. Additionally, the study of programmatic sustainability presents methodological challenges. In this article, we propose a conceptual framework to support analyses of sustainability of communicable disease programmes. Through this work, we also aim to clarify a link between notions of integration and sustainability. As a part of development of the conceptual framework, we conducted a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed literature on concepts, definitions, analytical approaches and empirical studies on sustainability in health systems. Identified conceptual proposals for analysis of sustainability in health systems lack an explicit conceptualization of what a health system is. Drawing upon theoretical concepts originating in sustainability sciences and our review here, we conceptualize a communicable disease programme as a component of a health system which is viewed as a complex adaptive system. We propose five programmatic characteristics that may explain a potential for sustainability: leadership, capacity, interactions (notions of integration), flexibility/adaptability and performance. Though integration of elements of a programme with other system components is important, its role in sustainability is context specific and difficult to predict. The proposed framework might serve as a basis for further empirical evaluations in understanding complex interplay between programmes and broader health systems in the development of sustainable responses to communicable diseases.

  4. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Document Server

    A. Petrilli

    2013-01-01

    The organisation of the Open Days at the end of September was the single biggest effort of the CMS Communications Group this year. We would like to thank all volunteers for their hard work to show our Point 5 facilities and explain science and technology to the general public. During two days more than 5,000 people visited the CMS detector underground and profited from the surface activities, which included an exhibition on CMS, a workshop on superconductivity, and an activity for our younger visitors involving wooden Kapla blocks. The Communications Group took advantage of the preparations to produce new CMS posters that can be reused at other venues. Event display images have been produced not just for this occasion but also for other exhibits, education purposes, publications etc. During the Open Days, Gilles Jobin, 2012 winner of CERN Collide@CERN prize, performed his Quantum show in Point 5, with the light installation of German artist Julius von Bismarck. Image 3: CERN Open Days at CMS wel...

  5. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor and D. Barney

    2010-01-01

    CMS Centres, Outreach and the 7 TeV Media Event The new CMS Communications group is now established and is addressing three areas that are critical to CMS as it enters the physics operations phase: - Communications Infrastructure, including almost 50 CMS Centres Worldwide, videoconferencing systems, and CERN meeting rooms - Information systems, including the internal and external Web sites as well as the document preparation and management systems - Outreach and Education activities, including working with print, radio and TV media, visits to CMS, and exhibitions. The group has been active in many areas, with the highest priority being accorded to needs of CMS operations and preparations for the major media event planned for 7 TeV collisions. Unfortunately the CMS Centre@CERN suffered a major setback when, on 21st December, a cooling water pipe froze and burst on the floor above the CMS Centre main room. Water poured through the ceiling, flooding the floor and soaking some of the consoles, before e...

  6. Community level composting in a developing country: case study of KIWODET, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberlin, A.S.; Szanto, G.L.

    2011-01-01

    Environmentally sustainable waste management practices have a limited relevance and viability in developing countries. Despite a technological potential, composting initiatives often share this fate. Little is known about the functioning of community level composting, which is reportedly the optimal

  7. Community level composting in a developing country: case study of KIWODET, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberlin, A.S.; Szanto, G.L.

    2011-01-01

    Environmentally sustainable waste management practices have a limited relevance and viability in developing countries. Despite a technological potential, composting initiatives often share this fate. Little is known about the functioning of community level composting, which is reportedly the optimal

  8. Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Psicólogo, magíster en Salud Pública.; Ipince, Alessandra; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. antropóloga.; Toyama, Mauricio; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Letras y Ciencias Humanas, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima, Perú. estudiante de Psicología.; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú. médico geriatra.; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú, EsSalud. Lima, Perú. médico cirujano.; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú, EsSalud. Lima, Perú. médico pediatra.; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Centro de Salud “El Progreso”, Microrred de Salud Carabayllo, Red de Salud Túpac Amaru, DISA V Lima Ciudad, Ministerio de Salud, Lima, Perú. psicólogo.; Araya, Ricardo; Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Londres, Reino Unido. médico psiquiatra, doctor en Epidemiología Psiquiátrica.; Miranda, J. Jaime; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster y doctor en Epidemiología.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Addition...

  9. Review and Current Status of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection at the Community Level in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kootanavanichpong, Nusorn; Kompor, Ponthip; Chavenkun, Wasugree; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Norkaew, Jun; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Panpimanmas, Sukij; Rujirakul, Ratana; Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Pholsripradit, Poowadol; Eksanti, Thawatchai; Phatisena, Tanida; Loyd, Ryan A; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J

    2015-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is remains a public health problem in Thailand, particularly in the northeast and north regions which have the highest incidences of chonalgiocarcinoma (CCA). O. viverrini causes the disease opithorchiasis, and its has been classified as a group 1 biological carcinogen. Humans, dogs, and cats become infected with O. viverrini by ingesting raw or undercooked fish containing infective metacercariae. The first human cases of O. viverrini infection were reported in Thailand 100 years ago, and it's still a problem at the community level. Based on data for the year 2009, more than 6 million people were infected with O. viverrini. Associated medical care and loss of wages in Thailand costs about $120 million annually. This review highlights the current status of O. viverrini infection in communities of Thailand through active surveillance for the five years period from 2010 and 2015. A total of 17 community-based surveys were conducted, most in the northeast region. Some 7 surveys demonstrated a high prevalence over 20%, and the highest was 45.7%. Most commonly infection was found in age group of 35 years and older, males, and agricultural workers. Although, the national prevalence may be decreasing but the results show that the O. viverrini infection is still high in communities of the northeast region. Therefore, the focus in populations living in northeast Thailand should be screening of infection and changing their eating behavior.

  10. Preventive Medicine in World War II. Volume 7. Communicable Diseases. Arthropodborne other than Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    Personal communication. Harr/ Mo« MD.. Professor of Preventive Media or. Mew Tork Unl- Tcrsltr Coll ’.«« of Medicine, to Henry E. ».elener. M.D., Research...Fierre Jaune. L’Encyelopeclle M&lico- chirurgicale , 2d edition, Paris. 12- 1WÖC.) 362 rnSIJIIMI’AHI.E DISEASES Government, which in turn have

  11. Comprehension of insincere communication in neurodegenerative disease: lies, sarcasm, and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shany-Ur, Tal; Poorzand, Pardis; Grossman, Scott N; Growdon, Matthew E; Jang, Jung Y; Ketelle, Robin S; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2012-01-01

    Comprehension of insincere communication is an important aspect of social cognition requiring visual perspective taking, emotion reading, and understanding others' thoughts, opinions, and intentions. Someone who is lying intends to hide their insincerity from the listener, while a sarcastic speaker wants the listener to recognize they are speaking insincerely. We investigated whether face-to-face testing of comprehending insincere communication would effectively discriminate among neurodegenerative disease patients with different patterns of real-life social deficits. We examined ability to comprehend lies and sarcasm from a third-person perspective, using contextual cues, in 102 patients with one of four neurodegenerative diseases (behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD], Alzheimer's disease [AD], progressive supranuclear palsy [PSP], and vascular cognitive impairment) and 77 healthy older adults (normal controls--NCs). Participants answered questions about videos depicting social interactions involving deceptive, sarcastic, or sincere speech using The Awareness of Social Inference Test. All subjects equally understood sincere remarks, but bvFTD patients displayed impaired comprehension of lies and sarcasm compared with NCs. In other groups, impairment was not disease-specific but was proportionate to general cognitive impairment. Analysis of the task components revealed that only bvFTD patients were impaired on perspective taking and emotion reading elements and that both bvFTD and PSP patients had impaired ability to represent others' opinions and intentions (i.e., theory of mind). Test performance correlated with informants' ratings of subjects' empathy, perspective taking and neuropsychiatric symptoms in everyday life. Comprehending insincere communication is complex and requires multiple cognitive and emotional processes vulnerable across neurodegenerative diseases. However, bvFTD patients show uniquely focal and severe impairments at every level

  12. [Constructing an ACP Simulation-Situation Communication Training Program for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-O; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The aging population and changing lifestyles have lead to the increased general risk of chronic kidney disease. Taiwan currently has the highest incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) of any country or region in the world. Hemodialysis patients must endure comorbidities and face the uncertainties of death. The best way to achieve a good death is for patients to sign advance care planning (ACP). However, the key factors contributing to low ACP signature rates have been the lack of communication skills and related training among medical staffs. This article explores the dilemma of ACP using an example of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and proposes a theory-based approach to develop a theoretical framework for an ACP simulation-situation communication training program that integrates the simulation situation model, PREPARED model, and scaffolding theory. Readers may use this framework to design ACP simulation-situation communication training programs that conform to their own conditions and then test the effectiveness and feasibility of these programs in clinical settings.

  13. A Simulation of Communicable Disease and Herd Immunity for the Microbiology Classroom or Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Wiles

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern medicine has reduced the incidence of communicable disease, but humanity continues to suffer from a wide variety of ailments caused by infectious microorganisms. Modelling this transmission allows for a greater awareness of the various mechanisms through which disease can spread. This procedure allows students to participate in a completely safe, real-time exercise that demonstrates the ease at which a susceptible population can become infected. In addition, this exercise allows for a demonstration of the efficacy of herd immunity. An easily-prepared set of cards takes the place of actual microorganisms.

  14. Differentials in risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases from the race/color standpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Carvalho Malta; Lenildo de Moura; Regina Tomie Ivata Bernal

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the differences between the prevalence of risk factors of non-communicable chronic disease by race/color. It is a cross-sectional study using data from a telephone survey of 45,448 adults. Prevalence ratios for chronic disease risk factors by race/color were calculated. After adjustments were made for education and income, race/color differences persisted. Among afro-descendant and mulatto women and mulatto men a higher prevalence ratio was identified of physical ...

  15. Communicable diseases as health risks at mass gatherings other than Hajj: what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gautret

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mass gatherings are characterized by the concentration of people temporally and spatially, and may lead to the emergence of infectious diseases due to enhanced transmission between attendees. This is well-demonstrated in the context of the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages in Saudi Arabia. The goal of this review was to present the available evidence on outbreaks associated with a variety of pathogens, or also the lack thereof, as assessed by thorough surveillance at any mass gatherings with the exception of those in Saudi Arabia. A systematic search for relevant articles in the literature was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Sixty-eight studies were identified. Although outbreaks have not been reported frequently in or after mass gatherings outside the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages, they have sometimes occurred at Muslim, Christian, and Hindu religious events, at sports events, and at large-scale open air festivals. In this review it was found that the most common outbreaks at these mass gatherings involved vaccine preventable diseases, mainly measles and influenza, but also mumps and hepatitis A. Meningococcal disease has rarely been recorded. Additionally it was found that the transmission of various communicable diseases that may not be prevented by vaccination has been recorded in association with mass gatherings. These were mainly gastrointestinal infections, caused by a variety of pathogens. It was also noted that some outbreaks occurring at mass gatherings have resulted in the international spread of communicable diseases.

  16. Determinants of public phobia about infectious diseases in South Korea: effect of health communication and gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Tae-Ro

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the individual and social determinants of the public's phobia of infectious diseases in South Korea, where collective action was recently fueled by the public phobia over mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE]). Gender-specific multivariate regression was used to compare the public perception of BSE and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). The analysis results differentiated between the determinants of the phobia for the 2 diseases, BSE and HPAI (N = 1002). As with HIV/AIDS and leprosy, the public fear of HPAI was expressed as a disease phobia that seeks to ensure the social exclusion of infection sources, whereas the fear of BSE was influenced by social and communication factors. Therefore, BSE, unlike previous HPAI, can be rapidly amplified amid the growing distrust in health communication, in which case the social determinants of disease phobia are associated with communicator trust, social values, and political attitude toward diseases rather than disease perception.

  17. COMMUNICATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The Medical Service is taking part in the French, National Hearing Day You are invited on 15th May 2002 to come to the infirmary, build. 57 ground floor, between 9.00 and 16.00 to find out the possible harmful effects of noise, risk prevention and other auditory diseases and problems. A hard of Hearing Association member will be there to answer your questions. An on the spot hearing test will be available.

  18. Looking Beyond the Terrestrial: The Potential of Seaweed Derived Bioactives to Treat Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth G. Collins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are a large and diverse group of marine organisms that are commonly found in the maritime regions of the world. They are an excellent source of biologically active secondary metabolites and have been shown to exhibit a wide range of therapeutic properties, including anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic activities. Several Asian cultures have a strong tradition of using different varieties of seaweed extensively in cooking as well as in herbal medicines preparations. As such, seaweeds have been used to treat a wide variety of health conditions such as cancer, digestive problems, and renal disorders. Today, increasing numbers of people are adopting a “westernised lifestyle” characterised by low levels of physical exercise and excessive calorific and saturated fat intake. This has led to an increase in numbers of chronic Non-communicable diseases (NCDs such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus, being reported. Recently, NCDs have replaced communicable infectious diseases as the number one cause of human mortality. Current medical treatments for NCDs rely mainly on drugs that have been obtained from the terrestrial regions of the world, with the oceans and seas remaining largely an untapped reservoir for exploration. This review focuses on the potential of using seaweed derived bioactives including polysaccharides, antioxidants and fatty acids, amongst others, to treat chronic NCDs such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus.

  19. Applying the WHO ICF Framework to Communication Assessment and Goal Setting in Huntington's Disease: A Case Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Emma; Anderson, Alison; Togher, Leanne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal, hereditary neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a triad of motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms that impact on both communicative effectiveness and the treatment techniques used to maximize communicative participation. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of…

  20. Applying the WHO ICF Framework to Communication Assessment and Goal Setting in Huntington's Disease: A Case Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Emma; Anderson, Alison; Togher, Leanne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal, hereditary neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a triad of motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms that impact on both communicative effectiveness and the treatment techniques used to maximize communicative participation. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of…

  1. A Survey of Earthquake-Affected Region and Controlling Actions to Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad koosha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : There are always changes in our planet that can threat human life and earthquake is one of them and has an increasing importance. This study aims to survey earthquake-affected region and controlling actions to communicable and non-communicable diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012. Material and Methods : This is a cross-sectional study that its data were collected by East Azerbaijan province health center personnel and were analyzed and reported by current research team on the disease categories and relevant, controlling activities. In addition, the researchers assessed strengths and weaknesses of the teams’ performance from their members’ perspectives by interview. Results : The findings indicate that status of environmental health and psychological disorders is suitable and status of communicable and non-communicable diseases is acceptable. The strengths points of health teams included rapid assessment and on-time response to earthquake and constant monitoring of diseases and weaknesses were lack of coordination and organizing in disaster management Conclusion : This study showed that implemented activities for disease control and preventing epidemics had enough effectiveness and this experience can be used as a suitable model for disaster management in similar situations.

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors and non-communicable diseases in Abia state, Nigeria: report of a community-based survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O S Ogah; O O Madukwe; U U Onyeonoro; I I Chukwuonye; A U Ukegbu; M O Akhimien; I G Okpechi

    2013-01-01

      The purpose of this survey was to determine the burden of non-communicable diseases as well as associated cardiovascular risk factors in the state using the World Health Organization (WHO) steps approach...

  3. Political priority in the global fight against non–communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Maher

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of non–communicable diseases (NCDs – such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic respiratory diseases – is surging globally. Yet despite the availability of cost–effective interventions, NCDs receive less than 3% of annual development assistance for health to low and middle income countries. The top donors in global health – including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the US Government, and the World Bank – together commit less than 2% of their budgets to the prevention and control of NCDs. Why is there such meagre funding on the table for the prevention and control of NCDs? Why has a global plan of action aimed at halting the spread of NCDs been so difficult to achieve?

  4. Bioactive Peptide of Marine Origin for the Prevention and Treatment of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Pangestuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCD are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The four main leading causes of NCD are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, respiratory diseases and diabetes. Recognizing the devastating impact of NCD, novel prevention and treatment strategies are extensively sought. Marine organisms are considered as an important source of bioactive peptides that can exert biological functions to prevent and treatment of NCD. Recent pharmacological investigations reported cardio protective, anticancer, antioxidative, anti-diabetic, and anti-obesity effects of marine-derived bioactive peptides. Moreover, there is available evidence supporting the utilization of marine organisms and its bioactive peptides to alleviate NCD. Marine-derived bioactive peptides are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to a consumer’s well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution focus on the bioactive peptides derived from marine organisms and elaborates its possible prevention and therapeutic roles in NCD.

  5. Prevention and management of non-communicable disease: the IOC consensus statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Ugur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; Van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarise the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the IOC in April 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within healthcare systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: (1) Focus on behavioural change as the core component of all clinical programmes for the prevention and management of chronic disease. (2) Establish actual centres to design, implement, study and improve preventive programmes for chronic disease. (3) Use human-centred design in the creation of prevention programmes with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. (4) Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programmes for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet and lifestyle. (5) Mobilise resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programmes of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programmes within healthcare. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this agenda forward.

  6. Prevention and management of non-communicable disease: the IOC consensus statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Uğur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology, and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in April, 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within health care systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: 1. Focus on behavioural change as the core component of all clinical programs for the prevention and management of chronic disease. 2. Establish actual centres to design, implement, study, and improve preventive programs for chronic disease. 3. Use human-centered design in the creation of prevention programs with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. 4. Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programs for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet and lifestyle. 5. Mobilize resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programs of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programs within health care. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad-hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this

  7. Global Strategies for the Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases and Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Nakatani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article on global health reviews the environment surrounding health strategies and plans, as well as lessons learned from the first 15 years of the 21st century, followed by a discussion on the quest for a new paradigm for disease control efforts and challenges and opportunities for Japan.

  8. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mursheda Begum

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs. It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002-13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs, so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009-13, whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals.

  9. Screening for Non-Communicable Diseases among transport employees of a University: A Descriptive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chythra R Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In most parts of the world today, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are on the rise. Worldwide they are currently responsible for almost half (42% of the premature deaths which occurs before the age of 70. Due to sedentary lifestyle, workers of transportation department may be at a higher risk for development of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycaemia.Objective: To screen all the transport employees of a university for non-communicable diseases.Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among all transport employees to screen for hypertension, Type II diabetes, obesity and visual impairment. Data was collected by personal interviews using a pre designed questionnaire. Anthropometry, blood pressure recording, fasting blood glucose testing, vision assessment followed by electrocardiogram recording was done for all subjects.Results: Out of 90 participants, 10(11.1% had diabetes, 26(28.9% were hypertensive, 36(40.0% were overweight and obese, three individuals had myopia and abnormal colour vision, whereas 17(18.9% had impaired near vision. The screen positives were referred to tertiary care hospital for further management. Over half of the subjects reported alcohol use while 21(23.4% were using tobacco. Only 43(47.8% used seat belts while driving.Conclusion: Proportion of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes was found to be more among the transport employees. This demands an urgent need for appropriate preventive and health promotive interventions to address these chronic diseases.

  10. Assessment of risk factors of non-communicable diseases among high school students in Mangalore, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Non-communicable diseases are ever increasing and will soon outnumber the prevalence of communicable diseases. This study aims to detect prevalence of risk factors of non-communicable diseases in high school students and its comparison among students of private and government schools, Mangalore. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted amongst consenting high-school students. The data collected included socio-demographic factors, dietary habits, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, height and weight. Data was tabulated and analyzed using Microsoft excel and SPSS version 11.5 software. Chi square test was used to determine the association of various factors with risk factors, P < 0.05 was considered significant. The results were presented as tables. Result: 413 students were surveyed from private and government schools. Age range was 13-15 years. One-tenth of the students had adequate dietary habits. Though most students were physically active, the type and duration of activity was inadequate. Two students were obese, both females. There were statistically significant differences among various socioeconomic classes, type of school and the presence of certain risk factors. Alcohol intake among students of upper class was significant ( P = 0.006. Conclusion: The prevalence of risk factors for NCD is low among high-school students of Mangalore. Students should be educated about having adequate amount of fruits and vegetables and advised to reduce the consumption of fast food. Vigorous activity should be encouraged amongst the students to prevent them from getting obese.

  11. Ethnic and gender differentials in non-communicable diseases and self-rated health in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane K L Teh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This paper examines the ethnic and gender differentials in high blood pressure (HBP, diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD, arthritis and asthma among older people in Malaysia, and how these diseases along with other factors affect self-rated health. Differentials in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases among older people are examined in the context of socio-cultural perspectives in multi-ethnic Malaysia. METHODS: Data for this paper are obtained from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey. The survey covered a nationally representative sample of 3,406 persons aged 50 and over, comprising three main ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians and all other indigenous groups. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical logistic regression were used in the analyses. RESULTS: Arthritis was the most common non-communicable disease (NCD, followed by HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD. Older females were more likely than males to have arthritis and HBP, but males were more likely to have asthma. Diabetes and CHD were most prevalent among Indians, while arthritis and HBP were most prevalent among the Indigenous groups. Older people were more likely to report poor health if they suffered from NCD, especially CHD. Controlling for socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors, Chinese were least likely to report poor health, whereas Indians and Indigenous people were more likely to do so. Chinese that had HBP were more likely to report poor health compared to other ethnic groups with the same disease. Among those with arthritis, Indians were more likely to report poor health. CONCLUSION: Perceived health status and prevalence of arthritis, HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD varied widely across ethnic groups. Promotion of healthy lifestyle, early detection and timely intervention of NCDs affecting different ethnic groups and gender with socio-cultural orientations would go a long way in alleviating the debilitating effects of the common NCDs among

  12. Ethnic and gender differentials in non-communicable diseases and self-rated health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jane K L; Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the ethnic and gender differentials in high blood pressure (HBP), diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), arthritis and asthma among older people in Malaysia, and how these diseases along with other factors affect self-rated health. Differentials in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases among older people are examined in the context of socio-cultural perspectives in multi-ethnic Malaysia. Data for this paper are obtained from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey. The survey covered a nationally representative sample of 3,406 persons aged 50 and over, comprising three main ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians) and all other indigenous groups. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical logistic regression were used in the analyses. Arthritis was the most common non-communicable disease (NCD), followed by HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD. Older females were more likely than males to have arthritis and HBP, but males were more likely to have asthma. Diabetes and CHD were most prevalent among Indians, while arthritis and HBP were most prevalent among the Indigenous groups. Older people were more likely to report poor health if they suffered from NCD, especially CHD. Controlling for socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors, Chinese were least likely to report poor health, whereas Indians and Indigenous people were more likely to do so. Chinese that had HBP were more likely to report poor health compared to other ethnic groups with the same disease. Among those with arthritis, Indians were more likely to report poor health. Perceived health status and prevalence of arthritis, HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD varied widely across ethnic groups. Promotion of healthy lifestyle, early detection and timely intervention of NCDs affecting different ethnic groups and gender with socio-cultural orientations would go a long way in alleviating the debilitating effects of the common NCDs among older people.

  13. The burden of non-communicable diseases in Nigeria; in the context of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyaki, Musa Baba; Garbati, Musa Abubakar

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights the tenets of globalization and how its elements have spread to sub-Saharan Africa, and Nigeria in particular. It assesses the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Nigeria and its relationship with globalization. It further describes the conceptual framework on which to view the impact of globalization on NCDs in Nigeria. It assesses the Nigerian dimension of the relationship between the risk factors of NCDs and globalization. Appropriate recommendations on tackling the burden of NCDs in Nigeria based on cost-effective, culturally sensitive, and evidence-based interventions are highlighted.

  14. The effect of depression on physician-patient communication among Hispanic end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Amelia Victoria; Siegel, Jason T; Alvaro, Eusebio M; O'Brien, Erin Keely

    2013-01-01

    End-stage renal disease is associated with increased level of depression. Depression is associated with a reduction in the ability of people to effectively communicate in interpersonal settings. The interaction between end-stage renal disease patients and their physicians has important implications for the course of the treatment of this disease; however, there is limited research examining the influence of depression on general patient-physician communication. This study examines the association between depression and physician-patient communication in a sample of Hispanic end-stage renal disease patients. Participating patients filled out the Beck Depression Inventory and self-reported their feelings about meeting with physicians. Patients then met with a physician, and a nurse practitioner observed the interaction. Results indicate that depression was negatively associated with patients' self-reported perceptions of their readiness for the appointment (r =-.20) and with self-reported communication efficacy (r =-.19). Moreover, the nurse practitioner rated patients with depression as being significantly less likely (a) to ask for clarification (r =-.40), (b) to be engaged in the conversation (r =-.46), and (c) to be forthcoming with the physician (r =-.37). Results of this study have significant implications for communication between physicians and end-stage renal disease patients and for the influence of depression on patient-physician communication.

  15. Lifestyle and Non-Communicable Diseases: A double edged sword for future India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Kumar Chakma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle has long been associated with the development of many chronic diseases. WHO has recognized diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke, cancer and chronic lung disease/COPD as major non-communicable diseases (NCDs. These major NCDs share common lifestyle related risk factors like physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, tobacco use and harmful use of alcohol. Globally, the current scenario of NCDs is the major cause of morbidity and mortality. According to WHO Report 2004, they account for almost 60% of deaths and 47% of global burden of disease. Epidemics of NCDs are presently emerging or accelerating in most developing countries. In India, 53% of the deaths in 2008 were due to NCDs (WHO and cardiovascular disease (CVDs alone account for 24 percent of all deaths. As of 2005, India experienced the “highest loss in potentially productive years of life” worldwide and the leading cause of death was cardiovascular disease; mostly affecting people aged 35-64 years. The projected cumulative loss of national income for India due to NCDs mortality for 2006-2015 will be USD237 billion. By 2030, this productivity loss is expected to double to 17.9 million years lost. These major NCDs are largely preventable through effective interventions by tackling the lifestyle related modifiable risk factors. This review discusses the current scenario of NCDs with their impact on health and socioeconomic development, the threat posed by the rising trends of disease burden along with socio-demographic transition and the challenges needs to be addressed for the prevention and control of NCDs.

  16. Molecular Communication Model for Targeted Drug Delivery in Multiple Disease Sites With Diversely Expressed Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A K; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B T Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery (TDD) for disease therapy using liposomes as nanocarriers has received extensive attention in the literature. The liposome's ability to incorporate capabilities such as long circulation, stimuli responsiveness, and targeting characteristics, makes it a versatile nanocarrier. Timely drug release at the targeted site requires that trigger stimuli such as pH, light, and enzymes be uniquely overexpressed at the targeted site. However, in some cases, the targeted sites may not express trigger stimuli significantly, hence, achieving effective TDD at those sites is challenging. In this paper, we present a molecular communication-based TDD model for the delivery of therapeutic drugs to multiple sites that may or may not express trigger stimuli. The nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver models for the molecular communication system are presented. Here, the nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver are injected into the targeted body system's blood network. The compartmental pharmacokinetics model is employed to model the transportation of these therapeutic nanocarriers to the targeted sites where they are meant to anchor before the delivery process commences. We also provide analytical expressions for the delivered drug concentration. The effectiveness of the proposed model is investigated for drug delivery on tissue surfaces. Results show that the effectiveness of the proposed molecular communication-based TDD depends on parameters such as the total transmitter volume capacity, the receiver radius, the diffusion characteristic of the microenvironment of the targeted sites, and the concentration of the enzymes associated with the nanotransmitter and the nanoreceiver designs.

  17. Urbanization and non-communicable disease in Southeast Asia: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkurawaranon, C; Jiraporncharoen, W; Chenthanakij, B; Doyle, P; Nitsch, D

    2014-10-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been highlighted as a major public health issue in the Southeast (SE) Asian region. One of the major socio-environmental factors that are considered to be associated with such a rise in NCDs is urbanization. Urbanization is associated with behavioural changes such as eating an unhealthy diet, and a decrease in physical activities, which may result in associated obesity. The SE Asian region also has a substantive burden of infectious disease such as HIV and malaria, which may modify associations between urbanization and development of NCDs. A systematic review was conducted until April 2013. Using four databases: EMBASE, PubMed, GlobalHealth and DigitalJournal, the systematic review pools existing evidence on urban-rural gradients in NCD prevalence/incidence. The study found that in SE Asia, urban exposure was positively associated with coronary heart disease, diabetes and respiratory diseases in children. Urban exposure was negatively associated with rheumatic heart diseases. The stages of economic development may also modify the association between urbanization and NCDs such as diabetes. There was pronounced heterogeneity between associations. It is recommended that future studies examine the major constituents of NCDs separately and also focus on the interplay between lifestyle and infectious risk factors for NCDs. Prospective studies are needed to understand the diverse causal pathways between urbanization and NCDs in SE Asia.

  18. Natural disasters and communicable diseases in the Americas: contribution of veterinary public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Schneider

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of natural disasters on the people living in the Americas are often amplified by socio-economic conditions. This risk may be increased by climate-related changes. The public health consequences of natural disasters include fatalities as well as an increased risk of communicable diseases. Many of these diseases are zoonotic and foodborne diseases. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the importance of natural disasters for the Americas and to emphasise the contribution of veterinary public health (VPH to the management of zoonotic and foodborne disease risks. An analysis was conducted of natural disasters that occurred in the Americas between 2004 and 2008. Five cases studies illustrating the contributions of VPH in situations of disaster are presented. The data shows that natural disasters, particularly storms and floods, can create very important public health problems. Central America and the Caribbean, particularly Haiti, presented a higher risk than the other areas of the Americas. Two priority areas of technical cooperation are recommended for this region, namely: reducing the risk of leptospirosis and other vector-borne disease outbreaks related to floods and hurricanes and improving food safety. The contribution of different disciplines and sectors in disaster preparedness and response is of paramount importance to minimise morbidity and mortality.

  19. Natural disasters and communicable diseases in the Americas: contribution of veterinary public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maria Cristina; Tirado, Maria Cristina; Rereddy, Shruthi; Dugas, Raymond; Borda, Maria Isabel; Peralta, Eduardo Alvarez; Aldighieri, Sylvain; Cosivi, Ottorino

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of natural disasters on the people living in the Americas are often amplified by socio-economic conditions. This risk may be increased by climate-related changes. The public health consequences of natural disasters include fatalities as well as an increased risk of communicable diseases. Many of these diseases are zoonotic and foodborne diseases. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the importance of natural disasters for the Americas and to emphasise the contribution of veterinary public health (VPH) to the management of zoonotic and foodborne disease risks. An analysis was conducted of natural disasters that occurred in the Americas between 2004 and 2008. Five cases studies illustrating the contributions of VPH in situations of disaster are presented. The data shows that natural disasters, particularly storms and floods, can create very important public health problems. Central America and the Caribbean, particularly Haiti, presented a higher risk than the other areas of the Americas. Two priority areas of technical cooperation are recommended for this region, namely: reducing the risk of leptospirosis and other vector-borne disease outbreaks related to floods and hurricanes and improving food safety. The contribution of different disciplines and sectors in disaster preparedness and response is of paramount importance to minimise morbidity and mortality.

  20. Preferences of patients with Parkinson's disease for communication about advanced care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Keiran K; Brod, Lissa; Nutt, John; Fromme, Erik K

    2015-02-01

    Despite shortening life, Parkinson's disease (PD) is often not considered "terminal." Uncertainty exists about when to discuss end-of-life planning. A survey was sent to patients with PD assessing attitudes toward the timing and initiation of discussions regarding their disease. Data were analyzed for patient preferences regarding communication. Of 585 surveys, 267 were returned. Ninety-four percent of patients wanted prognosis and treatment information early. Half of the patients wanted to discuss advanced care documents early. Some wanted early discussions about end-of-life care planning (27%) or end-of-life care options such as hospice (21%). The majority felt shared responsibility for initiating discussions about life expectancy, advance care documents, and end-of-life care planning. Preferences regarding end-of-life discussions vary. Consequently, neurologists should ask patients about their preferences for this information and offer discussion periodically. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. The Economic impact of Non-communicable Diseases on households in India

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    Engelgau Michael M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In India, Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs and injuries account for an estimated 62% of the total age-standardized burden of forgone Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs. Public and private financing of clinical services to reduce the NCD burden is a major challenge. Methods We used National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO survey data from 1995-96 and 2004 covering nearly 200 thousand households to assess healthcare utilization patterns and out of pocket health spending by disease category. For this purpose, self-reported diseases and conditions were categorized into NCDs and non-NCDs. Survey data were used to assess how households financed their overall health expenditures and related this pattern to specific health conditions. We measured catastrophic spending on NCD-related hospitalization, defined as occurring when health expenditures exceeded 40% of a household's ability to pay, that is, household consumption spending less combined survival consumption expenditure; and impoverishment when per capita expenditure within the household decreased to below the poverty line once health spending was netted out. Results The share of NCDs in out of pocket health expenses incurred by households increased over time, from 31.6 percent in 1995-96 to 47.3 percent in 2004. In both years, own savings and income were the most important source of financing for many health conditions, typically between 40-60 percent of all spending, whereas 30-35 percent was from borrowing. The odds of catastrophic hospitalization expenditures for cancer was nearly 170% greater and for CVD and injuries 22 percent greater than the odds due to communicable diseases. Impoverishment patterns were similar. Conclusions Out of pocket expenses for treating NCDs rose sharply over the period from 1995-96 to 2004. When NCDs are present, the financial risks to which Indians households are exposed are significant.

  2. Microparticles Novel Mechanisms of Intracellular Communication: Implication in Health and Disease

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    Anna Meiliana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevailing view that eukaryotic cells are restrained from intercellular exchange of genetic information has been challenged by recent reports on nanotubes, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, and nucleic acid—binding peptides that provide novel pathways for cell—cell communication, with implications in health and disease. CONTENT: Microparticles (MPs are a heterogeneous population of small plasma membrane structures that serve as important signaling structures between cells. MPs are composed of a phospholipid bilayer that exposes transmembrane proteins and receptors and encloses cytosolic components such as enzymes, transcription factors, and mRNA derived from their parent cells. Growing evidence suggests that MPs regulate inflammation, stimulate coagulation, affect vascular functions and apoptosis, and can also play a role in cell proliferation or differentiation. MPs circulate in the bloodstream, can be detected in the peripheral blood, and may originate from different vascular cell types (eg, platelets, monocytes, endothelial cells, red blood cells, and granulocytes. SUMMARY: Cells of various types release small membrane vesicles called MP on their activation, as well as during the process of apoptosis. The properties and roles of MP generated in different contexts are diverse and are determined by their parent cell and the pathway of their generation, which affects their content. MP are involved in multiple cellular functions, including immunomodulation, inflammation, coagulation, and intercellular communication. MPs are able to deliver molecular signals in the form of lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, or functional trans-membrane proteins from the parent cell to distantly located targets. From a clinical point of view, MP may serve as biomarkers for disease status and may be found useful for developing novel therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: microparticles, microvesicle, membrane remodeling, intercellular communication.

  3. Using the Concept of "Population Dose" in Planning and Evaluating Community-Level Obesity Prevention Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Allen; Schwartz, Pamela M.; Rauzon, Suzanne; Bourcier, Emily; Senter, Sandra; Spring, Rebecca; Beery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and evaluating community-level initiatives focused on policy and environment change, it is useful to have estimates of the impact on behavioral outcomes of particular strategies (e.g., building a new walking trail to promote physical activity). We have created a measure of estimated strategy-level impact--"population dose"--based on…

  4. Social Networks and Social Support: Implications for Natural Helper and Community Level Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Barbara A.

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on the linkage between social support and social networks and health educational programs that involve interventions at the network and community level. Addresses programs enhancing entire networks through natural helpers; and programs strengthening overlapping networks/communities through key opinion and informal leaders who are engaged…

  5. Risk communication as a core public health competence in infectious disease management: Development of the ECDC training curriculum and programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Petra; Abraham, Thomas; Sarkar, Satyajit; Wysocki, Piotr; Cecconi, Sabrina; Apfel, Franklin; Nurm, Ülla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication has been identified as a core competence for guiding public health responses to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (2005) call for all countries to build capacity and a comprehensive understanding of health risks before a public health emergency to allow systematic and coherent communication, response and management. Research studies indicate that while outbreak and crisis communication concepts and tools have long been on the agenda of public health officials, there is still a need to clarify and integrate risk communication concepts into more standardised practices and improve risk communication and health, particularly among disadvantaged populations. To address these challenges, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) convened a group of risk communication experts to review and integrate existing approaches and emerging concepts in the development of a training curriculum. This curriculum articulates a new approach in risk communication moving beyond information conveyance to knowledge- and relationship-building. In a pilot training this approach was reflected both in the topics addressed and in the methods applied. This article introduces the new conceptual approach to risk communication capacity building that emerged from this process, presents the pilot training approach developed, and shares the results of the course evaluation.

  6. Leveraging rapid community-based HIV testing campaigns for non-communicable diseases in rural Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Chamie

    Full Text Available The high burden of undiagnosed HIV in sub-Saharan Africa limits treatment and prevention efforts. Community-based HIV testing campaigns can address this challenge and provide an untapped opportunity to identify non-communicable diseases (NCDs. We tested the feasibility and diagnostic yield of integrating NCD and communicable diseases into a rapid HIV testing and referral campaign for all residents of a rural Ugandan parish.A five-day, multi-disease campaign, offering diagnostic, preventive, treatment and referral services, was performed in May 2011. Services included point-of-care screening for HIV, malaria, TB, hypertension and diabetes. Finger-prick diagnostics eliminated the need for phlebotomy. HIV-infected adults met clinic staff and peer counselors on-site; those with CD4 ≤ 100/µL underwent intensive counseling and rapid referral for antiretroviral therapy (ART. Community participation, case-finding yield, and linkage to care three months post-campaign were analyzed.Of 6,300 residents, 2,323/3,150 (74% adults and 2,020/3,150 (69% children participated. An estimated 95% and 52% of adult female and male residents participated respectively. Adult HIV prevalence was 7.8%, with 46% of HIV-infected adults newly diagnosed. Thirty-nine percent of new HIV diagnoses linked to care. In a pilot subgroup with CD4 ≤ 100, 83% linked and started ART within 10 days. Malaria was identified in 10% of children, and hypertension and diabetes in 28% and 3.5% of adults screened, respectively. Sixty-five percent of hypertensives and 23% of diabetics were new diagnoses, of which 43% and 61% linked to care, respectively. Screening identified suspected TB in 87% of HIV-infected and 19% of HIV-uninfected adults; 52% percent of HIV-uninfected TB suspects linked to care.In an integrated campaign engaging 74% of adult residents, we identified a high burden of undiagnosed HIV, hypertension and diabetes. Improving male attendance and optimizing linkage to care

  7. Computer-based interactive health communications for people with chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey LM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leanne M Casey,1 Bonnie A Clough,1 Mary E Mihuta,1 Heather Green,1 Wayne Usher,2 Daniel A James,3,4 David D Rowlands,3 E-Liisa Laakso5 1Griffith Health Institute Behavioural Basis of Health Program, School of Applied Psychology, 2School of Education and Professional Studies, 3Sports and Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Engineering, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; 4Centre of Excellence for Applied Sport Science Research, Queensland Academy of Sport, Queensland, Australia; 5Griffith Health Institute Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia Abstract: Chronic diseases (CD – such as cardiovascular, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory diseases – are projected to be the most common causes of mortality and morbidity by 2030. Use of a participatory decision-making model that emphasizes a partnership among practitioners, patients, and their families to achieve desired goals is a key strategy in achieving optimal outcomes. The Interactive Health Communication Applications (IHCAs can support participatory decision making by providing the unique infrastructure needed to deliver support for the multiple requirements of patients with CD. The aim of this paper is to provide a descriptive review of the use of IHCAs in the treatment of chronic disease. Patient acceptability and satisfaction were identified as key issues that can be enhanced by ensuring that IHCAs provide: 1 emotional support and empowerment; 2 education and information from health professionals; and 3 telecommunication instead of onsite visiting. An important benefit of IHCAs can be an improved quality of communication between the patients and the health care professionals, which is a critical and predictive factor of treatment outcomes for many patients with CD. Similarly, there is good evidence to suggest that IHCAs can improve the patients’ adherence to both medication and behavioral

  8. Global health governance and the challenge of chronic, non-communicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers how we can conceptualize a "global response" to chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs)--including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and tobacco-related diseases. These diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries, and also in developing countries outside sub-Saharan Africa. The paper reviews emerging and proposed initiatives for global NCD governance, explains why NCDs merit a global response, and the ways in which global initiatives ultimately benefit national health outcomes. As the global response to NCDs matures, and the number of initiatives and partnerships increases, it will become increasingly important to map their respective contributions, and to evaluate progress overall. It is not yet clear what institutional mechanism, if any, will rise above the sea of surrounding initiatives to play this global role. This paper therefore aims to provide a conceptual map for making sense of what individual initiatives contribute to global governance. This map also draws attention to the distinctively "global" public health functions that a global response to NCDs should seek to discharge.

  9. Application of risk perception and communication strategies to manage disease outbreaks of coastal shrimp farming in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan

    2008-01-01

      Risk and uncertainty are very common issues in coastal shrimp industry like in any other business. A variety of risks are associated in shrimp farming like, production risks, technical risks, economical risks and disease of shrimp. However, risk of economic losses due to shrimp mortality (for...... diseases) is the major concern of shrimp producers of developing countries like Bangladesh, India, Thailand, China and many other countries. The risk of disease outbreaks in shrimp farms could be effectively prevented and managed by early identification of disease occurrence and by rapid communication...... of such a risk to the shrimp farmers. The risk perception and communication concepts could be applied to identify and to manage the disease occurrence in the initial stage. This conceptual paper provides the models to prevent and to manage shrimp diseases in coastal shrimp farming of Bangladesh and other...

  10. Prioritization of intervention methods for prevention of communicable diseases in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, A. W.

    poor housing environment (14.5-24.0%). Water quality played the least role in transmission of diseases accounting for only 3-8%. It was concluded that provision of hygiene education, and improvement of water quantity and housing, in that order can significantly contribute to reduction of communicable diseases in the area. Improvement of water quality has potentially the least effect on the number of morbidity and mortality cases.

  11. Family health history communication networks of older adults: importance of social relationships and disease perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J

    2013-10-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication (have shared and intend to share new FHH information with family members) to inform public health efforts to facilitate FHH dissemination. Information on 970 social network members enumerated by 99 seniors (aged 57 years and older) at 3 senior centers in Memphis, Tennessee, through face-to-face interviews was analyzed. Participants shared FHH information with 27.5% of the network members; 54.7% of children and 24.4% of siblings. Two-level logistic regression models showed that participants had shared FHH with those to whom they provided emotional support (odds ratio [OR] = 1.836) and felt close to (OR = 1.757). Network-members were more likely to have received FHH from participants with a cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.617) and higher familiarity with (OR = 1.380) and importance of sharing FHH with family (OR = 1.474). Participants intended to share new FHH with those who provide tangible support to (OR = 1.804) and were very close to them (OR = 2.112). Members with whom participants intend to share new FHH were more likely to belong to the network of participants with higher perceived severity if family members encountered heart disease (OR = 1.329). Many first-degree relatives were not informed of FHH. Perceptions about FHH and disease risk as well as quality of social relationships may play roles in whether seniors communicate FHH with their families. Future studies may consider influencing these perceptions and relationships.

  12. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: A Lifecourse Approach to the Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Baird

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCDs, such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis, affect individuals in all countries worldwide. Given the very high worldwide prevalence of NCDs across a range of human pathology, it is clear that traditional approaches targeting those at most risk in older adulthood will not efficiently ameliorate this growing burden. It will thus be essential to robustly identify determinants of NCDs across the entire lifecourse and, subsequently, appropriate interventions at every stage to reduce an individual’s risk of developing these conditions. A lifecourse approach has the potential to prevent NCDs, from before conception through fetal life, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and into older age. In this paper, we describe the origins of the lifecourse concept, the importance of early life influences, for example during pregnancy, examine potential underlying mechanisms in both cell biology and behavior change, and finally describe current efforts to develop interventions that take a lifecourse approach to NCD prevention. Two principal approaches to improving women’s nutritional status are outlined: nutritional supplementation and behavior change.

  13. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: A Lifecourse Approach to the Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Janis; Jacob, Chandni; Barker, Mary; Fall, Caroline H. D.; Hanson, Mark; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Kumaran, Kalyanaraman; Cooper, Cyrus

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis, affect individuals in all countries worldwide. Given the very high worldwide prevalence of NCDs across a range of human pathology, it is clear that traditional approaches targeting those at most risk in older adulthood will not efficiently ameliorate this growing burden. It will thus be essential to robustly identify determinants of NCDs across the entire lifecourse and, subsequently, appropriate interventions at every stage to reduce an individual’s risk of developing these conditions. A lifecourse approach has the potential to prevent NCDs, from before conception through fetal life, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and into older age. In this paper, we describe the origins of the lifecourse concept, the importance of early life influences, for example during pregnancy, examine potential underlying mechanisms in both cell biology and behavior change, and finally describe current efforts to develop interventions that take a lifecourse approach to NCD prevention. Two principal approaches to improving women’s nutritional status are outlined: nutritional supplementation and behavior change. PMID:28282852

  14. A New Wave of Vaccines for Non-Communicable Diseases: What Are the Regulatory Challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Jonathan J; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent one of the greatest achievements of medicine, dramatically reducing the incidence of serious or life-threatening infectious diseases and allowing people to live longer, healthier lives. As life expectancy has increased, however, the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes has increased. This shifting burden of disease has heightened the already urgent need for therapies that treat or prevent NCDs, a need that is now being met with increased efforts to develop NCD vaccines. Like traditional vaccines, NCD vaccines work by modulating the human immune system, but target cells, proteins or other molecules that are associated with the NCD in question rather than pathogens or pathogen-infected cells. Efforts are underway to develop NCD vaccines to address not only cancer and hypertension, but also addiction, obesity, asthma, arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and Crohn's disease, among others. NCD vaccines present an interesting challenge for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is tasked with approving new treatments on the basis of efficacy and safety. Should NCD vaccines be evaluated under the same analytic frame as traditional vaccines, or that of biologic drugs? Despite the borrowed nomenclature, NCD vaccines differ in important ways from infectious disease vaccines. Because infectious disease vaccines are generally administered to healthy individuals, often children, tolerance for adverse events is low and willingness to pay is limited. It is important to have infectious disease vaccines even for rare or eradicated disease (e.g., smallpox), in the event of an outbreak. The efficacy of infectious disease vaccines is generally high, and the vaccines convey population level benefits associated with herd immunity and potential eradication. The combination of substantial population-level benefits, low willingness to pay, and low tolerance for adverse events explains the

  15. Non-communicable diseases in the South-East Asia region: burden, strategies and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Jai P; Garg, Renu; Fric, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a global health and developmental emergency, as they cause premature deaths,exacerbate poverty and threaten national economies. In 2008, they were the top killers in the South-East Asia region, causing 7.9 million deaths; the number of deaths is expected to increase by 21% over the next decade. One-third of the 7.9 million deaths (34%) occurred in those strategies for the prevention and control of NCDs include (i) reducing exposure to risk factors through health promotion and primary prevention, (ii) early diagnosis and management of people with NCDs, and (iii) surveillance to monitor trends in risk factors and diseases. Tackling NCDs calls for a paradigm shift: from addressing each NCD separately to collectively addressing a cluster of diseases in an integrated manner, and from using a biomedical approach to a public health approach guided by the principles of universal access and social justice. High levels of commitment and multisectoral actions are needed to reverse the growing burden of NCDs in the South-East Asia region.

  16. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Medicalization of global health 3: the medicalization of the non-communicable diseases agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the massive global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) due to their prevalence, projected social and economic costs, and traditional neglect compared to infectious disease. The 2011 UN Summit, WHO 25×25 targets, and support of major medical and advocacy organisations have propelled prominence of NCDs on the global health agenda. NCDs are by definition 'diseases' so already medicalized. But their social drivers and impacts are acknowledged, which demand a broad, whole-of-society approach. However, while both individual- and population-level targets are identified in the current NCD action plans, most recommended strategies tend towards the individualistic approach and do not address root causes of the NCD problem. These so-called population strategies risk being reduced to expectations of individual and behavioural change, which may have limited success and impact and deflect attention away from government policies or regulation of industry. Industry involvement in NCD agenda-setting props up a medicalized approach to NCDs: food and drink companies favour focus on individual choice and responsibility, and pharmaceutical and device companies favour calls for expanded access to medicines and treatment coverage. Current NCD framing creates expanded roles for physicians, healthcare workers, medicines and medical monitoring. The professional rather than the patient view dominates the NCD agenda and there is a lack of a broad, engaged, and independent NGO community. The challenge and opportunity lie in defining priorities and developing strategies that go beyond a narrow medicalized framing of the NCD problem and its solutions.

  18. [Confidentiality in HIV-infection/AIDS--a comment on the Communicable Disease Control Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frich, J C

    1995-05-10

    The new Communicable Diseases Control Act has come into force in Norway. It makes it compulsory for a physician to warn a third party if it is obvious that a HIV-positive patient, with a high degree of certainty, puts the third party at risk of being infected with HIV. Some philosophers characterize medical confidentiality as an intransigent and absolute obligation, others as a prima facie duty. This article supports the latter view, but the author still argues that strict conditions have to be fulfilled before a physician should consider breaking medical confidentiality: The doctor must try repeatedly to gain the consent or co-operation of the patient involved. Possible negative long-term consequences for the preventive HIV-work support strict medical confidentiality.

  19. Role of occupational health in managing non-communicable diseases in Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pg Khalifah Pg Ismail

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Like most ASEAN countries, Brunei faces an epidemic of non-communicable diseases. To deal with the complexity of NCDs prevention, all perspectives - be it social, familial or occupational – need to be considered. In Brunei Darussalam, occupational health services (OHS offered by its Ministry of Health, among others, provide screening and management of NCDs at various points of service. The OHS does not only issue fitness to work certificates, but is a significant partner in co-managing patients’ health conditions, with the advantage of further management at the workplace. Holistic approach of NCD management in the occupational setting is strengthened with both employer and employee education and participation, targeting several approaches including risk management and advocating healthy lifestyles as part of a healthy workplace programme.

  20. Ethical models underpinning responses to threats to public health: a comparison of approaches to communicable disease control in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainotti, Sabina; Moran, Nicola; Petrini, Carlo; Shickle, Darren

    2008-11-01

    Increases in international travel and migratory flows have enabled infectious diseases to emerge and spread more rapidly than ever before. Hence, it is increasingly easy for local infectious diseases to become global infectious diseases (GIDs). National governments must be able to react quickly and effectively to GIDs, whether naturally occurring or intentionally instigated by bioterrorism. According to the World Health Organisation, global partnerships are necessary to gather the most up-to-date information and to mobilize resources to tackle GIDs when necessary. Communicable disease control also depends upon national public health laws and policies. The containment of an infectious disease typically involves detection, notification, quarantine and isolation of actual or suspected cases; the protection and monitoring of those not infected; and possibly even treatment. Some measures are clearly contentious and raise conflicts between individual and societal interests. In Europe national policies against infectious diseases are very heterogeneous. Some countries have a more communitarian approach to public health ethics, in which the interests of individual and society are more closely intertwined and interdependent, while others take a more liberal approach and give priority to individual freedoms in communicable disease control. This paper provides an overview of the different policies around communicable disease control that exist across a select number of countries across Europe. It then proposes ethical arguments to be considered in the making of public health laws, mostly concerning their effectiveness for public health protection.

  1. Community-based integration of management of non-communicable diseases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a leading cause of deaths and of disease burden in China.This paper analyzes the rationale and implications of a community-based approach to a better coordinated NCDs care and management system in China.As argued by the author, the buildup of an integrated NCDs care delivery system is feasible now and large health expenditures will be saved if more stable outpatients with NCDs could be shifted to community health facilities to receive their medications.However,the key issues remain in building a general practitioner led (GP-led) primary care delivery system in China.Some prominent issues include the shortage of quality generalists, lack of proper incentives and management mechanisms, and the absence of patients and provider, and restrictive arrangements in basic health insurance policies.Even with these hard-to-solve issues, some recent reform initiatives for integrated NCDs care delivery in some localities have demonstrated originality and creativeness in developing better coordination between primary and secondary NCDs care.However, without large-scale public sector reform, innate issues with human resource development, income distribution and financing of public healthcare providers cannot be solved.It may take a long time to see deep integration of primary and secondary NCDs care in China.Copyright 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production.Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd.This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  2. Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeks Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. Methods We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references. Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. Results We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR and confidence intervals (CI, combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98. Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25. The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. Conclusion Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence.

  3. Multilevel analysis of individual and community level factors associated with institutional delivery in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Zeleke A; Lerebo, Wondwossen T; Gebrehiwot, Tesfay G; Abadura, Samir A

    2015-08-26

    Improving maternal health is one of the eight millennium development goals to reduce maternal mortality (MM) by three quarters between 1990 and 2015. Institutional delivery is considered to be the most critical intervention in reducing MM and ensuring safe motherhood. However, the level of maternal morbidity and mortality in Ethiopia are among the highest in the world and the proportion of births occurring at health facilities is very low. This study examined the individual and community level factors associated with institutional delivery in Ethiopia. Data from the 2011 Ethiopian demographic and health survey were used to identify individual and community level factors associated with institutional delivery among women who had a live birth during the 5 years preceding the survey. Taking into account the nested structure of the data, multilevel logistic regression analysis has been employed to a nationally representative sample of 7757 women nested with in 595 communities. At the individual level; higher educational level of the women (AOR = 3.60; 95% CI 2.491-5.214), women from richest households (AOR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.143-2.648) and increased ante natal care attendance (AOR = 4.43; 95% CI 3.405-5.751) were associated with institutional delivery. Additionally, at the community level; urban residence (AOR = 4.74; 95% CI 3.196-7.039), residing in communities with high proportion of educated women (AOR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.256-2.319) and residing in communities with high ANC utilization rate (AOR = 1.55; 95% CI 1.132-2.127) had a significant effect on institutional delivery. Also region and distance to health facility showed significant association with institutional delivery. The random effects showed that the variation in institutional delivery service utilization between communities was statistically significant. Both individual and community level factors are associated with institutional delivery service uptake. As a result, further research is needed to better

  4. Individual versus community-level measures of women decisionmaking involvement and child survival in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J O Akinyemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although decision-making authority is associated with maternal healthcare utilisation, the evidence on the relative importance of individual-level v. community-level decision-making participation for child survival in sub-Saharan Africa is limited. Objectives. To assess the net effects of individual- and community-level measures of decision-making involvement (DMI on under-5 mortality in Nigeria. Methods. Data on a nationally representative sample of 31 482 children in the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey were analysed. Mothers who reported involvement in decision-making on own healthcare, major household purchases and visits to friends and relatives were categorised as having high DMI. Community-level measures of DMI were derived by aggregating the individual measures at the cluster level. Kaplan-Meier estimates of childhood mortality rates were computed. Multilevel discrete-time hazard models were employed to investigate the net effect of individual- and community-level DMI on childhood mortality. Results. Childhood mortality, at 59 months, was higher among children of women with low DMI (120 per 1 000 compared with those with high DMI (84 per 1 000. The full multilevel model showed that there was no difference in the risk of childhood death between children whose mothers had high v. low DMI (hazard ratio (HR 1.01, CI 0.90 - 1.12. However, mortality risk was found to be lower among children in communities with medium DMI (HR 0.84, CI 0.74 - 0.96. Maternal age at child’s birth, education, household wealth index and preceding birth interval were significantly associated with under-five mortality. Conclusion. Besides socioeconomic and biodemographic characteristics, community- and not individual-level DMI was associated with under-5 mortality. Women’s empowerment programmes targeting maternal and child health outcomes should also focus on communities.

  5. Injuries in community-level Australian football: Results from a club-based injury surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekegren, Christina L; Gabbe, Belinda J; Donaldson, Alex; Cook, Jill; Lloyd, David; Finch, Caroline F

    2015-11-01

    Far fewer injury surveillance systems exist within community sport than elite sport. As a result, most epidemiological data on sports injuries have limited relevance to community-level sporting populations. There is potential for data from community club-based injury surveillance systems to provide a better understanding of community sports injuries. This study aimed to describe the incidence and profile of community-level Australian football injuries reported using a club-based injury surveillance system. Prospective, epidemiological study. Sports trainers from five community-level Australian football leagues recorded injury data during two football seasons using the club-based system. An online surveillance tool developed by Sports Medicine Australia ('Sports Injury Tracker') was used for data collection. The injury incidence, profile and match injury rate were reported. Injury data for 1205 players were recorded in season one and for 823 players in season two. There was significant variability in injury incidence across clubs. However, aggregated data were consistent across football seasons, with an average of 0.7 injuries per player per season and 38-39 match injuries per 1000 h match exposure. A large proportion of injuries occurred during matches, involved the lower limb and resulted from contact. Data from the club-based system provided a profile of injuries consistent with previous studies in community-level Australian football. Moreover, injury incidence was consistent with other studies using similar personnel to record data. However, injury incidence was lower than that reported in studies using player self-report or healthcare professionals and may be an underestimate of true values. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The transition from managed care to consumerism: a community-level status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Ginsburg, Paul B; Draper, Debra A

    2008-01-01

    This paper assesses the evolving "facilitated consumerism" model of health care at the community level using data from the Community Tracking Study (CTS). We find that in a relatively short time, large employers and health plans have made notable progress in putting the building blocks in place to support their vision of consumerism. However, developments in the CTS communities suggest that the consumerism strategy evolving in local markets is more nuanced than implied by some descriptions of health care consumerism.

  7. Using community-level metrics to monitor the effects of marine protected areas on biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soykan, Candan U; Lewison, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are used to protect species, communities, and their associated habitats, among other goals. Measuring MPA efficacy can be challenging, however, particularly when considering responses at the community level. We gathered 36 abundance and 14 biomass data sets on fish assemblages and used meta-analysis to evaluate the ability of 22 distinct community diversity metrics to detect differences in community structure between MPAs and nearby control sites. We also considered the effects of 6 covariates-MPA size and age, MPA size and age interaction, latitude, total species richness, and level of protection-on each metric. Some common metrics, such as species richness and Shannon diversity, did not differ consistently between MPA and control sites, whereas other metrics, such as total abundance and biomass, were consistently different across studies. Metric responses derived from the biomass data sets were more consistent than those based on the abundance data sets, suggesting that community-level biomass differs more predictably than abundance between MPA and control sites. Covariate analyses indicated that level of protection, latitude, MPA size, and the interaction between MPA size and age affect metric performance. These results highlight a handful of metrics, several of which are little known, that could be used to meet the increasing demand for community-level indicators of MPA effectiveness. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Changes in community-level riparian plant traits over inundation gradients, Colorado River, Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy-Sulentic, Miles; Kolb, Thomas; Merritt, David; Palmquist, Emily C.; Ralston, Barbara E.; Sarr, Daniel; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons of community-level functional traits across environmental gradients have potential for identifying links among plant characteristics, adaptations to stress and disturbance, and community assembly. We investigated community-level variation in specific leaf area (SLA), plant mature height, seed mass, stem specific gravity (SSG), relative cover of C4 species, and total plant cover over hydrologic zones and gradients in years 2013 and 2014 in the riparian plant community along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Vegetation cover was lowest in the frequently inundated active channel zone, indicating constraints on plant establishment and production by flood disturbance and anaerobic stress. Changes in trait values over hydrologic zones and inundation gradients indicate that frequently inundated plots exhibit a community-level ruderal strategy with adaptation to submergence (high SLA and low SSG, height, seed mass, C4 relative cover), whereas less frequently inundated plots exhibit adaptation to drought and infrequent flood disturbance (low SLA and high SSG, height, seed mass, C4 relative cover). Variation in traits not associated with inundation suggests niche differentiation and multiple modes of community assembly. The results enhance understanding of future responses of riparian communities of the Grand Canyon to anticipated drying and changes in hydrologic regime.

  9. Mechanisms of migration development at the community level: Migrant networks and types of links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Serban

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper approaches the problem of the development mechanism of international migration at community level.Some empirical observations cumulated during several researches,at origin and destination area, regarding Romanian migration to Spain constitute the starting points. Appealing to the distinction introduced by Mark Granovetter in 1976 between weak and strongties, we find that, if initially migration develops almost exclusively based on social relations that could be assimilated to strong ties,there is a moment in the process of development when the departures on the base of weak ties, with important consequences on the migrant’s situation at destination, increase.The paper tries to clarify, preponderantly invoking theoretical arguments,in what measure the departures based on weak ties between migrant and non migrant are normal in the process of international migration development at community level. The study concludes that, because of cumulative effects, migration evolution to a phase when the departure is possible based on weak ties is explainable.Two mechanisms mainly contribute to this result: enhancement of incentives to migrate (because of quantitative and qualitative information increase; visibility of migration effects in the origin area;changes of relative deprivation at community level and migration costs and risk lowering, with the consequence of reduction of effective support that a non-migrant needs from one migrant in order to migrate.

  10. Optimising and communicating options for the control of invasive plant disease when there is epidemiological uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Nik J; Stutt, Richard O J H; DeSimone, R Erik; Gottwald, Tim R; Gilligan, Christopher A

    2015-04-01

    Although local eradication is routinely attempted following introduction of disease into a new region, failure is commonplace. Epidemiological principles governing the design of successful control are not well-understood. We analyse factors underlying the effectiveness of reactive eradication of localised outbreaks of invading plant disease, using citrus canker in Florida as a case study, although our results are largely generic, and apply to other plant pathogens (as we show via our second case study, citrus greening). We demonstrate how to optimise control via removal of hosts surrounding detected infection (i.e. localised culling) using a spatially-explicit, stochastic epidemiological model. We show how to define optimal culling strategies that take account of stochasticity in disease spread, and how the effectiveness of disease control depends on epidemiological parameters determining pathogen infectivity, symptom emergence and spread, the initial level of infection, and the logistics and implementation of detection and control. We also consider how optimal culling strategies are conditioned on the levels of risk acceptance/aversion of decision makers, and show how to extend the analyses to account for potential larger-scale impacts of a small-scale outbreak. Control of local outbreaks by culling can be very effective, particularly when started quickly, but the optimum strategy and its performance are strongly dependent on epidemiological parameters (particularly those controlling dispersal and the extent of any cryptic infection, i.e. infectious hosts prior to symptoms), the logistics of detection and control, and the level of local and global risk that is deemed to be acceptable. A version of the model we developed to illustrate our methodology and results to an audience of stakeholders, including policy makers, regulators and growers, is available online as an interactive, user-friendly interface at http://www.webidemics.com/. This version of our model

  11. Novel Neuromodulation Techniques to Assess Interhemispheric Communication in Neural Injury and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Samuel S.; Pelled, Galit

    2017-01-01

    Interhemispheric interaction has a major role in various neurobehavioral functions. Its disruption is a major contributor to the pathological changes in the setting of brain injury such as traumatic brain injury, peripheral nerve injury, and stroke, as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Because interhemispheric interaction has a crucial role in functional consequence in these neuropathological states, a review of noninvasive and state-of-the-art molecular based neuromodulation methods that focus on or have the potential to elucidate interhemispheric interaction have been performed. This yielded approximately 170 relevant articles on human subjects or animal models. There has been a recent surge of reports on noninvasive methods such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Since these are noninvasive techniques with little to no side effects, their widespread use in clinical studies can be easily justified. The overview of novel neuromodulation methods and how they can be applied to study the role of interhemispheric communication in neural injury and neurodegenerative disease is provided. Additionally, the potential of each method in therapeutic use as well as investigating the pathophysiology of interhemispheric interaction in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injury is discussed. New technologies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation could have a great impact in understanding interhemispheric pathophysiology associated with acquired injury and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as designing improved rehabilitation therapies. Also, advances in molecular based neuromodulation techniques such as optogenetics and other chemical, thermal, and magnetic based methods provide new capabilities to stimulate or inhibit a specific brain location and a specific neuronal population. PMID:28337129

  12. Optimising and communicating options for the control of invasive plant disease when there is epidemiological uncertainty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik J Cunniffe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although local eradication is routinely attempted following introduction of disease into a new region, failure is commonplace. Epidemiological principles governing the design of successful control are not well-understood. We analyse factors underlying the effectiveness of reactive eradication of localised outbreaks of invading plant disease, using citrus canker in Florida as a case study, although our results are largely generic, and apply to other plant pathogens (as we show via our second case study, citrus greening. We demonstrate how to optimise control via removal of hosts surrounding detected infection (i.e. localised culling using a spatially-explicit, stochastic epidemiological model. We show how to define optimal culling strategies that take account of stochasticity in disease spread, and how the effectiveness of disease control depends on epidemiological parameters determining pathogen infectivity, symptom emergence and spread, the initial level of infection, and the logistics and implementation of detection and control. We also consider how optimal culling strategies are conditioned on the levels of risk acceptance/aversion of decision makers, and show how to extend the analyses to account for potential larger-scale impacts of a small-scale outbreak. Control of local outbreaks by culling can be very effective, particularly when started quickly, but the optimum strategy and its performance are strongly dependent on epidemiological parameters (particularly those controlling dispersal and the extent of any cryptic infection, i.e. infectious hosts prior to symptoms, the logistics of detection and control, and the level of local and global risk that is deemed to be acceptable. A version of the model we developed to illustrate our methodology and results to an audience of stakeholders, including policy makers, regulators and growers, is available online as an interactive, user-friendly interface at http://www.webidemics.com/. This version

  13. [Non-communicable chronic diseases in Brazil: from risk factors to social impact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, I; Mendonça, G A; Teixeira, M T

    1996-05-01

    The current epidemiologic profile of Brazil includes both the diseases of underdevelopment and those associated with modern life. Consequently, the country faces the difficult task of carrying out health promotion and protection activities aimed at controlling communicable diseases as well as noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCDs). This study sought to describe the epidemiologic situation of Brazilian adults with regard to NCDs and to present available data on the quality of care provided for these diseases and their social impact. To these ends, a literature review was conducted for the period 1964-1995--that is, since the beginning of the production and dissemination of data on cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and diabetes. Of the 153 bibliographic references that were discovered, 97 were used. The social, political, economic, and health inequities that exist among Brazil's geographic regions are reflected in the national scientific production, which is concentrated in the Southeast and South. Most of the studies based on primary data come from those regions. Information is scarce from the North-east, except the city of Salvador. Therefore, the health profile of adults--including risk factors and morbidity and mortality--can be better delineated for residents of the South and Southeast of the country, whereas for the other regions the necessary information is practically nonexistent. Risk factors linked to life-style are as widespread and important in Brazil as they are in industrialized countries. Prevalence and mortality rates among persons with or without certain socio-environmental risks (such as low level of schooling or unskilled occupations) indicate that NCDs predominate in the lowest social strata. Inter-regional differences in the prevalence of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, the most common fatal cardiovascular causes, and the predominant cancers, as well as morbidity and mortality in both sexes, illustrate the political, social, and

  14. Performance Assessment of a Communicable Disease Surveillance System in Response to the Twin Earthquakes of East Azerbaijan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Javad; Ardalan, Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Goya, Mohammad Mehdi; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Following the twin earthquakes on August 11, 2012, in the East Azerbaijan province of Iran, the provincial health center set up a surveillance system to monitor communicable diseases. This study aimed to assess the performance of this surveillance system. In this quantitative-qualitative study, performance of the communicable diseases surveillance system was assessed by using the updated guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Qualitative data were collected through interviews with the surveillance system participants, and quantitative data were obtained from the surveillance system. The surveillance system was useful, simple, representative, timely, and flexible. The data quality, acceptability, and stability of the surveillance system were 65.6%, 10.63%, and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity and positive predictive value were not calculated owing to the absence of a gold standard. The surveillance system satisfactorily met the goals expected for its setup. The data obtained led to the control of communicable diseases in the affected areas. Required interventions based on the incidence of communicable disease were designed and implemented. The results also reassured health authorities and the public. However, data quality and acceptability should be taken into consideration and reviewed for implementation in future disasters.

  15. Disparities in Reportable Communicable Disease Incidence by Census Tract-Level Poverty, New York City, 2006–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin-Rector, Alison; Hadler, James L.; Fine, Annie D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We described disparities in selected communicable disease incidence across area-based poverty levels in New York City, an area with more than 8 million residents and pronounced household income inequality. Methods. We geocoded and categorized cases of 53 communicable diseases diagnosed during 2006 to 2013 by census tract-based poverty level. Age-standardized incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated for areas with 30% or more versus fewer than 10% of residents below the federal poverty threshold. Results. Diseases associated with high poverty included rickettsialpox (IRR = 3.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.29, 5.95), chronic hepatitis C (IRR for new reports = 3.58; 95% CI = 3.50, 3.66), and malaria (IRR = 3.48; 95% CI = 2.97, 4.08). Diseases associated with low poverty included domestic tick-borne diseases acquired through travel to areas where infected vectors are prevalent, such as human granulocytic anaplasmosis (IRR = 0.08; 95% CI = 0.03, 0.19) and Lyme disease (IRR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.32, 0.36). Conclusions. Residents of high poverty areas were disproportionately affected by certain communicable diseases that are amenable to public health interventions. Future work should clarify subgroups at highest risk, identify reasons for the observed associations, and use findings to support programs to minimize disparities. PMID:26180961

  16. [Health Communication: Preventing the Spread of Ebola Virus Disease in the Portuguese Spoken African Countries--Methodology KISS & KEYWORDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Isabel De; Miguel, José Pereira; Antunes, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Health Communication is considered as an important discipline in medicine and health sciences for his role as true determinant of health. We highlight their contribution to health promotion and disease prevention. Thus, the Health Communication Plan (PCS): Preventing the spread of Ebola virus disease in the Portuguese Speaking African Countries - KISS & KEYWORDS methodology is a tool that aims to minimize the risk of infection by Ebola virus in the Portuguese Speaking African Countries and also train for a general improvement of health conditions of the local populations. In the PCS design are especially considered the social and cultural contexts of the target populations, especially the customs, traditions and religion. Health Communication is considered as an Essential Function of Public Health and its main is to provide a population-based approach. The target of communication actions are population groups in addition to the individual communication, target-audiences are people without access to the media, in Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde and Sao Tome and Principe. Under the communication plan uses the methodology, models and practices both by media professionals as health. A proximity approach and cultural mediation, previously identified key facts, are defined objectives; outlines to the Plan in concrete and its implementation methodology (target-audience and following intervention, materials to be used and key-messages and partners to mobilize) following the World Health Organisation standards.

  17. lnvestigation on children with acute non-communicable diseases and their caregivers in developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron Asibi Abuosi; Delali Margaret Badasu; Alfred Edwin Yawson; Francis Anderson Adzei; Deborah Atobrah; John Kwasi Anarfi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate children with acute non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and their caregivers in developing countries. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in three out of the ten regions of Ghana. A total of 1 540 caregivers/parents of children with NCDs were interviewed. Data was analysed with the aid of IBM SPSS version 20. Statistical techniques used in the analysis included frequencies, means, SD and factor analysis. Findings were analysed according to the major themes of the study. Results: Caregivers indicated that the incidence of NCDs among children is on the in-crease. They also believed that enemies can cause diseases in children. Caregivers tend to seek treatment in hospitals/clinics rather than from traditional or herbal medicine. However, they complement biomedical treatment with prayers for healing/deliverance. It was also found that NCDs have a negative effect on the physical and mental development of children as well as their school performance;and caring for children with NCDs also poses material, emotional and financial burden to caregivers. Conclusions: Serious attention needs to be given to the development and implementa-tion of policies to better the lot of children with NCDs. Conscious efforts need to be made to encourage and assist the caregivers with necessary resources to cater for their children's educational and health needs in particular.

  18. Chronic non-communicable diseases, risk and health promotion: social construction of Vigitel participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika de Azevedo Leitão Mássimo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dimension of choice and adherence to healthy lifestyles is in the area of social constructions made in representations of individuals and had not yet been included in the Surveillance of Risk and Protective Factors for Chronic Diseases by Telephone Survey (VIGITEL analysis systems. This article aims to understand, in individual narratives, representations contained in the trajectories of people's lives selected from the 2010 VIGITEL sample, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. It is a qualitative study based on Social Representation Theory. Thirty in-depth and open interviews with subjects selected from the 2010 VIGITEL sample were conducted in Belo Horizonte in the State of Minas Gerais. The Structural Analysis of Narrative technique was used to reveal the content of speeches. Age and heredity representations related to NCDs are part of the spectrum of current scientific information. Learning from childhood onwards is the basis of care. The lack of comprehension of the pathophysiology of NCDs, and the depth of representations of illness and death related to communicable diseases, is partly responsible for the difficulty of preventing NCDs.

  19. [Analysis on urban elderly people's preference for prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming-fan; Feng, Xing-lin

    2014-04-18

    To investigate the outpatient provider preference and its influencing factors among residents older than 45 years in China's urban areas. The data of China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey (CHARLS) taking place in the year 2011 were analyzed with the method of multinominal logistic regression. In the last month, the rates of respondents with hypertension or/and diabetes who were reported being ill and seeking treatment were higher than that of those without such diseases. 51.73% of the hypertensive and 64.81% of the diabetic preferred hospitals to community health service (CHS) and private clinics. Regression results showed that people with Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI), higher education level, higher capacity to pay and diabetes tended to choose hospitals rather than CHS. Urban people with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) preferred to use hospitals rather than the CHS, which reflected CHS's low performance in NCDs management. UEBMI failed to channel off the insured people to CHS. CHS needs to strengthen its ability to manage NCDs, and UEBMI should implement measures to attract patients' flow to CHS.

  20. Report of a serious reportable communicable disease at a major sporting event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummiskey, J; Borrione, P; Bachil, N; Ergen, E; Pigozzi, F

    2008-06-01

    A European Youth Olympic Sports Festival (EYOF), in Jaca, Northern Aragon, Spain, involving 1500 athletes, from 43 countries was held in January for 7 days. The event was marred by a case of type B Neisseria meningitidis. The usual care of the patient was performed in a local hospital. He eventually made a full recovery. The case was reported to the Local Health Authority and the National Public Health authority of the patient's country. Their advice was to treat the core case, give prophylactic therapy to the inner circle (28 athletes and officials) and surveillance of the other close contacts (84 total) with temperature and symptom review daily. They advised against further information being given to the rest of the athletes and officials, in case it might give rise to a panic situation. The dilemma of the responsible physicians was that 1500 athletes were traveling back to 43 countries within the incubation period of the bacterial meningitis. It was decided that informing each country was appropriate. This was done at the event by informing the Chef of the Missions and writing to the Secretary Generals of each National Olympic Committee attending. This was the first serious contagious disease at a major sporting event. The way in which the wider dispersing attendees were informed at the event should form the basis of management at sporting events in the likelihood of a serious communicable disease.

  1. Profile of non-communicable disease risk factors among employees at a Saudi university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Mostafa, Ola Abdelmoniem; Darwish, Amr Ahmed; Al-Naboli, Mohamed Rashad

    2014-01-01

    There is paucity of studies defining the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors in Saudi Arabia despite the surging epidemic of obesity, change in dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the prevalence of NCDs risk factors among employees at King Faisal University in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia and to determine the possible correlates for clustering of NCDs risk factors among them. All employees were invited to participate; the World Health Organization STEPwise approach was used for data collection which consisted of a personal interview to collect socio-demographic characteristics, NCD history, tobacco use, vegetables and fruit consumption, and physical activity (PA), followed by anthropometric measurements namely weight, height and waist circumference and blood pressure measurements, subjects were finally subjected to biochemical tests with determination of fasting plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, cholesterol and high density lipoproteins. Of the surveyed employees (n=691), daily current smokers accounted for 22.7%. 94.9%, 95.1% and 86% consumed university's employees had multiple (≥3) NCD risk factors. Screening and health promotion initiatives should be launched at least targeting the modifiable factors to avert the excessive risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and several types of cancers.

  2. Differentials in risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases from the race/color standpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; de Moura, Lenildo; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata

    2015-03-01

    This article aims to analyze the differences between the prevalence of risk factors of non-communicable chronic disease by race/color. It is a cross-sectional study using data from a telephone survey of 45,448 adults. Prevalence ratios for chronic disease risk factors by race/color were calculated. After adjustments were made for education and income, race/color differences persisted. Among afro-descendant and mulatto women and mulatto men a higher prevalence ratio was identified of physical activity at work and physical activity at home. Afro-descendant women and mulatto men indulged in less physical inactivity. Mulatto men and women showed a lower prevalence of smoking and consumption of 20 cigarettes daily and lower consumption of fruit and vegetables. A higher consumption of full-fat milk with and beans was observed among afro-descendant and mulatto men. Afro-descendant women had a lower prevalence of drinking and driving. Afro-descendant women and men ate more meat with fat and afro-descendant men suffered more from hypertension. Differences in risk factors by race/color can be explained by cultural aspects, by not fully adjustable socioeconomic differences that determine less access to goods and less opportunities for the afro-descendant population.

  3. Differentials in risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases from the race/color standpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Carvalho Malta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the differences between the prevalence of risk factors of non-communicable chronic disease by race/color. It is a cross-sectional study using data from a telephone survey of 45,448 adults. Prevalence ratios for chronic disease risk factors by race/color were calculated. After adjustments were made for education and income, race/color differences persisted. Among afro-descendant and mulatto women and mulatto men a higher prevalence ratio was identified of physical activity at work and physical activity at home. Afro-descendant women and mulatto men indulged in less physical inactivity. Mulatto men and women showed a lower prevalence of smoking and consumption of 20 cigarettes daily and lower consumption of fruit and vegetables. A higher consumption of full-fat milk with and beans was observed among afro-descendant and mulatto men. Afro-descendant women had a lower prevalence of drinking and driving. Afro-descendant women and men ate more meat with fat and afro-descendant men suffered more from hypertension. Differences in risk factors by race/color can be explained by cultural aspects, by not fully adjustable socioeconomic differences that determine less access to goods and less opportunities for the afro-descendant population.

  4. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wood

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi.Methods: This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy.Results: A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0% were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff’s knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients.Conclusion: Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training.

  5. Challenges to implementing communicable disease surveillance in New York City evacuation shelters after Hurricane Sandy, November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, Alison D; Bregman, Brooke; Jones, Lucretia; Reddy, Vasudha; Waechter, HaeNa; Balter, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy hit New York City (NYC) on October 29, 2012. Before and after the storm, 73 temporary evacuation shelters were established. The total census of these shelters peaked at approximately 6,800 individuals. Concern about the spread of communicable diseases in shelters prompted the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) to rapidly develop a surveillance system to report communicable diseases and emergency department transports from shelters. We describe the implementation of this system. Establishing effective surveillance in temporary shelters was challenging and required in-person visits by DOHMH staff to ensure reporting. After system establishment, surveillance data were used to identify some potential disease clusters. For the future, we recommend pre-event planning for disease surveillance.

  6. [Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Ipince, Alessandra; Toyama, Mauricio; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Araya, Ricardo; Miranda, J Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Additionally, the gap between access to mental health care in Peru is analyzed. Lastly, the alternatives to reduce the gap are explored. Of these alternatives, the integration of mental health into primary care services is emphasized; as a feasible way to meet the care needs of the general population, and people with chronic diseases in particular, in the Peruvian context.

  7. Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy I. Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Methods: Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. Results: In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD, a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Discussion: Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda.

  8. Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeremy I; Dunkle, Ashley; Akiteng, Ann R; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Kagimu, Richard; Mondo, Charles K; Mutungi, Gerald; Rabin, Tracy L; Skonieczny, Michael; Sykes, Jamila; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW) training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD), a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda.

  9. Matched and Mismatched Appraisals of the Effectiveness of Communication Strategies by Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y.; Orange, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Communication problems stemming from Alzheimer's disease (AD) often result in misunderstandings that can be linked with problem behaviours and increased caregiver stress. Moreover, these communication breakdowns also can result either from caregivers' use of ineffective communication strategies, which paradoxically are…

  10. Nutrient reference value: non-communicable disease endpoints--a conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, J R; Blumberg, J B; L'Abbe, M; LeDoux, M; Rice, H B; von Schacky, C; Yaktine, A; Griffiths, J C

    2016-03-01

    scientific evidence does exist to confirm a relationship between the intake of a specific bioactive constituent and enhanced health conditions or reduced risk of a chronic disease. Further, research on the putative mechanisms of action of various classes of bioactives is supported by national and pan-national government agencies, and academic institutions, as well as functional food and dietary supplement manufacturers. Consumers are becoming educated and are seeking to purchase products containing bioactives, yet there is no evaluative process in place to let the public know how strong the science is behind the benefits or the quantitative amounts needed to achieve these beneficial health effects or to avoid exceeding the upper level (UL). When one lacks an essential nutrient, overt deficiency with concomitant physiological determents and eventually death are expected. The absence of bioactive substances from the diet results in suboptimal health, e.g., poor cellular and/or physiological function, which is relative and not absolute. Regrettably at this time, there is no DRI process to evaluate bioactives, although a recent workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health (Options for Consideration of Chronic Disease Endpoints for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs); March 10-11, 2015; http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dri/ ) did explore the process to develop DVs for nutrients, the lack of which result in increased risk of chronic disease (non-communicable disease) endpoints. A final report is expected soon. This conference (CRN-International Scientific Symposium; "Nutrient Reference Value-Non-Communicable Disease (NRV-NCD) Endpoints," 20 November in Kronberg, Germany; http://www.crn-i.ch/2015symposium/ ) explores concepts related to the Codex NRV process, the public health opportunities in setting NRVs for bioactive constituents, and further research and details on the specific class of bioactives, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (also termed omega-3 fatty

  11. Chronic non-communicable diseases in Cameroon - burden, determinants and current policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echouffo-Tcheugui Justin B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cameroon is experiencing an increase in the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs, which accounted for 43% of all deaths in 2002. This article reviews the published literature to critically evaluate the evidence on the frequency, determinants and consequences of NCDs in Cameroon, and to identify research, intervention and policy gaps. The rising trends in NCDs have been documented for hypertension and diabetes, with a 2-5 and a 10-fold increase in their respective prevalence between 1994 and 2003. Magnitudes are much higher in urban settings, where increasing prevalence of overweight/obesity (by 54-82% was observed over the same period. These changes largely result from the adoption of unfavorable eating habits, physical inactivity, and a probable increasing tobacco use. These behavioral changes are driven by the economic development and social mobility, which are part of the epidemiologic transition. There is still a dearth of information on chronic respiratory diseases and cancers, as well as on all NDCs and related risk factors in children and adolescents. More nationally representative data is needed to tract risk factors and consequences of NCDs. These conditions are increasingly been recognized as a priority, mainly through locally generated evidence. Thus, national-level prevention and control programs for chronic diseases (mainly diabetes and hypertension have been established. However, the monitoring and evaluation of these programs is necessary. Budgetary allocations data by the ministry of health would be helpful, to evaluate the investment in NCDs prevention and control. Establishing more effective national-level tobacco control measures and food policies, as well as campaigns to promote healthy diets, physical activity and tobacco cessation would probably contribute to reducing the burden of NCDs.

  12. Translational informatics approach for identifying the functional molecular communicators linking coronary artery disease, infection and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ankit; Ghatge, Madankumar; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Vangala, Rajani Kanth

    2016-05-01

    Translational informatics approaches are required for the integration of diverse and accumulating data to enable the administration of effective translational medicine specifically in complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). In the current study, a novel approach for elucidating the association between infection, inflammation and CAD was used. Genes for CAD were collected from the CAD‑gene database and those for infection and inflammation were collected from the UniProt database. The cytomegalovirus (CMV)‑induced genes were identified from the literature and the CAD‑associated clinical phenotypes were obtained from the Unified Medical Language System. A total of 55 gene ontologies (GO) termed functional communicator ontologies were identified in the gene sets linking clinical phenotypes in the diseasome network. The network topology analysis suggested that important functions including viral entry, cell adhesion, apoptosis, inflammatory and immune responses networked with clinical phenotypes. Microarray data was extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus (dataset: GSE48060) for highly networked disease myocardial infarction. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes and their GO terms suggested that CMV infection may trigger a xenobiotic response, oxidative stress, inflammation and immune modulation. Notably, the current study identified γ‑glutamyl transferase (GGT)‑5 as a potential biomarker with an odds ratio of 1.947, which increased to 2.561 following the addition of CMV and CMV‑neutralizing antibody (CMV‑NA) titers. The C‑statistics increased from 0.530 for conventional risk factors (CRFs) to 0.711 for GGT in combination with the above mentioned infections and CRFs. Therefore, the translational informatics approach used in the current study identified a potential molecular mechanism for CMV infection in CAD, and a potential biomarker for risk prediction.

  13. Patent and exclusivity status of essential medicines for non-communicable disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim K Mackey

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The threat of non-communicable diseases ("NCDs" is increasingly becoming a global health crisis and are pervasive in high, middle, and low-income populations resulting in an estimated 36 million deaths per year. There is a need to assess intellectual property rights ("IPRs" that may impede generic production and availability and affordability to essential NCD medicines. METHODS: Using the data sources listed below, the study design systematically eliminated NCD drugs that had no patent/exclusivity provisions on API, dosage, or administration route. The first step identified essential medicines that treat certain high disease burden NCDs. A second step examined the patent and exclusivity status of active ingredient, dosage and listed route of administration using exclusion criteria outlined in this study. MATERIALS: We examined the patent and exclusivity status of medicines listed in the World Health Organization's ("WHO" Model List of Essential Drugs (Medicines ("MLEM" and other WHO sources for drugs treating certain NCDs. i.e., cardiovascular and respiratory disease, cancers, and diabetes. We utilized the USA Food and Drug Administration Orange Book and the USA Patent and Trademark Office databases as references given the predominant number of medicines registered in the USA. RESULTS: Of the 359 MLEM medicines identified, 22% (79/359 address targeted NCDs. Of these 79, only eight required in-depth patent or exclusivity assessment. Upon further review, no NCD MLEM medicines had study patent or exclusivity protection for reviewed criteria. CONCLUSIONS: We find that ensuring availability and affordability of potential generic formulations of NCD MLEM medicines appears to be more complex than the presence of IPRs with API, dosage, or administration patent or exclusivity protection. Hence, more sophisticated analysis of NCD barriers to generic availability and affordability should be conducted in order to ensure equitable access to global

  14. Healthcare model with use of information and communication technology for patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew

    2016-07-15

    The healthcare system is positioned in the patient's environment and works with other determinants of the treatment. Patient care requires a whole system compatible to the needs of organizational and technical solutions. The purpose of this study is to present a new model of patient-oriented care, in which the use of information and communication technology (ICT) can improve the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the process of healthcare for chronically ill patients. Knowledge of the circumstances surrounding ecosystem and of the patients' needs, taking into account the fundamental healthcare goals allows us to build a new models of care, starting with the economic assumptions. The method used is modeling the construction of efficient healthcare system with the patient-centered model using ICT tools. We present a new systemic concept of building patient's environment in which he is the central figure of the healthcare organization - so called patient centered system. The use of ICT in the model of chronic patient's healthcare can improve the effectiveness of this kind of care. The concept is a vision to making wide platform of information management in chronic disease in a real environment ecosystem of patient using ICT tools. On the basis of a systematic approach to the model of chronic disease, and the knowledge of the patient itself, a model of the ecosystem impacts and interactions through information feedback and the provision of services can be constructed. ICT assisted techniques will increase the effectiveness of patient care, in which nowadays information exchange plays a key role.

  15. Association of Insurance and Community-Level Socioeconomic Status With Treatment and Outcome of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jacob Y; Yoon, Ja Kyoung; Shin, Aaron K; Blumenfeld, Philip; Mai, Miranda; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2017-09-01

    Community-level socioeconomic status, particularly insurance status, is increasingly becoming important as a possible determinant in patient outcomes. To determine the association of insurance and community-level socioeconomic status with outcome for patients with pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study extracted data from more than 1500 Commission on Cancer-accredited facilities collected in the National Cancer Database. A total of 35 559 patients diagnosed with SCC of the pharynx from 2004 through 2013 were identified. The χ2 test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were used to analyze data from April 1, 2016, through April 16, 2017. Overall survival was defined as time to death from the date of diagnosis. Among the 35 559 patients identified (75.6% men and 24.4% women; median age, 61 years [range, 18-90 years]), 15 146 (42.6%) had Medicare coverage; 13 061 (36.7%), private insurance; 4881 (13.7%), Medicaid coverage; and 2471 (6.9%), no insurance. Uninsured patients and Medicaid recipients were more likely to be younger, black, or Hispanic; to have lower median household income and lower educational attainment; to present with higher TNM stages of disease; and to start primary treatment at a later time from diagnosis. Those with private insurance (reference group) had significantly better overall survival than uninsured patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.72; 95% CI, 1.59-1.87), Medicaid recipients (HR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.88-2.12), or Medicare recipients (HR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.99-2.16), as did those with median household income of at least $63 000 (reference) vs $48 000 to $62 999 (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.13-1.26), $38 000 to $47 999 (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.24-1.38), and less than $38 000 (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.43-1.59). On multivariable analysis, insurance status and median household income remained independent prognostic factors for overall survival even after accounting for educational attainment, race, Charlson/Deyo comorbidity

  16. Socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in Colombia, 1998-2007: The double burden of non-communicable diseases and injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Arroyave (Ivan); A. Burdorf (Alex); D. Cardona (Doris); M. Avendano Pabon (Mauricio)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Non-communicable diseases have become the leading cause of death in middle-income countries, but mortality from injuries and infections remains high. We examined the contribution of specific causes to disparities in adult premature mortality (ages 25-64) by educational level

  17. Promotion of access to essential medicines for non-communicable diseases : practical implications of the UN political declaration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogerzeil, Hans V.; Liberman, Jonathan; Wirtz, Veronika J.; Kishore, Sandeep P.; Selvaraj, Sakthi; Kiddell-Monroe, Rachel; Mwangi-Powell, Faith N.; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido

    2013-01-01

    Access to medicines and vaccines to prevent and treat non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is unacceptably low worldwide. In the 2011 UN political declaration on the prevention and control of NCDs, heads of government made several commitments related to access to essential medicines, technologies, and v

  18. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to

  19. An Adaptation of the Teaching Reference Community Developed by the National Communicable Disease Center. Dixon, Tiller County, U. S. A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocks, Barry

    Demographic and other descriptive data on a hypothetical metropolitan area (Dixon City, Tiller County) are presented in the report, which is intended as a health study and training model. Most of the statistical and descriptive data are drawn from a health training model developed by the Communicable Disease Center, U. S. Department of Health,…

  20. Do You Remember? How Caregivers Question Their Spouses Who Have Alzheimer's Disease and the Impact on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Jeff A.; Perry, JoAnn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the types of questions caregivers use and their outcomes when conversing with their spouse with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular interest was caregivers' use of yes-no and open-ended questions and the demands they make on the memory of the person with AD. It was hypothesized that communication between caregivers and…

  1. Partnering to meet training needs: a communicable-disease continuing education course for public health nurses in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Lorraine K; Dail, Kathy; Horney, Jennifer A; Davis, Mary V; Wallace, John W; Maillard, Jean-Marie; MacDonald, Pia

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the General Communicable Disease Control Branch of the North Carolina Division of Public Health and the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness partnered to create a free continuing education course in communicable-disease surveillance and outbreak investigations for public health nurses. The course was a competency-based curriculum with 14 weeks of Internet-based instruction, culminating in a two-day classroom-based skills demonstration. In spring 2006, the course became mandatory for all public health nurses who spend at least three-fourths of their time on tasks related to communicable diseases. As of December 2006, 177 nurses specializing in communicable diseases from 74 North Carolina counties had completed the course. Evaluations indicated that participants showed statistically significant improvements in self-perceived confidence to perform competencies addressed by the course. This course has become a successful model that combines academic expertise in curriculum development and teaching technologies with practical expertise in course content and audience needs. Through a combination of Internet and classroom instruction, this course has delivered competency-based training to the public health professionals who perform as frontline epidemiologists throughout North Carolina.

  2. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to ana

  3. Nurse-led care interventions for high blood pressure control: Implications for non-communicable disease programs in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Nurses play a significant role in the control of high blood pressure when they employ effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of hypertension. Adapting effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of non-communicable diseases could improve patient outcomes in Uganda.

  4. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to ana

  5. Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emodi, Ij; Ikefuna, An; Ujunwa, Fa; Chinawa, Jm

    2014-01-01

    .... It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu...

  6. Cost of care of chronic non-communicable diseases in Jamaican patients: the role of obesity

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    Christine M. Fray-Aiken

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the economic cost of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases (CNCDs and the portion attributable to obesity among patients in Jamaica. METHODS: The cost-of-illness approach was used to estimate the cost of care in a hospital setting in Jamaica for type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, gallbladder disease, breast cancer, colon cancer, osteoarthritis, and high cholesterol. Cost and service utilization data were collected from the hospital records of all patients with these diseases who visited the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI during 2006. Patients were included in the study if they were between15 and 74 years of age and if female, were not pregnant during that year. Costs were categorized as direct or indirect. Direct costs included costs for prescription drugs, consultation visits (emergency and clinic visits, hospitalizations, allied health services, diagnostic and treatment procedures. Indirect costs included costs attributed to premature mortality, disability (permanent and temporary, and absenteeism. Indirect costs were discounted at 3% rate. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 554 patients (40% males (60% females. The economic burden of the nine diseases was estimated at US$ 5,672,618 (males 37%; females 63% and the portion attributable to obesity amounted to US$ 1,157,173 (males 23%; females 77%. Total direct cost was estimated at US$ 3,740,377 with female patients accounting for 69.9% of this cost. Total indirect cost was estimated at US$ 1,932,241 with female patients accounting for 50.6% of this cost. The greater cost among women was not found to be statistically significant. Overall, on a per capita basis, males and females accrued similar costs-of-illness (US$ 9,451.75 vs. US$ 10,758.18. CONCLUSIONS: In a country with per capita GDP of less than US$ 5,300, a per capita annual cost of illness of US$ 10,239 for CNCDs is excessive and has detrimental implications for the

  7. Addressing geographical variation in the progression of non-communicable diseases in Peru: the CRONICAS cohort study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Smeeth, Liam; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William

    2012-01-01

    Background The rise in non-communicable diseases in developing countries has gained increased attention. Given that around 80% of deaths related to non-communicable diseases occur in low- and middle-income countries, there is a need for local knowledge to address such problems. Longitudinal studies can provide valuable information about disease burden of non-communicable diseases in Latin America to inform both public health and clinical settings. Methods The CRONICAS cohort is a longitudinal study performed in three Peruvian settings that differ by degree of urbanisation, level of outdoor and indoor pollution and altitude. The author sought to enrol an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 1000 participants at each site. Study procedures include questionnaires on socio-demographics and well-known risk factors for cardiopulmonary disease, blood draw, anthropometry and body composition, blood pressure and spirometry before and after bronchodilators. All participants will be visited at baseline, at 20 and 40 months. A random sample of 100 households at each site will be assessed for 24 h particulate matter concentration. Primary outcomes include prevalence of risk factors for cardiopulmonary diseases, changes in blood pressure and blood glucose over time and decline in lung function. Discussion There is an urgent need to characterise the prevalence and burden of non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. Peru is a middle-income country currently undergoing a rapid epidemiological transition. This longitudinal study will provide valuable information on cardiopulmonary outcomes in three different settings and will provide a platform to address potential interventions that are locally relevant or applicable to other similar settings in Latin America.

  8. Non-communicable disease risk factors and treatment preference of obese patients in Cape Town

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    Kathryn Manning

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insights into the characteristics of treatment seekers for lifestyle changes and treatment preferences are necessary for intervention planning.Aim: To compile a profile of treatment-seeking obese patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs or NCD risk factors and to compare patients who choose group-based (facility-based therapeutic group [FBTG] versus usual care (individual consultations treatment.Setting: A primary healthcare facility in Cape Town, South Africa.Methods: One hundred and ninety-three patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Ninety six chose FBTG while 97 chose usual care. A questionnaire, the hospital database and patients’ folders were used to collect data. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured. STATA 11.0 was used for descriptive statistics and to compare the two groups.Results: The subjects’ mean age was 50.4 years, 78% were women and of low education levels and income, and 41.5% had type 2 diabetes, 83.4% hypertension and 69.5% high cholesterol. Mean (s.d. HbA1c was 9.1 (2.0%, systolic BP 145.6 (21.0 mmHg, diastolic BP 84.5 (12.0 mmHg, cholesterol 5.4 (1.2 mmol/L, body mass indicator (BMI 39.3 (7.3 kg/m2 and waist circumference 117 (12.6 cm. These figures were undesirable although pharmacological treatment for diabetes and hypertension was in place. Only 14% were physically active, while TV viewing was > 2h/day. Mean daily intake of fruit and vegetables (2.2 portions/day was low while added sugar (5 teaspoons and sugar-sweetened beverages (1.3 glasses were high. Usual care patients had a higher smoking prevalence, HbA1c, number of NCD risk factors and refined carbohydrate intake, and a lower fruit and vegetable intake.Conclusion: Treatment seekers were typically middle-aged, low income women with various modifiable and intermediate risk factors for NCDs. Patients choosing usual care could have more NCD risks.Keywords: Non-communicable diseases; primary health care; family

  9. Clustering of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases among Adolescents from Southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloyse Elaine Gimenes Nunes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the simultaneous presence of risk factors for non-communicable diseases and the association of these risk factors with demographic and economic factors among adolescents from southern Brazil.The study included 916 students (14-19 years old enrolled in the 2014 school year at state schools in São José, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Risk factors related to lifestyle (i.e., physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet, demographic variables (sex, age and skin colour and economic variables (school shift and economic level were assessed through a questionnaire. Simultaneous behaviours were assessed by the ratio between observed and expected prevalences of risk factors for non-communicable diseases. The clustering of risk factors was analysed by multinomial logistic regression. The clusters of risk factors that showed a higher prevalence were analysed by binary logistic regression.The clustering of two, three, four, and five risk factors were found in 22.2%, 49.3%, 21.7% and 3.1% of adolescents, respectively. Subgroups that were more likely to have both behaviours of physical inactivity and unhealthy diet simultaneously were mostly composed of girls (OR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.57-5.85 and those with lower socioeconomic status (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.05-3.21; simultaneous physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet were mainly observed among older adolescents (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05-2.12. Subgroups less likely to have both behaviours of sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet were mostly composed of girls (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.38-0.89; simultaneous physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet were mainly observed among older individuals (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.87 and those of the night shift (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.43-0.82.Adolescents had a high prevalence of simultaneous risk factors for NCDs

  10. Care-seeking patterns for fatal non-communicable diseases among women of reproductive age in rural northwest Bangladesh

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    Sikder Shegufta S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though non-communicable diseases contribute to an increasing share of the disease burden in South Asia, health systems in most rural communities are ill-equipped to deal with chronic illness. This analysis seeks to describe care-seeking behavior among women of reproductive age who died from fatal non-communicable diseases as recorded in northwest rural Bangladesh between 2001 and 2007. Methods This analysis utilized data from a large population-based cohort trial in northwest rural Bangladesh. To conduct verbal autopsies of women who died while under study surveillance, physicians interviewed family members to elicit the biomedical symptoms that the women experienced as well as a narrative of the events leading to deaths. We performed qualitative textual analysis of verbal autopsy narratives for 250 women of reproductive age who died from non-communicable diseases between 2001 and 2007. Results The majority of women (94% sought at least one provider for their illnesses. Approximately 71% of women first visited non-certified providers such as village doctors and traditional healers, while 23% first sought care from medically certified providers. After the first point of care, women appeared to switch to medically certified practitioners when treatment from non-certified providers failed to resolve their illness. Conclusions This study suggests that treatment seeking patterns for non-communicable diseases are affected by many of the sociocultural factors that influence care seeking for pregnancy-related illnesses. Families in northwest rural Bangladesh typically delayed seeking treatment from medically certified providers for NCDs due to the cost of services, distance to facilities, established relationships with non-certified providers, and lack of recognition of the severity of illnesses. Most women did not realize initially that they were suffering from a chronic illness. Since women typically reached medically certified

  11. How do patients with peripheral arterial disease communicate their knowledge about their illness and treatments? A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wann-Hansson, Christine; Wennick, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a chronic illness, and patients with peripheral arterial disease should receive advice about lifestyle changes and medical therapies to reduce further atherosclerotic complications. Previous research has indicated that patients with peripheral arterial disease lack information about their disease and secondary prevention measures. The aim was to elucidate how patients with peripheral arterial disease communicate their knowledge about their illness and treatments. During 2009, seven focus group interviews were conducted with twenty-one patients (50-81 years old) with peripheral arterial disease and were analysed using content analysis. When respondents with PAD communicate their knowledge about the illness and its treatments they "Navigate through uncertainty, believes and facts about PAD, displaying an active or passive information-seeking behaviour". After discharge, they felt a feeling of relief at first, which was later exchanged into uncertainty from their restricted knowledge about the illness and how to behave following revascularisation. For example, during the discussions about risk factors, smoking was noted as a major risk factor, that triggered feelings of guilt. Thus, the respondents needed to consult other sources of information to manage their everyday lives. Following endovascular treatment, the short amount of time spent with peripheral arterial disease patients requires innovative guidance in clinical practice to meet individuals' needs regardless of whether the patient actively or passively understands and manages their peripheral arterial disease.

  12. Chronic Non-Communicable Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disease in sub-Saharan Africa: An Academic Model for Countering the Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S.; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Carter, E. Jane; Binanay, Cynthia; Corey, G. Ralph; Einterz, Robert M.; Tierney, William M.; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Non-communicable diseases are rapidly overtaking infectious, perinatal, nutritional and maternal diseases as the major causes of worldwide death and disability. It is estimated that within the next 10-15 years, the increasing burden of chronic diseases and the ageing of the population will expose the world to an unprecedented burden of chronic diseases. Preventing the potential ramifications of a worldwide epidemic of chronic non-communicable diseases in a sustainable manner requires coordinated, collaborative efforts. Herein we present our collaboration's strategic plan to understand, treat and prevent chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in Western Kenya which builds on a two decade partnership between academic universities in North America and Kenya; the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH). We emphasize the importance of training Kenyan clinician-investigators who will ultimately lead efforts in cardiovascular and pulmonary disease care, education and research. This penultimate aim will be achieved by our five main goals. Our goals include creating an administrative core capable of managing operations, develop clinical and clinical research training curricula, enhancing existing technology infrastructure and implementing relevant research programs. Leveraging a strong international academic partnership with respective expertise in cardiovascular medicine, pulmonary medicine and medical informatics we have undertaken to understand and counter cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in Kenya by addressing patient care, teaching and clinical research. PMID:21570512

  13. Community-level education accelerates the cultural evolution of fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleran, Heidi; Jasienska, Grazyna; Nenko, Ilona; Galbarczyk, Andrzej; Mace, Ruth

    2014-03-22

    Explaining why fertility declines as populations modernize is a profound theoretical challenge. It remains unclear whether the fundamental drivers are economic or cultural in nature. Cultural evolutionary theory suggests that community-level characteristics, for example average education, can alter how low-fertility preferences are transmitted and adopted. These assumptions have not been empirically tested. Here, we show that community-level education accelerates fertility decline in a way that is neither predicted by individual characteristics, nor by the level of economic modernization in a population. In 22 high-fertility communities in Poland, fertility converged on a smaller family size as average education in the community increased-indeed community-level education had a larger impact on fertility decline than did individual education. This convergence was not driven by educational levels being more homogeneous, but by less educated women having fewer children than expected, and more highly educated social networks, when living among more highly educated neighbours. The average level of education in a community may influence the social partners women interact with, both within and beyond their immediate social environments, altering the reproductive norms they are exposed to. Given a critical mass of highly educated women, less educated neighbours may adopt their reproductive behaviour, accelerating the pace of demographic transition. Individual characteristics alone cannot capture these dynamics and studies relying solely on them may systematically underestimate the importance of cultural transmission in driving fertility declines. Our results are inconsistent with a purely individualistic, rational-actor model of fertility decline and suggest that optimization of reproduction is partly driven by cultural dynamics beyond the individual.

  14. Report of the Council for Exceptional Children's Task Force on Policy Issues Relating to the Management of Students with Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    How schools can effectively work with exceptional students who have communicable diseases was the focus of an eight-member Task Force appointed by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Governmental Relations Committee. Its report begins with an overview of existing guidelines and defines specific communicable diseases (Hepatitis B,…

  15. The SDGs Will Require Integrated Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health at the Community Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Chelsey R; Graybill, Lauren; Fawzi, Wafaie; Kinabo, Joyce

    2016-03-01

    Child malnutrition is an urgent and complex issue and requires integrated approaches across agriculture, nutrition, and health. This issue has gained prominence at the global level. While national-level efforts are underway in many countries, there is little information on how to integrate at the community level. Here, we offer a community-based approach using cadres of agricultural and community health workers, drawing on qualitative work we have conducted in Tanzania. Agriculture is an important driver of nutritional and health outcomes, and improving child health will require practical solutions for integration that can add to the evidence base.

  16. Does Social Capital Explain Community-Level Differences in Organ Donor Designation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladin, Keren; Wang, Rui; Fleishman, Aaron; Boger, Matthew; Rodrigue, James R

    2015-09-01

    The growing shortage of life-saving organs has reached unprecedented levels, with more than 120,000 Americans waiting for them. Despite national attempts to increase organ donation and federal laws mandating the equitable allocation of organs, geographic disparities remain. A better understanding of the contextual determinants of organ donor designation, including social capital, may enhance efforts to increase organ donation by raising the probability of collective action and fostering norms of reciprocity and cooperation while increasing costs to defectors. Because community-level factors, including social capital, predict more than half the variation in donor designation, future interventions should tailor strategies to specific communities as the unit of intervention. The growing shortage of organs has reached unprecedented levels. Despite national attempts to increase donation and federal laws mandating the equitable allocation of organs, their availability and waiting times vary significantly nationwide. Organ donor designation is a collective action problem in public health, in which the regional organ supply and average waiting times are determined by the willingness of individuals to be listed as organ donors. Social capital increases the probability of collective action by fostering norms of reciprocity and cooperation while increasing costs to defectors. We examine whether social capital and other community-level factors explain geographic variation in organ donor designation rates in Massachusetts. We obtained a sample of 3,281,532 registered drivers in 2010 from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Registry of Motor Vehicles (MassDOT RMV). We then geocoded the registry data, matched them to 4,466 census blocks, and linked them to the 2010 US Census, the American Community Survey (ACS), and other sources to obtain community-level sociodemographic, social capital (residential segregation, voter registration and participation, residential

  17. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on macro-economic productivity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Layal; Falla, Abby; van der Lee, Sven J; Muka, Taulant; Imo, David; Jaspers, Loes; Colpani, Veronica; Mendis, Shanthi; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Bramer, Wichor M; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have large economic impact at multiple levels. To systematically review the literature investigating the economic impact of NCDs [including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)] on macro-economic productivity. Systematic search, up to November 6th 2014, of medical databases (Medline, Embase and Google Scholar) without language restrictions. To identify additional publications, we searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted authors in the field. Randomized controlled trials, cohort, case-control, cross-sectional, ecological studies and modelling studies carried out in adults (>18 years old) were included. Two independent reviewers performed all abstract and full text selection. Disagreements were resolved through consensus or consulting a third reviewer. Two independent reviewers extracted data using a predesigned data collection form. Main outcome measure was the impact of the selected NCDs on productivity, measured in DALYs, productivity costs, and labor market participation, including unemployment, return to work and sick leave. From 4542 references, 126 studies met the inclusion criteria, many of which focused on the impact of more than one NCD on productivity. Breast cancer was the most common (n = 45), followed by stroke (n = 31), COPD (n = 24), colon cancer (n = 24), DM (n = 22), lung cancer (n = 16), CVD (n = 15), cervical cancer (n = 7) and CKD (n = 2). Four studies were from the WHO African Region, 52 from the European Region, 53 from the Region of the Americas and 16 from the Western Pacific Region, one from the Eastern Mediterranean Region and none from South East Asia. We found large regional differences in DALYs attributable to NCDs but especially for cervical and lung cancer. Productivity losses in the USA ranged from 88 million

  18. Perceived Changes in Communication as an Effect of STN Surgery in Parkinson's Disease: A Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Ahlberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore four individuals' perspective of the way their speech and communication changed as a result of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation treatment for Parkinson's disease. Interviews of two men and two women were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged as a result of the analysis. The first theme included sub-themes describing both increased and unexpected communication difficulties such as a more vulnerable speech function, re-emerging stuttering and cognitive difficulties affecting communication. The second theme comprised strategies to improve communication, using different speech techniques and communicative support, as well as trying to achieve changes in medical and stimulation parameters. The third theme included descriptions of mixed feelings surrounding the surgery. Participants described the surgery as an unavoidable dramatic change, associated both with improved quality of life but also uncertainty and lack of information, particularly regarding speech and communication changes. Despite negative effects on speech, the individuals were generally very pleased with the surgical outcome. More information before surgery regarding possible side effects on speech, meeting with a previously treated patient and possibly voice and speech therapy before or after surgery are suggested to facilitate the adjustment to the new speech conditions.

  19. Advance Care Planning and Goals of Care Communication in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease and Multi-Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2016-05-01

    This article provides an approach to advance care planning (ACP) and goals of care communication in older adults with cardiovascular disease and multi-morbidity. The goal of ACP is to ensure that the medical care patients receive is aligned with their values and preferences. In this article, the authors outline common benefits and challenges to ACP for older adults with cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity. Recognizing that these patients experience diverse disease trajectories and receive care in multiple health care settings, the authors provide practical steps for multidisciplinary teams to integrate ACP into brief clinic encounters.

  20. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases between the major population groups in Israel: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Green, Manfred S; Soskolne, Varda; Neumark, Yehuda

    2017-06-24

    Israel is a high-income country with an advanced health system and universal health-care insurance. Overall, the health status has improved steadily over recent decades. We examined differences in morbidity, mortality, and risk factors for selected non-communicable diseases (NCDs) between subpopulation groups. Between 1975 and 2014, life expectancy in Israel steadily increased and is currently above the average life expectancy for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Nevertheless, life expectancy has remained lower among Israeli Arabs than Israeli Jews, and this gap has recently widened. Age-adjusted mortality as a result of heart disease, stroke, or diabetes remains higher in Arabs, whereas age-adjusted incidence and mortality of cancer were higher among Jews. The prevalence of obesity and low physical activity in Israel is considerably higher among Arabs than Jews. Smoking prevalence is highest for Arab men and lowest for Arab women. Health inequalities are also evident by the indicators of socioeconomic position and in subpopulations, such as immigrants from the former Soviet Union, ultra-Orthodox Jews, and Bedouin Arabs. Despite universal health coverage and substantial improvements in the overall health of the Israeli population, substantial inequalities in NCDs persist. These differences might be explained, at least in part, by gaps in social determinants of health. The Ministry of Health has developed comprehensive programmes to reduce these inequalities between the major population groups. Sustained coordinated multisectoral efforts are needed to achieve a greater impact and to address other social inequalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-communicable diseases among children in Ghana: health and social concerns of parent/caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawson, Alfred E; Abuosi, Aaron A; Badasu, Delali M; Atobra, Deborah; Adzei, Francis A; Anarfi, John K

    2016-06-01

    Globally, there is a progressive rise in the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This paper examined the health and social concerns of parents/caregivers on in-patient care for children with NCDs in Ghana. This was a cross-sectional study in three large health facilities in Ghana (the largest in the South, the largest in the North and the largest in the Eastern part of Ghana. Data was collected with a structured questionnaire among 225 caregivers (≥18 years) of 149 children with NCDs in health facilities in the three regions. Data was analyzed with simple descriptive statistics. Most caregivers 169(75.0%) were women, relatively young (median age 35years), mostly married and resided in urban areas. Sickle cell disease was the commonest NCD among the children. All 169(75.0%) caregivers believed children suffer NCDs because of sins of parents/ancestors, 29(12.9%) believed herbalists/spiritualists have insights into treating NCDs and 73(32.6%) have previously used herbs/traditional medicine for child's illness. NCD in children was a burden and caused financial difficulties for families. Most caregivers (>96.0%) indicated NCDs in children should be included in national health insurance benefits package and a comprehensive national NCD policy is needed. Absence of national NCD policy for children is a major challenge. The burden of care rests mainly on the parents/caregivers. A national strategic intervention on the importance of awareness generation on the causes, risk factors, prevention and treatment of NCDs for families and communities is essential. Government support through national health and social policy initiatives are essential.

  2. Medicalization of global health 3: the medicalization of the non-communicable diseases agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocalyn Clark

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition of the massive global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs due to their prevalence, projected social and economic costs, and traditional neglect compared to infectious disease. The 2011 UN Summit, WHO 25×25 targets, and support of major medical and advocacy organisations have propelled prominence of NCDs on the global health agenda. NCDs are by definition ‘diseases’ so already medicalized. But their social drivers and impacts are acknowledged, which demand a broad, whole-of-society approach. However, while both individual- and population-level targets are identified in the current NCD action plans, most recommended strategies tend towards the individualistic approach and do not address root causes of the NCD problem. These so-called population strategies risk being reduced to expectations of individual and behavioural change, which may have limited success and impact and deflect attention away from government policies or regulation of industry. Industry involvement in NCD agenda-setting props up a medicalized approach to NCDs: food and drink companies favour focus on individual choice and responsibility, and pharmaceutical and device companies favour calls for expanded access to medicines and treatment coverage. Current NCD framing creates expanded roles for physicians, healthcare workers, medicines and medical monitoring. The professional rather than the patient view dominates the NCD agenda and there is a lack of a broad, engaged, and independent NGO community. The challenge and opportunity lie in defining priorities and developing strategies that go beyond a narrow medicalized framing of the NCD problem and its solutions.

  3. The environmental roots of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and the epigenetic impacts of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineis, Paolo; Stringhini, Silvia; Porta, Miquel

    2014-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing worldwide. We hypothesize that environmental factors (including social adversity, diet, lack of physical activity and pollution) can become "embedded" in the biology of humans. We also hypothesize that the "embedding" partly occurs because of epigenetic changes, i.e., durable changes in gene expression patterns. Our concern is that once such factors have a foundation in human biology, they can affect human health (including NCDs) over a long period of time and across generations. To analyze how worldwide changes in movements of goods, persons and lifestyles (globalization) may affect the "epigenetic landscape" of populations and through this have an impact on NCDs. We provide examples of such changes and effects by discussing the potential epigenetic impact of socio-economic status, migration, and diet, as well as the impact of environmental factors influencing trends in age at puberty. The study of durable changes in epigenetic patterns has the potential to influence policy and practice; for example, by enabling stratification of populations into those who could particularly benefit from early interventions to prevent NCDs, or by demonstrating mechanisms through which environmental factors influence disease risk, thus providing compelling evidence for policy makers, companies and the civil society at large. The current debate on the '25 × 25 strategy', a goal of 25% reduction in relative mortality from NCDs by 2025, makes the proposed approach even more timely. Epigenetic modifications related to globalization may crucially contribute to explain current and future patterns of NCDs, and thus deserve attention from environmental researchers, public health experts, policy makers, and concerned citizens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perception of non-communicable diseases predicts consumption of fruits and vegetables

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    Charles Surjadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Nutrition has come to the fore as one of the major modifiable determinants of chronic disease. Establishing healthy eating habits during adolescence is important given that fruit and vegetable consumption has long-term health-protective benefits. The objective of this study was to investigate the determinant factors of fruit and vegetable consumption habits among Padang inhabitants Methods We conducted a questionnaire-based rapid assessment of 150 respondents who came from different settings: The questionnaire consisted of items on personal characteristics such as age, working status, gender, and personal knowledge of the subjects about the cause of non-communicable diseases (NCDs and their activities to prevent NCDs. Bivariate analysis was applied to look for variables significantly related to healthy eating (vegetable and fruit consumption. We applied multiple logistic regression to look for the best model to explain factors related to regular fruit and vegetable consumption. Results The age range of the subjects was 14 to 76 years, 60% of subjects were women, and 40% were men. The study indicated that 64.7% of the respondents perceived that eating habits relate to NCD, while 67.3% consumed fruits and vegetables regularly. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that gender (O.R.=2.74; 95% C.I. 1.54-5.27 and perception of NCD as being related to healthy eating (O.R.=5.62;95% C.I. 2.93-10.76 were significantly related to regular fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusion This study demonstrated that perception of NCD was the most determinant factor of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. Activities to improve practice of regular fruit and vegetable consumption are part of control of NCD risk factors.

  5. Non-communicable diseases and human rights: Global synergies, gaps and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Laura; Tarantola, Daniel; Hoffmann, Michael; Gruskin, Sofia

    2017-10-01

    The incorporation of human rights in health policy and programmes is known to strengthen responses to health problems and help address disparities created or exacerbated by illness yet this remains underexplored in relation to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Aiming to understand existing synergies and how they might be further strengthened, we assessed the extent to which human rights are considered in global NCD policies and strategies and the degree of attention given to NCDs by select United Nations human rights mechanisms. Across global NCD policies and strategies, rhetorical assertions regarding human rights appear more often than actionable statements, thus limiting their implementation and impact. Although no human rights treaty explicitly mentions NCDs, some human rights monitoring mechanisms have been paying increasing attention to NCDs. This provides important avenues for promoting the incorporation of human rights norms and standards into NCD responses as well as for accountability. Linking NCDs and human rights at the global level is critical for encouraging national-level action to promote better outcomes relating to both health and human rights. The post-2015 development agenda constitutes a key entry point for highlighting these synergies and strengthening opportunities for health and rights action at global, national and local levels.

  6. Behavioural Risk Factors for Non Communicable Disease among Rural Adults in Andra Pradesh

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    Trupti N Bodhare, Kanchi Venkatesh, Samir Bele, Gali Kashiram, Sujata Devi, Achanta Vivekanand

    2013-01-01

    Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in rural area of Karimnagar among 410 participants. Various risk factors assessed were smoking and alcohol intake, physical inactivity, obesity, hypertension and stress among participants. Results: The mean age of the participants was 56.41 ± 11.90 years. Male accounted for 55.6% of the total sample, 34.9% were illiterate and 70.7% belonged to an upper lower class. Presence of at least one risk factor was observed among 76.3% of participants. The prevalence of hypertension was 38.5% among participants, 24.6% were current smokers whereas 29.8% were current alcohol users. Stress was exhibited by 24.9% and 25.9% were physically inactive. A binary logistic regression analysis revealed that older age (p = 0.000, male gender (p = 0.001, illiteracy (p = 0.007 and lower socio-economic status (p = 0.001 were associated with the presence of at least one risk factor. Conclusion: High prevalence of risk factors among rural popula-tion warrants an immediate attention. There is a need for careful monitoring and control of non-communicable disease risk factors in rural area.

  7. Embedding non-communicable diseases in the post-2015 development agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, George; Binagwaho, Agnes; Haines, Andy; Jahan, Selim; Nugent, Rachel; Rojhani, Ariella; Stuckler, David

    2013-02-16

    The post-2015 development agenda will build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in which health is a core component. This agenda will focus on human development, incorporate the components of the Millennium Declaration, and will be made sustainable by support from the social, economic, and environmental domains of activity, represented graphically as the strands of a triple helix. The approaches to prevention and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been elaborated in the political declaration of the UN high-level meeting on NCDs and governments have adopted a goal of 25% reduction in relative mortality from NCDs by 2025 (the 25 by 25 goal), but a strong movement is needed based on the evidence already available, enhanced by effective partnerships, and with political support to ensure that NCDs are embedded in the post-2015 human development agenda. NCDs should be embedded in the post-2015 development agenda, since they are leading causes of death and disability, have a negative effect on health, and, through their effect on the societal, economic, and the environmental domains, impair the sustainability of development. Some drivers of unsustainable development, such as the transport, food and agriculture, and energy sectors, also increase the risk of NCDs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and Implementation of Worksite Health and Wellness Programs: A Focus on Non-Communicable Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Briggs, Paige; Cahalin, Brendan L; Myers, Jonathan; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of worksite health and wellness programs (WHWPs) in the United States (US) hold promise as a means to improve population health and reverse current trends in non-communicable disease incidence and prevalence. However, WHWPs face organizational, economic, systematic, legal, and logistical challenges which have combined to impact program availability and expansion. Even so, there is a burgeoning body of evidence indicating WHWPs can significantly improve the health profile of participating employees in a cost effective manner. This foundation of scientific knowledge justifies further research inquiry to elucidate optimal WHWP models. It is clear that the development, implementation and operation of WHWPs require a strong commitment from organizational leadership, a pervasive culture of health and availability of necessary resources and infrastructure. Since organizations vary significantly, there is a need to have flexibility in creating a customized, effective health and wellness program. Furthermore, several key legal issues must be addressed to facilitate employer and employee needs and responsibilities; the US Affordable Care Act will play a major role moving forward. The purposes of this review are to: 1) examine currently available health and wellness program models and considerations for the future; 2) highlight key legal issues associated with WHWP development and implementation; and 3) identify challenges and solutions for the development and implementation of as well as adherence to WHWPs.

  9. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in developing countries: a symposium report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Purnat, Tina Dannemann; Phuong, Nguyen Thi Anh; Mwingira, Upendo; Schacht, Karsten; Fröschl, Günter

    2014-12-11

    In recent years, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have globally shown increasing impact on health status in populations with disproportionately higher rates in developing countries. NCDs are the leading cause of mortality worldwide and a serious public health threat to developing countries. Recognizing the importance and urgency of the issue, a one-day symposium was organized on NCDs in Developing Countries by the CIHLMU Center for International Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich on 22nd March 2014. The objective of the symposium was to understand the current situation of different NCDs public health programs and the current trends in NCDs research and policy, promote exchange of ideas, encourage scientific debate and foster networking, partnerships and opportunities among experts from different clinical, research, and policy fields. The symposium was attended by more than seventy participants representing scientists, physicians, academics and students from several institutes in Germany and abroad. Seven key note presentations were made at the symposium by experts from Germany, UK, France, Bangladesh and Vietnam. This paper highlights the presentations and discussions during the symposium on different aspects of NCDs in developing countries. The symposium elucidated the dynamics of NCDs in developing countries and invited the participants to learn about evidence-based practices and policies for prevention and management of major NCDs and to debate the way forward.

  10. Developing a Performance Assessment Framework and Indicators for Communicable Disease Management in Natural Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Javad; Ardalan, Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Goya, Mohammad Mehdi; Akbarisari, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Communicable disease management (CDM) is an important component of disaster public health response operations. However, there is a lack of any performance assessment (PA) framework and related indicators for the PA. This study aimed to develop a PA framework and indicators in CDM in disasters. In this study, a series of methods were used. First, a systematic literature review (SLR) was performed in order to extract the existing PA frameworks and indicators. Then, using a qualitative approach, some interviews with purposively selected experts were conducted and used in developing the PA framework and indicators. Finally, the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used for weighting of the developed indicators. The input, process, products, and outcomes (IPPO) framework was found to be an appropriate framework for CDM PA. Seven main functions were revealed to CDM during disasters. Forty PA indicators were developed for the four categories. There is a lack of any existing PA framework in CDM in disasters. Thus, in this study, a PA framework (IPPO framework) was developed for the PA of CDM in disasters through a series of methods. It can be an appropriate framework and its indicators could measure the performance of CDM in disasters.

  11. Non communicable disease and risky behaviour in an urban university community Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ige, O K; Owoaje, E T; Adebiyi, O A

    2013-03-01

    Most developing countries have only limited information on the burden of Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) even though rapid transitions in these NCDs have been predicted. To describe the burden of selected NCDs and associated risk behaviours in an urban university community in Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey of 525 representative staff of a University in a large city in Nigeria was conducted. In all, 27.6% were already diagnosed with at least one NCD (hypertension-21.5%, diabetes-11%, cancer 2.9%) while 67.4% reported at least one risk behaviour (unhealthy diet- 96%, sedentary living- 27.4% excessive alcohol use-5.1% and smoking- 1.9%). Multiple risk behaviours were observed in 29.9% with no significant variation by sex or age. Those 40 years and above had significantly higher prevalence of NCD, particularly for hypertension (p<0.05). Only 7%, considered themselves to be at risk of NCDs. Those whose parents had NCDs OR: 5.9 (2.4-14.5) and those who currently had NCDs OR: 3.9(1.8-8.1) perceived themselves at risk of one or more NCDs, but not those with multiple risk behaviours. The high burden of NCDs and risk behaviours in the face of limited self-perceived risk has been demonstrated and calls for urgent intervention.

  12. AWARENESS OF NON COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND THEIR RISK FACTORS AMONG RURAL SCHOOL CHILDREN

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    Siddharudha Shivalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Behavioral interventions for Non Communicable Diseases (NCD abeyance would profit the most, if initiated at an early age. Major risk factors of NCDs are changing life style and behavior pattern which are largely due to practices adopted in younger age. Students' awareness about NCDs and their risk factors is an important part of population based prevention strategy. Objective: To assess the awareness of NCDs and their risk factors among rural intermediate school children. Methodology: A School based cross sectional study was conducted in Chiraigaon Community Development Block of Varanasi from July - Aug 2010. Intermediate school children from eight inter-colleges of Chiraigaon development block were the study subjects. Pretested questionnaire was used in the study and frequency and proportions were used to analyze the data. Results: Less than one third of the children were aware about Diabetes and Hypertension (27% and 31% respectively. Only 18% knew about Body Mass Index (BMI as an indicator of obesity. In general awareness of NCDs was more in boys than girl. Conclusion: Over all awareness of NCDs and their risk factors among students was not satisfactory. There is a need and scope for health education activity regarding NCDs and their risk factors to promote healthy life style among these school children.

  13. Non-communicable diseases and HIV care and treatment: models of integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Malia; Ojikutu, Bisola; Andrian, Soa; Sohng, Elaine; Minior, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing cause of morbidity in low-income countries including in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Integration of NCD and HIV services can build upon experience with chronic care models from HIV programmes. We describe models of NCD and HIV integration, challenges and lessons learned. A literature review of published articles on integrated NCD and HIV programs in low-income countries and key informant interviews were conducted with leaders of identified integrated NCD and HIV programs. Information was synthesised to identify models of NCD and HIV service delivery integration. Three models of integration were identified as follows: NCD services integrated into centres originally providing HIV care; HIV care integrated into primary health care (PHC) already offering NCD services; and simultaneous introduction of integrated HIV and NCD services. Major challenges identified included NCD supply chain, human resources, referral systems, patient education, stigma, patient records and monitoring and evaluation. The range of HIV and NCD services varied widely within and across models. Regardless of model of integration, leveraging experience from HIV care models and adapting existing systems and tools is a feasible method to provide efficient care and treatment for the growing numbers of patients with NCDs. Operational research should be conducted to further study how successful models of HIV and NCD integration can be expanded in scope and scaled-up by managers and policymakers seeking to address all the chronic care needs of their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Community Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP, Characterization and Microbial Activity of Soil Amended with Dairy Sewage Sludge

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    Jerzy Lipiec

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to assess the influence of organic amendment applications compared to mineral fertilization on soil microbial activity and functional diversity. The field experiment was set up on a soil classified as an Eutric Cambisol developed from loess (South-East Poland. Two doses of both dairy sewage sludge (20 Mg·ha−1 and 26 Mg·ha−1 and of mineral fertilizers containing the same amount of nutrients were applied. The same soil without any amendment was used as a control. The soil under undisturbed native vegetation was also included in the study as a representative background sample. The functional diversity (catabolic potential was assessed using such indices as Average Well Color Development (AWCD, Richness (R and Shannon–Weaver index (H. These indices were calculated, following the community level physiological profiling (CLPP using Biolog Eco Plates. Soil dehydrogenase and respiratory activity were also evaluated. The indices were sensitive enough to reveal changes in community level physiological profiles due to treatment effects. It was shown that dairy sewage amended soil was characterized by greater AWCD, R, H and dehydrogenase and respiratory activity as compared to control or mineral fertilized soil. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and principal component analysis (PCA were used to depict the differences of the soil bacterial functional diversity between the treatments.

  15. Intention to use sport concussion guidelines among community-level coaches and sports trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Joshua D; White, Peta E; Ewing, Michael T; Makdissi, Michael; Davis, Gavin A; Donaldson, Alex; Sullivan, S John; Seward, Hugh; Finch, Caroline F

    2014-09-01

    Sporting bodies have developed guidelines for managing community-level players with suspected concussion in response to international consensus statements on concussion in sport. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that influence the intended use of concussion guidelines among community-level coaches and sports trainers from two popular football codes in Australia: Australian football and rugby league. Cross-sectional survey. The survey, based on an extended theory of planned behaviour model, was completed by 183 Australian football coaches, 121 Australian football sports trainers, 171 rugby league coaches, and 142 rugby league sports trainers. Personal norms and self-efficacy were significant predictors of intention to use concussion guidelines, although the relationship between self-efficacy and intention was stronger among Australian football coaches than rugby league coaches. Analysis of the salient beliefs that underpin self-efficacy found that coaches, irrespective of football code, felt less familiar (χ(2)=25.70, psports trainers in using the concussion guidelines. At the same time, Australian football personnel, irrespective of their team role, felt that they had insufficient time (χ(2)=8.04, psport concussion guidelines should focus on enhancing self-efficacy and leveraging personal norms. Increasing coaches' familiarity and experience in using the concussion guidelines would also be warranted, as would finding ways to overcome the perceived time and resource constraints identified among Australian football personnel. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Responses of community-level plant-insect interactions to climate warming in a meadow steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Zou, Xuehui; Wang, Deli; Wan, Shiqiang; Wang, Ling; Guo, Jixun

    2015-12-21

    Climate warming may disrupt trophic interactions, consequently influencing ecosystem functioning. Most studies have concentrated on the temperature-effects on plant-insect interactions at individual and population levels, with a particular emphasis on changes in phenology and distribution. Nevertheless, the available evidence from the community level is limited. A 3-year field manipulative experiment was performed to test potential responses of plant and insect communities, and plant-insect interactions, to elevated temperature in a meadow steppe. Warming increased the biomass of plant community and forbs, and decreased grass biomass, indicating a shift from grass-dominant to grass-forb mixed plant community. Reduced abundance of the insect community under warming, particularly the herbivorous insects, was attributed to lower abundance of Euchorthippus unicolor and a Cicadellidae species resulting from lower food availability and higher defensive herbivory. Lower herbivore abundance caused lower predator species richness because of reduced prey resources and contributed to an overall decrease in insect species richness. Interestingly, warming enhanced the positive relationship between insect and plant species richness, implying that the strength of the plant-insect interactions was altered by warming. Our results suggest that alterations to plant-insect interactions at a community level under climate warming in grasslands may be more important and complex than previously thought.

  17. Community-Level HIV Risk Behaviors and HIV Prevalence among Women and Men in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speizer, Ilene S.; Gómez, Anu Manchikanti; Stewart, James; Voss, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Most studies on HIV risk in sub-Saharan Africa focus on individual-level socio-demographic and behavioral correlates of risk. Only recently have researchers and programmers considered the context within which individuals live. This study uses the 2005–6 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey to examine the correlation between the prevalence of HIV at the community level and the prevalence of HIV risk-taking behaviors. Results show that women and men living in communities with higher HIV prevalence in the opposite sex are at increased risk of HIV. In addition, rural women and men living in communities with greater premarital and non-marital sex are at greater risk of HIV. Finally, HIV prevalence is higher among women and men living in urban areas with higher intimate partner violence. Programs should address community-level social norms that make high-risk behaviors acceptable and thus increase all women and men’s risk of HIV, not just those engaged in high-risk behaviors. PMID:22010807

  18. Individual Versus Community-Level Risk Compensation Following Preexposure Prophylaxis of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Martin; Murphy, Dean A

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed the concept of risk compensation and how it has been applied in HIV prevention, paying particular attention to the strategy of HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). In risk compensation, reduced perceptions of risk after the introduction of a preventative intervention lead to more frequent risk-taking behavior. Such a change may undermine the intervention's protective benefits. We found that many studies purporting to investigate risk compensation do not assess or report changes in perceptions of risk, instead relying on behavioral measures. Our analysis suggests a complex and sometimes counterintuitive relationship between the introduction of a new prevention intervention, perceptions of HIV risk, and subsequent changes in behavior. As PrEP is introduced, we believe comprehensive assessment of community-level risk compensation-that is, changes in risk perceptions and behavior as a result of increased optimism about avoiding HIV among people not directly protected by PrEP-should not be omitted. We therefore suggest ways to assess prevention optimism and community-level risk compensation.

  19. Responses of community-level plant-insect interactions to climate warming in a meadow steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Zou, Xuehui; Wang, Deli; Wan, Shiqiang; Wang, Ling; Guo, Jixun

    2015-01-01

    Climate warming may disrupt trophic interactions, consequently influencing ecosystem functioning. Most studies have concentrated on the temperature-effects on plant-insect interactions at individual and population levels, with a particular emphasis on changes in phenology and distribution. Nevertheless, the available evidence from the community level is limited. A 3-year field manipulative experiment was performed to test potential responses of plant and insect communities, and plant-insect interactions, to elevated temperature in a meadow steppe. Warming increased the biomass of plant community and forbs, and decreased grass biomass, indicating a shift from grass-dominant to grass-forb mixed plant community. Reduced abundance of the insect community under warming, particularly the herbivorous insects, was attributed to lower abundance of Euchorthippus unicolor and a Cicadellidae species resulting from lower food availability and higher defensive herbivory. Lower herbivore abundance caused lower predator species richness because of reduced prey resources and contributed to an overall decrease in insect species richness. Interestingly, warming enhanced the positive relationship between insect and plant species richness, implying that the strength of the plant-insect interactions was altered by warming. Our results suggest that alterations to plant-insect interactions at a community level under climate warming in grasslands may be more important and complex than previously thought. PMID:26686758

  20. Responding to non-communicable diseases in Zambia: a policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukanu, Mulenga M; Zulu, Joseph Mumba; Mweemba, Chrispin; Mutale, Wilbroad

    2017-04-24

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are an emerging global health concern. Reports have shown that, in Zambia, NCDs are also an emerging problem and the government has begun initiating a policy response. The present study explores the policy response to NCDs by the Ministry of Health in Zambia using the policy triangle framework of Walt and Gilson. A qualitative approach was used for the study. Data collected through key informant interviews with stakeholders who were involved in the NCD health policy development process as well as review of key planning and policy documents were analysed using thematic analysis. The government's policy response was as a result of international strategies from WHO, evidence of increasing disease burden from NCDs and pressure from interest groups. The government developed the NCD strategic plan based on the WHO Global Action Plan for NCDs 2013-2030. Development of the NCD strategic plan was driven by the government through the Ministry of Health, who set the agenda and adopted the final document. Stakeholders participated in the fine tuning of the draft document from the Ministry of Health. The policy development process was lengthy and this affected consistency in composition of the stakeholders and policy development momentum. Lack of representative research evidence for some prioritised NCDs and use of generic targets and indicators resulted in the NCD strategic plan being inadequate for the Zambian context. The interventions in the strategic plan also underutilised the potential of preventing NCDs through health education. Recent government pronouncements were also seen to be conflicting the risk factor reduction strategies outlined in the NCD strategic plan. The content of the NCD strategic plan inadequately covered all the major NCDs in Zambia. Although contextual factors like international strategies and commitments are crucial catalysts to policy development, there is need for domestication of international guidelines and

  1. ASSESSMENT OF LIFESTYLE-RELATED RISK FACTORS CONTRIBUTING FOR CHRONIC NON COMMUNICABLE DISEASE IN PATIENTS VISITING RURAL TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Dahal Prasanna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Non-communicable diseases remain an area of high public health concern especially in developing countries where growing middle class and ever changing lifestyle have led to the rapid increase in the burden of non-communicable disease. The study aimed to assess various lifestyle and behavioral risk factors contributing for non-communicable chronic disease in patients visiting rural tertiary care hospital. A total of 152 patients were selected and analyzed in the study out of which 49 (32.22% were female and 102 (67.78% were male. The average age of the male patients were found to be 61.79years (SD±9.28 and females were 57.1years (SD±10.3. Majority of patients were from lower socioeconomic and educational status. Various risk factors contributing for chronic non-communicable disease that are identified in the study were advance age i.e. > 40years 142 (93.42%, genetically risk factor 46 (30.26%, poor income status 120 (78.95%, occupational exposure to dust, smoke and irritants 111 (73.03%, high body mass index (BMI75 (49.34%, stress 110 (72.37%, inadequate sleep 5 (3.29%, smoking habit 69 (45.4%, Alcohol consuming habit 63 (41.48%, lack of physical activity 59 (38.81%, rare fruit consuming habit 72 (47.37% and less vegetable consumption i.e. ≤ 1/day were 32 (21.05%. Study concluded that substantially high levels of the various lifestyle and behavioral related risk factors such as poor socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol consumption, high BMI or obesity, stress etc, were significantly associated in patients with chronic disease.

  2. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Chronic Non-communicable Diseases Using WHO Steps Approach in an Adult Population in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ankur; Anand, Tanu; Sharma, Urvi; Kishore, Jugal; Chakraborty, Mantosh; Ray, Prakash Chandra; Ingle, Gopal Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing worldwide largely due to prevalence of various risk factors, which can be controlled. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to measure the prevalence of major preventable risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases in an urban resettlement colony of Delhi, using STEPS approach. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study, that included a random sample of 200 adults, was conducted. A study tool based on the WHO STEPS questionnaire for assessing non-communicable diseases and their risk factors was used. Fasting venous blood sample was collected to assess the lipid profile and fasting blood sugar. Anthropometric measurements of the participants were also taken. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: Out of the 200 participants, 26% (n = 52) were consuming alcohol and 17% (n = 34) were smoking. Majority (77.5%) had a raised waist circumference, and more than two-thirds were either overweight or obese. Fasting blood sugar levels were found to be raised in 18% of the study population. More than third participants had raised systolic and diastolic blood pressures and abnormal lipid profiles. More males were found to be overweight in comparison to females (P < 0.01), but in contrast, obesity (P < 0.05) and raised waist circumference (P < 0.001) were more common in females. Tobacco use was more common in lower class (P < 0.05), whereas obesity was commoner in the upper socio-economic class (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Study showed a high burden of risk factors for NCDs in the study population, pointing towards changing disease epidemiology of non-communicable diseases in India. PMID:25161966

  3. Public health impact of global heating due to climate change: potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Butler, Ainslie J; Lucas, Robyn M; Bonita, Ruth

    2010-04-01

    Several categories of ill health important at the global level are likely to be affected by climate change. To date the focus of this association has been on communicable diseases and injuries. This paper briefly analyzes potential impacts of global climate change on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We reviewed the limited available evidence of the relationships between climate exposure and chronic and NCDs. We further reviewed likely mechanisms and pathways for climatic influences on chronic disease occurrence and impacts on pre-existing chronic diseases. There are negative impacts of climatic factors and climate change on some physiological functions and on cardio-vascular and kidney diseases. Chronic disease risks are likely to increase with climate change and related increase in air pollution, malnutrition, and extreme weather events. There are substantial research gaps in this arena. The health sector has a major role in facilitating further research and monitoring the health impacts of global climate change. Such work will also contribute to global efforts for the prevention and control of chronic NCDs in our ageing and urbanizing global population.

  4. Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review

    OpenAIRE

    I J Emodi; Ikefuna, A. N.; F A Ujunwa; Chinawa, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-communicable diseases are increasing worldwide due to rapidly changing lifestyles and socio-economic status. It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. Objective: To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu. Materials and Methods: A review of admissions into the Paediatrics ward of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, between January 1999 and Dece...

  5. Innovations in non-communicable diseases management in ASEAN: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Lim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and present an unprecedented challenge to economic and social development globally. In Southeast Asia, the challenges are exacerbated by vastly differing levels of health systems development and funding availability. In addressing the burden of NCDs, ASEAN nations need to fundamentally re-examine how health care services are structured and delivered and discover new models as undiscerning application of models from other geographies with different cultures and resources will be problematic. Objective: We sought to examine cases of innovation and identify critical success factors in NCD management in ASEAN. Design: A qualitative design, focusing on in-depth interviews and site visits to explore the meanings and perceptions of participants regarding innovations in NCD against the backdrop of the overall context of delivering health care within the country's context was adopted. Results: In total 12 case studies in six ASEAN countries were analysed. Primary interventions accounted for five of the total cases, whereas secondary interventions comprised four, and tertiary interventions three. Five core themes contributing to successful innovation for NCD management were identified. They include: 1 encourage better outcomes through leadership and support, 2 strengthen inter-disciplinary partnership, 3 community ownership is key, 4 recognise the needs of the people and what appeals to them, and 5 raise awareness through capacity building and increasing health literacy. Conclusions: Innovation is vital in enabling ASEAN nations to successfully address the growing crisis of NCDs. More of the same or wholesale transfers of developed world models will be ineffective and lead to financially unsustainable programmes or programmes lacking appropriate human capital. The case studies have demonstrated the transformative impact of innovation and identified key factors in

  6. The role of law and governance reform in the global response to non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Roger S; Patterson, David

    2014-06-05

    Addressing non-communicable diseases ("NCDs") and their risk-factors is one of the most powerful ways of improving longevity and healthy life expectancy for the foreseeable future - especially in low- and middle-income countries. This paper reviews the role of law and governance reform in that process. We highlight the need for a comprehensive approach that is grounded in the right to health and addresses three aspects: preventing NCDs and their risk factors, improving access to NCD treatments, and addressing the social impacts of illness. We highlight some of the major impediments to the passage and implementation of laws for the prevention and control of NCDs, and identify important practical steps that governments can take as they consider legal and governance reforms at country level.We review the emerging global architecture for NCDs, and emphasise the need for governance structures to harness the energy of civil society organisations and to create a global movement that influences the policy agenda at the country level. We also argue that the global monitoring framework would be more effective if it included key legal and policy indicators. The paper identifies priorities for technical legal assistance in implementing the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020. These include high-quality legal resources to assist countries to evaluate reform options, investment in legal capacity building, and global leadership to respond to the likely increase in requests by countries for technical legal assistance. We urge development agencies and other funders to recognise the need for development assistance in these areas. Throughout the paper, we point to global experience in dealing with HIV and draw out some relevant lessons for NCDs.

  7. Tobacco use: A major risk factor for non communicable diseases in South-East Asia region

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    J S Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is a serious public health problem in the South East Asia Region where use of both smoking and smokeless form of tobacco is widely prevalent. The region has almost one quarter of the global population and about one quarter of all smokers in the world. Smoking among men is high in the Region and women usually take to chewing tobacco. The prevalence across countries varies significantly with smoking among adult men ranges from 24.3% (India to 63.1% (Indonesia and among adult women from 0.4% (Sri Lanka to 15% (Myanmar and Nepal. The prevalence of smokeless tobacco use among men varies from 1.3% (Thailand to 31.8% (Myanmar, while for women it is from 4.6% (Nepal to 27.9% (Bangladesh. About 55% of total deaths are due to Non communicable diseases (NCDs with 53.4% among females with highest in Maldives (79.4% and low in Timor-Leste (34.4%. Premature mortality due to NCDs in young age is high in the region with 60.7% deaths in Timor Leste and 60.6% deaths in Bangladesh occurring below the age of 70 years. Age standardized death rate per 100,000 populations due to NCDs ranges from 793 (Bhutan and 612 (Maldives among males and 654 (Bhutan and 461 (Sri Lanka among females respectively. Out of 5.1 millions tobacco attributable deaths in the world, more than 1 million are in South East Asia Region (SEAR countries. Reducing tobacco use is one of the best buys along with harmful use of alcohol, salt reduction and promotion of physical activity for preventing NCDs. Integrating tobacco control with broader population services in the health system framework is crucial to achieve control of NCDs and sustain development in SEAR countries.

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIAGNOSTICS AND ALIMENTARY PREVENTION SYSTEM OF NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

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    A. V. Pogozheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Violation of dietary intake structure leads to changes in nutritional status. This contributes to the development of non-communicable diseases, which account for more than half of causes of death inRussia. Materials and methods: In a consultative and diagnostic center "Healthy Nutrition" of theInstituteofNutritionthe nutritional status of 3580 patients (mean age 48.4±0.3  years has been examined, including genomic and post-translational analysis. 30.0% of patients were overweight and 34.1% were obese.Results: Analysis of actual dietary intake showed an increase in energy intake due to excess intake of total (44.2%  energy and saturated fat (13.6%. Serum biochemistry analyses revealed increased cholesterol levels in 68.7%  of patients, increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in 63.9%, increased triglycerides in 22.5%, and increased blood glucose in 29.4%. The frequencies of risk alleles of genes associated with development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus were as follows: 47.8% for the polymorphism rs9939609 (FTO gene, 8.3% for the polymorphism rs4994 (gene ADRB3, 60.2% for the polymorphism rs659366 (gene UCP2, 36.6% for the rs5219  polymorphism in the gene of ATPdependent potassium channel.Conclusion: These results can be used for development of a personalized diet based on assessment of a patient's nutritional status. 

  9. Impact of school policies on non-communicable disease risk factors - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankur; Bassi, Shalini; Nazar, Gaurang P; Saluja, Kiran; Park, MinHae; Kinra, Sanjay; Arora, Monika

    2017-04-04

    Globally, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are identified as one of the leading causes of mortality. NCDs have several modifiable risk factors including unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and alcohol abuse. Schools provide ideal settings for health promotion, but the effectiveness of school policies in the reduction of risk factors for NCD is not clear. This study reviewed the literature on the impact of school policies on major NCD risk factors. A systematic review was conducted to identify, collate and synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of school policies on reduction of NCD risk factors. A search strategy was developed to identify the relevant studies on effectiveness of NCD policies in schools for children between the age of 6 to 18 years in Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Data extraction was conducted using pre-piloted forms. Studies included in the review were assessed for methodological quality using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) quality assessment tool. A narrative synthesis according to the types of outcomes was conducted to present the evidence on the effectiveness of school policies. Overall, 27 out of 2633 identified studies were included in the review. School policies were comparatively more effective in reducing unhealthy diet, tobacco use, physical inactivity and inflammatory biomarkers as opposed to anthropometric measures, overweight/obesity, and alcohol use. In total, for 103 outcomes independently evaluated within these studies, 48 outcomes (46%) had significant desirable changes when exposed to the school policies. Based on the quality assessment, 18 studies were categorized as weak, six as moderate and three as having strong methodological quality. Mixed findings were observed concerning effectiveness of school policies in reducing NCD risk factors. The findings demonstrate that schools can be a good setting for initiating positive changes in reducing NCD risk factors, but more research is

  10. Horizontal inequity in public health care service utilization for non-communicable diseases in urban Vietnam

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    Vu Duy Kien

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A health system that provides equitable health care is a principal goal in many countries. Measuring horizontal inequity (HI in health care utilization is important to develop appropriate and equitable public policies, especially policies related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs. Design: A cross-sectional survey of 1,211 randomly selected households in slum and non-slum areas was carried out in four urban districts of Hanoi city in 2013. This study utilized data from 3,736 individuals aged 15 years and older. Respondents were asked about health care use during the previous 12 months; information included sex, age, and self-reported NCDs. We assessed the extent of inequity in utilization of public health care services. Concentration indexes for health care utilization and health care needs were constructed via probit regression of individual utilization of public health care services, controlling for age, sex, and NCDs. In addition, concentration indexes were decomposed to identify factors contributing to inequalities in health care utilization. Results: The proportion of healthcare utilization in the slum and non-slum areas was 21.4 and 26.9%, respectively. HI in health care utilization in favor of the rich was observed in the slum areas, whereas horizontal equity was achieved among the non-slum areas. In the slum areas, we identified some key factors that affect the utilization of public health care services. Conclusion: Our results suggest that to achieve horizontal equity in utilization of public health care services, policy should target preventive interventions for NCDs, focusing more on the poor in slum areas.

  11. Perspectives on healthcare, chronic non-communicable disease, and healthworlds in an urban and rural setting.

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    Ibanez-Gonzalez, Daniel Lopes

    2014-12-01

    Background Amidst diverging discourses describing chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) and healthcare access, the hermeneutical tradition within sociology, particularly as exemplified in the work of Jurgen Habermas, provides a starting point for exploring and interpreting the experiences of chronic illness and healthcare access. In this study, we aimed to understand how women living with NCDs experience their illness and access healthcare in an urban and rural context. Methods This study was a mixed-methods comparative case study of the healthcare access experiences of women with NCDs in an urban and rural area in South Africa. The core of the study methodology was a comparative qualitative case study, with quantitative methods serving to contextualise the findings. Results The cross-sectional survey describes a low resource population with a high prevalence of NCDs. Slightly over half the respondents in urban Soweto (50.7%) reported having at least one NCD. Only around a third (33.3%) of these participants reported accessing formal healthcare services in the past 6 months. Similar trends were found in the review of research carried out in rural Agincourt. The qualitative case study in Soweto is characterised by a preoccupation with how medicine from the clinic interacts with the body. The Agincourt qualitative case study highlights the importance of church membership, particularly of African Christian Churches, as the strongest factor motivating against the open use of traditional medicine. Discussion A consideration of the findings suggests five broad themes for further research: 1) processes of constructing body narratives; 2) encounters with purposive-rational systems; 3) encounters with traditional medicine; 4) encounters with contemporary informal medicine; and 5) religion and healthcare. These five themes constitute the beginning of a comprehensive schema of the lifeworld/healthworld.

  12. Innovations in non-communicable diseases management in ASEAN: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Melissa M H; Alsagoff, Fatimah Z; Ha, Duc

    2014-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and present an unprecedented challenge to economic and social development globally. In Southeast Asia, the challenges are exacerbated by vastly differing levels of health systems development and funding availability. In addressing the burden of NCDs, ASEAN nations need to fundamentally re-examine how health care services are structured and delivered and discover new models as undiscerning application of models from other geographies with different cultures and resources will be problematic. We sought to examine cases of innovation and identify critical success factors in NCD management in ASEAN. A qualitative design, focusing on in-depth interviews and site visits to explore the meanings and perceptions of participants regarding innovations in NCD against the backdrop of the overall context of delivering health care within the country's context was adopted. In total 12 case studies in six ASEAN countries were analysed. Primary interventions accounted for five of the total cases, whereas secondary interventions comprised four, and tertiary interventions three. Five core themes contributing to successful innovation for NCD management were identified. They include: 1) encourage better outcomes through leadership and support, 2) strengthen inter-disciplinary partnership, 3) community ownership is key, 4) recognise the needs of the people and what appeals to them, and 5) raise awareness through capacity building and increasing health literacy. Innovation is vital in enabling ASEAN nations to successfully address the growing crisis of NCDs. More of the same or wholesale transfers of developed world models will be ineffective and lead to financially unsustainable programmes or programmes lacking appropriate human capital. The case studies have demonstrated the transformative impact of innovation and identified key factors in successful implementation. Beyond pilot success, the bigger challenge is

  13. Legal priorities for prevention of non-communicable diseases: innovations from WHO's Eastern Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostin, L O; Abou-Taleb, H; Roache, S A; Alwan, A

    2017-03-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of death globally and in the World Health Organization's (WHO) Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR). This paper reports on a research collaboration between the WHO's Eastern Mediterranean Office (EMRO) and the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University that aims to identify (1) regionally relevant, cost-effective and affordable legal interventions to prevent NCDs, and (2) methods to strengthen implementation and enforcement. Comparative analysis of >200 international, regional and domestic interventions addressing key NCD risk factors, including tobacco, alcohol, diet and physical inactivity. Researchers searched legal and policy databases including the WHO Nutrition, Obesity and Physical Activity Database and drew upon academic commentary and 'grey' literature. Measures included evidence of impact; evidence of cost-effectiveness; and monitoring and enforcement mechanisms. Researchers identified many examples of legal interventions effectively reducing NCD risk factors. Key enabling factors for effective NCD-related laws include regulatory capacity; governance mechanisms promoting multisectoral collaboration and accountability; and tailoring interventions to local legal, economic and social contexts. In the EMR, and globally, law can be a cost-effective and affordable means of curbing underlying drivers of the NCD pandemic, such as rampant junk food marketing. Building upon this research, together with international and regional experts, EMRO has identified 10 priority interventions in the areas of tobacco control, unhealthy diets and NCD governance. The EMRO/O'Neill Institute partnership will develop guidance tools and capacity building initiatives to support Member States to harness the power of law to achieve population health improvements. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Innovations in non-communicable diseases management in ASEAN: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Melissa M. H.; Alsagoff, Fatimah Z.; Ha, Duc

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and present an unprecedented challenge to economic and social development globally. In Southeast Asia, the challenges are exacerbated by vastly differing levels of health systems development and funding availability. In addressing the burden of NCDs, ASEAN nations need to fundamentally re-examine how health care services are structured and delivered and discover new models as undiscerning application of models from other geographies with different cultures and resources will be problematic. Objective We sought to examine cases of innovation and identify critical success factors in NCD management in ASEAN. Design A qualitative design, focusing on in-depth interviews and site visits to explore the meanings and perceptions of participants regarding innovations in NCD against the backdrop of the overall context of delivering health care within the country's context was adopted. Results In total 12 case studies in six ASEAN countries were analysed. Primary interventions accounted for five of the total cases, whereas secondary interventions comprised four, and tertiary interventions three. Five core themes contributing to successful innovation for NCD management were identified. They include: 1) encourage better outcomes through leadership and support, 2) strengthen inter-disciplinary partnership, 3) community ownership is key, 4) recognise the needs of the people and what appeals to them, and 5) raise awareness through capacity building and increasing health literacy. Conclusions Innovation is vital in enabling ASEAN nations to successfully address the growing crisis of NCDs. More of the same or wholesale transfers of developed world models will be ineffective and lead to financially unsustainable programmes or programmes lacking appropriate human capital. The case studies have demonstrated the transformative impact of innovation and identified key factors in successful

  15. Profile of Non-communicable Disease Risk Factors Among Young People in Palau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chifa; Singeo, Singeru Travis; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Honjo, Kaori; Mita, Takashi; Ikerdeu, Edolem; Cui, Renzhe; Li, Yuanying; Watson, Berry Moon; Ngirmang, Gregorio; Iso, Hiroyasu; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    Although non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become the predominant health problems of Palauan society, there have been no comprehensive data on NCD risk factors available to develop effective control strategies. Therefore, the first Palauan national STEPwise approach to risk factor Surveillance (STEPS) was completed in mid-2013 to provide information on its adult population aged 25 to 64 years. This study aims to obtain corresponding data from the younger adults aged 18 to 24 years, who remained to be surveyed. We conducted an epidemiological study, targeting the 18- to 24-year-old age group. A survey station and a mobile team were established to recruit voluntary participants dwelling in Koror. A slightly modified WHO STEPS instrument was used, including a structured questionnaire for behavioral risk factors, physical measurements, and blood tests. A total of 356 young people were recruited during the survey. In both sexes, nearly half of the participants were overweight/obese. The prevalence of hypertension was higher in men than in women (17.6% vs 1.7%). Raised blood glucose and impaired fasting glucose were observed in 3.5% and 5.2% of the total participants, respectively. About 36% of the subjects were observed to have raised levels of total cholesterol. More than 70% of the young people were current tobacco users, in terms of all kinds of tobacco products. The current survey, for the first time, revealed a high prevalence of NCD risk factors, especially overweight/obesity and tobacco use, among young people in Palau. This indicates that swift measures against NCDs are required even in this young age group.

  16. The WISHED Trial: implementation of an interactive health communication application for patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Andrea; Walsh, Michael; Jain, Arsh K; Bosch, Eric; Moreau, Cathy; Garland, Jocelyn; Brimble, K Scott

    2016-01-01

    Despite many advantages over facility-based therapies, less than 25 % of prevalent dialysis patients in Ontario are on a home therapy. Interactive health communication applications, web-based packages for patients, have been shown to have a beneficial effect on knowledge, social support, self-efficacy, and behavioral and clinical outcomes but have not been evaluated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Web-based tools designed for patients with CKD exist but to our knowledge have not been assessed in their ability to influence dialysis modality decision-making. To determine if a web-based tool increases utilization of a home-based therapy in patients with CKD starting dialysis. This is a multi-centered randomized controlled study. Participants will be recruited from sites in Canada. Two hundred and sixty-four consenting patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 20 ml/min/1.73 m(2) who have received modality education will be enrolled in the study. The primary outcome will be the proportion of participants who are on dialysis using a home-based therapy within 3 months of dialysis initiation. Secondary outcomes will include the proportion of patients intending to perform a home-based modality and measures of dialysis knowledge, decision conflict, and social support. The between-group differences in frequencies will be expressed as either absolute risk differences and/or by calculating the odds ratio and its associated 95 % confidence interval. This study will assess whether access to a website dedicated to supporting and promoting home-based dialysis therapies will increase the proportion of patients with CKD who initiate a home-based dialysis therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01403454, registration date: July 21, 2011.

  17. Perspectives on healthcare, chronic non-communicable disease, and healthworlds in an urban and rural setting

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    Daniel Lopes Ibanez-Gonzalez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amidst diverging discourses describing chronic non-communicable disease (NCD and healthcare access, the hermeneutical tradition within sociology, particularly as exemplified in the work of Jurgen Habermas, provides a starting point for exploring and interpreting the experiences of chronic illness and healthcare access. In this study, we aimed to understand how women living with NCDs experience their illness and access healthcare in an urban and rural context. Methods: This study was a mixed-methods comparative case study of the healthcare access experiences of women with NCDs in an urban and rural area in South Africa. The core of the study methodology was a comparative qualitative case study, with quantitative methods serving to contextualise the findings. Results: The cross-sectional survey describes a low resource population with a high prevalence of NCDs. Slightly over half the respondents in urban Soweto (50.7% reported having at least one NCD. Only around a third (33.3% of these participants reported accessing formal healthcare services in the past 6 months. Similar trends were found in the review of research carried out in rural Agincourt. The qualitative case study in Soweto is characterised by a preoccupation with how medicine from the clinic interacts with the body. The Agincourt qualitative case study highlights the importance of church membership, particularly of African Christian Churches, as the strongest factor motivating against the open use of traditional medicine. Discussion: A consideration of the findings suggests five broad themes for further research: 1 processes of constructing body narratives; 2 encounters with purposive–rational systems; 3 encounters with traditional medicine; 4 encounters with contemporary informal medicine; and 5 religion and healthcare. These five themes constitute the beginning of a comprehensive schema of the lifeworld/healthworld.

  18. Who will deliver comprehensive healthy lifestyle interventions to combat non-communicable disease? Introducing the healthy lifestyle practitioner discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Hivert, Marie-France; Williams, Mark A; Briggs, Paige D; Guazzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Unhealthy lifestyle characteristics (i.e., physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor diet, and smoking) as well as associated poor health metrics (i.e., dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) are the primary reasons for the current non-communicable disease crisis. Compared to those with the poorest of lifestyles and associated health metrics, any movement toward improving lifestyle and associated health metrics improves health outcomes. To address the non-communicable disease crisis we must: 1) acknowledge that healthy lifestyle (HL) interventions are a potent medicine; and 2) move toward a healthcare system that embraces primordial as much as, if not more than, secondary prevention with a heavy focus on HL medicine. This article introduces the Healthy Lifestyle Practitioner, focused on training health professionals to deliver HL medicine.

  19. Food pricing strategies, population diets, and non-communicable disease: a systematic review of simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Helen; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Nghiem, Nhung; Blakely, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Food pricing strategies have been proposed to encourage healthy eating habits, which may in turn help stem global increases in non-communicable diseases. This systematic review of simulation studies investigates the estimated association between food pricing strategies and changes in food purchases or intakes (consumption) (objective 1); Health and disease outcomes (objective 2), and whether there are any differences in these outcomes by socio-economic group (objective 3). Electronic databases, Internet search engines, and bibliographies of included studies were searched for articles published in English between 1 January 1990 and 24 October 2011 for countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Where ≥ 3 studies examined the same pricing strategy and consumption (purchases or intake) or health outcome, results were pooled, and a mean own-price elasticity (own-PE) estimated (the own-PE represents the change in demand with a 1% change in price of that good). Objective 1: pooled estimates were possible for the following: (1) taxes on carbonated soft drinks: own-PE (n  =  4 studies), -0.93 (range, -0.06, -2.43), and a modelled -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04%) reduction in energy (calorie) intake for each 1% price increase (n  =  3 studies); (2) taxes on saturated fat: -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04%) reduction in energy intake from saturated fat per 1% price increase (n  =  5 studies); and (3) subsidies on fruits and vegetables: own-PE (n = 3 studies), -0.35 (-0.21, -0.77). Objectives 2 and 3: variability of food pricing strategies and outcomes prevented pooled analyses, although higher quality studies suggested unintended compensatory purchasing that could result in overall effects being counter to health. Eleven of 14 studies evaluating lower socio-economic groups estimated that food pricing strategies would be associated with pro-health outcomes. Food pricing strategies also have the potential to reduce disparities. Based on modelling

  20. Food pricing strategies, population diets, and non-communicable disease: a systematic review of simulation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Eyles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food pricing strategies have been proposed to encourage healthy eating habits, which may in turn help stem global increases in non-communicable diseases. This systematic review of simulation studies investigates the estimated association between food pricing strategies and changes in food purchases or intakes (consumption (objective 1; Health and disease outcomes (objective 2, and whether there are any differences in these outcomes by socio-economic group (objective 3. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Electronic databases, Internet search engines, and bibliographies of included studies were searched for articles published in English between 1 January 1990 and 24 October 2011 for countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Where ≥ 3 studies examined the same pricing strategy and consumption (purchases or intake or health outcome, results were pooled, and a mean own-price elasticity (own-PE estimated (the own-PE represents the change in demand with a 1% change in price of that good. Objective 1: pooled estimates were possible for the following: (1 taxes on carbonated soft drinks: own-PE (n  =  4 studies, -0.93 (range, -0.06, -2.43, and a modelled -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04% reduction in energy (calorie intake for each 1% price increase (n  =  3 studies; (2 taxes on saturated fat: -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04% reduction in energy intake from saturated fat per 1% price increase (n  =  5 studies; and (3 subsidies on fruits and vegetables: own-PE (n = 3 studies, -0.35 (-0.21, -0.77. Objectives 2 and 3: variability of food pricing strategies and outcomes prevented pooled analyses, although higher quality studies suggested unintended compensatory purchasing that could result in overall effects being counter to health. Eleven of 14 studies evaluating lower socio-economic groups estimated that food pricing strategies would be associated with pro-health outcomes. Food pricing strategies also have the potential to reduce

  1. Food Pricing Strategies, Population Diets, and Non-Communicable Disease: A Systematic Review of Simulation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Helen; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Nghiem, Nhung; Blakely, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Food pricing strategies have been proposed to encourage healthy eating habits, which may in turn help stem global increases in non-communicable diseases. This systematic review of simulation studies investigates the estimated association between food pricing strategies and changes in food purchases or intakes (consumption) (objective 1); Health and disease outcomes (objective 2), and whether there are any differences in these outcomes by socio-economic group (objective 3). Methods and Findings Electronic databases, Internet search engines, and bibliographies of included studies were searched for articles published in English between 1 January 1990 and 24 October 2011 for countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Where ≥3 studies examined the same pricing strategy and consumption (purchases or intake) or health outcome, results were pooled, and a mean own-price elasticity (own-PE) estimated (the own-PE represents the change in demand with a 1% change in price of that good). Objective 1: pooled estimates were possible for the following: (1) taxes on carbonated soft drinks: own-PE (n = 4 studies), −0.93 (range, −0.06, −2.43), and a modelled −0.02% (−0.01%, −0.04%) reduction in energy (calorie) intake for each 1% price increase (n = 3 studies); (2) taxes on saturated fat: −0.02% (−0.01%, −0.04%) reduction in energy intake from saturated fat per 1% price increase (n = 5 studies); and (3) subsidies on fruits and vegetables: own-PE (n = 3 studies), −0.35 (−0.21, −0.77). Objectives 2 and 3: variability of food pricing strategies and outcomes prevented pooled analyses, although higher quality studies suggested unintended compensatory purchasing that could result in overall effects being counter to health. Eleven of 14 studies evaluating lower socio-economic groups estimated that food pricing strategies would be associated with pro-health outcomes. Food pricing strategies also have the

  2. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on households and impoverishment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Loes; Colpani, Veronica; Chaker, Layal; van der Lee, Sven J; Muka, Taulant; Imo, David; Mendis, Shanthi; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Bramer, Wichor M; Falla, Abby; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-03-01

    The global economic impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on household expenditures and poverty indicators remains less well understood. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature evaluating the global economic impact of six NCDs [including coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)] on households and impoverishment. Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception to November 6th 2014. To identify additional publications, reference lists of retrieved studies were searched. Randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohorts, case-control, cross-sectional, modeling and ecological studies carried out in adults and assessing the economic consequences of NCDs on households and impoverishment. No language restrictions. All abstract and full text selection was done by two independent reviewers. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers and checked by a third independent reviewer. Studies were included evaluating the impact of at least one of the selected NCDs and on at least one of the following measures: expenditure on medication, transport, co-morbidities, out-of-pocket (OOP) payments or other indirect costs; impoverishment, poverty line and catastrophic spending; household or individual financial cost. From 3,241 references, 64 studies met the inclusion criteria, 75% of which originated from the Americas and Western Pacific WHO region. Breast cancer and DM were the most studied NCDs (42 in total); CKD and COPD were the least represented (five and three studies respectively). OOP payments and financial catastrophe, mostly defined as OOP exceeding a certain proportion of household income, were the most studied outcomes. OOP expenditure as a proportion of family income, ranged between 2 and 158% across the different NCDs and countries. Financial catastrophe due to

  3. Genotype vs. Phenotype and the Rise of Non-Communicable Diseases: The Importance of Lifestyle Behaviors During Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Brian W.; Skidmore, Paula M; Orta, Olivia R; Faulkner, James; Lambrick, Danielle; Signal, Leigh; Williams, Michelle A.; Stoner, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Despite continued research and growing public awareness, the incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCD) continues to accelerate. While a person may have a genetic predisposition to certain NCDs, the rapidly changing epidemiology of NCDs points to the importance of environmental, social, and behavioural determinants of health. Specifically, three lifestyle behaviours expose children to important environmental cues and stressors: physical activity, nutritional intake, and sleep behaviour. Fai...

  4. The role and importance of economic evaluation of traditional herbal medicine use for chronic non-communicable diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes GD; Aboyade OM; Hill JD; Rasu RS

    2015-01-01

    Gail D Hughes,1 Oluwaseyi M Aboyade,1 John D Hill,2 Rafia S Rasu3 1South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Western Cape, South Africa; 2Department of Pharmacy, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCD) constitute major public health problems globally, with an impact on morbidity and mortality ranking high and second to HIV/AIDS. Existing studies conduct...

  5. The impact of economic crises on communicable disease transmission and control: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Suhrcke

    Full Text Available There is concern among public health professionals that the current economic downturn, initiated by the financial crisis that started in 2007, could precipitate the transmission of infectious diseases while also limiting capacity for control. Although studies have reviewed the potential effects of economic downturns on overall health, to our knowledge such an analysis has yet to be done focusing on infectious diseases. We performed a systematic literature review of studies examining changes in infectious disease burden subsequent to periods of crisis. The review identified 230 studies of which 37 met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 30 found evidence of worse infectious disease outcomes during recession, often resulting from higher rates of infectious contact under poorer living circumstances, worsened access to therapy, or poorer retention in treatment. The remaining studies found either reductions in infectious disease or no significant effect. Using the paradigm of the "SIR" (susceptible-infected-recovered model of infectious disease transmission, we examined the implications of these findings for infectious disease transmission and control. Key susceptible groups include infants and the elderly. We identified certain high-risk groups, including migrants, homeless persons, and prison populations, as particularly vulnerable conduits of epidemics during situations of economic duress. We also observed that the long-term impacts of crises on infectious disease are not inevitable: considerable evidence suggests that the magnitude of effect depends critically on budgetary responses by governments. Like other emergencies and natural disasters, preparedness for financial crises should include consideration of consequences for communicable disease control.

  6. Community Vitality: The Role of Community-Level Resilience Adaptation and Innovation in Sustainable Development

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    Lenore Newman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Community level action towards sustainable development has emerged as a key scale of intervention in the effort to address our many serious environmental issues. This is hindered by the large-scale destruction of both urban neighbourhoods and rural villages in the second half of the twentieth century. Communities, whether they are small or large, hubs of experimentation or loci of traditional techniques and methods, can be said to have a level of community vitality that acts as a site of resilience, adaptation and innovation in the face of environmental challenges. This paper outlines how community vitality acts as a cornerstone of sustainable development and suggests some courses for future research. A meta-case analysis of thirty-five Canadian communities reveals the characteristics of community vitality emerging from sustainable development experiments and its relationship to resilience, applied specifically to community development.

  7. Impact of Anthropogenic Noise on Aquatic Animals: From Single Species to Community-Level Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Saeed Shafiei; Neo, Yik Yaw; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise underwater is on the rise and may affect aquatic animals of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Many recent studies concern some sort of impact assessment of a single species. Few studies addressed the noise impact on species interactions underwater, whereas there are some studies that address community-level impact but only on land in air. Key processes such as predator-prey or competitor interactions may be affected by the masking of auditory cues, noise-related disturbance, or attentional interference. Noise-associated changes in these interactions can cause shifts in species abundance and modify communities, leading to fundamental ecosystem changes. To gain further insight into the mechanism and generality of earlier findings, we investigated the impact on both a predator and a prey species in captivity, zebrafish (Danio rerio) preying on waterfleas (Daphnia magna).

  8. Challenges in the management of nutritional disorders and communicable diseases in child day care centers: a quantitative and qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantyner, Tulio; Konstantyner, Thais Cláudia Roma de Oliveira; Toloni, Maysa Helena Aguiar; Longo-Silva, Giovana; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2017-03-01

    In Brazil, although many children from low income families attend day care centers with appropriate hygiene practices and food programs, they have nutritional disorders and communicable diseases. This quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study identified staff challenges in child day care centers and suggested alternative activity management to prevent nutritional disorders and communicable diseases. The study included 71 nursery teachers and 270 children from public and philanthropic day care centers (teacher to child ratios of 1:2.57 and 1:6.40, respectively). Interviews and focus groups were conducted with teachers and parents, and anthropometry and blood samples were drawn from the children by digital puncture. Children in philanthropic child day care centers were more likely to be hospitalized due to communicable diseases. Teachers from philanthropic child day care centers had lower age, income and education and higher work responsibilities based on the number of children and working time. The focus groups characterized institutions with organized routines, standard food practices, difficulties with caretaking, and lack of training to provide healthcare to children. Strategies to improve children's health in day care settings should focus on training of teachers about healthcare and nutrition.

  9. Vulnerability Index to Climate Change and its Application for Community-level Risk Assessment in Thailand

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    Atsamon Limsakul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the vulnerability-led approach, the Prevalent Community-level Vulnerability Index (PCVI was developed as a simple composite index used to represent community-level vulnerability to climate change in the socioeconomic and hazard contexts. The PCVI consists of three major components which are Exposure & hazard, Socioeconomic-ecological fragility and Coping capacity. All of these components are further comprised of different indicators, representing different aspects of biophysical and social vulnerability of grass-root communities. Based on the results analyzed in the provincial pilot sites, the PCVI could represent both spatial patterns and magnitudes of vulnerability of each community in consistence with the local economic-social-environmental contexts. It generally reflects the differences in the local contexts and factors that determine overall vulnerability of each community. For the ease in calculating the PCVI especially for the provincial operating staffs and general public, the PREvalent Community Climate Change Vulnerability Tool (RECCC was further developed as a user-friendly, Excel-based program. In conclusions, the outputs of this study that include the PCVI and its database as well as the RECCC program are useful not only for analyzing vulnerability and assessing risks of community to climate change, but also for supporting decision-making process in developing and implementing adaptation activities at provincial level. These outputs were also designed for further integrating as a supplementary part of Provincial�s Decision Supporting System (DSS, with the purpose of promoting the participation of local organizations and stakeholders in coping with the adverse impacts of climate change. However, additional development of ERCCC program, together with dissemination of the vulnerability framework as well as the use of ERCCC program to local organizations needs to be continued.

  10. Oligotyping reveals community level habitat selection within the genus Vibrio

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    Victor Thomas Schmidt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Vibrio is a metabolically and genetically diverse group of facultative anaerobic Bacteria, common in aquatic environments and marine hosts. The genus contains several species of importance to human health and aquaculture, including the causative agents of human cholera and fish vibriosis. Vibrios display a wide variety of known life histories, from opportunistic pathogens to long-standing symbioses with individual host species. Studying Vibrio ecology has been challenging as individual species often display a wide range of habitat preferences, and groups of vibrios can act as socially cohesive groups. Although strong associations with salinity, temperature and other environmental variables have been established, the degree of habitat or host specificity at both the individual and community levels is unknown. Here we use oligotyping analyses in combination with a large collection of existing Vibrio 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequence data to reveal patterns of Vibrio ecology across a wide range of environmental, host, and abiotic substrate associated habitats. Our data show that individual taxa often display a wide range of habitat preferences yet tend to be highly abundant in either substrate-associated or free-living environments. Our analyses show that Vibrio communities share considerable overlap between two distinct hosts (i.e., sponge and fish yet are distinct from the abiotic plastic substrates. Lastly, evidence for habitat specificity at the community level exists in some habitats, despite considerable stochasticity in others. In addition to providing insights into Vibrio ecology across a broad range of habitats, our study shows the utility of oligotyping as a facile, high-throughput and unbiased method for large scale analyses of publicly available sequence data repositories and suggests its wide application could greatly extend the range of possibilities to explore microbial ecology.

  11. Community-level football injury epidemiology: traumatic injuries treated at Swedish emergency medical facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpka, Toomas; Schyllander, Jan; Stark Ekman, Diana; Ekman, Robert; Dahlström, Örjan; Hägglund, Martin; Kristenson, Karolina; Jacobsson, Jenny

    2017-05-16

    Despite the popularity of the sport, few studies have investigated community-level football injury patterns. This study examines football injuries treated at emergency medical facilities using data from three Swedish counties. An open-cohort design was used based on residents aged 0-59 years in three Swedish counties (pop. 645 520). Data were collected from emergency medical facilities in the study counties between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010. Injury frequencies and proportions for age groups stratified by sex were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) and displayed per diagnostic group and body location. Each year, more than 1/200 person aged 0-59 years sustained at least one injury during football play that required emergency medical care. The highest injury incidence was observed among adolescent boys [2009 injuries per 100 000 population years (95% CI 1914-2108)] and adolescent girls [1413 injuries per 100 000 population years (95% CI 1333-1498)]. For female adolescents and adults, knee joint/ligament injury was the outstanding injury type (20% in ages 13-17 years and 34% in ages 18-29 years). For children aged 7-12 years, more than half of the treated injuries involved the upper extremity; fractures constituted about one-third of these injuries. One of every 200 residents aged 0-59 years in typical Swedish counties each year sustained a traumatic football injury that required treatment in emergency healthcare. Further research on community-level patterns of overuse syndromes sustained by participation in football play is warranted.

  12. Microbial community-level toxicity testing of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates in aquatic microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian K; Jørgensen, Niels O G; Nielsen, Tommy H; Winding, Anne

    2004-08-01

    Complex microbial communities may serve as ideal and ecologically relevant toxicity indicators. We here report an assessment of frequently used methods in microbial ecology for their feasibility to detect toxic effects of the environmentally important surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on microbial communities in lake water and treated waste water. The two microbial communities were evaluated for changes in community structure and function over a period of 7 weeks in replicated aquatic microcosms amended with various levels of LAS (0, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 mg l(-1)) and inorganic nutrients. In general, the two communities behaved similarly when challenged with LAS. Following lag periods of 1-3 weeks, LAS was degraded to non-toxic substances. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments and [3H]leucine incorporation were the most sensitive assays with effect levels of 0-1 and 1-10 mg LAS l(-1), respectively. Community-level physiological profiles and pollution-induced community tolerance determinations using Biolog microplates demonstrated less sensitivity with effect levels of 10-100 mg LAS l(-1). Total cell counts and net uptake of inorganic N and P were unaffected even at 100 mg LAS l(-1). Interestingly, different microbial communities developed in some replicate microcosms, indicating the importance of stochastic events for community succession. We conclude that microbial community-level toxicity testing holds great promise and suggest a polyphasic approach involving a range of independent methods targeting both the structure and function of the tested microbial communities.

  13. The Built Environment—A Missing “Cause of the Causes” of Non-Communicable Diseases

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    Kelvin L. Walls

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations “25 × 25 Strategy” of decreasing non-communicable diseases (NCDs, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases, by 25% by 2025 does not appear to take into account all causes of NCDs. Its focus is on a few diseases, which are often linked with life-style factors with “voluntary” “modifiable behavioral risk factors” causes tending towards an over-simplification of the issues. We propose to add some aspects of our built environment related to hazardous building materials, and detailed form of the construction of infrastructure and buildings, which we think are some of the missing causes of NCDs. Some of these could be termed “involuntary causes”, as they relate to factors that are beyond the control of the general public.

  14. The Built Environment—A Missing “Cause of the Causes” of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Kelvin L.; Boulic, Mikael; Boddy, John W. D.

    2016-01-01

    The United Nations “25 × 25 Strategy” of decreasing non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases, by 25% by 2025 does not appear to take into account all causes of NCDs. Its focus is on a few diseases, which are often linked with life-style factors with “voluntary” “modifiable behavioral risk factors” causes tending towards an over-simplification of the issues. We propose to add some aspects of our built environment related to hazardous building materials, and detailed form of the construction of infrastructure and buildings, which we think are some of the missing causes of NCDs. Some of these could be termed “involuntary causes”, as they relate to factors that are beyond the control of the general public. PMID:27690064

  15. The Transferability of Health Promotion and Education Approaches Between Non-communicable Diseases and Communicable Diseases—an Analysis of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. McQueen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a seeming lack within the public health fields of both research and practice of information sharing across so-called “silos of work”. Many professionals in the public health fields dealing with infectious diseases (IDs are unaware of the programs and approaches taken by their colleagues in the non-communicable diseases (NCDs arena, and vice versa. A particular instance of this is in the understanding and application of health promotion approaches. This is a problem that needs to be addressed with the goal of producing the most efficient and effective health promotion approaches to the prevention and control of diseases in general. Objectives: This project examined health promotion approaches to the prevention of NCDs that could be used in the prevention of IDs. Methods: A knowledge synthesis and translation perspective was undertaken. We screened and analyzed a wide range of sources that were considered relevant, with particular emphasis on systematic reviews, published articles and the grey literature. Results: The analysis revealed a diverse health promotion knowledge base for application to IDs. Comprehensive health promotion models were found to be useful. Findings suggest that there are profound similarities for health promotion approaches in both NCDs and IDs. Conclusions: This study revealed gaps in knowledge synthesis to translation. The need for development of intervention and implementation research is considered.

  16. Knowledge of communicable and noncommunicable diseases among Karen ethnic high school students in rural Thasongyang, the far northwest of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorga T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thaworn Lorga,1 Myo Nyein Aung,1,2 Prissana Naunboonruang,1 Piyatida Junlapeeya,1 Apiradee Payaprom31Boromarajonani College of Nursing Nakhon Lampang (BCNLP, Lampang, Thailand; 2Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan; 3Thasongyang Hospital, Thasongyang, Tak, ThailandBackground: The double burden of communicable and noncommunicable diseases (NCD is an increasing trend in low- and-middle income developing countries. Rural and minority populations are underserved and likely to be affected severely by these burdens. Knowledge among young people could provide immunity to such diseases within a community in the long term. In this study we aimed to assess the knowledge of several highly prevalent NCDs (diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and several highly incident communicable diseases (malaria and diarrheal diseases among Karen high school students in a rural district in far northwest of Thailand. The aim of the study is to explore information for devising life-course health education that will be strategically based in schools.Method: A cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee of Boromarajonani College of Nursing Nakhon Lampang (BCNLP, Lampang, Thailand was conducted in Thasongyang, Tak province, from September 2011 to January 2012. Questionnaires for assessing knowledge regarding diabetes, hypertension, COPD, malaria, and diarrheal diseases were delivered to all 457 Karen high school students attending Thasongyang high school. A total of 371 students returned the questionnaires. Experts' validation and split-half reliability assessment was applied to the instrument.Results: Students' main sources of health information were their teachers (62%, health care workers (60%, television (59%, and parents (54%. Familial risk factors of diabetes and hypertension were not known to more than two thirds of the students. Except obesity and physical

  17. Communicable disease-related sudden death in the 21st century in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Akinwumi Oluwole Komolafe,3 Olanrewaju Olayinka Olayemi,2 Adeleye Abiodun Adeomi4 1Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Department of Medicine, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 3Department of Morbid Anatomy, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria; 4Department of Community Medicine, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria Background: Some cases of sudden death (SD have been attributed to communicable diseases (CD in middle- and low-income countries of the world even in this 21st century. CDs produce clinical symptoms and signs over several days before culminating in death. They are also amenable to treatment with antimicrobials if affected persons present early. We sought to find out the incidence of CD-related SD at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital (Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria – a tertiary health facility in southwest Nigeria – and the prevailing associated factors. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of CD-related SD in adult patients aged 18 years and older that occurred from January 2003 to December 2011. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 was used for analysis of the generated data. Percentages and frequencies were calculated. Results: There were 17 (39.6% CD-related SDs out of the 48 cases of SD studied. CD-related SD also accounted for 2.4% of all adult medical admissions. The mean age of the patients was 37.6 ± 11.6 years, age range of 25–62 years, mode of 25 years, and median 34 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1.8:1. Typhoid sepsis was responsible for SD in 47.1% of patients, pulmonary tuberculosis in 17.7% of patients, and lobar pneumonia in 17.7% of patients. The most affected age group was the 20–29-year-old group

  18. Shared communication processes within healthcare teams for rare diseases and their influence on healthcare professionals' innovative behavior and patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budych Karolina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A rare disease is a pattern of symptoms that afflicts less than five in 10,000 patients. However, as about 6,000 different rare disease patterns exist, they still have significant epidemiological relevance. We focus on rare diseases that affect multiple organs and thus demand that multidisciplinary healthcare professionals (HCPs work together. In this context, standardized healthcare processes and concepts are mainly lacking, and a deficit of knowledge induces uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, individualized solutions for each patient are needed. This necessitates an intensive level of innovative individual behavior and thus, adequate idea generation. The final implementation of new healthcare concepts requires the integration of the expertise of all healthcare team members, including that of the patients. Therefore, knowledge sharing between HCPs and shared decision making between HCPs and patients are important. The objective of this study is to assess the contribution of shared communication and decision-making processes in patient-centered healthcare teams to the generation of innovative concepts and consequently to improvements in patient satisfaction. Methods A theoretical framework covering interaction processes and explorative outcomes, and using patient satisfaction as a measure for operational performance, was developed based on healthcare management, innovation, and social science literature. This theoretical framework forms the basis for a three-phase, mixed-method study. Exploratory phase I will first involve collecting qualitative data to detect central interaction barriers within healthcare teams. The results are related back to theory, and testable hypotheses will be derived. Phase II then comprises the testing of hypotheses through a quantitative survey of patients and their HCPs in six different rare disease patterns. For each of the six diseases, the sample should comprise an average of 30 patients with

  19. Are there any changes in burden and management of communicable diseases in areas affected by Cyclone Nargis?

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    Siriwan Pichit

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to assess the situation of communicable diseases under national surveillance in the Cyclone Nargis-affected areas in Myanmar (Burma before and after the incident. Methods Monthly data during 2007, 2008 and 2009 from the routine reporting system for disease surveillance of the Myanmar Ministry of Health (MMOH were reviewed and compared with weekly reporting from the Early Warning and Rapid Response (EWAR system. Data from some UN agencies, NGOs and Tri-Partite Core Group (TCG periodic reviews were also extracted for comparisons with indicators from Sphere and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. Results Compared to 2007 and 2009, large and atypical increases in diarrheal disease and especially dysentery cases occurred in 2008 following Cyclone Nargis. A seasonal increase in ARI reached levels higher than usual in the months of 2008 post-Nargis. The number of malaria cases post-Nargis also increased, but it was less clear if this reflected normal seasonal patterns or was specifically associated with the disaster event. There was no significant change in the occurrence of other communicable diseases in Nargis-affected areas. Except for a small decrease in mortality for diarrheal diseases and ARI in 2008 in Nargis-affected areas, population-based mortality rates for all other communicable diseases showed no significant change in 2008 in these areas, compared to 2007 and 2009. Tuberculosis control programs reached their targets of 70% case detection and 85% treatment success rates in 2007 and 2008. Vaccination coverage rates for DPT 3rd dose and measles remained at high though measles coverage still did not reach the Sphere target of 95% even by 2009. Sanitary latrine coverage in the Nargis-affected area dropped sharply to 50% in the months of 2008 following the incident but then rose to 72% in 2009. Conclusion While the incidence of diarrhea, dysentery and ARI increased post-Nargis in areas affected by the

  20. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials of mHealth interventions against non-communicable diseases in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephani, Victor; Opoku, Daniel; Quentin, Wilm

    2016-07-15

    The reasons of deaths in developing countries are shifting from communicable diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). At the same time the number of health care interventions using mobile phones (mHealth interventions) is growing rapidly. We review studies assessing the health-related impacts of mHealth on NCDs in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs). A systematic literature search of three major databases was performed in order to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of mHealth interventions. Identified studies were reviewed concerning key characteristics of the trial and the intervention; and the relationship between intervention characteristics and outcomes was qualitatively assessed. The search algorithms retrieved 994 titles. 8 RCTs were included in the review, including a total of 4375 participants. Trials took place mostly in urban areas, tested different interventions (ranging from health promotion over appointment reminders and medication adjustments to clinical decision support systems), and included patients with different diseases (diabetes, asthma, hypertension). Except for one study all showed rather positive effects of mHealth interventions on reported outcome measures. Furthermore, our results suggest that particular types of mHealth interventions that were found to have positive effects on patients with communicable diseases and for improving maternal care are likely to be effective also for NCDs. Despite rather positive results of included RCTs, a firm conclusion about the effectiveness of mHealth interventions against NCDs is not yet possible because of the limited number of studies, the heterogeneity of evaluated mHealth interventions and the wide variety of reported outcome measures. More research is needed to better understand the specific effects of different types of mHealth interventions on different types of patients with NCDs in LaMICs.

  1. Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Medley, Nancy; Darzi, Andrea J; Richardson, Marty; Habiba Garga, Kesso; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    to adjust for cluster effects. Outcomes should be reported uniformly so that they are comparable to commonly-used population indicators. We recommend further cluster-RCTs of pregnant women and women in their reproductive years, using combinations of interventions and looking at outcomes that are important to pregnant women, such as maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, alongside the explanatory outcomes along the pathway of care: ANC coverage, the services provided during ANC and deliveries in health facilities. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes What is the issue? The World Health Organization recommends at least four antenatal visits for all pregnant women. Almost half of pregnant women worldwide miss out on this level of care, and this is more problematic in low- and middle-income countries. Why is this important? Healthcare during pregnancy is a priority because poor antenatal attendance is associated with delivery of low birthweight babies and more newborn deaths. Antenatal care also provides opportunity for nutritional and health checks, such as whether a woman has a disease like malaria or has been exposed to infectious diseases such as HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) or syphilis. What evidence did we find? We reviewed randomised controlled trials that tested ways to improve the uptake of antenatal care during pregnancy. Some trials tested community-based interventions (media campaigns, education on self and infant care or financial incentives for pregnant women to attend antenatal care), while other trials looked at health systems interventions (home visits for pregnant women or provision of equipment for clinics). We included 34 trials with approximately 400,000 women. Most trials took place in low- and middle-income countries, and most trials were conducted in a way that made us feel confident about trusting the published reports. We assessed 30 of the

  2. The role of home-based information and communications technology interventions in chronic disease management: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Rekha; Warren, Jim

    2009-06-01

    This article presents a systematic literature review done to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of home-based information and communications technology enabled interventions for chronic disease management, with emphasis on their impact on health outcomes and costs. Relevant articles were retrieved from PubMed and evaluated using quality worksheets with pre-identified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 256 articles retrieved, 27 were found to concord with the study criteria. Evaluation of the identified articles was conducted irrespective of study design, type of home-based intervention or chronic disease involved. The review demonstrates that HBIs applied to chronic disease management improve functional and cognitive patient outcomes and reduce healthcare spending. However, further research is needed to assess benefit in terms of evidence-based outcome indicators (that can provide a basis for meta-analysis), to confirm sustainable cost benefits, and to systematically collect data on physician satisfaction with patient management.

  3. The social nature of chronic noncommunicable diseases and how to tackle them through communication technology, training, and outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moreno, Jose M; Apfel, Franklin; Sanchez, Jose Luis Alfonso; Galea, Gauden; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2011-08-01

    As world leaders prepare for the United Nations High Level Meeting on Noncommunicable Diseases, to take place in September 2011, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and economic and business fora have created new alliances and initiatives to accelerate research, advocacy, and political commitment. This article argues that the time is propitious to reflect on the social nature of the most common behavioral noncommunicable disease determinants, including tobacco and alcohol use, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet. Evidence is presented related to the fact that these diseases are profoundly rooted in social and community ties and points to the need for a modern communication strategy to serve as a linchpin of any successful action to address these public health threats. Several proposals, aimed at promoting health literacy, strengthening health workforce skills, capturing the power of new media and technologies, and targeting vulnerable groups, are discussed.

  4. Toward core inter-professional health promotion competencies to address the non-communicable diseases and their risk factors through knowledge translation: Curriculum content assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Elizabeth; Moffat, Marilyn; Skinner, Margot; Dornelas de Andrade, Armele; Myezwa, Hellen; Söderlund, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background To increase the global impact of health promotion related to non-communicable diseases, health professionals need evidence-based core competencies in health assessment and lifestyle behavior change. Assessment of health promotion curricula by health professional programs is a first step. Such program assessment is a means of 1. demonstrating collective commitment across health professionals to prevent non-communicable diseases; 2. addressing the knowledge translation gap between wh...

  5. Economics of chronic diseases protocol : Cost-effectiveness modelling and the future burden of non-communicable disease in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divajeva, Diana; Marsh, Tim; Logstrup, Susanne; Kestens, Marleen; Vemer, Pepijn; Kriaucioniene, Vilma; Peresson, Sophie; O'Kelly, Sophie; Rito, Ana; Webber, Laura

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of chronic disease is caused by risk factors which are mostly preventable. Effective interventions to reduce these risks are known and proven to be applicable to a variety of settings. Chronic disease is generally developed long before the fatal outcome, meaning that a lot o

  6. Economics of chronic diseases protocol : Cost-effectiveness modelling and the future burden of non-communicable disease in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divajeva, Diana; Marsh, Tim; Logstrup, Susanne; Kestens, Marleen; Vemer, Pepijn; Kriaucioniene, Vilma; Peresson, Sophie; O'Kelly, Sophie; Rito, Ana; Webber, Laura

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of chronic disease is caused by risk factors which are mostly preventable. Effective interventions to reduce these risks are known and proven to be applicable to a variety of settings. Chronic disease is generally developed long before the fatal outcome, meaning that a lot o

  7. Trial Protocol: Communicating DNA-based risk assessments for Crohn's disease: a randomised controlled trial assessing impact upon stopping smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of the risk of developing Crohn's disease (CD can be made using DNA testing for mutations in the NOD2 (CARD15 gene, family history, and smoking status. Smoking doubles the risk of CD, a risk that is reduced by stopping. CD therefore serves as a timely and novel paradigm within which to assess the utility of predictive genetic testing to motivate behaviour change to reduce the risk of disease. The aim of the study is to describe the impact upon stopping smoking of communicating a risk of developing CD that incorporates DNA analysis. We will test the following main hypothesis: Smokers who are first degree relatives (FDRs of CD probands are more likely to make smoking cessation attempts following communication of risk estimates of developing CD that incorporate DNA analysis, compared with an equivalent communication that does not incorporate DNA analysis. Methods/design A parallel groups randomised controlled trial in which smokers who are FDRs of probands with CD are randomly allocated in families to undergo one of two types of assessment of risk for developing CD based on either: i. DNA analysis, family history of CD and smoking status, or ii. Family history of CD and smoking status The primary outcome is stopping smoking for 24 hours or longer in the six months following provision of risk information. The secondary outcomes are seven-day smoking abstinence at one week and six month follow-ups. Randomisation of 470 smoking FDRs of CD probands, with 400 followed up (85%, provides 80% power to detect a difference in the primary outcome of 14% between randomised arms, at the 5% significance level. Discussion This trial provides one of the strongest tests to date of the impact of communicating DNA-based risk assessment on risk-reducing behaviour change. Specific issues regarding the choice of trial design are discussed. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN21633644

  8. Public Hygiene Campaign in Denmark during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Had No Effect on Hospitalization Rate of Communicable Diseases in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Sevelsted, Astrid; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the Danish National board of Health carried out massive public hygiene campaigns to limit spread of disease. We aimed to investigate whether this resulted in lower incidences of communicable diseases in the paediatric population.......During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the Danish National board of Health carried out massive public hygiene campaigns to limit spread of disease. We aimed to investigate whether this resulted in lower incidences of communicable diseases in the paediatric population....

  9. Association between individual-level and community-level socio-economic status and blood pressure among Inuit in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riva, Mylène; Larsen, C. V. L.; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite abundant evidence that socio-economic status (SES) is a fundamental determinant of health, there is a dearth of research examining association between SES, measured at the individual and community levels, and cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations...... household income and in affluent more urbanized towns. Sex-stratified analyses demonstrate the salience of community conditions for men. Conclusions. The association observed between blood pressure and community-level socio-economic conditions suggests that public health and social policies, programmes....... Objectives. To examine the influence of individual-level and community-level SES on systolic and diastolic blood pressure among Greenlandic Inuit. Methods. Multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data from the Inuit Health in Transition Greenland Survey, to which 3,108 Greenlandic Inuit aged 18 years...

  10. Factors Affecting Parent's Perception on Air Quality-From the Individual to the Community Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yulin; Liu, Fengfeng; Lu, Yuanan; Mao, Zongfu; Lu, Hanson; Wu, Yanyan; Chu, Yuanyuan; Yu, Lichen; Liu, Yisi; Ren, Meng; Li, Na; Chen, Xi; Xiang, Hao

    2016-05-12

    The perception of air quality significantly affects the acceptance of the public of the government's environmental policies. The aim of this research is to explore the relationship between the perception of the air quality of parents and scientific monitoring data and to analyze the factors that affect parents' perceptions. Scientific data of air quality were obtained from Wuhan's environmental condition reports. One thousand parents were investigated for their knowledge and perception of air quality. Scientific data show that the air quality of Wuhan follows an improving trend in general, while most participants believed that the air quality of Wuhan has deteriorated, which indicates a significant difference between public perception and reality. On the individual level, respondents with an age of 40 or above (40 or above: OR = 3.252; 95% CI: 1.170-9.040), a higher educational level (college and above: OR = 7.598; 95% CI: 2.244-25.732) or children with poor healthy conditions (poor: OR = 6.864; 95% CI: 2.212-21.302) have much more negative perception of air quality. On the community level, industrial facilities, vehicles and city construction have major effects on parents' perception of air quality. Our investigation provides baseline information for environmental policy researchers and makers regarding the public's perception and expectation of air quality and the benefits to the environmental policy completing and enforcing.

  11. Putting on the moves: Individual, household, and community-level determinants of residential mobility in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Pendakur

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internal residential mobility is an important contributor to economic vitality, helping to address gaps in the labour market, assisting regions to develop comparative advantages, and encouraging the circulation of skills, capital, and networks within a country. Mobility is, however, a complex sociological phenomenon influenced by individual, household, and community-level variables. Objective: This article examines the combined impact of individual, household, and community characteristics on both short- and long-distance residential mobility in Canada. The study is motivated by a broader concern with economic development and community vitality, particularly in smaller towns and cities that have recently struggled to attract newcomers. Methods: A series of multilevel random intercept regression models are run on Canadian census data from 2006. Canada-wide findings are compared to those for five sizes of community - from small towns with fewer than 10,000 people to major metropolitan cities. Results: Despite the continued growth of major metropolitan areas, city size is not an attractor in and of itself. Rather, one of the most powerful draws for both small towns and large cities is the diversity of the existing population, as measured by the proportion of residents who are immigrants and/or visible minorities. Conclusions: These findings challenge some long-held stereotypes about rural living, and suggest that rural development strategies ought to include measures for enhancing diversity as a means of attracting all types of internal migrants to small towns and cities.

  12. Mountain Commons: Changing Space and Status at Community Levels in the Himalayas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narpat S. JODHA

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the imperatives of nature-society interaction in the Himalayas as seen through CPR (Common Property Resources). It specifically looks at the process and factors that characterize the dynamics of the above interactions,with particular reference to the changing status and governance of CPRs at community levels. The paper puts together the synthesis of observations and inferences of different studies by ICIMOD and others in mountain regions, particularly in different parts of Nepal, India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan. Rural CPRs (providing sustenance supplies and services)as an important component of a community's natural resource base, manifest the institutional arrangements evolved by the communities to facilitate their adaptations to nature.The above process can be more clearly illustrated with reference to specific characteristics of mountain areas,called mountain specificities.However, over time, the situation of CPRs in terms of their extent and status, governance and management as well as contributions to community sustenance, has changed. The paper attempts to indicate potential lead lines for searching options for rehabilitation of CPRs, based on a closer understanding of the factors contributing to their decline.

  13. The mixed effects of migration: community-level migration and birthweight in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Erin R; Choi, Kate H

    2015-05-01

    Research on the relationship between migration and infant health in Mexico finds that migration has mixed impacts on the risk of low birthweight (LBW). Whereas the departure and absence of household and community members are harmful, remittances are beneficial. We extend this work by considering a different measure of infant health in addition to LBW: macrosomia (i.e., heavy birthweight), which is associated with infant, child, and maternal morbidities but has a different social risk profile from LBW. We link the 2008 and 2009 Mexican birth certificates with community data from the 2000 Mexican census to analyze the association between various dimensions of community-level migration (i.e., rates of out-migration, receipt of remittances, and return migration) and the risk of LBW and macrosomia. We examine this association using two sets of models which differ in the extent to which they account for endogeneity. We find that the health impacts of migration differ depending not only on the dimension of migration, but also on the measure of health, and that they are robust to potential sources of endogeneity. Whereas community remittances and return migration are associated with lower risk of LBW, they are associated with increased risk of macrosomia. By contrast, out-migration is associated with increased risk of LBW and lower risk of macrosomia. Our analysis of endogeneity suggests that bias resulting from unmeasured differences between communities with different levels of migration may result in an underestimate of the impacts of community migration on birthweight.

  14. New Zealand rugby health study: motor cortex excitability in retired elite and community level rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gwyn N; Hume, Patria A; Stavric, Verna; Brown, Scott R; Taylor, Denise

    2017-01-13

    Rugby union is a high contact sport in which players frequently experience brain injuries. Acute brain injury is associated with altered corticomotor function. However, it is uncertain if long-term exposure to rugby is associated with any alterations in corticomotor function. The aim of the study was to assess measures of corticomotor excitability and inhibition in retired rugby players in comparison to retired non-contact sport players. The design was a cross-sectional study with three groups of retired athletes: elite rugby (n=23), community level rugby (n=28) and non-contact sport control (n=22). Assessments of corticomotor excitability were made using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Resting motor threshold was significantly higher and long-interval intracortical inhibition was greater in the elite rugby group compared to the control group. Participants in the two rugby groups had sustained significantly more concussions than the control group. We provide some evidence of altered corticomotor excitation and inhibition in retired elite rugby players in comparison to retired non-contact sport players. Given the absence of findings in the community rugby group, who had experienced a similar number of concussions, the association with previous brain injury is unclear.

  15. Community level workers: awareness generation for improving children’s health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetu Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Routine immunisation and Vitamin A supplementation are two of many services offered by Government of India to reduce child mortality and morbidity. The three groups of community level workers (CLWs i.e. Auxiliary Nurse Midwives from health department, Anganwadi Workers from women and child development department and Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs are responsible for raising awareness and demand for these services. Objectives: The paper assesses the knowledge and participation of CLWs in generating awareness about the two services namely immunisation and Vitamin A supplementation among eligible mothers; and mother’s knowledge on these two services.  Methods: The study was conducted in 16 villages of two administrative blocks of Udaipur district in Rajasthan. Multistage purposive sampling was used for study area selection. Data collection was done using mixed methods-1 observations of 16 Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition days; 2 questionnaire based survey of 46 CLWs; and 3 questionnaire based survey of 321 programme beneficiaries i.e. infant’s mothers. Results: Limited knowledge of CLWs and their participation in awareness generation activities for the two services was noticed, which was also reflected in the poor knowledge among mothers on the two services. Conclusion: The study results may partially explain the poor child immunization in Rajasthan. Initiatives to increase CLWs’ knowledge of child immunization and Vitamin A supplementation; and increasing their participation in awareness generation activities need serious consideration by the healthcare system to improve immunization coverage.

  16. Economics of chronic diseases protocol: cost-effectiveness modelling and the future burden of non-communicable disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divajeva, Diana; Marsh, Tim; Logstrup, Susanne; Kestens, Marleen; Vemer, Pepijn; Kriaucioniene, Vilma; Peresson, Sophie; O'Kelly, Sophie; Rito, Ana; Webber, Laura

    2014-05-16

    The majority of chronic disease is caused by risk factors which are mostly preventable. Effective interventions to reduce these risks are known and proven to be applicable to a variety of settings. Chronic disease is generally developed long before the fatal outcome, meaning that a lot of people spend a number of years in poor health. Effective prevention measures can prolong lives of individuals and significantly improve their quality of life. However, the methods to measure cost-effectiveness are a subject to much debate. The Economics of Chronic Diseases project aims to establish the best possible methods of measuring cost-effectiveness as well as develop micro-simulation models apt at projecting future burden of chronic diseases, their costs and potential savings after implementation of cost-effective interventions. This research project will involve eight European countries: Bulgaria, Finland, Greece, Lithuania, The Netherlands, Poland, Portugal and the United Kingdom (UK). A literature review will be conducted to identify scientific articles which critically review the methods of cost-effectiveness. Contact will be made health economists to inform and enrich this review. This evidence will be used as a springboard for discussion at a meeting with key European stakeholders and experts with the aim of reaching a consensus on recommendations for cost-effectiveness methodology. Epidemiological data for coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be collected along with data on time trends in three major risk factors related to these diseases, specifically tobacco consumption, blood pressure and body mass index. Economic and epidemiological micro-simulation models will be developed to asses the future distributions of risks, disease outcomes, healthcare costs and the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in Europe. This work will help to establish the best

  17. 湖北省慢性病流行现状与防控策略%The situation and strategies for preventing and controlling non-communicable chronic diseases in Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东会; 张岚; 祝淑珍; 张庆军

    2013-01-01

    Objective The situation and strategies in preventing and controlling non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) in Hubei province were introduced in order to further shed light on NCDs prevention strategies and focus on action. Methods The development and achievement, as well as policies made in Hubei Province regarding to NCD prevention and control were systematically summarized. Results The situation was quite so far is quietly serious in Hubei Province. Through the 10-year development in the field of NCDs prevention, the prevention and control system for NCDs has been established in Hubei Province; with basic public health services as the foundation, health management as the means, healthy lifestyle action at population level as the emphasis, preventing and reducing NCDs as the its purposes. Conclusions To prevent and control NCDs, it will be our high priorities are: to make supportive policies, strengthen the collaboration between departments, perfect the information system, set and promote appropriate techniques, and promote comprehensive prevention and control for NCDs at community level.%目的 慢性病及其危险因素已成为严重的公共卫生问题.方法 如何从群体角度实现慢性病的有效防控是卫生工作面临的一项新的挑战.结果 通过分析湖北省慢性病流行现状及慢性病防控政策.结论 介绍过去10年湖北省慢性病防控的发展与成效,为进一步明确慢性病防治策略与行动重点提供思路.

  18. 'I have a feeling I can't speak to anybody': A thematic analysis of communication perspectives in people with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarotti, Nicolò; Simpson, Jane; Fletcher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study explored the perspectives of people affected by Huntington's disease (HD) on their own communicative abilities. Methods Qualitative semi-structured interviews were carried out with eight people with early HD. The data were analysed through thematic analysis. Results Four themes were constructed from the data, characterised by the following core topics: How HD directs and mediates communication; Regaining control to improve communication; Emotional outflows into communication and the struggle for separation; Sheltering as a way to boost confidence in communication. Discussion Separating patients' identity as individuals from that of a person with a disease can help increase communicative control. Consistent with the general theory and model of self-regulation, patients should be allowed a wider range of choices to regain control over communication. Achieving better emotion regulation is of paramount importance for communication, and factors such as medication regimes, relationships and existing coping strategies should be strengthened. Consistent with previous research, feelings of safety and the idea of a safe place ('sheltering') represent an effective coping mechanism. Practical implications include the refinement of communication and relationships among clinicians, caregivers, and patients with HD by considering a wider range of medical, psychological and socio-environmental factors.

  19. Communicative Strategies Used by Spouses of Individuals with Communication Disorders Related to Stroke-Induced Aphasia and Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Emilia; Hartelius, Lena; Saldert, Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    Background: A communicative disability interferes with the affected person's ability to take active part in social interaction, but non-disabled communication partners may use different strategies to support communication. However, it is not known whether similar strategies can be used to compensate for different types of communicative…

  20. Information and communication technology systems to improve quality of life and safety of Alzheimer's disease patients: a multicenter international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Alberto; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Benelli, Edoardo; Zanesco, Antonio; Cabello, Ana; Margelí, M Carmen; Wanche-Politis, Sophia; Seferis, Kostas; Sancarlo, Daniele; Kilias, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Within the frame of the European Commission funded Smart Home for Elderly People (HOPE) Project, relatives/caregivers of 223 Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients were recruited in Italy, Spain, and Greece for a multicenter international survey on the potential role of Information and Communication Technology system (ICT-systems) for AD patients. A five-minute video on HOPE ICT-systems was shown, and all relatives/caregivers completed a 13-item questionnaire that evaluated the potential role of: A) ICT-systems in improving quality of life, care, and safety; B) devices for monitoring personal movements, medication use, and ambient environmental conditions; C) devices to improve communication, home-based rehabilitation, and reduction of specific risks; and D) possible agreement in using ICT-systems by AD patients. Relatives/caregivers reported that ICT-systems could be very useful to improve: A) quality of life (66.4%), care (56.1%), and safety (87.0%); B) monitoring bed rest and movements (80.7%), medication use (87.4%), and ambient environmental conditions (85.2%); and C) emergency communication (83.4%). Relatives/caregivers reported that ICT-systems could be significantly more useful for AD patients aged 75-84 than patients aged educational level considered ICT-systems more useful than relatives/caregivers aged educational level (p ICT-system could be useful to improve the management of AD patients.

  1. Fractalkine Mediates Communication between Pathogenic Proteins and Microglia: Implications of Anti-Inflammatory Treatments in Different Stages of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Desforges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases has been widely demonstrated. Intraneuronal protein accumulation may regulate microglial activity via the fractalkine (CX3CL1 signaling pathway that provides a mechanism through which neurons communicate with microglia. CX3CL1 levels fluctuate in different stages of neurodegenerative diseases and in various animal models, warranting further investigation of the mechanisms underlying microglial response to pathogenic proteins, including Tau, β-amyloid (Aβ, and α-synuclein. The temporal relationship between microglial activity and localization of pathogenic proteins (intra- versus extracellular likely determines whether neuroinflammation mitigates or exacerbates disease progression. Evidence in transgenic models suggests a beneficial effect of microglial activity on clearance of proteins like Aβ and a detrimental effect on Tau modification, but the role of CX3CL1 signaling in α-synucleinopathies is less clear. Here we review the nature of fractalkine-mediated neuronmicroglia interaction, which has significant implications for the efficacy of anti-inflammatory treatments during different stages of neurodegenerative pathology. Specifically, it is likely that anti-inflammatory treatment in early stages of disease during intraneuronal accumulation of proteins could be beneficial, while anti-inflammatory treatment in later stages when proteins are secreted to the extracellular space could exacerbate disease progression.

  2. Collateral Damage and Communicable Disease with Particular Reference to Tactical Nuclear War in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-31

    assess the impact of wartime disruption on the frequency of disease outbreaks . Given the poor state of pre- dictability of epidemiology for peacetime...34since the end of World War II, there has not been a single outbreak of the classical com- municable diseases in Europe, Canada and the United States...former scourges, such as cholera, smallpox, plague and typhus fever. Scarlet fever, infectious hepatitis and salmonellosis are the diseases with the

  3. 78 FR 58513 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Communicable Diseases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... (EIA) is an infectious and potentially fatal viral disease of equines. There is no vaccine or treatment... veterinarians; laboratory, diagnostic, and research facility personnel; stockyard personnel; and owners...

  4. Community-Level Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities in Constructed Wetlands: Effects of Sample Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Mark; Weber, Kela; Nivala, Jaime; Aubron, Thomas; Müller, Roland Arno

    2016-03-01

    Community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) using BIOLOG® EcoPlates™ has become a popular method for characterizing and comparing the functional diversity, functional potential, and metabolic activity of heterotrophic microbial communities. The method was originally developed for profiling soil communities; however, its usage has expanded into the fields of ecotoxicology, agronomy, and the monitoring and profiling of microbial communities in various wastewater treatment systems, including constructed wetlands for water pollution control. When performing CLPP on aqueous samples from constructed wetlands, a wide variety of sample characteristics can be encountered and challenges may arise due to excessive solids, color, or turbidity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of different sample preparation methods on CLPP performed on a variety of aqueous samples covering a broad range of physical and chemical characteristics. The results show that using filter paper, centrifugation, or settling helped clarify samples for subsequent CLPP analysis, however did not do so as effectively as dilution for the darkest samples. Dilution was able to provide suitable clarity for the darkest samples; however, 100-fold dilution significantly affected the carbon source utilization patterns (CSUPs), particularly with samples that were already partially or fully clear. Ten-fold dilution also had some effect on the CSUPs of samples which were originally clear; however, the effect was minimal. Based on these findings, for this specific set of samples, a 10-fold dilution provided a good balance between ease of use, sufficient clarity (for dark samples), and limited effect on CSUPs. The process and findings outlined here can hopefully serve future studies looking to utilize CLPP for functional analysis of microbial communities and also assist in comparing data from studies where different sample preparation methods were utilized.

  5. Improved maternal nutrition decreases children’s long-term risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Improved maternal nutrition to decrease children’s long-term risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity The nutritional well-being of pregnant women affects not only their health and their fetuses' development but also children's long-term risk of developing NCDs or obesity, according...... been recognized for decades, the report offers a systematized review of the most recent evidence on maternal nutrition and obesity and NCD prevention. The findings confirm that a mother's nutritional status – including overweight and obesity, excessive gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes...... – affects not only her child's health as an infant but also the child's risk of obesity and related chronic diseases as an adult. In short, maternal nutrition can truly have an intergenerational impact. Fighting NCDs and obesity through measures to improve maternal nutrition: NCDs are the leading cause...

  6. Bioactive Plant Metabolites in the Management of Non-Communicable Metabolic Diseases: Looking at Opportunities beyond the Horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Prasad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been an unprecedented worldwide rise in non-communicable metabolic diseases (NCDs, particularly cardiovascular diseases (CVD and diabetes. While modern pharmacotherapy has decreased the mortality in the existing population, it has failed to stem the rise. Furthermore, a large segment of the world population cannot afford expensive pharmacotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for inexpensive preventive measures to control the rise in CVD and diabetes and associated co-morbidities. The purpose of this review is to explore the role of food bioactives in prevention of NCDs. To this end, we have critically analyzed the possible utility of three classes of food bioactives: (a resistant starch, a metabolically resistant carbohydrate known to favorably modulate insulin secretion and glucose metabolism; (b cyclo (His-Pro, a food-derived cyclic dipeptides; and (c polyphenol-rich berries. Finally, we have also briefly outlined the strategies needed to prepare these food-bioactives for human use.

  7. A COMMUNITY BASED STUDY ON THE PREVALENCE OF BEHAVIORAL RISK FACTORS OF NON - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN DAVANGERE CITY, KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Swamy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : As we slowly advance into the 21 st Century, we find that the challenges posed by non - communicable diseases (NCDs present an imminent threat to people worldwide. The rapidly growing epidemic of non - communicable diseases is clearly related to changes in life styles. OBJECTIVES : 1 To study the socio - demographic factors of the region. 2 To assess the prevalence of behavioral risk factors for non - communica ble diseases. METHODS : S tudy D esign: A Community - based cross - sectional descriptive study. S tudy P articipants : 2000 urban people of Davangere city, belonging to the age group 15 - 64 years. S tudy P eriod : 1 st December 2008 and 30 th November 2009 (1 year. METHODOLOGY: A multi - stage sampling method with households as sampling unit. Information on behavioral risk factors was obtained through standardized methods as recommended by the STEPS 1 survey guideline of the World Health Organization after modifying to suit the local requirement. S tatistical A nalysis : Proportion and Chi - square test. RESULTS : Total participants in the study were 2000, comprised of 1000 males’ and1000 females. High burden of NCD risk factors was observed among urban population: current sm oking - 15.2% (Male - 30.1%, Female - 0.2%; current smokeless tobacco use - 17.8% (Male - 28.8%, Female - 6.8%; current alcohol use - 17.5% (Male - 32.8%, Female - 1.3%; physical inactivity - 30.4% (Male - 17.6%, Female - 43.3 . I NTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS : Substantially high levels of the various behavioral risk factors in this urban population suggest an urgent need for adopting healthy life style modifications among the population in general. The increased risk observed among the younger generation for ri sk factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption calls for urgent corrective steps and measures for long - term monitoring of all major risk factors as well as the major chronic disease conditions.

  8. Community-level intimate partner violence and the circumstances of first sex among young women from five African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speizer Ilene S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender-based violence is an important risk factor for adverse reproductive health (RH. Community-level violence may inhibit young women's ability to engage in safer sexual behaviors due to a lack of control over sexual encounters. Few studies examine violence as a contextual risk factor. Methods Using nationally representative data from five African countries, the association between community-level physical or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV and the circumstances of first sex (premarital or marital among young women (ages 20-29 was examined. Results In Mali, and Kenya bivariate analyses showed that young women who had premarital first sex were from communities where a significantly higher percentage of women reported IPV experience compared to young women who had marital first sex. Multivariate analyses confirmed the findings for these two countries; young women from communities with higher IPV were significantly more likely to have had premarital first sex compared to first sex in union. In Liberia, community-level IPV was associated with a lower risk of premarital sex as compared to first sex in union at a marginal significance level. There was no significant relationship between community-level IPV and the circumstances of first sex in the Democratic Republic of Congo or Zimbabwe. Conclusion These findings indicate that context matters for RH. Individualized efforts to improve RH may be limited in their effectiveness if they do not acknowledge the context of young women's lives. Programs should target prevention of violence to improve RH outcomes of youth.

  9. Incorporating Ecosystem Services into Community-level Decision-Making: A San Juan, Puerto Rico Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program is developing tools and approaches to incorporate ecosystem goods and services concepts into community-level decision-making. The San Juan Community Study is one of a serie...

  10. How community-level social and economic developments have changed the patterns of substance use in a transition economy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaozhao Y

    2017-07-01

    Most social changes take place at the community level before indirectly affecting individuals. Although the contextual effect is far-reaching, few studies have investigated the important questions of: how do community-level developments affect drinking and smoking, and how do they change the existing gender and income patterns of drinking and smoking, particularly in transition economies? In this study, I used a Chinese panel dataset between 1991 and 2011 to reveal the moderating effects of community developments. Through multilevel growth curve modeling that controls for age, period, and cohort effects, as well as individual- and community-level covariates, I found that community-level economic development and social development are negatively associated with drinking and smoking. Moreover, economic and social developments also moderate the important influences of income and gender: women start to drink more in communities with higher economic development; the traditionally positive association between income and smoking/drinking is also reversed, i.e. the rich start to smoke and drink less in communities with higher social development. This study concludes that the rapid changes in communal social and economic structures have created new health disparities based on the gender and socioeconomic hierarchy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring soil bacteria with community-level physiological profiles using Biolog™ ECO-plates in the Netherlands and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutgers, Michiel; Wouterse, Marja; Drost, Sytske M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil samples were analyzed with community-level physiological profiles (CLPP) using Biolog™ ECO-plates in the Netherlands Soil Monitoring Network (NSMN; 704 samples) and in a European-wide transect (73 samples). The selection of sites was based on a representative sample of major soil texture typ...

  12. Health communication, genetic determinism, and perceived control: the roles of beliefs about susceptibility and severity versus disease essentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Kahl, Mary L; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; Traeder, Tara

    2012-08-01

    This research examined the lay public's beliefs about genes and health that might be labeled deterministic. The goals of this research were to sort through the divergent and contested meanings of genetic determinism in an effort to suggest directions for public health genomic communication. A survey conducted in community-based settings of 717 participants included 267 who self-reported race as African American and 450 who self-reported race as Caucasian American. The survey results revealed that the structure of genetic determinism included 2 belief sets. One set aligned with perceived threat, encompassing susceptibility and severity beliefs linked to genes and health. The other set represents beliefs about biological essentialism linked to the role of genes for health. These concepts were found to be modestly positively related. Threat beliefs predicted perceived control over genes. Public health efforts to communicate about genes and health should consider effects of these messages for (a) perceived threat relating to susceptibility and severity and (b) perceptions of disease essentialism. Perceived threat may enhance motivation to act in health protective ways, whereas disease essentialist beliefs may contribute to a loss of motivation associated with control over health.

  13. Belief in Family Planning Myths at the Individual and Community Levels and Modern Contraceptive Use in Urban Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Abdou; Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Okigbo, Chinelo C

    2015-12-01

    Negative myths and misconceptions about family planning are a barrier to modern contraceptive use. Most research on the subject has focused on individual beliefs about contraception; however, given that myths spread easily within communities, it is also important to examine how the prevalence of negative myths in a community affects the aggregate level of method use. Baseline data collected in 2010-2011 by the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation project on women aged 15-49 living in selected cities in Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal were used. Multivariate analyses examined associations between modern contraceptive use and belief in negative myths for individuals and communities. In each country, the family planning myths most prevalent at the individual and community levels were that "people who use contraceptives end up with health problems," "contraceptives are dangerous to women's health" and "contraceptives can harm your womb." On average, women in Nigeria and Kenya believed 2.7 and 4.6 out of eight selected myths, respectively, and women in Senegal believed 2.6 out of seven. Women's individual-level belief in myths was negatively associated with their modern contraceptive use in all three countries (odds ratios, 0.2-0.7). In Nigeria, the women's community-level myth variable was positively associated with modern contraceptive use (1.6), whereas the men's community-level myth variable was negatively associated with use (0.6); neither community-level variable was associated with modern contraceptive use in Kenya or Senegal. Education programs are needed to dispel common myths and misconceptions about modern contraceptives. In Nigeria, programs that encourage community-level discussions may be effective at reducing myths and increasing modern contraceptive use.

  14. Community-Level Social Capital and Psychological Distress among the Elderly in Japan: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomoko; Suzuki, Etsuji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Kawachi, Ichiro; Takao, Soshi

    2015-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence, previous studies have not clearly separated the contribution of community-level social capital on mental health from that of individual-level social support. We examined the association between community-level social capital and psychological distress in a sample of older Japanese individuals, taking into account the effects of individual-level social capital and social support. We collected data via a cross-sectional survey among all residents aged ≥65 in three rural municipalities in Okayama Prefecture. We measured two components of social capital in the questionnaire: perceptions of trust and reciprocity in the community. Community-level social capital was obtained by aggregating individual responses and calculating the proportion of subjects reporting mistrust and lack of reciprocity. Psychological distress was assessed by the Kessler Psychological Distress scale. We calculated rate ratios [corrected] (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for psychological distress using two-level Poisson regression models (9,761 individuals nested within 35 communities). The prevalence of psychological distress was 39.8%. Low community-level social capital was associated with psychological distress, even after controlling for individual-level social support, age, sex, educational attainment, frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking status, body mass index, marital status, socioeconomic status, and number of cohabiters. The adjusted RRs per 10% increase of the proportion of mistrust and lack of reciprocity in the communities were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.01-1.51) and 1.12 (95% CI: 1.02-1.24), respectively. Lower levels of community-level social capital are associated with psychological distress among the Japanese elderly population, even after adjusting for individual-level perceptions of social capital and social support.

  15. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of Palau: a systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiho, Henry M; Demei, Yorah; Kuartei, Stevenson; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Republic of Palau and describes the burden due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 7.1% increase in the population between 2000 and 2010. Significant shifts in the age groups show declines among children and young adults under 34 years of age and increases among adult residents over 45 years of age. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that play a significant role in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include heart disease and cancer. A 2003 community household survey was conducted and 22.4% of them reported a history of diabetes in the household. A survey among Ministry of Health employees showed that 44% of the men and 47% of the women were overweight and 46% of the men and 42% of the women were obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, and support services to address these NCD. Priority issues and needs for the administrative and clinical systems were identified.

  16. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards; Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian K. Noor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD coding system. Results: A total of 2,614 patient records were analysed. The age group with the highest admissions was the 56‒65-year-old age group (19.4% and the majority of patients were admitted for one week or less (86.4%. Non-communicable diseases constituted 71.8% of all cases. According to ICD classifications, patients were admitted most frequently due to infectious or parasitic diseases (19.7%, followed by diseases of the circulatory (16.4%, digestive (16.4% and genito-urinary (13.8% systems. The most common diseases were cardiovascular disease (16.4%, malaria (11.3%, gastritis/peptic ulcer disease (9.8%, urinary tract infections (7.2% and diabetes mellitus (6.9%. The mortality rate was 4.7%. Conclusion: The burden of non-communicable diseases was found to exceed that of communicable diseases among patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital.

  17. 75 FR 20559 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Communicable Diseases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... equines. There is no vaccine or treatment for the disease. It is often difficult to differentiate from... accredited and State veterinarians; laboratory, diagnostic, and research facility personnel; and stockyard... State veterinarians; laboratory, diagnostic, and research facility personnel; stockyard personnel;...

  18. Comparative responses of river biofilms at the community level to common organic solvent and herbicide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paule, A; Roubeix, V; Swerhone, G D W; Roy, J; Lauga, B; Duran, R; Delmas, F; Paul, E; Rols, J L; Lawrence, J R

    2016-03-01

    Residual pesticides applied to crops migrate from agricultural lands to surface and ground waters. River biofilms are the first aquatic non-target organisms which interact with pesticides. Therefore, ecotoxicological experiments were performed at laboratory scale under controlled conditions to investigate the community-level responses of river biofilms to a chloroacetanilide herbicide (alachlor) and organic solvent (methanol) exposure through the development referenced to control. Triplicate rotating annular bioreactors, inoculated with river water, were used to cultivate river biofilms under the influence of 1 and 10 μg L(-1) of alachlor and 25 mg L(-1) of methanol. For this purpose, functional (thymidine incorporation and carbon utilization spectra) and structural responses of microbial communities were assessed after 5 weeks of development. Structural aspects included biomass (chlorophyll a, confocal laser scanning microscopy) and composition (fluor-conjugated lectin binding, molecular fingerprinting, and diatom species composition). The addition of alachlor resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial biomass at 1 μg L(-1), whereas at 10 μg L(-1), it induced a significant reduction of exopolymer lectin binding, algal, bacterial, and cyanobacterial biomass. However, there were no changes in biofilm thickness or thymidine incorporation. No significant difference between the bacterial community structures of control and alachlor-treated biofilms was revealed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses. However, the methanol-treated bacterial communities appeared different from control and alachlor-treated communities. Moreover, methanol treatment resulted in an increase of bacterial biomass and thymidine incorporation as well. Changes in dominant lectin binding suggested changes in the exopolymeric substances and community composition. Chlorophyll a and cyanobacterial biomass were also altered by methanol. This study suggested

  19. Mapping heatwave health risk at the community level for public health action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buscail Camille

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climate change poses unprecedented challenges, ranging from global and local policy challenges to personal and social action. Heat-related deaths are largely preventable, but interventions for the most vulnerable populations need improvement. Therefore, the prior identification of high risk areas at the community level is required to better inform planning and prevention. We aimed to demonstrate a simple and flexible conceptual framework relying upon satellite thermal data and other digital data with the goal of easily reproducing this framework in a variety of urban configurations. Results The study area encompasses Rennes, a medium-sized French city. A Landsat ETM + image (60 m resolution acquired during a localized heatwave (June 2001 was used to estimate land surface temperature (LST and derive a hazard index. A land-use regression model was performed to predict the LST. Vulnerability was assessed through census data describing four dimensions (socio-economic status, extreme age, population density and building obsolescence. Then, hazard and vulnerability indices were combined to deliver a heatwave health risk index. The LST patterns were quite heterogeneous, reflecting the land cover mosaic inside the city boundary, with hotspots of elevated temperature mainly observed in the city center. A spatial error regression model was highly predictive of the spatial variation in the LST (R2 = 0.87 and was parsimonious. Three land cover descriptors (NDVI, vegetation and water fractions were negatively linked with the LST. A sensitivity analysis (based on an image acquired on July 2000 yielded similar results. Southern areas exhibited the most vulnerability, although some pockets of higher vulnerability were observed northeast and west of the city. The heatwave health risk map showed evidence of infra-city spatial clustering, with the highest risks observed in a north–south central band. Another sensitivity analysis gave

  20. Inequities in intraurban areas in the distribution of risk factors for non communicable diseases, Belo Horizonte, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Carvalho Malta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In order to identify intraurban differentials, the prevalence of major protection and risk factors for non communicable chronic diseases were analyzed in nine health districts of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: Analysis of data from a telephone survey conducted with 2,000 adults in Belo Horizonte, in 2010, using the average linkage method for cluster analysis among the health districts, using sociodemographic variables (education, race and marital status. The study compared the prevalence of risk factors for non communicable diseases among the health districts. Results: Four clusters were identified. The best socio-demographic indicators were found in cluster 4 (South Central health district, which also showed a higher prevalence of protective factors such as higher consumption of fruits and vegetables, higher frequency of physical activity practice in the free time, use of ultraviolet protection, higher proportion of ex-smokers, and lower prevalence of whole milk and high-fat meat consumption. As a risk factor, cluster 4 showed a higher proportion of alcohol abuse. Cluster 1, with the worst socio-demographic indicators, concentrated more risk factors such as consumption of whole milk, low regular consumption of fruit and vegetables, and lower practice of physical activity in the free time. The most frequent protective indicators in cluster 1 were the regular consumption of beans, having breakfast at home, and lower alcohol abuse. Conclusion: Intra-urban differences were found in the distribution of risk and protection factors or non transmissible diseases, these differences can support planning aimed at actions for greater equity in health.

  1. The Public Sphere in Emerging Infectious Disease Communication: Recipient or Active and Vocal Partner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat; Shir-Raz, Yaffa; Walter, Nathan; Mordini, Emilio; Dimitriou, Dimitris; James, James J; Green, Manfred S

    2015-08-01

    Recent years have seen advances in theories and models of risk and crisis communication, with a focus on emerging epidemic infection. Nevertheless, information flow remains unilateral in many countries and does not take into account the public's polyvocality and the fact that its opinions and knowledge often "compete" with those of health authorities. This article addresses the challenges organizations face in communicating with the public sphere. Our theoretical approach is conceptualized through a framework that focuses on the public sphere and that builds upon existing guidelines and studies in the context of health and pandemics. We examine how health organizations cope with the public's transformation from recipients to an active and vocal entity, ie, how and to what extent health organizations address the public's anxiety and concerns arising in the social media during outbreaks. Although international organizations have aspired to relate to the public as a partner, this article identifies notable gaps. Organizations must involve the public throughout the crisis and conduct dialogues free of prejudices, paternalism, and preconceptions. Thereby, they can impart precise and updated information reflecting uncertainty and considering cultural differences to build trust and facilitate cooperation with the public sphere.

  2. Reinventing mass communication: a World Health Organization tool for behavioral change to control disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Debabar

    2004-01-01

    Most of the WHO's vertical programs, because they were ill-conceived, ill-designed, and defectively implemented, have fallen far short of expectations. These limitations have been doggedly ignored by the WHO, although the authorities in India have now realized that such vertical programs are expensive and not sustainable. Launching of Communication for Behavioral Impact (COMBI) appears to mark a desperate effort to revive their performance. It represents yet another deviation from the mandate given to the WHO. In 1983, the then director general warned against motivational manipulation of people to sell health ideas, but the WHO has now brazenly come forward to look for help from the private sector. COMBI uses the jargon and language of the market place to "market" health programs; it calls this "cause-related marketing." The WHO has been most a historical in conceptualizing COMBI, as it has not learned from the failure of UNICEF's earlier venture to market child survival by employing experts in social marketing to bring about "community mobilization." The WHO should have reviewed the large body of literature on work in the health social sciences, health education, and the many programs based on the concept of "information, education, and communication." The pointed neglect of such key issues raises serious moral, ethical, and human rights questions. The COMBI approach amounts to be a breach of trust--a threat to human dignity.

  3. An individual-level meta-analysis assessing the impact of community-level sanitation access on child stunting, anemia, and diarrhea: Evidence from DHS and MICS surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A; Grisham, Thomas; Slawsky, Erik; Narine, Lutchmie

    2017-06-01

    A lack of access to sanitation is an important risk factor child health, facilitating fecal-oral transmission of pathogens including soil-transmitted helminthes and various causes of diarrheal disease. We conducted a meta-analysis of cross-sectional surveys to determine the impact that community-level sanitation access has on child health for children with and without household sanitation access. Using 301 two-stage demographic health surveys and multiple indicator cluster surveys conducted between 1990 and 2015 we calculated the sanitation access in the community as the proportion of households in the sampled cluster that had household access to any type of sanitation facility. We then conducted exact matching of children based on various predictors of living in a community with high access to sanitation. Using logistic regression with the matched group as a random intercept we examined the association between the child health outcomes of stunted growth, any anemia, moderate or severe anemia, and diarrhea in the previous two weeks and the exposure of living in a community with varying degrees of community-level sanitation access. For children with household-level sanitation access, living in a community with 100% sanitation access was associated with lowered odds of stunting (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.97, 95%; confidence interval (CI) = 0.94-1.00; n = 14,153 matched groups, 1,175,167 children), any anemia (AOR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.67-0.78; n = 5,319 matched groups, 299,033 children), moderate or severe anemia (AOR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.68-0.77; n = 5,319 matched groups, 299,033 children) and diarrhea (AOR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.91-0.97); n = 16,379 matched groups, 1,603,731 children) compared to living in a community with diarrhea (AOR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.98-1.02; n = 16,379 matched groups, 1,603,731 children) compared to children without household-level sanitation access living in communities with 1-30% sanitation access. Community-level sanitation access is associated

  4. Can China achieve a one-third reduction in premature mortality from non-communicable diseases by 2030?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yichong; Zeng, Xinying; Liu, Jiangmei; Liu, Yunning; Liu, Shiwei; Yin, Peng; Qi, Jinlei; Zhao, Zhenping; Yu, Shicheng; Hu, Yuehua; He, Guangxue; Lopez, Alan D; Gao, George F; Wang, Linhong; Zhou, Maigeng

    2017-07-11

    The United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 include reducing premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by one third. To assess the feasibility of this goal in China, we projected premature mortality in 2030 of NCDs under different risk factor reduction scenarios. We used China results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 as empirical data for projections. Deaths between 1990 and 2013 for cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, and other NCDs were extracted, along with population numbers. We disaggregated deaths into parts attributable and unattributable to high systolic blood pressure (SBP), smoking, high body mass index (BMI), high total cholesterol, physical inactivity, and high fasting glucose. Risk factor exposure and deaths by NCD category were projected to 2030. Eight simulated scenarios were also constructed to explore how premature mortality will be affected if the World Health Organization's targets for risk factors reduction are achieved by 2030. If current trends for each risk factor continued to 2030, the total premature deaths from NCDs would increase from 3.11 million to 3.52 million, but the premature mortality rate would decrease by 13.1%. In the combined scenario in which all risk factor reduction targets are achieved, nearly one million deaths among persons 30 to 70 years old due to NCDs would be avoided, and the one-third reduction goal would be achieved for all NCDs combined. More specifically, the goal would be achieved for CVD and chronic respiratory diseases, but not for cancer and diabetes. Reduction in the prevalence of high SBP, smoking, and high BMI played an important role in achieving the goals. Reaching the goal of a one-third reduction in premature mortality from NCDs is possible by 2030 if certain targets for risk factor intervention are reached, but more efforts are required to achieve risk factor reduction.

  5. Using the EC decision on case definitions for communicable diseases as a terminology source--lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkanyi, Laszlo; Heja, Gergely; Nagy, Attlia

    2014-01-01

    Extracting scientifically accurate terminology from an EU public health regulation is part of the knowledge engineering work at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). ECDC operates information systems at the crossroads of many areas - posing a challenge for transparency and consistency. Semantic interoperability is based on the Terminology Server (TS). TS value sets (structured vocabularies) describe shared domains as "diseases", "organisms", "public health terms", "geo-entities" "organizations" and "administrative terms" and others. We extracted information from the relevant EC Implementing Decision on case definitions for reporting communicable diseases, listing 53 notifiable infectious diseases, containing clinical, diagnostic, laboratory and epidemiological criteria. We performed a consistency check; a simplification - abstraction; we represented lab criteria in triplets: as 'y' procedural result /of 'x' organism-substance/on 'z' specimen and identified negations. The resulting new case definition value set represents the various formalized criteria, meanwhile the existing disease value set has been extended, new signs and symptoms were added. New organisms enriched the organism value set. Other new categories have been added to the public health value set, as transmission modes; substances; specimens and procedures. We identified problem areas, as (a) some classification error(s); (b) inconsistent granularity of conditions; (c) seemingly nonsense criteria, medical trivialities; (d) possible logical errors, (e) seemingly factual errors that might be phrasing errors. We think our hypothesis regarding room for possible improvements is valid: there are some open issues and a further improved legal text might lead to more precise epidemiologic data collection. It has to be noted that formal representation for automatic classification of cases was out of scope, such a task would require other formalism, as e.g. those used by rule

  6. Developing the agenda for European Union collaboration on non-communicable diseases research in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ly Adama

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health research is increasing in Africa, but most resources are currently chanelled towards infectious diseases and health system development. While infectious diseases remain a heavy burden for some African countries, non-communicable diseases (NCDs account for more than half of all deaths globally and WHO predicts 27% increase in NCDs in Africa over the next decade. We present findings of a European-Africa consultation on the research agenda for NCDs. Methods A workshop was held in Yaoundé, Cameroon, organized by the Network for the Coordination and Advancement of Sub-Saharan Africa-European Union Science and Technology Cooperation (CAAST-Net. Drawing on initial presentations, a small expert group from academic, clinical, public-health and administrative positions considered research needs in Africa for cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. Results Research in Africa can draw from different environmental and genetic characteristics to understand the causes of the disease, while economic and social factors are important in developing relevant strategies for prevention and treatment. The suggested research needs include better methods for description and recording, clinical studies, understanding cultural impacts, prevention strategies, and the integrated organisation of care. Specific fields proposed for research are listed. Conclusions Our paper contributes to transparency in the process of priority-setting for health research in Africa. Although the European Union Seventh Framework Research Programme prioritises biomedical and clinical research, research for Africa should also address broader social and cultural research and intervention research for greatest impact. Research policy leaders in Africa must engage national governments and international agencies as well as service providers and research communities. None can act effectively alone. Bringing together the different stakeholders, and feeding the results

  7. Early disruption of glial communication via connexin gap junction in multiple sclerosis, Baló's disease and neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and Baló's disease (BD) are inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS. We previously reported anti-aquaporin-4 (anti-AQP4) antibody-dependent AQP4 loss occurs in some NMO patients, while antibody-independent AQP4 astrocytopathy can occur in heterogeneous demyelinating conditions, including MS, NMO and BD. To investigate the relationship between astrocytopathy and demyelination, we focused on connexins (Cxs), which form gap junctions (GJs) between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and maintain homeostasis in the CNS. We evaluated expression of astrocytic Cx43/Cx30 and oligodendrocytic Cx47/Cx32 in autopsied materials from MS, NMO and BD patients. Astrocytic Cx43 and oligodendrocytic Cx32/Cx47 expressions were significantly diminished in both demyelinated and preserved myelin layers in all BD samples. In the leading edge of BD lesions, Cx43 and AQP4 loss preceded Cx32/Cx47 loss. Half of the NMO and MS samples showed preferential loss of astrocytic Cx43 expression in actively demyelinating and chronic active lesions, where heterotypic Cx43/Cx47 astrocyte-oligodendrocyte GJs were lost. Cases with Cx43 loss were significantly associated with rapid disease progression, regardless of the disease phenotype. Pathologically, Cx43 loss was frequently accompanied by distal oligodendrogliopathy. Our findings suggest that Cx43 astrocytopathy can occur in MS, BD and NMO. Moreover, astrocytic Cx43 loss may be associated with disease aggressiveness and distal oligodendrogliopathy in demyelinating conditions. Early disruption of glial communications via GJs may cause loss of glia syncytium, thereby inducing oligodendroglial damage and myelin loss. Inhibition of Cx hemichannels and restoration of GJs may be a possible therapeutic target for demyelinating disorders. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Implementing a public web based GIS service for feedback of surveillance data on communicable diseases in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekdahl Karl

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveillance data allow for analysis, providing public health officials and policy-makers with a basis for long-term priorities and timely information on possible outbreaks for rapid response (data for action. In this article we describe the considerations and technology behind a newly introduced public web tool in Sweden for easy retrieval of county and national surveillance data on communicable diseases. Methods The web service was designed to automatically present updated surveillance statistics of some 50 statutory notifiable diseases notified to the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI. The surveillance data is based on clinical notifications from the physician having treated the patient and laboratory notifications, merged into cases using a unique personal identification number issued to all Swedish residents. The web service use notification data from 1997 onwards, stored in a relational database at the SMI. Results The web service presents surveillance data to the user in various ways; tabulated data containing yearly and monthly disease data per county, age and sex distribution, interactive maps illustrating the total number of cases and the incidence per county and time period, graphs showing the total number of cases per week and graphs illustrating trends in the disease data. The system design encompasses the database (storing the data, the web server (holding the web service and an in-the-middle computer (to ensure good security standards. Conclusions The web service has provided the health community, the media, and the public with easy access to both timely and detailed surveillance data presented in various forms. Since it was introduced in May 2003, the system has been accessed more than 1,000,000 times, by more than 10,000 different viewers (over 12.600 unique IP-numbers.

  9. 78 FR 11521 - Control of Communicable Disease; Foreign-Requirements for Importers of Nonhuman Primates (NHP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... disease that may be fatal to humans, including filoviruses, hepatitis, herpes B virus, tuberculosis (TB..., 1990) issued following a 1990 incident involving identification of Ebola virus (Reston strain) among... collect or create records of the intended purpose for imported NHPs and maintain records regarding each...

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: A Basic Mechanism in Inflammation-Related Non-Communicable Diseases and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hernández-Aguilera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not necessarily a predisposing factor for disease. It is the handling of fat and/or excessive energy intake that encompasses the linkage of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism to the deleterious effects associated with the continuous excess of food ingestion. The roles of cytokines and insulin resistance in excessive energy intake have been studied extensively. Tobacco use and obesity accompanied by an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity are the main factors that underlie noncommunicable diseases. The implication is that the management of energy or food intake, which is the main role of mitochondria, is involved in the most common diseases. In this study, we highlight the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the mutual relationships between causative conditions. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that fuse and divide in response to environmental stimuli, developmental status, and energy requirements. These organelles act to supply the cell with ATP and to synthesise key molecules in the processes of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism. Therefore, energy sensors and management effectors are determinants in the course and development of diseases. Regulating mitochondrial function may require a multifaceted approach that includes drugs and plant-derived phenolic compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that improve mitochondrial biogenesis and act to modulate the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  11. Local communication among mucosal immune cells in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Mulder, Chris J; Mearin, M Luisa; Koning, Frits

    2015-05-01

    In patients with celiac disease, gluten consumption causes inflammation of the duodenum, and, to a lesser extent, the proximal jejunum. Immune-dominant gluten peptides are modified by the enzyme TG2, leading to their high-affinity binding to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules, present in people with a predisposition to celiac disease. Gluten peptide-loaded HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules are recognized by highly conserved receptors on CD4(+) T cells in the lamina propria. B cells specific for TG2 and modified gluten peptides are also abundant in the lamina propria of patients with celiac disease. In the epithelium, interleukin-15 activates intraepithelial lymphocytes that promote destruction of epithelial cells. However, it is not clear how the immune responses in the lamina propria and the epithelium, separated by a basement membrane, are linked. We review the immune processes that occur in the lamina propria and their potential effects on epithelial pathology in celiac disease.

  12. 77 FR 75885 - Control of Communicable Diseases: Foreign; Scope and Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Definitions AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS/CDC), Department of Health and Human... industry and public health partners. As part of the update, we are updating five existing definitions... States Updated. Vector Updated. A. Definitions Updated Under Section 71.1 International...

  13. 77 FR 75936 - Control of Communicable Diseases: Interstate; Scope and Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Definitions AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS/CDC), Department of Health and Human... Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is proposing to update the definitions for interstate... current medical and public health principles and practice. Table 1 lists the current definitions found...

  14. Effects of Cognitive-Communication Stimulation for Alzheimer's Disease Patients Treated with Donepezil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sandra Bond; Weiner, Myron F.; Rackley, Audette; Hynan, Linda S.; Zientz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    ds to growing evidence that active cognitive stimulation may slow the rate of verbal and functional decline and decrease negative emotional symptoms in AD when combined with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, indicating a need to advance research in the area of cognitive treatments. The fact that AD is a progressive brain disease should not preclude…

  15. Verbal communication among Alzheimer's disease patients, their caregivers, and primary care physicians during primary care office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karen L; Lingler, Jennifer H; Schulz, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Primary care visits of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often involve communication among patients, family caregivers, and primary care physicians (PCPs). The objective of this study was to understand the nature of each individual's verbal participation in these triadic interactions. To define the verbal communication dynamics of AD care triads, we compared verbal participation (percent of total visit speech) by each participant in patient/caregiver/PCP triads. Twenty-three triads were audio taped during a routine primary care visit. Rates of verbal participation were described and effects of patient cognitive status (MMSE score, verbal fluency) on verbal participation were assessed. PCP verbal participation was highest at 53% of total visit speech, followed by caregivers (31%) and patients (16%). Patient cognitive measures were related to patient and caregiver verbal participation, but not to PCP participation. Caregiver satisfaction with interpersonal treatment by PCP was positively related to caregiver's own verbal participation. Caregivers of AD patients and PCPs maintain active, coordinated verbal participation in primary care visits while patients participate less. Encouraging verbal participation by AD patients and their caregivers may increase the AD patient's active role and caregiver satisfaction with primary care visits.

  16. Interdisciplinary communication of infectious disease research - translating complex epidemiological findings into understandable messages for village chicken farmers in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Joerg; Hla, Than; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in animal disease control and prevention is dependent on several factors including farmers' uptake of new technologies and skills, particularly in developing countries. Extension is the means by which information about these technologies and skills is delivered to farmers, in order that they can use this knowledge to improve farming practices and their quality of life. This implies a shift from traditional methods to new science-based methods of production. However, in many developing countries farmers are illiterate and unable to understand written outcomes of scientific research. This paper summarizes approaches to communicate epidemiological findings and reports on experiences obtained from a research project in Myanmar, where results from epidemiological field investigations and intervention studies were 'translated' in an understandable manner to village communities. Rural chicken farmers were the central focus of this extension work and simple and sustainable methods to improve the health and production of scavenging chicken flocks were promoted. Unique extension materials transformed scientific outputs published in international journals into clear pictographic messages comprehendible by villagers, while maintaining country-specific, traditional, religious and public perspectives. Benefits, difficulties and pitfalls in using extension methods to communicate advice on preventive veterinary medicine measures in different cross-cultural settings are discussed and guidelines on how to distribute epidemiological research results to illiterate farmers are provided.

  17. Overweight, obesity and related non-communicable diseases in Asian Indian girls and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, S M; Misra, A; Gulati, S; Gupta, R

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising globally and in India. Overweight, obesity and related diseases need to be delineated in Asian Indian women. A literature search was done using key words like 'obesity', 'Asian Indian women', 'body fat distribution', 'type 2 diabetes', 'fertility', 'polycystic ovarian disease', metabolic syndrome', 'cardiovascular disease', 'non-alcoholic fatty liver disease', 'gender', 'sex' and 'prevalence' up to September 2012 in Pubmed and Google Scholar search engines. This review highlights the Asian Indian body composition with regards to obesity and provides a collated perspective of gender-specific prevalence of the co-morbidities. Recent data show that women (range of prevalence of overweight and obesity from different studies 15-61%) have higher prevalence of overweight and obesity as compared with men (range of prevalence of overweight and obesity from different studies 12-54%) in India and that obesity is increasing in the youth. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in both men and women steeply rose in a Punjabi community from Jaipur. Importantly, prevalence of abdominal obesity has been consistently higher in women than in men. The lowest prevalence (6.0%) of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women is reported from South India (rural Andhra Pradesh; 2006) and the highest (14.0%) by the National Urban Diabetes Survey (2001). Although the clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors was generally high, it increased further in post-menopausal women. There are a number of factors that predispose Indian women to obesity; sedentary behaviour, imbalanced diets, sequential and additive postpartum weight gain and further decrease in physical activity during this period and cultural issues. In view of these data, preventive measures should be specifically targeted to Indian women.

  18. Genotype vs. Phenotype and the Rise of Non-Communicable Diseases: The Importance of Lifestyle Behaviors During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brian W; Skidmore, Paula M; Orta, Olivia R; Faulkner, James; Lambrick, Danielle; Signal, Leigh; Williams, Michelle A; Stoner, Lee

    2016-01-13

    Despite continued research and growing public awareness, the incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCD) continues to accelerate. While a person may have a genetic predisposition to certain NCDs, the rapidly changing epidemiology of NCDs points to the importance of environmental, social, and behavioural determinants of health. Specifically, three lifestyle behaviours expose children to important environmental cues and stressors: physical activity, nutritional intake, and sleep behaviour. Failure to expose children to proper gene-environment interactions, through the aforementioned lifestyle behaviours, can and will predispose children to the development of NCDs. Reengineering the environments of children can induce a paradigm shift, from a predominantly biomedical health model of treating symptomology, to a more holistic model based on encouraging appropriate behavioral decisions and optimal health.

  19. Improved maternal nutrition decreases children’s long-term risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Improved maternal nutrition to decrease children’s long-term risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity The nutritional well-being of pregnant women affects not only their health and their fetuses' development but also children's long-term risk of developing NCDs or obesity, according...... of death and disability in the WHO European Region. The need to address the current epidemics of obesity, diabetes and other NCDs is already identified as a major health priority: the European policy framework, Health 2020, and Sustainable Development Goal 3 have specific targets related to NCDs....... The evidence emphasizes the need to implement strategies to optimize the nutrition of reproductive-age women. The evidence suggests that such interventions are among the most effective and sustainable means of achieving positive effects on health and reducing health inequalities across the next generation...

  20. Critical assessment of the research outcomes of European birth cohorts: linking environmental factors with non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piler, P; Kandrnal, V; Bláha, L

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this review paper was to stimulate collaborative discussions toward the development of a general concept of an open source protocol for a feasible and efficient longitudinal birth cohort study exploring non-communicable diseases (NCDs), their multifactorial etiology and relations between various risk factors. The present paper systematically reviews the design of existing birth cohorts in Europe containing environmental exposure data, and assesses a quantity and quality of their research outcomes as their potential to be an effective tool for studying non-communicable diseases and their risk factors. European birth cohorts with more than 3000 participants have been included in the study. A total number of scientific papers published in the internationally recognized journals and their impact factors and citation records were evaluated for all cohorts as surrogates for their efficiency to contribute to NCDs understanding and thus their prevention. The birth cohorts contributing most significantly to the NCD understanding shared common features: (i) study size between 10,000 and 15,000 mother-child pairs; (ii) repeated assessment of children from prenatal into adulthood; and (iii) availability of biological samples. Smaller cohorts and cohorts with a specific focus generated a lower number of publications; however, these often received considerably a higher number of citations. General cohort studies with 10,000-15,000 mother-child pairs allow a broader context interpretation, publish a higher number of articles, and often lead to the formation of infrastructures for 'spin-off (nested) studies'. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in the Adult Population of Urban Areas in Kabul City, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja Mir Islam Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-Communicable diseases (NCDs are a major global problem. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of common risk factors for NCDs among the adult population in urban areas of Kabul city, Afghanistan. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted from December 2011 through March 2012 and involved a survey of 1169 respondents, aged 40 years and above. Multistage cluster sampling was used for participant selection, followed by random sampling of the participants. The World Health Organization STEPwise approachfor Surveillance (STEPS was modified and used for this study. Results: The overall prevalence of smoking was 5.1% (14.7% men versus 0.3% women and using mouth snuff was 24.4% in men and 1.3% in women. The prevalence of obesity and hypertension were 19.1% and 45.2 % in men and 37.3% and 46.5% in women. Prevalence of diabetes was 16.1% in men and 12% in women. The overall prevalence of obesity, hypertension and diabetes mellitus was 31.2%, 46% and 13.3%, respectively. On average, subjects consumed 3.37 servings of fruit and 2.96 servings of leafy vegetables per week. Mean walking and sitting hours per week (as proxies for physical activity were 19.4 and 20.5, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated that age was a significant risk factor for obesity (OR=1.86, diabetes (OR=2/09 and hypertension (OR=4.1. Obesity was significantly associated with sex (OR=1.65. Conclusion: These results highlight the need for interventions to reduce and prevent risk factors of non-communicable diseases in urban areas of Kabul City, Afghanistan.

  2. Prevalence of risk factors for non-communicable diseases in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: results from a STEPS survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Luc H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD in Vietnam, information on the prevalence of preventable risk factors for NCD is restricted to the main urban centres of Ha Noi, and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC. This population-based survey aimed to describe the prevalence of risk factors for NCD in a rural Vietnamese sample. Methods This survey was conducted using the WHO "STEPwise approach to surveillance of non-communicable diseases" (STEPS methodology. Participants (n = 1978 were residents of the Mekong Delta region selected by multi-stage sampling. Standardised international protocols were used to measure behavioural risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, physical characteristics (weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure – BP, fasting blood glucose (BG and total cholesterol (TC. Data were analysed using complex survey analysis methods. Results In this sample, 8.8% of men and 12.6% of women were overweight (body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and 2.3% of men and 1.5% of women were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2. The prevalence of hypertension (systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg, or taking medication for hypertension was 27.3% for men and 16.2% for women. There were 1.0% of men and 1.1% of women with raised BG (defined as capillary whole BG of at least 6.1 mmol/L. Conclusion We provide the first NCD risk factor profile of people living in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam using standardised methodology. Our findings for this predominantly rural sample differ from previous studies conducted in Ha Noi and HCMC, and suggest that it is inappropriate to generalise findings from the big-city surveys to the other 80% of the population.

  3. Development of methodology for community level toxicity testing using the fathead minnow seven day survival-growth impairment test

    OpenAIRE

    Lauth, John Robert

    1990-01-01

    Single species toxicity tests are widely used to assess the potential effects of a toxicant on aquatic life. Increasingly, it is necessary to understand how the results of these tests relate to toxicant effects in natural communities. This dissertation presents the methodology and validation for a community level toxicity test that bridges the gap between single species tests and natutal community responses. The research involved control of environmental parameters, improvement...

  4. Phylogeny, Seed Trait, and Ecological Correlates of Seed Germination at the Community Level in a Degraded Sandy Grassland

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhengning; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Zhimin; Li, Yanjuan; Liu, Qingqing; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination strongly affects plant population growth and persistence, and it can be dramatically influenced by phylogeny, seed traits, and ecological factors. In this study, we examined the relationships among seed mass, seed shape, and germination percentage (GP), and assessed the extent to which phylogeny, seed traits (seed mass, shape, and color) and ecological factors (ecotype, life form, adult longevity, dispersal type, and onset of flowering) influence GP at the community level. Al...

  5. Heavy burden of non-communicable diseases at early age and gender disparities in an adult population of Burkina Faso: world health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miszkurka Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO estimates suggest that age-specific death rates from non-communicable diseases are higher in sub-Saharan Africa than in high-income countries. The objectives of this study were to examine, in Burkina Faso, the prevalence of non-communicable disease symptoms by age, gender, socioeconomic group and setting (rural/urban, and to assess gender and socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of these symptoms. Methods We obtained data from the Burkina Faso World Health Survey, which was conducted in an adult population (18 years and over with a high response rate (4822/4880 selected individuals. The survey used a multi-stage stratified random cluster sampling strategy to identify participants. The survey collected information on socio-demographic and economic characteristics, as well as data on symptoms of a variety of health conditions. Our study focused on joint disease, back pain, angina pectoris, and asthma. We estimated prevalence correcting for the sampling design. We used multiple Poisson regression to estimate associations between non-communicable disease symptoms, gender, socioeconomic status and setting. Results The overall crude prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI were: 16.2% [13.5; 19.2] for joint disease, 24% [21.5; 26.6] for back pain, 17.9% [15.8; 20.2] for angina pectoris, and 11.6% [9.5; 14.2] for asthma. Consistent relationships between age and the prevalence of non-communicable disease symptoms were observed in both men and women from rural and urban settings. There was markedly high prevalence in all conditions studied, starting with young adults. Women presented higher prevalence rates of symptoms than men for all conditions: prevalence ratios and 95% CIs were 1.20 [1.01; 1.43] for joint disease, 1.42 [1.21; 1.66] for back pain, 1.68 [1.39; 2.04] for angina pectoris, and 1.28 [0.99; 1.65] for asthma. Housewives and unemployed women had the highest prevalence rates of non-communicable disease

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of gut-directed hypnosis on inflammatory bowel disease: a brief communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Laurie; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2007-10-01

    Hypnotically assisted treatments have been used to reduce stress, improve gastrointestinal motility, strengthen immune function, and potentially reduce inflammation. Such treatments may also help reduce disease flares and improve quality of life in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The authors report the results of a case series of 8 white female patients with inactive IBD. All participants initiated and completed treatment, supporting the general acceptability of hypnotically assisted treatment among IBD patients. There was a significant improvement in IBD-quality of life scores for the group posttreatment, t(7) = -3.38, p = .01, with a mean improvement in quality of life of 29 points with significant changes in all 4 subscales. No negative effects of treatment were found.

  7. Community-level adult daily smoking prevalence moderates the association between adolescents' cigarette smoking and perceived smoking by friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrul, Johannes; Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Grube, Joel W; Friend, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the complex interactions among the individual- and community-level social risk factors that underlie adolescents' smoking behaviors. This study investigated whether community-level adult daily smoking prevalence is associated with adolescents' smoking and whether it moderates the associations between perceived friends' smoking approval and smoking behavior and adolescents' own smoking. Self-reported data from 1,190 youths (50.3% female; 13-18 years old) in 50 midsized Californian cities were obtained through telephone interviews. Community characteristics were obtained from 2010 GeoLytics data. Community adult daily smoking prevalence was ascertained from telephone interviews with 8,918 adults conducted in the same 50 cities. Multilevel analyses, controlling for individual and city characteristics, were used to predict adolescents' past 12-month smoking from perceived friends' smoking approval and smoking behavior and from community adult daily smoking prevalence. Results showed that perceived friends' smoking approval and behavior were associated positively with adolescents' smoking, as was the community-level prevalence of adult daily smoking. Furthermore, the association between perceived friends' smoking behavior and adolescents' own smoking was moderated by the prevalence of adult daily smokers in the community. Specifically, the association was stronger in cities with higher prevalence of adult smokers. These results suggest that adult community norms that are more supportive of smoking may enhance the influence of friends' smoking behavior. Therefore, interventions designed to prevent or reduce youths' smoking should also focus on reducing smoking by adults.

  8. Short communication. Old diseases for new nightmares: distemper strikes back in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Lorusso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the distemper outbreak that affected the population of Apennine wolves (Canis lupus in Italy during 2013. Distemper, as rabies, is a well-known viral infectious disease that concerns the canine population worldwide and represents a threat for wild species too. Implementation of vaccination and legislation for compulsory vaccination strategies should be achieved in areas with endangered wild species.

  9. Using communication skills to improve adherence in children with chronic disease: the adherence equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Paul L P; Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to maintenance medication is common in paediatric chronic conditions. Despite the common belief that nonadherence is therapy-resistant, and the apparent lack of evidence for successful interventions to improve adherence, there is, in fact, a considerable body of evidence suggesting that adherence can be improved by applying specific communicative consultation skills. These can be summarized as the adherence equation: adherence=follow-up+dialogue+barriers and beliefs+empathy and education => concordance. Close follow-up of children with a chronic condition is needed to establish a therapeutic partnership with the family. Teaching self management skills is not a unidirectional process of providing information, but requires a constructive and collaborative dialogue between the medical team and the family. Identifying barriers to adherence can be achieved in a non-confrontational manner, by showing a genuine interest what the patient's views and preferences are. In particular, parental illness perceptions and medication beliefs should be identified, because they are strong drivers of nonadherence. Through empathic evidence-based education, such perceptions and beliefs can be modified. By applying these strategies, concordance between the child's family and the medical team can be achieved, resulting in optimal adherence to the jointly created treatment plan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CASALUD: an innovative health-care system to control and prevent non-communicable diseases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martinez, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Mexico and other Latin American countries are currently facing a dramatic increase in the number of adults suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which require prolonged, continuous care. This epidemiological shift has created new challenges for health-care systems. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN) have recognised the growing human and economic costs of NCDs and outlined an action plan, recognising that NCDs are preventable, often with common preventable risk factors linked to risky health behaviours. In line with international best practices, Mexico has applied a number of approaches to tackle these diseases. However, challenges remain for the Mexican health-care system, and in planning a strategy for combating and preventing NCDs, it must consider how best to integrate these strategies with existing health-care infrastructure. Shifting the paradigm of care in Mexico from a curative, passive approach to a preventive, proactive model will require an innovative and replicable system that guarantees availability of medicines and services, strengthens human capital through ongoing professional education, expands early and continuous access to care through proactive prevention strategies and incorporates technological innovations in order to do so. Here, we describe CASALUD: an innovative model in health-care that leverages international best practices and uses innovative technology to deliver NCD care, control and prevention. In addition, we describe the lessons learned from the initial implementation of the model for its effective use in Mexico, as well as the plans for wider implementation throughout the country, in partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Health. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  11. Non-Communicable Disease Clinical Practice Guidelines in Brazil: A Systematic Assessment of Methodological Quality and Transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Caroline de Godoi Rezende Costa; Romano-Lieber, Nicolina Silvana; Ribeiro, Eliane; de Melo, Daniela Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Annually, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) kill 38 million people worldwide, with low and middle-income countries accounting for three-quarters of these deaths. High-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are fundamental to improving NCD management. The present study evaluated the methodological rigor and transparency of Brazilian CPGs that recommend pharmacological treatment for the most prevalent NCDs. We conducted a systematic search for CPGs of the following NCDs: asthma, atrial fibrillation, benign prostatic hyperplasia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and/or stable angina, dementia, depression, diabetes, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. CPGs comprising pharmacological treatment recommendations were included. No language or year restrictions were applied. CPGs were excluded if they were merely for local use and referred to NCDs not listed above. CPG quality was independently assessed by two reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation instrument, version II (AGREE II). "Scope and purpose" and "clarity and presentation" domains received the highest scores. Sixteen of 26 CPGs were classified as low quality, and none were classified as high overall quality. No CPG was recommended without modification (77% were not recommended at all). After 2009, 2 domain scores ("rigor of development" and "clarity and presentation") increased (61% and 73%, respectively). However, "rigor of development" was still rated < 30%. Brazilian healthcare professionals should be concerned with CPG quality for the treatment of selected NCDs. Features that undermined AGREE II scores included the lack of a multidisciplinary team for the development group, no consideration of patients' preferences, insufficient information regarding literature searches, lack of selection criteria, formulating recommendations, authors' conflict of interest

  12. Task shifting for non-communicable disease management in low and middle income countries--a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohina Joshi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One potential solution to limited healthcare access in low and middle income countries (LMIC is task-shifting- the training of non-physician healthcare workers (NPHWs to perform tasks traditionally undertaken by physicians. The aim of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of studies involving task-shifting for the management of non-communicable disease (NCD in LMIC. METHODS: A search strategy with the following terms "task-shifting", "non-physician healthcare workers", "community healthcare worker", "hypertension", "diabetes", "cardiovascular disease", "mental health", "depression", "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease", "respiratory disease", "cancer" was conducted using Medline via Pubmed and the Cochrane library. Two reviewers independently reviewed the databases and extracted the data. FINDINGS: Our search generated 7176 articles of which 22 were included in the review. Seven studies were randomised controlled trials and 15 were observational studies. Tasks performed by NPHWs included screening for NCDs and providing primary health care. The majority of studies showed improved health outcomes when compared with usual healthcare, including reductions in blood pressure, increased uptake of medications and lower depression scores. Factors such as training of NPHWs, provision of algorithms and protocols for screening, treatment and drug titration were the main enablers of the task-shifting intervention. The main barriers identified were restrictions on prescribing medications and availability of medicines. Only two studies described cost-effective analyses, both of which demonstrated that task-shifting was cost-effective. CONCLUSIONS: Task-shifting from physicians to NPHWs, if accompanied by health system re-structuring is a potentially effective and affordable strategy for improving access to healthcare for NCDs. Since the majority of study designs reviewed were of inadequate quality, future research methods should include

  13. The Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases: study design and baseline characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Na

    Full Text Available Diet and nutrition have been reported to be associated with many common chronic diseases and blood-based assessment would be vital to investigate the association and mechanism, however, blood-based prospective studies are limited. The Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases was set up in 2010. From 2010 to 2012, 9,734 participants completed the baseline survey, including demographic characteristics, dietary intake, lifestyles and physical condition, and anthropometrics. A re-survey on 490 randomly selected participants was done by using the same methods which were employed in the baseline survey. For all participants, the mean age was 50 years and 36% of them were men. Approximately 99.4 % of cohort members donated blood samples. The mean total energy intake was 2671.7 kcal/day in men and 2245.9 kcal/day in women, the mean body mass index was 25.7 kg/m2 in men and 24.6 kg/m2 in women, with 18.4% being obese (≥ 28 kg/m2, 12.7% being diabetic, and 29.5% being hypertensive. A good agreement was obtained for the physical measurements between the baseline survey and re-survey. The resources from the cohort and its fasting and postprandial blood samples collected both at baseline and in each follow-up will be valuable and powerful in investigating relationship between diet, nutrition and chronic diseases and discovering novel blood biomarkers and the metabolism of these biomarkers related to chronic diseases.

  14. Strengthening systems for communicable disease surveillance: creating a laboratory network in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndihokubwayo Jean B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent emergence of a novel strain of influenza virus with pandemic potential underscores the need for quality surveillance and laboratory services to contribute to the timely detection and confirmation of public health threats. To provide a framework for strengthening disease surveillance and response capacities in African countries, the World Health Organization Regional Headquarters for Africa (AFRO developed Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR aimed at improving national surveillance and laboratory systems. IDSR emphasizes the linkage of information provided by public health laboratories to the selection of relevant, appropriate and effective public health responses to disease outbreaks. Methods We reviewed the development of Rwanda's National Reference Laboratory (NRL to understand essential structures involved in creating a national public health laboratory network. We reviewed documents describing the NRL's organization and record of test results, conducted site visits, and interviewed health staff in the Ministry of Health and in partner agencies. Findings were developed by organizing thematic categories and grouping examples within them. We purposefully sought to identify success factors as well as challenges inherent in developing a national public health laboratory system. Results Among the identified success factors were: a structured governing framework for public health surveillance; political commitment to promote leadership for stronger laboratory capacities in Rwanda; defined roles and responsibilities for each level; coordinated approaches between technical and funding partners; collaboration with external laboratories; and use of performance results in advocacy with national stakeholders. Major challenges involved general infrastructure, human resources, and budgetary constraints. Conclusions Rwanda's experience with collaborative partnerships contributed to creation of a functional

  15. Preventive Medicine in World War 2. Volume 6. Communicable Diseases. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    In 1043. A«. J. Trop. M«HI. 37: 177 200. Maren INT. 10 CO.MMIMCAltl.i: DISKAKKS cide . t’\\|H’ll(’d sis :III Aerosol misl; 1.1K; Iniiadciiiiig of...investigation of mosquito rc|>ellfii(s at tlio Orlando Lalto- ratory of the Ihireau of Entomology and Plant (Juaraiiiiiic tesis were also made on larval...8217OMML’ML’AHI.K. »ISKASES cides to control insect pests ami disease vectors, l’yivlliruin was llu> active ingredient of most of thi* insecticides employed

  16. Women Health in Saudi Arabia: A review of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Alquaiz, Aljoharah; R Siddiqui, Amna; H Qureshi, Riaz; A Fouda, Mona; A Almuneef, Maha; A Habib, Fawzia; M Turkistani, Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    This is a review of the changing pattern of chronic diseases among women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Data from national surveys conducted in KSA, whose results were published between 1996 and 2011 were used. The results showed that over a period of ten years the prevalence of obesity increased in Saudi women from 23.6% to 44.0% and in men from 14.2% to 26.2%; self-reported physical inactivity worsened in both women (from 84.7% to 98.1%) and men (from 43.3% to 93.9%); prevalence of smoking in women increased (from 0.9% to 7.6%), while it declined in men (from 21.0% to 18.7%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was significantly greater in women than men (42.0% versus 37.2%; p women are potentially at a greater risk than a decade ago to develop cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, with a notable increase in obesity compared to men.

  17. Into the Paradigm of Local Factors as Contributors for Peri-implant Disease: Short Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Tözüm, Tolga Fikret; Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    Although some systemic conditions have been associated with peri-implant disease, local contributing factors largely remain to be determined. This study aimed at evaluating, based on clinical photographs obtained from peri-implantitis treatment publications, the possible local contributing factors involved in its development based upon a survey obtained from three experienced clinicians (> 20 years of expertise). Cohen's kappa index was used to test the interexaminer reliability. "Too-buccal implant position" was the only parameter to reach almost perfect interexaminer agreement (κ = 0.81). "Thin-tissue biotype" and "minimal presence of keratinized mucosa" demonstrated moderate agreement (κ = 0.43 and κ = 0.58, respectively). The rest of the parameters studied based on clinical photographs were fair or poor. Therefore, based on this clinicians' survey, implants too buccally placed, minimal or a lack of keratinized mucosa, and thin-tissue biotype might contribute to a higher susceptibility of developing peri-implantitis. These factors must be the focus of attention in future cross-sectional studies on the incidence of peri-implant diseases.

  18. The roles of community health workers in management of non-communicable diseases in an urban township.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolekile, Lungiswa P; Puoane, Thandi; Schneider, Helen; Levitt, Naomi S; Steyn, Krisela

    2014-11-21

    Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly being recognised as a crucial part of the health workforce in South Africa and other parts of the world. CHWs have taken on a variety of roles, including community empowerment, provision of services and linking communities with health facilities. Their roles are better understood in the areas of maternal and child health and infectious diseases (HIV infection, malaria and tuberculosis). This study seeks to explore the current roles of CHWs working with non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The study was conducted in an urban township in Cape Town, South Africa. A qualitative naturalistic research design utilising observations and in-depth interviews with CHWs and their supervisors working in Khayelitsha was used. CHWs have multiple roles in the care of NCDs. They act as health educators, advisors, rehabilitation workers and support group facilitators. They further screen for complications of illness and assist community members to navigate the health system. These roles are shaped both by expectations of the health system and in response to community needs. This study indicates the complexities of the roles of CHWs working with NCDs. Understanding the actual roles of CHWs provides insights into not only the competencies required to enable them to fulfil their daily functions, but also the type of training required to fill the present gaps.

  19. Non-communicable diseases in decontamination workers in areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster: a retrospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Toyoaki; Ozaki, Akihiko; Leppold, Claire; Nomura, Shuhei; Shimada, Yuki; Tsukada, Manabu; Nemoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Shigeaki; Kanazawa, Yukio; Ohira, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and whether NCDs were treated or not, among hospitalised decontamination workers who moved to radio-contaminated areas after Japan's 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. Methods We retrospectively extracted records of decontamination workers admitted to Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital between 1 June 2012 and 31 August 2015, from hospital records. We investigated the incidence of underlying NCDs such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes among the decontamination workers, and their treatment status, in addition to the reasons for their hospital admission. Results A total of 113 decontamination workers were admitted to the hospital (112 male patients, median age of 54 years (age range: 18–69 years)). In terms of the demographics of underlying NCDs in this population, 57 of 72 hypertensive patients (79.2%), 37 of 45 dyslipidaemic patients (82.2%) and 18 of 27 hyperglycaemic patients (66.7%) had not been treated for their NCDs before admission to the hospital. Conclusions A high burden of underlying NCDs was found in hospitalised decontamination workers in Fukushima. Managing underlying diseases such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes mellitus is essential among this population. PMID:27974372

  20. Sleeping with the enemy: the United Nations Development Programme and its position on the non-communicable disease epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Anil G; Lal, Pranay G; Buragohain, Anita

    2014-02-01

    The United Nations Development Programme's (UNDP) position on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is undermined by a key issue at the global institutional level. Fundamentally, the nature of the relationship between international development agencies and the tobacco industry is at odds with the professed public health priorities of the former. At its core, the business model of the tobacco industry is premised on the sale of addictive and disease-causing substances that fuel NCDs in the first place. The role of the United Nations system and, in particular, UNDP is to 'build nations that can withstand crisis', not to collaborate with entities that profit from crises. This simple and well-established fact cannot be overlooked. We outline an array of conflict of interests. If the effects of NCDs are ever to be reversed, then international agencies such as the UNDP ought to adhere to ethical standards in choosing partners and avoid conflict of interests. In the absence of this, the UNDP may well compromise its own agenda and proliferate NCDs rather than containing them.

  1. Self-reported prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases and associated factors among older adults in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Phaswana-Mafuya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the prevalence and predictors of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs of older adults in South Africa. This study aims to investigate the self-reported prevalences of major chronic NCDs and their predictors among older South Africans. Methods: We conducted a national population-based cross-sectional survey with a sample of 3,840 individuals aged 50 years or above in South Africa in 2008. The outcome variable was the self-reported presence of chronic NCDs suffered, namely, arthritis, stroke, angina, diabetes, chronic lung disease, asthma, depression, and hypertension. The exposure variables were sociodemographic characteristics: age, gender, education, wealth status, race, marital status, and residence. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine sociodemographic factors predictive of the presence of chronic NCDs. Results: The prevalence of chronic NCDs was 51.8%. The prevalence of multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions was 22.5%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that being female, being in age groups 60–79 and 70–79, being Coloured or Asian, having no schooling, having greater wealth, and residing in an urban area were associated with the presence of NCDs. Conclusion: The rising burden of chronic NCDs affecting older people places a heavy burden on the healthcare system as a result of increased demand and access to healthcare services. Concerted effort is needed to develop strategies for the prevention and management of NCDs, especially among economically disadvantaged individuals who need these services the most.

  2. National Responses to HIV/AIDS and Non-Communicable Diseases in Developing Countries: Analysis of Strategic Parallels and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haregu, Tilahun Nigatu; Setswe, Geoffrey; Elliott, Julian; Oldenburg, Brian

    2014-03-26

    HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) epidemics may have many important similarities in their aetiology, pathogenesis and management. Evidence about the similarities and differences between the national responses HIV/AIDS and NCDs is essential for an integrated response. The objective of this study was to examine the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and NCDs in selected developing countries. This study applied a strategic level comparative case study approach as its study design. The main construct was national response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs. The 4 overarching themes were policy response, institutional mechanism, programmatic response and strategic information. Four countries were purposively selected as cases. Data were collected and triangulated from a multiple sources. The focus of analysis included identifying items for comparison, characteristics to be compared, degrees of similarity, and strategic importance of similarities. Analysis of data was qualitative content analysis with within-case, between-case, and across-case comparisons. While the nature of the disease and the contents of national HIV/AIDS and NCD policies are different, the policy processes involved are largely similar. Functional characteristics of programmatic response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs are similar. But the internal constituents are different. Though both HIV and NCDs require both a multi-sectorial response and a national coordination mechanism, the model and the complexity of the coordination are different. Strategic information frameworks for HIV/AIDS and NCDs use similar models. However, the indicators, targets and priorities are different. In conclusion, the national responses between HIV/AIDS and NCDs are largely similar in approaches and functions but different in content. Significance for public healthThis study explores the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The identified

  3. National Responses to HIV/AIDS and Non-Communicable Diseases in Developing Countries: Analysis of Strategic Parallels and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haregu, Tilahun Nigatu; Setswe, Geoffrey; Elliott, Julian; Oldenburg, Brian

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) epidemics may have many important similarities in their aetiology, pathogenesis and management. Evidence about the similarities and differences between the national responses HIV/AIDS and NCDs is essential for an integrated response. The objective of this study was to examine the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and NCDs in selected developing countries. This study applied a strategic level comparative case study approach as its study design. The main construct was national response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs. The 4 overarching themes were policy response, institutional mechanism, programmatic response and strategic information. Four countries were purposively selected as cases. Data were collected and triangulated from a multiple sources. The focus of analysis included identifying items for comparison, characteristics to be compared, degrees of similarity, and strategic importance of similarities. Analysis of data was qualitative content analysis with within-case, between-case, and across-case comparisons. While the nature of the disease and the contents of national HIV/AIDS and NCD policies are different, the policy processes involved are largely similar. Functional characteristics of programmatic response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs are similar. But the internal constituents are different. Though both HIV and NCDs require both a multi-sectorial response and a national coordination mechanism, the model and the complexity of the coordination are different. Strategic information frameworks for HIV/AIDS and NCDs use similar models. However, the indicators, targets and priorities are different. In conclusion, the national responses between HIV/AIDS and NCDs are largely similar in approaches and functions but different in content. Significance for public health This study explores the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The identified

  4. Does population mixing measure infectious exposure in children at the community level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John C; Law, Graham R; Boyle, Paul J; Feng, Zhiqiang; Gilthorpe, Mark S; Parslow, Roger C; Rudge, Gavin; Feltbower, Richard G

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies focusing on the etiology of childhood chronic diseases have used population mixing as a proxy for the level of infection circulating in a community. We compared different measures of population mixing (based on residential migration and commuting) and other demographic variables, derived from the United Kingdom Census, with hospital inpatient data on infections from two Government Office Regions in England (Eastern and the West Midlands) to inform the development of an infectious disease proxy for future epidemiological studies. The association between rates of infection and the population mixing measures was assessed, using incidence rate ratios across census areas, from negative binomial regression. Commuting distance demonstrated the most consistent association with admissions for infections across the two regions; areas with a higher median distance travelled by commuters leaving the area having a lower rate of hospital admissions for infections. Deprived areas and densely populated areas had a raised rate of admissions for infections. Assuming hospital admissions are a reliable indicator of common infection rates, the results from this study suggest that commuting distance is a consistent measure of population mixing in relation to infectious disease and deprivation and population density are reliable demographic proxies for infectious exposure. Areas that exhibit high levels of population mixing do not necessarily possess raised rates of hospital admissions for infectious disease.

  5. Communicable disease control in a migrant seasonal workers population: a case study in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, P J; Vold, L; Aavitsland, P

    2005-03-01

    Reliable data on the health status of migrant seasonal workers in Europe is scarce. Access to public health care for this population depends on national regulations, and their legal status in host countries. In this manuscript we describe a case study of a salmonellosis outbreak that occurred in Norway, and highlight the difficulties encountered in applying control measures in a population of seasonal migrant farm workers. Surveillance and control of infectious diseases need to be supported by legislation which makes implementation of control measures possible. Efforts have been made to improve the rights for migrants in Europe with regard to healthcare, but seasonal migrant workers still remain largely outsiders where these measures are concerned. Special attention should be given to this disadvantaged group in terms of social rights and healthcare. Preparedness plans should be improved to deal with contagious pathogens involving the seasonal migrant population.

  6. Communicating effectiveness of intervention for chronic diseases: what single format can replace comprehensive information?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovring, Henrik; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Kristiansen, Ivar S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about how GPs should convey information about treatment effectiveness to their patients in the context of cardiovascular disease. Hence we study the concordance of decisions based on one of four single information formats for treatment effectiveness with subsequent...... (NNT), or prolongation of life (POL) without heart attack, and were asked whether they would consent to treatment. Subsequently the same information was conveyed with all four formats jointly accompanied by a pictorial presentation of treatment effectiveness. Again, subjects should consider consent...... to treatment. RESULTS: After being informed about all four formats, 52%-79% of the respondents consented to treatment, depending on level of effectiveness and initial information format. Overall, ARR gave highest concordance, 94% (95% confidence interval (91%; 97%)) between initial and final decision, but ARR...

  7. Communication Skills and Decision Making for Elderly Patients With Advanced Kidney Disease: A Guide for Nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncicki, Holly M; Schell, Jane O

    2016-04-01

    Elderly patients comprise the most rapidly growing population initiating dialysis therapy and may derive particular benefit from comprehensive assessment of geriatric syndromes, coexisting comorbid conditions, and overall prognosis. Palliative care is a philosophy that aims to improve quality of life and assist with treatment decision making for patients with serious illness such as kidney disease. Palliative skills for the nephrology provider can aid in the care of these patients. This review provides nephrology providers with 4 primary palliative care skills to guide treatment decision making: (1) use prognostic tools to identify patients who may benefit from conservative management, (2) disclose prognostic information to patients who may not do well with dialysis therapy, (3) incorporate patient goals and values to outline a treatment plan, and (4) prepare patients and families for transitions and end of life.

  8. Community-based genetic education, communication channels, and knowledge of Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarik, F; Kaback, M M; Greenwald, S; Nathan, T J; Rosenthal, M; Bass, D M

    1977-01-01

    In the planning of community-based genetics education campaigns, we cannot assume the existence of a single-minded, passively receptive public, simply waiting to be "educated." Rather, we must consider the impact of preexisting circumstances, notably the differential life-status conditions, the special concerns, and individual motivations of the persons to be educated on their search for information that matters to them. Messages promulgated by mass media educational campaigns on issues in genetics typically do not fall on a homogeneous mass of equally responsive ears and eyes, even if the target population superficially appears to be homogeneous and preselected. Especially institutional sources, (e.g., schools and general education) for males, and social relations (e.g., informal contact among friends) for females are crucial strategic variables affecting transmission and reception of knowledge of Tay-Sachs disease.

  9. Non-communicable diseases, mental ill-health: Is it a failure of the food system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michel A

    2013-01-01

    The rise in brain disorders and mental ill-health is the most serious crisis facing the survival of humanity. Starting from an understanding of the origins of the nervous system and the brain, together with its nutritional requirements, the present direction of the food system since World War II (WWII) can be seen as departing from the biological essence of brain chemistry and its nutritional needs. Such advances in the food system would lead to epigenetic changes. Improper maternal/foetal nutrition is considered in this manner to lead to heart disease, stroke and diabetes in later life. Is there any reason why the brain would not be similarly susceptible to a nutritional background departing from its specific needs? The changing food system likely bears responsibility for the rise in mental ill health that has now overtaken all other burdens of ill health. Its globalisation is threatening civil society.

  10. Public Hygiene Campaign in Denmark during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Had No Effect on Hospitalization Rate of Communicable Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja Hawwa Vissing; Astrid Sevelsted; Hans Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the Danish National board of Health carried out massive public hygiene campaigns to limit spread of disease. We aimed to investigate whether this resulted in lower incidences of communicable diseases in the paediatric population. METHODS: The study compared annual hospitalization rates for childhood infections from 2005 to 2011. RESULTS: Admission rates for infections were higher during the year of the pandemic compared to the rest of the period. CONC...

  11. SurvNet@RKI--a multistate electronic reporting system for communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faensen, D; Claus, H; Benzler, J; Ammon, A; Pfoch, T; Breuer, T; Krause, G

    2006-01-01

    In 2001 Germany implemented a new electronic reporting system for surveillance of notifiable infectious diseases (SurvNet@RKI). The system is currently being used in all 431 local health departments (LHD), the 16 state health departments (SHD) and the Robert Koch-Institut (RKI), the national agency for infectious disease epidemiology. The SurvNet@RKI software is written in MS Access 97 and Visual Basic and it supports MS Access as well as MS SQL Server database management systems as a back-end. The database is designed as a distributed, dynamic database for 73 reporting categories with more than 600 fields and about 7000 predefined entry values. An integrated version management system documents deletion, undeletion, completion and correction of cases at any time and entry level and allows reproduction of previously conducted queries. Integrated algorithms and help functions support data quality and the application of case definitions. RKI makes the system available to all LHDs and SHDs free of charge. RKI receives an average of 300,000 case reports and 6240 outbreak reports per year through this system. A public web-based query interface, SurvStat@RKI, assures extensive and timely publication of the data. During the 5 years that SurvNet@RKI has been running in all LHDs and SHDs in Germany it has coped well with a complex federal structure which makes this system particularly attractive to multinational surveillance networks. The system is currently being migrated to Microsoft C#/.NET and transport formats in XML. Based on our experiences, we provide recommendations for the design and implementation of national or international electronic surveillance systems.

  12. The financial burden from non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankeu, Hyacinthe Tchewonpi; Saksena, Priyanka; Xu, Ke; Evans, David B

    2013-08-16

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) were previously considered to only affect high-income countries. However, they now account for a very large burden in terms of both mortality and morbidity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), although little is known about the impact these diseases have on households in these countries. In this paper, we present a literature review on the costs imposed by NCDs on households in LMICs. We examine both the costs of obtaining medical care and the costs associated with being unable to work, while discussing the methodological issues of particular studies. The results suggest that NCDs pose a heavy financial burden on many affected households; poor households are the most financially affected when they seek care. Medicines are usually the largest component of costs and the use of originator brand medicines leads to higher than necessary expenses. In particular, in the treatment of diabetes, insulin--when required--represents an important source of spending for patients and their families. These financial costs deter many people suffering from NCDs from seeking the care they need. The limited health insurance coverage for NCDs is reflected in the low proportions of patients claiming reimbursement and the low reimbursement rates in existing insurance schemes. The costs associated with lost income-earning opportunities are also significant for many households. Therefore, NCDs impose a substantial financial burden on many households, including the poor in low-income countries. The financial costs of obtaining care also impose insurmountable barriers to access for some people, which illustrates the urgency of improving financial risk protection in health in LMIC settings and ensuring that NCDs are taken into account in these systems. In this paper, we identify areas where further research is needed to have a better view of the costs incurred by households because of NCDs; namely, the extension of the geographical scope, the inclusion

  13. Fruit and vegetable consumption and prevalence of diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases in Zanzibar, Tanzania: a mixed-methods study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræbel, Tania Aase; Keller, Amélie; de Courten, Max

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of death in developed countries and account for roughly a third of deaths in developing countries. According to the 2004 Food and Agricultural Organization and WHO joint report on fruit and vegetables for health, low consumption of...

  14. Use of Health Information and Communication Technologies to Promote Health and Manage Behavioral Risk Factors Associated with Chronic Disease: Applications in the Field of Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia M.; Wang, Min Qi; Eddy, James M.; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2015-01-01

    This special issue provides real-world examples of the diverse methods health education researchers are using to expand existing applications of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for health promotion and chronic disease management. The original and review articles presented in this special issue investigate eHealth, mHealth, and…

  15. Use of Health Information and Communication Technologies to Promote Health and Manage Behavioral Risk Factors Associated with Chronic Disease: Applications in the Field of Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia M.; Wang, Min Qi; Eddy, James M.; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2015-01-01

    This special issue provides real-world examples of the diverse methods health education researchers are using to expand existing applications of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for health promotion and chronic disease management. The original and review articles presented in this special issue investigate eHealth, mHealth, and…

  16. Exploring the use of social network analysis to measure communication between disease programme and district managers at sub-national level in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawonga, Mary; Blaauw, Duane; Fonn, Sharon

    2015-06-01

    With increasing interest in maximising synergies between disease control programmes (DCP) and general health services (GHS), methods are needed to measure interactions between DCP and GHS actors. In South Africa, administrative integration reforms make GHS managers at decentralised level (district managers) responsible for the oversight of DCP operations within districts, with DCP managers (programme managers) providing specialist support. The reforms necessitate interdependence, but these actors work together ineffectively. Communication is crucial for joint working, but no research to assess communication between these actors has been done. This study explores the use of social network analysis (SNA) to measure the extent to which programme and district managers in South Africa communicate, using HIV monitoring and evaluation (M&E) as an exemplar. Data were collected from fifty one managers in two provinces during 2010-2011, to measure: a) one-on-one task-related communication - talking about the collation (verification, reporting) and use of HIV data for monitoring HIV interventions; and b) group communication through co-participating in management committees where HIV data are used for monitoring HIV interventions in districts. SNA measures were computed to describe actor centrality, network density (cohesion), and communication within and between respective manager groups. Block modelling was applied to identify management committees that connect respective manager groups. Results show HIV programme managers located at higher level communicated largely amongst themselves as a group (homophily), seldom talked to the district managers to whom they are supposed to provide specialist HIV M&E support, and rarely participated with them in management committees. This research demonstrates the utility of SNA as a tool for measuring the extent of communication between DCP and GHS actors at sub-national level. Actions are needed to bridge observed communication gaps in

  17. Passive surveillance of communicable diseases among inmates of Jos central prison, Nigeria

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    Ado-Baba Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Results: Out of 132 inmates that presented themselves for medical treatment at the prison clinic, eighty-nine (67.4% (95% CI=62.4-72.4 were infected with various pathogenic agents, namely Plasmodium parasites (37.1%, intestinal parasites (14.4%, human immunodeficiency virus (11.4% and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.5%. The parasites occurred both as mono and mixed-double and triple infections. Malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum predominates with 65.3% (32/49 while non-falciparum species had 20.4% due to P. malariae (16.3% and P. vivax (4.1%. Intestinal parasites accounted for 14.4% (95% CI=9.4-19.4 of the infections comprising five species, with Entamoeba hystolytica dorminating (57.9% and Strogyloides stercoralis rare (4.8%. Of the co-infection, the highest combination was Plasmodium + HIV (35.3%. Fifteen inmates had HIV virus (16.5% and 6 (6.6% had Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The age group 1-40 years recorded 93.3% and 100% of the HIV and tuberculosis infections respectively. Eleven deaths were recorded 4 years preceding this survey from various causes including HIV and septicemia. Conclusions: The study concludes that Nigerian prisons pose a serious threat as reservoir of diseases to the nation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1366-1374

  18. [Information and communication technology interventions supporting carers of people with Alzheimer's disease: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Faucounau, Véronique; de Rotrou, Jocelyne; Riguet, Mathilde; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2009-09-01

    Caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders are exposed to many stress factors which increase the risk of developing physical and psychological disturbances. To limit these negative effects, different psychosocial interventions for carers have been proposed. With progress in technologies, telephone or the internet can offer flexible and tailored means to deliver this kind of interventions. In this literature review, we listed and analysed the articles devoted to this topic. Sixteen papers concerning nine intervention programs were selected. The analysis shows that the internet, as a means to deliver an intervention programme, is more interactive, attractive and less intrusive than telephone. Efficacy of the interventions via this kind of technologies can be compared to that observed in face to face ones: despite weak methodology and inconsistent outcomes of the studies, they showed some improvement in burden, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy. Finally, before implementation of this kind of technologies, it is necessary to test learnability, adaptability and acceptability. Usability of a technology is a key factor for its adoption and efficacy.

  19. Communicating effectiveness of intervention for chronic diseases: what single format can replace comprehensive information?

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    Kristiansen Ivar S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is uncertainty about how GPs should convey information about treatment effectiveness to their patients in the context of cardiovascular disease. Hence we study the concordance of decisions based on one of four single information formats for treatment effectiveness with subsequent decisions based on all four formats combined with a pictorial representation. Methods A randomized study comprising 1,169 subjects aged 40–59 in Odense, Denmark. Subjects were randomized to receive information in terms of absolute risk reduction (ARR, relative risk reduction (RRR, number needed to treat (NNT, or prolongation of life (POL without heart attack, and were asked whether they would consent to treatment. Subsequently the same information was conveyed with all four formats jointly accompanied by a pictorial presentation of treatment effectiveness. Again, subjects should consider consent to treatment. Results After being informed about all four formats, 52%–79% of the respondents consented to treatment, depending on level of effectiveness and initial information format. Overall, ARR gave highest concordance, 94% (95% confidence interval (91%; 97% between initial and final decision, but ARR was not statistically superior to the other formats. Conclusion Decisions based on ARR had the best concordance with decisions based on all four formats and pictorial representation, but the difference in concordance between the four formats was small, and it is unclear whether respondents fully understood the information they received.

  20. Short communication. Inheritance of yield, yield components and resistance to major diseases in Sesamum indicum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bramaway, M. A. S.; Shaban, W. I.

    2008-07-01

    Field experiments were conducted over 2005 and 2006 to study the gene action associated with yield and ten yield components, as well as resistance Fusarium wilt, charcoal rot and Alternaria leaf spot, in 6x6 half-diallel sesame progenies (F1). Highly significant differences among the 15 F1s and their six parents were detected with respect to all the investigated traits. A preponderance of non-additive genetic variance was seen for all the studied traits, except for days to maturity and resistance to Alternaria leaf spot. Ten traits showed over dominance. Recessive alleles were predominantly involved in fruiting branches plant-1, capsules plant-1 and single plant yield. The distribution of genes with positive and negative effects were symmetrical or nearly symmetrical with respect to 1000-seed weight, charcoal rot disease resistance, fruiting branches plant-1, capsules plant-1, single plant yield, and oil content. The parents possessed mostly negative genes in dominant form with respect to capsules plant-1, 1000-seed weight, oil content, and resistance to charcoal rot and Alternaria leaf spot; positive genes in recessive form were observed for the rest of the studied traits. Given the gene action observed, bi parental mating or diallel selective mating and heterosis breeding is suggested for the improvement of sesame. (Author) 24 refs.

  1. Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review.

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    Emodi, Ij; Ikefuna, An; Ujunwa, Fa; Chinawa, Jm

    2014-11-01

    Non-communicable diseases are increasing worldwide due to rapidly changing lifestyles and socio-economic status. It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu. A review of admissions into the Paediatrics ward of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, between January 1999 and December 2008 was done using the registry of admission and discharge. The age range of patients admitted during the period was 2 months to 18 years (mean 5.27 ± 5.42 years). There were 1173 (59.6%) males and 796 (40.4%) females. Disorders of the haematological system accounted for 514 (23.3%) of the non-communicable diseases among the admissions, malignancies accounted for 424 (19.2%) among the admissions, whereas the renal, central nervous, and cardiovascular systems were involved in 282 (12.8%), 274 (12.4%), and 241 (10.9%) patients, respectively. There were 274 (12.4%) deaths and 1667 (75.5%) discharges while 38 (1.7%) were discharged against medical advice. Data on 221(10.2%) of the patients were reported missing. Malignancies contributed to 75 (27.3%) of the deaths, haematological disorders accounted for 44 (16%) whereas renal disorders and nutritional disorders contributed to 43 (15.7%) and 41 (15%) of the deaths, respectively. Non-communicable diseases affect children in our environment and contribute to morbidity and mortality in children. Strategies to prevent these diseases should be encouraged in order to avert the challenges of double burden of the diseases in children.

  2. Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review

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    I J Emodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-communicable diseases are increasing worldwide due to rapidly changing lifestyles and socio-economic status. It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. Objective: To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu. Materials and Methods: A review of admissions into the Paediatrics ward of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, between January 1999 and December 2008 was done using the registry of admission and discharge. Results: The age range of patients admitted during the period was 2 months to 18 years (mean 5.27 ± 5.42 years. There were 1173 (59.6% males and 796 (40.4% females. Disorders of the haematological system accounted for 514 (23.3% of the non-communicable diseases among the admissions, malignancies accounted for 424 (19.2% among the admissions, whereas the renal, central nervous, and cardiovascular systems were involved in 282 (12.8%, 274 (12.4%, and 241 (10.9% patients, respectively. There were 274 (12.4% deaths and 1667 (75.5% discharges while 38 (1.7% were discharged against medical advice. Data on 221(10.2% of the patients were reported missing. Malignancies contributed to 75 (27.3% of the deaths, haematological disorders accounted for 44 (16% whereas renal disorders and nutritional disorders contributed to 43 (15.7% and 41 (15% of the deaths, respectively. Conclusion: Non-communicable diseases affect children in our environment and contribute to morbidity and mortality in children. Strategies to prevent these diseases should be encouraged in order to avert the challenges of double burden of the diseases in children.

  3. Age, chronic non-communicable disease and choice of traditional Chinese and western medicine outpatient services in a Chinese population

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    Yeoh Eng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1997 Hong Kong reunified with China and the development of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM started with this change in national identity. However, the two latest discussion papers on Hong Kong's healthcare reform have failed to mention the role of TCM in primary healthcare, despite TCM's public popularity and its potential in tackling the chronic non-communicable disease (NCD challenge in the ageing population. This study aims to describe the interrelationship between age, non-communicable disease (NCD status, and the choice of TCM and western medicine (WM services in the Hong Kong population. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of the Thematic Household Survey (THS 2005 dataset. The THS is a Hong Kong population representative face to face survey was conducted by the Hong Kong Administrative Region Government of China. A random sample of respondents aged >15 years were invited to report their use of TCM and WM in the past year, together with other health and demographic information. A total of 33,263 persons were interviewed (response rate 79.2%. Results Amongst those who received outpatient services in the past year (n = 18,087, 80.23% only visited WM doctors, 3.17% consulted TCM practitioners solely, and 16.60% used both type of services (double consulters. Compared to those who only consulted WM doctor, multinomial logistic regression showed that double consulters were more likely to be older, female, NCD patients, and have higher socioeconomic backgrounds. Further analysis showed that the association between age and double consulting was curvilinear (inverted U shaped regardless of NCD status. Middle aged (45-60 years NCD patients, and the NCD free "young old" group (60-75 years were most likely to double consult. On the other hand, the relationship between age and use of TCM as an alternative to WM was linear regardless of NCD status. The NCD free segment of the population was more inclined to use TCM alone

  4. Non-communicable diseases in Mozambique: risk factors, burden, response and outcomes to date

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    Silva-Matos Carla

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mozambique is located on the East Coast of Africa bordering South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and Tanzania and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Currently NCDs account for 28% of deaths in Mozambique. Risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use and poor diet are present in both urban and rural settings. Diseases such as hypertension and diabetes affect large proportions of the population, but people are often unaware of their condition or poorly managed. Data from studies on diabetes highlight the financial burden for NCD management in Mozambique for both the individual and health system. The National Strategic Plan for the prevention and control of NCDs in Mozambique has as its aim to create a positive environment to minimise or eliminate the exposure to risk factors and guarantee access to care. The plan has as its overall objective to reduce exposure to risk factors and morbidity and mortality due to NCDs and has 4 areas of intervention: 1 Prevention and health education with regards to NCDs; 2 Access to quality care, treatment and follow-up; 3 Prevention of disability and premature mortality and 4 Surveillance, research, monitoring and evaluation and advocacy for NCDs. The Ministry of Health developed projects for diabetes and hypertension and used these as key lessons that could then be applied to other NCDs. Mozambique, through political commitment from the Ministry of Health and the dedication of local champions, has been able to garner international support to improve care for people with diabetes and then use this to develop its National Plan for NCDs. Despite this increase in attention resources available do not match the challenge of NCDs in Mozambique. Mozambique’s experience provides a practical example of actions that can be undertaken in a resource poor country to tackle the emerging burden of NCDs.

  5. Prevalence of risk factors for non-communicable diseases in Bangladesh: Results from STEPS survey 2010

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    Mohammad Mostafa Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nationally representative data on noncommunicable disease (NCD risk factors are lacking in Bangladesh. This study was done to determine the prevalence of common risk factors for major NCDs among men and women of rural and urban areas of Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: This survey was done with 9,275 individuals aged 25 years or older randomly drawn from all over the country. Information on diet, physical activity, tobacco and alcohol, and treatment history for hypertension and diabetes were collected. Height, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure (BP were measured. Results: There were 4,312 men and 4,963 women with the mean age of 42 years (standard deviation 13 years. Half of them (54% used tobacco in some form, <1% consumed alcohol within the past 30 days, 92% did not consume adequate fruit and vegetables (five servings or more, and 35% had low physical activity level [<600 metabolic equivalent (MET min per week]. Documented diabetes was found in 4% of the participants. Seventeen percent were overweight [body mass index (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 and 21% had abdominal obesity (men ≥94, women ≥80 cm. Overall, 21% people had hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg or medication. Physical inactivity, alcohol intake, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes were more prevalent in urban areas, as opposed to tobacco. Tobacco intake showed a decreasing gradient, but hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and low physical activity showed an increasing gradient across the wealth quartiles. Conclusion: Risk factors are widely prevalent in Bangladeshi people across sexes and across both rural and urban areas of residences. NCD prevention through risk factor control, and early detection and treatment of hypertension and diabetes are warranted.

  6. Non-communicable diseases in Mozambique: risk factors, burden, response and outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Matos, Carla; Beran, David

    2012-11-21

    Mozambique is located on the East Coast of Africa bordering South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and Tanzania and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Currently NCDs account for 28% of deaths in Mozambique. Risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use and poor diet are present in both urban and rural settings. Diseases such as hypertension and diabetes affect large proportions of the population, but people are often unaware of their condition or poorly managed. Data from studies on diabetes highlight the financial burden for NCD management in Mozambique for both the individual and health system. The National Strategic Plan for the prevention and control of NCDs in Mozambique has as its aim to create a positive environment to minimise or eliminate the exposure to risk factors and guarantee access to care. The plan has as its overall objective to reduce exposure to risk factors and morbidity and mortality due to NCDs and has 4 areas of intervention: 1) Prevention and health education with regards to NCDs; 2) Access to quality care, treatment and follow-up; 3) Prevention of disability and premature mortality and 4) Surveillance, research, monitoring and evaluation and advocacy for NCDs. The Ministry of Health developed projects for diabetes and hypertension and used these as key lessons that could then be applied to other NCDs. Mozambique, through political commitment from the Ministry of Health and the dedication of local champions, has been able to garner international support to improve care for people with diabetes and then use this to develop its National Plan for NCDs. Despite this increase in attention resources available do not match the challenge of NCDs in Mozambique. Mozambique's experience provides a practical example of actions that can be undertaken in a resource poor country to tackle the emerging burden of NCDs.

  7. Traumatic physical health consequences of intimate partner violence against women: what is the role of community-level factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antai, Diddy

    2011-12-20

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is a serious public health issue with recognizable direct health consequences. This study assessed the association between IPV and traumatic physical health consequences on women in Nigeria, given that communities exert significant influence on the individuals that are embedded within them, with the nature of influence varying between communities. Cross-sectional nationally-representative data of women aged 15 - 49 years in the 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey was used in this study. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between IPV and several forms of physical health consequences. Bruises were the most common form of traumatic physical health consequences. In the adjusted models, the likelihood of sustaining bruises (OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.05 - 3.46), wounds (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.31 - 4.95), and severe burns (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 1.63 - 6.28) was significantly higher for women exposed to IPV compared to those not exposed to IPV. However, after adjusting for individual- and community-level factors, women with husbands/partners with controlling behavior, those with primary or no education, and those resident in communities with high tolerance for wife beating had a higher likelihood of experiencing IPV, whilst mean community-level education and women 24 years or younger were at lower likelihood of experiencing IPV. Evidence from this study shows that exposure to IPV is associated with increased likelihood of traumatic physical consequences for women in Nigeria. Education and justification of wife beating were significant community-level factors associated with traumatic physical consequences, suggesting the importance of increasing women's levels of education and changing community norms that justify controlling behavior and IPV.

  8. Traumatic physical health consequences of intimate partner violence against women: what is the role of community-level factors?

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    Antai Diddy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV against women is a serious public health issue with recognizable direct health consequences. This study assessed the association between IPV and traumatic physical health consequences on women in Nigeria, given that communities exert significant influence on the individuals that are embedded within them, with the nature of influence varying between communities. Methods Cross-sectional nationally-representative data of women aged 15 - 49 years in the 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey was used in this study. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between IPV and several forms of physical health consequences. Results Bruises were the most common form of traumatic physical health consequences. In the adjusted models, the likelihood of sustaining bruises (OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.05 - 3.46, wounds (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.31 - 4.95, and severe burns (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 1.63 - 6.28 was significantly higher for women exposed to IPV compared to those not exposed to IPV. However, after adjusting for individual- and community-level factors, women with husbands/partners with controlling behavior, those with primary or no education, and those resident in communities with high tolerance for wife beating had a higher likelihood of experiencing IPV, whilst mean community-level education and women 24 years or younger were at lower likelihood of experiencing IPV. Conclusions Evidence from this study shows that exposure to IPV is associated with increased likelihood of traumatic physical consequences for women in Nigeria. Education and justification of wife beating were significant community-level factors associated with traumatic physical consequences, suggesting the importance of increasing women's levels of education and changing community norms that justify controlling behavior and IPV.

  9. Taking Action With Data: Improving Environmental Public Health at the Community Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camponeschi, Jenny; Vogt, Christy M; Creswell, Paul D; Mueller, Meridith; Christenson, Megan; Werner, Mark A

    The Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Wisconsin Tracking) compiles and provides data on health endpoints and related environmental exposures as a resource to local health departments, tribes, academia, and other stakeholders. The goal of providing these data is that stakeholders use them to develop projects that improve environmental health in their communities-that is, moving from "data to action." To encourage use of Wisconsin Tracking data, we developed a minigrants program and issued a funding opportunity to local health departments and tribes. The opportunity requested proposals for small projects using our data, with the goal of making public health improvements in those communities. Wisconsin Tracking evaluated the minigrants program after its completion. Eight local health departments in Wisconsin were awarded up to $10 500 to develop and implement projects over a 9-month period. Wisconsin Tracking created a funding opportunity announcement requiring utilization of our data to develop projects by local health departments in Wisconsin. We reviewed and scored applications, evaluating proposals on a range of criteria. During the 9-month project period, Wisconsin Tracking staff members provided a variety of technical assistance to grantees. An evaluation of the overall program followed. Funded communities used Wisconsin Tracking data to improve public health infrastructure, leverage partnerships, establish new initiatives, respond to emergencies, improve communication with stakeholders and residents, and make a variety of public health improvements in their communities. Efforts to increase use of our data catalyzed development of small-scale environmental health projects. This minigrants program was successful at building relationships between local health departments and Wisconsin Tracking, increasing awareness of Wisconsin Tracking data and resources, and contributing to numerous documented public health improvements throughout Wisconsin.

  10. Communicating geological hazards: assisting geoscientists in communication skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverman, D. G. E.

    2009-04-01

    Communication is important in all aspects of the geosciences but is more prominent in the area of geological hazards, as the main audience for scientific information often lacks a geoscience background; and because the implications of not communicating results effectively can be very serious. Geoscientists working in the hazards area face particular challenges in communicating the concepts of risk, probability and uncertainty. Barriers to effective communication of geoscience include the complex language used by geoscientists, restriction of dissemination of results to traditional scientific media, identification of the target audience, inability to tailor products to a variety of audiences, and lack of institutional support for communication efforts. Geoscientists who work in the area of natural hazards need training in risk communication, media relations, and communicating to non-technical audiences. Institutions need to support the efforts of geoscientists in communicating their results through providing communications training; ensuring access to communications professionals; rewarding efforts to engage the public; and devoting sufficient staff and budget to the effort of disseminating results. Geoscientists themselves have to make efforts to change attitudes towards social science, and to become involved in decision making at a community level. The International Union of Geological Sciences Commission for "Geoscience for Environmental Management" established a working group to deal with these issues. This group is holding workshops, publishing collections of papers, and is looking at other means to aid geoscientists in addressing these problems.

  11. The burden of selected chronic non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in Malawi: nationwide STEPS survey.

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    Kelias P Msyamboza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs are becoming significant causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan African countries, although local, high-quality data to inform evidence-based policies are lacking. OBJECTIVES: To determine the magnitude of NCDs and their risk factors in Malawi. METHODS: Using the WHO STEPwise approach to chronic disease risk factor surveillance, a population-based, nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted between July and September 2009 on participants aged 25-64 years. Socio-demographic and behaviour risk factors were collected in Step 1. Physical anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were documented in Step 2. Blood cholesterol and fasting blood glucose were measured in Step 3. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A total of 5,206 adults (67% females were surveyed. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and raised blood pressure (BP were more frequent in males than females, 25% vs 3%, 30% vs 4% and 37% vs 29%. Overweight, physical inactivity and raised cholesterol were more common in females than males, 28% vs 16%, 13% vs 6% and 11% vs 6%. Tobacco smoking was more common in rural than urban areas 11% vs 7%, and overweight and physical inactivity more common in urban than rural areas 39% vs 22% and 24% vs 9%, all with p<0.05. Overall (both sexes prevalence of tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity was 14%, 17%, 22%, 10% and prevalence of raised BP, fasting blood sugar and cholesterol was 33%, 6% and 9% respectively. These data could be useful in the formulation and advocacy of NCD policy and action plan in Malawi.

  12. Policy initiatives, culture and the prevention and control of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, T Alafia; Guell, Cornelia; Legetic, Branka; Unwin, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    To explore interactions between disease burden, culture and the policy response to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) within the Caribbean, a region with some of the highest prevalence rates, morbidity and mortality from NCDs in the Americas. We undertook a wide ranging narrative review, drawing on a variety of peer reviewed, government and intergovernmental literature. Although the Caribbean is highly diverse, linguistically and ethnically, it is possible to show how 'culture' at the macro-level has been shaped by shared historic, economic and political experiences and ties. We suggest four broad groupings of countries: the English-speaking Caribbean Community (CARICOM); the small island states that are still colonies or departments of colonial powers; three large-Spanish speaking countries; and Haiti, which although part of CARICOM is culturally distinct. We explore how NCD health policies in the region stem from and are influenced by the broad characteristics of these groupings, albeit played out in varied ways in individual countries. For example, the Port of Spain declaration (2007) on NCDs can be understood as the product of the co-operative and collaborative relationships with CARICOM, which are based on a shared broad culture. We note, however, that studies investigating the relationships between the formation of NCD policy and culture (at any level) are scarce. Within the Caribbean region it is possible to discern relationships between culture at the macro-level and the formation of NCD policy. However, there is little work that directly assesses the interactions between culture and NCD policy formation. The Caribbean with its cultural diversity and high burden of NCDs provides an ideal environment within which to undertake further studies to better understand the interactions between culture and health policy formation.

  13. Prevalence and risk factors for self-reported non-communicable diseases among older Ugandans: a cross-sectional study

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    Stephen Ojiambo Wandera

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited evidence about the prevalence and risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs among older Ugandans. Therefore, this article is aimed at investigating the prevalence of self-reported NCDs and their associated risk factors using a nationally representative sample. Design: We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2010 Uganda National Household Survey (UNHS using a weighted sample of 2,382 older people. Frequency distributions for descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square tests to identify the association between self-reported NCDs and selected explanatory variables were done. Finally, multivariable complementary log–log regressions to estimate the risk factors for self-reported NCDs among older people in Uganda were done. Results: About 2 in 10 (23% older persons reported at least one NCD [including hypertension (16%, diabetes (3%, and heart disease (9%]. Among all older people, reporting NCDs was higher among those aged 60–69 and 70–79; Muslims; and Pentecostals and Seventh Day Adventists (SDAs. In addition, the likelihood of reporting NCDs was higher among older persons who depended on remittances and earned wages; owned a bicycle; were sick in the last 30 days; were disabled; and were women. Conversely, the odds of reporting NCDs were lower for those who were relatives of household heads and were poor. Conclusions: In Uganda, self-reported NCDs were associated with advanced age, being a woman, having a disability, ill health in the past 30 days, being rich, depended on remittances and earning wages, being Muslim, Pentecostal and SDAs, and household headship. The Ministry of Health should prevent and manage NCDs by creating awareness in the public and improving the supply of essential drugs for these health conditions. Finally, there is a need for specialised surveillance studies of older people to monitor the trends and patterns of NCDs over time.

  14. National responses to HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases in developing countries: analysis of strategic parallels and differences

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    Tilahun Nigatu Haregu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs epidemics may have many important similarities in their aetiology, pathogenesis and management. Evidence about the similarities and differences between the national responses HIV/AIDS and NCDs is essential for an integrated response. The objective of this study was to examine the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and NCDs in selected developing countries. This study applied a strategic level comparative case study approach as its study design. The main construct was national response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs. The 4 overarching themes were policy response, institutional mechanism, programmatic response and strategic information. Four countries were purposively selected as cases. Data were collected and triangulated from a multiple sources. The focus of analysis included identifying items for comparison, characteristics to be compared, degrees of similarity, and strategic importance of similarities. Analysis of data was qualitative content analysis with within-case, between-case, and across-case comparisons. While the nature of the disease and the contents of national HIV/AIDS and NCD policies are different, the policy processes involved are largely similar. Functional characteristics of programmatic response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs are similar. But the internal constituents are different. Though both HIV and NCDs require both a multi-sectorial response and a national coordination mechanism, the model and the complexity of the coordination are different. Strategic information frameworks for HIV/AIDS and NCDs use similar models. However, the indicators, targets and priorities are different. In conclusion, the national responses between HIV/AIDS and NCDs are largely similar in approaches and functions but different in content.

  15. Impact of adherence to WHO infant feeding recommendations on later risk of obesity and non-communicable diseases: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne; Bland, Ruth M; Connelly, Andrew; Reilly, John J

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to WHO infant feeding recommendations has short-term benefits and may also help in the prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This study reviewed the evidence on whether adherence to all elements of the WHO infant feeding recommendations (comparison group those exclusively breastfed to 6 months, introduced to appropriate complementary feeding from 6 months, with continued breastfeeding to at least 24 months; exposure group characterised by non-adherence to any of the three recommendations) is associated with reduced risk of later obesity or cardiometabolic disease. The population of interest was children not classified as very low weight (weight-for-age z-score >-3.0). MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, CINAHL plus, ProQuest Dissertations and Thesis were systematically searched from 2001 to July 2014, manual reference searching of a birth cohort register (http://www.birthcohorts.net/) as well as papers identified in the search and selected journals was carried out. The database search yielded 9050 records, 275 English-language full-text articles were screened, but no studies were eligible, failing to meet the following criteria: comparison (213); exposure (14); population (3); relevant outcome (5); outcome before 24 months (9); insufficient information provided (30); plus one study was qualitative. Eight studies met the inclusion criterion of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, but did not meet the other inclusion criteria. The present study has revealed an important gap in the evidence on NCD prevention, and suggestions for addressing this evidence gap are provided. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The relationship between non-communicable disease occurrence and poverty-evidence from demographic surveillance in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Andrew J; Rose, Sherri; Khan, Jahangir Am; Ahmed, Sayem; Peters, David H; Niessen, Louis W; Trujillo, Antonio J

    2016-07-01

    In low-income countries, a growing proportion of the disease burden is attributable to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). There is little knowledge, however, of their impact on wealth, human capital, economic growth or household poverty. This article estimates the risk of being poor after an NCD death in the rural, low-income area of Matlab, Bangladesh. In a matched cohort study, we estimated the 2-year relative risk (RR) of being poor in Matlab households with an NCD death in 2010. Three separate measures of household economic status were used as outcomes: an asset-based index, self-rated household economic condition and total household landholding. Several estimation methods were used including contingency tables, log-binomial regression and regression standardization and machine learning. Households with an NCD death had a large and significant risk of being poor. The unadjusted RR of being poor after death was 1.19, 1.14 and 1.10 for the asset quintile, self-rated condition and landholding outcomes. Adjusting for household and individual level independent variables with log-binomial regression gave RRs of 1.19 [standard error (SE) 0.09], 1.16 (SE 0.07) and 1.14 (SE 0.06), which were found to be exactly the same using regression standardization (SE: 0.09, 0.05, 0.03). Machine learning-based standardization produced slightly smaller RRs though still in the same order of magnitude. The findings show that efforts to address the burden of NCD may also combat household poverty and provide a return beyond improved health. Future work should attempt to disentangle the mechanisms through which economic impacts from an NCD death occur. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Nutrition transition in South Asia: the emergence of non-communicable chronic diseases [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghose Bishwajit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overview: South Asian countries have experienced a remarkable economic growth during last two decades along with subsequent transformation in social, economic and food systems. Rising disposable income levels continue to drive the nutrition transition characterized by a shift from a traditional high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets towards diets with a lower carbohydrate and higher proportion of saturated fat, sugar and salt. Steered by various transitions in demographic, economic and nutritional terms, South Asian population are experiencing a rapidly changing disease profile. While the healthcare systems have long been striving to disentangle from the vicious cycle of poverty and undernutrition, South Asian countries are now confronted with an emerging epidemic of obesity and a constellation of other non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This dual burden is bringing about a serious health and economic conundrum and is generating enormous pressure on the already overstretched healthcare system of South Asian countries.   Objectives: The Nutrition transition has been a very popular topic in the field of human nutrition during last few decades and many countries and broad geographic regions have been studied. However there is no review on this topic in the context of South Asia  as yet. The main purpose of this review is to highlight the factors accounting for the onset of nutrition transition and its subsequent impact on epidemiological transition in five major South Asian countries including Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Special emphasis was given on India and Bangladesh as they together account for 94% of the regional population and about half world’s malnourished population. Methods: This study is literature based. Main data sources were published research articles obtained through an electronic medical databases search.

  18. Hazardous substance releases at the community level: a practical approach to analyzing potential health threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, L; Narkunas, D

    1994-07-01

    1. When a hazardous substance release occurs in a community, public health nurses must consider whether community members have been exposed, and whether that exposure is sufficient to impact public health. 2. An exposure pathway is the process by which an individual is exposed to contaminants that originate from some source of contamination. The exposure pathway method is effective in determining whether community members are exposed to hazardous substances in their community. 3. After determining a completed exposure pathway, a toxicological analysis estimates the dose of hazardous substances community members may have received and whether that dose may increase risks for an adverse health effect. 4. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) provides information to health care professionals that can assist them in conducting exposure and toxicological analyses.

  19. Changing patterns of under- and over-nutrition in South African children-future risks of non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinabhai, Champaklal C; Taylor, Myra; Sullivan, Keith R

    2005-03-01

    Under- and over-nutrition in children in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was investigated comparing data collected from primary school children in a rural district (643 children aged 8-11 years in 1994) with secondary data from the National Schools Study (16,179 children, 4-11 years in 1994), the Vitamin A Consultative Group Study (408 children, 2-5 years in 1994) and the Income Dynamics Study (1,593 children, 2-11 years in 1998). Stunting and wasting (WHO/NCHS guidelines) and overweight and obesity (International Obesity Task Force guidelines) were retrospectively analysed from these studies and compared in the children aged 4-5 and 8-11 years. There was moderate stunting in 10-25%, wasting in 1-6%, 5-24% were overweight and 1-10% obese. Girls in the National Schools Study (pchildren are changing and might indicate the early stages of a complex nutritional transition. Action is required to prevent the future risk of non-communicable diseases.

  20. Task Shifting the Management of Non-Communicable Diseases to Nurses in Kibera, Kenya: Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some, David; Edwards, Jeffrey K; Reid, Tony; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Kosgei, Rose J; Wilkinson, Ewan; Baruani, Bienvenu; Kizito, Walter; Khabala, Kelly; Shah, Safieh; Kibachio, Joseph; Musembi, Phylles

    2016-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa there is an increasing need to leverage available health care workers to provide care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This study was conducted to evaluate adherence to Médecins Sans Frontières clinical protocols when the care of five stable NCDs (hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, epilepsy, asthma, and sickle cell) was shifted from clinical officers to nurses. Descriptive, retrospective review of routinely collected clinic data from two integrated primary health care facilities within an urban informal settlement, Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya (May to August 2014). There were 3,554 consultations (2025 patients); 733 (21%) were by nurses out of which 725 met the inclusion criteria among 616 patients. Hypertension (64%, 397/616) was the most frequent NCD followed by asthma (17%, 106/616) and diabetes mellitus (15%, 95/616). Adherence to screening questions ranged from 65% to 86%, with an average of 69%. Weight and blood pressure measurements were completed in 89% and 96% of those required. Laboratory results were reviewed in 91% of indicated visits. Laboratory testing per NCD protocols was higher in those with hypertension (88%) than diabetes mellitus (67%) upon review. Only 17 (2%) consultations were referred back to clinical officers. Nurses are able to adhere to protocols for managing stable NCD patients based on clear and standardized protocols and guidelines, thus paving the way towards task shifting of NCD care to nurses to help relieve the significant healthcare gap in developing countries.

  1. Task Shifting the Management of Non-Communicable Diseases to Nurses in Kibera, Kenya: Does It Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Some

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa there is an increasing need to leverage available health care workers to provide care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This study was conducted to evaluate adherence to Médecins Sans Frontières clinical protocols when the care of five stable NCDs (hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, epilepsy, asthma, and sickle cell was shifted from clinical officers to nurses.Descriptive, retrospective review of routinely collected clinic data from two integrated primary health care facilities within an urban informal settlement, Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya (May to August 2014.There were 3,554 consultations (2025 patients; 733 (21% were by nurses out of which 725 met the inclusion criteria among 616 patients. Hypertension (64%, 397/616 was the most frequent NCD followed by asthma (17%, 106/616 and diabetes mellitus (15%, 95/616. Adherence to screening questions ranged from 65% to 86%, with an average of 69%. Weight and blood pressure measurements were completed in 89% and 96% of those required. Laboratory results were reviewed in 91% of indicated visits. Laboratory testing per NCD protocols was higher in those with hypertension (88% than diabetes mellitus (67% upon review. Only 17 (2% consultations were referred back to clinical officers.Nurses are able to adhere to protocols for managing stable NCD patients based on clear and standardized protocols and guidelines, thus paving the way towards task shifting of NCD care to nurses to help relieve the significant healthcare gap in developing countries.

  2. Dietary patterns and non-communicable disease risk in Indian adults: secondary analysis of Indian Migration Study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Edward Jm; Green, Rosemary; Agrawal, Sutapa; Aleksandrowicz, Lukasz; Bowen, Liza; Kinra, Sanjay; Macdiarmid, Jennie I; Haines, Andy; Dangour, Alan D

    2017-08-01

    Undernutrition and non-communicable disease (NCD) are important public health issues in India, yet their relationship with dietary patterns is poorly understood. The current study identified distinct dietary patterns and their association with micronutrient undernutrition (Ca, Fe, Zn) and NCD risk factors (underweight, obesity, waist:hip ratio, hypertension, total:HDL cholesterol, diabetes). Data were from the cross-sectional Indian Migration Study, including semi-quantitative FFQ. Distinct dietary patterns were identified using finite mixture modelling; associations with NCD risk factors were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression models. India. Migrant factory workers, their rural-dwelling siblings and urban non-migrants. Participants (7067 adults) resided mainly in Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh. Five distinct, regionally distributed, dietary patterns were identified, with rice-based patterns in the south and wheat-based patterns in the north-west. A rice-based pattern characterised by low energy consumption and dietary diversity ('Rice & low diversity') was consumed predominantly by adults with little formal education in rural settings, while a rice-based pattern with high fruit consumption ('Rice & fruit') was consumed by more educated adults in urban settings. Dietary patterns met WHO macronutrient recommendations, but some had low micronutrient contents. Dietary pattern membership was associated with several NCD risk factors. Five distinct dietary patterns were identified, supporting sub-national assessments of the implications of dietary patterns for various health, food system or environment outcomes.

  3. Chronic non-communicable disease and healthcare access in middle-aged and older women living in Soweto, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lopes Ibanez-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to describe the healthcare access, beliefs, and practices of middle-aged and older women residing in Soweto. This is a cross-sectional study of the primary (female caregivers of the Birth to Twenty Cohort, based in Soweto, South Africa. The study instrument was administered to 1 102 caregivers as part of routine annual data collection. Over half the respondents (50.7% reported having at least one chronic non-communicable disease (CND, only a small portion (33.3% of whom reported accessing a healthcare service in the last 6 months. Reported availability of private medical practice and government clinics was high (75.1% and 61.5% respectively. The low utilisation of healthcare services by women with CND is a concern in terms of healthcare management. There is a need to further investigate how healthcare beliefs are formed, as well as the feasibility of programmes to support the ongoing management of CND in Soweto.

  4. Strategic investments in non-communicable diseases (NCD) research in Africa: the GSK Africa NCD Open Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew D; Dufton, Ann M; Katso, Roy M; Gatsi, Sally A; Williams, Pauline M; Strange, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014, GSK announced a number of new strategic investments in Africa. One of these included investment of up to 25 million Pounds Sterling (£25 million) to create the world's first R&D Open Lab to increase understanding of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Africa. The vision is to create a new global R&D effort with GSK working in partnership with major funders, academic centres and governments to share expertise and resources to conduct high-quality research. The Africa NCD Open Lab will see GSK scientists collaborate with scientific research centres across Africa. An independent advisory board of leading scientists and clinicians will provide input to develop the strategy and selection of NCD research projects within a dynamic and networked open-innovation environment. It is hoped that these research projects will inform prevention and treatment strategies in the future and will enable researchers across academia and industry to discover and develop new medicines to address the specific needs of African patients.

  5. Ecological genomics meets community-level modelling of biodiversity: mapping the genomic landscape of current and future environmental adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Keller, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation is a central feature of most species occupying spatially heterogeneous environments, and may factor critically in responses to environmental change. However, most efforts to model the response of species to climate change ignore intraspecific variation due to local adaptation. Here, we present a new perspective on spatial modelling of organism-environment relationships that combines genomic data and community-level modelling to develop scenarios regarding the geographic distribution of genomic variation in response to environmental change. Rather than modelling species within communities, we use these techniques to model large numbers of loci across genomes. Using balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) as a case study, we demonstrate how our framework can accommodate nonlinear responses of loci to environmental gradients. We identify a threshold response to temperature in the circadian clock gene GIGANTEA-5 (GI5), suggesting that this gene has experienced strong local adaptation to temperature. We also demonstrate how these methods can map ecological adaptation from genomic data, including the identification of predicted differences in the genetic composition of populations under current and future climates. Community-level modelling of genomic variation represents an important advance in landscape genomics and spatial modelling of biodiversity that moves beyond species-level assessments of climate change vulnerability.

  6. Soil nitrogen drives community-level phosphorus resorption in a co-limited system: evidence from a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, C. R.; Yanai, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Fertilization studies in northeastern forests suggest that forest productivity may be co-limited by nitrogen and phosphorus. Foliar nutrient resorption is a crucial conservation mechanism for plants. Resorption controls litterfall nutrient concentration, and litterfall is the largest aboveground nutrient flux in this system. Previous studies have attempted to link the foliar resorption of P to soil P status with mixed results. We propose that in an N and P co-limited system, foliar resorption of P may be linked to N availability. Here we compare the foliar chemistry of six hardwood tree species to soil chemistry across 18 plots in 6 stands in Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. Resorption efficiency was calculated by species as the percent difference between green and senesced leaves. We weighted the resorption efficiencies for dominant tree species in each plot by their litterfall mass to create a community-level estimate of resorption for each plot. Estimates of soil N content to 30 centimeters in the mineral soil were strongly correlated with community-level estimates of both P resorption efficiency (p=0.002) and proficiency (p=0.006). At the population level, this trend was observed in four of the six tree species sampled. Neither N nor P resorption was correlated with any of the soil P fractions we examined. If N availability drives biological P conservation, it would provide an important mechanism for the coupled cycling of N and P in co-limited systems.

  7. Community level evaluation of adenoid hypertrophy on the basis of symptom scoring and its X-ray correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Dixit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the major causes of pediatric morbidity today at the community level is infection involving the ear, nose, and throat. Maximum of these patients respond well initially on general regular medications, but then recurrent complaints are not very uncommon. One of the major causes for such recurrence is hypertrophy of adenoids, the evaluation of which requires a battery of sophisticated investigative tools and expertise which are lacking at the community level. The aim of the study is to evaluate various symptoms related to adenoid hypertrophy and its correlation to the size of the adenoid seen in the lateral view nasopharyngeal X-ray. The aim of the study was to assess various symptoms related to adenoid hypertrophy and its correlation with the size of adenoid radiologically. Methods: A total of fifty cases of pediatric age with strong clinical suspicion of adenoid hypertrophy were included in the study. Through ENT examination was done. X-ray lateral view nasopharynx was obtained. Results: Adenoid hypertrophy was graded according to symptoms score and lateral cephalometric/radiographs. Snoring was the most frequent symptom which had a linear relation with the size of the adenoid. Conclusion: There was good agreement between symptom and the X-ray findings.

  8. Study of Picture Archiving and Communications System for application of orbital disease%眼眶病变中PACS图像系统的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晓晖; 施明光

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨眼眶病变中PACS图像系统的诊断价值.方法 对70例眼眶病变患者行眼眶CT检查,部分行MRI,DSA检查.结果 在70例眼眶疾病中眼眶骨折38例,海绵状血管瘤4例,皮样囊肿3例,眼眶异物2例,其他23例.PACS图像系统能有效提高诊断率.结论 PACS图像系统在眼眶病变中的诊断中具有重要价值,并能指导手术方案的设计.%Objective To study of Picture Archiving and Communications System for application in orbital disease.Methods Picture Archiving and Communications System was performed on orbital disease of 70 cases.Results The orbital disease included blow-out fracture in 70 cases,blow-out fracture 38 cases,venous angioma 4 cases,dermoid cyst 3 cases,orbital foreign body 2 case and others 14 cases.Conclusions Picture Archiving and Communications System can provide accurate diagnosis for orbital disease and instruct operate scheme.

  9. Medical examination of aliens--removal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from definition of communicable disease of public health significance. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-02

    Through this final rule, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is amending its regulations to remove "Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection" from the definition of communicable disease of public health significance and remove references to "HIV" from the scope of examinations for aliens. Prior to this final rule, aliens with HIV infection were considered to have a communicable disease of public health significance and were thus inadmissible to the United States per the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). While HIV infection is a serious health condition, it is not a communicable disease that is a significant public health risk for introduction, transmission, and spread to the U.S. population through casual contact. As a result of this final rule, aliens will no longer be inadmissible into the United States based solely on the ground they are infected with HIV, and they will not be required to undergo HIV testing as part of the required medical examination for U.S. immigration.

  10. Guidance for evaluating mass communication health initiatives: summary of an expert panel discussion sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbatangelo-Gray, Jodie; Cole, Galen E; Kennedy, May G

    2007-09-01

    In May 2004, 12 experts in evaluating large-scale health communication programs came to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to participate in an electronic focus group discussion. They offered advice on topics ranging from the role of logic models to the best strategies for controlling for self-selection bias in surveys regarding outcomes of exposure to mass media health messages. The experts also highlighted health communication evaluation topics that have received too little scientific attention. Finally, they made strategic policy recommendations. Use of the state-of-the-art evaluation methods that they recommended could improve the communication of factual and persuasive health messages and help to guard the public health of the nation. Their advice may also advance evaluation practice in other substantive areas, especially where it is difficult or impossible to implement randomized designs.

  11. Promotion, prevention and protection: interventions at the population- and community-levels for mental, neurological and substance use disorders in low- and middle-income countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petersen, Inge; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Semrau, Maya; Barry, Margaret M; Chisholm, Dan; Gronholm, Petra; Egbe, Catherine O; Thornicroft, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In addition to services within the health system, interventions at the population and community levels are also important for the promotion of mental health, primary prevention of mental, neurological and substance use (MNS...

  12. Relationships between Self-efficacy and Collective Efficacy at the Family/Community Level and Mental Health among Families of Special Olympics Athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between perceptions of self-efficacy and collective efficacy at the family/community level and mental health status among the families...

  13. A systematic community-based participatory approach to refining an evidence-based community-level intervention: the HOLA intervention for Latino men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Daniel, Jason; Alonzo, Jorge; Duck, Stacy; García, Manuel; Downs, Mario; Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Alegría-Ortega, José; Miller, Cindy; Boeving Allen, Alex; Gilbert, Paul A; Marsiglia, Flavio F

    2013-07-01

    Our community-based participatory research partnership engaged in a multistep process to refine a culturally congruent intervention that builds on existing community strengths to promote sexual health among immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). The steps were the following: (1) increase Latino MSM participation in the existing partnership, (2) establish an Intervention Team, (3) review the existing sexual health literature, (4) explore needs and priorities of Latino MSM, (5) narrow priorities based on what is important and changeable, (6) blend health behavior theory with Latino MSM's lived experiences, (7) design an intervention conceptual model, (8) develop training modules and (9) resource materials, and (10) pretest and (11) revise the intervention. The developed intervention contains four modules to train Latino MSM to serve as lay health advisors known as Navegantes. These modules synthesize locally collected data with other local and national data; blend health behavior theory, the lived experiences, and cultural values of immigrant Latino MSM; and harness the informal social support Latino MSM provide one another. This community-level intervention is designed to meet the expressed sexual health priorities of Latino MSM. It frames disease prevention within sexual health promotion.

  14. Syringe Access, Syringe Sharing, and Police Encounters among People Who Inject Drugs in New York City: A Community-Level Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beletsky, Leo; Heller, Daliah; Jenness, Samuel M.; Neaigus, Alan; Gelpi-Acosta, Camila; Hagan, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Background Injection drug user (IDU) experience and perceptions of police practices may alter syringe exchange program (SEP) use or influence risky behaviour. Previously, no community-level data had been collected to identify the prevalence or correlates of police encounters reported by IDUs in the United States. Methods New York City IDUs recruited through respondent-driven sampling were asked about past-year police encounters and risk behaviours, as part of the National HIV Behavioural Surveillance study. Data were analysed using multiple logistic regression. Results A majority (52%) of respondents (n=514) reported being stopped by police officers; 10% reported syringe confiscation. In multivariate modelling, IDUs reporting police stops were less likely to use SEPs consistently (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.40–0.89), and IDUs who had syringes confiscated may have been more likely to share syringes (AOR=1.76; 95% CI=0.90–3.44), though the finding did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Findings suggest that police encounters may influence consistent SEP use. The frequency of IDU-police encounters highlights the importance of including contextual and structural measures in infectious disease risk surveillance, and the need to develop approaches harmonizing structural policing and public health. PMID:23916801

  15. An individual-level meta-analysis assessing the impact of community-level sanitation access on child stunting, anemia, and diarrhea: Evidence from DHS and MICS surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Larsen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A lack of access to sanitation is an important risk factor child health, facilitating fecal-oral transmission of pathogens including soil-transmitted helminthes and various causes of diarrheal disease. We conducted a meta-analysis of cross-sectional surveys to determine the impact that community-level sanitation access has on child health for children with and without household sanitation access.Using 301 two-stage demographic health surveys and multiple indicator cluster surveys conducted between 1990 and 2015 we calculated the sanitation access in the community as the proportion of households in the sampled cluster that had household access to any type of sanitation facility. We then conducted exact matching of children based on various predictors of living in a community with high access to sanitation. Using logistic regression with the matched group as a random intercept we examined the association between the child health outcomes of stunted growth, any anemia, moderate or severe anemia, and diarrhea in the previous two weeks and the exposure of living in a community with varying degrees of community-level sanitation access. For children with household-level sanitation access, living in a community with 100% sanitation access was associated with lowered odds of stunting (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.97, 95%; confidence interval (CI = 0.94-1.00; n = 14,153 matched groups, 1,175,167 children, any anemia (AOR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.67-0.78; n = 5,319 matched groups, 299,033 children, moderate or severe anemia (AOR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.68-0.77; n = 5,319 matched groups, 299,033 children and diarrhea (AOR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.91-0.97; n = 16,379 matched groups, 1,603,731 children compared to living in a community with < 30% sanitation access. For children without household-level sanitation access, living in communities with 0% sanitation access was associated with higher odds of stunting (AOR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02-1.06; n = 14,153 matched groups, 1

  16. Analysis of Communication Sources Used by Farmers in Handling Poultry Diseases in Ughelli North Local Government Area of Delta State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbamu, J. U.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the communication sources used by farmers in handling poultry diseases. Using random and stratified sampling techniques, 8 villages and 80 farmers were used for this study. Structured questionnaire and interview schedule were used to collect data. Data were analysed through use of percentages, mean scores and regression analysis. It was found that veterinary officers, friends and contact farmers were the major sources of communication used by the farmers in handling poultry diseases. Regulated movement of unauthorized persons, use of foot bath at entrance of poultry house, and battery cages for good litter management were the least techniques adopted by the farmers for poultry disease prevention. On the other hand, the techniques mostly adopted for disease prevention were good ventilation and hygiene, vaccination of birds and application of antibiotics in drinking water and feed. The result of regression analysis showed that veterinary officers, agricultural extension workers and friends made significant contribution to adoption of poultry disease prevention techniques. Broadcast media programmes on livestock production should be initiated and aired twice a week to provide critical information on poultry disease management to farmers.

  17. Individual and community level socioeconomic inequalities in contraceptive use in 10 Newly Independent States: a multilevel cross-sectional analysis

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    Janevic Teresa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Little is known regarding the association between socioeconomic factors and contraceptive use in the Newly Independent States (NIS, countries that have experienced profound changes in reproductive health services during the transition from socialism to a market economy. Methods Using 2005–2006 data from Demographic Health Surveys (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Moldova and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan, we examined associations between individual and community socioeconomic status with current modern contraceptive use (MCU among N = 55,204 women aged 15–49 married or in a union. Individual socioeconomic status was measured using quintiles of wealth index and education level (higher than secondary school, secondary school or less. Community socioeconomic status was measured as the percentage of households in the poorest quintile of the nationals household wealth index (0%, 0–25%, or greater than 25%. We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate associations adjusted for age, number of children, urban/rural, and socioeconomic variables. Results MCU varied by country from 14% (in Azerbaijan to 62% (in Belarus. Overall, women living in the poorest communities were less likely than those in the richest to use modern contraceptives (adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 0.82, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.76, 0.89. Similarly, there was an increasing odds of MCU with increasing individual-level wealth. Women with a lower level of education also had lower odds of MCU than those with a higher level of education (aOR = .75, 95%CI = 0.71, 0.79. In country-specific analyses, community-level socioeconomic inequalities were apparent in 4 of 10 countries; in contrast, inequalities by individual-level wealth were apparent in 7 countries and by education in 8 countries. All countries in which community-level socioeconomic status was associated with

  18. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic patterns of chronic non-communicable disease among the older adult population in Ghana

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    Nadia Minicuci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Ghana, the older adult population is projected to increase from 5.3% of the total population in 2015 to 8.9% by 2050. National and local governments will need information about non-communicable diseases (NCDs in this population in order to allocate health system resources and respond to the health needs of older adults. Design: The 2007/08 Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE Wave 1 in Ghana used face-to-face interviews in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 50-plus years. Individual respondents were asked about their overall health, diagnosis of 10 chronic non-communicable conditions, and common health risk factors. A number of anthropometric and health measurements were also taken in all respondents, including height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and blood pressure (BP. Results: This paper includes 4,724 adults aged 50-plus years. The highest prevalence of self-reported chronic conditions was for hypertension [14.2% (95% CI 12.8–15.6] and osteoarthritis [13.8%, (95% CI 11.7–15.9]. The figure for hypertension reached 51.1% (95% CI 48.9–53.4 when based on BP measurement. The prevalence of current smokers was 8.1% (95% CI 7.0–9.2, while 2.0 (95% CI 1.5–2.5 were infrequent/frequent heavy drinkers, 67.9% (95% CI 65.2–70.5 consume insufficient fruits and vegetables, and 25.7% (95% CI 23.1–28.3 had a low level of physical activity. Almost 10% (95% CI 8.3–11.1 of adults were obese and 77.6% (95% CI 76.0–79.2 had a high-risk waist-to-hip ratio (WHR. Risks from tobacco and alcohol consumption continued into older age, while insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, low physical activity and obesity increased with increasing age. The patterns of risk factors varied by income quintile, with higher prevalence of obesity and low physical activity in wealthier respondents, and higher prevalence of insufficient fruit and vegetable intake and smoking in lower-income respondents. The multivariate

  19. Linkage to HIV, TB and non-communicable disease care from a mobile testing unit in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshini Govindasamy

    Full Text Available HIV counseling and testing may serve as an entry point for non-communicable disease screening.To determine the yield of newly-diagnosed HIV, tuberculosis (TB symptoms, diabetes and hypertension, and to assess CD4 count testing, linkage to care as well as correlates of linkage and barriers to care from a mobile testing unit.A mobile unit provided screening for HIV, TB symptoms, diabetes and hypertension in Cape Town, South Africa between March 2010 and September 2011. The yield of newly-diagnosed cases of these conditions was measured and clients were followed-up between January and November 2011 to assess linkage. Linkage to care was defined as accessing care within one, three or six months post-HIV diagnosis (dependent on CD4 count and one month post-diagnosis for other conditions. Clinical and socio-demographic correlates of linkage to care were evaluated using Poisson regression and barriers to care were determined.Of 9,806 clients screened, the yield of new diagnoses was: HIV (5.5%, TB suspects (10.1%, diabetes (0.8% and hypertension (58.1%. Linkage to care for HIV-infected clients, TB suspects, diabetics and hypertensives was: 51.3%, 56.7%, 74.1% and 50.0%. Only disclosure of HIV-positive status to family members or partners (RR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.04-6.3, p=0.04 was independently associated with linkage to HIV care. The main barrier to care reported by all groups was lack of time to access a clinic.Screening for HIV, TB symptoms and hypertension at mobile units in South Africa has a high yield but inadequate linkage. After-hours and weekend clinics may overcome a major barrier to accessing care.

  20. Establishment of health clinics as mass screening and referral systems for chronic non-communicable diseases in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Heidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to establish a comprehensive screening and referral system for chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCD in the routine primary health care, and to determine the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia in adult population invited by public announcement to the Health clinics in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: This survey was conducted from March 2010, and the current paper presents data obtained until November 2011. To provide health services for prevention and control of CNCDs, with priority of type2 diabetes mellitus, Health clinics were established in different parts of Isfahan city with a population of approximately 2,100,000 in Iran. The general populations aged 30 years and above were invited to the Health clinics by public announcement. Results: A total of 198972 participants were screened. The mean age of participants was 47.8 years (48.5 men, 47.3 women, with a range of 1 to 95 years old and standard deviation of 12.3 years (12.7 men, 12.1 women. Overall, 22% of participants had impaired fasting glucose, 25% had hypercholesterolemia, 31% had hypertriglyceridemia, and 20% had metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The high prevalence of dysglycemia and diabetes in our survey may serve as confirmatory evidence about the importance of mass screening and early diagnosis of CNCDs′ risk factors. Our model of establishing Health clinics, as a comprehensive referral system in the routine primary health care can be adopted by Middle Eastern countries, where CNCDs notably diabetes are an emerging health problem.

  1. Economic evaluations of non-communicable disease interventions in developing countries: a critical review of the evidence base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Damian

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic projections suggest a major increase in non-communicable disease (NCD mortality over the next two decades in developing countries. In a climate of scarce resources, policy-makers need to know which interventions represent value for money. The prohibitive cost of performing multiple economic evaluations has generated interest in transferring the results of studies from one setting to another. This paper aims to bridge the gap in the current literature by critically evaluating the available published data on economic evaluations of NCD interventions in developing countries. Methods We identified and reviewed the methodological quality of 32 economic evaluations of NCD interventions in developing countries. Developing countries were defined according to the World Bank classification for low- and lower middle-income countries. We defined NCDs as the 12 categories listed in the 1993 World Bank report Investing in Health. English language literature was searched for the period January 1984 and January 2003 inclusive in Medline, Science Citation Index, HealthStar, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and Embase using medical subheading terms and free text searches. We then assessed the quality of studies according to a set of pre-defined technical criteria. Results We found that the quality of studies was poor and resource allocation decisions made by local and global policy-makers on the basis of this evidence could be misleading. Furthermore we have identified some clear gaps in the literature, particularly around injuries and strategies for tackling the consequences of the emerging tobacco epidemic. Conclusion In the face of poor evidence the role of so-called generalised cost-effectiveness analyses has an important role to play in aiding public health decision-making at the global level. Further research is needed to investigates the causes of variation among cost, effects and cost-effectiveness data within and between

  2. Health Communication and Social Marketing Campaigns for Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Control: What Is the Evidence of their Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L; Kachur, Rachel E; Noar, Seth M; McFarlane, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sex in the media, a culture of silence surrounds sexual health in the United States, serving as a barrier to sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, testing, and treatment. Campaigns can increase STD-related knowledge, communication, and protective behaviors. This review assesses the effectiveness of STD prevention and testing campaigns in the United States to inform the field on their use as a strategy for affecting behavior change. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify original research articles, published between 2000 and 2014, which report on US media campaigns promoting community- or population-level STD testing or prevention behaviors and are evaluated for impact on one or more behavioral outcomes. Titles and abstracts were independently reviewed by 2 researchers. The review yielded 26 articles representing 16 unique STD testing and/or prevention campaigns. Most campaigns were developed using formative research and social marketing or behavioral theory. Most campaigns (68.75%) used posttest-only or pretest-posttest designs without comparison groups for evaluation; only 5 campaigns used control groups, and these proved challenging (i.e., achieving necessary exposure and avoiding contamination). Nearly all campaigns found differences between exposed and unexposed individuals on one or more key behavioral outcomes. Several campaigns found dose-response relationships. Among evaluations with uncontaminated control groups whose campaigns achieved sufficient exposure, sustained campaign effects were observed among targeted populations. Current findings suggest that campaigns can impact targeted STD-related behaviors and add to the evidence that greater exposure is associated with greater behavior change.

  3. Ethnopharmacological appraisal of culturally important medicinal plants and polyherbal formulas used against communicable diseases in Rodrigues Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoisy, Anne Kathie; Mahomoodally, Fawzi

    2016-12-24

    The tropical island of Rodrigues is one of three islands that constitute the Mascarene archipelago in the Indian Ocean. Currently considered as a biodiversity hotspot, the island has also a resilient history in the use of traditional medicine. However, there has been no ethnopharmacological study to document quantitatively such traditional practice against communicable diseases (CD), which currently accounts for 6.61% annual death and 30.7% attendances in public hospitals. The aim of the present study was to collect, analyse, and document traditionally used medicinal plants (MP) and polyherbal formulas from key informants and traditional medicine practitioners (TMP) in Rodrigues to treat and/or manage common CD. Data was collected via face-to-face interviews with MP users (n=113) and TMP (n=9) from 17 key sites. Seven quantitative ethnopharmacological indices, namely family use value (FUV), use value (UV), informant agreement ratio (IAR), relative frequency of citation (RFC), fidelity level (FL), relative importance (RI), and ethnobotanicity index (EI) were calculated. Ninety-seven plants belonging to 49 families were recorded to be in common use as monotherapy (80 plants) and/or as part of polyherbal preparation (23 plants) for the treatment and/or management of 16 different CD. Thirteen MPs were found to have a maximum FL of 100% for CD. The highest IAR (0.98) was observed for diseases of the eye and adnexa and skin and subcutaneous tissue. The highest FUV was for Arecaceae. Ayapana triplinervis (Vahl) R.M. king et H.Rob. scored the highest UV (UV=2.72). Seven endemic medicinal plants have been recorded to be employed in cultural rituals for the management of common CDs, whereas 14 polyherbal preparations were used to treat and/or manage 6 different types of CDs. Side effects were also reported following use of some these medicinal plants. Given the dearth of updated information on traditional medicine from Rodrigues, this work has provided an

  4. Prevalence and Knowledge Assessment of HIV and Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors among Formal Sector Employees in Namibia.

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    Leonor Guariguata

    Full Text Available The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs is growing in sub-Saharan Africa combined with an already high prevalence of infectious disease, like HIV. Engaging the formal employment sector may present a viable strategy for addressing both HIV and NCDs in people of working age. This study assesses the presence of three of the most significant threats to health in Namibia among employees in the formal sector: elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV and assesses the knowledge and self-perceived risk of employees for these conditions.A health and wellness screening survey of employees working in 13 industries in the formal sector of Namibia was conducted including 11,192 participants in the Bophelo! Project in Namibia, from January 2009 to October 2010. The survey combined a medical screening for HIV, blood glucose and blood pressure with an employee-completed survey on knowledge and risk behaviors for those conditions. We estimated the prevalence of the three conditions and compared to self-reported employee knowledge and risk behaviors and possible determinants.25.8% of participants had elevated blood pressure, 8.3% of participants had an elevated random blood glucose measurement, and 8.9% of participants tested positive for HIV. Most participants were not smokers (80%, reported not drinking alcohol regularly (81.2%, and had regular condom use (66%. Most participants could not correctly identify risk factors for hypertension (57.2%, diabetes (57.3%, or high-risk behaviors for HIV infection (59.5%. In multivariate analysis, having insurance (OR:1.15, 95%CI: 1.03 - 1.28 and a managerial position (OR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.13 - 1.47 were associated with better odds of knowledge of diabetes.The prevalence of elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV among employees of the Namibian formal sector is high, while risk awareness is low. Attention must be paid to improving the knowledge of health-related risk factors as well as

  5. Inculcating health awareness in Karachi, Pakistan: How innovative, socially acceptable methods can help combat communicable diseases of poverty

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    Maryam Huda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the megacity of Karachi, which has a population of more than 24 million, more than 9.2 million people (approximately 40 per cent live in squatter settlements. Communities here are characterised by low socioeconomic settings, crowded living conditions, inadequate water and sanitation facilities, and poor health-related behaviours. Such conditions create an environment favourable to the spread of communicable diseases like tuberculosis (TB, hepatitis and dengue. Since 1985, the Department of Community Health Sciences at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan has run the Urban Health Program (UHP, a community-campus partnership operating in these disadvantaged squatter settlements. Recent explosive increases in the spread of dengue, hepatitis and TB, however, necessitated special attention and activities on a scale and pace that was greater than could be accommodated as part of UHP’s core work. Thus, having an already well-established collaborative model with social accountability measures in place, a dedicated mass awareness program was initiated over the course of one year, from mid 2015: the AGAHI project. This article describes AGAHI’s innovative, low-cost, collaborative activities conducted in partnership with two squatter communities, Sultanabad and Rehri Goth, to build health awareness, improved care-seeking and compliance to treatment. Activities ranged from school sessions, role plays and awareness walks to laneway meetings, training of health care workers, door-to-door campaigns and collaboration with local religious leaders, public sector groups and NGOs. Building on the collaborative work of the UHP, in just 12 months AGAHI was able to conduct 80 health awareness sessions with 4000 participants. Moreover, high-risk and vulnerable populations were identified and referred for further treatment. A comparative cross-sectional survey afterwards revealed a significant increase in knowledge among Sultanabad residents as compared to

  6. Prevalence of non-communicable diseases in Brazilian children: follow-up at school age of two Brazilian birth cohorts of the 1990's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Antônio A; Barbieri, Marco A; Cardoso, Viviane C; Batista, Rosângela F; Simões, Vanda M; Vianna, Elcio O; Gutierrez, Manoel R; Figueiredo, Maria L; Silva, Nathalia A; Pereira, Thaís S; Rodriguez, Juliana D; Loureiro, Sônia R; Ribeiro, Valdinar S; Bettiol, Heloisa

    2011-06-21

    Few cohort studies have been conducted in low and middle-income countries to investigate non-communicable diseases among school-aged children. This article aims to describe the methodology of two birth cohorts, started in 1994 in Ribeirão Preto (RP), a more developed city, and in 1997/98 in São Luís (SL), a less developed town. Prevalences of some non-communicable diseases during the first follow-up of these cohorts were estimated and compared. Data on singleton live births were obtained at birth (2858 in RP and 2443 in SL). The follow-up at school age was conducted in RP in 2004/05, when the children were 9-11 years old and in SL in 2005/06, when the children were 7-9 years old. Follow-up rates were 68.7% in RP (790 included) and 72.7% in SL (673 participants). The groups of low (children with below average cognitive function (28.9% vs 12.2%), mental health problems (47.4% vs 38.4%), depression (21.6% vs 6.0%) and underweight (5.8% vs 3.6%). There was no difference in the prevalence of bruxism, recurrent abdominal pain, asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness between cities. Some non-communicable diseases were highly prevalent, especially in the more developed city. Some high rates suggest that the burden of non-communicable diseases will be high in the future, especially mental health problems.

  7. The Pattern and Trend of Non-communicable Diseases in Children in Jos, North Central Nigeria: A Four-year Review

    OpenAIRE

    Esther S Yiltok; Helen O. Akhiwu; Ibrahim I. Abok; Olukemi O. Ige; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are becoming significant causes of morbidity and mortality. However very little information is available in our setting on the trend of NCDs in children. The aim is to determine the pattern and trend of NCDs in children in Jos, Nigeria. Study Design: This is a retrospective study of patients that were admitted and managed for NCDs. The relevant clinical information was extracted from the hospital records. Place and Duration of Study: The Emergenc...

  8. Sense of community in Hong Kong: relations with community-level characteristics and residents' well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Winnie W S; Cheung, Rebecca Y M; Law, Lawrence S C

    2009-09-01

    Sense of community (SOC) has been one of the most studied topics in community psychology. However, no empirical study to date has investigated SOC in Hong Kong and its relations with community characteristics and residents' psychological well-being. A representative sample of 941 Hong Kong Chinese based on a randomized household survey was conducted in all 18 districts in Hong Kong. Results of hierarchical linear modeling indicated that SOC was not associated with sociodemographic indicators on both the individual-level (i.e., gender, age, family income, education level, type of residence, and area-to-capita ratio of residence) and the community-level (i.e., proportion of individuals with tertiary education, median family income, ownership of residence, population density, and resident stability). SOC was negatively related to daily hassles and positively with social support and quality of life. Conceptualization of SOC in Hong Kong was discussed.

  9. Microbial Community-Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) and herbicide mineralization potential in groundwater affected by agricultural land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janniche, Gry Sander; Spliid, Henrik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse groundwater pollution from agricultural land use may impact the microbial groundwater community, which was investigated as Community-Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) using EcoPlate™. Water was sampled from seven piezometers and a spring in a small agricultural catchment with diffuse...... herbicide and nitrate pollution. Based on the Shannon–Wiener and Simpson's diversity indices the diversity in the microbial communities was high. The response from the EcoPlates™ showed which substrates support groundwater bacteria, and all 31 carbon sources were utilized by organisms from at least one......-galacturonic acid, tween 40, and 4-hydroxy benzoic acid as substrates, whereas none preferred 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, α-d-lactose, d,l-α-glycerol phosphate, α-ketobutyric acid, l-threonine and glycyl-l-glutamic acid. Principal Component Analysis of the CLPP's clustered the most agriculturally affected groundwater...

  10. Community-level influences on women's experience of intimate partner violence and terminated pregnancy in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antai, Diddy; Adaji, Sunday

    2012-11-14

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health problem with serious consequences for women's physical, mental, sexual and reproductive health. Reproductive health outcomes such as unwanted and terminated pregnancies, fetal loss or child loss during infancy, non-use of family planning methods, and high fertility are increasingly recognized. However, little is known about the role of community influences on women's experience of IPV and its effect on terminated pregnancy, given the increased awareness of IPV being a product of social context. This study sought to examine the role of community-level norms and characteristics in the association between IPV and terminated pregnancy in Nigeria. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed on nationally-representative cross-sectional data including 19,226 women aged 15-49 years in Nigeria. Data were collected by a stratified two-stage sampling technique, with 888 primary sampling units (PSUs) selected in the first sampling stage, and 7,864 households selected through probability sampling in the second sampling stage. Women who had experienced physical IPV, sexual IPV, and any IPV were more likely to have terminated a pregnancy compared to women who had not experienced these IPV types.IPV types were significantly associated with factors reflecting relationship control, relationship inequalities, and socio-demographic characteristics. Characteristics of the women aggregated at the community level (mean education, justifying wife beating, mean age at first marriage, and contraceptive use) were significantly associated with IPV types and terminated pregnancy. Findings indicate the role of community influence in the association between IPV-exposure and terminated pregnancy, and stress the need for screening women seeking abortions for a history of abuse.

  11. Community-level influences on women's experience of intimate partner violence and terminated pregnancy in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antai Diddy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV is a major public health problem with serious consequences for women’s physical, mental, sexual and reproductive health. Reproductive health outcomes such as unwanted and terminated pregnancies, fetal loss or child loss during infancy, non-use of family planning methods, and high fertility are increasingly recognized. However, little is known about the role of community influences on women's experience of IPV and its effect on terminated pregnancy, given the increased awareness of IPV being a product of social context. This study sought to examine the role of community-level norms and characteristics in the association between IPV and terminated pregnancy in Nigeria. Methods Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed on nationally-representative cross-sectional data including 19,226 women aged 15–49 years in Nigeria. Data were collected by a stratified two-stage sampling technique, with 888 primary sampling units (PSUs selected in the first sampling stage, and 7,864 households selected through probability sampling in the second sampling stage. Results Women who had experienced physical IPV, sexual IPV, and any IPV were more likely to have terminated a pregnancy compared to women who had not experienced these IPV types. IPV types were significantly associated with factors reflecting relationship control, relationship inequalities, and socio-demographic characteristics. Characteristics of the women aggregated at the community level (mean education, justifying wife beating, mean age at first marriage, and contraceptive use were significantly associated with IPV types and terminated pregnancy. Conclusion Findings indicate the role of community influence in the association between IPV-exposure and terminated pregnancy, and stress the need for screening women seeking abortions for a history of abuse.

  12. Household and community-level Adverse Childhood Experiences and adult health outcomes in a diverse urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Roy; Cronholm, Peter F; Fein, Joel A; Forke, Christine M; Davis, Martha B; Harkins-Schwarz, Mary; Pachter, Lee M; Bair-Merritt, Megan H

    2016-02-01

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), which include family dysfunction and community-level stressors, negatively impact the health and well being of children throughout the life course. While several studies have examined the impact of these childhood exposures amongst racially and socially diverse populations, the contribution of ACEs in the persistence of socioeconomic disparities in health is poorly understood. To determine the association between ACEs and health outcomes amongst a sample of adults living in Philadelphia and examine the moderating effect of Socioeconomic Status (SES) on this association, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1,784 Philadelphia adults, ages 18 and older, using random digit di