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Sample records for common susceptibility variants

  1. Common susceptibility variants examined for association with dilated cardiomyopathy.

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    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Kinnamon, Daniel D; Hamilton, Kara; Khuri, Sawsan; Hershberger, Ray E; Martin, Eden R

    2010-03-01

    Rare mutations in more than 20 genes have been suggested to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but explain only a small percentage of cases, mainly in familial forms. We hypothesised that more common variants may also play a role in increasing genetic susceptibility to DCM, similar to that observed in other common complex disorders. To test this hypothesis, we performed case-control analyses on all DNA polymorphic variation identified in a resequencing study of six candidate DCM genes (CSRP3, LDB3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, and TNNT2) conducted in 289 unrelated white probands with DCM of unknown cause and 188 unrelated white controls. In univariate analyses, we identified associated common variants at LDB3 site 10779, LDB3 site 57877, MYH7 sites 16384 and 17404, and TCAP sites 140 and 1735. Multivariate analyses to examine the joint effects of multiple gene variants confirmed univariate results for MYH7 and TCAP and identified a block of nine variants in MYH7 that was strongly associated with DCM. Common variants in genes known to be causative of DCM may play a role in genetic susceptibility to DCM. Our results suggest that examination of common genetic variants may be warranted in future studies of DCM and other Mendelian-like disorders.

  2. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

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    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W; Baker, Annette L; Shulman, Stanford T; Rowley, Anne H; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5' untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 x 10(-8) in the Japanese and P = 3.7 x 10(-3) in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD.

  3. Combined analyses of 20 common obesity susceptibility variants

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    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Sparsø, Thomas; Grarup, Niels;

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes.......Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes....

  4. Common variants in the TPH2 promoter confer susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Chen; Lu, Weihong; Song, Lisheng; Liu, Dentang; Xu, Yifeng; Fang, Yiru

    2012-07-01

    Serotonergic system-related genes may be good candidates in investigating the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Our previous study suggested that promoter region of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2) may confer the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated whether common variants within TPH2 promoter may predispose to paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. A total of 509 patients who met DSM-IV criteria for paranoid schizophrenia and 510 matched healthy controls were recruited for this study. Five polymorphisms within TPH2 promoter region were tested. No statistically significant differences were found in allele or genotype frequencies between schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. The frequency of the rs4448731T-rs6582071A-rs7963803A-rs4570625T-rs11178997A haplotype was significantly higher in cases compared to the controls (P = 0.003; OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.15-1.95). Our results suggest that the common variants within TPH2 promoter are associated with paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. Further studies in larger samples are warranted to elucidate the role of TPH2 in the etiology of paranoid schizophrenia.

  5. Association of common variants in mismatch repair genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a multigene study

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    Pina Julieta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MMR is responsible for the repair of base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion loops. Besides this, MMR is also associated with an anti-recombination function, suppressing homologous recombination. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability have been detected in a large number of skin samples from breast cancer patients, suggesting a potential role of MMR in breast cancer susceptibility. Methods We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in a Caucasian Portuguese population (287 cases and 547 controls to estimate the susceptibility to non-familial breast cancer associated with some polymorphisms in mismatch repair genes (MSH3, MSH4, MSH6, MLH1, MLH3, PMS1 and MUTYH. Results Using unconditional logistic regression we found that MLH3 (L844P, G>A polymorphism GA (Leu/Pro and AA (Pro/Pro genotypes were associated with a decreased risk: OR = 0.65 (0.45-0.95 (p = 0.03 and OR = 0.62 (0.41-0.94 (p = 0.03, respectively. Analysis of two-way SNP interaction effects on breast cancer revealed two potential associations to breast cancer susceptibility: MSH3 Ala1045Thr/MSH6 Gly39Glu - AA/TC [OR = 0.43 (0.21-0.83, p = 0.01] associated with a decreased risk; and MSH4 Ala97Thr/MLH3 Leu844Pro - AG/AA [OR = 2.35 (1.23-4.49, p = 0.01], GG/AA [OR = 2.11 (1.12-3,98, p = 0.02], and GG/AG [adjusted OR = 1.88 (1.12-3.15, p = 0.02] all associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. Conclusion It is possible that some of these common variants in MMR genes contribute significantly to breast cancer susceptibility. However, further studies with a large sample size will be needed to support our results.

  6. Common variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes do not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

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    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Chen; Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Gong, Wei; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Lu, Weihong; Chen, Xiaogang; Fang, Yiru; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been frequently reported in schizophrenia. Phosphatase and tension homologue-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protease (PARL) are mitochondrial proteins, and genetic variants of these two genes may confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia by influencing mitochondrial function. In this study, we conducted a two-stage genetic association study to test this hypothesis. We genotyped 4 PINK1 and 5 PARL genetic variants and evaluated the potential association of the 9 SNPs with schizophrenia in two independent case-control cohorts of 2510 Han Chinese individuals. No positive association of common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes with schizophrenia was identified in our samples after Bonferroni correction. Re-analysis of the newly updated Psychiatric Genetics Consortium (PGC) data sets confirmed our negative result. Intriguingly, one PINK1 SNP (rs10916832), which showed a marginally significant association in only Hunan samples (P = 0.032), is associated with the expression of a schizophrenia susceptible gene KIF17 according to the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our study indicated that common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes are unlikely to be involved in schizophrenia. Further studies are essential to characterize the role of the PINK1 and PARL genes in schizophrenia.

  7. Common variants of OPA1 conferring genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

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    Xiang, Yang-Lin; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Onset of leprosy was highly affected by host nutritional condition and energy production, (partially) due to genomic loss and parasitic life style of M. leprae. The optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) gene plays an essential role in mitochondria, which function in cellular energy supply and innate immunity. To investigate the potential involvement of OPA1 in leprosy. We analyzed 7 common genetic variants of OPA1 in 1110 Han Chinese subjects with and without leprosy, followed by mRNA expression profiling and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We observed positive associations between OPA1 variants rs9838374 (Pgenotypic=0.003) and rs414237 (Pgenotypic=0.002) with lepromatous leprosy. expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis showed that the leprosy-related risk allele C of rs414237 is correlated with lower OPA1 mRNA expression level. Indeed, we identified a decrease of OPA1 mRNA expression in both with patients and cellular model of leprosy. In addition, the PPI analysis showed that OPA1 protein was actively involved in the interaction network of M. leprae induced differentially expressed genes. Our results indicated that OPA1 variants confer risk of leprosy and may affect OPA1 expression, mitochondrial function and antimicrobial pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The longitudinal association of common susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes and obesity with fasting glucose level and BMI

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    Beilby John P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in the effects of genetic variants on physiological traits over time or with age may alter the trajectories of these traits. However, few studies have investigated this possibility for variants associated with type 2 diabetes or obesity, and these show little consensus. We aimed to characterise the possible longitudinal associations of common diabetes-susceptibility variants in the KCNJ11, PPARG, TCF7L2, IGF2BP2, CDKAL1, SLC30A8 and HHEX gene loci, with fasting glucose level; and of an obesity-associated variant in the FTO gene, with body mass index (BMI. Methods The study analysed data from the Busselton Health Study (n = 4,554. Cross-sectional association analyses included family data and used the total association test. Longitudinal association analyses of unrelated participant data (n = 2,864 used linear mixed-effects models. Results In cross-sectional analyses, we observed associations of the T allele at the IGF2BP2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs4402960 with raised fasting glucose (p = 0.045, and the A allele at the FTO SNP rs9939609 with raised BMI (p = 0.003. Longitudinal analyses showed no significant associations between SNPs and changes in fasting glucose or BMI in the same individuals, either over mean follow-up times of 18.7 and 21.8 years respectively, or with age during adulthood. Conclusions There was no indication that the effects of common type 2 diabetes variants on fasting glucose varied with age during adulthood or over time.

  9. Common variants at 19p13 are associated with susceptibility to ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Kelly L; Tyrer, Jonathan; Song, Honglin

    2010-01-01

    survival time data and a parallel association analysis of EOC susceptibility. Two SNPs at 19p13.11, rs8170 and rs2363956, showed evidence of association with survival (overall P = 5 × 10¿4 and P = 6 × 10¿4, respectively), but they did not replicate in phase 3. However, the same two SNPs demonstrated genome......-wide significance for risk of serous EOC (P = 3 × 10¿¿ and P = 4 × 10¿¹¹, respectively). Expression analysis of candidate genes at this locus in ovarian tumors supported a role for the BRCA1-interacting gene C19orf62, also known as MERIT40, which contains rs8170, in EOC development....

  10. Common variants at 19p13 are associated with susceptibility to ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Kelly L; Tyrer, Jonathan; Song, Honglin

    2010-01-01

    survival time data and a parallel association analysis of EOC susceptibility. Two SNPs at 19p13.11, rs8170 and rs2363956, showed evidence of association with survival (overall P = 5 × 10⁻⁴ and P = 6 × 10⁻⁴, respectively), but they did not replicate in phase 3. However, the same two SNPs demonstrated genome......-wide significance for risk of serous EOC (P = 3 × 10⁻⁹ and P = 4 × 10⁻¹¹, respectively). Expression analysis of candidate genes at this locus in ovarian tumors supported a role for the BRCA1-interacting gene C19orf62, also known as MERIT40, which contains rs8170, in EOC development....

  11. Combined analysis of 19 common validated type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene variants shows moderate discriminative value and no evidence of gene-gene interaction

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    Sparsø, T; Grarup, N; Andreasen, C;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The list of validated type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants has recently been expanded from three to 19. The variants identified are common and have low penetrance in the general population. The aim of the study is to investigate the combined effect of the 19 variants by applyi...... analysis of the 19 validated variants enables detection of subgroups at substantially increased risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the discrimination between glucose-tolerant and type 2 diabetes individuals is still too inaccurate to achieve clinical value....

  12. Common variants at 19p13 are associated with susceptibility to ovarian cancer

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    Bolton, Kelly L.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J.; Notaridou, Maria; Jones, Chris; Sher, Tanya; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Wozniak, Eva; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Weidhaas, Joanne; Paik, Daniel; Van Den Berg, David J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H.; Brewster, Wendy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Narod, Steven A.; Levine, Douglas A.; Kaye, Stanley B.; Brown, Robert; Paul, Jim; Flanagan, James; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S.; Campbell, Ian; Gore, Martin E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Medrek, Krzysztof; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Palmieri, Rachel T.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Edwin S.; Phelan, Catherine; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Kruger-Kjaer, Susan; Blaeker, Jan; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Gross, Jenny; Karlan, Beth Y.; Ness, Roberta B.; Edwards, Robert P.; Odunsi, Kunle; Moyisch, Kirsten B.; Baker, Julie A.; Modugno, Francesmary; Heikkinenen, Tuomas; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Doerk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Thompson, Pamela J.; Carney, Michael E.; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hein, Rebecca; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L.; Doherty, Jennifer; Chen, Chu; Rafnar, Thorunn; Besenbacher, Soren; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari; Birrer, Michael J.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Hernandez, Dena; Cramer, Daniel W.; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Thiel, Falk C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Webb, Penelope M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chanock, Stephen; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sellers, Tom; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancy in the developed world accounting for 4 percent of deaths from cancer in women1. We performed a three-phase genome-wide association study of EOC survival in 8,951 EOC cases with available survival time data, and a parallel association analysis of EOC susceptibility. Two SNPs at 19p13.11, rs8170 and rs2363956, showed evidence of association with survival (overall P=5×10−4 and 6×10−4), but did not replicate in phase 3. However, the same two SNPs demonstrated genome-wide significance for risk of serous EOC (P=3×10−9 and 4×10−11 respectively). Expression analysis of candidate genes at this locus in ovarian tumors supported a role for the BRCA1 interacting gene C19orf62, also known as MERIT40, which contains rs8170, in EOC development. PMID:20852633

  13. Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease – a genome-wide analysis of common variants

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    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R.; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Levi, Christopher; O′Donnell, Christopher J.; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Seshadri, Sudha; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bis, Joshua C.; Peters, Annette; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; März, Winfried; Meschia, James F.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ikram, M. Arfan; McPherson, Ruth; Stefansson, Kari; Sudlow, Cathie; Reilly, Muredach P.; Thompson, John R.; Sharma, Pankaj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Watkins, Hugh; Rothwell, Peter M.; Roberts, Robert; Markus, Hugh S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Farrall, Martin; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each have a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Methods Genome-wide association data were obtained from the METASTROKE, CARDIoGRAM, and C4D consortia. We first analyzed common variants reaching a nominal threshold of significance (pstroke (LAS) subtype. Results Common variants associated with CAD at pgenetic risk of ischemic stroke and particularly the large artery stroke subtype with coronary artery disease. PMID:24262325

  14. Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease: a genome-wide analysis of common variants.

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    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D; Assimes, Themistocles L; Levi, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M; Hengstenberg, Christian; Seshadri, Sudha; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bis, Joshua C; Peters, Annette; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; März, Winfried; Meschia, James F; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ikram, M Arfan; McPherson, Ruth; Stefansson, Kari; Sudlow, Cathie; Reilly, Muredach P; Thompson, John R; Sharma, Pankaj; Hopewell, Jemma C; Chambers, John C; Watkins, Hugh; Rothwell, Peter M; Roberts, Robert; Markus, Hugh S; Samani, Nilesh J; Farrall, Martin; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each has a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Genome-wide association data were obtained from the METASTROKE, Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM), and Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics consortia. We first analyzed common variants reaching a nominal threshold of significance (Pstroke (LAS) subtype. Common variants associated with CAD at Pgenetic risk of IS and particularly the LAS subtype with CAD.

  15. Association of eleven common, low-penetrance colorectal cancer susceptibility genetic variants at six risk loci with clinical outcome.

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    Janelle M Hoskins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low-penetrance genetic variants have been increasingly recognized to influence the risk of tumor development. Risk variants for colorectal cancer (CRC have been mapped to chromosome positions 8q23.3, 8q24, 9p24.1, 10p14, 11q23, 14q22.2, 15q13, 16q22.1, 18q21, 19q13.1 and 20p12.3. In particular, the 8q24 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs6983267, has reproducibly been associated with the risk of developing CRC. As the CRC risk SNPs may also influence disease outcome, thus in this study, we evaluated whether they influence patient survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA samples from 583 CRC patients enrolled in the prospective, North Carolina Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium Study (NC CanCORS were genotyped for 11 CRC susceptibility SNPs at 6 CRC risk loci. Relationships between genotypes and patient survival were examined using Cox regression analysis. In multivariate analysis, patients homozygous for the CRC risk allele of rs7013278 or rs7014346 (both at 8 q24 were only nominally significant for poorer overall survival compared to patients homozygous for the protective allele (hazard ratio = 2.20 and 1.96, respectively; P<0.05. None of these associations, however, remained statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. The other nine susceptibility SNPs tested were not significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We did not find evidence of association of CRC risk variants with patient survival.

  16. Common variants in FKBP5 gene and major depressive disorder (MDD) susceptibility: a comprehensive meta-analysis

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    Rao, Shuquan; Yao, Yao; Ryan, Joanne; Li, Tao; Wang, Duan; Zheng, Chuan; Xu, Yong; Xu, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have investigated the association between common variants in FKBP5 and MDD; however, the results remain inconsistent. In order to conduct a comprehensive meta-analysis of the association between FKBP5 variants and MDD risk, seven studies involving 26582 subjects, including 12491 cases with MDD and 14091 controls, were enrolled totally. Four common SNPs (rs1360780, rs4713916, rs3800373 and rs755658) with complete data from two or more studies were analyzed. In the total sample, there was no evidence of a significant association between MDD and any of the four SNPs using a random-effects model. However, after removing one heterogeneous German study, as indicated by sensitivity analysis, both the rs1360780 T-allele (Z = 2.95, P = 0.003, OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02-1.11) and the rs3800373 C-allele (Z = 3.05, P = 0.002, OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.02-1.12) were significantly associated with MDD in a fixed-effect model. Our study thus provides support for an association between specific FKBP5 genetic variants and MDD risk. Rs4713916 was not significantly associated with MDD; However, this analysis had limited statistical power and larger sample sizes are required to further validate this result. Future research should also investigate possible gender- and ethnicity-specific differences in the association between FKBP5 and MDD.

  17. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status.

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    Michele D Binder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients.

  18. Common variants in the COL4A4 gene confer susceptibility to lattice degeneration of the retina.

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    Akira Meguro

    Full Text Available Lattice degeneration of the retina is a vitreoretinal disorder characterized by a visible fundus lesion predisposing the patient to retinal tears and detachment. The etiology of this degeneration is still uncertain, but it is likely that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in its development. To identify genetic susceptibility regions for lattice degeneration of the retina, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS using a dense panel of 23,465 microsatellite markers covering the entire human genome. This GWAS in a Japanese cohort (294 patients with lattice degeneration and 294 controls led to the identification of one microsatellite locus, D2S0276i, in the collagen type IV alpha 4 (COL4A4 gene on chromosome 2q36.3. To validate the significance of this observation, we evaluated the D2S0276i region in the GWAS cohort and in an independent Japanese cohort (280 patients and 314 controls using D2S0276i and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the region. The strong associations were observed in D2S0276i and rs7558081 in the COL4A4 gene (Pc = 5.8 × 10(-6, OR = 0.63 and Pc = 1.0 × 10(-5, OR = 0.69 in a total of 574 patients and 608 controls, respectively. Our findings suggest that variants in the COL4A4 gene may contribute to the development of lattice degeneration of the retina.

  19. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

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    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating...

  20. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in th...

  1. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

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    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  2. Common sequence variants on 2p15 and Xp11.22 confer susceptibility to prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudmundsson, J.; Sulem, P.; Rafnar, T.; Bergthorsson, J.T.; Manolescu, A.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Sigurdsson, A.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Blondal, T.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Stacey, S.N.; Kostic, J.; Kristinsson, K.T.; Birgisdottir, B.; Ghosh, S.; Magnusdottir, D.N.; Thorlacius, S.; Thorleifsson, G.; Zheng, S.L.; Sun, J.; Chang, B.L.; Elmore, J.B.; Breyer, J.P.; McReynolds, K.M.; Bradley, K.M.; Yaspan, B.L.; Wiklund, F.; Stattin, P.; Lindstrom, S.; Adami, H.O.; McDonnell, S.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Cunningham, J.M.; Wang, L.; Cerhan, J.R.; Sauver, J.L. St; Isaacs, S.D.; Wiley, K.E.; Partin, A.W.; Walsh, P.C.; Polo, S.; Ruiz-Echarri, M.; Navarrete, S.; Fuertes, F.; Saez, B.; Godino, J.; Weijerman, P.C.; Swinkels, D.W.; Aben, K.K.H.; Witjes, J.A.M.; Suarez, B.K.; Helfand, B.T.; Frigge, M.L.; Kristjansson, K.; Ober, C.; Jonsson, E.; Einarsson, G.V.; Xu, J.; Gronberg, H.; Smith, J.R.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Isaacs, W.B.; Catalona, W.J.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Gulcher, J.R.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Stefansson, K.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide SNP association study on prostate cancer on over 23,000 Icelanders, followed by a replication study including over 15,500 individuals from Europe and the United States. Two newly identified variants were shown to be associated with prostate cancer: rs5945572 on Xp11.22 and

  3. Common variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 and GRIA3 receptor genes are associated with migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfrancesco Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system which acts by the activation of either ionotropic (AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptors or G-protein coupled metabotropic receptors. Glutamate is widely accepted to play a major role in the path physiology of migraine as implicated by data from animal and human studies. Genes involved in synthesis, metabolism and regulation of both glutamate and its receptors could be, therefore, considered as potential candidates for causing/predisposing to migraine when mutated. Methods The association of polymorphic variants of GRIA1-GRIA4 genes which encode for the four subunits (GluR1-GluR4 of the alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA receptor for glutamate was tested in migraineurs with and without aura (MA and MO and healthy controls. Results Two variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 (rs2195450 and GRIA3 (rs3761555 genes resulted strongly associated with MA (P = 0.00002 and P = 0.0001, respectively, but not associated with MO, suggesting their role in cortical spreading depression. Whereas the rs548294 variant in GRIA1 gene showed association primarily with MO phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that MA and MO phenotypes could be genetically related. These variants modify binding sites for transcription factors altering the expression of GRIA1 and GRIA3 genes in different conditions. Conclusions This study represents the first genetic evidence of a link between glutamate receptors and migraine.

  4. Common Variants in CLDN2 and MORC4 Genes Confer Disease Susceptibility in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Giri

    Full Text Available A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS identified association with variants in X-linked CLDN2 and MORC4, and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci with chronic pancreatitis (CP in North American patients of European ancestry. We selected 9 variants from the reported GWAS and replicated the association with CP in Indian patients by genotyping 1807 unrelated Indians of Indo-European ethnicity, including 519 patients with CP and 1288 controls. The etiology of CP was idiopathic in 83.62% and alcoholic in 16.38% of 519 patients. Our study confirmed a significant association of 2 variants in CLDN2 gene (rs4409525-OR 1.71, P = 1.38 x 10-09; rs12008279-OR 1.56, P = 1.53 x 10-04 and 2 variants in MORC4 gene (rs12688220-OR 1.72, P = 9.20 x 10-09; rs6622126-OR 1.75, P = 4.04x10-05 in Indian patients with CP. We also found significant association at PRSS1-PRSS2 locus (OR 0.60; P = 9.92 x 10-06 and SAMD12-TNFRSF11B (OR 0.49, 95% CI [0.31-0.78], P = 0.0027. A variant in the gene MORC4 (rs12688220 showed significant interaction with alcohol (OR for homozygous and heterozygous risk allele -14.62 and 1.51 respectively, P = 0.0068 suggesting gene-environment interaction. A combined analysis of the genes CLDN2 and MORC4 based on an effective risk allele score revealed a higher percentage of individuals homozygous for the risk allele in CP cases with 5.09 fold enhanced risk in individuals with 7 or more effective risk alleles compared with individuals with 3 or less risk alleles (P = 1.88 x 10-14. Genetic variants in CLDN2 and MORC4 genes were associated with CP in Indian patients.

  5. Common variant of PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) gene is associated with gout susceptibility: A replication study and meta-analysis in Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Toshihide; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawamura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Naito, Mariko; Kawai, Sayo; Takada, Yuzo; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-12-01

    PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) is a scaffold protein that organizes a transportsome and regulates several transporters' functions including urate and drug transporters. Therefore, PDZK1 in renal proximal tubules may affect serum uric acid levels through PDZK1-binding renal urate transporters. Two previous studies in Japanese male population reported that a PDZK1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs12129861, was not associated with gout. In the present study, we performed a further association analysis between gout and rs12129861 in a different large-scale Japanese male population and a meta-analysis with previous Japanese population studies. We genotyped rs12129861 in 1210 gout cases and 1224 controls of a Japanese male population by TaqMan assay. As a result, we showed that rs12129861 was significantly associated with gout susceptibility (P = 0.016, odds ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.96). The result of the meta-analysis among Japanese populations also showed a significant association (P = 0.013, OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.75-0.97). Our findings show the significant association between gout susceptibility and common variant of PDZK1 which reportedly regulates the functions of urate transporters in the urate transportsome.

  6. A common variant mapping to CACNA1A is associated with susceptibility to exfoliation syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Mizoguchi, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common recognizable cause of open-angle glaucoma worldwide. To better understand the etiology of XFS, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,484 cases and 1,188 controls from Japan and followed up the most significant findings in a further ...

  7. Genome-wide association study of migraine implicates a common susceptibility variant on 8q22.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Verneri; Stefansson, Hreinn; Kallela, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a common episodic neurological disorder, typically presenting with recurrent attacks of severe headache and autonomic dysfunction. Apart from rare monogenic subtypes, no genetic or molecular markers for migraine have been convincingly established. We identified the minor allele of rs1...

  8. Multiple common susceptibility variants near BMP pathway loci GREM1, BMP4, and BMP2 explain part of the missing heritability of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian P M Tomlinson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified 14 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs that are associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC, and several of these tagSNPs are near bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathway loci. The penalty of multiple testing implicit in GWAS increases the attraction of complementary approaches for disease gene discovery, including candidate gene- or pathway-based analyses. The strongest candidate loci for additional predisposition SNPs are arguably those already known both to have functional relevance and to be involved in disease risk. To investigate this proposition, we searched for novel CRC susceptibility variants close to the BMP pathway genes GREM1 (15q13.3, BMP4 (14q22.2, and BMP2 (20p12.3 using sample sets totalling 24,910 CRC cases and 26,275 controls. We identified new, independent CRC predisposition SNPs close to BMP4 (rs1957636, P = 3.93×10(-10 and BMP2 (rs4813802, P = 4.65×10(-11. Near GREM1, we found using fine-mapping that the previously-identified association between tagSNP rs4779584 and CRC actually resulted from two independent signals represented by rs16969681 (P = 5.33×10(-8 and rs11632715 (P = 2.30×10(-10. As low-penetrance predisposition variants become harder to identify-owing to small effect sizes and/or low risk allele frequencies-approaches based on informed candidate gene selection may become increasingly attractive. Our data emphasise that genetic fine-mapping studies can deconvolute associations that have arisen owing to independent correlation of a tagSNP with more than one functional SNP, thus explaining some of the apparently missing heritability of common diseases.

  9. Multiple Common Susceptibility Variants near BMP Pathway Loci GREM1, BMP4, and BMP2 Explain Part of the Missing Heritability of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Sara E.; Tenesa, Albert; Jones, Angela M.; Howarth, Kimberley; Palles, Claire; Broderick, Peter; Jaeger, Emma E. M.; Farrington, Susan; Lewis, Annabelle; Prendergast, James G. D.; Pittman, Alan M.; Theodoratou, Evropi; Olver, Bianca; Walker, Marion; Penegar, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Whiffin, Nicola; Martin, Lynn; Ballereau, Stephane; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Lubbe, Steven; Howie, Bryan; Marchini, Jonathan; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Duggan, David; Conti, David; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Campbell, Harry; Sieber, Oliver; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Young, Joanne; Baird, Paul N.; Gallinger, Steven; Newcomb, Polly; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark A.; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Kerr, David J.; Cheadle, Jeremy; Pharoah, Paul; Casey, Graham; Houlston, Richard S.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 14 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) that are associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), and several of these tagSNPs are near bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway loci. The penalty of multiple testing implicit in GWAS increases the attraction of complementary approaches for disease gene discovery, including candidate gene- or pathway-based analyses. The strongest candidate loci for additional predisposition SNPs are arguably those already known both to have functional relevance and to be involved in disease risk. To investigate this proposition, we searched for novel CRC susceptibility variants close to the BMP pathway genes GREM1 (15q13.3), BMP4 (14q22.2), and BMP2 (20p12.3) using sample sets totalling 24,910 CRC cases and 26,275 controls. We identified new, independent CRC predisposition SNPs close to BMP4 (rs1957636, P = 3.93×10−10) and BMP2 (rs4813802, P = 4.65×10−11). Near GREM1, we found using fine-mapping that the previously-identified association between tagSNP rs4779584 and CRC actually resulted from two independent signals represented by rs16969681 (P = 5.33×10−8) and rs11632715 (P = 2.30×10−10). As low-penetrance predisposition variants become harder to identify—owing to small effect sizes and/or low risk allele frequencies—approaches based on informed candidate gene selection may become increasingly attractive. Our data emphasise that genetic fine-mapping studies can deconvolute associations that have arisen owing to independent correlation of a tagSNP with more than one functional SNP, thus explaining some of the apparently missing heritability of common diseases. PMID:21655089

  10. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsS...

  11. How important are rare variants in common disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Pierre, Aude; Génin, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have uncovered hundreds of common genetic variants involved in complex diseases. However, for most complex diseases, these common genetic variants only marginally contribute to disease susceptibility. It is now argued that rare variants located in different genes could in fact play a more important role in disease susceptibility than common variants. These rare genetic variants were not captured by genome-wide association studies using single nucleotide polymorphism-chips but with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, they have become detectable. It is now possible to study their contribution to common disease by resequencing samples of cases and controls or by using new genotyping exome arrays that cover rare alleles. In this review, we address the question of the contribution of rare variants in common disease by taking the examples of different diseases for which some resequencing studies have already been performed, and by summarizing the results of simulation studies conducted so far to investigate the genetic architecture of complex traits in human. So far, empirical data have not allowed the exclusion of many models except the most extreme ones involving only a small number of rare variants with large effects contributing to complex disease. To unravel the genetic architecture of complex disease, case-control data will not be sufficient, and alternative study designs need to be proposed together with methodological developments.

  12. The role of common genetic variants in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Muller, Christian; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Olesen, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    this approach. Highly penetrant variants in lone AF have also been described in a number of cases. Furthermore, familial AF, although rare, have been recognized for many years. Variants associated with AF have been identified in more than 40 genes, including cardiac gap junction proteins, ion channels and beta......This review focuses on the genetic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the role of variants in the susceptibility of developing the disease. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. Studies in the last decade have demonstrated that AF, and in particular...... and non-cardiac diseases....

  13. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J; Benítez, Javier; Arias Pérez, José Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Malats, Núria; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna J; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hopper, John L; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Sigurdson, Alice J; Linet, Martha S; Schonfeld, Sara J; Freedman, D Michal; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm Wr; Cross, Simon S; Dunning, Alison M; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Lambrechts, Diether; Reumers, Joke; Smeets, Ann; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Irwanto, Astrid K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Holland, Helene; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Bojensen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; John, Esther M; West, Dee W; Whittemore, Alice S; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Hein, Rebecca; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Beckmann, Matthias W; Heusinger, Katharina; Ekici, Arif B; Haeberle, Lothar; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Easton, Doug F; Pharoah, Paul D; García-Closas, Montserrat; Goode, Ellen L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated two-way interactions between each of age at menarche, ever having had a live birth, number of live births, age at first birth and body mass index (BMI) and each of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (10q26-rs2981582 (FGFR2), 8q24-rs13281615, 11p15-rs3817198 (LSP1), 5q11-rs889312 (MAP3K1), 16q12-rs3803662 (TOX3), 2q35-rs13387042, 5p12-rs10941679 (MRPS30), 17q23-rs6504950 (COX11), 3p24-rs4973768 (SLC4A7), CASP8-rs17468277, TGFB1-rs1982073 and ESR1-rs3020314). Interactions were tested for by fitting logistic regression models including per-allele and linear trend main effects for SNPs and risk factors, respectively, and single-parameter interaction terms for linear departure from independent multiplicative effects. These analyses were applied to data for up to 26,349 invasive breast cancer cases and up to 32,208 controls from 21 case-control studies. No statistical evidence of interaction was observed beyond that expected by chance. Analyses were repeated using data from 11 population-based studies, and results were very similar. The relative risks for breast cancer associated with the common susceptibility variants identified to date do not appear to vary across women with different reproductive histories or body mass index (BMI). The assumption of multiplicative combined effects for these established genetic and other risk factors in risk prediction models appears justified.

  14. Two-stage comprehensive evaluation of genetic susceptibility of common variants in FBXO38, AP3B2 and WHAMM to severe chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Dong; Dong, Li; Zeng, Lingfang; Yang, Rui; Xu, Jing; Wu, Yue; Xu, Ran; Tao, Hong; Zhang, Nan

    2015-12-08

    Chronic periodontitis is an oral disorder characterized with gingival inflammation and bone destruction. As the sixth-most prevalent condition affecting more than 743 million people around the world, it is classified as one of the seven destructive oral disorders. Early genetic epidemiological evidence indicated a major role for genetics in periodontal disease development. In this study, we conducted a two-stage comprehensive evaluation of the genetic susceptibility of FBXO38, AP3B2 and WHAMM with the diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis. A total of 5,065 study subjects from the Han Chinese population consisting of 1,264 cases and 3,801 healthy controls were recruited, and 65 single nucleotide markers related to the three candidate genes were genotyped to investigate the susceptibility of patients with these polymorphisms to severe chronic periodontitis. To increase the coverage of genetic markers, we implemented imputation techniques to extend the number of tested makers to 416. Single marker and haplotype-based analyses were performed, and significant results were obtained for FBXO38 (rs10043775, P = 0.0009) and AP3B2 (rs11631963-rs11637433, CA, P = 9.98 × 10(-5); rs1864699-rs2099259-rs2278355, ATC, P = 3.84 × 10(-8)). Our findings provide direct evidence for the association of FBXO38 and AP3B2 with severe chronic periodontitis in the Han Chinese population.

  15. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  16. Common NOD2/CARD15 variants are not associated with susceptibility or the clinicopathologic characteristics of sporadic colorectal cancer in Hungarian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemela Orsolya

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological observations suggest that cancer arises from chronically inflamed tissues. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a typical example as patients with longstanding IBD are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC and mutations of the NOD2/CARD15 gene increase the risk for Crohn's disease (CD. Recently, NOD2/CARD15 has been associated with a risk for CRC in some studies, which stemmed from ethnically diverse populations. Our aim was to identify common NOD2/CARD15 mutations in Hungarian patients with sporadic CRC. Methods A total of 194 sporadic CRC patients (m/f: 108/86, age at diagnosis of CRC: 63.2 ± 9.1 years old and 200 healthy subjects were included. DNA was screened for SNP8, SNP12 and SNP13 NOD2/CARD15 mutations by denaturing-HPLC and confirmed by direct sequencing. Results NOD2/CARD15 mutations were found in 28 patients (14.4% and in 23 controls (11.5%, p = NS. Allele frequencies for SNP8/R702W (1.8% vs. 1.5% SNP12/G908R (1.8% vs. 1.8% and SNP13/3020insC (3.6% vs. 2.5% were also not statistically different between patients and controls. The clinicopathologic characteristics of CRC patients with or without NOD2/CARD15 mutations were not significantly different. Conclusion Our results suggest that common NOD2/CARD15 mutations alone do not contribute to CRC risk in the Hungarian population.

  17. Susceptibility genetic variants associated with early-onset colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, María Dolores; López-Dóriga, Adriana; Bujanda, Luis; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Muñoz, Jenifer; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Jover, Rodrigo; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cosme, Angel; Enríquez-Navascués, José María; Moreno, Victor; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Western countries. Hereditary forms only correspond to 5% of CRC burden. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified common low-penetrant CRC genetic susceptibility loci. Early-onset CRC (CRC65 years old) (n = 1264). CRC susceptibility variants at 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 18q21 (rs4939827), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253) were genotyped in all DNA samples. A genotype-phenotype correlation with clinical and pathological characteristics in both groups was performed. Risk allele carriers for rs3802842 [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.05, P = 0.0096, dominant model) and rs4779584 (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.02-1.9, P = 0.0396, dominant model) were more frequent in the CRC<50 group, whereas homozygotes for rs10795668 risk allele were also more frequent in the early-onset CRC (P = 0.02, codominant model). Regarding early-onset cases, 14q22 (rs4444235), 11q23 (rs3802842) and 20p12 (rs961253) variants were more associated with family history of CRC or tumors of the Lynch syndrome spectrum excluding CRC. In our entire cohort, sum of risk alleles was significantly higher in patients with a CRC family history (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.06-1.85, P = 0.01). In conclusion, variants at 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842) and 15q13.3 (rs4779584) may have a predominant role in predisposition to early-onset CRC. Association of CRC susceptibility variants with some patient's familiar and personal features could be relevant for screening and surveillance strategies in this high-risk group and it should be explored in further studies.

  18. Association of Common Variants in MMPs with Periodontitis Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyang; Zhu, Ying; Singh, Pradeep; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered to play an important role during tissue remodeling and extracellular matrix degradation. And functional polymorphisms in MMPs genes have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of periodontitis. Recently, many studies have investigated the association between MMPs polymorphisms and periodontitis risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to quantify the influence of MMPs polymorphisms on the susceptibility to periodontitis, we performed a meta-analysis and systematic review. Results. Overall, this comprehensive meta-analysis included a total of 17 related studies, including 2399 cases and 2002 healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that although studies of the association between MMP-8 −799 C/T variant and the susceptibility to periodontitis have not yielded consistent results, MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G, −519 A/G, and −422 A/T), MMP-2 (−1575 G/A, −1306 C/T, −790 T/G, and −735 C/T), MMP-3 (−1171 5A/6A), MMP-8 (−381 A/G and +17 C/G), MMP-9 (−1562 C/T and +279 R/Q), and MMP-12 (−357 Asn/Ser), as well as MMP-13 (−77 A/G, 11A/12A) SNPs are not related to periodontitis risk. Conclusions. No association of these common MMPs variants with the susceptibility to periodontitis was found; however, further larger-scale and multiethnic genetic studies on this topic are expected to be conducted to validate our results. PMID:27194818

  19. Sociability and susceptibility to the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sheldon; Doyle, William J; Turner, Ronald; Alper, Cuneyt M; Skoner, David P

    2003-09-01

    There is considerable evidence that social relationships can influence health, but only limited evidence on the health effects of the personality characteristics that are thought to mold people's social lives. We asked whether sociability predicts resistance to infectious disease and whether this relationship is attributable to the quality and quantity of social interactions and relationships. Three hundred thirty-four volunteers completed questionnaires assessing their sociability, social networks, and social supports, and six evening interviews assessing daily interactions. They were subsequently exposed to a virus that causes a common cold and monitored to see who developed verifiable illness. Increased sociability was associated in a linear fashion with a decreased probability of developing a cold. Although sociability was associated with more and higher-quality social interactions, it predicted disease susceptibility independently of these variables. The association between sociability and disease was also independent of baseline immunity (virus-specific antibody), demographics, emotional styles, stress hormones, and health practices.

  20. Hierarchical generalized linear models for multiple groups of rare and common variants: jointly estimating group and individual-variant effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengjun Yi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex diseases and traits are likely influenced by many common and rare genetic variants and environmental factors. Detecting disease susceptibility variants is a challenging task, especially when their frequencies are low and/or their effects are small or moderate. We propose here a comprehensive hierarchical generalized linear model framework for simultaneously analyzing multiple groups of rare and common variants and relevant covariates. The proposed hierarchical generalized linear models introduce a group effect and a genetic score (i.e., a linear combination of main-effect predictors for genetic variants for each group of variants, and jointly they estimate the group effects and the weights of the genetic scores. This framework includes various previous methods as special cases, and it can effectively deal with both risk and protective variants in a group and can simultaneously estimate the cumulative contribution of multiple variants and their relative importance. Our computational strategy is based on extending the standard procedure for fitting generalized linear models in the statistical software R to the proposed hierarchical models, leading to the development of stable and flexible tools. The methods are illustrated with sequence data in gene ANGPTL4 from the Dallas Heart Study. The performance of the proposed procedures is further assessed via simulation studies. The methods are implemented in a freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/.

  1. Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models for Multiple Groups of Rare and Common Variants: Jointly Estimating Group and Individual-Variant Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Liu, Nianjun; Zhi, Degui; Li, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Complex diseases and traits are likely influenced by many common and rare genetic variants and environmental factors. Detecting disease susceptibility variants is a challenging task, especially when their frequencies are low and/or their effects are small or moderate. We propose here a comprehensive hierarchical generalized linear model framework for simultaneously analyzing multiple groups of rare and common variants and relevant covariates. The proposed hierarchical generalized linear models introduce a group effect and a genetic score (i.e., a linear combination of main-effect predictors for genetic variants) for each group of variants, and jointly they estimate the group effects and the weights of the genetic scores. This framework includes various previous methods as special cases, and it can effectively deal with both risk and protective variants in a group and can simultaneously estimate the cumulative contribution of multiple variants and their relative importance. Our computational strategy is based on extending the standard procedure for fitting generalized linear models in the statistical software R to the proposed hierarchical models, leading to the development of stable and flexible tools. The methods are illustrated with sequence data in gene ANGPTL4 from the Dallas Heart Study. The performance of the proposed procedures is further assessed via simulation studies. The methods are implemented in a freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/). PMID:22144906

  2. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, ... factors. Population-Based Autism Genetics and Environment Study Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from ...

  3. Genetic susceptibility variants associated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulí, Anna; Lozano, Juan José; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo; Bessa, Xavier; Muñoz, Jenifer; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Clofent, Juan; Morillas, Juan Diego; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in Western countries. Once a tumour develops, a differentiated prognosis could be determined by lifestyle habits or inherited and somatic genetic factors. Finding such prognostic factors will be helpful in order to identify cases with a shorter survival or at a higher risk of recurrence that may benefit from more intensive treatment and follow-up surveillance. Sixteen CRC genetic susceptibility variants were directly genotyped in a cohort of 1235 CRC patients recruited by the EPICOLON Spanish consortium. Univariate Cox and multivariate regression analyses were performed taking as primary outcomes overall survival (OS), disease-free survival and recurrence-free interval. Genetic variants rs9929218 at 16q22.1 and rs10795668 at 10p14 may have an effect on OS. The G allele of rs9929218 was linked with a better OS [GG genotype, genotypic model: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.93, P = 0.0179; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.94, P = 0.0202]. Likewise, the G allele of rs10795668 was associated with better clinical outcome (GG genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-1.01, P = 0.0570; GA genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.92, P = 0.0137; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.94, P = 0.0194). In conclusion, CRC susceptibility variants rs9929218 and rs10795668 may exert some influence in modulating patient's survival and they deserve to be further tested in additional CRC cohorts in order to confirm their potential as prognosis or predictive biomarkers.

  4. Variant origin of thyrolingual trunk from left common carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhiraja V

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A case is reported in which there was a variant origin of thyrolingual trunk from left common carotid artery 2 cm below its bifurcation in the neck. The trunk was running forward and medially and later it was dividing into upper lingual and lower superior thyroid branches. No such artery was seen on right side.

  5. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  6. The Association between Pediatric NAFLD and Common Genetic Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Rosaria Umano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most common complications of obesity. Several studies have shown that genetic predisposition probably plays an important role in its pathogenesis. In fact, in the last few years a large number of genetic studies have provided compelling evidence that some gene variants, especially those in genes encoding proteins regulating lipid metabolism, are associated with intra-hepatic fat accumulation. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the gene variants that have affected the natural history of the disease.

  7. Vitamin D binding protein variants associate with asthma susceptibility in the Chinese han population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youming

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Polymorphisms of genes encoding components of the vitamin D pathway have been reported to associate with the risk of asthma. We have previously demonstrated that vitamin D status was associated with lung function in Chinese asthma patients. In this study, we tested whether polymorphisms of genes encoding for vitamin D receptor (VDR, vitamin D 25-hydroxylase (CYP2R1 and vitamin D binding protein (GC were associated with asthma in the Chinese Han population. Methods We sequenced all 8 exons of VDR and all 5 exons of CYP2R1 in a Chinese case-control cohort of asthma consisting of 467 cases and 288 unrelated healthy controls. Two mutations were identified in these regions. These variants were specified as rs2228570 in exon 2 of VDR and rs12794714 in exon 1 of CYP2R1. We also genotyped two common polymorphisms in GC gene (rs4588 and rs7041 by a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP method. We analyzed the association between these 4 polymorphisms and asthma susceptibility and asthma-related traits. Results Polymorphic markers in VDR and CYP2R1 were not associated with asthma in the Chinese Han cohort. Importantly, variants in GC gene, which give rise to the two most common electrophoretic isoforms of the vitamin D binding protein, were associated with asthma susceptibility. Compared with isoform Gc1, Gc2 was significantly associated with the risk of asthma (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.01-1.78 p = 0.006. Conclusions The results provide supporting evidence for association between GC variants and asthma susceptibility in the Chinese Han population.

  8. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  9. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  10. Estimating the proportion of variation in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis captured by common SNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Corey T.; Disanto, Giulio; Breden, Felix; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with underlying genetic and environmental factors. Although the contribution of alleles within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are known to exert strong effects on MS risk, much remains to be learned about the contributions of loci with more modest effects identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs), as well as loci that remain undiscovered. We use a recently developed method to estimate the proportion of variance in disease liability explained by 475,806 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 1,854 MS cases and 5,164 controls. We reveal that ~30% of MS genetic liability is explained by SNPs in this dataset, the majority of which is accounted for by common variants. These results suggest that the unaccounted for proportion could be explained by variants that are in imperfect linkage disequilibrium with common GWAS SNPs, highlighting the potential importance of rare variants in the susceptibility to MS.

  11. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  12. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  13. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro,; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume de...

  14. Gene Variants Are Associated with PCOS Susceptibility and Hyperandrogenemia in Young Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Kyeong Song

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity and insulin resistance are also common features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Therefore, the FTO gene might be a candidate gene for PCOS susceptibility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of FTO gene variants on PCOS susceptibility and metabolic and reproductive hormonal parameters.MethodsWe recruited 432 women with PCOS (24±5 years and 927 healthy women with regular menstrual cycles (27±5 years and performed a case-control association study. We genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8050136 in the FTO gene and collected metabolic and hormonal measurements.ResultsLogistic regression revealed that the G/G genotype (rs1421085, 1.6%, the C/C genotype (rs17817449, 1.6%, and the A/A genotype (rs8050136, 1.6% were strongly associated with an increased risk of PCOS (odds ratio, 2.551 to 2.559; all P<0.05. The strengths of these associations were attenuated after adjusting for age and BMI. The women with these genotypes were more obese and exhibited higher free androgen indices (P<0.05 and higher free testosterone levels (P=0.053 to 0.063 compared to the other genotypes. However the significant differences disappeared after adjusting for body mass index (BMI. When we analyzed the women with PCOS and the control groups separately, there were no significant differences in the metabolic and reproductive hormonal parameters according to the FTO gene variants.ConclusionThe rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8050136 variants of the FTO gene were associated with PCOS susceptibility and hyperandrogenemia in young Korean women. These associations may be mediated through an effect of BMI.

  15. Gene and pathway level analyses of germline DNA-repair gene variants and prostate cancer susceptibility using the iCOGS-genotyping array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations within DNA-repair genes are implicated in susceptibility to multiple forms of cancer. For prostate cancer (PrCa), rare mutations in BRCA2 and BRCA1 give rise to moderately elevated risk, whereas two of B100 common, low-penetrance PrCa susceptibility variants identif...

  16. Rare variants in XRCC2 as breast cancer susceptibility alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbers, F.S.; Wijnen, J.T.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Collee, M.J.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Manoukian, S.; Feroce, I.; Capra, F.; Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; Guidugli, L.; Offit, K.; Shah, S.; Campbell, I.G.; Thompson, E.R.; James, P.A.; Trainer, A.H.; Gracia, J.; Benitez, J.; Asperen, C.J. van; Devilee, P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, rare germline variants in XRCC2 were detected in non-BRCA1/2 familial breast cancer cases, and a significant association with breast cancer was reported. However, the breast cancer risk associated with these variants needs further evaluation. METHODS: The coding regions and exo

  17. No association of common VCP variants with sporadic frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Axel; Friedrich, Patricia; Diehl, Janine; Ibach, Bernd; Schoepfer-Wendels, Andreas; Mueller, Jakob C; Konta, Lidija; Laws, Simon M; Kurz, Alexander; Foerstl, Hans; Riemenschneider, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the gene for valosin containing protein (VCP) cause autosomal dominant inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). To investigate the role of this novel gene in sporadic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), we genotyped 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the entire VCP genomic region in 198 patients with sporadic FTD and 184 matched controls from Germany. No significant association could be demonstrated. There is no evidence, that common variants in VCP confer a strong risk to the development of sporadic FTD.

  18. Association of LRRK2 exonic variants with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Owen A; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Heckman, Michael G; Aasly, Jan O; Abahuni, Nadine; Annesi, Grazia; Bacon, Justin A; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Brighina, Laura; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Carr, Jonathan; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Dickson, Dennis W; Diehl, Nancy N; Elbaz, Alexis; Ferrarese, Carlo; Ferraris, Alessandro; Fiske, Brian; Gibson, J Mark; Gibson, Rachel; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ioannidis, John P A; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Jeon, Beom S; Kim, Yun Joong; Klein, Christine; Kruger, Rejko; Kyratzi, Elli; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Chin-Hsien; Lynch, Timothy; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Mellick, George D; Mutez, Eugénie; Nilsson, Christer; Opala, Grzegorz; Park, Sung Sup; Puschmann, Andreas; Quattrone, Aldo; Sharma, Manu; Silburn, Peter A; Sohn, Young Ho; Stefanis, Leonidas; Tadic, Vera; Theuns, Jessie; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Uitti, Ryan J; Valente, Enza Maria; van de Loo, Simone; Vassilatis, Demetrios K; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; White, Linda R; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Farrer, Matthew J

    2011-10-01

    Background The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) harbours highly penetrant mutations that are linked to familial parkinsonism. However, the extent of its polymorphic variability in relation to risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been assessed systematically. We therefore assessed the frequency of LRRK2 exonic variants in individuals with and without PD, to investigate the role of the variants in PD susceptibility. LRRK2 was genotyped in patients with PD and controls from three series (white, Asian, and Arab-Berber) from sites participating in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium. Genotyping was done for exonic variants of LRRK2 that were identified through searches of literature and the personal communications of consortium members. Associations with PD were assessed by use of logistic regression models. For variants that had a minor allele frequency of 0·5% or greater, single variant associations were assessed, whereas for rarer variants information was collapsed across variants. 121 exonic LRRK2 variants were assessed in 15 540 individuals: 6995 white patients with PD and 5595 controls, 1376 Asian patients and 962 controls, and 240 Arab-Berber patients and 372 controls. After exclusion of carriers of known pathogenic mutations, new independent risk associations were identified for polymorphic variants in white individuals (M1646T, odds ratio 1·43, 95% CI 1·15-1·78; p=0·0012) and Asian individuals (A419V, 2·27, 1·35-3·83; p=0·0011). A protective haplotype (N551K-R1398H-K1423K) was noted at a frequency greater than 5% in the white and Asian series, with a similar finding in the Arab-Berber series (combined odds ratio 0·82, 0·72-0·94; p=0·0043). Of the two previously reported Asian risk variants, G2385R was associated with disease (1·73, 1·20-2·49; p=0·0026), but no association was noted for R1628P (0·62, 0·36-1·07; p=0·087). In the Arab-Berber series, Y2189C showed potential evidence of risk association with

  19. Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A; McBurney, H J; Roberts, S A; Lalloo, F; Howell, A; Evans, D G; Newman, W G

    2010-12-01

    Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1/2 mutation positive and 104 BRCA1/2 mutation negative) with familial ovarian cancer were genotyped for FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3 and CASP8 variants. The p.Asp302His CASP8 variant was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in the familial BRCA1/2 mutation negative ovarian cancer cases (P = 0.016). The synonymous TNRC9/TOX3 (Ser51) variant was present at a significantly lower frequency than in patients with familial BRCA1/2 positive breast cancer (P = 0.0002). Our results indicate that variants in CASP8 and TNRC9/TOX3 alter the risk of disease in individuals affected with familial ovarian cancer.

  20. Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration: common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Melissa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex and multifaceted disease involving contributions from both genetic and environmental influences. Previous work exploring the genetic contributions of AMD has implicated numerous genomic regions and a variety of candidate genes as modulators of AMD susceptibility. Nevertheless, much of this work has revolved around single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and it is apparent that a significant portion of the heritability of AMD cannot be explained through these mechanisms. In this review, we consider the role of common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, microRNAs, and mitochondrial genetics in AMD. Copy number variations in regulators of complement activation genes (CFHR1 and CFHR3 and glutathione S transferase genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been associated with AMD, and several additional loci have been identified as regions of potential interest but require further evaluation. MicroRNA dysregulation has been linked to the retinal pigment epithelium degeneration in geographic atrophy, ocular neovascularization, and oxidative stress, all of which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of AMD. Certain mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and SNPs in mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase genes have also been associated with AMD. The role of these additional mechanisms remains only partly understood, but the importance of their further investigation is clear to elucidate more completely the genetic basis of AMD.

  1. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  2. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trubicka Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations.

  3. Seeking genetic susceptibility variants for colorectal cancer: the EPICOLON consortium experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Abulí, Anna; Muñoz, Jenifer; Bessa, Xavier; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ferro, Marta; Giráldez, María Dolores; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Jover, Rodrigo; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel

    2012-03-01

    The EPICOLON consortium was initiated in 1999 by the Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterology Association. It recruited consecutive, unselected, population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and control subjects matched by age and gender without personal or familial history of cancer all over Spain with the main goal of gaining knowledge in Lynch syndrome and familial CRC. This epidemiological, prospective and multicentre study collected extensive clinical data and biological samples from ∼2000 CRC cases and 2000 controls in Phases 1 and 2 involving 25 and 14 participating hospitals, respectively. Genetic susceptibility projects in EPICOLON have included candidate-gene approaches evaluating single-nucleotide polymorphisms/genes from the historical category (linked to CRC risk by previous studies), from human syntenic CRC susceptibility regions identified in mouse, from the CRC carcinogenesis-related pathways Wnt and BMP, from regions 9q22 and 3q22 with positive linkage in CRC families, and from the mucin gene family. This consortium has also participated actively in the identification 5 of the 16 common, low-penetrance CRC genetic variants identified so far by genome-wide association studies. Finishing their own pangenomic study and performing whole-exome sequencing in selected CRC samples are among EPICOLON future research prospects.

  4. Evidence for significant overlap between common risk variants for Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debby Laukens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A multicenter genome-wide association scan for Crohn's Disease (CD has recently reported 40 CD susceptibility loci, including 29 novel ones (19 significant and 10 putative. To gain insight into the genetic overlap between CD and ankylosing spondylitis (AS, these markers were tested for association in AS patients. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two previously established associations, namely with the MHC and IL23R loci, were confirmed. In addition, rs2872507, which maps to a locus associated with asthma and influences the expression of the ORMDL3 gene in lymphoblastoid cells, showed a significant association with AS (p = 0.03. In gut biopsies of AS and CD patients, ORMDL3 expression was not significantly different from controls and no correlation was found with the rs2872507 genotype (Spearman's rho: -0.067. The distribution of p-values for the remaining 36 SNPs was significantly skewed towards low p-values unless the top 5 ranked SNPs (ORMDL3, NKX2-3, PTPN2, ICOSLG and MST1 were excluded from the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Association analysis using risk variants for CD led to the identification of a new risk variant associated with AS (ORMDL3, underscoring a role for ER stress in AS. In addition, two known and five potentially relevant associations were detected, contributing to common susceptibility of CD and AS.

  5. A role for coding functional variants in HNF4A in type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafar-Mohammadi, B; Groves, C J; Gjesing, A P;

    2011-01-01

    allele frequency [MAF] ~0.1%; T130I, MAF ~3.0%)-known to influence downstream HNF-4A target gene expression-are of interest, but previous type 2 diabetes association reports were inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the contribution of these variants to type 2 diabetes susceptibility through large......Rare mutations in the gene HNF4A, encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4a (HNF-4A), account for ~5% of cases of MODY and more frequent variants in this gene may be involved in multifactorial forms of diabetes. Two low-frequency, non-synonymous variants in HNF4A (V255M, minor...

  6. Genetic variants of CD209 associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

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    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology mainly affecting children in Asian countries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209 in humans was showed to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade and associated with KD susceptibility. This study was conducted to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of CD209 and the risk KD. METHODS: A total of 948 subjects (381 KD and 567 controls were recruited. Nine tagging SNPs (rs8112310, rs4804800, rs11465421, rs1544766, rs4804801, rs2287886, rs735239, rs735240, rs4804804 were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Significant associations were found between CD209 polymorphisms (rs4804800, rs2287886, rs735240 and the risk of KD. Haplotype analysis for CD209 polymorphisms showed that A/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0002, OR = 1.61 and G/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0365, OR = 1.52 had higher risk of KD as compared with G/G/A haplotype in rs2287886/rs735239/rs735240 pairwise allele analysis. There were no significant association in KD with regards to CAL formation and IVIG treatment responses. CONCLUSION: CD209 polymorphisms were responsible for the susceptibility of KD, but not CAL formation and IVIG treatment responsiveness.

  7. Whole genome sequencing of an African American family highlights toll like receptor 6 variants in Kawasaki disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Levy, Eric; Ribeiro dos Santos, Andre M.; Yang, Hai; Hibberd, Martin L.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Harismendy, Olivier; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Burns, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common acquired pediatric heart disease. We analyzed Whole Genome Sequences (WGS) from a 6-member African American family in which KD affected two of four children. We sought rare, potentially causative genotypes by sequentially applying the following WGS filters: sequence quality scores, inheritance model (recessive homozygous and compound heterozygous), predicted deleteriousness, allele frequency, genes in KD-associated pathways or with significant associations in published KD genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and with differential expression in KD blood transcriptomes. Biologically plausible genotypes were identified in twelve variants in six genes in the two affected children. The affected siblings were compound heterozygous for the rare variants p.Leu194Pro and p.Arg247Lys in Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6), which affect TLR6 signaling. The affected children were also homozygous for three common, linked (r2 = 1) intronic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in TLR6 (rs56245262, rs56083757 and rs7669329), that have previously shown association with KD in cohorts of European descent. Using transcriptome data from pre-treatment whole blood of KD subjects (n = 146), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses were performed. Subjects homozygous for the intronic risk allele (A allele of TLR6 rs56245262) had differential expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a function of genotype (p = 0.0007) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis. TLR6 plays an important role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition, and sequence variations may affect binding affinities that in turn influence KD susceptibility. This integrative genomic approach illustrates how the analysis of WGS in multiplex families with a complex genetic disease allows examination of both the common disease–common variant and common disease–rare variant hypotheses. PMID:28151979

  8. Impact of type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants on quantitative glycemic traits reveals mechanistic heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimas, Antigone S; Lagou, Vasiliki; Barker, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Patients with established type 2 diabetes display both beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. To define fundamental processes leading to the diabetic state, we examined the relationship between type 2 diabetes risk variants at 37 established susceptibility loci and indices of proinsulin pr...

  9. Association of variants of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in the Dutch Breda cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.; Zhernakova, A.; Strengman, E.; van Haeften, T.W.; Hofker, M.H.; Wijmenga, C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim/hypothesis A strong association between susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and common variants of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), encoding an enteroendocrine transcription factor involved in glucose homeostasis, has been reported in three different populations (Iceland, Denmark and USA) b

  10. Prevalence of common disease-associated variants in Asian Indians

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    Allayee Hooman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asian Indians display a high prevalence of diseases linked to changes in diet and environment that have arisen as their lifestyle has become more westernized. Using 1200 genome-wide polymorphisms in 432 individuals from 15 Indian language groups, we have recently shown that: (i Indians constitute a distinct population-genetic cluster, and (ii despite the geographic and linguistic diversity of the groups they exhibit a relatively low level of genetic heterogeneity. Results We investigated the prevalence of common polymorphisms that have been associated with diseases, such as atherosclerosis (ALOX5, hypertension (CYP3A5, AGT, GNB3, diabetes (CAPN10, TCF7L2, PTPN22, prostate cancer (DG8S737, rs1447295, Hirschsprung disease (RET, and age-related macular degeneration (CFH, LOC387715. In addition, we examined polymorphisms associated with skin pigmentation (SLC24A5 and with the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (TAS2R38. All polymorphisms were studied in a cohort of 576 India-born Asian Indians sampled in the United States. This sample consisted of individuals whose mother tongue is one of 14 of the 22 "official" languages recognized in India as well as individuals whose mother tongue is Parsi, a cultural group that has resided in India for over 1000 years. Analysis of the data revealed that allele frequency differences between the different Indian language groups were small, and interestingly the variant alleles of ALOX5 g.8322G>A and g.50778G>A, and PTPN22 g.36677C>T were present only in a subset of the Indian language groups. Furthermore, a latitudinal cline was identified both for the allele frequencies of the SNPs associated with hypertension (CYP3A5, AGT, GNB3, as well as for those associated with the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (TAS2R38. Conclusion Although caution is warranted due to the fact that this US-sampled Indian cohort may not represent a random sample from India, our results will hopefully assist in the

  11. Regulatory element-based prediction identifies new susceptibility regulatory variants for osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shi; Guo, Yan; Dong, Shan-Shan; Hao, Ruo-Han; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Yi-Xiao; Chen, Jia-Bin; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Yang, Tie-Lin

    2017-08-01

    Despite genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many susceptibility genes for osteoporosis, it still leaves a large part of missing heritability to be discovered. Integrating regulatory information and GWASs could offer new insights into the biological link between the susceptibility SNPs and osteoporosis. We generated five machine learning classifiers with osteoporosis-associated variants and regulatory features data. We gained the optimal classifier and predicted genome-wide SNPs to discover susceptibility regulatory variants. We further utilized Genetic Factors for Osteoporosis Consortium (GEFOS) and three in-house GWASs samples to validate the associations for predicted positive SNPs. The random forest classifier performed best among all machine learning methods with the F1 score of 0.8871. Using the optimized model, we predicted 37,584 candidate SNPs for osteoporosis. According to the meta-analysis results, a list of regulatory variants was significantly associated with osteoporosis after multiple testing corrections and contributed to the expression of known osteoporosis-associated protein-coding genes. In summary, combining GWASs and regulatory elements through machine learning could provide additional information for understanding the mechanism of osteoporosis. The regulatory variants we predicted will provide novel targets for etiology research and treatment of osteoporosis.

  12. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, JAS; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest. PMID:22843504

  13. Common nonsynonymous variants in PCSK1 confer risk of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzinou, Michael; Creemers, John W M; Choquet, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in PCSK1 cause monogenic obesity. To assess the contribution of PCSK1 to polygenic obesity risk, we genotyped tag SNPs in a total of 13,659 individuals of European ancestry from eight independent case-control or family-based cohorts. The nonsynonymous variants rs6232, encoding N221D...

  14. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions re

  15. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions

  16. Association of primary open-angle glaucoma with mitochondrial variants and haplogroups common in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiseva, Harini V.; Trachtman, Benjamin; Bowman, Anita S.; Sagaser, Anna; Sankar, Prithvi; Miller-Ellis, Eydie; Lehman, Amanda; Addis, Victoria; O'Brien, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the population frequencies of all common mitochondrial variants and ancestral haplogroups among 1,999 subjects recruited for the Primary Open-Angle African American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) Study, including 1,217 primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) cases and 782 controls, and to identify ancestral subpopulations and mitochondrial mutations as potential risk factors for POAG susceptibility. Methods Subject classification by characteristic glaucomatous optic nerve findings and corresponding visual field defects, as defined by enrolling glaucoma specialists, stereo disc photography, phlebotomy, extraction of total DNA from peripheral blood or saliva, DNA quantification and normalization, PCR amplification of whole mitochondrial genomes, Ion Torrent deep semiconductor DNA sequencing on DNA pools (“Pool-seq”), Sanger sequencing of 3,479 individual mitochondrial DNAs, and bioinformatic analysis. Results The distribution of common African haplogroups within the POAAGG study population was broadly similar to prior surveys of African Americans. However, the POAG case population was found to be enriched in L1c2 haplogroups, which are defined in part by missense mutations m.6150G>A (Val83Ile, odds ratio [OR] 1.8, p=0.01), m.6253C>T (Met117Thr, rs200165736, OR 1.6, p=0.04), and m.6480G>A (Val193Ile, rs199476128, OR 4.6, p=0.04) in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (MT-CO1) gene and by a variant, m.2220A>G (OR 2.0, p=0.01), in MT-RNR2, which encodes the mitochondrial ribosomal 16s RNA gene. L2 haplogroups were predicted to be overrepresented in the POAG case population by Pool-seq, and the difference was confirmed to be significant with Sanger sequencing, that targeted the L2-associated variants m.2416T>C (rs28358580, OR 1.2, p=0.02) and m.2332C>T (OR 1.2, p=.02) in MT-RNR2. Another variant within MT-RNR2, m.3010G>A (rs3928306), previously implicated in sensitivity to the optic neuropathy-associated antibiotic linezolid, and arising on D4 and J1

  17. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shahi, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D’alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analysed 14,498 multiple sclerosis subjects and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (p-value < 1.0 × 10-4). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 multiple sclerosis subjects and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (p-value < 5.0 × 10-8); three found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants in 103 discrete loci outside of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With high resolution Bayesian fine-mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalogue of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine-mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals. PMID:24076602

  18. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive, rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive, rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant, and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive. In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1

  19. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Trubicka Joanna; Grabowska-Kłujszo Ewa; Suchy Janina; Masojć Bartłomiej; Serrano-Fernandez Pablo; Kurzawski Grzegorz; Cybulski Cezary; Górski Bohdan; Huzarski Tomasz; Byrski Tomasz; Gronwald Jacek; Złowocka Elżbieta; Kładny Józef; Banaszkiewicz Zbigniew; Wiśniowski Rafał

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be ...

  20. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayling, Timothy M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Weedon, Michael N; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Freathy, Rachel M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Perry, John R B; Elliott, Katherine S; Lango, Hana; Rayner, Nigel W; Shields, Beverley; Harries, Lorna W; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J; Knight, Bridget; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ness, Andrew R; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Ring, Susan M; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sovio, Ulla; Bennett, Amanda J; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J; Karpe, Fredrik; Owen, Katharine R; Cardon, Lon R; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Smith, George Davey; Hattersley, Andrew T; McCarthy, Mark I

    2007-05-11

    Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass.

  1. The Impact of PPARγ Genetic Variants on IBD Susceptibility and IBD Disease Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mwinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ is a nuclear receptor that regulates numerous pathways including cytokine expression and immune responses and plays an important role in controlling colon inflammation. We aimed at determining the occurring PPARγ SNPs, at predicting the haplotypes, and at determining the frequency outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients in comparison with healthy controls. We determined genetic variants in the coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR1C3 gene in 284 IBD patients and 194 controls and predicted NR1C3 haplotypes via bioinformatic analysis. We investigated whether certain NR1C3 variants are associated with susceptibility to IBD or its disease course. None of the detected 22 NR1C3 variants were associated with IBD. Two variants with allelic frequencies over 1% were included in haplotype/diplotype analyses. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed association with IBD development or disease course. We conclude that NR1C3 haplotypes are not related to IBD susceptibility or IBD disease activity.

  2. Common and rare variants in SCN10A modulate the risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Javad; Olesen, Morten S; Yuan, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    is in high linkage disequilibrium with the nonsynonymous variant in SCN10A, rs6795970 (V1073A, r(2)=0.933). We therefore sought to determine whether common and rare SCN10A variants are associated with early onset AF. METHODS AND RESULTS: SCN10A was sequenced in 225 AF patients in whom there was no evidence...... of other cardiovascular disease or dysfunction (lone AF). In an association study of the rs6795970 single nucleotide polymorphism variant, we included 515 AF patients and 2 control cohorts of 730 individuals free of AF and 6161 randomly sampled individuals. Functional characterization of SCN10A variants...... was performed by whole-cell patch-clamping. In the lone AF cohort, 9 rare missense variants and 1 splice site donor variant were detected. Interestingly, AF patients were found to have higher G allele frequency of rs6795970, which encodes the alanine variant at position 1073 (described from here on as A1073...

  3. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the CASC15, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1, and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated eight additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNPs at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2,101 cases and 4,202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing, and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNPs associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014: Pcombined = 0.0050; OR, 0.88; rs2979704: Pcombined = 0.0072; OR, 0.87; rs1059111: Pcombined = 0.0049; OR, 0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biologic investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens were associated with better overall survival (P = 0.03; HR, 0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and

  4. Comprehensive genotyping in dyslipidemia: mendelian dyslipidemias caused by rare variants and Mendelian randomization studies using common variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2017-04-01

    Dyslipidemias, especially hyper-low-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia, are important causal risk factors for coronary artery disease. Comprehensive genotyping using the 'next-generation sequencing' technique has facilitated the investigation of Mendelian dyslipidemias, in addition to Mendelian randomization studies using common genetic variants associated with plasma lipids and coronary artery disease. The beneficial effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering therapies on coronary artery disease have been verified by many randomized controlled trials over the years, and subsequent genetic studies have supported these findings. More recently, Mendelian randomization studies have preceded randomized controlled trials. When the on-target/off-target effects of rare variants and common variants exhibit the same direction, novel drugs targeting molecules identified by investigations of rare Mendelian lipid disorders could be promising. Such a strategy could aid in the search for drug discovery seeds other than those for dyslipidemias.

  5. Effect of Variants of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 on Cephalosporin and Carbapenem Susceptibilities in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Amrita; Demczuk, Walter; Martin, Irene; Mulvey, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the relationship between penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2/penA) and susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) and carbapenem antibiotics, we compared 17 PBP2 variants in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Nonmosaic and mosaic variants of PBP2 caused decreased susceptibility to ESCs and, to a lesser extent, to carbapenems. An A501P substitution in mosaic XXXIV_A501P conferred decreased susceptibility to ESCs but restored carbapenem susceptibility to wild-type levels. These results could aid the molecular surveillance of antimicrobial resistance to these agents.

  6. Estimating the total number of susceptibility variants underlying complex diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon-Cheong So

    Full Text Available Recently genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified numerous susceptibility variants for complex diseases. In this study we proposed several approaches to estimate the total number of variants underlying these diseases. We assume that the variance explained by genetic markers (Vg follow an exponential distribution, which is justified by previous studies on theories of adaptation. Our aim is to fit the observed distribution of Vg from GWAS to its theoretical distribution. The number of variants is obtained by the heritability divided by the estimated mean of the exponential distribution. In practice, due to limited sample sizes, there is insufficient power to detect variants with small effects. Therefore the power was taken into account in fitting. Besides considering the most significant variants, we also tried to relax the significance threshold, allowing more markers to be fitted. The effects of false positive variants were removed by considering the local false discovery rates. In addition, we developed an alternative approach by directly fitting the z-statistics from GWAS to its theoretical distribution. In all cases, the "winner's curse" effect was corrected analytically. Confidence intervals were also derived. Simulations were performed to compare and verify the performance of different estimators (which incorporates various means of winner's curse correction and the coverage of the proposed analytic confidence intervals. Our methodology only requires summary statistics and is able to handle both binary and continuous traits. Finally we applied the methods to a few real disease examples (lipid traits, type 2 diabetes and Crohn's disease and estimated that hundreds to nearly a thousand variants underlie these traits.

  7. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawrenson, K.; Iversen, E.S.; Tyrer, J.; Weber, R.P.; Concannon, P.; Hazelett, D.J.; Li, Q.; Marks, J.R.; Berchuck, A.; Lee, J.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Bandera, E.V.; Bean, Y.; Beckmann, M.W.; Bisogna, M.; Bjorge, L.; Bogdanova, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Bruinsma, F.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.G.; Carty, K.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Chen, A; Chen, Z.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.W; Cunningham, J.M.; Cybulski, C.; Plisiecka-Halasa, J.; Dennis, J.; Dicks, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Dork, T.; Bois, A. du; Eccles, D.; Easton, D.T.; Edwards, R.P.; Eilber, U.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fridley, B.L.; Gao, Y.T.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.G.; Glasspool, R.; Goode, E.L.; Goodman, M.T.; Gronwald, J.; Harter, P.; Hasmad, H.N.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Hillemanns, P.; Hogdall, E.; Hogdall, C.; Hosono, S.; Jakubowska, A.; Paul, J.; Jensen, A.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kjaer, S.K.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kellar, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Krakstad, C.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, A.W.; Cannioto, R.; Leminen, A.; Lester, J.; Levine, D.A.; Liang, D.; Lissowska, J.; Lu, K.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Massuger, L.F.; Matsuo, K.; McGuire, V.; McLaughlin, J.R.; Nevanlinna, H.; McNeish, I.; Menon, U.; Modugno, F.; Moysich, K.B.; Narod, S.A.; Nedergaard, L.; Ness, R.B.; Azmi, M.A. Noor; Odunsi, K.; Olson, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair g

  8. Utilizing mutual information for detecting rare and common variants associated with a categorical trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiming Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genome-wide association studies have succeeded in detecting novel common variants which associate with complex diseases. As a result of the fast changes in next generation sequencing technology, a large number of sequencing data are generated, which offers great opportunities to identify rare variants that could explain a larger proportion of missing heritability. Many effective and powerful methods are proposed, although they are usually limited to continuous, dichotomous or ordinal traits. Notice that traits having nominal categorical features are commonly observed in complex diseases, especially in mental disorders, which motivates the incorporation of the characteristics of the categorical trait into association studies with rare and common variants. Methods. We construct two simple and intuitive nonparametric tests, MIT and aMIT, based on mutual information for detecting association between genetic variants in a gene or region and a categorical trait. MIT and aMIT can gauge the difference among the distributions of rare and common variants across a region given every categorical trait value. If there is little association between variants and a categorical trait, MIT or aMIT approximately equals zero. The larger the difference in distributions, the greater values MIT and aMIT have. Therefore, MIT and aMIT have the potential for detecting functional variants. Results.We checked the validity of proposed statistics and compared them to the existing ones through extensive simulation studies with varied combinations of the numbers of variants of rare causal, rare non-causal, common causal, and common non-causal, deleterious and protective, various minor allele frequencies and different levels of linkage disequilibrium. The results show our methods have higher statistical power than conventional ones, including the likelihood based score test, in most cases: (1 there are multiple genetic variants in a gene or region; (2 both

  9. Identification of a novel prostate cancer susceptibility variant in the KLK3 gene transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Z; Amin Al Olama, A; Leongamornlert, D; Tymrakiewicz, M; Saunders, E; Guy, M; Giles, G G; Severi, G; Southey, M; Hopper, J L; Sit, K C; Harris, J M; Batra, J; Spurdle, A B; Clements, J A; Hamdy, F; Neal, D; Donovan, J; Muir, K; Pharoah, P D P; Chanock, S J; Brown, N; Benlloch, S; Castro, E; Mahmud, N; O'Brien, L; Hall, A; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Easton, D F; Eeles, R A

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. One of these (rs2735839) is located close to a plausible candidate susceptibility gene, KLK3, which encodes prostate-specific antigen (PSA). PSA is widely used as a biomarker for PrCa detection and disease monitoring. To refine the association between PrCa and variants in this region, we used genotyping data from a two-stage GWAS using samples from the UK and Australia, and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study. Genotypes were imputed for 197 and 312 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from HapMap2 and the 1000 Genome Project, respectively. The most significant association with PrCa was with a previously unidentified SNP, rs17632542 (combined P = 3.9 × 10(-22)). This association was confirmed by direct genotyping in three stages of the UK/Australian GWAS, involving 10,405 cases and 10,681 controls (combined P = 1.9 × 10(-34)). rs17632542 is also shown to be associated with PSA levels and it is a non-synonymous coding SNP (Ile179Thr) in KLK3. Using molecular dynamic simulation, we showed evidence that this variant has the potential to introduce alterations in the protein or affect RNA splicing. We propose that rs17632542 may directly influence PrCa risk.

  10. Relationship between two common lipoprotein lipase variants and the metabolic syndrome and its individual components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram, Julie K. K.; Hansen, Tine W.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common lipoprotein lipase (LPL) variants are important determinants of triglycerides (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (C) concentrations. High TG/low HDL-C tend to cluster with hypertension, glucose intolerance, and abdominal obesity and comprise the metabolic...... syndrome (MetS). The role of LPL variants as a cause of MetS is unclear. This study investigated the relationship between two common LPL variants and the presence of MetS and its individual components. METHODS: Cross-sectional study, including 2348 Danish women (50.7%) and men, age 41-72 years, without...

  11. Fine-mapping the HOXB region detects common variants tagging a rare coding allele: evidence for synthetic association in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Saunders

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10(-14. Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197, which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility.

  12. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variant C677T influences susceptibility to migraine with aura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundholm James

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C677T variant in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene is associated with increased levels of circulating homocysteine and is a mild risk factor for vascular disease. Migraine, with and without aura (MA and MO, is a prevalent and complex neurovascular disorder that may also be affected by genetically influenced hyperhomocysteinaemia. To determine whether the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene is associated with migraine susceptibility we utilised unrelated and family-based case-control study designs. Methods A total of 652 Caucasian migraine cases were investigated in this study. The MTHFR C677T variant was genotyped in 270 unrelated migraine cases and 270 controls as well as 382 affected subjects from 92 multiplex pedigrees. Results In the unrelated case-control sample we observed an over-representation of the 677T allele in migraine patients compared to controls, specifically for the MA subtype (40% vs. 33% (χ2 = 5.70, P = 0.017. The Armitage test for trend indicated a significant dosage effect of the risk allele (T for MA (χ2 = 5.72, P = 0.017. This linear trend was also present in the independent family-based sample (χ2 = 4.25, Padjusted = 0.039. Overall, our results indicate that the T/T genotype confers a modest, yet significant, increase in risk for the MA subtype (odds ratio: 2.0 – 2.5. No increased risk for the MO subtype was observed (P > 0.05. Conclusions In Caucasians, the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene influences susceptibility to MA, but not MO. Investigation into the enzyme activity of MTHFR and the role of homocysteine in the pathophysiology of migraine is warranted.

  13. Quantitative assessment of common genetic variants on FOXE1 and differentiated thyroid cancer risk.

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    Hongling Zhu

    Full Text Available Forkhead box E1 encodes the transcription factor FOXE1 (or TTF-2, which together with Homeobox protein NKX2-1, PAX8 and HHEX, are pivotal proteins required for thyroid gland formation, differentiation and function. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified FOXE1 as a thyroid cancer (TC susceptibility gene in populations of European descent. After that, a number of studies reported that the rs965513, rs1867277, and rs71369530 polymorphism in FOXE1 has been implicated in TC risk. However, the causal variants remain unknown. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis of 9,828 TC cases and 109,995 controls from 14 case-control studies was performed. Overall, significant results were observed for rs965513 (OR=1.71, 95% CI: 1.59-1.85, P<10(-5, rs1867277 (OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.51-1.78, P<10(-5 and rs71369530 (OR=2.01, 95% CI: 1.66-2.44, P<10(-5 polymorphism. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we found that rs965513 polymorphism confer high risk for Caucasians with per-allele OR of 1.80 (95% CI: 1.69-1.92, P<10(-5 compared to East Asians of 1.35 (95% CI: 1.09-1.67, P=0.006. There was strong evidence of heterogeneity, which largely disappeared after stratification by ethnicity. In the subgroup analysis by sample size, and study design, significantly increased risks were found for the polymorphism. In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrated that common variations of FOXE1 are a risk factor associated with increased TC susceptibility.

  14. Pigmented Pheochromocytoma: an Unusual Variant of a Common Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Kaur, Kavneet; Kumar, Tarun; Cherian, Libin Babu; Kaushal, Rohit; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Dhar, Anita; Seth, Amlesh; Jain, Deepali

    2016-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor arising from the adrenal medulla. A number of variants of pheochromocytoma are known; however, pigmented pheochromocytoma is extremely rare, with only few cases reported in literature. We report the cases of two patients with pigmented pheochromocytoma. Case 1 was a 28-year-old female who presented with complaints of breathlessness, palpitations, and anxiety for 5 years, which had worsened over the last 8 months. Computed tomography (CT) abdomen showed a right suprarenal mass. Case 2 was that of an 18-year-old girl who presented with similar complaints and was diagnosed with hypertension. CT abdomen showed bilateral adrenal masses. Urinary vanillyl mandelic acid was raised in both patients. Sections examined from all three tumors showed cells arranged in Zellballen pattern, separated by thin fibrovascular septae. Tumor cells showed moderate to marked nuclear pleomorphism in case 1. Mitoses were, however, not seen. There was no evidence of capsular or vascular invasion. Many of the tumor cells showed intracytoplasmic black pigment, which was positive for Fontana-Masson and was bleach-labile, confirming it as melanin. Hemosiderin deposition was also identified. Large areas of hemorrhagic necrosis were seen in case 1. Tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin and synaptophysin, while they were negative for HMB-45. Electron microscopy was performed. A final diagnosis of pigmented pheochromocytoma was rendered in both cases. Pigmented pheochromocytoma is a very rare tumor, which needs to be differentiated from other pigmented tumors like malignant melanoma of adrenal gland and pigmented adrenal adenoma. Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry help in making this distinction.

  15. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, D.P.; Stein, J.L.; Renteria, M.E.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Desrivieres, S.; Jahanshad, N.; Toro, R.; Wittfeld, K.; Abramovic, L.; Andersson, M.; Aribisala, B.S.; Armstrong, N.J.; Bernard, M.; Bohlken, M.M.; Boks, M.P.; Bralten, J.; Brown, A.A.; Chakravarty, M.M.; Chen, Q.; Ching, C.R.; Cuellar-Partida, G.; Braber, A.; Giddaluru, S.; Goldman, A.L.; Grimm, O.; Guadalupe, T.; Hass, J.; Woldehawariat, G.; Holmes, A.J.; Hoogman, M.; Janowitz, D.; Jia, T.; Kim, S.; Klein, M.; Kraemer, B.; Lee, P.H.; Olde Loohuis, L.M.; Luciano, M.; Macare, C.; Mather, K.A.; Mattheisen, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Nho, K.; Papmeyer, M.; Ramasamy, A.; Risacher, S.L.; Roiz-Santianez, R.; Rose, E.J.; Salami, A.; Samann, P.G.; Schmaal, L.; Schork, A.J.; Shin, J.; Strike, L.T.; Teumer, A.; Donkelaar, M.M.J. van; Eijk, K.R. van; Walters, R.K.; Westlye, L.T.; Whelan, C.D.; Winkler, A.M.; Zwiers, M.P.; Alhusaini, S.; Athanasiu, L.; Ehrlich, S.; Hakobjan, M.M.; Hartberg, C.B.; Haukvik, U.K.; Heister, A.J.; Hoehn, D.; Kasperaviciute, D.; Liewald, D.C.; Lopez, L.M.; Makkinje, R.R.; Matarin, M.; Naber, M.; McKay, D.R.; Needham, M.; Nugent, A.C.; Putz, B.; Royle, N.A.; Shen, L.; Sprooten, E.; Trabzuni, D.; Marel, S.S. van der; Hulzen, K.J.E. van; Walton, E.; Wolf, C.; Almasy, L.; Ames, D.; Arepalli, S.; Assareh, A.A.; Bastin, M.E.; Brodaty, H.; Bulayeva, K.B.; Carless, M.A.; Cichon, S.; Corvin, A.; Curran, J.E.; Czisch, M.; Fisher, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common

  16. A robust GWSS method to simultaneously detect rare and common variants for complex disease.

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    Chung-Feng Kao

    Full Text Available The rapid advances in sequencing technologies and the resulting next-generation sequencing data provide the opportunity to detect disease-associated variants with a better solution, in particular for low-frequency variants. Although both common and rare variants might exert their independent effects on the risk for the trait of interest, previous methods to detect the association effects rarely consider them simultaneously. We proposed a class of test statistics, the generalized weighted-sum statistic (GWSS, to detect disease associations in the presence of common and rare variants with a case-control study design. Information of rare variants was aggregated using a weighted sum method, while signal directions and strength of the variants were considered at the same time. Permutations were performed to obtain the empirical p-values of the test statistics. Our simulation showed that, compared to the existing methods, the GWSS method had better performance in most of the scenarios. The GWSS (in particular VDWSS-t method is particularly robust for opposite association directions, association strength, and varying distributions of minor-allele frequencies. It is therefore promising for detecting disease-associated loci. For empirical data application, we also applied our GWSS method to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data, and the results were consistent with the simulation, suggesting good performance of our method. As re-sequencing studies become more popular to identify putative disease loci, we recommend the use of this newly developed GWSS to detect associations with both common and rare variants.

  17. Association between the APC gene D1822V variant and the genetic susceptibility of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Maohui; Fang, Xiping; Yang, Qian; Ouyang, Gang; Chen, Daping; Ma, Xiang; Li, Huachi; Xie, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene polymorphisms are believed to contribute to tumor susceptibility. However, the association between genetic variants (A/T) in the APC gene D1822V polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility remains unknown. To determine this association, a case-control study was performed. The genotype of the APC gene D1822V variants was analyzed by DNA sequencing in blood samples collected from 196 patients with CRC and 279 healthy subjects. There were no significant associations between the case and control groups in the distribution of AT [odds ratio (OR), 0.604; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.355-1.029) and TT genotypes (OR, 0.438; 95% CI, 0.045-4.247) relative to the AA genotype. The ratio of the T allele was significantly lower (P=0.047) in the case group compared with the control group (OR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.374-0.997), indicating that the T allele conferred a protective effect in CRC. The frequency of the AT genotype among the subjects diagnosed at >45 years of age was lower than those diagnosed at a younger age (P<0.05). The present study demonstrates that the T allele of the D1822V polymorphism may exert a protective effect against CRC, however, these findings require further validation in a larger sample size.

  18. A Common Variant of IL-6R is Associated with Elevated IL-6 Pathway Activity in Alzheimer's Disease Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddick, Patrick C G; Larson, Jessica L; Rathore, Nisha; Bhangale, Tushar R; Phung, Qui T; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Lill, Jennie R; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan; Farrer, Lindsay A; Kauwe, John S; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison M; Behrens, Timothy W; Watts, Ryan J; Graham, Robert R; Kaminker, Joshua S; van der Brug, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The common p.D358A variant (rs2228145) in IL-6R is associated with risk for multiple diseases and with increased levels of soluble IL-6R in the periphery and central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that the p.D358A allele leads to increased proteolysis of membrane bound IL-6R and demonstrate that IL-6R peptides with A358 are more susceptible to cleavage by ADAM10 and ADAM17. IL-6 responsive genes were identified in primary astrocytes and microglia and an IL-6 gene signature was increased in the CNS of late onset Alzheimer's disease subjects in an IL6R allele dependent manner. We conducted a screen to identify variants associated with the age of onset of Alzheimer's disease in APOE ɛ4 carriers. Across five datasets, p.D358A had a meta P = 3 ×10-4 and an odds ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval 1.12 -1.48. Our study suggests that a common coding region variant of the IL-6 receptor results in neuroinflammatory changes that may influence the age of onset of Alzheimer's disease in APOE ɛ4 carriers.

  19. Joint effect of multiple common SNPs predicts melanoma susceptibility.

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    Shenying Fang

    Full Text Available Single genetic variants discovered so far have been only weakly associated with melanoma. This study aims to use multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs jointly to obtain a larger genetic effect and to improve the predictive value of a conventional phenotypic model. We analyzed 11 SNPs that were associated with melanoma risk in previous studies and were genotyped in MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC and Harvard Medical School investigations. Participants with ≥15 risk alleles were 5-fold more likely to have melanoma compared to those carrying ≤6. Compared to a model using the most significant single variant rs12913832, the increase in predictive value for the model using a polygenic risk score (PRS comprised of 11 SNPs was 0.07(95% CI, 0.05-0.07. The overall predictive value of the PRS together with conventional phenotypic factors in the MDACC population was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.64-0.69. PRS significantly improved the risk prediction and reclassification in melanoma as compared with the conventional model. Our study suggests that a polygenic profile can improve the predictive value of an individual gene polymorphism and may be able to significantly improve the predictive value beyond conventional phenotypic melanoma risk factors.

  20. Associations of two common genetic variants with breast cancer risk in a chinese population: a stratified interaction analysis.

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    Yuxiang Lin

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified a series of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer (BC. However, the correlations between these variants and breast cancer are still not clear. In order to explore the role of breast cancer susceptibility variants in a Southeast Chinese population, we genotyped two common SNPs at chromosome 6q25 (rs2046210 and in TOX3 (rs4784227 in a case-control study with a total of 702 breast cancer cases and 794 healthy-controls. In addition, we also evaluated the multiple interactions among genetic variants, risk factors, and tumor subtypes. Associations of genotypes with breast cancer risk was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. The results indicated that both polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer, with per allele OR = 1.35, (95%CI = 1.17-1.57 for rs2046210 and per allele OR = 1.24 (95%CI = 1.06-1.45 for rs4784227. Furthermore, in subgroup stratified analyses, we observed that the T allele of rs4784227 was significantly associated with elevated OR among postmenopausal populations (OR = 1.44, 95%CI 1.11-1.87 but not in premenopausal populations, with the heterogeneity P value of P = 0.064. These findings suggest that the genetic variants at chromosome 6q25 and in the TOX3 gene may play important roles in breast cancer development in a Chinese population and the underlying biological mechanisms need to be further elucidated.

  1. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  2. Immunochip SNP array identifies novel genetic variants conferring susceptibility to candidaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Johnson, Melissa D.; Smeekens, Sanne P.; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos; Karjalainen, Juha; Franke, Lude; Withoff, Sebo; Plantinga, Theo S.; de Veerdonk, Frank L. van; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Marchetti, Oscar; Perfect, John R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Candidaemia is the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infection, with a high mortality rate of up to 40%. Identification of host genetic factors that confer susceptibility to candidaemia may aid in designing adjunctive immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we hypothesize that variation in immune g

  3. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

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    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  4. Common variants in KCNN3 are associated with lone atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T. Ellinor (Patrick); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); A. Pfeufer (Arne); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); M. Mueller (Martina); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); E.R. Fox (Ervin); D. Darbar (Dawood); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); R. Schnabel (Renate); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed); K. Rice (Kenneth); D.R. van Wagoner (David); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); C. van Noord (Charlotte); T.J. Wang (Thomas); G.B. Ehret (Georg); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); G. Steinbeck (Gerhard); L.J. Launer (Lenore); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S. Makino (Seiko); M. Nelis (Mari); D.J. Milan (David); S. Perz (Siegfried); T. Esko (Tõnu); A. Köttgen (Anna); S. Moebus (Susanne); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); M. Li (Man); S. Möhlenkamp (Stefan); W.H. Linda Kao; R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); C.A. MacRae (Calum); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D. Levy (Daniel); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); A. Metspalu (Andres); E.J. Topol (Eric); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); D.M. Roden (Dan); T. Meitinger (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J. Barnard (John); D.E. Arking (Dan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); S. Kääb (Stefan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Previous studies have identified several genetic loci associated with typical AF. We sought to identify common genetic variants underlying lone AF. This condition affects a subset of individuals without overt heart disease

  5. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; Maloney, Cliona M.; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; de Boer, Anthonius; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goe, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshal, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondah, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Christie, Jason D.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Maerz, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Watkins, Hugh; Grant, Struan F. A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Kumari, Meena; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and

  6. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; Maloney, Cliona M.; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; de Boer, Anthonius; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goe, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshal, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondah, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Christie, Jason D.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Maerz, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Watkins, Hugh; Grant, Struan F. A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Kumari, Meena; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and

  7. Common variants in KCNN3 are associated with lone atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T. Ellinor (Patrick); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); A. Pfeufer (Arne); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); M. Mueller (Martina); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); E.R. Fox (Ervin); D. Darbar (Dawood); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); R. Schnabel (Renate); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed); K. Rice (Kenneth); D.R. van Wagoner (David); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); C. van Noord (Charlotte); T.J. Wang (Thomas); G.B. Ehret (Georg); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); G. Steinbeck (Gerhard); L.J. Launer (Lenore); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S. Makino (Seiko); M. Nelis (Mari); D.J. Milan (David); S. Perz (Siegfried); T. Esko (Tõnu); A. Köttgen (Anna); S. Moebus (Susanne); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); M. Li (Man); S. Möhlenkamp (Stefan); W.H. Linda Kao; R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); C.A. MacRae (Calum); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D. Levy (Daniel); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); A. Metspalu (Andres); E.J. Topol (Eric); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); D.M. Roden (Dan); T. Meitinger (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J. Barnard (John); D.E. Arking (Dan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); S. Kääb (Stefan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Previous studies have identified several genetic loci associated with typical AF. We sought to identify common genetic variants underlying lone AF. This condition affects a subset of individuals without overt heart disease

  8. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L; Schmidt, Daniel F; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-11-15

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.10, P = 2.9 × 10(-6)], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03-1.07, P = 1.7 × 10(-6)) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07-1.12, P = 5.1 × 10(-17)). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05-1.10, P = 1.0 × 10(-8)); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04-1.07, P = 2.0 × 10(-10)). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act.

  9. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J.; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C.; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G.; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis; McGuffog, Lesley; Offit, Ken; Lee, Andrew; Dicks, Ed; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; LaBoissière, Sylvie; Robidoux, Frederic; Nielsen, Sune F.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Windebank, Sharon A.; Hilker, Christopher A.; Meyer, Jeffrey; Angelakos, Maggie; Maskiell, Judi; van der Schoot, Ellen; Rutgers, Emiel; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans; Boonyawongviroj, Prat; Siriwanarungsan, Pornthep; Schrauder, Michael; Rübner, Matthias; Oeser, Sonja; Landrith, Silke; Williams, Eileen; Ryder-Mills, Elaine; Sargus, Kara; McInerney, Niall; Colleran, Gabrielle; Rowan, Andrew; Jones, Angela; Sohn, Christof; Schneeweiß, Andeas; Bugert, Peter; Álvarez, Núria; Lacey, James; Wang, Sophia; Ma, Huiyan; Lu, Yani; Deapen, Dennis; Pinder, Rich; Lee, Eunjung; Schumacher, Fred; Horn-Ross, Pam; Reynolds, Peggy; Nelson, David; Ziegler, Hartwig; Wolf, Sonja; Hermann, Volker; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija; Kemiläinen, Helena; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Bowtell, D; Chenevix-Trench, G; deFazio, A; Gertig, D; Green, A; Webb, P; Green, A.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Webb, P.; Whiteman, D.; Fung, Annie; Yashiki, June; Peuteman, Gilian; Smeets, Dominiek; Brussel, Thomas Van; Corthouts, Kathleen; Obi, Nadia; Heinz, Judith; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Celik, Muhabbet; Olchers, Til; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Maniscalco, Angela; Rossi, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Tranchant, Martine; Valois, Marie-France; Turgeon, Annie; Heguy, Lea; Sze Yee, Phuah; Kang, Peter; Nee, Kang In; Mariapun, Shivaani; Sook-Yee, Yoon; Lee, Daphne; Ching, Teh Yew; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Otsukka, Meeri; Mononen, Kari; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; staff, OFBCR; Krol-Warmerdam, E.; Molenaar, J.; Blom, J.; Brinton, Louise; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Peplonska, Beata; Zatonski, Witold; Chao, Pei; Stagner, Michael; Bos, Petra; Blom, Jannet; Crepin, Ellen; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Heemskerk, Annette; Higham, Sue; Cross, Simon; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Brock, Ian; Luccarini, Craig; Conroy, Don; Baynes, Caroline; Chua, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.10, P = 2.9 × 10−6], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03–1.07, P = 1.7 × 10−6) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07–1.12, P = 5.1 × 10−17). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05–1.10, P = 1.0 × 10−8); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04–1.07, P = 2.0 × 10−10). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act

  10. Susceptibility gene discovery for common metabolic and endocrine traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M I

    2002-02-01

    Almost all major causes of ill-health and premature death in human societies worldwide - including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and many infectious diseases - are, at least in part, genetically determined. Typically, risk of succumbing to one of these illnesses is thought to depend on both the individual repertoire of variation within a number of key susceptibility genes and the history of exposure to relevant environmental factors. For many of these conditions, the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis remains obscure. This represents a major obstacle to development of improved, rational strategies for disease treatment, prevention and eradication. It is easy therefore to appreciate the importance attached to efforts to deliver more comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis. Nor is it hard to understand that identification of major susceptibility genes should highlight those components of molecular machinery that are critical for the preservation of normal health. The benefits promised are great, but progress to gene identification in multifactorial traits has been rather disappointing to date. Why is this? This review aims to answer this question by describing current and future approaches to gene discovery in multifactorial traits. The examples quoted will mostly relate to type 2 diabetes, but the issues and approaches are generic, and apply equally to other multifactorial traits in the endocrine and metabolic arena - type 1 diabetes; obesity; hyperlipidaemia; autoimmune thyroid disease; polycystic ovarian syndrome - and beyond.

  11. ELMO1 variants and susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy in American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Robert L; Millis, Meredith P; Young, Naomi J; Kobes, Sayuko; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; DiStefano, Johanna K

    2010-12-01

    Variants in the engulfment and cell motility 1 gene, ELMO1, have previously been associated with kidney disease attributed to type 2 diabetes. The Pima Indians of Arizona have high rates of diabetic nephropathy, which is strongly dependent on genetic determinants; thus, we sought to investigate the role of ELMO1 polymorphisms in mediating susceptibility to this disease in this population. Genotype distributions were compared among 141 individuals with nephropathy and 416 individuals without heavy proteinuria in a family study of 257 sibships, and 107 cases with diabetic ESRD and 108 controls with long duration diabetes and no nephropathy. We sequenced 17.4 kb of ELMO1 and identified 19 variants. We genotyped 12 markers, excluding those in 100% genotypic concordance with other variants or with a minor allele frequency <0.05, plus 21 additional markers showing association with ESRD in earlier studies. In the family study, the strongest evidence for association was with rs1345365 (odds ratio [OR]=2.42 per copy of A allele [1.35-4.32]; P=0.001) and rs10951509 (OR=2.42 per copy of A allele [1.31-4.48]; P=0.002), both of which are located in intron 13 and are in strong pairwise linkage disequilibrium (r(2)=0.97). These associations were in the opposite direction from those observed in African Americans, which suggests that the relationship between diabetic kidney disease and ELMO1 variation may involve as yet undiscovered functional variants or complex interactions with other biological variables.

  12. Vascular Genetic Variants and Ischemic Stroke Susceptibility in Albanians from the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajram Kamberi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute first-ever ischemic stroke (FIS is a heterogeneous, polygenic disorder. The contribution of vascular genetic variants as inherited causes of ischemic stroke has remained controversial. AIM: To examine the association of genetic variants in vascular factors with the occurrence of FIS. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The current research was performed in a group of 39 patients with FIS (study group and 102 healthy volunteers (control group. We analyzed the prevalence of vascular genetic variants in following genes: factor V, prothrombin, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, factor XIII, plasminogen activator 1, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein E, β-fibrinogen, human platelet antigen 1, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and lymphotoxin alpha. RESULTS: It was found that heterozygous LTA 804C>A and FXIII V34L Leu/Leu were significantly more frequent in patients with FIS than in control group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively. The frequency of FXIII V34L Val/Val was significantly lower in patients with FIS than in control group (p = 0.020. Other frequencies of vascular gene variants in patients with FIS and in control group were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive study to present data indicating that polymorphism of vascular genes in the prevalence of acute FIS exists in the Albanian population from the Republic of Macedonia. Variations in these genes have been detected in patients with acute FIS, suggesting that their combination might act in a susceptible or protective manner in this Albanian population.

  13. Identification of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmwe, Su Su; Aizaki, Hideki; Date, Tomoko; Murakami, Kyoko; Ishii, Koji; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Koike, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2010-03-01

    Ribavirin (RBV), a nucleoside analogue, is used in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in combination with interferons. However, potential mechanisms of RBV resistance during HCV replication remain poorly understood. Serial passage of cells harboring HCV genotype 2a replicon in the presence of RBV resulted in the reduced susceptibility of the replicon to RBV. Transfection of fresh cells with RNA from RBV-resistant replicon cells demonstrated that the RBV resistance observed is largely replicon-derived. Four major amino acid substitutions: T1134S in NS3, P1969S in NS4B, V2405A in NS5A, and Y2471H in NS5B region, were identified. Site-directed mutagenesis of these mutations into the replicon indicated that Y2471H plays a role in the reduced susceptibility to RBV and leads to decrease in replication fitness. The results, in addition to analysis of sequence database, suggest that HCV variants with reduced susceptibility to RBV identified are preferential to genotype 2a.

  14. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  15. Circadian gene variants and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ann Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732 and without (N = 1780 type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+ using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66-0.86], p = 3.18 × 10(-5, while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07-1.39], p = 0.003. Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01-1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.99], p = 0.015 respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: None of the selected circadian gene variants was associated with type

  16. Common and rare variants in SCN10A modulate the risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Javad; Olesen, Morten S.; Yuan, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    linkage disequil. with the nonsynonymous variant in SCN10A, rs6795970 (V1073A, r2=0.933). We therefore sought to det. whether common and rare SCN10A variants are assocd. with early onset AF. Methods and Results: SCN10A was sequenced in 225 AF patients in whom there was no evidence of other cardiovascular...... disease or dysfunction (lone AF). In an assocn. study of the rs6795970 single nucleotide polymorphism variant, we included 515 AF patients and 2 control cohorts of 730 individuals free of AF and 6161 randomly sampled individuals. Functional characterization of SCN10A variants was performed by whole......-cell patch-clamping. In the lone AF cohort, 9 rare missense variants and 1 splice site donor variant were detected. Interestingly, AF patients were found to have higher G allele frequency of rs6795970, which encodes the alanine variant at position 1073 (described from here on as A1073, odds ratio =1.35 [1...

  17. Genome-wide association analysis of imputed rare variants: application to seven common complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Reedik; Asimit, Jennifer L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Morris, Andrew P

    2012-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying loci contributing effects to a range of complex human traits. The majority of reproducible associations within these loci are with common variants, each of modest effect, which together explain only a small proportion of heritability. It has been suggested that much of the unexplained genetic component of complex traits can thus be attributed to rare variation. However, genome-wide association study genotyping chips have been designed primarily to capture common variation, and thus are underpowered to detect the effects of rare variants. Nevertheless, we demonstrate here, by simulation, that imputation from an existing scaffold of genome-wide genotype data up to high-density reference panels has the potential to identify rare variant associations with complex traits, without the need for costly re-sequencing experiments. By application of this approach to genome-wide association studies of seven common complex diseases, imputed up to publicly available reference panels, we identify genome-wide significant evidence of rare variant association in PRDM10 with coronary artery disease and multiple genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with type 1 diabetes. The results of our analyses highlight that genome-wide association studies have the potential to offer an exciting opportunity for gene discovery through association with rare variants, conceivably leading to substantial advancements in our understanding of the genetic architecture underlying complex human traits.

  18. Inherited coding variants at the CDKN2A locus influence susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Heng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Wenjian;

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence from genome-wide association studies for a strong inherited genetic basis of susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children, yet the effects of protein-coding variants on ALL risk have not been systematically evaluated. Here we show a missense variant...... of haematopoietic progenitor cells, and is preferentially retained in ALL tumour cells. Resequencing the CDKN2A-CDKN2B locus in 2,407 childhood ALL cases reveals 19 additional putative functional germline variants. These results provide direct functional evidence for the influence of inherited genetic variation...

  19. A weighted polygenic risk score using 14 known susceptibility variants to estimate risk and age onset of psoriasis in Han Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianyong Yin

    Full Text Available With numbers of common variants identified mainly through genome-wide association studies (GWASs, there is great interest in incorporating the findings into screening individuals at high risk of psoriasis. The purpose of this study is to establish genetic prediction models and evaluate its discriminatory ability in psoriasis in Han Chinese population. We built the genetic prediction models through weighted polygenic risk score (PRS using 14 susceptibility variants in 8,819 samples. We found the risk of psoriasis among individuals in the top quartile of PRS was significantly larger than those in the lowest quartile of PRS (OR = 28.20, P < 2.0×10(-16. We also observed statistically significant associations between the PRS, family history and early age onset of psoriasis. We also built a predictive model with all 14 known susceptibility variants and alcohol consumption, which achieved an area under the curve statistic of ~ 0.88. Our study suggests that 14 psoriasis known susceptibility loci have the discriminating potential, as is also associated with family history and age of onset. This is the genetic predictive model in psoriasis with the largest accuracy to date.

  20. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Variants on Quantitative Glycemic Traits Reveals Mechanistic Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Antigone S.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Barker, Adam; Knowles, Joshua W.; Mägi, Reedik; Hivert, Marie-France; Benazzo, Andrea; Rybin, Denis; Jackson, Anne U.; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Ci; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Boesgaard, Trine Welløv; Grarup, Niels; Abbasi, Fahim A.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hao, Ke; Yang, Xia; Lecoeur, Cécile; Barroso, Inês; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Chines, Peter S.; Erdos, Michael R.; Graessler, Jurgen; Kovacs, Peter; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Payne, Felicity; Stancakova, Alena; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Cauchi, Stéphane; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Smith, Ulf; Boehnke, Michael; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Quertemous, Thomas; Lind, Lars; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Walker, Mark; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Spranger, Joachim; Stumvoll, Michael; Meigs, James B.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Dupuis, Josée; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Ingelsson, Erik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Prokopenko, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Patients with established type 2 diabetes display both β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. To define fundamental processes leading to the diabetic state, we examined the relationship between type 2 diabetes risk variants at 37 established susceptibility loci, and indices of proinsulin processing, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. We included data from up to 58,614 nondiabetic subjects with basal measures and 17,327 with dynamic measures. We used additive genetic models with adjustment for sex, age, and BMI, followed by fixed-effects, inverse-variance meta-analyses. Cluster analyses grouped risk loci into five major categories based on their relationship to these continuous glycemic phenotypes. The first cluster (PPARG, KLF14, IRS1, GCKR) was characterized by primary effects on insulin sensitivity. The second cluster (MTNR1B, GCK) featured risk alleles associated with reduced insulin secretion and fasting hyperglycemia. ARAP1 constituted a third cluster characterized by defects in insulin processing. A fourth cluster (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, HHEX/IDE, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B) was defined by loci influencing insulin processing and secretion without a detectable change in fasting glucose levels. The final group contained 20 risk loci with no clear-cut associations to continuous glycemic traits. By assembling extensive data on continuous glycemic traits, we have exposed the diverse mechanisms whereby type 2 diabetes risk variants impact disease predisposition. PMID:24296717

  1. Association between common variants near LBX1 and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis replicated in the Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is one of the most common spinal deformities found in adolescent populations. Recently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS in a Japanese population indicated that three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs11190870, rs625039 and rs11598564, all located near the LBX1 gene, may be associated with AIS susceptibility [1]. This study suggests a novel AIS predisposition candidate gene and supports the hypothesis that somatosensory functional disorders could contribute to the pathogenesis of AIS. These findings warrant replication in other populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we conducted a case-control study consisting of 953 Chinese Han individuals from southern China (513 patients and 440 healthy controls, and the three SNPs were all found to be associated with AIS predisposition. The ORs were observed as 1.49 (95% CI 1.23-1.80, P = 5.09E-5, 1.70 (95% CI 1.42-2.04, P = 1.17E-8 and 1.52 (95% CI 1.27-1.83, P = 5.54E-6 for rs625039, rs11190870 and rs11598564, respectively. Second, a case-only study including a subgroup of AIS patients (N = 234 was performed to determine the effects of these variants on the severity of the condition. However, we did not find any association between these variants and the severity of curvature. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the genetic variants near the LBX1 gene are associated with AIS susceptibility in Chinese Han population. It successfully replicates the results of the GWAS, which was performed in a Japanese population.

  2. Susceptibility of ornamental pepper banker plant candidates to common greenhouse pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility of four potential ornamental pepper banker plant candidates [Black Pearl (BP), Explosive Ember (EE), Masquerade (MA), Red Missile (RM), and a commercial pepper cultivar Blitz (BL)] were evaluated against three common greenhouse pests - Bemisia tabaci, Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Fra...

  3. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra;

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines...

  4. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... for the translation of personalized genomics into targeted healthcare....

  5. Common STAT3 variants are not associated with obesity or insulin resistance in female twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, Yalda; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Gooljar, Sakina B.; Collins, Laura J.; Lane, Carl A.; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Spector, Tim D.; O'Dell, Sandra D.

    2007-01-01

    JAMSHIDI, YALDA, THEODOSIOS KYRIAKOU, SAKINA B. GOOLJAR, LAURA J. COLLINS, CARL A. LANE, HAROLD SNIEDER, XIAOLING WANG, TIM D. SPECTOR, AND SANDRA D. O'DELL. Common STAT3 variants are not associated with obesity or insulin resistance in female twins. Obesity. 2007; 15:1634-1639. In animal models, ST

  6. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  7. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Rietveld (Niels); T. Esko (Tõnu); G. Davies (Gail); T.H. Pers (Tune); P. Turley (Patrick); B. Benyamin (Beben); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); J.J. Lee (James J.); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); M. Miller (Mike); O. Rostapshova (Olga); S. van der Lee (Sven); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); N. Amin (Najaf); D. Conley (Dalton); J. Derringer; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); E.L. Glaeser (Edward L.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C. Hayward (Caroline); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); J. Karjalainen (Juha); D. Laibson (David); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); D.C. Liewald (David C.); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. McGue (Matt); G. Mcmahon (George); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); S. Pinker (Steven); D.J. Porteous (David J.); D. Posthuma (Danielle); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); B.H. Smithk (Blair H.); J.M. Starr (John); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); N.J. Timpsonm (Nicholas J.); M. Trzaskowskin (Maciej); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); M.E. Ward (Mary); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G.D. Smith; I.J. Deary (Ian J.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); R. Plomin (Robert); P.M. Visscher (Peter); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); D. Cesarini (David); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxyphenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education

  8. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2

  9. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutat

  10. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudet, Mia M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M.; Guiducci, Candace; Segre, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. Overeem; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers

  11. Common variants at VRK2 and TCF4 conferring risk of schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinberg, Stacy; de Jong, Simone; Andreassen, Ole A.; Werge, Thomas; Borglum, Anders D.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Gustafsson, Omar; Costas, Javier; Pietilainen, Olli P. H.; Demontis, Ditte; Papiol, Sergi; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Breuer, Rene; Vassos, Evangelos; Giegling, Ina; Fraser, Gillian; Walker, Nicholas; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Suvisaari, Jaana; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Paunio, Tiina; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Strengman, Eric; Jurgens, Gesche; Glenthoj, Birte; Terenius, Lars; Hougaard, David M.; Orntoft, Torben; Wiuf, Carsten; Didriksen, Michael; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Nordentoft, Merete; van Winkel, Ruud; Kenis, Gunter; Abramova, Lilia; Kaleda, Vasily; Arrojo, Manuel; Sanjuan, Julio; Arango, Celso; Sperling, Swetlana; Rossner, Moritz; Ribolsi, Michele; Magni, Valentina; Siracusano, Alberto; Christiansen, Claus; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Veldink, Jan; van den Berg, Leonard; Ingason, Andres; Muglia, Pierandrea; Murray, Robin; Noethen, Markus M.; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Petursson, Hannes; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Kong, Augustine; Rubino, I. Alex; De Hert, Marc; Rethelyi, Janos M.; Istvan Bitter, [No Value; Jonsson, Erik G.; Golimbet, Vera; Carracedo, Angel; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Peltonen, Leena; Ophoff, Roel A.; Collier, David A.; St Clair, David; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; Stefansson, Hreinn; Rujescu, Dan; Stefansson, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Common sequence variants have recently joined rare structural polymorphisms as genetic factors with strong evidence for association with schizophrenia. Here we extend our previous genome-wide association study and meta-analysis (totalling 7 946 cases and 19 036 controls) by examining an expanded set

  12. Common STAT3 variants are not associated with obesity or insulin resistance in female twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, Yalda; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Gooljar, Sakina B.; Collins, Laura J.; Lane, Carl A.; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Spector, Tim D.; O'Dell, Sandra D.

    JAMSHIDI, YALDA, THEODOSIOS KYRIAKOU, SAKINA B. GOOLJAR, LAURA J. COLLINS, CARL A. LANE, HAROLD SNIEDER, XIAOLING WANG, TIM D. SPECTOR, AND SANDRA D. O'DELL. Common STAT3 variants are not associated with obesity or insulin resistance in female twins. Obesity. 2007; 15:1634-1639. In animal models,

  13. Common variants at VRK2 and TCF4 conferring risk of schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinberg, S.; Jong, Sijbrand J. de; Andreassen, O.A.; Werge, T.; Borglum, A.D.; Mors, O.; Mortensen, P.B.; Gustafsson, O.; Costas, J.; Pietilainen, O.P.H.; Demontis, D.; Papiol, S.; Huttenlocher, J.; Mattheisen, M.; Breuer, R.; Vassos, E.; Giegling, I.; Fraser, G.; Walker, N.; Tuulio-Henriksson, A.; Suvisaari, J.; Lonnqvist, J.; Paunio, T.; Agartz, I.; Melle, I.; Djurovic, S.; Strengman, E.; Jurgens, G.; Glenthoj, B.; Terenius, L.; Hougaard, D.M.; Orntoft, T.; Wiuf, C.; Didriksen, M.; Hollegaard, M.V.; Nordentoft, M.; Winkel, R. van; Kenis, G.; Abramova, L.; Kaleda, V.; Arrojo, M.; Sanjuan, J.; Arango, C.; Sperling, S.; Rossner, M.; Ribolsi, M.; Magni, V.; Siracusano, A.; Christiansen, C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Veldink, J.; Berg, L. van den; Ingason, A.; Muglia, P.; Murray, R.; Nothen, M.M.; Sigurdsson, E.; Petursson, H.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Rubino, I.A.; Hert, M. de; Rethelyi, J.M.; Bitter, I.; Jonsson, E.G.; Golimbet, V.; Carracedo, A.; Ehrenreich, H.; Craddock, N.; Owen, M.J.; O'Donovan, M.C.; Ruggeri, M.; Tosato, S.; Peltonen, L.; Ophoff, R.A.; Collier, D.A.; St Clair, D.; Rietschel, M.; Cichon, S.; Stefansson, H.; Rujescu, D.; Stefansson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Common sequence variants have recently joined rare structural polymorphisms as genetic factors with strong evidence for association with schizophrenia. Here we extend our previous genome-wide association study and meta-analysis (totalling 7 946 cases and 19 036 controls) by examining an expanded set

  14. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudet, Mia M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M.; Guiducci, Candace; Segre, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. Overeem; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers

  15. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutat

  16. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd;

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  17. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D; Lee, James J; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Michael B; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L; Hansell, Narelle K; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H; Starr, John M; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G; Verhulst, Frank C; Ward, Mary E; Wright, Margaret J; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2014-01-01

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated

  18. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D; Lee, James J; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Michael B; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L; Hansell, Narelle K; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H; Starr, John M; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G; Verhulst, Frank C; Ward, Mary E; Wright, Margaret J; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2014-01-01

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated

  19. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Rietveld (Niels); T. Esko (Tõnu); G. Davies (Gail); T.H. Pers (Tune); P. Turley (Patrick); B. Benyamin (Beben); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); J.J. Lee (James J.); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); M. Miller (Mike); O. Rostapshova (Olga); S. van der Lee (Sven); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); N. Amin (Najaf); D. Conley (Dalton); J. Derringer; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); E.L. Glaeser (Edward L.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C. Hayward (Caroline); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); J. Karjalainen (Juha); D. Laibson (David); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); D.C. Liewald (David C.); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. McGue (Matt); G. Mcmahon (George); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); S. Pinker (Steven); D.J. Porteous (David J.); D. Posthuma (Danielle); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); B.H. Smithk (Blair H.); J.M. Starr (John); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); N.J. Timpsonm (Nicholas J.); M. Trzaskowskin (Maciej); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); M.E. Ward (Mary); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G.D. Smith; I.J. Deary (Ian J.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); R. Plomin (Robert); P.M. Visscher (Peter); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); D. Cesarini (David); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxyphenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education

  20. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis C virus replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to a benzofuran inhibitor, HCV-796.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Anita Y M; Cheng, Huiming; Johann, Stephen; Mullen, Stanley; Chunduru, Srinivas K; Young, Dorothy C; Bard, Joel; Chopra, Rajiv; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Mansour, Tarek; O'Connell, John

    2008-09-01

    HCV-796 selectively inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In hepatoma cells containing a genotype 1b HCV replicon, HCV-796 reduced HCV RNA levels by 3 to 4 log(10) HCV copies/mug total RNA (the concentration of the compound that inhibited 50% of the HCV RNA level was 9 nM). Cells bearing replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to HCV-796 were generated in the presence of HCV-796, followed by G418 selection. Sequence analysis of the NS5B gene derived from the replicon variants revealed several amino acid changes within 5 A of the drug-binding pocket. Specifically, mutations were observed at Leu314, Cys316, Ile363, Ser365, and Met414 of NS5B, which directly interact with HCV-796. The impacts of the amino acid substitutions on viral fitness and drug susceptibility were examined in recombinant replicons and NS5B enzymes with the single-amino-acid mutations. The replicon variants were 10- to 1,000-fold less efficient in forming colonies in cells than the wild-type replicon; the S365L variant failed to establish a stable cell line. Other variants (L314F, I363V, and M414V) had four- to ninefold-lower steady-state HCV RNA levels. Reduced binding affinity with HCV-796 was demonstrated in an enzyme harboring the C316Y mutation. The effects of these resistance mutations were structurally rationalized using X-ray crystallography data. While different levels of resistance to HCV-796 were observed in the replicon and enzyme variants, these variants retained their susceptibilities to pegylated interferon, ribavirin, and other HCV-specific inhibitors. The combined virological, biochemical, biophysical, and structural approaches revealed the mechanism of resistance in the variants selected by the potent polymerase inhibitor HCV-796.

  1. A weighted genetic risk score using all known susceptibility variants to estimate rheumatoid arthritis risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwood, Annie; Han, Buhm; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Lunt, Mark; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Background There is currently great interest in the incorporation of genetic susceptibility loci into screening models to identify individuals at high risk of disease. Here, we present the first risk prediction model including all 46 known genetic loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was created using 45 RA non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) susceptibility loci, imputed amino acids at HLA-DRB1 (11, 71 and 74), HLA-DPB1 (position 9) HLA-B (position 9) and gender. The wGRS was tested in 11 366 RA cases and 15 489 healthy controls. The risk of developing RA was estimated using logistic regression by dividing the wGRS into quintiles. The ability of the wGRS to discriminate between cases and controls was assessed by receiver operator characteristic analysis and discrimination improvement tests. Results Individuals in the highest risk group showed significantly increased odds of developing anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-positive RA compared to the lowest risk group (OR 27.13, 95% CI 23.70 to 31.05). The wGRS was validated in an independent cohort that showed similar results (area under the curve 0.78, OR 18.00, 95% CI 13.67 to 23.71). Comparison of the full wGRS with a wGRS in which HLA amino acids were replaced by a HLA tag single-nucleotide polymorphism showed a significant loss of sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions Our study suggests that in RA, even when using all known genetic susceptibility variants, prediction performance remains modest; while this is insufficiently accurate for general population screening, it may prove of more use in targeted studies. Our study has also highlighted the importance of including HLA variation in risk prediction models. PMID:24092415

  2. Common type 2 diabetes risk gene variants associate with gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Grarup, Niels; Damm, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 11 recently identified type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Type 2 diabetes risk variants in TCF7L2, CDKAL1, SLC30A8, HHEX/IDE, CDKN2A/2B, IGF2BP2, FTO, TCF2, PPARG, KCNJ11......, and WFS1 loci were genotyped in a cohort of women with a history of GDM (n = 283) and glucose-tolerant women of the population-based Inter99 cohort (n = 2446). RESULTS: All the risk alleles in the 11 examined type 2 diabetes risk variants showed an odds ratio (OR) greater than 1 for the GDM group compared....... CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence in a prior GDM group of several previously proven type 2 diabetes risk alleles equals the findings from association studies on type 2 diabetes. This supports the hypothesis that GDM and type 2 diabetes are two of the same entity....

  3. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D suscept...

  4. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  5. Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taal, H Rob; St Pourcain, Beate; Thiering, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    q21 signal have shown genome-wide association with adult intracranial volume, Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, indicating that a common genetic variant in this region might link early brain growth with neurological disease in later life.......To identify genetic variants associated with head circumference in infancy, we performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N = 10,768 individuals of European ancestry enrolled in pregnancy and/or birth cohorts) and followed up three lead signals in six replication...

  6. BANK1 functional variants are associated with susceptibility to diffuse systemic sclerosis in Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, B; Gourh, P; Broen, J; Agarwal, S K; Simeon, C; Ortego-Centeno, N; Vonk, M C; Coenen, M; Riemekasten, G; Hunzelmann, N; Hesselstrand, R; Tan, F K; Reveille, J D; Assassi, S; Garcia-Hernandez, F J; Carreira, P; Camps, M; Fernandez-Nebro, A; de la Peña, P Garcia; Nearney, T; Hilda, D; Gónzalez-Gay, M A; Airo, P; Beretta, L; Scorza, R; Radstake, T R D J; Mayes, M D; Arnett, F C; Martin, J

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the possible association of the BANK1 gene with genetic susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc) and its subphenotypes. Methods A large multicentre case–control association study including 2380 patients with SSc and 3270 healthy controls from six independent case–control sets of Caucasian ancestry (American, Spanish, Dutch, German, Swedish and Italian) was conducted. Three putative functional BANK1 polymorphisms (rs17266594 T/C, rs10516487 G/A, rs3733197 G/A) were selected as genetic markers and genotyped by Taqman 5´ allelic discrimination assay. Results A significant association of the rs10516487 G and rs17266594 T alleles with SSc susceptibility was observed (pooled OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22; p=0.01 and pooled OR=1.14, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.25; p=0.003, respectively), whereas the rs3733197 genetic variant showed no statistically significant deviation. Stratification for cutaneous SSc phenotype showed that the BANK1 rs10516487 G, rs17266594 T and rs3733197 G alleles were strongly associated with susceptibility to diffuse SSc (dcSSc) (pooled OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.37, p=0.005; pooled OR=1.23, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.41, p=0.001; pooled OR=1.15, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.31, p=0.02, respectively). Similarly, stratification for specific SSc autoantibodies showed that the association of BANK1 rs10516487, rs17266594 and rs3733197 polymorphisms was restricted to the subgroup of patients carrying anti-topoisomerase I antibodies (pooled OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.41, p=0.03; pooled OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.46, p=0.01; pooled OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.47, p=0.004, respectively). Conclusion The results suggest that the BANK1 gene confers susceptibility to SSc in general, and specifically to the dcSSc and anti-topoisomerase I antibody subsets. PMID:19815934

  7. Statistical Colocalization of Genetic Risk Variants for Related Autoimmune Diseases in the Context of Common Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Mary D.; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M.; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Ann; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent datasets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis, revealed 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which with two or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions there was evidence that causal variants differed. We identified novel disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other three disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes candidate genes: COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1, suggesting a shared cellular etiology. PMID:26053495

  8. Common variants of TLR1 associate with organ dysfunction and sustained pro-inflammatory responses during sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pino-Yanes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical components for host pathogen recognition and variants in genes participating in this response influence susceptibility to infections. Recently, TLR1 gene polymorphisms have been found correlated with whole blood hyper-inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecules and associated with sepsis-associated multiorgan dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI. We examined the association of common variants of TLR1 gene with sepsis-derived complications in an independent study and with serum levels for four inflammatory biomarkers among septic patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TLR1 gene were genotyped in samples from a prospective multicenter case-only study of patients with severe sepsis admitted into a network of intensive care units followed for disease severity. Interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and C-reactive protein (CRP serum levels were measured at study entry, at 48 h and at 7(th day. Alleles -7202G and 248Ser, and the 248Ser-602Ile haplotype were associated with circulatory dysfunction among severe septic patients (0.001 ≤ p ≤ 0.022, and with reduced IL-10 (0.012 ≤ p ≤ 0.047 and elevated CRP (0.011 ≤ p ≤ 0.036 serum levels during the first week of sepsis development. Additionally, the -7202GG genotype was found to be associated with hospital mortality (p = 0.017 and ALI (p = 0.050 in a combined analysis with European Americans, suggesting common risk effects among studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results partially replicate and extend previous findings, supporting that variants of TLR1 gene are determinants of severe complications during sepsis.

  9. Common variants of TLR1 associate with organ dysfunction and sustained pro-inflammatory responses during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Casula, Milena; Blanco, Jesús; Muriel, Arturo; Espinosa, Elena; García-Bello, Miguel; Torres, Antoni; Ferrer, Miguel; Zavala, Elizabeth; Villar, Jesús; Flores, Carlos

    2010-10-29

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical components for host pathogen recognition and variants in genes participating in this response influence susceptibility to infections. Recently, TLR1 gene polymorphisms have been found correlated with whole blood hyper-inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecules and associated with sepsis-associated multiorgan dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI). We examined the association of common variants of TLR1 gene with sepsis-derived complications in an independent study and with serum levels for four inflammatory biomarkers among septic patients. Seven tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TLR1 gene were genotyped in samples from a prospective multicenter case-only study of patients with severe sepsis admitted into a network of intensive care units followed for disease severity. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels were measured at study entry, at 48 h and at 7(th) day. Alleles -7202G and 248Ser, and the 248Ser-602Ile haplotype were associated with circulatory dysfunction among severe septic patients (0.001 ≤ p ≤ 0.022), and with reduced IL-10 (0.012 ≤ p ≤ 0.047) and elevated CRP (0.011 ≤ p ≤ 0.036) serum levels during the first week of sepsis development. Additionally, the -7202GG genotype was found to be associated with hospital mortality (p = 0.017) and ALI (p = 0.050) in a combined analysis with European Americans, suggesting common risk effects among studies. These results partially replicate and extend previous findings, supporting that variants of TLR1 gene are determinants of severe complications during sepsis.

  10. Association between the g.296596G > A genetic variant of RELN gene and susceptibility to autism in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Mei, Zhu; Sun, Lixin

    2013-12-01

    Autism is a childhood neuro-developmental disorder, and Reelin (RELN) is an important candidate gene for influencing autism. This study aimed at investigating the influence of genetic variants of the RELN gene on autism susceptibility. In this study, 205 autism patients and 210 healthy controls were recruited and the genetic variants of the RELN gene were genotyped by the created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR) method. The influence of genetic variants on autism susceptibility was analyzed by association analysis, and the g.296596G > A genetic variant in exon10 of the RELN gene was detected. The frequencies of allele/genotype in autistic patients were significantly different from those in healthy controls, and a statistically significant association was detected between this genetic variant and autism susceptibility. Our data lead to the inference that the g.296596G > A genetic variant in the RELN gene has a potential influence on autism susceptibility in the Chinese Han population.

  11. Common variants within oxidative phosphorylation genes influence risk of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher D; Biffi, Alessandro; Nalls, Michael A; Devan, William J; Schwab, Kristin; Ayres, Alison M; Valant, Valerie; Ross, Owen A; Rost, Natalia S; Saxena, Richa; Viswanathan, Anand; Worrall, Bradford B; Brott, Thomas G; Goldstein, Joshua N; Brown, Devin; Broderick, Joseph P; Norrving, Bo; Greenberg, Steven M; Silliman, Scott L; Hansen, Björn M; Tirschwell, David L; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Selim, Magdy; Roquer, Jaume; Montaner, Joan; Singleton, Andrew B; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Woo, Daniel; Furie, Karen L; Meschia, James F; Rosand, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated association between mitochondrial DNA variants and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated whether variants within a larger set of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes encoded by both autosomal and mitochondrial DNA were associated with risk of IS and, based on our results, extended our investigation to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This association study used a discovery cohort of 1643 individuals, a validation cohort of 2432 individuals for IS, and an extension cohort of 1476 individuals for ICH. Gene-set enrichment analysis was performed on all structural OXPHOS genes, as well as genes contributing to individual respiratory complexes. Gene-sets passing gene-set enrichment analysis were tested by constructing genetic scores using common variants residing within each gene. Associations between each variant and IS that emerged in the discovery cohort were examined in validation and extension cohorts. IS was associated with genetic risk scores in OXPHOS as a whole (odds ratio [OR], 1.17; P=0.008) and complex I (OR, 1.06; P=0.050). Among IS subtypes, small vessel stroke showed association with OXPHOS (OR, 1.16; P=0.007), complex I (OR, 1.13; P=0.027), and complex IV (OR, 1.14; P=0.018). To further explore this small vessel association, we extended our analysis to ICH, revealing association between deep hemispheric ICH and complex IV (OR, 1.08; P=0.008). This pathway analysis demonstrates association between common genetic variants within OXPHOS genes and stroke. The associations for small vessel stroke and deep ICH suggest that genetic variation in OXPHOS influences small vessel pathobiology. Further studies are needed to identify culprit genetic variants and assess their functional consequences.

  12. Prevalence of common hemoglobin variants in an afro-descendent Ecuadorian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Yamila; Zurita, Camilo; Calvopiña, Diego; Villacís, Jacqueline; Mora, Marcelo

    2013-04-04

    Hemoglobinopathies are among the most studied and frequent pathologies. These genetic disorders are considered a very important health care threat in many tropical countries. Ecuador is a tropical Latin-American country with an important presence of afro-descendants (7.2%). Afro-descendants are among the ethnic groups with higher frequency of hemoglobinopathies reported. Ambuqui is a region within the Imbabura province with an important presence of afro-descendants (>50%). The present study analyzed the frequency of the most common hemoglobin variants in an asymptomatic afro-descendent population using capillary electrophoresis. From 114 individuals, 25 (22%) reported a hemoglobin variant. All individuals that presented hemoglobin variants were heterozygotes (asymptomatic). Hemoglobin S (sickle cell trait) was the most frequent variant found (14%), followed by hemoglobin E (4.4%), Fetal (2.6%) and C (1%). Prevalence of hemoglobin S was consistent with populations from other countries, but it was lower than other Ecuadorian afro-descendent populations. Frequency of hemoglobin C was lower than other afro-descendent populations. This data suggests the possibility of gene flow from Native American individuals to the Ambuqui population there by lowering the frequency of their hemoglobin variants compared with other afro-descendant populations. Evaluating the frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Ecuadorian populations is essential. Despite the high frequency of these disorders, very few health care facilities implement hemoglobinopathies tests as a routine practice.

  13. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  14. Association of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Variants With Advanced Prostate Cancer Risk in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Lindström, Sara; Allen, Naomi E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Albanes, Demetrius; Barricarte, Aurelio; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Chanock, Stephen; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gapstur, Susan M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Henderson, Brian E.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Krogh, Vittorio; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stram, Daniel O.; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth; Willett, Walter C.; Hunter, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies have found an inverse association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and prostate cancer (PCa), and genome-wide association studies have found common variants near 3 loci associated with both diseases. The authors examined whether a genetic background that favors T2D is associated with risk of advanced PCa. Data from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, a genome-wide association study of 2,782 advanced PCa cases and 4,458 controls, were used to evaluate whether individual single nucleotide polymorphisms or aggregations of these 36 T2D susceptibility loci are associated with PCa. Ten T2D markers near 9 loci (NOTCH2, ADCY5, JAZF1, CDKN2A/B, TCF7L2, KCNQ1, MTNR1B, FTO, and HNF1B) were nominally associated with PCa (P < 0.05); the association for single nucleotide polymorphism rs757210 at the HNF1B locus was significant when multiple comparisons were accounted for (adjusted P = 0.001). Genetic risk scores weighted by the T2D log odds ratio and multilocus kernel tests also indicated a significant relation between T2D variants and PCa risk. A mediation analysis of 9,065 PCa cases and 9,526 controls failed to produce evidence that diabetes mediates the association of the HNF1B locus with PCa risk. These data suggest a shared genetic component between T2D and PCa and add to the evidence for an interrelation between these diseases. PMID:23193118

  15. Evidence-based psychiatric genetics, AKA the false dichotomy between common and rare variant hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, P M; Goddard, M E; Derks, E M; Wray, N R

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we review some of the data that contribute to our understanding of the genetic architecture of psychiatric disorders. These include results from evolutionary modelling (hence no data), the observed recurrence risk to relatives and data from molecular markers. We briefly discuss the common-disease common-variant hypothesis, the success (or otherwise) of genome-wide association studies, the evidence for polygenic variance and the likely success of exome and whole-genome sequencing studies. We conclude that the perceived dichotomy between 'common' and 'rare' variants is not only false, but unhelpful in making progress towards increasing our understanding of the genetic basis of psychiatric disorders. Strong evidence has been accumulated that is consistent with the contribution of many genes to risk of disease, across a wide range of allele frequencies and with a substantial proportion of genetic variation in the population in linkage disequilibrium with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on commercial genotyping arrays. At the same time, most causal variants that segregate in the population are likely to be rare and in total these variants also explain a significant proportion of genetic variation. It is the combination of allele frequency, effect size and functional characteristics that will determine the success of new experimental paradigms such as whole exome/genome sequencing to detect such loci. Empirical results suggest that roughly half the genetic variance is tagged by SNPs on commercial genome-wide chips, but that individual causal variants have a small effect size, on average. We conclude that larger experimental sample sizes are essential to further our understanding of the biology underlying psychiatric disorders.

  16. Common variants near MC4R are associated with fat mass, weight and risk of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Li, Shengxu; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Prokopenko, Inga; Inouye, Michael; Freathy, Rachel M; Attwood, Antony P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Bergmann, Sven; Bennett, Amanda J; Bingham, Sheila A; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Cauchi, Stéphane; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian; Dina, Christian; De, Subhajyoti; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M; Sadaf Farooqi, I; Froguel, Philippe; Ghori, Jilur; Groves, Christopher J; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hebebrand, Johannes; Heid, Iris M; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Herrera, Blanca; Hinney, Anke; Hunt, Sarah E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D M; Karpe, Fredrik; Keniry, Andrew; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; Marchini, Jonathan; McArdle, Wendy L; McGinnis, Ralph; Meyre, David; Munroe, Patricia B; Morris, Andrew D; Ness, Andrew R; Neville, Matthew J; Nica, Alexandra C; Ong, Ken K; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Potter, Simon; Pouta, Anneli; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ring, Susan M; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scherag, André; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Syddall, Holly E; Teichmann, Sarah A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tobias, Jonathan H; Uda, Manuela; Vogel, Carla I Ganz; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Wraight; Yuan, Xin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Strachan, David P; Ouwehand, Willem H; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Frayling, Timothy M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hunter, David J; Hu, Frank B; Lyon, Helen N; Voight, Benjamin F; Ridderstrale, Martin; Groop, Leif; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Albai, Giuseppe; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Schlessinger, David; Jackson, Anne U; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2008-06-01

    To identify common variants influencing body mass index (BMI), we analyzed genome-wide association data from 16,876 individuals of European descent. After previously reported variants in FTO, the strongest association signal (rs17782313, P = 2.9 x 10(-6)) mapped 188 kb downstream of MC4R (melanocortin-4 receptor), mutations of which are the leading cause of monogenic severe childhood-onset obesity. We confirmed the BMI association in 60,352 adults (per-allele effect = 0.05 Z-score units; P = 2.8 x 10(-15)) and 5,988 children aged 7-11 (0.13 Z-score units; P = 1.5 x 10(-8)). In case-control analyses (n = 10,583), the odds for severe childhood obesity reached 1.30 (P = 8.0 x 10(-11)). Furthermore, we observed overtransmission of the risk allele to obese offspring in 660 families (P (pedigree disequilibrium test average; PDT-avg) = 2.4 x 10(-4)). The SNP location and patterns of phenotypic associations are consistent with effects mediated through altered MC4R function. Our findings establish that common variants near MC4R influence fat mass, weight and obesity risk at the population level and reinforce the need for large-scale data integration to identify variants influencing continuous biomedical traits.

  17. Common variants near MC4R are associated with fat mass, weight and risk of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Li, Shengxu; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Prokopenko, Inga; Inouye, Michael; Freathy, Rachel M; Attwood, Antony P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Bergmann, Sven; Bennett, Amanda J; Bingham, Sheila A; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Cauchi, Stéphane; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian; Dina, Christian; De, Subhajyoti; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Froguel, Philippe; Ghori, Jilur; Groves, Christopher J; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hebebrand, Johannes; Heid, Iris M; Herrera, Blanca; Hinney, Anke; Hunt, Sarah E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D M; Karpe, Fredrik; Keniry, Andrew; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; Marchini, Jonathan; McArdle, Wendy L; McGinnis, Ralph; Meyre, David; Munroe, Patricia B; Morris, Andrew D; Ness, Andrew R; Neville, Matthew J; Nica, Alexandra C; Ong, Ken K; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Potter, Simon; Pouta, Anneli; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ring, Susan M; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scherag, André; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Syddall, Holly E; Teichmann, Sarah A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tobias, Jonathan H; Uda, Manuela; Vogel, Carla I Ganz; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Wraight, Vicki L; Yuan, Xin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Strachan, David P; Ouwehand, Willem H; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Frayling, Timothy M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hunter, David J; Hu, Frank B; Lyon, Helen N; Voight, Benjamin F; Ridderstrale, Martin; Groop, Leif; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Albai, Giuseppe; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Schlessinger, David; Jackson, Anne U; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2009-01-01

    To identify common variants influencing body mass index (BMI), we analyzed genome-wide association data from 16,876 individuals of European descent. After previously reported variants in FTO, the strongest association signal (rs17782313, P = 2.9 × 10−6) mapped 188 kb downstream of MC4R (melanocortin-4 receptor), mutations of which are the leading cause of monogenic severe childhood-onset obesity. We confirmed the BMI association in 60,352 adults (per-allele effect = 0.05 Z-score units; P = 2.8 × 10−15) and 5,988 children aged 7–11 (0.13 Z-score units; P = 1.5 × 10−8). In case-control analyses (n = 10,583), the odds for severe childhood obesity reached 1.30 (P = 8.0 × 10−11). Furthermore, we observed overtransmission of the risk allele to obese offspring in 660 families (P (pedigree disequilibrium test average; PDT-avg) = 2.4 × 10−4). The SNP location and patterns of phenotypic associations are consistent with effects mediated through altered MC4R function. Our findings establish that common variants near MC4R influence fat mass, weight and obesity risk at the population level and reinforce the need for large-scale data integration to identify variants influencing continuous biomedical traits. PMID:18454148

  18. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Linetta); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is l

  19. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is l

  20. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is

  1. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  2. Common PPARγ variants C161T and Pro12Ala are not associated with inflammatory bowel disease in an Australian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Georgia E; Fowler, Elizabeth V; Griffiths, Lyn R; Doecke, James D; Radford-Smith, Graham L

    2012-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a transcription factor, highly expressed in colonic epithelial cells, adipose tissue and macrophages, with an important role in the regulation of inflammatory pathways. The common PPARγ variants C161T and Pro12Ala have recently been associated with Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and an extensive UC phenotype respectively, in a Chinese population. PPARγ Pro12Ala variant homozygotes appear to be protected from the development of Crohn's disease (CD) in European Caucasians. A case-control study was performed for both variants (CD n=575, UC n=306, Controls n=360) using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in an Australian IBD cohort. A transmission disequilibrium test was also performed using CD trios for the PPARγ C161T variant. Genotype-phenotype analyses were also undertaken. There was no significant difference in genotype distribution data or allele frequency between CD and UC patients and controls. There was no difference in allele transmission for the C161T variant. No significant relationship between the variants and disease location was observed. We were unable to replicate in a Caucasian cohort the recent association between PPARγ C161T and UC or between PPARγ Pro12Ala and an extensive UC phenotype in a Chinese population. There are significant ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility to IBD and its phenotypic expression.

  3. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  4. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  5. Common variants in the PARL and PINK1 genes increase the risk to leprosy in Han Chinese from South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Feng, Jia-Qi; Li, Guo-Dong; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. We hypothesized that mitochondrial genes PARL and PINK1 would confer risk to leprosy. Thirteen tag SNPs of PARL and PINK1 were analyzed in 3620 individuals with or without leprosy from China. We also sequenced the entire exons of PARL, PINK1 and PARK2 in 80 patients with a family history of leprosy by using the next generation sequencing technology (NGS). We found that PARL SNP rs12631031 conferred a risk to leprosy (Padjusted = 0.019) and multibacillary leprosy (MB, Padjusted = 0.020) at the allelic level. rs12631031 and rs7653061 in PARL were associated with leprosy and MB (dominant model, Padjusted leprosy at the genotypic level (Padjusted = 0.004). We confirmed that common variants in PARL and PINK1 were associated with leprosy in patients underwent NGS. Furthermore, PARL and PINK1 could physically interact with each other and were involved in the highly connected network formed by reported leprosy susceptibility genes. Together, our results showed that PARL and PINK1 genetic variants are associated with leprosy. PMID:27876828

  6. Evaluation of common type 2 diabetes risk variants in a South Asian population of Sri Lankan descent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Hassanali

    Full Text Available Most studies seeking common variant associations with type 2 diabetes (T2D have focused on individuals of European ancestry. These discoveries need to be evaluated in other major ancestral groups, to understand ethnic differences in predisposition, and establish whether these contribute to variation in T2D prevalence and presentation. This study aims to establish whether common variants conferring T2D-risk in Europeans contribute to T2D-susceptibility in the South Asian population of Sri Lanka.Lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs at 37 T2D-risk loci attaining genome-wide significance in Europeans were genotyped in 878 T2D cases and 1523 normoglycaemic controls from Sri Lanka. Association testing was performed by logistic regression adjusting for age and sex and by the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test after stratifying according to self-identified ethnolinguistic subgroup. A weighted genetic risk score was generated to examine the combined effect of these SNPs on T2D-risk in the Sri Lankan population.Of the 36 SNPs passing quality control, sixteen showed nominal (p<0.05 association in Sri Lankan samples, fifteen of those directionally-consistent with the original signal. Overall, these association findings were robust to analyses that accounted for membership of ethnolinguistic subgroups. Overall, the odds ratios for 31 of the 36 SNPs were directionally-consistent with those observed in Europeans (p = 3.2×10(-6. Allelic odds ratios and risk allele frequencies in Sri Lankan subjects were not systematically different to those reported in Europeans. Genetic risk score and risk of T2D were strongly related in Sri Lankans (per allele OR 1.10 [95%CI 1.08-1.13], p = 1.2×10(-17.Our data indicate that most T2D-risk variants identified in Europeans have similar effects in South Asians from Sri Lanka, and that systematic difference in common variant associations are unlikely to explain inter-ethnic differences in prevalence or presentation of T2D.

  7. A novel common variant in DCST2 is associated with length in early life and height in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Ralf J P; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Kooijman, Marjolein N; Guxens, Mònica; Stergiakouli, Evangelia; Sääf, Annika; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Geller, Frank; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Cousminer, Diana L; Körner, Antje; Thiering, Elisabeth; Curtin, John A; Myhre, Ronny; Huikari, Ville; Joro, Raimo; Kerkhof, Marjan; Warrington, Nicole M; Pitkänen, Niina; Ntalla, Ioanna; Horikoshi, Momoko; Veijola, Riitta; Freathy, Rachel M; Teo, Yik-Ying; Barton, Sheila J; Evans, David M; Kemp, John P; St Pourcain, Beate; Ring, Susan M; Davey Smith, George; Bergström, Anna; Kull, Inger; Hakonarson, Hakon; Mentch, Frank D; Bisgaard, Hans; Chawes, Bo; Stokholm, Jakob; Waage, Johannes; Eriksen, Patrick; Sevelsted, Astrid; Melbye, Mads; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Hofman, Albert; de Jongste, Johan C; Taal, H Rob; Uitterlinden, André G; Armstrong, Loren L; Eriksson, Johan; Palotie, Aarno; Bustamante, Mariona; Estivill, Xavier; Gonzalez, Juan R; Llop, Sabrina; Kiess, Wieland; Mahajan, Anubha; Flexeder, Claudia; Tiesler, Carla M T; Murray, Clare S; Simpson, Angela; Magnus, Per; Sengpiel, Verena; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Lewin, Alexandra; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Buxton, Jessica L; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Sebert, Sylvain; Vaarasmaki, Marja; Lakka, Timo; Lindi, Virpi; Gehring, Ulrike; Postma, Dirkje S; Ang, Wei; Newnham, John P; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Pahkala, Katja; Raitakari, Olli T; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Boomsma, Dorret I; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Ilonen, Jorma; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Pers, Tune H; Liang, Liming; Huang, Jinyan; Hocher, Berthold; Knip, Mikael; Saw, Seang-Mei; Holloway, John W; Melén, Erik; Grant, Struan F A; Feenstra, Bjarke; Lowe, William L; Widén, Elisabeth; Sergeyev, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Custovic, Adnan; Jacobsson, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Atalay, Mustafa; Koppelman, Gerard H; Pennell, Craig E; Niinikoski, Harri; Dedoussis, George V; Mccarthy, Mark I; Frayling, Timothy M; Sunyer, Jordi; Timpson, Nicholas J; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2015-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been identified for adult height, but not much is known about the genetics of skeletal growth in early life. To identify common genetic variants that influence fetal skeletal growth, we meta-analyzed 22 genome-wide association studies (Stage 1; N = 28 459). We identified

  8. A novel common variant in DCST2 i>is associated with length in early life and height in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Kooijman, Marjolein N.;

    2015-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been identified for adult height, but not much is known about the genetics of skeletal growth in early life. To identify common genetic variants that influence fetal skeletal growth, we meta-analyzed 22 genome-wide association studies (Stage 1; N = 28 459). We identif...

  9. A novel common variant in> DCST2 is associated with length in early life and height in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Kooijman, Marjolein N.;

    2015-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been identified for adult height, but not much is known about the genetics of skeletal growth in early life. To identify common genetic variants that influence fetal skeletal growth, we meta-analyzed 22 genome-wide association studies (Stage 1; N = 28 459). We identif...

  10. Common variation in the ABO glycosyltransferase is associated with susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, Andrew E.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Auburn, Sarah; Diakite, Mahamadou; Forton, Julian T.; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Marsh, Kevin; Malcolm E Molyneux

    2007-01-01

    There is growing epidemiological and molecular evidence that ABO blood group affects host susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum infection. The high frequency of common ABO alleles means that even modest differences in susceptibility could have a significant impact on the health of people living in malaria endemic regions. We performed an association study, the first to utilize key molecular genetic variation underlying the ABO system, genotyping >9000 individuals across 3 African pop...

  11. Multiple linear combination (MLC) regression tests for common variants adapted to linkage disequilibrium structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yun Joo; Sun, Lei; Poirier, Julia G.; Paterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By jointly analyzing multiple variants within a gene, instead of one at a time, gene‐based multiple regression can improve power, robustness, and interpretation in genetic association analysis. We investigate multiple linear combination (MLC) test statistics for analysis of common variants under realistic trait models with linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on HapMap Asian haplotypes. MLC is a directional test that exploits LD structure in a gene to construct clusters of closely correlated variants recoded such that the majority of pairwise correlations are positive. It combines variant effects within the same cluster linearly, and aggregates cluster‐specific effects in a quadratic sum of squares and cross‐products, producing a test statistic with reduced degrees of freedom (df) equal to the number of clusters. By simulation studies of 1000 genes from across the genome, we demonstrate that MLC is a well‐powered and robust choice among existing methods across a broad range of gene structures. Compared to minimum P‐value, variance‐component, and principal‐component methods, the mean power of MLC is never much lower than that of other methods, and can be higher, particularly with multiple causal variants. Moreover, the variation in gene‐specific MLC test size and power across 1000 genes is less than that of other methods, suggesting it is a complementary approach for discovery in genome‐wide analysis. The cluster construction of the MLC test statistics helps reveal within‐gene LD structure, allowing interpretation of clustered variants as haplotypic effects, while multiple regression helps to distinguish direct and indirect associations. PMID:27885705

  12. ROCK2 allelic variants are not associated with pre-eclampsia susceptibility in the Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, H; Laivuori, H; Kerkelä, E; Jiao, H; Hiltunen, L; Heino, S; Tiala, I; Knuutila, S; Rasi, V; Kere, J; Kivinen, K

    2009-07-01

    The rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase 2 (ROCK2) gene has been suggested to associate with general hypertension and is therefore a plausible functional candidate gene for pre-eclampsia. ROCK2 maps to chromosome 2p25, which we have implicated previously in a linkage study of pre-eclampsia. We have re-sequenced exons and putative promoter region of ROCK2 in up to 30 pre-eclampsia patients and 22 controls and genotyped putative functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as well as tagging SNPs from HapMap in a Finnish case-control data set-340 affected and 357 matched control individuals-for a genetic association study of ROCK2 in pre-eclampsia. Even though several new SNPs were discovered, we did not detect significant allelic or haplotypic association between ROCK2 and pre-eclampsia. We assessed ROCK2 expression in placentas by microarray analysis, but no significant expression differences were observed when comparing preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies. We conclude that common genetic variation in ROCK2 is unlikely to make a major contribution to the risk of pre-eclampsia, but cannot exclude the possibility of having missed non-coding functional variants or rare coding variants.

  13. Variant in the 5' untranslated region of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor is associated with susceptibility to mastitis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2012-09-01

    Mastitis is a common infectious disease of the mammary gland and generates large losses in the dairy industry. By means of positional cloning and functional analysis techniques, we here show that insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) can possibly mediate susceptibility to mastitis through autophagy. Scanning the whole genome of cows (Bos taurus) that were susceptible or resistant to mastitis in the half-sib families revealed that susceptible cows had a relatively long stretch of cytosine residues (C stretch) in the 5' untranslated region of IGF1R. The forebrain embryonic zinc finger-like (FEZL) transcription factor, which was previously identified as a factor controlling mastitis resistance in the same half-sib families, bound the C stretch of IGF1R. The susceptible type of FEZL with a glycine stretch containing 13 glycines (13G) and the longer C stretch of IGF1R together enhanced expression of IGF1R. Enhancing IGF1R inhibited autophagy in response to Streptococcus agalactiae invasion of mammary epithelial cells, whereas treatment with rapamycin, a known inducer of autophagy, rescued it. Cows carrying the variant combination of 13GFEZL might be more susceptible to mastitis as the result of impaired autophagy. Our results suggest that IGF1R could control innate immunity in mammals and serve as a potential tool for preventing mastitis.

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies a common variant associated with risk of endometrial cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda B Spurdle; Thompson, Deborah J.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S; O’Mara, Tracy; Walker, Logan C.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Fahey, Paul; Montgomery, Grant,; Webb, Penelope M; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B.

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract in developed countries. To identify genetic variants associated with endometrial cancer risk, we undertook a genome-wide association study involving 1,265 endometrial cancer cases from Australia and the UK and 5,190 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared for 519,655 SNPs. Forty-seven SNPs that showed evidence of association with endometrial c...

  15. Role of ABCC2 common variants in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Sookoian; Gustavo Castano; Carlos J Pirola

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), a disorder that adversely affects maternal wellbeing and fetal outcome, is unclear. However, multiple factors probably interact along with a genetic predisposition. We would like to add some comments on a paper recently published concerning the role of ABCB11 and ABCC2 polymorphisms in both ICP and contraceptive-induced cholestasis, especially in the light of our recently published findings about a positive association between ICP and ABCC2 common variants.

  16. An evaluation of association between common variants in C4BPB/C4BPA genes and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuihong; Lu, Houquan; Ni, Jianliang; Zhang, Jiangtao; Tang, Wenxin; Lu, Weihong; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Chen

    2015-03-17

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that both maternal bacterial and viral infections during pregnancy increase the risk of schizophrenia among offspring, but to date there is not clear explanation for this increased risk. Previously, the decreased C4b-binding protein (C4BP), a potent circulating soluble inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, was reported to be associated with risk of schizophrenia. Here, we analyzed 4 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of C4BPB and 5 SNPs of C4BPA in a group of 556 schizophrenia patients and a matched group of 610 healthy controls to see if the genes C4BPB and C4BPA, which encode C4BP, may confer a susceptibility to schizophrenia. Comparing the genotype and allele frequencies of those SNPs between cases and controls, we found no association between the C4BPB/C4BPA variants and schizophrenia. Our results provided preliminary evidence that C4BPB/C4BPA may not confer susceptibility to schizophrenia among Han Chinese. Further genetic studies from large-scale population are required to obtain more conclusive results.

  17. Evaluating the Performance of Fine-Mapping Strategies at Common Variant GWAS Loci.

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    Martijn van de Bunt

    Full Text Available The growing availability of high-quality genomic annotation has increased the potential for mechanistic insights when the specific variants driving common genome-wide association signals are accurately localized. A range of fine-mapping strategies have been advocated, and specific successes reported, but the overall performance of such approaches, in the face of the extensive linkage disequilibrium that characterizes the human genome, is not well understood. Using simulations based on sequence data from the 1000 Genomes Project, we quantify the extent to which fine-mapping, here conducted using an approximate Bayesian approach, can be expected to lead to useful improvements in causal variant localization. We show that resolution is highly variable between loci, and that performance is severely degraded as the statistical power to detect association is reduced. We confirm that, where causal variants are shared between ancestry groups, further improvements in performance can be obtained in a trans-ethnic fine-mapping design. Finally, using empirical data from a recently published genome-wide association study for ankylosing spondylitis, we provide empirical confirmation of the behaviour of the approximate Bayesian approach and demonstrate that seven of twenty-six loci can be fine-mapped to fewer than ten variants.

  18. Association of gene variants with susceptibility to type 2diabetes among Omanis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sawsan Al-Sinani; Nicolas Woodhouse; Ali Al-Mamari; Omaima Al-Shafie; Mohammed Al-Shafaee; Said Al-Yahyaee; Mohammed Hassan; Deepali Jaju; Khamis Al-Hashmi; Mohammed Al-Abri; Khalid Al-Rassadi; Syed Rizvi; Yengo Loic; Philippe Froguel; Riad Bayoumi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of 10 knowncommon gene variants with susceptibility to type 2diabetes mellitus (T2D) among Omanis.METHODS: Using case-control design, a total of992 diabetic patients and 294 normoglycemic OmaniArabs were genotyped, by an allelic discriminationassay-by-design TaqMan method on fast real timepolymerase chain reaction system, for the followinggene variants: KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146),CDKAL1 (rs10946398), CDKN2A/B (rs10811661), FTO(rs9939609 and rs8050136), IGF2BP2 (rs4402960),SLC30A8 (rs13266634) CAPN10 (rs3792267) andHHEX (rs1111875). T2D patients were recruited fromthe Diabetes Clinic (n = 243) and inpatients (n = 749)at Sultan Qaboos Univesity Hospital (SQUH), Muscat,Oman. Adult control participants (n = 294) werevolunteers from the community and from those visitingFamily Medicine Clinic at SQU, for regular medicalcheckup. The difficulty in recruiting Omani participantswith no family history of diabetes was the main reasonbehind the small number of control participants in thisstudy. Almost all volunteers questioned had a relative with diabetes mellitus. Inspite of the small number ofnormoglycemic controls in this study, this sample wassufficient for detection of genes and loci for commonalleles influencing T2D with an odds ratio of ≥ 1.3reaching at least 80% power. Data was collected fromJune 2010 to February 2012.RESULTS: Using binary logistic regression analysis,four gene variants showed significant association withT2D risk: KCNJ11 (rs5219, P = 5.8 × 10-6, OR = 1.74),TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 0.001, OR = 1.46), CDKAL1(rs10946398, P = 0.002, OR = 1.44) and CDKN2A/B(rs10811661, P = 0.020, OR = 1.40). The fixation indexanalysis of these four gene variants indicated significantgenetic differentiation between diabetics and controls{[KCNJ11 (rs5219), P 〈 0.001], [TCF7L2 (rs7903146),P 〈 0.001], [CDKAL1 (rs10946398), P 〈 0

  19. Innate immunity glycoprotein gp-340 variants may modulate human susceptibility to dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Ingegerd

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial adhesion is an important determinant of colonization and infection, including dental caries. The salivary scavenger receptor cysteine-rich glycoprotein gp-340, which mediates adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (implicated in caries, harbours three major size variants, designated gp-340 I to III, each specific to an individual saliva. Here we have examined the association of the gp-340 I to III polymorphisms with caries experience and adhesion of S. mutans. Methods A case-referent study was performed in 12-year-old Swedish children with high (n = 19 or low (n = 19 caries experiences. We measured the gp-340 I to III saliva phenotypes and correlated those with multiple outcome measures for caries experience and saliva adhesion of S. mutans using the partial least squares (PLS multivariate projection technique. In addition, we used traditional statistics and 2-year caries increment to verify the established PLS associations, and bacterial adhesion to purified gp-340 I to III proteins to support possible mechanisms. Results All except one subject were typed as gp-340 I to III (10, 23 and 4, respectively. The gp-340 I phenotype correlated positively with caries experience (VIP = 1.37 and saliva adhesion of S. mutans Ingbritt (VIP = 1.47. The gp-340 II and III phenotypes tended to behave in the opposite way. Moreover, the gp-340 I phenotype tended to show an increased 2-year caries increment compared to phenotypes II/III. Purified gp-340 I protein mediated markedly higher adhesion of S. mutans strains Ingbritt and NG8 and Lactococcus lactis expressing AgI/II adhesins (SpaP or PAc compared to gp-340 II and III proteins. In addition, the gp-340 I protein appeared over represented in subjects positive for Db, an allelic acidic PRP variant associated with caries, and subjects positive for both gp-340 I and Db tended to experience more caries than those negative for both proteins. Conclusion Gp-340 I behaves as a caries

  20. Genetic association study of common mitochondrial variants on body fat mass.

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    Tie-Lin Yang

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role in ATP production and energy metabolism. Previous studies suggest that common variants in mtDNA are associated with several common complex diseases, including obesity. To test the hypothesis that common mtDNA variants influence obesity-related phenotypes, including BMI and body fat mass, we genotyped a total of 445 mtSNPs across the whole mitochondrial genome in a large sample of 2,286 unrelated Caucasian subjects. 72 of these 445 mtSNPs passed quality control criteria, and were used for subsequent analyses. We also classified all subjects into nine common European haplogroups. Association analyses were conducted for both BMI and body fat mass with single mtSNPs and mtDNA haplogroups. Two mtSNPs, mt4823 and mt8873 were detected to be significantly associated with body fat mass, with adjusted P values of 4.94 × 10⁻³ and 4.58 × 10⁻², respectively. The minor alleles mt4823 C and mt8873 A were associated with reduced fat mass values and the effect size (β was estimated to be 3.52 and 3.18, respectively. These two mtSNPs also achieved nominally significant levels for association with BMI. For haplogroup analyses, we found that haplogroup X was strongly associated with both BMI (adjusted P = 8.31 × 10⁻³ and body fat mass (adjusted P = 5.67×10⁻⁴ Subjects classified as haplogroup X had lower BMI and fat mass values, with the β estimated to be 2.86 and 6.03, respectively. Our findings suggest that common variants in mitochondria might play a role in variations of body fat mass. Further molecular and functional studies will be needed to clarify the potential mechanism.

  1. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  2. Heritability estimates of the Big Five personality traits based on common genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, R A; Pluess, M

    2015-07-14

    According to twin studies, the Big Five personality traits have substantial heritable components explaining 40-60% of the variance, but identification of associated genetic variants has remained elusive. Consequently, knowledge regarding the molecular genetic architecture of personality and to what extent it is shared across the different personality traits is limited. Using genomic-relatedness-matrix residual maximum likelihood analysis (GREML), we here estimated the heritability of the Big Five personality factors (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness for experience) in a sample of 5011 European adults from 527,469 single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. We tested for the heritability of each personality trait, as well as for the genetic overlap between the personality factors. We found significant and substantial heritability estimates for neuroticism (15%, s.e. = 0.08, P = 0.04) and openness (21%, s.e. = 0.08, P agreeableness and conscientiousness. The bivariate analyses showed that the variance explained by common variants entirely overlapped between neuroticism and openness (rG = 1.00, P personality traits using the GREML approach. Findings should be considered exploratory and suggest that detectable heritability estimates based on common variants is shared between neuroticism and openness to experiences.

  3. Low frequency variants in the exons only encoding isoform A of HNF1A do not contribute to susceptibility to type 2 diabetes.

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    Bahram Jafar-Mohammadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is considerable interest in the hypothesis that low frequency, intermediate penetrance variants contribute to the proportion of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D susceptibility not attributable to the common variants uncovered through genome-wide association approaches. Genes previously implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes are obvious candidates in this respect. In this study, we focussed on exons 8-10 of the HNF1A gene since rare, penetrant mutations in these exons (which are only transcribed in selected HNF1A isoforms are associated with a later age of diagnosis of Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY than mutations in exons 1-7. The age of diagnosis in the subgroup of HNF1A-MODY individuals with exon 8-10 mutations overlaps with that of early multifactorial T2D, and we set out to test the hypothesis that these exons might also harbour low-frequency coding variants of intermediate penetrance that contribute to risk of multifactorial T2D. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed targeted capillary resequencing of HNF1A exons 8-10 in 591 European T2D subjects enriched for genetic aetiology on the basis of an early age of diagnosis ( or =1 affected sibling. PCR products were sequenced and compared to the published HNF1A sequence. We identified several variants (rs735396 [IVS9-24T>C], rs1169304 [IVS8+29T>C], c.1768+44C>T [IVS9+44C>T] and rs61953349 [c.1545G>A, p.T515T] but no novel non-synonymous coding variants were detected. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that low frequency, nonsynonymous coding variants in the terminal exons of HNF1A are unlikely to contribute to T2D-susceptibility in European samples. Nevertheless, the rationale for seeking low-frequency causal variants in genes known to contain rare, penetrant mutations remains strong and should motivate efforts to screen other genes in a similar fashion.

  4. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes.

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    Dennis Lal

    Full Text Available The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic.We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients.We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%. Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1 are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10-4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test, previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions.

  5. Allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 repair genes and susceptibility of oral cancer in Brazilian patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Reis, Mariana Bisarro; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; de Souza Fonseca Ribeiro, Enilze Maria

    2013-01-01

    genes have been found to be associated with oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of allelic variants Arg194Trp (rs:1799782) and Arg399Gln (rs: 25487) of XRCC1 gene and Thr241Met (rs: 861539) of XRCC3 gene and susceptibility to oral cancer. We also...... variants of the XRCC1 gene within codon 194 (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.44-1.51) and codon 399 (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.59-1.50) and within the XRCC3 gene (OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.45-1.16) were not associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. A combinational analysis of SNPs in both genes indicated no association....... The presence of the allelic variants of these two genes had no statistically significant effect on tumor differentiation, lymph node invasion or tumor size. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 are not suitable markers for susceptibility to carcinomas of the oral cavity...

  6. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-07-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7-ADH1C-ADH1B-ADH1A-ADH6-ADH4-ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans.

  7. Association of Common Variants in LOX with Keratoconus: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Hong, Jiaxu; Wu, Dan; Xu, Jianjiang

    2015-01-01

    Several case-control studies have been performed to examine the association of genetic variants in lysyl oxidase (LOX) with keratoconus. However, the results remained inconclusive and great heterogeneity might exist across populations. A comprehensive literature search for studies that published up to June 25, 2015 was performed. Summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) were estimated with fixed effects model when I250%. Publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and Egger's test. A total of four studies including 1,467 keratoconus cases and 4,490 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. SNPs rs2956540 and rs10519694 showed significant association with keratoconus, with ORs of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P = 1.43E-08) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.61-0.97, P = 0.026), respectively. In contrast, our study lacked sufficient evidences to support the association of rs1800449/rs2288393 with keratoconus across populations. This meta-analysis suggested that two LOX variants, rs2956540 and rs10519694, may affect individual susceptibility to keratoconus, while distinct heterogeneity existed within this locus. Larger-scale and multi-ethnic genetic studies on keratoconus are required to further validate the results.

  8. M89V Sialic acid Acetyl Esterase (SIAE) and all other non-synonymous common variants of this gene are catalytically normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Vasant; Taylor, Kendra N; Pedrick, Kathryn; Donado, Carlos; Netravali, Ilka Arun; Haider, Khaleda; Cariappa, Annaiah; Dalomba, Natasha F; Pillai, Shiv

    2013-01-01

    Catalytically defective rare variants of Sialic acid Acetyl Esterase (SIAE) have previously been linked to autoimmunity. Studies presented here confirm that the M89V SIAE protein and all other products of common variant alleles of SIAE are catalytically normal. Although overexpressing transfected non-lymphoid cells secrete small amounts of SIAE that can associate with the cell surface, normal human lymphocytes do not exhibit cell surface SIAE, supporting genetic evidence in mice that indicates that this protein functions in a lymphocyte intrinsic manner. Analyses of the plasma proteome also indicate that SIAE is not secreted in vivo. A re-analysis exclusively of catalytically defective rare variant alleles of SIAE in subjects in which this gene was completely sequenced confirmed an association of SIAE with autoimmunity. A subset of catalytically defective rare variant SIAE alleles has previously been typed in a large genotyping study comparing a diverse group of disease subjects and controls; our re-analysis of this data shows that catalytically defective alleles are enriched in disease subjects. These data suggest that SIAE may be associated with autoimmunity and that further study of catalytically defective rare variant SIAE alleles in terms of autoimmune disease susceptibility is strongly warranted.

  9. M89V Sialic acid Acetyl Esterase (SIAE and all other non-synonymous common variants of this gene are catalytically normal.

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    Vasant Chellappa

    Full Text Available Catalytically defective rare variants of Sialic acid Acetyl Esterase (SIAE have previously been linked to autoimmunity. Studies presented here confirm that the M89V SIAE protein and all other products of common variant alleles of SIAE are catalytically normal. Although overexpressing transfected non-lymphoid cells secrete small amounts of SIAE that can associate with the cell surface, normal human lymphocytes do not exhibit cell surface SIAE, supporting genetic evidence in mice that indicates that this protein functions in a lymphocyte intrinsic manner. Analyses of the plasma proteome also indicate that SIAE is not secreted in vivo. A re-analysis exclusively of catalytically defective rare variant alleles of SIAE in subjects in which this gene was completely sequenced confirmed an association of SIAE with autoimmunity. A subset of catalytically defective rare variant SIAE alleles has previously been typed in a large genotyping study comparing a diverse group of disease subjects and controls; our re-analysis of this data shows that catalytically defective alleles are enriched in disease subjects. These data suggest that SIAE may be associated with autoimmunity and that further study of catalytically defective rare variant SIAE alleles in terms of autoimmune disease susceptibility is strongly warranted.

  10. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  11. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  12. Contribution of 32 GWAS-identified common variants to severe obesity in European adults referred for bariatric surgery.

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    Reedik Mägi

    Full Text Available The prevalence of severe obesity, defined as body mass index (BMI ≥ 35.0 kg/m(2, is rising rapidly. Given the disproportionately high health burden and healthcare costs associated with this condition, understanding the underlying aetiology, including predisposing genetic factors, is a biomedical research priority. Previous studies have suggested that severe obesity represents an extreme tail of the population BMI variation, reflecting shared genetic factors operating across the spectrum. Here, we sought to determine whether a panel of 32 known common obesity-susceptibility variants contribute to severe obesity in patients (n = 1,003, mean BMI 48.4 ± 8.1 kg/m(2 attending bariatric surgery clinics in two European centres. We examined the effects of these 32 common variants on obesity risk and BMI, both as individual markers and in combination as a genetic risk score, in a comparison with normal-weight controls (n = 1,809, BMI 18.0-24.9 kg/m(2; an approach which, to our knowledge, has not been previously undertaken in the setting of a bariatric clinic. We found strong associations with severe obesity for SNP rs9939609 within the FTO gene (P = 9.3 × 10(-8 and SNP rs2815752 near the NEGR1 gene (P = 3.6 × 10(-4, and directionally consistent nominal associations (P<0.05 for 12 other SNPs. The genetic risk score associated with severe obesity (P = 8.3 × 10(-11 but, within the bariatric cohort, this score did not associate with BMI itself (P = 0.264. Our results show significant effects of individual BMI-associated common variants within a relatively small sample size of bariatric patients. Furthermore, the burden of such low-penetrant risk alleles contributes to severe obesity in this population. Our findings support that severe obesity observed in bariatric patients represents an extreme tail of the population BMI variation. Moreover, future genetic studies focused on bariatric patients may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of

  13. Association of common ATM variants with familial breast cancer in a South American population

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    Peralta Octavio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATM gene has been frequently involved in hereditary breast cancer as a low-penetrance susceptibility gene but evidence regarding the role of ATM as a breast cancer susceptibility gene has been contradictory. Methods In this study, a full mutation analysis of the ATM gene was carried out in patients from 137 Chilean breast cancer families, of which 126 were BRCA1/2 negatives and 11 BRCA1/2 positives. We further perform a case-control study between the subgroup of 126 cases BRCA1/2 negatives and 200 controls for the 5557G>A missense variant and the IVS38-8T>C and the IVS24-9delT polymorphisms. Results In the full mutation analysis we detected two missense variants and eight intronic polymorphisms. Carriers of the variant IVS24-9delT, or IVS38-8T>C, or 5557G>A showed an increase in breast cancer risk. The higher significance was observed in the carriers of IVS38-8T>C (OR = 3.09 [95%CI 1.11–8.59], p = 0.024. The IVS24-9 T/(-T, IVS38-8 T/C, 5557 G/A composite genotype confered a 3.19 fold increase in breast cancer risk (OR = 3.19 [95%CI 1.16–8.89], p = 0.021. The haplotype estimation suggested a strong linkage disequilibrium between the three markers (D' = 1. We detected only three haplotypes in the cases and control samples, some of these may be founder haplotypes in the Chilean population. Conclusion The IVS24-9 T/(-T, IVS38-8 T/C, 5557 G/A composite genotype alone or in combination with certain genetic background and/or environmental factors, could modify the cancer risk by increasing genetic inestability or by altering the effect of the normal DNA damage response.

  14. Common variants near FRK/COL10A1 and VEGFA are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yi); T. Bhangale (Tushar); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Ripke (Stephan); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); P.L. Tan (Perciliz); E.H. Souied (Eric); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); R. Reynolds (Robyn); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); K.A. Chin (Kimberly); L. Sobrin (Lucia); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); P.H. Lee (Phil); N. Leveziel (Nicolas); D.J. Zack (Donald); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); R.T. Smith (Theodore); G.R. Barile (Gaetano); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); R. Hogg (Ruth); U. Chakravarthy (Usha); L.D. Robman (Luba); O. Gustafsson (Omar); H. Sigurdsson (Haraldur); W. Ortmann (Ward); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); K. Stefansson (Kari); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); R. Allikmets (Rando); M.A. Brantley (Milam); P.N. Baird (Paul); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); R.R. Graham (Robert); J.M. Seddon (Johanna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDespite significant progress in the identification of genetic loci for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), not all of the heritability has been explained. To identify variants which contribute to the remaining genetic susceptibility, we performed the largest meta-analysis of genome-w

  15. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects.

  16. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair...

  17. Genome-wide meta-analysis of observational studies shows common genetic variants associated with macronutrient intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J.S. Ngwa; F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis); D.K. Houston (Denise); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Luan; V. Mikkilä (Vera); F. Renström (Frida); E. Sonestedt (Emily); J.H. Zhao (Jing); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); L. Qi (Lu); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.C. De Oliveira Otto (Marcia); E.J. Dhurandhar (Emily); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); I. Johansson (Ingegerd); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); K. Lohman (Kurt); A. Manichaikul (Ani); N.M. McKeown (Nicola ); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); A.B. Singleton (Andrew); K. Stirrups (Kathy); J. Viikari (Jorma); Z. Ye (Zheng); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I. Barroso (Inês); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); A. Hofman (Albert); Y. Liu (Yongmei); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); K.E. North (Kari); M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Langenberg (Claudia); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.B. Hu (Frank); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); O. Raitakari (Olli); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Johnson (Anthony); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.A. Schrack (Jennifer); R.D. Semba; D.S. Siscovick (David); D.K. Arnett (Donna); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P.W. Franks (Paul); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer )

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macronutrient intake varies substantially between individuals, and there is evidence that this variation is partly accounted for by genetic variants. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with macronutrient intake. D

  18. Mining the LIPG allelic spectrum reveals the contribution of rare and common regulatory variants to HDL cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet A Khetarpal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5' UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL, consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813 is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5' UTR variant (rs34474737 that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci.

  19. Common Variant of FTO Gene, rs9939609, and Obesity in Pakistani Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeela Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies confirmed the association of FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene common variant, rs9939609, with obesity in European populations. However, studies in Asian populations revealed conflicting results. We examined the association of rs9939609 variant of FTO gene with obesity and obesity-related anthropometric and metabolic parameters in Pakistani population. Body weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference, and blood pressure (BP were measured. BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR were calculated. Levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, insulin, leptin, and leptin receptors were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated. The results showed association of FTO gene, rs9939609, with obesity in females (>18 years of age. FTO minor allele increased the risk of obesity by 2.8 times (95% CI = 1.3–6.0 in females. This allele showed association with body weight, BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, WHR, BP, plasma FBG levels, HOMA-IR, plasma insulin levels, and plasma leptin levels. In conclusion, FTO gene, rs9939609, is associated with BMI and risk of obesity in adult Pakistani females. Association of rs9939609 variant with higher FBG, plasma insulin, and leptin levels indicates that this polymorphism may disturb the metabolism in adult females and predispose them to obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the above-mentioned findings were not seen in children or males.

  20. Contribution of rare and common variants determine complex diseases-Hirschsprung disease as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria M; Sribudiani, Yunia; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Amiel, Jeanne; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud; Ceccherini, Isabella; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Fernández, Raquel M; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercè; Griseri, Paola; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Tam, Paul K; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Eggen, Bart J L; te Meerman, Gerard J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2013-10-01

    Finding genes for complex diseases has been the goal of many genetic studies. Most of these studies have been successful by searching for genes and mutations in rare familial cases, by screening candidate genes and by performing genome wide association studies. However, only a small fraction of the total genetic risk for these complex genetic diseases can be explained by the identified mutations and associated genetic loci. In this review we focus on Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) as an example of a complex genetic disorder. We describe the genes identified in this congenital malformation and postulate that both common 'low penetrant' variants in combination with rare or private 'high penetrant' variants determine the risk on HSCR, and likely, on other complex diseases. We also discuss how new technological advances can be used to gain further insights in the genetic background of complex diseases. Finally, we outline a few steps to develop functional assays in order to determine the involvement of these variants in disease development.

  1. Comparative analysis of phenotypes features in two common genetic variants of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Sharkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The algorithm of differential diagnosis of the two most common genetic variants the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2A and DMD, developed on the basis of a comprehensive survey of 85 patients with a diagnosis specification using techniques of DNA analysis. It is shown that the accurate diagnosis of LGMD genetic types should be based on the results of the clinical and genealogical, biochemical and molecular genetic analysis. The proposed algorithm will significantly reduces the economic and time costs with expensive DNA testing.

  2. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499 and chromosome 10 (rs16917302. The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, . FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, . These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  3. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M; Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V; Nielsen, Finn C; Greene, Mark H; Greene, Mark I; Mai, Phuong L; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Daly, Mark J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Altshuler, David M; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-10-28

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5) and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4). These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  4. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499 and chromosome 10 (rs16917302. The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, . FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, . These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  5. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  6. Immunochip SNP array identifies novel genetic variants conferring susceptibility to candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeekens, Sanne P.; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos; Karjalainen, Juha; Franke, Lude; Withoff, Sebo; Plantinga, Theo S.; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Marchetti, Oscar; Perfect, John R.; Xavier, Ramnik; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia is the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infection, with a high mortality rate of up to 40%. Identification of host genetic factors that confer susceptibility to candidemia may aid in designing adjunctive immunotherapeutic strategies. We hypothesized that variation in immune genes may predispose to candidemia. We analyzed 118,989 SNPs across 186 loci known to be associated with immune-mediated diseases in the largest candidemia cohort to date of 217 patients of European ancestry and a group of 11,920 controls. The significant associations were validated by comparison with a disease-matched control group. We observed significant association between candidemia and SNPs in the CD58 (P = 1.97×10−11; OR = 4.68), LCE4A-C1orf68 (P = 1.98×10−10; OR = 4.25) and TAGAP (P = 1.84×10−8; OR = 2.96) loci. Individuals carrying two or more risk alleles had an increased risk for candidemia of 19.4-fold compared to individuals carrying no risk allele. While latent cornified envelope (LCE) genes contribute to mucosal integrity, the role of CD58 and TAGAP in host defense is unknown. Studies using transcriptomics, pathway analysis, and immunological validation showed that CD58 plays a role in the recognition and phagocytosis of Candida by macrophages, while TAGAP was involved in Candida-induced cytokine production. TAGAP-deficient mice were more susceptible to systemic Candida infection. We identified three novel genetic risk factors for candidemia, which we subsequently validated for their role in antifungal host defense. PMID:25197941

  7. A germline variant in the TP53 polyadenylation signal confers cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Masson, Gisli; Gudmundsson, Julius; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Magnusson, Olafur T; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Nexø, Bjørn A; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Hemminki, Kari; Corredera, Cristina; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Grasa, Pilar; Navarrete, Sebastian; Fuertes, Fernando; García-Prats, Maria D; Sanambrosio, Enrique; Panadero, Angeles; De Juan, Ana; Garcia, Almudena; Rivera, Fernando; Planelles, Dolores; Soriano, Virtudes; Requena, Celia; Aben, Katja K; van Rossum, Michelle M; Cremers, Ruben G H M; van Oort, Inge M; van Spronsen, Dick-Johan; Schalken, Jack A; Peters, Wilbert H M; Helfand, Brian T; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Badescu, Daniel; Codreanu, Ovidiu; Jinga, Mariana; Csiki, Irma E; Constantinescu, Vali; Badea, Paula; Mates, Ioan N; Dinu, Daniela E; Constantin, Adrian; Mates, Dana; Kristjansdottir, Sjofn; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Jonsson, Eirikur; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Einarsson, Gudmundur V; Sigurdsson, Fridbjorn; Moller, Pall H; Stefansson, Tryggvi; Valdimarsson, Trausti; Johannsson, Oskar T; Sigurdsson, Helgi; Jonsson, Thorvaldur; Jonasson, Jon G; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Rice, Terri; Hansen, Helen M; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Lachance, Daniel H; O Neill, Brian Patrick; Kosel, Matthew L; Decker, Paul A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Helgadottir, Hafdis T; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Lindblom, Annika; Sandler, Robert S; Keku, Temitope O; Banasik, Karina; Jørgensen, Torben; Witte, Daniel R; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Jinga, Viorel; Neal, David E; Catalona, William J; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Jenkins, Robert B; Nagore, Eduardo; Vogel, Ulla; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kumar, Rajiv; Mayordomo, José I; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Rafnar, Thorunn; Stefansson, Kari

    2011-09-25

    To identify new risk variants for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, we performed a genome-wide association study of 16 million SNPs identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders. We imputed genotypes for 41,675 Illumina SNP chip-typed Icelanders and their relatives. In the discovery phase, the strongest signal came from rs78378222[C] (odds ratio (OR) = 2.36, P = 5.2 × 10(-17)), which has a frequency of 0.0192 in the Icelandic population. We then confirmed this association in non-Icelandic samples (OR = 1.75, P = 0.0060; overall OR = 2.16, P = 2.2 × 10(-20)). rs78378222 is in the 3' untranslated region of TP53 and changes the AATAAA polyadenylation signal to AATACA, resulting in impaired 3'-end processing of TP53 mRNA. Investigation of other tumor types identified associations of this SNP with prostate cancer (OR = 1.44, P = 2.4 × 10(-6)), glioma (OR = 2.35, P = 1.0 × 10(-5)) and colorectal adenoma (OR = 1.39, P = 1.6 × 10(-4)). However, we observed no effect for breast cancer, a common Li-Fraumeni syndrome tumor (OR = 1.06, P = 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.88-1.27).

  8. TLR1, 2, 4, 6 and 9 Variants Associated with Tuberculosis Susceptibility: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiko Schurz

    Full Text Available Studies investigating the influence of toll-like receptor (TLR polymorphisms and tuberculosis susceptibility have yielded varying and often contradictory results in different ethnic groups. A meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between TLR variants and susceptibility to tuberculosis, both across and within specific ethnic groups.An extensive database search was performed for studies investigating the relationship between TLR and tuberculosis (TB susceptibility. Data was subsequently extracted from included studies and statistically analysed.32 articles involving 18907 individuals were included in this meta-analysis, and data was extracted for 14 TLR polymorphisms. Various genetic models were employed. An increased risk of TB was found for individuals with the TLR2 rs3804100 CC and the TLR9 rs352139 GA and GG genotypes, while decreased risk was identified for those with the AG genotype of TLR1 rs4833095. The T allele of TLR6 rs5743810 conferred protection across all ethnic groups. TLR2 rs5743708 subgroup analysis identified the A allele to increase susceptibility to TB in the Asian ethnic group, while conferring protection in the Hispanic group. The T allele of TLR4 rs4986791 was also found to increase the risk of TB in the Asian subgroup. All other TLR gene variants investigated were not found to be associated with TB in this meta-analysis.Although general associations were identified, most TLR variants showed no significant association with TB, indicating that additional studies investigating a wider range of pattern recognition receptors is required to gain a better understanding of this complex disease.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 variant D299G is associated with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareparsi, Sepideh; Buraczynska, Monika; Branham, Kari E H; Shah, Sapna; Eng, Donna; Li, Mingyao; Pawar, Hemant; Yashar, Beverly M; Moroi, Sayoko E; Lichter, Paul R; Petty, Howard R; Richards, Julia E; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elner, Victor M; Swaroop, Anand

    2005-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease that leads to progressive and irreversible vision loss among the elderly. Inflammation, oxidative damage, cholesterol metabolism and/or impaired function of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. We examined toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a candidate gene for AMD susceptibility because: (i) the TLR4 gene is located on chromosome 9q32-33, a region exhibiting evidence of linkage to AMD in three independent reports; (ii) the TLR4-D299G variant is associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease with subendothelial accumulation; (iii) the TLR4 is not only a key mediator of proinflammatory signaling pathways but also linked to regulation of cholesterol efflux and (iv) the TLR4 participates in phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments by the RPE. We examined D299G and T399I variants of TLR4 in a sample of 667 unrelated AMD patients and 439 unrelated controls, all of Caucasian ancestry. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated an increased risk of AMD in carriers of the G allele at TLR4 residue 299 (odds ratio=2.65, P=0.025), but lack of an independent effect by T399I variant. TLR4-D299G showed an additive effect on AMD risk (odds ratio=4.13, P=0.002) with allelic variants of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1), two genes involved in cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, the effect of TLR4, APOE and ABCA1 variants on AMD susceptibility was opposite to that of association with atherosclerosis risk. Our data provide evidence of a link between multiple diverse mechanisms underlying AMD pathogenesis.

  10. Gender-oriented Commonalities among Canadian and Iranian Englishes: An Analysis of Yes/No Question Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laya Heidari Darani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigatesvariability in English yes/no questions as well as the commonalities among yes/no question variants produced by members of two different varieties of English: Canadian English native speakers and Iranian EFL learners.Further, it probes the role of gender in theEnglish yes/no question variants produced by Canadian English native speakers and those produced by Iranian EFL learners. A modified version of the Edinburgh Map Task was used in data collection. 60 Canadians and Iranians performed the task and made English yes/no question variants considering the informal context. Based on the results, the same types of yes/no question variants were produced by both groups. However, with respect to quantity, Canadians made more variants while the context of use was similar. Another difference noticed was the most frequent variant: Iranians’ frequent variant coincided with the informal context, yet the Canadians’ frequent variant did not. Regarding gender, Iranians did not produce any gender-based variant; while Canadians showed that their production of yes/no question variants was gender-oriented. These findings revealed that both Canadians and Iranians from two different varieties of English syntactically behaved similarly, but their sociolinguistic behavior was not the same.

  11. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin; Warren, Helen; Cook, James P; Manning, Alisa K; Grarup, Niels; Sim, Xueling; Barnes, Daniel R; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Stančáková, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A; Groves, Christopher J; Rayner, N William; Neville, Matt J; Robertson, Neil R; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton J M; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian'an; Scott, Robert A; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C M; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Felix, Janine F; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Reilly, Dermot F; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas F; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh S; Highland, Heather M; Justice, Anne E; Marouli, Eirini; Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D; Jousilahti, Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Brown, Morris J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Connell, John M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I W; Numans, Mattijs E; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva R B; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Käräjämäki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrières, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Caulfield, Mark J; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J; Saleheen, Danish; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Danesh, John; Wain, Louise V; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-10-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to 192,763 individuals and used ∼155,063 samples for independent replication. We identified 30 new blood pressure- or hypertension-associated genetic regions in the general population, including 3 rare missense variants in RBM47, COL21A1 and RRAS with larger effects (>1.5 mm Hg/allele) than common variants. Multiple rare nonsense and missense variant associations were found in A2ML1, and a low-frequency nonsense variant in ENPEP was identified. Our data extend the spectrum of allelic variation underlying blood pressure traits and hypertension, provide new insights into the pathophysiology of hypertension and indicate new targets for clinical intervention.

  12. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Daniel R; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Fallgaard Nielsen, Sune; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Stančáková, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A; Groves, Christopher J; Rayner, N William; Neville, Matt J; Robertson, Neil R; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton JM; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian’an; Scott, Robert A; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David CM; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Felix, Janine F; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Reily, Dermot F; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh F; Highland, Heather M; Justice, Anne E; Marouli, Eirini; Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D; Jousilahti, Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Brown, Morris J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Connell, John M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul IW; Numans, Mattijs E; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva RB; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Blakemore, Alexandra IF; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex SF; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin NA; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Käräjämäki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S; Shafi Majumder, Abdulla al; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrières, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Caulfield, Mark J; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to ~192,000 individuals, and used ~155,063 samples for independent replication. We identified 31 novel blood pressure or hypertension associated genetic regions in the general population, including three rare missense variants in RBM47, COL21A1 and RRAS with larger effects (>1.5mmHg/allele) than common variants. Multiple rare, nonsense and missense variant associations were found in A2ML1 and a low-frequency nonsense variant in ENPEP was identified. Our data extend the spectrum of allelic variation underlying blood pressure traits and hypertension, provide new insights into the pathophysiology of hypertension and indicate new targets for clinical intervention. PMID:27618447

  13. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up...... to 192,763 individuals and used ∼155,063 samples for independent replication. We identified 30 new blood pressure- or hypertension-associated genetic regions in the general population, including 3 rare missense variants in RBM47, COL21A1 and RRAS with larger effects (>1.5 mm Hg/allele) than common...... variants. Multiple rare nonsense and missense variant associations were found in A2ML1, and a low-frequency nonsense variant in ENPEP was identified. Our data extend the spectrum of allelic variation underlying blood pressure traits and hypertension, provide new insights into the pathophysiology...

  14. Associations of Common Variants at APLN and Hypertension in Chinese Subjects with and without Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Apelin, the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor, has a potent hypotensive effect via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism in vivo. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the common variants of apelin gene (APLN and hypertension, which was reported recently in a Chinese Han population with and without diabetes. Methods. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on APLN were genotyped in 3156 diabetic patients and 3736 nondiabetic individuals. For non-diabetic subjects, 1779 were enrolled in stage 1 and 1757 were recruited for validation. A meta-analysis combining the two stages was carried out to obtain the overall effect. Results. In diabetic patients, no significant associations of the three SNPs with hypertension were observed. In contrast, we found that rs2235306 was associated with hypertension in non-diabetic males after adjusting for covariates (OR=1.19, P=0.039 while rs2235307 and rs3115759 displayed no evidence of association in both genders. One haplotype, C-C-A, also showed an association with hypertension (OR=1.47, P=0.032 only in men. However, analysis in stage 2 and meta-analysis did not support these findings. Conclusions. We conclude that common variants on APLN are not associated with the prevalence of hypertension in the Chinese.

  15. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. Objective: To investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. Methods: We meta-analyzed two GWAS on self......-reported allergy and sensitization comprising a total of 62,330 individuals. These results were used to calculate enrichment for SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we probed for enrichment within genetic pathways and of transcription factor binding sites, and characterized...... commonalities in the variant burden on tissue-specific regulatory sites by calculating the enrichment of allergy SNPs falling in gene regulatory regions in various cells using Encode Roadmap DHS data, and compared the allergy data with all known diseases. Conclusion: Among 290 loci previously associated with 16...

  16. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  17. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  18. Exome-wide association study identifies a TM6SF2 variant that confers susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlitina, Julia; Smagris, Eriks; Stender, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of liver disease. To elucidate the molecular basis of NAFLD, we performed an exome-wide association study of liver fat content. Three variants were associated with higher liver fat levels at the exome-wide significance level of 3...

  19. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P...

  20. Systematic evaluation of genes and genetic variants associated with type 1 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ram, Ramesh; Mehta, Munish; Nguyen, Tri Quang

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found >60 loci that confer genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Many of these are defined only by anonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms: the underlying causative genes, as well as the molecular bases by which they mediate susceptibility, are no...

  1. Association study of prostate cancer susceptibility variants with risks of invasive ovarian, breast, and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Koessler, T.; Ahmed, S.

    2008-01-01

    Several prostate cancer susceptibility loci have recently been identified by genome-wide association studies. These loci are candidates for susceptibility to other epithelial cancers. The aim of this study was to test these tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for association with invasive o...

  2. Association of Genetic Susceptibility Variants for Type 2 Diabetes with Breast Cancer Risk in Women of European Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G.; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E.; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S.; Winqvist, Robert; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. Results The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at P < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92 – 0.95, P = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02 – 1.06, P = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95 – 0.99, P = 8.05E-04). Conclusions We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk. PMID:27053251

  3. Severe osteoarthritis of the hand associates with common variants within the ALDH1A2 gene and with rare variants at 1p31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Helgadottir, Hafdis T

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and is a major cause of pain and disability in the elderly. To search for sequence variants that confer risk of osteoarthritis of the hand, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in subjects with severe hand osteoarthritis, using...

  4. Identification of Variants in Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes and Determination of Functional and Clinical Significance of Novel Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    likely deleterious variants in genes for which clinical guidelines exist for management, namely TP53 (4), CDKN2A (1) MSH2 (1), and MUTYH (double...included 26 study genes plus BRCA1 and BRCA2 and were: 1) high penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes (CDH1, PTEN, STK11, TP53 ); 2) genes known...for management, namely TP53 (4), CDKN2A (1) MSH2 (1), and MUTYH (double heterozygote). Twenty- four patients (8.6%) had deleterious or likely

  5. A common variant in the telomerase RNA component is associated with short telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer T Njajou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres shorten as cells divide. This shortening is compensated by the enzyme telomerase. We evaluated the effect of common variants in the telomerase RNA component (TERC gene on telomere length (TL in the population-based Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC Study and in two replication samples (the TwinsUK Study and the Amish Family Osteoporosis Study, AFOS. METHODOLOGY: Five variants were identified in the TERC region by sequence analysis and only one SNP was common (rs2293607, G/A. The frequency of the G allele was 0.26 and 0.07 in white and black, respectively. Testing for association between TL and rs2293607 was performed using linear regression models or variance component analysis conditioning on relatedness among subjects. RESULTS: The adjusted mean TL was significantly shorter in 665 white carriers of the G allele compared to 887 non-carriers from the Health ABC Study (4.69±0.05 kbp vs. 4.86±0.04 kbp, measured by quantitative PCR, p = 0.005. This association was replicated in another white sample from the TwinsUK Study (6.90±0.03 kbp in 301 carriers compared to 7.06±0.03 kbp in 395 non-carriers, measured by Southern blots, p = 0.009. A similar pattern of association was observed in whites from the family-based AFOS and blacks from the Health ABC cohort, although not statistically significant, possibly due to the lower allele frequency in these populations. Combined analysis using 2,953 white subjects from 3 studies showed a significant association between TL and rs2293607 (β = -0.19±0.04 kbp, p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a significant association between a common variant in TERC and TL in humans, suggesting that TERC may play a role in telomere homeostasis.

  6. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S Hong; Trynka, Gosia

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common...... diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg(2)) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach...... partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg(2) from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment...

  7. Mammographic Breast Density and Common Genetic Variants in Breast Cancer Risk Prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Pei Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Known prediction models for breast cancer can potentially by improved by the addition of mammographic density and common genetic variants identified in genome-wide associations studies known to be associated with risk of the disease. We evaluated the benefit of including mammographic density and the cumulative effect of genetic variants in breast cancer risk prediction among women in a Singapore population.We estimated the risk of breast cancer using a prospective cohort of 24,161 women aged 50 to 64 from Singapore with available mammograms and known risk factors for breast cancer who were recruited between 1994 and 1997. We measured mammographic density using the medio-lateral oblique views of both breasts. Each woman's genotype for 75 SNPs was simulated based on the genotype frequency obtained from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium data and the cumulative effect was summarized by a genetic risk score (GRS. Any improvement in the performance of our proposed prediction model versus one containing only variables from the Gail model was assessed by changes in receiver-operating characteristic and predictive values.During 17 years of follow-up, 680 breast cancer cases were diagnosed. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals were 1.60 (1.22-2.10, 2.20 (1.65-2.92, 2.33 (1.71-3.20, 2.12 (1.43-3.14, and 3.27 (2.24-4.76 for the corresponding mammographic density categories: 11-20cm2, 21-30cm2, 31-40cm2, 41-50cm2, 51-60cm2, and 1.10 (1.03-1.16 for GRS. At the predicted absolute 10-year risk thresholds of 2.5% and 3.0%, a model with mammographic density and GRS could correctly identify 0.9% and 0.5% more women who would develop the disease compared to a model using only the Gail variables, respectively.Mammographic density and common genetic variants can improve the discriminatory power of an established breast cancer risk prediction model among females in Singapore.

  8. Rare and common variants in LPL and APOA5 in Thai subjects with severe hypertriglyceridemia: A resequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Charoen, Supannika; Kiateprungvej, Arunrat; Chartyingcharoen, Palm; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Plengpanich, Wanee

    2016-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia usually results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Few data exist on the genetics of severe hypertriglyceridemia in Asian populations. To examine the genetic variants of 3 candidate genes known to influence triglyceride metabolism, LPL, APOC2, and APOA5, which encode lipoprotein lipase, apolipoprotein C-II, and apolipoprotein A-V, respectively, in a large group of Thai subjects with severe hypertriglyceridemia. We identified sequence variants of LPL, APOC2, and APOA5 by sequencing exons and exon-intron junctions in 101 subjects with triglyceride levels ≥ 10 mmol/L (886 mg/dL) and compared with those of 111 normotriglyceridemic subjects. Six different rare variants in LPL were found in 13 patients, 2 of which were novel (1 heterozygous missense variant: p.Arg270Gly and 1 frameshift variant: p.Asp308Glyfs*3). Four previously identified heterozygous missense variants in LPL were p.Ala98Thr, p.Leu279Val, p.Leu279Arg, and p.Arg432Thr. Collectively, these rare variants were found only in the hypertriglyceridemic group but not in the control group (13% vs 0%, P hypertriglyceridemia. A common p.Gly185Cys APOA5 variant, in particular, was quite prevalent and potentially contributed to hypertriglyceridemia in this group of patients. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants show common metabolic features in central metabolism irrespective of the underlying auxotrophism

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    André eKriegeskorte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the classical phenotype, Staphylococcus aureus may exhibit the small colony-variant (SCV phenotype, which has been associated with chronic, persistent and/or relapsing infections. SCVs are characterized by common phenotypic features such as slow growth, altered susceptibility to antibiotic agents and pathogenic traits based on increased internalization and intracellular persistence. They show frequently auxotrophiesms mainly based on two different mechanisms: (i deficiencies in electron transport as shown for menadione- and/or hemin-auxotrophs and (ii thymidylate biosynthetic-defective SCVs. To get a comprehensive overview of the metabolic differences between both phenotypes, we compared sets of clinically derived menadione-, hemin- and thymidine-auxotrophic SCVs and stable site directed mutants exhibiting the SCV phenotype with their corresponding isogenic parental strains displaying the normal phenotype. Isotopologue profiling and transcriptional analysis of central genes involved in carbon metabolism, revealed large differences between both phenotypes. Labeling experiments with [U-13C6]glucose showed reduced 13C incorporation into aspartate and glutamate from all SCVs irrespective of the underlying auxotrophism. More specifically, these SCVs showed decreased fractions of 13C2-aspartate and glutamate; 13C3-glutamate was not detected at all in the SCVs. In comparison to the patterns in the corresponding experiment with the classical S. aureus phenotype, this indicated a reduced carbon flux via the citric acid cycle in all SCV phenotypes. Indeed, the aconitase-encoding gene (acnA was found down-regulated in all SCV phenotypes under study. In conclusion, all SCV phenotypes including clinical isolates and site-directed mutants displaying the SCV phenotype were characterized by down-regulation of citric acid cycle activity. The common metabolic features in central carbon metabolism found in all SCVs may explain similar

  10. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants show common metabolic features in central metabolism irrespective of the underlying auxotrophism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, André; Grubmüller, Stephanie; Huber, Claudia; Kahl, Barbara C; von Eiff, Christof; Proctor, Richard A; Peters, Georg; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Becker, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the classical phenotype, Staphylococcus aureus may exhibit the small colony-variant (SCV) phenotype, which has been associated with chronic, persistent and/or relapsing infections. SCVs are characterized by common phenotypic features such as slow growth, altered susceptibility to antibiotic agents and pathogenic traits based on increased internalization and intracellular persistence. They show frequently auxotrophies mainly based on two different mechanisms: (i) deficiencies in electron transport as shown for menadione- and/or hemin-auxotrophs and (ii) thymidylate biosynthetic-defective SCVs. To get a comprehensive overview of the metabolic differences between both phenotypes, we compared sets of clinically derived menadione-, hemin- and thymidine-auxotrophic SCVs and stable site directed mutants exhibiting the SCV phenotype with their corresponding isogenic parental strains displaying the normal phenotype. Isotopologue profiling and transcriptional analysis of central genes involved in carbon metabolism, revealed large differences between both phenotypes. Labeling experiments with [U-(13)C6]glucose showed reduced (13)C incorporation into aspartate and glutamate from all SCVs irrespective of the underlying auxotrophism. More specifically, these SCVs showed decreased fractions of (13)C2-aspartate and glutamate; (13)C3-glutamate was not detected at all in the SCVs. In comparison to the patterns in the corresponding experiment with the classical S. aureus phenotype, this indicated a reduced carbon flux via the citric acid cycle in all SCV phenotypes. Indeed, the aconitase-encoding gene (acnA) was found down-regulated in all SCV phenotypes under study. In conclusion, all SCV phenotypes including clinical isolates and site-directed mutants displaying the SCV phenotype were characterized by down-regulation of citric acid cycle activity. The common metabolic features in central carbon metabolism found in all SCVs may explain similar characteristics of the S

  11. Rare A2ML1 variants confer susceptibility to otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Chiong, Charlotte M; Reyes-Quintos, Ma Rina T; Tantoco, Ma Leah C; Wang, Xin; Acharya, Anushree; Abbe, Izoduwa; Giese, Arnaud P; Smith, Joshua D; Allen, E Kaitlynn; Li, Biao; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Garcia, Marieflor Cristy; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D V; Labra, Patrick John; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa I; Chan, Abner L; Wang, Gao T; Daly, Kathleen A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Patel, Janak A; Riazuddin, Saima; Sale, Michele M; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ahmed, Zubair M; Abes, Generoso T; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-08-01

    A duplication variant within the middle ear-specific gene A2ML1 cosegregates with otitis media in an indigenous Filipino pedigree (LOD score = 7.5 at reduced penetrance) and lies within a founder haplotype that is also shared by 3 otitis-prone European-American and Hispanic-American children but is absent in non-otitis-prone children and >62,000 next-generation sequences. We identified seven additional A2ML1 variants in six otitis-prone children. Collectively, our studies support a role for A2ML1 in the pathophysiology of otitis media.

  12. Rare A2ML1 variants confer susceptibility to otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Chiong, Charlotte M.; Reyes-Quintos, Ma. Rina T.; Tantoco, Ma. Leah C.; Wang, Xin; Acharya, Anushree; Abbe, Izoduwa; Giese, Arnaud P.; Smith, Joshua D.; Allen, E. Kaitlynn; Li, Biao; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Garcia, Marieflor Cristy; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D.V.; Labra, Patrick John; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa I.; Chan, Abner L.; Wang, Gao T.; Daly, Kathleen A.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Patel, Janak A.; Riazuddin, Saima; Sale, Michele M.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Abes, Generoso T.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    A duplication variant within middle-ear-specific gene A2ML1 co-segregates with otitis media in an indigenous Filipino pedigree (LOD score=7.5 at reduced penetrance) and lies within a founder haplotype that is also shared by three otitis-prone European- and Hispanic-American children, but is absent in non-otitis-prone children and >62,000 next-generation sequences. Seven additional A2ML1 variants were identified in six otitis-prone children. Collectively our studies support a role for A2ML1 in the pathophysiology of otitis media. PMID:26121085

  13. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klei Lambertus

    2012-10-01

    of results from genome-wide association studies, demonstrate that a myriad of common variants of very small effect impacts ASD liability.

  14. Gender-Specific Association of ATP2B1 Variants with Susceptibility to Essential Hypertension in the Han Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Qian, Hai-xia; Hu, Su-pei; Liu, Li-ya; Zhou, Mi; Feng, Mei; Su, Jia; Ji, Lin-dan

    2016-01-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) found that several ATP2B1 variants are associated with essential hypertension (EHT). But the "genome-wide significant" ATP2B1 SNPs (rs2681472, rs2681492, rs17249754, and rs1105378) are in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) and are located in the same LD block in Chinese populations. We asked whether there are other SNPs within the ATP2B1 gene associated with susceptibility to EHT in the Han Chinese population. Therefore, we performed a case-control study to investigate the association of seven tagSNPs within the ATP2B1 gene and EHT in the Han Chinese population, and we then analyzed the interaction among different SNPs and nongenetic risk factors for EHT. A total of 902 essential hypertensive cases and 902 normotensive controls were involved in the study. All 7 tagSNPs within the ATP2B1 gene were retrieved from HapMap, and genotyping was performed using the Tm-shift genotyping method. Chi-squared test, logistic regression, and propensity score analysis showed that rs17249754 was associated with EHT, particularly in females. The MDR analysis demonstrated that the interaction of rs2070759, rs17249754, TC, TG, and BMI increased the susceptibility to hypertension. Crossover analysis and stratified analysis indicated that BMI has a major effect on the development of hypertension, while ATP2B1 variants have a minor effect.

  15. Cumulative impact of common genetic variants and other risk factors on colorectal cancer risk in 42 103 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Ballereau, Stephane; Brewster, David H.; Koessler, Thibaud; Pharoah, Paul; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Voelzke, Henry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; von Holst, Susanna; Picelli, Simone; Lindblom, Annika; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Newcomb, Polly A.; Abuli, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Niittymaeki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri; Zanke, Brent; Hudson, Tom; Gallinger, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Walther, Axel; Kerr, David; Lubbe, Steven; Broderick, Peter; Chandler, Ian; Pittman, Alan; Penegar, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. A study was conducted in a large multi-population study to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data combined with other r

  16. Genetic variant rs401681 at 5p15.33 modifies susceptibility to lung cancer but not esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Man Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human 5p15.33 locus contains two well-known genes, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1-like (CLPTM1L genes, which have been implicated in carcinogenesis. A common sequence variant, rs401681, located in an intronic region of CLPTM1L, has been reported to be associated with lung cancer risk based on genome-wide association study. However, subsequent replication studies in diverse populations have yielded inconsistent results. In addition, genetic variants at 5p15.33, including rs401681, have been shown to be involved in the susceptibility to multiple malignancies. Nevertheless, the role of these TERT-CLPTM1L variants in the etiology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC remains unknown. METHODS: We genotyped the rs401681 polymorphism using TaqMan methodology and analyzed its association with the risk of lung cancer and ESCC in a case-control study of 1,479 cancer patients (726 with lung cancer and 753 with ESCC and 860 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses revealed that rs401681 T genotypes were associated with a significantly decreased risk of lung cancer (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.782, 95% CI=0.625-0.978, P=0.031; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.786; 95% CI=0.635-0.972, P=0.026. Stratification analysis by histology type indicated that rs401681 T genotypes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Furthermore, no significant association was observed between rs401681 and the risk of ESCC (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.910, 95% CI=0.734-1.129, P=0.392; TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.897, 95%CI=0.624-1.290, P=0.558; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.908, 95% CI=0.740-1.114, P=0.355. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide further evidence supporting rs401681 as a genetic variant associated with the risk of lung cancer. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the rs401681 variant and the risk of ESCC in a Han Chinese

  17. A germline variant in the TP53 polyadenylation signal confers cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Jonasdottir, Aslaug

    2011-01-01

    To identify new risk variants for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, we performed a genome-wide association study of 16 million SNPs identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders. We imputed genotypes for 41,675 Illumina SNP chip-typed Icelanders and their relatives. In the discovery ...

  18. A germline variant in the TP53 polyadenylation signal confers cancer susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stacey, S.N.; Sulem, P.; Jonasdottir, A.; Masson, G.; Gudmundsson, J.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Magnusson, O.T.; Gudjonsson, S.A.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Nexo, B.A.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Rudnai, P.; Gurzau, E.; Koppova, K.; Hemminki, K.; Corredera, C.; Fuentelsaz, V.; Grasa, P.; Navarrete, S.; Fuertes, F.; Garcia-Prats, M.D.; Sanambrosio, E.; Panadero, A.; Juan, A. de; Garcia, A.; Rivera, F.; Planelles, D.; Soriano, V.; Requena, C.; Aben, K.K.H.; Rossum, M.M. van; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Oort, I.M. van; Spronsen, D.J. van; Schalken, J.A.; Peters, W.H.M.; Helfand, B.T.; Donovan, J.L.; Hamdy, F.C.; Badescu, D.; Codreanu, O.; Jinga, M.; Csiki, I.E.; Constantinescu, V.; Badea, P.; Mates, I.N.; Dinu, D.E.; Constantin, A.; Mates, D.; Kristjansdottir, S.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Jonsson, E.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Einarsson, G.V.; Sigurdsson, F.; Moller, P.H.; Stefansson, T.; Valdimarsson, T.; Johannsson, O.T.; Sigurdsson, H.; Jonsson, T.; Jonasson, J.G.; Tryggvadottir, L.; Rice, T.; Hansen, H.M.; Xiao, Y.; Lachance, D.H.; Kosel, M.L.; Decker, P.A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Johannsdottir, H.; Helgadottir, H.T.; Sigurdsson, A.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Lindblom, A.; Sandler, R.S.; Keku, T.O.; Banasik, K.; Jorgensen, T.; Witte, D.R.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Jinga, V.; Neal, D.E.; Catalona, W.J.; Wrensch, M.; Wiencke, J.; Jenkins, R.B.; Nagore, E.; Vogel, U.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kumar, R.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Olafsson, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    To identify new risk variants for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, we performed a genome-wide association study of 16 million SNPs identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders. We imputed genotypes for 41,675 Illumina SNP chip-typed Icelanders and their relatives. In the discovery pha

  19. Association between the g.296596G > A genetic variant of RELN gene and susceptibility to autism in a Chinese Han population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a childhood neuro-developmental disorder, and Reelin (RELN is an important candidate gene for influencing autism. This study aimed at investigating the influence of genetic variants of the RELN gene on autism susceptibility. In this study, 205 autism patients and 210 healthy controls were recruited and the genetic variants of the RELN gene were genotyped by the created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR method. The influence of genetic variants on autism susceptibility was analyzed by association analysis, and the g.296596G > A genetic variant in exon10 of the RELN gene was detected. The frequencies of allele/genotype in autistic patients were significantly different from those in healthy controls, and a statistically significant association was detected between this genetic variant and autism susceptibility. Our data lead to the inference that the g.296596G > A genetic variant in the RELN gene has a potential influence on autism susceptibility in the Chinese Han population.

  20. Common variants in the HLA-DQ region confer susceptibility to idiopathic achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gockel, Ines; Becker, Jessica; Wouters, Mira M.; Niebisch, Stefan; Gockel, Henning R.; Hess, Timo; Ramonet, David; Zimmermann, Julian; Vigo, Ana Gonzalez; Trynka, Gosia; de Leon, Antonio Ruiz; de la Serna, Julio Perez; Urcelay, Elena; Magadi Gopalaiah, Vinod Kumar; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Drescher, Daniel; Kneist, Werner; Marquardt, Jens U.; Galle, Peter R.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Annese, Vito; Latiano, Anna; Fumagalli, Uberto; Laghi, Luigi; Cuomo, Rosario; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Mueller, Michaela; Eckardt, Alexander J.; Tack, Jan; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Mangold, Elisabeth; Heilmann, Stefanie; Kiesslich, Ralf; von Rahden, Burkhard H. A.; Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Schulz, Henning G.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heneka, Michael T.; Lang, Hauke; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Noethen, Markus M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Knapp, Michael; Schumacher, Johannes

    Idiopathic achalasia is characterized by a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax due to a loss of neurons in the myenteric plexus(1,2). This ultimately leads to massive dilatation and an irreversibly impaired megaesophagus. We performed a genetic association study in 1,068 achalasia

  1. Common variant rs9939609 in gene FTO confers risk to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO has been associated with obesity, especially the common variant rs9939609. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine-metabolic disorder and over 50% of patients are overweight/obese. Thus FTO is a potential candidate gene for PCOS but their relationship is confusing and remains to be clarified in different population with a large sample size. METHOD: This study was performed adopting a two-stage design by genotyping SNP rs9939609. The first set comprise of 741 PCOS and 704 control subjects, with data from our previous GWAS. The second phase of replication study was performed among another independent group of 2858 PCOS and 2358 control subjects using TaqMan-MGB probe assay. All subjects are from Han Chinese. RESULTS: The less meaningful association of FTO rs9939609 and PCOS discovered in GWAS (P = 2.47E-03, was further confirmed in the replication study (P = 1.86E-09. Using meta-analysis, the P-meta value has reached 6.89E-12, over-exceeding the genome-wide association level of 5.00E-8. By combination, the P value was 1.26E-11 and after BMI adjustment it remained significant(P = 1.82E-06. To further elucidate whether this association is resulted from obesity or PCOS per se, the samples were divided into two groups-obese and non-obese PCOS, and the results were still positive in obese group (P obese = 5.81E-05, OR = 1.55, as well as in non-obese PCOS group (P non-obese = 7.06E-04, OR = 1.28. CONCLUSION: Variant rs9939609 in FTO is associated with PCOS in Chinese women, not only in obese PCOS subjects, but also in non-obese cases.

  2. Association between Common Genetic Variants and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Risk in a Chinese Han Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Yuan, Yi; Yang, Hua; Li, Jingjie; Feng, Tian; Ouyang, Yongri; Jin, Tianbo; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinopathies affecting 5-7% of reproductive age women worldwide. The aim of our study was to explore the PCOS-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations between common genetic variants and PCOS risk in a Han Chinese women population. Methods: In this case-control study, 285 Chinese Han women aged 28.50±6.858 years with PCOS and 299 controls of a mean age of 32.66±7.018 years were compared. We selected recently published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) which identified several genetic loci in PCOS. All the SNPs were genotyped by Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. Associations between the gene and the risk of PCOS were tested using various genetic models by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and Plink. Results: We found that rs705702 in the RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS (odds ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.87, p=0.011) and increased the PCOS risk. The genotypic model analysis also showed that rs705702 was associated with PCOS risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SNPs rs705702 in gene RAB5B/SUOX was associated with PCOS in Han Chinese women. PMID:27217259

  3. Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J C

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer's disease susceptibility variants in the MS4A6A gene are associated with altered levels of MS4A6A expression in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lee, Sang Hyuck; Lunnon, Katie; Keohane, Aoife; Powell, John; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Furney, Simon; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela

    2014-02-01

    An increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) has previously been found to be associated with variants at the MS4A6A locus. We sought to identify which genes and transcripts in this region have altered expression in AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are influenced by the AD risk variant(s), as a first step to understanding the molecular basis of AD susceptibility at this locus. Common variants located within highly expressed MS4A6A transcripts were significantly associated with AD and MS4A6A expression levels in blood from MCI and AD subjects (p < 0.05, rs610932, rs7232, rs583791). More copies of the protective (minor) allele were associated with lower MS4A6A expression of each transcript (e.g., p = 0.019; rs610932-total MS4A6A). Furthermore, in heterozygous AD subjects, relative expression of the protective allele of V4-MS4A6A transcripts was lower (p < 0.008). Irrespective of genotype, MS4A6A transcripts were increased in blood from people with AD (p < 0.003), whereas lower expression of full length V1-MS4A6A (p = 0.002) and higher expression of V4-MS4A6A (p = 1.8 × 10(-4)) were observed in MCI, relative to elderly controls. The association between genotype and expression was less consistent in brain, although BA9 did have a similar genotype association with V4-MS4A6A transcripts as in blood. MS4A6A transcripts were widely expressed in tissues and cells, with the exception of V4-MS4A6A, which was not expressed in neuronal cells. Together these results suggest that high levels of MS4A6A in emerging AD pathology are detrimental. Persons with MCI may lower MS4A6A expression to minimize detrimental disease associated MS4A6A activity. However, those with the susceptibility allele appear unable to decrease expression sufficiently, which may explain their increased risk for developing AD. Inhibiting MS4A6A may therefore promote a more neuroprotective phenotype, although further work is needed to establish whether this is the case.

  5. Forkhead box C2 promoter variant c.-512C>T is associated with increased susceptibility to chronic venous diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Surendran

    Full Text Available Chronic venous disease (CVD is one of the most prevalent yet underrated disorders worldwide. High heritability estimates of CVD indicate prominent genetic components in its etiology and pathology. Mutations in human forkhead box C2 (FoxC2 gene are strongly associated with valve failure in saphenous and deep veins of lower extremities. We explored the association of genetic variants of FoxC2 as well as FoxC2 mRNA and protein expression levels with CVD of lower limbs. We systematically sequenced the single coding exon, 5' and 3' flanking regions of FoxC2 gene in 754 study subjects which includes 382 patients with CVD and 372 healthy subjects. Four novel and three reported polymorphisms were identified in our cohort. Three variants in 5' flanking region and one in 3' flanking region of FoxC2 gene were significantly associated with CVD risk. FoxC2 mRNA in vein tissues from 22 patients was 4±1.42 fold increased compared to saphenous veins from 20 normal subjects (pT (rs34221221: C>T variant which is located in the FoxC2 putative promoter region was further analyzed. Functional analysis of c.-512C>T revealed increased mRNA and protein expression in patients with homozygous TT genotype compared to heterozygous CT and wild CC genotypes. Luciferase assay indicated higher transcriptional activity of mutant compared to wild genotype of this variant. These findings suggested that c.-512C>T variant of FoxC2 was strongly associated with susceptibility to CVD and also that this variant resulted in FoxC2 overexpression. To obtain a mechanistic insight into the role of upregulated FoxC2 in varicosities, we overexpressed FoxC2 in venous endothelial cells and observed elevated expression of arterial markers Dll4 and Hey2 and downregulation of venous marker COUP-TFII. Our study indicates altered FoxC2-Notch signaling in saphenous vein wall remodeling in patients with varicose veins.

  6. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  7. Rare Variants in the TREX1 Gene and Susceptibility to Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Barizzone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TREX1 (DNase III is an exonuclease involved in response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were previously observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS. We performed a mutational analysis of the TREX1 gene on three autoimmune diseases: SLE (210 patients and SS (58 patients, to confirm a TREX1 involvement in the Italian population, and systemic sclerosis (SSc, 150 patients because it shares similarities with SLE (presence of antinuclear antibodies and connective tissue damage. We observed 7 variations; two of these are novel nonsynonymous variants (p.Glu198Lys and p.Met232Val. They were detected in one SS and in one SSc patient, respectively, and in none of the 200 healthy controls typed in this study and of the 1712 published controls. In silico analysis predicts a possibly damaging role on protein function for both variants. The other 5 variations are synonymous and only one of them is novel (p.Pro48Pro. This study contributes to the demonstration that TREX1 is involved in autoimmune diseases and proposes that the spectrum of involved autoimmune diseases can be broader and includes SSc. We do not confirm a role of TREX1 variants in SLE.

  8. BANK1 functional variants are associated with susceptibility to diffuse systemic sclerosis in Caucasians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda, B.; Gourh, P.; Broen, J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Simeon, C.; Ortego-Centeno, N.; Vonk, M.C.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Riemekasten, G.; Hunzelmann, N.; Hesselstrand, R.; Tan, F.K.; Reveille, J.D.; Assassi, S.; Garcia-Hernandez, F.J.; Carreira, P.; Camps, M.; Fernandez-Nebro, A.; Garcia de la Pena Lefebvre, P.; Nearney, T.; Hilda, D.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Airo, P.; Beretta, L.; Scorza, R.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Mayes, M.D.; Arnett, F.C.; Martin, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible association of the BANK1 gene with genetic susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc) and its subphenotypes. METHODS: A large multicentre case-control association study including 2380 patients with SSc and 3270 healthy controls from six independent case-control

  9. Common variants near MC4R in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits and energy expenditure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kring, Sofia Inez Iqbal; Holst, C; Toubro, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Common variants near melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) have been related to fatness and type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of rs17782313 and rs17700633 in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits, weight development and energy expenditure.......Common variants near melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) have been related to fatness and type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of rs17782313 and rs17700633 in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits, weight development and energy expenditure....

  10. Common genetic variants in pre-microRNAs are associated with risk of coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.L.; Ye, Y.; Qian, H.Y.; Song, Z.F.; Jia, X.M.; Zhang, Z.D.; Zhou, J.W.; Ni, C.H. [Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China). Dept. of Occupational Medicien & Environmental Health

    2010-01-15

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small noncoding RNA molecules thought to be involved in biological functions, including embryonic development, chromosome architecture, cell proliferation and apoptosis. We hypothesized that common variants in the miRNAs are associated with risk of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). In a case-control study of 496 CWP patients and 513 control subjects frequency matched by exposure years and work types, we genotyped four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs2910164, rs2292832, rs11614913 and rs3746444) in pre-miRNAs (miR-146a, miR-149, miR196a2 and miR-499) and assessed the associations with risk of CWP. A significantly increased risk of CWP was found for the miR-149 rs2292832 TT genotype (odds ratio (OR), 1.31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.69), compared with the CT/CC genotypes, and this increased risk was evident among subgroups of those aged {ge} 68 years (OR=1.52, 95% CI=1.03-2.25), dust exposure {ge} 26 years (OR=1.42, 95% CI=1.04-1.93) and ever smokers (OR=1.48, 95% CI=1.00-2.20). Furthermore, a significant association was observed between the genotypes and patients with stages II and III (OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.05-2.14 for stage II, and OR=3.33, 95% CI=1.67-6.65 for stage III). These results suggest that miR-149 rs2292832 polymorphism is involved in susceptibility to developing CWP.

  11. Variants of C-C motif chemokine 22 (CCL22 are associated with susceptibility to atopic dermatitis: case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomitsu Hirota

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory skin disease caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. AD is characterized by the local infiltration of T helper type 2 (Th2 cells. Recent clinical studies have shown important roles of the Th2 chemokines, CCL22 and CCL17 in the pathogenesis of AD. To investigate whether polymorphisms of the CCL22 gene affect the susceptibility to AD, we conducted association studies and functional studies of the related variants. We first resequenced the CCL22 gene and found a total of 39 SNPs. We selected seven tag SNPs in the CCL22 gene, and conducted association studies using two independent Japanese populations (1(st population, 916 cases and 1,032 controls; 2(nd population 1,034 cases and 1,004 controls. After the association results were combined by inverse variance method, we observed a significant association at rs4359426 (meta-analysis, combined P = 9.6×10⁻⁶; OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.85. Functional analysis revealed that the risk allele of rs4359426 contributed to higher expression levels of CCL22 mRNA. We further examined the allelic differences in the binding of nuclear proteins by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The signal intensity of the DNA-protein complex derived from the G allele of rs223821, which was in absolute LD with rs4359426, was higher than that from the A allele. Although further functional analyses are needed, it is likely that related variants play a role in susceptibility to AD in a gain-of-function manner. Our findings provide a new insight into the etiology and pathogenesis of AD.

  12. Variants of C-C motif chemokine 22 (CCL22) are associated with susceptibility to atopic dermatitis: case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Tomomitsu; Saeki, Hidehisa; Tomita, Kaori; Tanaka, Shota; Ebe, Kouji; Sakashita, Masafumi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Miyatake, Akihiko; Doi, Satoru; Enomoto, Tadao; Hizawa, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Tohru; Masuko, Hironori; Sasaki, Takashi; Ebihara, Tamotsu; Amagai, Masayuki; Esaki, Hitokazu; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Noguchi, Emiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kubo, Michiaki; Tamari, Mayumi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. AD is characterized by the local infiltration of T helper type 2 (Th2) cells. Recent clinical studies have shown important roles of the Th2 chemokines, CCL22 and CCL17 in the pathogenesis of AD. To investigate whether polymorphisms of the CCL22 gene affect the susceptibility to AD, we conducted association studies and functional studies of the related variants. We first resequenced the CCL22 gene and found a total of 39 SNPs. We selected seven tag SNPs in the CCL22 gene, and conducted association studies using two independent Japanese populations (1(st) population, 916 cases and 1,032 controls; 2(nd) population 1,034 cases and 1,004 controls). After the association results were combined by inverse variance method, we observed a significant association at rs4359426 (meta-analysis, combined P = 9.6×10⁻⁶; OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.85). Functional analysis revealed that the risk allele of rs4359426 contributed to higher expression levels of CCL22 mRNA. We further examined the allelic differences in the binding of nuclear proteins by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The signal intensity of the DNA-protein complex derived from the G allele of rs223821, which was in absolute LD with rs4359426, was higher than that from the A allele. Although further functional analyses are needed, it is likely that related variants play a role in susceptibility to AD in a gain-of-function manner. Our findings provide a new insight into the etiology and pathogenesis of AD.

  13. Inflammation gene variants and susceptibility to albuminuria in the U.S. population: analysis in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1991-1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Man-huei

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Albuminuria, a common marker of kidney damage, serves as an important predictive factor for the progression of kidney disease and for the development of cardiovascular disease. While the underlying etiology is unclear, chronic, low-grade inflammation is a suspected key factor. Genetic variants within genes involved in inflammatory processes may, therefore, contribute to the development of albuminuria. Methods We evaluated 60 polymorphisms within 27 inflammatory response genes in participants from the second phase (1991-1994 of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, a population-based and nationally representative survey of the United States. Albuminuria was evaluated as logarithm-transformed albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR, as ACR ≥ 30 mg/g, and as ACR above sex-specific thresholds. Multivariable linear regression and haplotype trend analyses were conducted to test for genetic associations in 5321 participants aged 20 years or older. Differences in allele and genotype distributions among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans were tested in additive and codominant genetic models. Results Variants in several genes were found to be marginally associated (uncorrected P value IL1B (rs1143623 among Mexican Americans remained significantly associated with increased odds, while IL1B (rs1143623, CRP (rs1800947 and NOS3 (rs2070744 were significantly associated with ACR ≥ 30 mg/g in this population (additive models, FDR-P TNF rs1800750, which failed the test for Hardy-Weinberg proportions in this population. Haplotypes within MBL2, CRP, ADRB2, IL4R, NOS3, and VDR were significantly associated (FDR-P Conclusions Our findings suggest a small role for genetic variation within inflammation-related genes to the susceptibility to albuminuria. Additional studies are needed to further assess whether genetic variation in these, and untested, inflammation genes alter the

  14. Susceptibility of common alder (Alnus glutinosa) seeds and seedlings to Phytophthora alni and other Phytophthora species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, M. M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Phytophthora alni is a highly destructive host specific pathogen to alders (Alnus spp.) spreading all over Europe. Recently this pathogen has been reported to cause diseases in common alder (Alnus glutinosa) in Spain. Seeds and seedlings of A. glutinosa were tested in vitro for their susceptibility to alder Phytophthora and other Phytophthora species. Isolates of P. alni ssp. alni, P. cinnamomi, P. citrophthora, P. nicotianae and P. palmivora were used in the experiments. Seeds and seedlings were inoculated with a zoospore suspension and uniform mycelial blocks of agar of the Phytophthora species. Susceptibility was calculated in terms of pathogen virulence on seed germination and seedling mortality 42 and 67 days after inoculation respectively. Seed germination and seedling mortality rates varied differently among the isolates used. Results implied that common alder and its seeds and seedlings are at risk to be infected by P. alni. In addition, other Phytophthora species are able to infect this kind of material showing their relative host non-specificity. This is one important finding concerning alder regeneration in infected areas, and the possibility of disease spread on this plant material. (Author) 42 refs.

  15. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiologic studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P<5×10−8 for each) to examine the role of triglycerides on risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides, and show that the direction and magnitude of both are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong magnitude of association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a polymorphism's strength of effect on triglycerides is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD. PMID:24097064

  17. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Ting

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC/β-catenin (CTNNB1 genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001. After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer.

  18. Association of common variants in ERBB4 with congenital left ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Kim L; Zender, Gloria A; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M; Seagraves, Nikki J; Fernbach, Susan D; Zapata, Gladys; Lewin, Mark; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Belmont, John W

    2011-03-01

    The left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) defects aortic valve stenosis (AVS), coarctation of the aorta (COA), and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) represent an embryologically related group of congenital cardiovascular malformations. They are common and cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Prior evidence suggests a strong genetic component in their causation. We selected NRG1, ERBB3, and ERBB4 of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as candidate genes for investigation of association with LVOT defects based on the importance of this pathway in cardiac development and the phenotypes in knockout mouse models. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed on 343 affected case-parent trios of European ancestry. We identified a specific haplotype in intron 3 of ERBB4 that was positively associated with the combined LVOT defects phenotype (p=0.0005) and in each anatomic defect AVS, COA, and HLHS separately. Mutation screening of individuals with an LVOT defect failed to identify a coding sequence or splice site change in ERBB4. RT-PCR on lymphoblastoid cells from LVOT subjects did not show altered splice variant ratios among those homozygous for the associated haplotype. These results suggest ERBB4 is associated with LVOT defects. Further replication will be required in separate cohorts to confirm the consistency of the observed association. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-11-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphism's effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.

  20. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H.; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F.; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lee, James J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Medland, Sarah E.; Miller, Michael B.; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J.; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G.; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H.; Starr, John M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ward, Mary E.; Wright, Margaret J.; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Koellinger, Philipp D.

    2014-01-01

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  1. Estimating the proportion of variation in susceptibility to schizophrenia captured by common SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, S Hong; DeCandia, Teresa R; Ripke, Stephan;

    2012-01-01

    of schizophrenia is the same in males and females, and that a disproportionate proportion of variation is attributable to a set of 2,725 genes expressed in the central nervous system (CNS; P = 7.6 × 10(-8)). These results are consistent with a polygenic genetic architecture and imply more individual SNP......Schizophrenia is a complex disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Using 9,087 affected individuals, 12,171 controls and 915,354 imputed SNPs from the Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Consortium (PGC-SCZ), we estimate that 23% (s.e. = 1......%) of variation in liability to schizophrenia is captured by SNPs. We show that a substantial proportion of this variation must be the result of common causal variants, that the variance explained by each chromosome is linearly related to its length (r = 0.89, P = 2.6 × 10(-8)), that the genetic basis...

  2. A common genetic variant within SCN10A modulates cardiac SCN5A expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Malou; Smemo, Scott; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Arnolds, David E; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Klous, Petra; McKean, David; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D; Moosmann, Julia; Toka, Okan; Yang, Xinan H; Koopmann, Tamara T; Adriaens, Michiel E; Bezzina, Connie R; de Laat, Wouter; Seidman, Christine; Seidman, J G; Christoffels, Vincent M; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Barnett, Phil; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2014-01-01

    Variants in SCN10A, which encodes a voltage-gated sodium channel, are associated with alterations of cardiac conduction parameters and the cardiac rhythm disorder Brugada syndrome; however, it is unclear how SCN10A variants promote dysfunctional cardiac conduction. Here we showed by high-resolution

  3. A common variant in the PTPN11 gene contributes to the risk of tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodship, Judith A; Hall, Darroch; Topf, Ana; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Griffin, Helen; Rahman, Thahira J; Glen, Elise; Tan, Huay; Palomino Doza, Julian; Relton, Caroline L; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Cosgrove, Catherine; Brook, David; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Bu'Lock, Frances A; O'Sullivan, John; Stuart, A Graham; Parsons, Jonathan; Cordell, Heather J; Keavney, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the commonest cyanotic form of congenital heart disease. In 80% of cases, TOF behaves as a complex genetic condition exhibiting significant heritability. As yet, no common genetic variants influencing TOF risk have been robustly identified. Two hundred and seven haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in 22 candidate genes were genotyped in a test cohort comprising 362 nonsyndromic British white patients with TOF together with 717 unaffected parents of patients and 183 unrelated healthy controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with suggestive evidence of association in the test cohort (P<0.01) were taken forward for genotyping in an independent replication cohort comprising 392 cases of TOF, 218 unaffected parents of patients, and 1319 controls. Significant association was observed for 1 single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11066320 in the PTPN11 gene, in both the test and the replication cohort. Genotype at rs11066320 was associated with a per-allele odds ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 1.52; P=2.9 × 10(-6)) in the total cohort of TOF cases and controls; this remained highly significant after Bonferroni correction for 207 analyses (corrected P=0.00061). Genotype at rs11066320 was responsible for a population-attributable risk of TOF of approximately 10%. Common variation in the linkage disequilibrium block including the PTPN11 gene contributes to the risk of nonsyndromic TOF. Rare mutations in PTPN11 are known to cause the autosomal dominant condition Noonan syndrome, which includes congenital heart disease, by upregulating Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Our results suggest a role for milder perturbations in PTPN11 function in sporadic, nonsyndromic congenital heart disease.

  4. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  5. Ethanol and reactive species increase basal sequence heterogeneity of hepatitis C virus and produce variants with reduced susceptibility to antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seronello, Scott; Montanez, Jessica; Presleigh, Kristen; Barlow, Miriam; Park, Seung Bum; Choi, Jinah

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibits a high level of genetic variability, and variants with reduced susceptibility to antivirals can occur even before treatment begins. In addition, alcohol decreases efficacy of antiviral therapy and increases sequence heterogeneity of HCV RNA but how ethanol affects HCV sequence is unknown. Ethanol metabolism and HCV infection increase the level of reactive species that can alter cell metabolism, modify signaling, and potentially act as mutagen to the viral RNA. Therefore, we investigated whether ethanol and reactive species affected the basal sequence variability of HCV RNA in hepatocytes. Human hepatoma cells supporting a continuous replication of genotype 1b HCV RNA (Con1, AJ242652) were exposed to ethanol, acetaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, or L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) that decreases intracellular glutathione as seen in patients. Then, NS5A region was sequenced and compared with genotype 1b HCV sequences in the database. Ethanol and BSO elevated nucleotide and amino acid substitution rates of HCV RNA by 4-18 folds within 48 hrs which were accompanied by oxidative RNA damage. Iron chelator and glutathione ester decreased both RNA damage and mutation rates. Furthermore, infectious HCV and HCV core gene were sufficient to induce oxidative RNA damage even in the absence of ethanol or BSO. Interestingly, the dn/ds ratio and percentage of sites undergoing positive selection increased with ethanol and BSO, resulting in an increased detection of NS5A variants with reduced susceptibility to interferon alpha, cyclosporine, and ribavirin and others implicated in immune tolerance and modulation of viral replication. Therefore, alcohol is likely to synergize with virus-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress to modulate the basal mutation rate of HCV. Positive selection induced by alcohol and reactive species may contribute to antiviral resistance.

  6. Resistance-Associated NS5A Variants of Hepatitis C Virus Are Susceptible to Interferon-Based Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Itakura

    Full Text Available The presence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs of hepatitis C virus (HCV attenuates the efficacy of direct acting antivirals (DAAs. The objective of this study was to characterize the susceptibility of RAVs to interferon-based therapy.Direct and deep sequencing were performed to detect Y93H RAV in the NS5A region. Twenty nine genotype 1b patients with detectable RAV at baseline were treated by a combination of simeprevir, pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The longitudinal changes in the proportion of Y93H RAV during therapy and at breakthrough or relapse were determined.By direct sequencing, Y93H RAV became undetectable or decreased in proportion at an early time point during therapy (within 7 days in 57% of patients with both the Y93H variant and wild type virus at baseline when HCV RNA was still detectable. By deep sequencing, the proportion of Y93H RAV against Y93 wild type was 52.7% (5.8%- 97.4% at baseline which significantly decreased to 29.7% (0.16%- 98.3% within 7 days of initiation of treatment (p = 0.023. The proportion of Y93H RAV was reduced in 21 of 29 cases (72.4% and a marked reduction of more than 10% was observed in 14 cases (48.7%. HCV RNA reduction was significantly greater for Y93H RAV (-3.65±1.3 logIU/mL/day than the Y93 wild type (-3.35±1.0 logIU/mL/day (p<0.001.Y93H RAV is more susceptible to interferon-based therapy than the Y93 wild type.

  7. A sequence variant at 4p16.3 confers susceptibility to urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Soren; Vermeulen, Sita H; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stacey, Simon N; Gudmundsson, Julius; Zanon, Carlo; Kostic, Jelena; Masson, Gisli; Bjarnason, Hjordis; Palsson, Stefan T; Skarphedinsson, Oskar B; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Witjes, J Alfred; Grotenhuis, Anne J; Verhaegh, Gerald W; Bishop, D Timothy; Sak, Sei Chung; Choudhury, Ananya; Elliott, Faye; Barrett, Jennifer H; Hurst, Carolyn D; de Verdier, Petra J; Ryk, Charlotta; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Vineis, Paolo; Polidoro, Silvia; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Campagna, Marcello; Placidi, Donatella; Arici, Cecilia; Zeegers, Maurice P; Kellen, Eliane; Gutierrez, Berta Saez; Sanz-Velez, José I; Sanchez-Zalabardo, Manuel; Valdivia, Gabriel; Garcia-Prats, Maria D; Hengstler, Jan G; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Dietrich, Holger; Ophoff, Roel A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Alexiusdottir, Kristin; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Geirsson, Gudmundur; Nikulasson, Sigfus; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Kong, Augustine; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir; Mungan, N Aydin; Lindblom, Annika; van Es, Michael A; Porru, Stefano; Buntinx, Frank; Golka, Klaus; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Matullo, Giuseppe; Steineck, Gunnar; Kiltie, Anne E; Aben, Katja K H; Jonsson, Eirikur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Knowles, Margaret A; Rafnar, Thorunn; Stefansson, Kari

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we reported germline DNA variants associated with risk of urinary bladder cancer (UBC) in Dutch and Icelandic subjects. Here we expanded the Icelandic sample set and tested the top 20 markers from the combined analysis in several European case-control sample sets, with a total of 4,739 cases and 45,549 controls. The T allele of rs798766 on 4p16.3 was found to associate with UBC (odds ratio = 1.24, P = 9.9 × 10−12). rs798766 is located in an intron of TACC3, 70 kb from FGFR3, which often harbors activating somatic mutations in low-grade, noninvasive UBC. Notably, rs798766[T] shows stronger association with low-grade and low-stage UBC than with more aggressive forms of the disease and is associated with higher risk of recurrence in low-grade stage Ta tumors. The frequency of rs798766[T] is higher in Ta tumors that carry an activating mutation in FGFR3 than in Ta tumors with wild-type FGFR3. Our results show a link between germline variants, somatic mutations of FGFR3 and risk of UBC. PMID:20348956

  8. rs5888 variant of SCARB1 gene is a possible susceptibility factor for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Seddon, Johanna M; Richard, Florence; Reynolds, Robyn; Leveziel, Nicolas; Benlian, Pascale; Borel, Patrick; Feingold, Josué; Munnich, Arnold; Soubrane, Gisèle; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Souied, Eric H

    2009-10-05

    Major genetic factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have recently been identified as susceptibility risk factors, including variants in the CFH gene and the ARMS2 LOC387715/HTRA1locus. Our purpose was to perform a case-control study in two populations among individuals who did not carry risk variants for CFHY402H and LOC387715 A69S (ARMS2), called "study" individuals, in order to identify new genetic risk factors. Based on a candidate gene approach, we analyzed SNP rs5888 of the SCARB1 gene, coding for SRBI, which is involved in the lipid and lutein pathways. This study was conducted in a French series of 1241 AMD patients and 297 controls, and in a North American series of 1257 patients with advanced AMD and 1732 controls. Among these individuals, we identified 61 French patients, 77 French controls, 85 North American patients and 338 North American controls who did not carry the CFH nor ARMS2 polymorphisms. An association between AMD and the SCARB1 gene was seen among the study subjects. The genotypic distribution of the rs5888 polymorphism was significantly different between cases and controls in the French population (plutein and vitamin E) metabolism in AMD.

  9. Diagnostic value of post-heparin lipase testing in detecting common genetic variants in the LPL and LIPC genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Hoek (Mandy); G.M. Dallinga-Thie (Geesje); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPost-heparin lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase activities are used to identify primary disorders of triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol metabolism. Their ability to identify common variants in the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) genes is unclear. To investigate the ab

  10. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin; Warren, Helen; Cook, James P.; Manning, Alisa K.; Grarup, Niels; Sim, Xueling; Barnes, Daniel R.; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R.; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Rasheed, Asif; Samue, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Jackson, Anne U.; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J.; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Stancakova, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P.; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S.; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A.; Groves, Christopher J.; Rayner, N. William; Neville, Matt J.; Robertson, Neil R.; Yiorkas, Andrianos M.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M.; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P.; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V.; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian'an; Scott, Robert A.; Harris, Sarah E.; Liewald, David C. M.; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Goran; Renstrom, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Felix, Janine F.; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstign, Anders; Reilly, Dermot F.; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas F.; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh S.; Highland, Heather M.; Justice, Anne E.; Marouli, Eirini; Lindstrom, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W.; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Mannisto, Satu; Deary, Ian J.; Starr, John M.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J.; Brown, Morris J.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Connell, John M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J.; Esko, Tonu; Magi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Numans, Mattijs E.; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva R. B.; Korpi-Hyovalti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L.; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex S. F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Karajamaki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S.; Majmnder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I.; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V.; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrieres, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J.; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M.; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D.; Nordestgaard, Borge Gronne; Caulfield, Mark J.; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saleheen, Danish; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Danesh, John; Wain, Louise V.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low frequency and common genetic variants in up to 192

  11. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin; Warren, Helen; Cook, James P; Manning, Alisa K; Grarup, Niels; Sim, Xueling; Barnes, Daniel R; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Stančáková, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A; Groves, Christopher J; Rayner, N William; Neville, Matt J; Robertson, Neil R; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton J M; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian'an; Scott, Robert A; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C M; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Felix, Janine F; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Reilly, Dermot F; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas F; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh S; Highland, Heather M; Justice, Anne E; Marouli, Eirini; Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D; Jousilahti, Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Brown, Morris J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Connell, John M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I W; Numans, Mattijs E; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva R B; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Käräjämäki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrières, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Caulfield, Mark J; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J; Saleheen, Danish; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Danesh, John; Wain, Louise V; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to 192

  12. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surendran, P. (Praveen); F. Drenos (Fotios); R. Young (Robin); H. Warren (Helen); Cook, J.P. (James P.); A.K. Manning (Alisa); N. Grarup (Niels); X. Sim (Xueling); D. Barnes (Daniel); H.E. Witkowska (Ewa); J.R. Staley (James R.); V. Tragante (Vinicius); T. Tukiainen (Taru); H. Yaghootkar (Hanieh); Masca, N. (Nicholas); C.M. Freitag (Christine); T. Ferreira (Teresa); O. Giannakopoulou (Olga); Tinker, A. (Andrew); M. Harakalova (Magdalena); E. Mihailov (Evelin); Liu, C. (Chunyu); A. Kraja (Aldi); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); A. Rasheed (Asif); M. Samuel (Maria); W. Zhao (Wei); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Narisu (Narisu); A.J. Swift (Amy); L. Southam (Lorraine); J. Marten (Jonathan); J.R. Huyghe (Jeroen R.); A. Stancáková (Alena); C. Fava (Cristiano); Ohlsson, T. (Therese); A. Matchan (Angela); K. Stirrups (Kathy); J. Bork-Jensen (Jette); A.P. Gjesing (Anette); Kontto, J. (Jukka); M. Perola (Markus); S. Shaw-Hawkins (Sue); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); Zhang, H. (He); L.A. Donnelly (Louise); C.J. Groves (Christopher); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); M.J. Neville (Matthew); N.R. Robertson (Neil); Yiorkas, A.M. (Andrianos M.); K.H. Herzig; E. Kajantie (Eero); W. Zhang (Weihua); S.M. Willems (Sara); L. Lannfelt (Lars); G. Malerba (Giovanni); N. Soranzo (Nicole); E. Trabetti (Elisabetta); N. Verweij (Niek); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); Vergnaud, A.-C. (Anne-Claire); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); Poveda, A. (Alaitz); T.V. Varga (Tibor V.); M. Caslake (Muriel); A.J.M. De Craen (Anton J. M.); S. Trompet (Stella); J. Luan (Jian'An); R.A. Scott (Robert); S.E. Harris (Sarah); D.C. Liewald (David C.); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); C. Menni (Cristina); A.-E. Farmaki (Aliki-Eleni); G. Hallmans (Göran); F. Renström (Frida); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); Hassinen, M. (Maija); S. Burgess (Stephen); Vasan, R.S. (Ramachandran S.); J.F. Felix (Janine); Uria-Nickelsen, M. (Maria); A. Mälarstig (Anders); Reilly, D.F. (Dermot F.); Hoek, M. (Maarten); Vogt, T.F. (Thomas F.); H. Lin (Honghuang); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); M. Traylor (Matthew); H.S. Markus (Hugh); H. Highland (Heather); A.E. Justice (Anne); E. Marouli (Eirini); J. Lindström (Jaana); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. Komulainen (Pirjo); T.A. Lakka (Timo); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); O. Polasek (Ozren); I. Rudan (Igor); Rolandsson, O. (Olov); P.W. Franks (Paul); G.V. Dedoussis (George); T.D. Spector (Timothy); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); S. Männistö (Satu); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); J.M. Starr (John); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.J. Wareham (Nick); M.J. Brown (Morris); A. Dominiczak (Anna); Connell, J.M. (John M.); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); N. Sattar (Naveed); I. Ford (Ian); Packard, C.J. (Chris J.); T. Esko (Tõnu); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Metspalu (Andres); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); Van Der Meer, P. (Peter); P. van der Harst (Pim); G. Gambaro (Giovanni); Ingelsson, E. (Erik); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); M.E. Numans (Mattijs); I. Brandslund (Ivan); Christensen, C. (Cramer); Petersen, E.R.B. (Eva R. B.); E. Korpi-Hyövälti (Eeva); H. Oksa (Heikki); J.C. Chambers (John); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); S. Franks (Steve); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); Linneberg, A. (Allan); T. Skaaby (Tea); Thuesen, B. (Betina); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); K. Hveem (Kristian); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); L. Groop (Leif); Käräjämäki, A. (Annemari); A. Palotie (Aarno); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); D.S. Alam (Dewan S.); Majumder, A.A.S. (Abdulla Al Shafi); E. di Angelantonio (Emanuele); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); N.R. Poulter (Neil); A. Stanton (Alice); P. Sever (Peter); P. Amouyel (Philippe); D. Arveiler (Dominique); Blankenberg, S. (Stefan); J. Ferrieres (Jean); F. Kee (Frank); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); G. Veronesi (Giovanni); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); P. Elliott (Paul); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); O. Melander (Olle); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); D. Porteous (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); G. Scotland (Generation); F.S. Collins (Francis); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); T. Hansen (T.); O. Pedersen (Oluf); M. Boehnke (Michael); H.M. Stringham (Heather); R. Frossard; C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); M.D. Tobin (Martin); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); M. Caulfield (Mark); A. Mahajan (Anubha); A.P. Morris (Andrew); Tomaszewski, M. (Maciej); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); Saleheen, D. (Danish); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); J. Danesh (John); Wain, L.V. (Louise V.); A.S. Butterworth (Adam); Howson, J.M.M. (Joanna M. M.); P. Munroe (Patricia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHigh blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants

  13. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    OpenAIRE

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma,Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.; Bray, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    White individuals have a high frequency of the common PAR4 gene (F2RL3) variant Ala120; blacks have a high frequency of Thr120.PAR4 Thr120 induces greater signaling and is associated with greater platelet aggregation and reduced inhibition by a PAR4 antagonist.

  14. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin; Warren, Helen; Cook, James P.; Manning, Alisa K.; Grarup, Niels; Sim, Xueling; Barnes, Daniel R.; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R.; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Rasheed, Asif; Samue, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Jackson, Anne U.; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J.; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Stancakova, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P.; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S.; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A.; Groves, Christopher J.; Rayner, N. William; Neville, Matt J.; Robertson, Neil R.; Yiorkas, Andrianos M.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M.; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P.; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V.; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian'an; Scott, Robert A.; Harris, Sarah E.; Liewald, David C. M.; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Goran; Renstrom, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Felix, Janine F.; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstign, Anders; Reilly, Dermot F.; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas F.; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh S.; Highland, Heather M.; Justice, Anne E.; Marouli, Eirini; Lindstrom, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W.; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Mannisto, Satu; Deary, Ian J.; Starr, John M.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J.; Brown, Morris J.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Connell, John M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J.; Esko, Tonu; Magi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Numans, Mattijs E.; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva R. B.; Korpi-Hyovalti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L.; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex S. F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Karajamaki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S.; Majmnder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I.; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V.; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrieres, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J.; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M.; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D.; Nordestgaard, Borge Gronne; Caulfield, Mark J.; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saleheen, Danish; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Danesh, John; Wain, Louise V.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low frequency and common genetic variants in up to

  15. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surendran, P. (Praveen); F. Drenos (Fotios); R. Young (Robin); H. Warren (Helen); Cook, J.P. (James P.); A.K. Manning (Alisa); N. Grarup (Niels); X. Sim (Xueling); D. Barnes (Daniel); H.E. Witkowska (Ewa); J.R. Staley (James R.); V. Tragante (Vinicius); T. Tukiainen (Taru); H. Yaghootkar (Hanieh); Masca, N. (Nicholas); C.M. Freitag (Christine); T. Ferreira (Teresa); O. Giannakopoulou (Olga); Tinker, A. (Andrew); M. Harakalova (Magdalena); E. Mihailov (Evelin); Liu, C. (Chunyu); A. Kraja (Aldi); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); A. Rasheed (Asif); M. Samuel (Maria); W. Zhao (Wei); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Narisu (Narisu); A.J. Swift (Amy); L. Southam (Lorraine); J. Marten (Jonathan); J.R. Huyghe (Jeroen R.); A. Stancáková (Alena); C. Fava (Cristiano); Ohlsson, T. (Therese); A. Matchan (Angela); K. Stirrups (Kathy); J. Bork-Jensen (Jette); A.P. Gjesing (Anette); Kontto, J. (Jukka); M. Perola (Markus); S. Shaw-Hawkins (Sue); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); Zhang, H. (He); L.A. Donnelly (Louise); C.J. Groves (Christopher); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); M.J. Neville (Matthew); N.R. Robertson (Neil); Yiorkas, A.M. (Andrianos M.); K.H. Herzig; E. Kajantie (Eero); W. Zhang (Weihua); S.M. Willems (Sara); L. Lannfelt (Lars); G. Malerba (Giovanni); N. Soranzo (Nicole); E. Trabetti (Elisabetta); N. Verweij (Niek); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); Vergnaud, A.-C. (Anne-Claire); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); Poveda, A. (Alaitz); T.V. Varga (Tibor V.); M. Caslake (Muriel); A.J.M. De Craen (Anton J. M.); S. Trompet (Stella); J. Luan (Jian'An); R.A. Scott (Robert); S.E. Harris (Sarah); D.C. Liewald (David C.); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); C. Menni (Cristina); A.-E. Farmaki (Aliki-Eleni); G. Hallmans (Göran); F. Renström (Frida); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); Hassinen, M. (Maija); S. Burgess (Stephen); Vasan, R.S. (Ramachandran S.); J.F. Felix (Janine); Uria-Nickelsen, M. (Maria); A. Mälarstig (Anders); Reilly, D.F. (Dermot F.); Hoek, M. (Maarten); Vogt, T.F. (Thomas F.); H. Lin (Honghuang); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); M. Traylor (Matthew); H.S. Markus (Hugh); H. Highland (Heather); A.E. Justice (Anne); E. Marouli (Eirini); J. Lindström (Jaana); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. Komulainen (Pirjo); T.A. Lakka (Timo); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); O. Polasek (Ozren); I. Rudan (Igor); Rolandsson, O. (Olov); P.W. Franks (Paul); G.V. Dedoussis (George); T.D. Spector (Timothy); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); S. Männistö (Satu); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); J.M. Starr (John); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.J. Wareham (Nick); M.J. Brown (Morris); A. Dominiczak (Anna); Connell, J.M. (John M.); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); N. Sattar (Naveed); I. Ford (Ian); Packard, C.J. (Chris J.); T. Esko (Tõnu); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Metspalu (Andres); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); Van Der Meer, P. (Peter); P. van der Harst (Pim); G. Gambaro (Giovanni); Ingelsson, E. (Erik); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); M.E. Numans (Mattijs); I. Brandslund (Ivan); Christensen, C. (Cramer); Petersen, E.R.B. (Eva R. B.); E. Korpi-Hyövälti (Eeva); H. Oksa (Heikki); J.C. Chambers (John); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); S. Franks (Steve); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); Linneberg, A. (Allan); T. Skaaby (Tea); Thuesen, B. (Betina); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); K. Hveem (Kristian); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); L. Groop (Leif); Käräjämäki, A. (Annemari); A. Palotie (Aarno); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); D.S. Alam (Dewan S.); Majumder, A.A.S. (Abdulla Al Shafi); E. di Angelantonio (Emanuele); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); N.R. Poulter (Neil); A. Stanton (Alice); P. Sever (Peter); P. Amouyel (Philippe); D. Arveiler (Dominique); Blankenberg, S. (Stefan); J. Ferrieres (Jean); F. Kee (Frank); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); G. Veronesi (Giovanni); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); P. Elliott (Paul); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); O. Melander (Olle); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); D. Porteous (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); G. Scotland (Generation); F.S. Collins (Francis); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); T. Hansen (T.); O. Pedersen (Oluf); M. Boehnke (Michael); H.M. Stringham (Heather); R. Frossard; C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); M.D. Tobin (Martin); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); M. Caulfield (Mark); A. Mahajan (Anubha); A.P. Morris (Andrew); Tomaszewski, M. (Maciej); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); Saleheen, D. (Danish); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); J. Danesh (John); Wain, L.V. (Louise V.); A.S. Butterworth (Adam); Howson, J.M.M. (Joanna M. M.); P. Munroe (Patricia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHigh blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants

  16. Trans-ancestry meta-analyses identify rare and common variants associated with blood pressure and hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Young, Robin; Warren, Helen; Cook, James P; Manning, Alisa K; Grarup, Niels; Sim, Xueling; Barnes, Daniel R; Witkowska, Kate; Staley, James R; Tragante, Vinicius; Tukiainen, Taru; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Masca, Nicholas; Freitag, Daniel F; Ferreira, Teresa; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Tinker, Andrew; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mihailov, Evelin; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Zhao, Wei; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Jackson, Anne U; Narisu, Narisu; Swift, Amy J; Southam, Lorraine; Marten, Jonathan; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Stančáková, Alena; Fava, Cristiano; Ohlsson, Therese; Matchan, Angela; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gjesing, Anette P; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Shaw-Hawkins, Susan; Havulinna, Aki S; Zhang, He; Donnelly, Louise A; Groves, Christopher J; Rayner, N William; Neville, Matt J; Robertson, Neil R; Yiorkas, Andrianos M; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kajantie, Eero; Zhang, Weihua; Willems, Sara M; Lannfelt, Lars; Malerba, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Poveda, Alaitz; Varga, Tibor V; Caslake, Muriel; de Craen, Anton J M; Trompet, Stella; Luan, Jian'an; Scott, Robert A; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C M; Marioni, Riccardo; Menni, Cristina; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hassinen, Maija; Burgess, Stephen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Felix, Janine F; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Reilly, Dermot F; Hoek, Maarten; Vogt, Thomas F; Lin, Honghuang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Traylor, Matthew; Markus, Hugh S; Highland, Heather M; Justice, Anne E; Marouli, Eirini; Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Rolandsson, Olov; Franks, Paul W; Dedoussis, George; Spector, Timothy D; Jousilahti, Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Deary, Ian J; Starr, John M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nick J; Brown, Morris J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Connell, John M; Jukema, J Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris J; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I W; Numans, Mattijs E; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Petersen, Eva R B; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Oksa, Heikki; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Franks, Steve; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise L; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina; Karpe, Fredrik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Doney, Alex S F; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif; Käräjämäki, AnneMari; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Alam, Dewan S; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Chowdhury, Rajiv; McCarthy, Mark I; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice V; Sever, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ferrières, Jean; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Veronesi, Giovanni; Virtamo, Jarmo; Deloukas, Panos; Elliott, Paul; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J; Hayward, Caroline; Scotland, Generation; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Stringham, Heather M; Frossard, Philippe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tobin, Martin D; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Caulfield, Mark J; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew P; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J; Saleheen, Danish; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Danesh, John; Wain, Louise V; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to

  17. Rare variants in MYD88, IRAK4 and IKBKG and susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda K Ellis

    Full Text Available Although rare variants within the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway genes have been found to underlie human primary immunodeficiencies associated with selective predisposition to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, the contribution of variants in these genes to IPD susceptibility at the population level remains unknown. Complete re-sequencing of IRAK4, MYD88 and IKBKG genes was undertaken in 164 IPD cases from the UK and 164 geographically-matched population-based controls. 233 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs were identified, of which ten were in coding regions. Four rare coding variants were predicted to be deleterious, two variants in MYD88 and two in IRAK4. The predicted deleterious variants in MYD88 were observed as two heterozygote cases but not seen in controls. Frequencies of predicted deleterious IRAK4 SNVs were the same in cases and controls. Our findings suggest that rare, functional variants in MYD88, IRAK4 or IKBKG do not significantly contribute to IPD susceptibility in adults at the population level.

  18. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  19. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1–EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-...

  20. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H A; Tynan, Graham A; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jones, Sarah A; Corr, Sinéad C; Bernard, Nicholas J; Hughes, Mark M; Corcoran, Sarah E; O'Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Neill, Luke A J; Lavelle, Ed C; Keane, Joseph

    2016-02-16

    Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer.

  1. Relative Susceptibility of Phyllocnistis citrella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) to Commonly Used Insecticides in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anjitha; Rao, C N; Ghike, Sonali; Dhengre, Vijay

    2017-04-01

    Foliar application of insecticides has been the most commonly followed practice to manage Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton in nurseries and flush leaves in citrus groves. Leaf dip bioassays were conducted against insecticides, viz., acephate 75SP, dimethoate 30EC, abamectin 1.9EC, fenvalerate 20EC, imidacloprid 17.8SL, and thiamethoxam 25WG, and were tested against P. citrella larvae for their susceptibility. Among six insecticides tested on second-instar P. citrella larvae collected from Nagpur mandarin/acid lime cultivars during 2013-2016, abamectin was the most toxic insecticide for the initial year (LC50 values ranged from 20.99 to 49.00 ppm), while dimethoate (LC50 of 36.57-160.95 ppm) and thiamethoxam (39.90-71.96 ppm) were consistently effective against P. citrella larvae for the rest of the period. Resistance ratio (RR) values calculated based on the baseline susceptible culture, viz., abamectin (1.24-2.33), acephate (1.03-2.31), fenvalerate (1.54-3.45), dimethoate(1.28-5.63), imidacloprid (1.29-8.64), and thiamethoxam (1.05-1.80), indicated that the current RR values were in low levels (RR < 10). © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Association of TLR variants with susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax malaria and parasitemia in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Ibiapina, Hiochelson Najibe Santos; Sampaio, Vanderson Souza; Xábregas, Lilyane Amorim; Brasil, Larissa Wanderley; Tarragô, Andréa Monteiro; Almeida, Anne Cristine Gomes; Kuehn, Andrea; Vitor-Silva, Sheila; Melo, Gisely Cardoso; Siqueira, André Machado; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Lacerda, Marcus Vinicius Guimarães; Malheiro, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria (Pv-malaria) is still considered a neglected disease despite an alarming number of individuals being infected annually. Malaria pathogenesis occurs with the onset of the vector-parasite-host interaction through the binding of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and receptors of innate immunity, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs). The triggering of the signaling cascade produces an elevated inflammatory response. Genetic polymorphisms in TLRs are involved in susceptibility or resistance to infection, and the identification of genes involved with Pv-malaria response is important to elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease and may contribute to the formulation of control and elimination tools. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in an intense transmission area of Pv-malaria in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. Genetic polymorphisms (SNPs) in different TLRs, TIRAP, and CD14 were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis in 325 patients infected with P. vivax and 274 healthy individuals without malaria history in the prior 12 months from the same endemic area. Parasite load was determined by qPCR. Simple and multiple logistic/linear regressions were performed to investigate association between the polymorphisms and the occurrence of Pv-malaria and parasitemia. The C/T (TLR5 R392StopCodon) and T/T (TLR9 -1486C/T) genotypes appear to be risk factors for infection by P. vivax (TLR5: C/C vs. C/T [OR: 2.116, 95% CI: 1.054-4.452, p = 0.031]; TLR9: C/C vs. T/T [OR: 1.919, 95% CI: 1.159-3.177, p = 0.010]; respectively). Fever (COEF = 7599.46, 95% CI = 3063.80-12135.12, p = 0.001) and the C/C genotype of TLR9 -1237C/T (COEF = 17006.63, 95% CI = 3472.83-30540.44, p = 0.014) were independently associated with increased parasitemia in patients with Pv-malaria. Variants of TLRs may predispose individuals to infection by P. vivax. The TLR5 R392StopCodon and TLR9 -1486C/T variants

  3. Genetic Variant rs10757278 on Chromosome 9p21 Contributes to Myocardial Infarction Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed that rs10757278 polymorphism (or its proxy rs1333049 on chromosome 9p21 is associated with myocardial infarction (MI susceptibility in individuals of Caucasian ancestry. Following studies in other populations investigated this association. However, some of these studies reported weak or no significant association. Here, we reevaluated this association using large-scale samples by searching PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Our results showed significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI with p = 6.09 × 10−22, odds ratio (OR = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.22–1.36 in pooled population. We further performed a subgroup analysis, and found significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in Asian and Caucasian populations. We identified that the association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI did not vary substantially by excluding any one study. However, the heterogeneity among the selected studies varies substantially by excluding the study from the Pakistan population. We found even more significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in pooled population, p = 3.55 × 10−53, after excluding the study from the Pakistan population. In summary, previous studies reported weak or no significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that rs10757278 polymorphism is significantly associated with MI susceptibility by analyzing large-scale samples.

  4. Genetic variants of 20q12 contributed to non-syndromic orofacial clefts susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X; Ma, L; Li, Y; Xu, M; Wang, W; Wang, H; Yuan, H; Du, Y; Li, S; Ma, J; Jiang, H; Wang, L; Zhang, W; Pan, Y

    2017-01-01

    Previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) identified a region near MAFB at chr20q12 associated with non-syndromic orofacial clefts (NSOC) susceptibility. However, whether other SNPs in this area could independently contribute to non-syndromic orofacial clefts in Chinese populations remained obscure. We selected 24 SNPs based on a haplotype-tagging SNP strategy and evaluated their associations with risk of non-syndromic orofacial clefts in a large-scale two-stage case-control study with 1278 cases and 1295 controls. Genotyping was performed with Sequenom and TaqMan assay. Associations between the SNPs and risk of non-syndromic orofacial clefts were estimated from unconditional logistic regression analyses. Overall, six SNPs were found to be the susceptible factors of non-syndromic orofacial clefts. The most significant and independent SNP was rs6129653 (additive model of P value = 1.4E-06). In subgroup analysis, its significant associations with cleft lip only (CLO) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) were observed. Furthermore, in silico bioinformatics analysis indicated that rs6129653 was located in the transcriptionally active region and associated with MAFB expression in human brain tissues. Rs6129653 was an independent locus of non-syndromic orofacial clefts among Chinese populations possibly due to its potential of distal transcriptional regulation of MAFB expression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Common variants on chromosome 9p21 are associated with normal tension glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuko Takamoto

    Full Text Available Although intraocular pressure (IOP is the most definitive cause of glaucoma, a subtype of open angle glaucoma (OAG termed normal tension glaucoma (NTG, which occurs in spite of normal IOP, accounts for a large part of glaucoma cases, especially in Japan. To find common genetic variants contributing to NTG in Japanese patients, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS. We performed the first screening for 531,009 autosomal SNPs with a discovery cohort of 286 cases and 557 controls, and then a second screening for the top 30 suggestive loci in an independent cohort of 183 cases and 514 controls. Our findings identified a significantly associated SNP; rs523096 [combined p-value = 7.40× 10(-8, odds ratio (OR= 2.00 with 95% confidence interval (CI 1.55-2.58] located 10 kbp upstream of CDKN2B on chromosome 9p21. Moreover, analysis of another independent case-control set successfully replicated the results of the screening studies (combined values of all 3 stages p = 4.96 × 10(-11, OR= 2.13 with 95% CI 1.69-2.68. The SNPs near rs523096 were recently reported to be associated with OAG associated with elevated IOP in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, the predominant subtype of glaucoma in Caucasian populations. Our results revealed that the 9p21 locus is also associated with NTG in Japanese. In addition, we identified SNPs more strongly associated with NTG.

  6. No Evidence of a Common DNA Variant Profile Specific to World Class Endurance Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfarth, Bernd; Wang, Guan; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Ahmetov, Ildus I.; Boulay, Marcel R.; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Eynon, Nir; Filipenko, Maxim L.; Garton, Fleur C.; Generozov, Edward V.; Govorun, Vadim M.; Houweling, Peter J.; Kawahara, Takashi; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Kulemin, Nickolay A.; Larin, Andrey K.; Maciejewska-Karłowska, Agnieszka; Miyachi, Motohiko; Muniesa, Carlos A.; Murakami, Haruka; Ospanova, Elena A.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pavlenko, Alexander V.; Pyankova, Olga N.; Santiago, Catalina; Sawczuk, Marek; Scott, Robert A.; Uyba, Vladimir V.; Yvert, Thomas; Perusse, Louis; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rauramaa, Rainer; North, Kathryn N.; Lucia, Alejandro; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Bouchard, Claude

    2016-01-01

    There are strong genetic components to cardiorespiratory fitness and its response to exercise training. It would be useful to understand the differences in the genomic profile of highly trained endurance athletes of world class caliber and sedentary controls. An international consortium (GAMES) was established in order to compare elite endurance athletes and ethnicity-matched controls in a case-control study design. Genome-wide association studies were undertaken on two cohorts of elite endurance athletes and controls (GENATHLETE and Japanese endurance runners), from which a panel of 45 promising markers was identified. These markers were tested for replication in seven additional cohorts of endurance athletes and controls: from Australia, Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Poland, Russia and Spain. The study is based on a total of 1520 endurance athletes (835 who took part in endurance events in World Championships and/or Olympic Games) and 2760 controls. We hypothesized that world-class athletes are likely to be characterized by an even higher concentration of endurance performance alleles and we performed separate analyses on this subsample. The meta-analysis of all available studies revealed one statistically significant marker (rs558129 at GALNTL6 locus, p = 0.0002), even after correcting for multiple testing. As shown by the low heterogeneity index (I2 = 0), all eight cohorts showed the same direction of association with rs558129, even though p-values varied across the individual studies. In summary, this study did not identify a panel of genomic variants common to these elite endurance athlete groups. Since GAMES was underpowered to identify alleles with small effect sizes, some of the suggestive leads identified should be explored in expanded comparisons of world-class endurance athletes and sedentary controls and in tightly controlled exercise training studies. Such studies have the potential to illuminate the biology not only of world class endurance performance but

  7. Can common functional gene variants affect visual discrimination in metacontrast masking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margus Maksimov

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of visual perception should be robustly fast and provide veridical information about environmental objects in order to facilitate survival and successful coping. Because species-specific brain mechanisms for fast vision must have evolved under heavy pressure for efficiency, it has been held that different human individuals see the physical world in the same way and produce psychophysical functions of visual discrimination that are qualitatively the same. For many years, this assumption has been implicitly accepted in vision research studying extremely fast, basic visual processes, including studies of visual masking. However, in recent studies of metacontrast masking surprisingly robust individual differences in the qualitative aspects of subjects' performance have been found. As the basic species-specific visual functions very likely are based on universal brain mechanisms of vision, these differences probably are the outcome of variability in ontogenetic development (i.e., formation of idiosyncrasic skills of perception. Such developmental differences can be brought about by variants of genes that are differentially expressed in the course of CNS development. The objective of this study was to assess whether visual discrimination in metacontrast masking is related to three widely studied genetic polymorphisms implicated in brain function and used here as independent variables. The findings suggest no main effects of BDNF Val66Met, NRG1/rs6994992, or 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms on metacontrast performance, but several notable interactions of genetic variables with gender, stage of the sequence of experimental trials, perceptual strategies, and target/mask shape congruence were found. Thus, basic behavioral functions of fast vision may be influenced by common genetic variability. Also, when left uncontrolled, genetic factors may seriously confound variables in vision research using masking, obscure clear theoretical interpretation, lead to

  8. Common variants at CD40 and other loci confer risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F; Lee, Annette T; Hackett, Rachel; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noël P; Gianniny, Lauren; Korman, Benjamin D; Padyukov, Leonid; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Chang, Monica; Catanese, Joseph J; Ding, Bo; Wong, Sandra; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Neale, Benjamin M; Coblyn, Jonathan; Cui, Jing; Tak, Paul P; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Criswell, Lindsey A; Amos, Christopher I; Seldin, Michael F; Kastner, Daniel L; Ardlie, Kristin G; Alfredsson, Lars; Costenbader, Karen H; Altshuler, David; Huizinga, Tom W J; Shadick, Nancy A; Weinblatt, Michael E; de Vries, Niek; Worthington, Jane; Seielstad, Mark; Toes, Rene E M; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Begovich, Ann B; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Daly, Mark J; Plenge, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    To identify rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in European populations, we conducted a meta-analysis of two published genome-wide association (GWA) studies totaling 3,393 cases and 12,462 controls. We genotyped 31 top-ranked SNPs not previously associated with rheumatoid arthritis in an independent replication of 3,929 autoantibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis cases and 5,807 matched controls from eight separate collections. We identified a common variant at the CD40 gene locus (rs4810485, P = 0.0032 replication, P = 8.2 x 10(-9) overall, OR = 0.87). Along with other associations near TRAF1 (refs. 2,3) and TNFAIP3 (refs. 4,5), this implies a central role for the CD40 signaling pathway in rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis. We also identified association at the CCL21 gene locus (rs2812378, P = 0.00097 replication, P = 2.8 x 10(-7) overall), a gene involved in lymphocyte trafficking. Finally, we identified evidence of association at four additional gene loci: MMEL1-TNFRSF14 (rs3890745, P = 0.0035 replication, P = 1.1 x 10(-7) overall), CDK6 (rs42041, P = 0.010 replication, P = 4.0 x 10(-6) overall), PRKCQ (rs4750316, P = 0.0078 replication, P = 4.4 x 10(-6) overall), and KIF5A-PIP4K2C (rs1678542, P = 0.0026 replication, P = 8.8 x 10(-8) overall).

  9. Common single nucleotide variants underlying drug addiction: more than a decade of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Kora-Mareen; Giné, Elena; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Calleja-Conde, Javier; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Drug-related phenotypes are common complex and highly heritable traits. In the last few years, candidate gene (CGAS) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a huge number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with drug use, abuse or dependence, mainly related to alcohol or nicotine. Nevertheless, few of these associations have been replicated in independent studies. The aim of this study was to provide a review of the SNPs that have been most significantly associated with alcohol-, nicotine-, cannabis- and cocaine-related phenotypes in humans between the years of 2000 and 2012. To this end, we selected CGAS, GWAS, family-based association and case-only studies published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals (using the PubMed/MEDLINE and Addiction GWAS Resource databases) in which a significant association was reported. A total of 371 studies fit the search criteria. We then filtered SNPs with at least one replication study and performed meta-analysis of the significance of the associations. SNPs in the alcohol metabolizing genes, in the cholinergic gene cluster CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4, and in the DRD2 and ANNK1 genes, are, to date, the most replicated and significant gene variants associated with alcohol- and nicotine-related phenotypes. In the case of cannabis and cocaine, a far fewer number of studies and replications have been reported, indicating either a need for further investigation or that the genetics of cannabis/cocaine addiction are more elusive. This review brings a global state-of-the-art vision of the behavioral genetics of addiction and collaborates on formulation of new hypothesis to guide future work. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, J.L.; Medland, S.E.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Hibar, D.P.; Senstad, R.E.; Winkler, A.M.; Toro, R.; Appel, K.; Bartecek, R.; Bergmann, O.; Bernard, M.; Brown, A.A.; Cannon, D.M.; Chakravarty, M.M.; Christoforou, A.; Domin, M.; Grimm, O.; Hollinshead, M.; Holmes, A.J.; Homuth, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Langan, C.; Lopez, L.M.; Hansell, N.K.; Hwang, K.S.; Kim, S.; Laje, G.; Lee, P.H.; Liu, X.; Loth, E.; Lourdusamy, A.; Mattingsdal, M.; Mohnke, S.; Maniega, S.M.; Nho, K.; Nugent, A.C.; O'Brien, C.; Papmeyer, M.; Putz, B.; Ramasamy, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Risacher, S.L.; Roddey, J.C.; Rose, E.J.; Ryten, M.; Shen, L.; Sprooten, E.; Strengman, E.; Teumer, A.; Trabzuni, D.; Turner, J.; Eijk, K. van; Erp, T.G. van; Tol, M.J. van; Wittfeld, K.; Wolf, C. de; Woudstra, S.; Aleman, A.; Alhusaini, S.; Almasy, L.; Binder, E.B.; Brohawn, D.G.; Cantor, R.M.; Carless, M.A.; Corvin, A.; Czisch, M.; Curran, J.E.; Davies, G.; Almeida, M.A. de; Delanty, N.; Depondt, C.; Duggirala, R.; Dyer, T.D.; Erk, S.; Fagerness, J.; Fox, P.T.; Freimer, N.B.; Gill, M.; Goring, H.H.; Hagler, D.J.; Hoehn, D.; Holsboer, F.; Hoogman, M.; Hosten, N.; Jahanshad, N.; Johnson, M.P.; Kasperaviciute, D.; Kent Jr., J.W.; Kochunov, P.; Lancaster, J.L.; Lawrie, S.M.; Liewald, D.C.; Mandl, R.C.W.; Matarin, M.; Mattheisen, M.; Meisenzahl, E.; Melle, I.; Moses, E.K.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Nauck, M.; Nothen, M.M.; Olvera, R.L.; Pandolfo, M.; Pike, G.B.; Puls, R.; Reinvang, I.; Renteria, M.E.; Rietschel, M.; Roffman, J.L.; Royle, N.A.; Rujescu, D.; Savitz, J.; Schnack, H.G.; Schnell, K.; Seiferth, N.; Smith, C.; Steen, V.M.; Valdes Hernandez, M.C.; Heuvel, M. van den; Wee, N.J. van der; Haren, N.E. Van; Veltman, J.A.; Volzke, H.; Walker, R.; Westlye, L.T.; Whelan, C.D.; Agartz, I.; Boomsma, D.I.; Cavalleri, G.L.; Dale, A.M.; Djurovic, S.; Drevets, W.C.; Hagoort, P.; Hall, J.; Heinz, A.; Jack Jr., C.R.; Foroud, T.M.; Hellard, S. Le; Macciardi, F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Poline, J.B.; Porteous, D.J.; Sisodiya, S.M.; Starr, J.M.; Sussmann, J.; Toga, A.W.; Veltman, D.J.; Walter, H.; Weiner, M.W.; Bis, J.C.; Ikram, M.A.; Smith, A.V.; Gudnason, V.; Tzourio, C.; Vernooij, M.W.; Launer, L.J.; DeCarli, C.; Seshadri, S.; Andreassen, O.A.; Apostolova, L.G.; Bastin, M.E.; Blangero, J.; Brunner, H.G.; Buckner, R.L.; Cichon, S.; Coppola, G.; Zubicaray, G.I. de; Deary, I.J.; Donohoe, G.; Geus, E.J. de; Espeseth, T.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Glahn, D.C.; Grabe, H.J.; Hardy, J.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.; Jenkinson, M.; Kahn, R.S.; McDonald, C.; McIntosh, A.M.; McMahon, F.J.; McMahon, K.L.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A.; Morris, D.W.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Nichols, T.E.; Ophoff, R.A.; Paus, T.; Pausova, Z.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Potkin, S.G.; Samann, P.G.; Saykin, A.J.; Schumann, G.; Smoller, J.W.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Weale, M.E.; Martin, N.G.; Franke, B.; Wright, M.J.; Thompson, P.M.; Klaasen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease and is reduced in schizophrenia, major depression and mesial temporal

  11. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Lee, Mei Chin; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Igo, Robert P; Haripriya, Aravind; Williams, Susan E; Astakhov, Yury S; Orr, Andrew C; Burdon, Kathryn P; Nakano, Satoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Abu-Amero, Khaled; Hauser, Michael; Li, Zheng; Prakadeeswari, Gopalakrishnan; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Kang, Jae H; Nelson, Sarah; Hayashi, Ken; Manabe, Shin-Ichi; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Inoue, Kenji; Irkec, Murat; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Järvelä, Irma; Schlottmann, Patricio; Lerner, S Fabian; Lamari, Hasnaa; Nilgün, Yildirim; Bikbov, Mukharram; Park, Ki Ho; Cha, Soon Cheol; Yamashiro, Kenji; Zenteno, Juan C; Jonas, Jost B; Kumar, Rajesh S; Perera, Shamira A; Chan, Anita S Y; Kobakhidze, Nino; George, Ronnie; Vijaya, Lingam; Do, Tan; Edward, Deepak P; de Juan Marcos, Lourdes; Pakravan, Mohammad; Moghimi, Sasan; Ideta, Ryuichi; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kappelgaard, Per; Wirostko, Barbara; Thomas, Samuel; Gaston, Daniel; Bedard, Karen; Greer, Wenda L; Yang, Zhenglin; Chen, Xueyi; Huang, Lulin; Sang, Jinghong; Jia, Hongyan; Jia, Liyun; Qiao, Chunyan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Xuyang; Zhao, Bowen; Wang, Ya-Xing; Xu, Liang; Leruez, Stéphanie; Reynier, Pascal; Chichua, George; Tabagari, Sergo; Uebe, Steffen; Zenkel, Matthias; Berner, Daniel; Mossböck, Georg; Weisschuh, Nicole; Hoja, Ursula; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich-Christoph; Mardin, Christian; Founti, Panayiota; Chatzikyriakidou, Anthi; Pappas, Theofanis; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Lambropoulos, Alexandros; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Shetty, Rohit; Porporato, Natalia; Saravanan, Vijayan; Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Shivkumar, Chandrashekaran; Kalpana, Narendran; Sarangapani, Sripriya; Kanavi, Mozhgan R; Beni, Afsaneh Naderi; Yazdani, Shahin; Lashay, Alireza; Naderifar, Homa; Khatibi, Nassim; Fea, Antonio; Lavia, Carlo; Dallorto, Laura; Rolle, Teresa; Frezzotti, Paolo; Paoli, Daniela; Salvi, Erika; Manunta, Paolo; Mori, Yosai; Miyata, Kazunori; Higashide, Tomomi; Chihara, Etsuo; Ishiko, Satoshi; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Yanagi, Masahide; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Tsutomu; Sakurai, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Takako; Chuman, Hideki; Aihara, Makoto; Inatani, Masaru; Miyake, Masahiro; Gotoh, Norimoto; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Ikeda, Yoko; Ueno, Morio; Sotozono, Chie; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Sagong, Min; Park, Kyu Hyung; Ahn, Jeeyun; Cruz-Aguilar, Marisa; Ezzouhairi, Sidi M; Rafei, Abderrahman; Chong, Yaan Fun; Ng, Xiao Yu; Goh, Shuang Ru; Chen, Yueming; Yong, Victor H K; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Olawoye, Olusola O; Ashaye, Adeyinka O; Ugbede, Idakwo; Onakoya, Adeola; Kizor-Akaraiwe, Nkiru; Teekhasaenee, Chaiwat; Suwan, Yanin; Supakontanasan, Wasu; Okeke, Suhanya; Uche, Nkechi J; Asimadu, Ifeoma; Ayub, Humaira; Akhtar, Farah; Kosior-Jarecka, Ewa; Lukasik, Urszula; Lischinsky, Ignacio; Castro, Vania; Grossmann, Rodolfo Perez; Megevand, Gordana Sunaric; Roy, Sylvain; Dervan, Edward; Silke, Eoin; Rao, Aparna; Sahay, Priti; Fornero, Pablo; Cuello, Osvaldo; Sivori, Delia; Zompa, Tamara; Mills, Richard A; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Hewitt, Alex W; Coote, Michael; Crowston, Jonathan G; Astakhov, Sergei Y; Akopov, Eugeny L; Emelyanov, Anton; Vysochinskaya, Vera; Kazakbaeva, Gyulli; Fayzrakhmanov, Rinat; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Owaidhah, Ohoud; Aljasim, Leyla Ali; Chowbay, Balram; Foo, Jia Nee; Soh, Raphael Q; Sim, Kar Seng; Xie, Zhicheng; Cheong, Augustine W O; Mok, Shi Qi; Soo, Hui Meng; Chen, Xiao Yin; Peh, Su Qin; Heng, Khai Koon; Husain, Rahat; Ho, Su-Ling; Hillmer, Axel M; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Escudero-Domínguez, Francisco A; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Martinon-Torres, Frederico; Salas, Antonio; Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Hansapinyo, Linda; Wanichwecharugruang, Boonsong; Kitnarong, Naris; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Nguyn, Hip X; Nguyn, Giang T T; Nguyn, Trình V; Zenz, Werner; Binder, Alexander; Klobassa, Daniela S; Hibberd, Martin L; Davila, Sonia; Herms, Stefan; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Rautenbach, Robyn M; Ziskind, Ari; Carmichael, Trevor R; Ramsay, Michele; Álvarez, Lydia; García, Montserrat; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Rodríguez-Calvo, Pedro P; Cueto, Luis Fernández-Vega; Oguz, Çilingir; Tamcelik, Nevbahar; Atalay, Eray; Batu, Bilge; Aktas, Dilek; Kasım, Burcu; Wilson, M Roy; Coleman, Anne L; Liu, Yutao; Challa, Pratap; Herndon, Leon; Kuchtey, Rachel W; Kuchtey, John; Curtin, Karen; Chaya, Craig J; Crandall, Alan; Zangwill, Linda M; Wong, Tien Yin; Nakano, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; den Hollander, Anneke I; Vesti, Eija; Fingert, John H; Lee, Richard K; Sit, Arthur J; Shingleton, Bradford J; Wang, Ningli; Cusi, Daniele; Qamar, Raheel; Kraft, Peter; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Heegaard, Steffen; Kivelä, Tero; Reis, André; Kruse, Friedrich E; Weinreb, Robert N; Pasquale, Louis R; Haines, Jonathan L; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Jonasson, Fridbert; Allingham, R Rand; Milea, Dan; Ritch, Robert; Kubota, Toshiaki; Tashiro, Kei; Vithana, Eranga N; Micheal, Shazia; Topouzis, Fotis; Craig, Jamie E; Dubina, Michael; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Stefansson, Kari; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasutto, Francesca; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2017-07-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS cases to refine the association at LOXL1, which previously showed inconsistent results across populations, and to identify new variants associated with XFS. We identified a rare protective allele at LOXL1 (p.Phe407, odds ratio (OR) = 25, P = 2.9 × 10(-14)) through deep resequencing of XFS cases and controls from nine countries. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of XFS cases and controls from 24 countries followed by replication in 18 countries identified seven genome-wide significant loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)). We identified association signals at 13q12 (POMP), 11q23.3 (TMEM136), 6p21 (AGPAT1), 3p24 (RBMS3) and 5q23 (near SEMA6A). These findings provide biological insights into the pathology of XFS and highlight a potential role for naturally occurring rare LOXL1 variants in disease biology.

  12. Population sequencing of two endocannabinoid metabolic genes identifies rare and common regulatory variants associated with extreme obesity and metabolite level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Targeted re-sequencing of candidate genes in individuals at the extremes of a quantitative phenotype distribution is a method of choice to gain information on the contribution of rare variants to disease susceptibility. The endocannabinoid system mediates signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues involved in the regulation of energy balance, is highly active in obese patients, and represents a strong candidate pathway to examine for genetic association with body mass index (BMI). Results We sequenced two intervals (covering 188 kb) encoding the endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in 147 normal controls and 142 extremely obese cases. After applying quality filters, we called 1,393 high quality single nucleotide variants, 55% of which are rare, and 143 indels. Using single marker tests and collapsed marker tests, we identified four intervals associated with BMI: the FAAH promoter, the MGLL promoter, MGLL intron 2, and MGLL intron 3. Two of these intervals are composed of rare variants and the majority of the associated variants are located in promoter sequences or in predicted transcriptional enhancers, suggesting a regulatory role. The set of rare variants in the FAAH promoter associated with BMI is also associated with increased level of FAAH substrate anandamide, further implicating a functional role in obesity. Conclusions Our study, which is one of the first reports of a sequence-based association study using next-generation sequencing of candidate genes, provides insights into study design and analysis approaches and demonstrates the importance of examining regulatory elements rather than exclusively focusing on exon sequences. PMID:21118518

  13. Population sequencing of two endocannabinoid metabolic genes identifies rare and common regulatory variants associated with extreme obesity and metabolite level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harismendy, Olivier; Bansal, Vikas; Bhatia, Gaurav; Nakano, Masakazu; Scott, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyun; Dib, Colette; Turlotte, Edouard; Sipe, Jack C; Murray, Sarah S; Deleuze, Jean Francois; Bafna, Vineet; Topol, Eric J; Frazer, Kelly A

    2010-01-01

    Targeted re-sequencing of candidate genes in individuals at the extremes of a quantitative phenotype distribution is a method of choice to gain information on the contribution of rare variants to disease susceptibility. The endocannabinoid system mediates signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues involved in the regulation of energy balance, is highly active in obese patients, and represents a strong candidate pathway to examine for genetic association with body mass index (BMI). We sequenced two intervals (covering 188 kb) encoding the endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in 147 normal controls and 142 extremely obese cases. After applying quality filters, we called 1,393 high quality single nucleotide variants, 55% of which are rare, and 143 indels. Using single marker tests and collapsed marker tests, we identified four intervals associated with BMI: the FAAH promoter, the MGLL promoter, MGLL intron 2, and MGLL intron 3. Two of these intervals are composed of rare variants and the majority of the associated variants are located in promoter sequences or in predicted transcriptional enhancers, suggesting a regulatory role. The set of rare variants in the FAAH promoter associated with BMI is also associated with increased level of FAAH substrate anandamide, further implicating a functional role in obesity. Our study, which is one of the first reports of a sequence-based association study using next-generation sequencing of candidate genes, provides insights into study design and analysis approaches and demonstrates the importance of examining regulatory elements rather than exclusively focusing on exon sequences. © 2010 Harismendy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. Genome wide analysis of drug-induced torsades de pointes: lack of common variants with large effect sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah R Behr

    Full Text Available Marked prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes is a serious adverse event during treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs and other culprit medications, and is a common cause for drug relabeling and withdrawal. Although clinical risk factors have been identified, the syndrome remains unpredictable in an individual patient. Here we used genome-wide association analysis to search for common predisposing genetic variants. Cases of drug-induced Torsades de Pointes (diTdP, treatment tolerant controls, and general population controls were ascertained across multiple sites using common definitions, and genotyped on the Illumina 610k or 1M-Duo BeadChips. Principal Components Analysis was used to select 216 Northwestern European diTdP cases and 771 ancestry-matched controls, including treatment-tolerant and general population subjects. With these sample sizes, there is 80% power to detect a variant at genome-wide significance with minor allele frequency of 10% and conferring an odds ratio of ≥2.7. Tests of association were carried out for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP by logistic regression adjusting for gender and population structure. No SNP reached genome wide-significance; the variant with the lowest P value was rs2276314, a non-synonymous coding variant in C18orf21 (p  =  3×10(-7, odds ratio = 2, 95% confidence intervals: 1.5-2.6. The haplotype formed by rs2276314 and a second SNP, rs767531, was significantly more frequent in controls than cases (p  =  3×10(-9. Expanding the number of controls and a gene-based analysis did not yield significant associations. This study argues that common genomic variants do not contribute importantly to risk for drug-induced Torsades de Pointes across multiple drugs.

  15. Genome Wide Analysis of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes: Lack of Common Variants with Large Effect Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Elijah R.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kääb, Stefan; Crawford, Dana C.; Nicoletti, Paola; Floratos, Aris; Sinner, Moritz F.; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Zumhagen, Sven; Guicheney, Pascale; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Marshall, Vanessa; Shakir, Saad; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Bevan, Steve; Jamshidi, Yalda; Bastiaenen, Rachel; Myerburg, Robert J.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Camm, A. John; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Norris, Kris; Altman, Russ B.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Jeffery, Steve; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Shen, Yufeng; George, Alfred L.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Marked prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes is a serious adverse event during treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs and other culprit medications, and is a common cause for drug relabeling and withdrawal. Although clinical risk factors have been identified, the syndrome remains unpredictable in an individual patient. Here we used genome-wide association analysis to search for common predisposing genetic variants. Cases of drug-induced Torsades de Pointes (diTdP), treatment tolerant controls, and general population controls were ascertained across multiple sites using common definitions, and genotyped on the Illumina 610k or 1M-Duo BeadChips. Principal Components Analysis was used to select 216 Northwestern European diTdP cases and 771 ancestry-matched controls, including treatment-tolerant and general population subjects. With these sample sizes, there is 80% power to detect a variant at genome-wide significance with minor allele frequency of 10% and conferring an odds ratio of ≥2.7. Tests of association were carried out for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by logistic regression adjusting for gender and population structure. No SNP reached genome wide-significance; the variant with the lowest P value was rs2276314, a non-synonymous coding variant in C18orf21 (p  =  3×10−7, odds ratio = 2, 95% confidence intervals: 1.5–2.6). The haplotype formed by rs2276314 and a second SNP, rs767531, was significantly more frequent in controls than cases (p  =  3×10−9). Expanding the number of controls and a gene-based analysis did not yield significant associations. This study argues that common genomic variants do not contribute importantly to risk for drug-induced Torsades de Pointes across multiple drugs. PMID:24223155

  16. Common genetic variants associated with thyroid function may be risk alleles for Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Purdey; Brix, Thomas H; Wilson, Scott G; Ward, Lynley C; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Walsh, John P

    2015-02-14

    Recent studies have identified common genetic variants associated with TSH, free T4 and thyroid peroxidase antibodies, but it is unclear whether these differ between patients with Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. To examine whether 11 common genetic variants differ between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. We genotyped 11 common variants in a discovery cohort of 203 Australian patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Two variants with significant or suggestive associations were analysed in a replication cohort of 384 Danish patients. For rs753760 (PDE10A), the minor allele frequency in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·38 vs. 0·23, respectively, (P = 6·42 × 10(-4) ) in the discovery cohort, 0·29 vs. 0·24 (P = 0·147) in the replication cohort and 0·32 vs. 0·24 in combined analysis (P = 0·0021; all analyses adjusted for sex). In healthy controls from Busselton, the frequency was 0·29, significantly different from Hashimoto's disease but not Graves' disease. For rs4889009 (MAF gene region), the frequency of the minor G-allele in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·48 vs. 0·36 (P = 0·0156) in the discovery cohort, 0·48 vs. 0·34 (P = 1·83 × 10(-4) ) in the replication cohort and 0·48 vs. 0·35 in the combined analysis (P = 7·53 × 10(-6) ); in controls, the frequency was 0·38, significantly different from Graves' disease but not Hashimoto's disease. After further adjustment for smoking, associations with rs4889009 remained significant, whereas those with rs753760 were not. Common variants in PDE10A and MAF gene regions may influence whether patients with AITD develop Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Rare and Common Variants in CARD14, Encoding an Epidermal Regulator of NF-kappaB, in Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Catherine T.; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A.; Nair, Rajan P.; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Stuart, Philip E.; Goldgar, David; Hayashi, Genki; Olfson, Emily H.; Feng, Bing-Jian; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kane, John P.; Wise, Carol A.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A.; Peddle, Lynette; Chandran, Vinod; Liao, Wilson; Rahman, Proton; Krueger, Gerald G.; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T.; Menter, Alan; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disorder of the skin and other organs. We have determined that mutations in CARD14, encoding a nuclear factor of kappa light chain enhancer in B cells (NF-kB) activator within skin epidermis, account for PSORS2. Here, we describe fifteen additional rare missense variants in CARD14, their distribution in seven psoriasis cohorts (>6,000 cases and >4,000 controls), and their effects on NF-kB activation and the transcriptome of keratinocytes. There were more CARD14 rare variants in cases than in controls (burden test p value = 0.0015). Some variants were only seen in a single case, and these included putative pathogenic mutations (c.424G>A [p.Glu142Lys] and c.425A>G [p.Glu142Gly]) and the generalized-pustular-psoriasis mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala); these three mutations lie within the coiled-coil domain of CARD14. The c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) familial-psoriasis mutation was present at a frequency of 0.0005 in cases of European ancestry. CARD14 variants led to a range of NF-kB activities; in particular, putative pathogenic variants led to levels >2.5× higher than did wild-type CARD14. Two variants (c.511C>A [p.His171Asn] and c.536G>A [p.Arg179His]) required stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) to achieve significant increases in NF-kB levels. Transcriptome profiling of wild-type and variant CARD14 transfectants in keratinocytes differentiated probably pathogenic mutations from neutral variants such as polymorphisms. Over 20 CARD14 polymorphisms were also genotyped, and meta-analysis revealed an association between psoriasis and rs11652075 (c.2458C>T [p.Arg820Trp]; p value = 2.1 × 10−6). In the two largest psoriasis cohorts, evidence for association increased when rs11652075 was conditioned on HLA-Cw∗0602 (PSORS1). These studies contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of psoriasis and illustrate the challenges faced in identifying pathogenic variants in common disease. PMID:22521419

  18. Sequence variant on 8q24 confers susceptibility to urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Thorlacius, Steinunn; Sulem, Patrick; Geller, Frank; Aben, Katja K.H.; Stacey, Simon N.; Gudmundsson, Julius; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Bergthorsson, Jon T.; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Blondal, Thorarinn; Witjes, J. Alfred; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Ploeg, Martine; Cornel, Erik B.; Vergunst, Henk; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Kristinsson, Kari T.; Mouy, Magali; Snorradottir, Steinunn; Placidi, Donatella; Campagna, Marcello; Arici, Cecilia; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Gurzau, Eugene; Rudnai, Peter; Kellen, Eliane; Polidoro, Silvia; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sanchez, Manuel; Saez, Berta; Valdivia, Gabriel; Ryk, Charlotta; de Verdier, Petra; Lindblom, Annika; Golka, Klaus; Bishop, D. Timothy; Knowles, Margaret A.; Nikulasson, Sigfus; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Jonsson, Eirikur; Geirsson, Gudmundur; Kristjansson, Baldvin; Mayordomo, Jose I.; Steineck, Gunnar; Porru, Stefano; Buntinx, Frank; Zeegers, Maurice P.; Fletcher, Tony; Kumar, Rajiv; Matullo, Giuseppe; Vineis, Paolo; Kiltie, Anne E.; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a genome wide SNP association study on 1,803 Urinary Bladder Cancer (UBC) cases and 34,336 controls from Iceland and the Netherlands and follow up studies in seven additional case control groups (2,165 cases and 3,800 controls). The strongest association was observed with allele T of rs9642880 on chromosome 8q24, 30kb upstream of the c-Myc gene (allele specific OR=1.22; P=9.34×10−12). Approximately 20% of individuals of European ancestry are homozygous for rs9642880 (T) and their estimated risk of developing UBC is 1.49 times that of non-carriers with population attributable risk (PAR) of 17%. No association was observed between UBC and the four 8q24 variants previously associated with prostate, colorectal and breast cancers, nor did rs9642880 associate with any of these three cancers. A weaker signal, but nonetheless of genome wide significance, was captured by rs710521 (A) located near the TP63 gene on chromosome 3q28 (allele specific OR=1.19; P=1. 15× 10−7). PMID:18794855

  19. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  20. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-05-01

    Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Advancement in genetic variants conferring obesity susceptibility from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Jia, Weiping; Hu, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Obesity prevalence has increased in recent years. Lifestyle change fuels obesity, but genetic factors cause more than 50% of average variations in obesity. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has hastened the progress of polygenic obesity research. As of this writing, more than 73 obesity susceptibility loci have been identified in ethnic groups through GWAS. The identified loci explain only 2% to 4% of obesity heritability, thereby indicating that a large proportion of loci remain undiscovered. Thus, the next step is to identify and confirm novel loci, which may exhibit smaller effects and lower allele frequencies than established loci. However, achieving these tasks has been difficult for researchers. GWAS help researchers discover the causal loci. Moreover, numerous biological studies have been performed on the polygenic effects on obesity, such as studies on fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), but the role of these polygenic effects in the mechanism of obesity remains unclear. Thus, obesity-causing variations should be identified, and insights into the biology of polygenic effects on obesity are needed.

  2. Common variation in the ABO glycosyltransferase is associated with susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Andrew E.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Auburn, Sarah; Diakite, Mahamadou; Forton, Julian T.; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Marsh, Kevin; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing epidemiological and molecular evidence that ABO blood group affects host susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum infection. The high frequency of common ABO alleles means that even modest differences in susceptibility could have a significant impact on the health of people living in malaria endemic regions. We performed an association study, the first to utilize key molecular genetic variation underlying the ABO system, genotyping >9000 individuals across 3 African populations. Using population- and family-based tests we demonstrated that alleles producing functional ABO enzymes are associated with greater risk of severe malaria phenotypes (particularly malarial anemia) in comparison with the frameshift deletion underlying blood group O: Case-control allelic odds ratio (OR) 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09 – 1.32, P=0.0003; Family-studies allelic OR 1.19, CI 1.08 – 1.32, P=0.001; Pooled across all studies allelic OR 1.18, CI 1.11 - 1.26, P=2×10−7. Analyzing the family trios we found suggestive evidence of a parent-of-origin effect at the ABO locus. Non-O haplotypes inherited from mothers, but not fathers, are significantly associated with severe malaria (likelihood ratio test of Weinberg, P=0.046). Finally we used HapMap data to demonstrate a region of low FST (−0.001) between the three main HapMap population groups across the ABO locus, an outlier in the empirical distribution of FST across chromosome 9 (~99.5 – 99.9th centile). This low FST region may be a signal of longstanding balancing selection at the ABO locus, caused by multiple infectious pathogens including P. falciparum. PMID:18003641

  3. Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs u...

  4. Common variant at 16p11.2 conferring risk of psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinberg, S; de Jong, S; Mattheisen, M

    2014-01-01

    -wide significant association with schizophrenia. Here we consider a mixed schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (psychosis) phenotype (addition of 7469 bipolar disorder cases, 1535 schizophrenia cases, 333 other psychosis cases, 808 unaffected family members and 46 160 controls). Combined analysis reveals a novel...... variant at 16p11.2 showing genome-wide significant association (rs4583255[T]; odds ratio=1.08; P=6.6 × 10(-11)). The new variant is located within a 593-kb region that substantially increases risk of psychosis when duplicated. In line with the association of the duplication with reduced body mass index...

  5. Comprehensive assessment of the disputed RET Y791F variant shows no association with medullary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Hatakana, Roxanne; Lourenço, Delmar M; Lindsey, Susan C; Camacho, Cleber P; Almeida, Marcio; Lima, José V; Sekiya, Tomoko; Garralda, Elena; Naslavsky, Michel S; Yamamoto, Guilherme L; Lazar, Monize; Meirelles, Osorio; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Lebrao, Maria Lucia; Duarte, Yeda A O; Blangero, John; Zatz, Mayana; Cerutti, Janete M; Maciel, Rui M B; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2015-02-01

    Accurate interpretation of germline mutations of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene is vital for the proper recommendation of preventive thyroidectomy in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-prone carriers. To gain information regarding the most disputed variant of RET, ATA-A Y791F, we sequenced blood DNA samples from a cohort of 2904 cancer-free elderly individuals (1261 via Sanger sequencing and 1643 via whole-exome/genome sequencing). We also accessed the exome sequences of an additional 8069 individuals from non-cancer-related laboratories and public databanks as well as genetic results from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) project. The mean allelic frequency observed in the controls was 0.0031, with higher occurrences in Central European populations (0.006/0.008). The prevalence of RET Y791F in the control databases was extremely high compared with the 40 known RET pathogenic mutations (P=0.00003), while no somatic occurrence has been reported in tumours. In this study, we report new, unrelated Brazilian individuals with germline RET Y791F-only: two tumour-free elderly controls; two individuals with sporadic MTC whose Y791F-carrying relatives did not show any evidence of tumours; and a 74-year-old phaeochromocytoma patient without MTC. Furthermore, we showed that the co-occurrence of Y791F with the strong RET C634Y mutation explains the aggressive MTC phenotypes observed in a large affected family that was initially reported as Y791F-only. Our literature review revealed that limited analyses have led to the misclassification of RET Y791F as a probable pathogenic variant and, consequently, to the occurrence of unnecessary thyroidectomies. The current study will have a substantial clinical influence, as it reveals, in a comprehensive manner, that RET Y791F only shows no association with MTC susceptibility.

  6. rs5888 variant of SCARB1 gene is a possible susceptibility factor for age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer Zerbib

    Full Text Available Major genetic factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD have recently been identified as susceptibility risk factors, including variants in the CFH gene and the ARMS2 LOC387715/HTRA1locus. Our purpose was to perform a case-control study in two populations among individuals who did not carry risk variants for CFHY402H and LOC387715 A69S (ARMS2, called "study" individuals, in order to identify new genetic risk factors. Based on a candidate gene approach, we analyzed SNP rs5888 of the SCARB1 gene, coding for SRBI, which is involved in the lipid and lutein pathways. This study was conducted in a French series of 1241 AMD patients and 297 controls, and in a North American series of 1257 patients with advanced AMD and 1732 controls. Among these individuals, we identified 61 French patients, 77 French controls, 85 North American patients and 338 North American controls who did not carry the CFH nor ARMS2 polymorphisms. An association between AMD and the SCARB1 gene was seen among the study subjects. The genotypic distribution of the rs5888 polymorphism was significantly different between cases and controls in the French population (p<0.006. Heterozygosity at the rs5888 SNP increased risk of AMD compared to the CC genotypes in the French study population (odds ratio (OR = 3.5, CI95%: 1.4-8.9, p<0.01 and after pooling the 2 populations (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.6-5.3, p<0.002. Subgroup analysis in exudative forms of AMD revealed a pooled OR of 3.6 for individuals heterozygous for rs5888 (95% CI: 1.7-7.6, p<0.0015. These results suggest the possible contribution of SCARB1, a new genetic factor in AMD, and implicate a role for cholesterol and antioxidant micronutrient (lutein and vitamin E metabolism in AMD.

  7. Variants in linkage disequilibrium with the late cornified envelope gene cluster deletion are associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2010-12-01

    A common deletion mapping to the psoriasis susceptibility locus 4 on chromosome 1q21, encompassing two genes of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster, has been associated with an increased risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV). One previous report found no association of the deletion with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), suggesting it may be a specific risk factor for PsV. Given the genetic overlap between PsA and PsV, a study was undertaken to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to this locus are risk factors for PsA in a UK and Irish population.

  8. Dogs and humans share a common susceptibility gene SRBD1 for glaucoma risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kanemaki

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy that is associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Primary open angle glaucoma is the most common type of glaucoma in canines, and its highest incidence among dog breeds has been reported in Shiba-Inus, followed by Shih-Tzus. These breeds are known to have an abnormal iridocorneal angle and dysplastic prectinate ligament. However, the hereditary and genetic backgrounds of these dogs have not yet been clarified. In this study, we investigated the association between polymorphisms of the glaucoma candidate genes, SRBD1, ELOVL5, and ADAMTS10, and glaucoma in Shiba-Inus and Shih-Tzus. We analyzed 11 polymorphisms in these three genes using direct DNA sequencing. Three SRBD1 SNPs, rs8655283, rs22018514 and rs22018513 were significantly associated with glaucoma in Shiba-Inus, while rs22018513, a synonymous SNP in exon 4, showed the strongest association (P = 0.00039, OR = 3.03. Conditional analysis revealed that rs22018513 could account for most of the association of these SNPs with glaucoma in Shiba-Inus. In Shih-Tzus, only rs9172407 in the SRBD1 intron 1 was significantly associated with glaucoma (P = 0.0014, OR = 5.25. There were no significant associations between the ELOVL5 or ADAMTS10 polymorphisms and glaucoma in Shiba-Inus and Shih-Tzus. The results showed that SRBD1 polymorphisms play an important role in glaucoma pathology in both Shiba-Inus and Shih-Tzus. SRBD1 polymorphisms have also been associated with normal- and high-tension glaucomas in humans. Therefore, SRBD1 may be a common susceptibility gene for glaucoma in humans and dogs. We anticipate that the nucleotide sequencing data from this study can be used in genetic testing to determine for the first time, the genetic status and susceptibility of glaucoma in dogs, with high precision. Moreover, canine glaucoma resulting from SRBD1 polymorphisms could be a useful animal model to study human glaucoma.

  9. Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Romanos, Jihane; Mistry, Vanisha; Szperl, Agata; Bakker, Sjoerd F.; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Castillejo, Gemma; de la Concha, Emilio G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Dias, Kerith-Rae M.; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Duerr, Richard H.; Edkins, Sarah; Franke, Lude; Fransen, Karin; Gutierrez, Javier; Heap, Graham A. R.; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Hunt, Sarah; Plaza Izurieta, Leticia; Izzo, Valentina; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Langford, Cordelia; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Mein, Charles A.; Midah, Vandana; Mitrovic, Mitja; Mora, Barbara; Morelli, Marinita; Nutland, Sarah; Nunez, Concepcion; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Pearce, Kerra; Platteel, Mathieu; Polanco, Isabel; Potter, Simon; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Rich, Stephen S.; Rybak, Anna; Luis Santiago, Jose; Senapati, Sabyasachi; Sood, Ajit; Szajewska, Hania; Troncone, Riccardo; Varade, Jezabel; Wallace, Chris; Wolters, Victorien M.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Thelma, B. K.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Urcelay, Elena; Ramon Bilbao, Jose; Mearin, M. Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Plagnol, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Using variants from the 1000 Genomes Project pilot European CEU dataset and data from additional resequencing studies, we densely genotyped 183 non-HLA risk loci previously associated with immune-mediated diseases in 12,041 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 12,228 controls. We identified 1

  10. Follicular pityriasis versicolor-Rare variant of a common dermatological disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tasleem Arif; Shagufta Rather

    2015-01-01

    Pityriasis versicolor is a superficial fungal infection of the skin caused by yeast of the genus Malassezia. It is characterized by hypopigmented or hyperpigmented macules and patches usually involving the trunk [1]. The variants of pityriasis versicolor include hypochromic, hyperchromic, combination of hypo-hyperchromic, erythematous, circinate, atrophic and acral [2-4].

  11. Follicular pityriasis versicolor-Rare variant of a common dermatological disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasleem Arif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis versicolor is a superficial fungal infection of the skin caused by yeast of the genus Malassezia. It is characterized by hypopigmented or hyperpigmented macules and patches usually involving the trunk [1]. The variants of pityriasis versicolor include hypochromic, hyperchromic, combination of hypo-hyperchromic, erythematous, circinate, atrophic and acral [2-4].

  12. Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, H. Rob; St Pourcain, Beate; Thiering, Elisabeth; Das, Shikta; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Kaakinen, Marika; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Geller, Frank; Guxens, Monica; Cousminer, Diana L.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Buxton, Jessica L.; Charoen, Pimphen; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Eriksson, Johan; Evans, David M.; Hofman, Albert; Kemp, John P.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Klopp, Norman; Lahti, Jari; Lye, Stephen J.; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Tiesler, Carla; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Debette, Stephanie; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Smith, Albert V.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fernandez-Banet, Julio; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; van der Heijden, Albert J.; Iniguez, Carmen; Lathrop, Mark; McArdle, Wendy L.; Molgaard, Anne; Newnham, John P.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pouta, Annneli; Ring, Susan M.; Sovio, Ulla; Standl, Marie; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; DeCarli, Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Estivill, Xavier; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Melbye, Mads; Bisgaard, Hans; Pennell, Craig E.; Widen, Elisabeth; Hakonarson, Hakon; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Adair, Linda S.; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Bergen, Nienke; Benke, Kelly; Berry, Diane; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Coin, Lachlan; Cousminer, Diana L.; Das, Shikta; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Flexeder, Claudia; Frayling, Tim; Freathy, Rachel M.; Gaillard, Romy; Geller, Frank; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Goh, Liang-Kee; Guxens, Monica; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Hadley, Dexter; Hedebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Holloway, John W.; Holst, Claus; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huikari, Ville; Hypponen, Elina; Iniguez, Carmen; Kaakinen, Marika; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.; Kirin, Mirna; Kowgier, Matthew; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lange, Leslie A.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lewin, Alex; Lindgren, Cecilia; Lindi, Virpi; Maggi, Reedik; Marsh, Julie; Middeldorp, Christel; Millwood, Iona; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nivard, Michel; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Ntalla, Ioanna; Oken, Emily; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pararajasingham, Jennifer; Prokopenko, Inga; Rodriguez, Alina; Salem, Rany M.; Sebert, Sylvain; Siitonen, Niina; Sovio, Ulla; St Pourcain, Beate; Strachan, David P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Taal, H. Rob; Teo, Yik-Ying; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Warrington, Nicole M.; White, Scott; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cooper, Cyrus; Estivill, Xavier; Gillman, Matthew; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hocher, Berthold; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakka, Timo A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Melbye, Mads; Mohlke, Karen L.; Dedoussis, George V.; Ong, Ken K.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Pennell, Craig E.; Price, Thomas S.; Power, Chris; Raitakari, Olli T.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Scherag, Andre; Simell, Olli; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Widen, Elisabeth; Wilson, James F.; Ang, Wei; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Bergen, Nienke; Benke, Kelly; Berry, Diane; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Coin, Lachlan; Cousminer, Diana L.; Das, Shikta; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M.; Frayling, Tim; Freathy, Rachel M.; Gaillard, Romy; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Guxens, Monica; Hadley, Dexter; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huikari, Ville; Hypponen, Elina; Kaakinen, Marika; Kowgier, Matthew; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lewin, Alex; Lindgren, Cecilia; Marsh, Julie; Middeldorp, Christel; Millwood, Iona; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Nivard, Michel; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rodriguez, Alina; Sebert, Sylvain; Sovio, Ulla; St Pourcain, Beate; Standl, Marie; Strachan, David P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Taal, H. Rob; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Warrington, Nicole M.; White, Scott; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Estivill, Xavier; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic variants associated with head circumference in infancy, we performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N = 10,768 individuals of European ancestry enrolled in pregnancy and/or birth cohorts) and followed up three lead signals in six replication stud

  13. Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Taal (Rob); B. St Pourcain (Beate); E. Thiering (Eelisabeth); S. Das; D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); N. Warrington (Nicole); M. Kaakinen (Marika); E. Kreiner-Møller (Eskil); J.P. Bradfield (Jonathan); R.M. Freathy (Rachel); F. Geller (Frank); M. Guxens (Mònica ); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); M. Kerkhof (Marjan); N. Timpson (Nicholas); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); L.J. Beilin (Lawrie); K. Bønnelykke (Klaus); J.L. Buxton (Jessica L); P. Charoen (Pimphen); B.L.K. Chawes (Bo Lund Krogsgaard); K. Hagen (Knut); D.M. Evans (David); A. Hofman (Albert); J.P. Kemp (John); C.E. Kim (Cecilia); N. Klopp (Norman); J. Lahti (Jari); S.J. Lye (Stephen); G. Mcmahon (George); F.D. Mentch (Frank); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); J. Sunyer (Jordi); C. Tiesler (Carla); H. Yaghootkar (Hanieh); M. Fornage (Myriam); S. Seshadri (Sudha); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Debette (Stéphanie); H.A. Vrooman (Henri); S. Sigurdsson (Stefan); S. Ropele (Stefan); L.H. Coker (Laura); W.T. Longstreth Jr; W.J. Niessen (Wiro); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); A. Beiser (Alexa); A.P. Zijdenbos; M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); M.A. Nalls (Michael); R. Au (Rhoda); H. Gudnason (Haukur); A. van der Lugt (Aad); T.B. Harris (Tamara); W.M. Meeks (William); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); D.J. Catellier (Diane); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); P.A. Wolf (Philip); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); T.H. Mosley (Thomas); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); L.J. Launer (Lenore); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); W.Q. Ang (Wei); C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt (Toos); N.E. Bergen (Nienke); P.J. Benke (Paul); D. Berry (Diane); L. Coin (Lachlan); P. Elliott (Paul); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); R. Gaillard (Romy); M. Groen-Blokhuis (Maria); D. Hadley (David); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); V. Huikari (Ville); E. Hypponen (Elina); M. Kowgier (Matthew); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); A. Lewin (Alex); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); J.A. Marsh (Julie); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); I.Y. Millwood (Iona); M. Nivard (Michel); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Rodriguez (Alfredo Chapin); S. Sebert (Sylvain); U. Sovio (Ulla); E. Standl (Eberhard); D.P. Strachan (David); H.R. Taal (Rob); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); B. Valcárcel (Beatriz); S. White (Scott); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); X. Estivill (Xavier); S.F. Grant; A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); J. Heinrich (Joachim); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); C.E. Pennell (Craig); C. Power (Christopher); E. Widen (Elisabeth); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); R.M. Chiavacci (Rosetta); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); J. Fernandez-Banet (Julio); A.L. Hartikainen; A.J. van der Heijden (Bert); A. Iñiguez (Andrés); M. Lathrop (Mark); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. Mølgaard (Anne); J.P. Newnham (John); A. Palotie (Aarno); A. Pouta (Anneli); S.M. Ring (Susan); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); H. Vissing; C. DeCarli (Charles); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); M. Melbye (Mads); H. Bisgaard; H. Hakonarson (Hakon); G.D. Smith; V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); L.S. Adair (Linda); M. Atalay (Mustafa); O.S.P. Davis (Oliver S.); C. Flexeder (Claudia); L.-K. Goh; C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); J. Hedebrand (Johannes); A. Hinney (Anke); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); J.W. Holloway (John); J.J. Holst; M. Horikoshi (Momoko); T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas); M. Kirin (Mirna); T.A. Lakka (Timo); L.A. Lange (Leslie); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); V. Lindi (Virpi); R. Maggi (Reedik); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); C. Nohr (Christian); I. Ntalla (Ioanna); E. Oken (Emily); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); J. Pararajasingham (Jennifer); R.M. Salem (Rany); N. Siitonen (Niina); H.R. Taal (Rob); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); C. Cooper (Charles); M.W. Gillman (Matthew W.); B. Hocher (Berthold); T.A. Lakka (Timo); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); G.V. Dedoussis (George); K.K. Ong (Ken); E. Pearson (Ewan); T.S. Price (Thomas); O. Raitakari (Olli); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); A. Scherag (Andre); O. Simell (Olli); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); J.F. Wilson (James)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic variants associated with head circumference in infancy, we performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N = 10,768 individuals of European ancestry enrolled in pregnancy and/or birth cohorts) and followed up three lead signals in six repl

  14. Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trynka, G.; Hunt, K.A.; Bockett, N.A.; Romanos, J.; Mistry, V.; Szperl, A.; Bakker, S.F.; Bardella, M.T.; Bhaw-Rosun, L.; Castillejo, G.; Concha, E. de la; Almeida, R.C. de; Dias, K.R.; Diemen, C.C. van; Dubois, P.C.; Duerr, R.H.; Edkins, S.; Franke, L.; Fransen, K.; Gutierrez, J.; Heap, G.A.; Hrdlickova, B.; Hunt, S.; Izurieta, L.P.; Izzo, V.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Langford, C.; Mazzilli, M.C.; Mein, C.A.; Midah, V.; Mitrovic, M.; Mora, B.; Morelli, M.; Nutland, S.; Nunez, C.; Onengut-Gumuscu, S.; Pearce, K.; Platteel, M.; Polanco, I.; Potter, S.; Ribes-Koninckx, C.; Ricano-Ponce, I.; Rich, S.S.; Rybak, A.; Santiago, J.L.; Senapati, S.; Sood, A.; Szajewska, H.; Troncone, R.; Varade, J.; Wallace, C.; Wolters, V.M.; Zhernakova, A.; Thelma, B.K.; Cukrowska, B.; Urcelay, E.; Bilbao, J.R.; Mearin, M.L.; Barisani, D.; Barrett, J.C.; Plagnol, V.; Deloukas, P.; Wijmenga, C.; Heel, D.A. van

    2011-01-01

    Using variants from the 1000 Genomes Project pilot European CEU dataset and data from additional resequencing studies, we densely genotyped 183 non-HLA risk loci previously associated with immune-mediated diseases in 12,041 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 12,228 controls. We identified 1

  15. Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, H. Rob; St Pourcain, Beate; Thiering, Elisabeth; Das, Shikta; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Kaakinen, Marika; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Geller, Frank; Guxens, Monica; Cousminer, Diana L.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Buxton, Jessica L.; Charoen, Pimphen; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Eriksson, Johan; Evans, David M.; Hofman, Albert; Kemp, John P.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Klopp, Norman; Lahti, Jari; Lye, Stephen J.; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Tiesler, Carla; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Debette, Stephanie; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Smith, Albert V.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fernandez-Banet, Julio; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; van der Heijden, Albert J.; Iniguez, Carmen; Lathrop, Mark; McArdle, Wendy L.; Molgaard, Anne; Newnham, John P.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pouta, Annneli; Ring, Susan M.; Sovio, Ulla; Standl, Marie; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; DeCarli, Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Estivill, Xavier; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Melbye, Mads; Bisgaard, Hans; Pennell, Craig E.; Widen, Elisabeth; Hakonarson, Hakon; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Adair, Linda S.; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Bergen, Nienke; Benke, Kelly; Berry, Diane; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Coin, Lachlan; Cousminer, Diana L.; Das, Shikta; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Flexeder, Claudia; Frayling, Tim; Freathy, Rachel M.; Gaillard, Romy; Geller, Frank; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Goh, Liang-Kee; Guxens, Monica; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Hadley, Dexter; Hedebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Holloway, John W.; Holst, Claus; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huikari, Ville; Hypponen, Elina; Iniguez, Carmen; Kaakinen, Marika; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.; Kirin, Mirna; Kowgier, Matthew; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lange, Leslie A.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lewin, Alex; Lindgren, Cecilia; Lindi, Virpi; Maggi, Reedik; Marsh, Julie; Middeldorp, Christel; Millwood, Iona; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nivard, Michel; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Ntalla, Ioanna; Oken, Emily; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pararajasingham, Jennifer; Prokopenko, Inga; Rodriguez, Alina; Salem, Rany M.; Sebert, Sylvain; Siitonen, Niina; Sovio, Ulla; St Pourcain, Beate; Strachan, David P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Taal, H. Rob; Teo, Yik-Ying; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Warrington, Nicole M.; White, Scott; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cooper, Cyrus; Estivill, Xavier; Gillman, Matthew; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hocher, Berthold; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakka, Timo A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Melbye, Mads; Mohlke, Karen L.; Dedoussis, George V.; Ong, Ken K.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Pennell, Craig E.; Price, Thomas S.; Power, Chris; Raitakari, Olli T.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Scherag, Andre; Simell, Olli; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Widen, Elisabeth; Wilson, James F.; Ang, Wei; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Bergen, Nienke; Benke, Kelly; Berry, Diane; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Coin, Lachlan; Cousminer, Diana L.; Das, Shikta; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M.; Frayling, Tim; Freathy, Rachel M.; Gaillard, Romy; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Guxens, Monica; Hadley, Dexter; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huikari, Ville; Hypponen, Elina; Kaakinen, Marika; Kowgier, Matthew; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lewin, Alex; Lindgren, Cecilia; Marsh, Julie; Middeldorp, Christel; Millwood, Iona; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Nivard, Michel; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rodriguez, Alina; Sebert, Sylvain; Sovio, Ulla; St Pourcain, Beate; Standl, Marie; Strachan, David P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Taal, H. Rob; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Warrington, Nicole M.; White, Scott; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Estivill, Xavier; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heinrich, Joachim; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pennell, Craig E.; Power, Chris; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Widen, Elisabeth; Ikram, M. Arfan; Fornage, Myriam; Smith, Albert V.; Seshadri, Sudha; Schmidt, Reinhold; Debette, Stephanie; Vrooman, Henri A.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Ropele, Stefan; Coker, Laura H.; Longstreth, W. T.; Niessen, Wiro J.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Beiser, Alexa; Zijdenbos, Alex P.; Struchalin, Maksim; Jack, Clifford R.; Nalls, Mike A.; Au, Rhoda; Hofman, Albert; Gudnason, Haukur; van der Lugt, Aad; Harris, Tamara B.; Meeks, William M.; Vernooij, Meike W.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Catellier, Diane; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Windham, B. Gwen; Wolf, Philip A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Schmidt, Helena; Launer, Lenore J.; Breteler, Monique M. B.; DeCarli, Charles

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic variants associated with head circumference in infancy, we performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N = 10,768 individuals of European ancestry enrolled in pregnancy and/or birth cohorts) and followed up three lead signals in six replication stud

  16. Common variants at 12q15 and 12q24 are associated with infant head circumference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, H. Rob; St Pourcain, Beate; Thiering, Elisabeth; Das, Shikta; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Kaakinen, Marika; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Geller, Frank; Guxens, Monica; Cousminer, Diana L.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Buxton, Jessica L.; Charoen, Pimphen; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Eriksson, Johan; Evans, David M.; Hofman, Albert; Kemp, John P.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Klopp, Norman; Lahti, Jari; Lye, Stephen J.; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Tiesler, Carla; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Debette, Stephanie; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Smith, Albert V.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fernandez-Banet, Julio; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; van der Heijden, Albert J.; Iniguez, Carmen; Lathrop, Mark; McArdle, Wendy L.; Molgaard, Anne; Newnham, John P.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pouta, Annneli; Ring, Susan M.; Sovio, Ulla; Standl, Marie; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; DeCarli, Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Estivill, Xavier; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Melbye, Mads; Bisgaard, Hans; Pennell, Craig E.; Widen, Elisabeth; Hakonarson, Hakon; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Adair, Linda S.; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Bergen, Nienke; Benke, Kelly; Berry, Diane; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Coin, Lachlan; Cousminer, Diana L.; Das, Shikta; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Flexeder, Claudia; Frayling, Tim; Freathy, Rachel M.; Gaillard, Romy; Geller, Frank; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Goh, Liang-Kee; Guxens, Monica; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Hadley, Dexter; Hedebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Holloway, John W.; Holst, Claus; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huikari, Ville; Hypponen, Elina; Iniguez, Carmen; Kaakinen, Marika; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.; Kirin, Mirna; Kowgier, Matthew; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lange, Leslie A.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lewin, Alex; Lindgren, Cecilia; Lindi, Virpi; Maggi, Reedik; Marsh, Julie; Middeldorp, Christel; Millwood, Iona; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nivard, Michel; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Ntalla, Ioanna; Oken, Emily; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pararajasingham, Jennifer; Prokopenko, Inga; Rodriguez, Alina; Salem, Rany M.; Sebert, Sylvain; Siitonen, Niina; Sovio, Ulla; St Pourcain, Beate; Strachan, David P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Taal, H. Rob; Teo, Yik-Ying; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Warrington, Nicole M.; White, Scott; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cooper, Cyrus; Estivill, Xavier; Gillman, Matthew; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hocher, Berthold; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakka, Timo A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Melbye, Mads; Mohlke, Karen L.; Dedoussis, George V.; Ong, Ken K.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Pennell, Craig E.; Price, Thomas S.; Power, Chris; Raitakari, Olli T.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Scherag, Andre; Simell, Olli; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Widen, Elisabeth; Wilson, James F.; Ang, Wei; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Bergen, Nienke; Benke, Kelly; Berry, Diane; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Coin, Lachlan; Cousminer, Diana L.; Das, Shikta; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M.; Frayling, Tim; Freathy, Rachel M.; Gaillard, Romy; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria; Guxens, Monica; Hadley, Dexter; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huikari, Ville; Hypponen, Elina; Kaakinen, Marika; Kowgier, Matthew; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lewin, Alex; Lindgren, Cecilia; Marsh, Julie; Middeldorp, Christel; Millwood, Iona; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Nivard, Michel; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rodriguez, Alina; Sebert, Sylvain; Sovio, Ulla; St Pourcain, Beate; Standl, Marie; Strachan, David P.; Sunyer, Jordi; Taal, H. Rob; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Warrington, Nicole M.; White, Scott; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Estivill, Xavier; Grant, Struan F. A.

    To identify genetic variants associated with head circumference in infancy, we performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N = 10,768 individuals of European ancestry enrolled in pregnancy and/or birth cohorts) and followed up three lead signals in six replication

  17. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P.; Senstad, Rudy E.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Orjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A.; Cannon, Dara M.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J.; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hwang, Kristy S.; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H.; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Munoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; O'Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Putz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Rose, Emma J.; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G. M.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Brohawn, David G.; Cantor, Rita M.; Carless, Melanie A.; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E.; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A. A.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gill, Michael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Hagler, Donald J.; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liewald, David C.; Mandl, Rene; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nauck, Matthias; Noethen, Markus M.; Olvera, Rene L.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G. Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Renteria, Miguel E.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G.; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Veltman, Joris A.; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Dale, Anders M.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W.; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W.; Veltman, Dick J.; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Smith, Albert V.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W.; Launer, Lenore J.; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Bastin, Mark E.; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernandez, Guillen; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Hardy, John; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, Rene S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W.; Potkin, Steven G.; Saemann, Philipp G.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease(1,2) and is reduced in schizophrenia(3), major depression(4) and mesia

  18. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nickels

    Full Text Available Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6 and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4. Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16 in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10 in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37 in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98 in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85 in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5, with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17 in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05 in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  19. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-10-04

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n=3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n=6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; pcarrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (pcarrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p<0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Combining Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Genetic Variant rs2736100 with Epidemiologic Factors in the Prediction of Lung Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Kewei; Chi, Lumei; Cui, Jiuwei; Jin, Lina; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants from a considerable number of susceptibility loci have been identified in association with cancer risk, but their interaction with epidemiologic factors in lung cancer remains to be defined. We sought to establish a forecasting model for identifying individuals with high-risk of lung cancer by combing gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms with epidemiologic factors. Genotyping and clinical data from 500 lung cancer cases and 500 controls were used for developing the logistic regression model. We found that lung cancer was associated with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) rs2736100 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The TERT rs2736100 model was still significantly associated with lung cancer risk when combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, including lower education, lower BMI, COPD history, heavy cigarettes smoking, heavy cooking emission, and dietary factors (over-consumption of meat and deficiency in fish/shrimp, vegetables, dairy products, and soybean products). These data suggest that combining TERT SNP and epidemiologic factors may be a useful approach to discriminate high and low-risk individuals for lung cancer.

  1. Common and Uncommon Anatomical Variants of Intrahepatic Bile Ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and its Clinical Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawagi, Radha; Sundar, Shyam; Raghuvanshi, Sameer; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Jayaraman, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative knowledge of intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) anatomy is critical for planning liver resections, liver transplantations and complex biliary reconstructive surgery. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the imaging features of various anatomical variants of IHD using magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) and their prevalence in our population. Material/Methods This observational clinical evaluation study included 224 patients who were referred for MRCP. MRCP was performed in a 1.5-Tesla magnet (Philips) with SSH MRCP 3DHR and SSHMRCP rad protocol. A senior radiologist assessed the biliary passage for anatomical variations. Results The branching pattern of the right hepatic duct (RHD) was typical in 55.3% of subjects. The most common variant was right posterior sectoral duct (RPSD) draining into the left hepatic duct (LHD) in 27.6% of subjects. Trifurcation pattern was noted in 9.3% of subjects. In 4% of subjects, RPSD was draining into the common hepatic duct (CHD) and in 0.8% of subjects into the cystic duct. Other variants were noted in 2.6% of subjects. In 4.9% of cases there was an accessory duct. The most common type of LHD branching pattern was a common trunk of segment 2 and 3 ducts joining the segment 4 duct in 67.8% of subjects. In 23.2% of subjects, segment 2 duct united with the common trunk of segment 3 and 4 and in 3.4% of subjects segment 2, 3, and 4 ducts united together to form LHD. Other uncommon branching patterns of LHD were seen in 4.9% of subjects. Conclusions Intrahepatic bile duct anatomy is complex with many common and uncommon variations. MRCP is a reliable non-invasive imaging method for demonstration of bile duct morphology, which is useful to plan complex surgeries and to prevent iatrogenic injuries. PMID:27298653

  2. Common genetic variants on 6q24 associated with exceptional episodic memory performance in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Christensen, Kaare;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: There are genetic influences on memory ability as we age, but no specific genes have been identified. OBJECTIVE: To use a cognitive endophenotype, exceptional episodic memory (EEM) performance, derived from nondemented offspring from the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) to identify genetic...... variants that may be responsible for the high cognitive performance of LLFS participants and further replicate these variants using an additional 4006 nondemented individuals from 4 independent elderly cohorts. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 467 LLFS participants from 18 families with 2...... or more offspring that exhibited exceptional memory performance were used for genome-wide linkage analysis. Adjusted multivariate linear analyses in the 40-megabase region encompassing the linkage peak were conducted using 4 independent replication data sets that included 4006 nondemented elderly...

  3. Common variants of the genes encoding erythropoietin and its receptor modulate cognitive performance in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästner, Anne; Grube, Sabrina; El-Kordi, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    -term memory readouts, with one particular combination of genotypes superior to all others (p 800), these associations were confirmed. A matching preclinical study with mice demonstrated cognitive processing speed and memory enhanced upon transgenic......Erythropoietin (EPO) improves cognitive performance in clinical studies and rodent experiments. We hypothesized that an intrinsic role of EPO for cognition exists, with particular relevance in situations of cognitive decline, which is reflected by associations of EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR......) genotypes with cognitive functions. To prove this hypothesis, schizophrenic patients (N > 1000) were genotyped for 5' upstream-located gene variants, EPO SNP rs1617640 (T/G) and EPORSTR(GA)(n). Associations of these variants were obtained for cognitive processing speed, fine motor skills and short...

  4. Identification of nine new susceptibility loci for testicular cancer, including variants near DAZL and PRDM14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Elise; Seal, Sheila; McDonald, Heather; Zhang, Feng; Elliot, Anna; Lau, KingWai; Perdeaux, Elizabeth; Rapley, Elizabeth; Eeles, Rosalind; Peto, Julian; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Nsengimana, Jeremie; Shipley, Janet; Bishop, D. Timothy; Stratton, Michael R; Easton, Douglas F; Huddart, Robert A; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common cancer in young men and is notable for its high familial risks1,2. To date, six loci associated with TGCT have been reported3-7. From GWAS analysis of 307,291 SNPs in 986 cases and 4,946 controls, we selected for follow-up 694 SNPs, which we genotyped in a further 1,064 TGCT cases and 10,082 controls from the UK. We identified SNPs at nine new loci showing association with TGCT (P<5×10−8), at 1q22, 1q24.1, 3p24.3, 4q24, 5q31.1, 8q13.3, 16q12.1, 17q22 and 21q22.3, which together account for an additional 4-6% of the familial risk of TGCT. The loci include genes plausibly related to TGCT development. PRDM14, at 8q13.3, is essential for early germ cell specification8 whilst DAZL, at 3p24.3, is required for regulation of germ cell development9. Furthermore, PITX1, at 5q31.1 regulates TERT expression, and is the third TGCT locus implicated in telomerase regulation10. PMID:23666240

  5. Genome-wide common and rare variant analysis provides novel insights into clozapine-associated neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Sophie E; Hamshere, Marian L; Ripke, Stephan; Pardinas, Antonio F; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Rees, Elliott; Richards, Alexander L; Leonenko, Ganna; Jorskog, L Fredrik; Chambert, Kimberly D; Collier, David A; Genovese, Giulio; Giegling, Ina; Holmans, Peter; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Kirov, George; McCarroll, Steven A; MacCabe, James H; Mantripragada, Kiran; Moran, Jennifer L; Neale, Benjamin M; Stefansson, Hreinn; Rujescu, Dan; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F; Owen, Michael J; O’Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James T R

    2016-01-01

    The antipsychotic clozapine is uniquely effective in the management of schizophrenia, but its use is limited by its potential to induce agranulocytosis. The causes of this, and of its precursor neutropenia, are largely unknown although genetic factors play an important role. We sought risk alleles for clozapine-associated neutropenia in a sample of 66 cases and 5583 clozapine-treated controls, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS), imputed HLA alleles, exome array, and copy number variation analyses. We then combined associated variants in a meta-analysis with data from the Clozapine-Induced Agranulocytosis Consortium (up to 163 cases and 7970 controls). In the largest combined sample to date, we identified a novel association with rs149104283 (OR=4.32, P=1.79×10-8), intronic to transcripts of SLCO1B3 and SLCO1B7, members of a family of hepatic transporter genes previously implicated in adverse drug reactions including simvastatin-induced myopathy and docetaxel-induced neutropenia. Exome array analysis identified gene-wide associations of uncommon non-synonymous variants within UBAP2 and STARD9. We additionally provide independent replication of a previously identified variant in HLA-DQB1 (OR=15.6, P = 0.015, positive predictive value = 35.1%). These results implicate biological pathways through which clozapine may act to cause this serious adverse effect. PMID:27400856

  6. Identification of susceptibility variants in ADIPOR1 gene associated with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and the comorbidity of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zening Jin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Adiponectin receptor 1 (encoded by ADIPOR1 is one of the major adiponectin receptors, and plays an important role in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, few studies have reported simultaneous associations between ADIPOR1 variants and type 2 diabetes (T2D, coronary artery disease (CAD and T2D with CAD. Based on the "common soil" hypothesis, we investigated whether ADIPOR1 polymorphisms contributed to the etiology of T2D, CAD, or T2D with CAD in a Northern Han Chinese population. METHODS: Our multi-disease comparison study enrolled 657 subjects, including 165 with T2D, 173 with CAD, 174 with both T2D and CAD (T2D+CAD, and 145 local healthy controls. Six ADIPOR1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and their association with disease risk was analyzed. RESULTS: Multi-case-control comparison identified two ADIPOR1 variants: rs3737884-G, which was simultaneously associated with an increased risk of T2D, CAD, and T2D+CAD (P-value range, 9.80×10(-5-6.30×10(-4; odds ratio (OR range: 1.96-2.42 and 16850797-C, which was separately associated with T2D and T2D+CAD (P-value range: 0.007-0.014; OR range: 1.71-1.77. The risk genotypes of both rs3737884 and 16850797 were consistently associated with common metabolic phenotypes in all three diseases (P-value range: 4.81×10(-42-0.001. We observed an increase in the genetic dose-dependent cumulative risk with increasing risk allele numbers in T2D, CAD and T2D+CAD (P trend from 1.35×10(-5-0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that ADIPOR1 risk polymorphisms are a strong candidate for the "common soil" hypothesis and could partially contribute to disease susceptibility to T2D, CAD, and T2D with CAD in the Northern Han Chinese population.

  7. New susceptibility variants to narcolepsy identified in HLA class II region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Hirataka, Akane; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Omata, Naoto; Kojima, Hiroto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Saji, Hiroh; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Wada, Yuji; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-02-01

    Narcolepsy, a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities, is tightly associated with human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQB1*06:02. DQB1*06:02 is common in the general population (10-30%); therefore, additional genetic factors are needed for the development of narcolepsy. In the present study, HLA-DQB1 in 664 Japanese narcoleptic subjects and 3131 Japanese control subjects was examined to determine whether HLA-DQB1 alleles located in trans of DQB1*06:02 are associated with narcolepsy. The strongest association was with DQB1*06:01 (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), odds ratio, OR = 0.39), as reported in previous studies. Additional predisposing effects of DQB1*03:02 were also found (P = 2.5 × 10(-9), OR = 1.97). A comparison between DQB1*06:02 heterozygous cases and controls revealed dominant protective effects of DQB1*06:01 and DQB1*05:01. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based conditional analysis controlling for the effect of HLA-DQB1 was performed to determine whether there were other independent HLA associations outside of HLA-DQB1. This analysis revealed associations at HLA-DPB1 in the HLA class II region (rs3117242, P = 4.1 × 10(-5), OR = 2.45; DPB1*05:01, P = 8.1 × 10(-3), OR = 1.39). These results indicate that complex HLA class II associations contribute to the genetic predisposition to narcolepsy.

  8. Common 5S rRNA variants are likely to be accepted in many sequence contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Lee, Youn-Hyung; Fox, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Over evolutionary time RNA sequences which are successfully fixed in a population are selected from among those that satisfy the structural and chemical requirements imposed by the function of the RNA. These sequences together comprise the structure space of the RNA. In principle, a comprehensive understanding of RNA structure and function would make it possible to enumerate which specific RNA sequences belong to a particular structure space and which do not. We are using bacterial 5S rRNA as a model system to attempt to identify principles that can be used to predict which sequences do or do not belong to the 5S rRNA structure space. One promising idea is the very intuitive notion that frequently seen sequence changes in an aligned data set of naturally occurring 5S rRNAs would be widely accepted in many other 5S rRNA sequence contexts. To test this hypothesis, we first developed well-defined operational definitions for a Vibrio region of the 5S rRNA structure space and what is meant by a highly variable position. Fourteen sequence variants (10 point changes and 4 base-pair changes) were identified in this way, which, by the hypothesis, would be expected to incorporate successfully in any of the known sequences in the Vibrio region. All 14 of these changes were constructed and separately introduced into the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence where they are not normally found. Each variant was evaluated for its ability to function as a valid 5S rRNA in an E. coli cellular context. It was found that 93% (13/14) of the variants tested are likely valid 5S rRNAs in this context. In addition, seven variants were constructed that, although present in the Vibrio region, did not meet the stringent criteria for a highly variable position. In this case, 86% (6/7) are likely valid. As a control we also examined seven variants that are seldom or never seen in the Vibrio region of 5S rRNA sequence space. In this case only two of seven were found to be potentially valid. The

  9. Role of a genetic variant on the 15q25.1 lung cancer susceptibility locus in smoking-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

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    Ji, Xuemei; Zhang, Weidong; Gui, Jiang; Fan, Xia; Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Yafang; An, Guangyu; Zhu, Dakai; Hu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The 15q25.1 lung cancer susceptibility locus, containing CHRNA5, could modify lung cancer susceptibility and multiple smoking related phenotypes. However, no studies have investigated the association between CHRNA5 rs3841324, which has been proven to have the highest association with CHRNA5 mRNA expression, and the risk of other smoking-associated cancers, except lung cancer. In the current study we examined the association between rs3841324 and susceptibility to smoking-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this case-control study we genotyped the CHRNA5 rs3841324 polymorphism with 400 NPC cases and 491 healthy controls who were Han Chinese and frequency-matched by age (±5 years), gender, and alcohol consumption. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We found that individuals with CHRNA5 rs3841324 combined variant genotypes (ins/del+del/del) had a >1.5-fold elevated risk for NPC than those with the ins/ins genotype (adjusted OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.16-2.00), especially among ever smokers (adjusted OR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.23-3.48). The combined variant genotypes acted jointly with cigarette smoking to contribute to a 4.35-fold increased NPC risk (adjusted OR = 4.35; 95% CI, 2.57-7.38). There was a dose-response relationship between deletion alleles and NPC susceptibility (trend test, P = 0.011). Our results suggest that genetic variants on the 15q25.1 lung cancer susceptibility locus may influence susceptibility to NPC, particularly for smoking-associated NPC. Such work may be helpful to facilitate an understanding of the etiology of smoking-associated cancers and improve prevention efforts.

  10. A common variant of HMGA2 is associated with adult and childhood height in the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedon, Michael N; Lettre, Guillaume; Freathy, Rachel M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Voight, Benjamin F; Perry, John R B; Elliott, Katherine S; Hackett, Rachel; Guiducci, Candace; Shields, Beverley; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Lango, Hana; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Timpson, Nicholas J; Burtt, Noel P; Rayner, Nigel W; Saxena, Richa; Ardlie, Kristin; Tobias, Jonathan H; Ness, Andrew R; Ring, Susan M; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Peltonen, Leena; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Groop, Leif C; Hattersley, Andrew T; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Frayling, Timothy M

    2011-01-01

    Human height is a classic, highly heritable quantitative trait. To begin to identify genetic variants influencing height, we examined genome-wide association data from 4,921 individuals. Common variants in the HMGA2 oncogene, exemplified by rs1042725, were associated with height (P = 4 × 10−8). HMGA2 is also a strong biological candidate for height, as rare, severe mutations in this gene alter body size in mice and humans, so we tested rs1042725 in additional samples. We confirmed the association in 19,064 adults from four further studies (P = 3 × 10−11, overall P = 4 × 10−16, including the genome-wide association data). We also observed the association in children (P = 1 × 10−6, N = 6,827) and a tall/short case-control study (P = 4 × 10−6, N = 3,207). We estimate that rs1042725 explains ~0.3% of population variation in height (~0.4 cm increased adult height per C allele). There are few examples of common genetic variants reproducibly associated with human quantitative traits; these results represent, to our knowledge, the first consistently replicated association with adult and childhood height. PMID:17767157

  11. Detecting the Common and Individual Effects of Rare Variants on Quantitative Traits by Using Extreme Phenotype Sampling

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    Ya-Jing Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to detect rare genetic variants associated with complex human traits. In recent literature, various methods specifically designed for rare variants are proposed. These tests can be broadly classified into burden and nonburden tests. In this paper, we take advantage of the burden and nonburden tests, and consider the common effect and the individual deviations from the common effect. To achieve robustness, we use two methods of combining p-values, Fisher’s method and the minimum-p method. In rare variant association studies, to improve the power of the tests, we explore the advantage of the extreme phenotype sampling. At first, we dichotomize the continuous phenotypes before analysis, and the two extremes are treated as two different groups representing a dichotomous phenotype. We next compare the powers of several methods based on extreme phenotype sampling and random sampling. Extensive simulation studies show that our proposed methods by using extreme phenotype sampling are the most powerful or very close to the most powerful one in various settings of true models when the same sample size is used.

  12. Susceptibility effects of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) variants and parental monitoring on externalizing behavior trajectories: Risk and protection conveyed by the minor allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Elisa M; Villafuerte, Sandra; Heitzeg, Mary M; Burmeister, Margit; Zucker, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Understanding factors increasing susceptibility to social contexts and predicting psychopathology can help identify targets for prevention. Persistently high externalizing behavior in adolescence is predictive of psychopathology in adulthood. Parental monitoring predicts low externalizing behavior, yet youth likely vary in the degree to which they are affected by parents. Genetic variants of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) may increase susceptibility to parental monitoring, thus impacting externalizing trajectories. We had several objectives: (a) to determine whether GABRA2 (rs279827, rs279826, rs279858) moderates the relationship between a component of parental monitoring, parental knowledge, and externalizing trajectories; (b) to test the form of this interaction to assess whether GABRA2 variants reflect risk (diathesis-stress) or susceptibility (differential susceptibility) factors; and (c) to clarify GABRA2 associations on the development of problem behavior. This prospective study (N = 504) identified three externalizing trajectory classes (i.e., low, decreasing, and high) across adolescence. A GABRA2 × Parental Monitoring effect on class membership was observed, such that A-carriers were largely unaffected by parental monitoring, whereas class membership for those with the GG genotype was affected by parental monitoring. Findings support differential susceptibility in GABRA2.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 promoter polymorphisms: common TLR4 variants may protect against severe urinary tract infection.

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    Bryndís Ragnarsdóttir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms affecting Toll-like receptor (TLR structure appear to be rare, as would be expected due to their essential coordinator role in innate immunity. Here, we assess variation in TLR4 expression, rather than structure, as a mechanism to diversify innate immune responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced the TLR4 promoter (4,3 kb in Swedish blood donors. Since TLR4 plays a vital role in susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI, promoter sequences were obtained from children with mild or severe disease. We performed a case-control study of pediatric patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU or those prone to recurrent acute pyelonephritis (APN. Promoter activity of the single SNPs or multiple allelic changes corresponding to the genotype patterns (GPs was tested. We then conducted a replication study in an independent cohort of adult patients with a history of childhood APN. Last, in vivo effects of the different GPs were examined after therapeutic intravesical inoculation of 19 patients with Escherichia coli 83972. We identified in total eight TLR4 promoter sequence variants in the Swedish control population, forming 19 haplotypes and 29 genotype patterns, some with effects on promoter activity. Compared to symptomatic patients and healthy controls, ABU patients had fewer genotype patterns, and their promoter sequence variants reduced TLR4 expression in response to infection. The ABU associated GPs also reduced innate immune responses in patients who were subjected to therapeutic urinary E. coli tract inoculation. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that genetic variation in the TLR4 promoter may be an essential, largely overlooked mechanism to influence TLR4 expression and UTI susceptibility.

  14. Radiological Study of Maxillary Sinus using CBCT: Relationship between Mucosal Thickening and Common Anatomic Variants in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory diseases of the maxillary sinus favour the thickening of the sinus mucosa. Therefore, it might be possible to establish a radiological, pathological threshold of mucosal thickening. Furthermore, there is an association between common anatomic variants of the nose and maxillary mucosal thickening. Aim To define the pathological thickening of maxillary sinus mucosa and its association with the presence of common anatomic variants (concha bullosa, Haller’s cell and accessory maxillary ostium). Materials and Methods From March 2014 to February 2016, Two hundred patients underwent Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) of the paranasal sinus. We conducted this retrospective study of total 70 patients, 34 patients i.e., a total of 68 meatus-maxillary units (study group - those affected by Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS) and another 36 patients i.e., a total of 72 meatus maxillary units (control group - without symptoms of CRS). We assessed the degree of thickening of the sinus mucosa distinguishing between ≥ 2mm or ≤ 2mm, than we analysed the behaviour of the thickness in the study group and in the control group. Chi-Square test was used to compare mucosal thickening between study and control group and the presence of some common anatomic variants or closure of maxillary ostium. Results In the study group we observed a clear association between maxillary mucosal thickening ≥ 2mm and CRS (p<0.01). We however, observed no association between the presence of common anatomic variations and thickening of the maxillary mucosa and between the presence of common anatomic variations and the study group. Instead, using a binary logistic regression, we observed a significant association (p<0.01) between closure of natural ostium of the maxillary sinus and mucosal thickening or between closure of natural ostium and study group. Conclusion We believe that a thickening of the maxillary mucosa ≥ 2mm and closure of natural maxillary ostium are

  15. A common 16p11.2 inversion underlies the joint susceptibility to asthma and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan R; Cáceres, Alejandro; Esko, Tonu; Cuscó, Ivon; Puig, Marta; Esnaola, Mikel; Reina, Judith; Siroux, Valerie; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Nadif, Rachel; Reinmaa, Eva; Milani, Lili; Bustamante, Mariona; Jarvis, Deborah; Antó, Josep M; Sunyer, Jordi; Demenais, Florence; Kogevinas, Manolis; Metspalu, Andres; Cáceres, Mario; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-03-06

    The prevalence of asthma and obesity is increasing worldwide, and obesity is a well-documented risk factor for asthma. The mechanisms underlying this association and parallel time trends remain largely unknown but genetic factors may be involved. Here, we report on a common ~0.45 Mb genomic inversion at 16p11.2 that can be accurately genotyped via SNP array data. We show that the inversion allele protects against the joint occurrence of asthma and obesity in five large independent studies (combined sample size of 317 cases and 543 controls drawn from a total of 5,809 samples; combined OR = 0.48, p = 5.5 × 10(-6)). Allele frequencies show remarkable worldwide population stratification, ranging from 10% in East Africa to 49% in Northern Europe, consistent with discordant and extreme genetic drifts or adaptive selections after human migration out of Africa. Inversion alleles strongly correlate with expression levels of neighboring genes, especially TUFM (p = 3.0 × 10(-40)) that encodes a mitochondrial protein regulator of energy balance and inhibitor of type 1 interferon, and other candidates for asthma (IL27) and obesity (APOB48R and SH2B1). Therefore, by affecting gene expression, the ~0.45 Mb 16p11.2 inversion provides a genetic basis for the joint susceptibility to asthma and obesity, with a population attributable risk of 39.7%. Differential mitochondrial function and basal energy balance of inversion alleles might also underlie the potential selection signature that led to their uneven distribution in world populations.

  16. Genome-wide interaction-based association analysis identified multiple new susceptibility Loci for common diseases.

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    Yang Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide interaction-based association (GWIBA analysis has the potential to identify novel susceptibility loci. These interaction effects could be missed with the prevailing approaches in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, no convincing loci have been discovered exclusively from GWIBA methods, and the intensive computation involved is a major barrier for application. Here, we developed a fast, multi-thread/parallel program named "pair-wise interaction-based association mapping" (PIAM for exhaustive two-locus searches. With this program, we performed a complete GWIBA analysis on seven diseases with stringent control for false positives, and we validated the results for three of these diseases. We identified one pair-wise interaction between a previously identified locus, C1orf106, and one new locus, TEC, that was specific for Crohn's disease, with a Bonferroni corrected P < 0.05 (P = 0.039. This interaction was replicated with a pair of proxy linked loci (P = 0.013 on an independent dataset. Five other interactions had corrected P < 0.5. We identified the allelic effect of a locus close to SLC7A13 for coronary artery disease. This was replicated with a linked locus on an independent dataset (P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁷. Through a local validation analysis that evaluated association signals, rather than locus-based associations, we found that several other regions showed association/interaction signals with nominal P < 0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the GWIBA approach was successful for identifying novel loci, and the results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of common diseases. In addition, our PIAM program was capable of handling very large GWAS datasets that are likely to be produced in the future.

  17. Common variants modify the age of onset for basal cell carcinomas in Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Binnaz; Byers, Helen J; Smith, Miriam J; Lear, John; Oudit, Deemesh; Bholah, Zaynab; Roberts, Stephen A; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2015-05-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and jaw keratocysts. Through association studies in cohorts of sporadic BCC, nine genetic variants have previously been identified to increase the risk of BCC. The nine SNPs were genotyped by Taqman allelic discrimination in 125 individuals with Gorlin syndrome. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional-Hazard regression analysis were applied to determine the association between genotypes and age of first BCC in individuals with Gorlin syndrome. The p.(Arg151Cys) variant in MC1R (rs1805007) was associated with an earlier median age of onset of BCC of 27 years (95% CI: 20-34) compared with 34 years (95% CI: 30-40) for wild-type individuals (hazard ratio (HR)=1.64, 95% CI: 1.04-2.58, P=0.034). The risk allele of the variant at the chromosome 5p15 locus encompassing TERT-CLPTM1L (rs401681) was also associated with an earlier median onset of BCC, 31 years (95% CI: 28-37) compared with 41 years (95% CI: 32-48, HR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.08-1.93, P=0.014). In individuals with a risk allele at either rs1805007 or rs401681 the median time to BCC was 31 years of age (95% CI: 28-34) compared with 44 years of age (95% CI: 38-53) in wild-type individuals (HR=2.48, 95% CI: 1.47-4.17, P=0.0002). Our findings may have implications for future personalized risk estimates and BCC screening strategies in individuals with Gorlin syndrome.

  18. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang,Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; ZHONG, CHUNLONG; Krystal, John H.; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-01-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatr...

  19. Contribution of common PCSK1 genetic variants to obesity in 8,359 subjects from multi-ethnic American population.

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    Hélène Choquet

    Full Text Available Common PCSK1 variants (notably rs6232 and rs6235 have been shown to be associated with obesity in European, Asian and Mexican populations. To determine whether common PCSK1 variants contribute to obesity in American population, we conducted association analyses in 8,359 subjects using two multi-ethnic American studies: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA. By evaluating the contribution of rs6232 and rs6235 in each ethnic group, we found that in European-American subjects from CARDIA, only rs6232 was associated with BMI (P = 0.006 and obesity (P = 0.018 but also increased the obesity incidence during the 20 years of follow-up (HR = 1.53 [1.07-2.19], P = 0.019. Alternatively, in African-American subjects from CARDIA, rs6235 was associated with BMI (P = 0.028 and obesity (P = 0.018. Further, by combining the two case-control ethnic groups from the CARDIA study in a meta-analysis, association between rs6235 and obesity risk remained significant (OR = 1.23 [1.05-1.45], P = 9.5×10(-3. However, neither rs6232 nor rs6235 was associated with BMI or obesity in the MESA study. Interestingly, rs6232 was associated with BMI (P = 4.2×10(-3 and obesity (P = 3.4×10(-3 in the younger European-American group combining samples from the both studies [less than median age (53 years], but not among the older age group (P = 0.756 and P = 0.935 for BMI and obesity, respectively. By combining all the case-control ethnic groups from CARDIA and MESA in a meta-analysis, we found no significant association for the both variants and obesity risk. Finally, by exploring the full PCSK1 locus, we observed that no variant remained significant after correction for multiple testing. These results indicate that common PCSK1 variants (notably rs6232 and rs6235 contribute modestly to obesity in multi-ethnic American population. Further, these results

  20. Case-control association testing of common variants from sequencing of DNA pools.

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    Allan F McRae

    Full Text Available While genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been successful in identifying a large number of variants associated with disease, the challenge of locating the underlying causal loci remains. Sequencing of case and control DNA pools provides an inexpensive method for assessing all variation in a genomic region surrounding a significant GWAS result. However, individual variants need to be ranked in terms of the strength of their association to disease in order to prioritise follow-up by individual genotyping. A simple method for testing for case-control association in sequence data from DNA pools is presented that allows the partitioning of the variance in allele frequency estimates into components due to the sampling of chromosomes from the pool during sequencing, sampling individuals from the population and unequal contribution from individuals during pool construction. The utility of this method is demonstrated on a sequence from the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH gene cluster on a case-control sample for heavy alcohol consumption.

  1. Common variants in left/right asymmetry genes and pathways are associated with relative hand skill.

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    William M Brandler

    Full Text Available Humans display structural and functional asymmetries in brain organization, strikingly with respect to language and handedness. The molecular basis of these asymmetries is unknown. We report a genome-wide association study meta-analysis for a quantitative measure of relative hand skill in individuals with dyslexia [reading disability (RD] (n = 728. The most strongly associated variant, rs7182874 (P = 8.68 × 10(-9, is located in PCSK6, further supporting an association we previously reported. We also confirmed the specificity of this association in individuals with RD; the same locus was not associated with relative hand skill in a general population cohort (n = 2,666. As PCSK6 is known to regulate NODAL in the development of left/right (LR asymmetry in mice, we developed a novel approach to GWAS pathway analysis, using gene-set enrichment to test for an over-representation of highly associated variants within the orthologs of genes whose disruption in mice yields LR asymmetry phenotypes. Four out of 15 LR asymmetry phenotypes showed an over-representation (FDR ≤ 5%. We replicated three of these phenotypes; situs inversus, heterotaxia, and double outlet right ventricle, in the general population cohort (FDR ≤ 5%. Our findings lead us to propose that handedness is a polygenic trait controlled in part by the molecular mechanisms that establish LR body asymmetry early in development.

  2. A Common Variant in the SETD7 Gene Predicts Serum Lycopene Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adamo, Christopher R; D'Urso, Antonietta; Ryan, Kathleen A; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Semba, Richard D; Steinle, Nanette I; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R; McArdle, Patrick F

    2016-02-06

    Dietary intake and higher serum concentrations of lycopene have been associated with lower incidence of prostate cancer and other chronic diseases. Identifying determinants of serum lycopene concentrations may thus have important public health implications. Prior studies have suggested that serum lycopene concentrations are under partial genetic control. The goal of this research was to identify genetic predictors of serum lycopene concentrations using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach among a sample of 441 Old Order Amish adults that consumed a controlled diet. Linear regression models were utilized to evaluate associations between genetic variants and serum concentrations of lycopene. Variant rs7680948 on chromosome 4, located in the intron region of the SETD7 gene, was significantly associated with serum lycopene concentrations (p = 3.41 × 10(-9)). Our findings also provided nominal support for the association previously noted between SCARB1 and serum lycopene concentrations, although with a different SNP (rs11057841) in the region. This study identified a novel locus associated with serum lycopene concentrations and our results raise a number of intriguing possibilities regarding the nature of the relationship between SETD7 and lycopene, both of which have been independently associated with prostate cancer. Further investigation into this relationship might help provide greater mechanistic understanding of these associations.

  3. AFPTAS results for common variants of bin packing: A new method to handle the small items

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Leah

    2009-01-01

    We consider two well-known natural variants of bin packing, and show that these packing problems admit asymptotic fully polynomial time approximation schemes (AFPTAS). In bin packing problems, a set of one-dimensional items of size at most 1 is to be assigned (packed) to subsets of sum at most 1 (bins). It has been known for a while that the most basic problem admits an AFPTAS. In this paper, we develop methods that allow to extend this result to other variants of bin packing. Specifically, the problems which we study in this paper, for which we design asymptotic fully polynomial time approximation schemes, are the following. The first problem is "Bin packing with cardinality constraints", where a parameter k is given, such that a bin may contain up to k items. The goal is to minimize the number of bins used. The second problem is "Bin packing with rejection", where every item has a rejection penalty associated with it. An item needs to be either packed to a bin or rejected, and the goal is to minimize the nu...

  4. Common variant at 16p11.2 conferring risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S; de Jong, S; Mattheisen, M; Costas, J; Demontis, D; Jamain, S; Pietiläinen, O P H; Lin, K; Papiol, S; Huttenlocher, J; Sigurdsson, E; Vassos, E; Giegling, I; Breuer, R; Fraser, G; Walker, N; Melle, I; Djurovic, S; Agartz, I; Tuulio-Henriksson, A; Suvisaari, J; Lönnqvist, J; Paunio, T; Olsen, L; Hansen, T; Ingason, A; Pirinen, M; Strengman, E; Hougaard, D M; Orntoft, T; Didriksen, M; Hollegaard, M V; Nordentoft, M; Abramova, L; Kaleda, V; Arrojo, M; Sanjuán, J; Arango, C; Etain, B; Bellivier, F; Méary, A; Schürhoff, F; Szoke, A; Ribolsi, M; Magni, V; Siracusano, A; Sperling, S; Rossner, M; Christiansen, C; Kiemeney, L A; Franke, B; van den Berg, L H; Veldink, J; Curran, S; Bolton, P; Poot, M; Staal, W; Rehnstrom, K; Kilpinen, H; Freitag, C M; Meyer, J; Magnusson, P; Saemundsen, E; Martsenkovsky, I; Bikshaieva, I; Martsenkovska, I; Vashchenko, O; Raleva, M; Paketchieva, K; Stefanovski, B; Durmishi, N; Pejovic Milovancevic, M; Lecic Tosevski, D; Silagadze, T; Naneishvili, N; Mikeladze, N; Surguladze, S; Vincent, J B; Farmer, A; Mitchell, P B; Wright, A; Schofield, P R; Fullerton, J M; Montgomery, G W; Martin, N G; Rubino, I A; van Winkel, R; Kenis, G; De Hert, M; Réthelyi, J M; Bitter, I; Terenius, L; Jönsson, E G; Bakker, S; van Os, J; Jablensky, A; Leboyer, M; Bramon, E; Powell, J; Murray, R; Corvin, A; Gill, M; Morris, D; O'Neill, F A; Kendler, K; Riley, B; Craddock, N; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Kong, A; Ehrenreich, H; Carracedo, A; Golimbet, V; Andreassen, O A; Børglum, A D; Mors, O; Mortensen, P B; Werge, T; Ophoff, R A; Nöthen, M M; Rietschel, M; Cichon, S; Ruggeri, M; Tosato, S; Palotie, A; St Clair, D; Rujescu, D; Collier, D A; Stefansson, H; Stefansson, K

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and genetic data support the notion that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share genetic risk factors. In our previous genome-wide association study, meta-analysis and follow-up (totaling as many as 18 206 cases and 42 536 controls), we identified four loci showing genome-wide significant association with schizophrenia. Here we consider a mixed schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (psychosis) phenotype (addition of 7469 bipolar disorder cases, 1535 schizophrenia cases, 333 other psychosis cases, 808 unaffected family members and 46 160 controls). Combined analysis reveals a novel variant at 16p11.2 showing genome-wide significant association (rs4583255[T]; odds ratio=1.08; P=6.6 × 10(-11)). The new variant is located within a 593-kb region that substantially increases risk of psychosis when duplicated. In line with the association of the duplication with reduced body mass index (BMI), rs4583255[T] is also associated with lower BMI (P=0.0039 in the public GIANT consortium data set; P=0.00047 in 22 651 additional Icelanders).

  5. Variants Other than Aspartic Acid at Codon 69 of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Gene Affect Susceptibility to Nucleoside Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Mark A.; Merigan, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    The T69D mutation in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) gene has been associated with reduced susceptibility to dideoxycytosine (ddC); however, several other mutations at codon 69 have been observed in antiretroviral drug-treated patients. The Stanford HIV RT and Protease Sequence Database was interrogated and showed that 23% of patients treated with nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTI) had mutations at codon 69. These variants included T69N, -S, -A, -G, -E, -I, and -K mutations that were present in patients treated with NRTI but not in drug-naive patients. Treatment history information showed that a substantial percentage of these codon 69 changes occurred in patients administered non-ddC-containing regimens. Different and specific patterns of other RT gene mutations were associated with the various codon 69 mutations. Drug susceptibility assays showed that viral constructs containing codon 69 variants could have reduced susceptibility to ddC and other RT inhibitors. These results suggest that the T69D mutation is not the only codon 69 variant associated with drug resistance and that ddC is not the only drug affected. PMID:11451685

  6. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke J H Coenen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF medication. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in seven TLR genes were genotyped in a Dutch cohort consisting of 378 RA patients and 294 controls. Significantly associated variants were investigated in replication cohorts from The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden (2877 RA patients and 2025 controls. 182 of the Dutch patients were treated with anti-TNF medication. Using these patients and a replication cohort (269 Swedish patients we analysed if genetic variants in TLR genes were associated with anti-TNF outcome. In the discovery phase of the study we found a significant association of SNPs rs2072493 in TLR5 and rs3853839 in TLR7 with RA disease susceptibility. Meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts did not confirm these findings. SNP rs2072493 in TLR5 was associated with anti-TNF outcome in the Dutch but not in the Swedish population. CONCLUSION: We conclude that genetic variants in TLRs do not play a major role in susceptibility for developing RA nor in anti-TNF treatment outcome in a Caucasian population.

  7. Germline genetic variants disturbing the Let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop alter breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao-Xiang Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that let-7 can repress the post-transcriptional translation of LIN28, and LIN28 in turn could block the maturation of let-7, forming a double-negative feedback loop. In this study, we investigated the effect of germline genetic variants on regulation of the homeostasis of the let-7/LIN28 loop and breast cancer risk. We initially demonstrated that the T/C variants of rs3811463, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located near the let-7 binding site in LIN28, could lead to differential regulation of LIN28 by let-7. Specifically, the C allele of rs3811463 weakened let-7-induced repression of LIN28 mRNA, resulting in increased production of LIN28 protein, which could in turn down-regulate the level of mature let-7. This effect was then validated at the tissue level in that the normal breast tissue of individuals with the rs3811463-TC genotype expressed significantly lower levels of let-7 and higher levels of LIN28 protein than those individuals with the rs3811463-TT genotype. Because previous in vitro and ex vivo experiments have consistently suggested that LIN28 could promote cellular transformation, we then systematically evaluated the relationship between rs3811463 as well as other common LIN28 SNPs and the risk of breast cancer in a stepwise manner. The first hospital-based association study (n = 2,300 demonstrated that two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, one of which was rs3811463, while the other was rs6697410. The C allele of the rs3811463 SNP corresponded to an increased risk of breast cancer with an odds ratio (OR of 1.25 (P = 0.0091, which was successfully replicated in a second independent study (n = 1,156 with community-based controls. The combined P-value of the two studies was 8.0 × 10⁻⁵. Taken together, our study demonstrates that host genetic variants could disturb the regulation of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop and alter breast cancer risk.

  8. Germline genetic variants disturbing the Let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop alter breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ao-Xiang; Yu, Ke-Da; Fan, Lei; Li, Ji-Yu; Yang, Chen; Huang, A-Ji; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that let-7 can repress the post-transcriptional translation of LIN28, and LIN28 in turn could block the maturation of let-7, forming a double-negative feedback loop. In this study, we investigated the effect of germline genetic variants on regulation of the homeostasis of the let-7/LIN28 loop and breast cancer risk. We initially demonstrated that the T/C variants of rs3811463, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located near the let-7 binding site in LIN28, could lead to differential regulation of LIN28 by let-7. Specifically, the C allele of rs3811463 weakened let-7-induced repression of LIN28 mRNA, resulting in increased production of LIN28 protein, which could in turn down-regulate the level of mature let-7. This effect was then validated at the tissue level in that the normal breast tissue of individuals with the rs3811463-TC genotype expressed significantly lower levels of let-7 and higher levels of LIN28 protein than those individuals with the rs3811463-TT genotype. Because previous in vitro and ex vivo experiments have consistently suggested that LIN28 could promote cellular transformation, we then systematically evaluated the relationship between rs3811463 as well as other common LIN28 SNPs and the risk of breast cancer in a stepwise manner. The first hospital-based association study (n = 2,300) demonstrated that two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, one of which was rs3811463, while the other was rs6697410. The C allele of the rs3811463 SNP corresponded to an increased risk of breast cancer with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.25 (P = 0.0091), which was successfully replicated in a second independent study (n = 1,156) with community-based controls. The combined P-value of the two studies was 8.0 × 10⁻⁵. Taken together, our study demonstrates that host genetic variants could disturb the regulation of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop and alter breast cancer risk.

  9. The common rs9939609 variant of the fat mass and obesity-associated gene is associated with obesity risk in children and adolescents of Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindpaintner Klaus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes have confirmed that a common variant, rs9939609, in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene region is associated with body mass index (BMI in European children and adults. A significant association of the same risk allele has been described in Asian adult populations, but the results are conflicting. In addition, no replication studies have been conducted in children and adolescents of Asian ancestry. Methods A population-based survey was carried out among 3503 children and adolescents (6-18 years of age in Beijing, China, including 1229 obese and 2274 non-obese subjects. We investigated the association of rs9939609 with BMI and the risk of obesity. In addition, we tested the association of rs9939609 with weight, height, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, fat mass percentage, birth weight, blood pressure and related metabolic traits. Results We found significant associations of rs9939609 variant with weight, BMI, BMI standard deviation score (BMI-SDS, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and fat mass percentage in children and adolescents (p for trend = 3.29 × 10-5, 1.39 × 10-6, 3.76 × 10-6, 2.26 × 10-5, 1.94 × 10-5, and 9.75 × 10-5, respectively. No significant associations were detected with height, birth weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and related metabolic traits such as total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fasting plasma glucose (all p > 0.05. Each additional copy of the rs9939609 A allele was associated with a BMI increase of 0.79 [95% Confidence interval (CI 0.47 to 1.10] kg/m2, equivalent to 0.25 (95%CI 0.14 to 0.35 BMI-SDS units. This rs9939609 variant is significantly associated with the risk of obesity under an additive model [Odds ratio (OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.50] after adjusting for age and gender. Moreover, an interaction between the FTO rs9939609

  10. Common variants in the type 2 diabetes KCNQ1 gene are associated with impairments in insulin secretion during hyperglycaemic glucose clamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van Haeften, Timon W; Landman, Gijs W D; Reiling, Erwin; Kleefstra, Nanne; Bilo, Henk J G; Klungel, Olaf H; de Boer, Anthonius; van Diemen, Cleo C; Wijmenga, Cisca; Boezen, Hendrika; Dekker, Jacqueline M; van 't Riet, Esther; Nijpels, Giel; Welschen, Laura M C; Zavrelova, Hata; Bruin, Elinda J; Elbers, Clara C; Bauer, Florianne; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Grobbee, Diederick E; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; van der A, Daphne L; Simonis-Bik, Annemarie M; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M W; Diamant, Michaela; Kramer, Mark H H; Boomsma, Dorret I; de Geus, Eco J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P Eline; Hofker, Marten H; 't Hart, Leen M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies in Japanese populations recently identified common variants in the KCNQ1 gene to be associated with type 2 diabetes. We examined the association of these variants within KCNQ1 with type 2 diabetes in a Dutch population, investigated their effects on

  11. Prediction of Quantitative Traits Using Common Genetic Variants: Application to Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sunghwan; Choi, Sungkyoung; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Taesung

    2016-12-01

    With the success of the genome-wide association studies (GWASs), many candidate loci for complex human diseases have been reported in the GWAS catalog. Recently, many disease prediction models based on penalized regression or statistical learning methods were proposed using candidate causal variants from significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms of GWASs. However, there have been only a few systematic studies comparing existing methods. In this study, we first constructed risk prediction models, such as stepwise linear regression (SLR), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and Elastic-Net (EN), using a GWAS chip and GWAS catalog. We then compared the prediction accuracy by calculating the mean square error (MSE) value on data from the Korea Association Resource (KARE) with body mass index. Our results show that SLR provides a smaller MSE value than the other methods, while the numbers of selected variables in each model were similar.

  12. Prediction of Quantitative Traits Using Common Genetic Variants: Application to Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghwan Bae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the success of the genome-wide association studies (GWASs, many candidate loci for complex human diseases have been reported in the GWAS catalog. Recently, many disease prediction models based on penalized regression or statistical learning methods were proposed using candidate causal variants from significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms of GWASs. However, there have been only a few systematic studies comparing existing methods. In this study, we first constructed risk prediction models, such as stepwise linear regression (SLR, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO, and Elastic-Net (EN, using a GWAS chip and GWAS catalog. We then compared the prediction accuracy by calculating the mean square error (MSE value on data from the Korea Association Resource (KARE with body mass index. Our results show that SLR provides a smaller MSE value than the other methods, while the numbers of selected variables in each model were similar.

  13. Prediction of Quantitative Traits Using Common Genetic Variants: Application to Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sunghwan; Choi, Sungkyoung; Kim, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    With the success of the genome-wide association studies (GWASs), many candidate loci for complex human diseases have been reported in the GWAS catalog. Recently, many disease prediction models based on penalized regression or statistical learning methods were proposed using candidate causal variants from significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms of GWASs. However, there have been only a few systematic studies comparing existing methods. In this study, we first constructed risk prediction models, such as stepwise linear regression (SLR), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and Elastic-Net (EN), using a GWAS chip and GWAS catalog. We then compared the prediction accuracy by calculating the mean square error (MSE) value on data from the Korea Association Resource (KARE) with body mass index. Our results show that SLR provides a smaller MSE value than the other methods, while the numbers of selected variables in each model were similar.

  14. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Polonikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase and PON2 (paraoxonase 2 as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma.

  15. DNA Sequence Variants in the Five Prime Untranslated Region of the Cyclooxygenase-2 Gene Are Commonly Found in Healthy Dogs and Gray Wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safra, Noa; Hayward, Louisa J; Aguilar, Miriam; Sacks, Benjamin N; Westropp, Jodi L; Mohr, F Charles; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Bannasch, Danika L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of regional DNA variants upstream to the translation initiation site of the canine Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) gene in healthy dogs. Cox-2 plays a role in various disease conditions such as acute and chronic inflammation, osteoarthritis and malignancy. A role for Cox-2 DNA variants in genetic predisposition to canine renal dysplasia has been proposed and dog breeders have been encouraged to select against these DNA variants. We sequenced 272-422 bases in 152 dogs unaffected by renal dysplasia and found 19 different haplotypes including 11 genetic variants which had not been described previously. We genotyped 7 gray wolves to ascertain the wildtype variant and found that the wolves we analyzed had predominantly the second most common DNA variant found in dogs. Our results demonstrate an elevated level of regional polymorphism that appears to be a feature of healthy domesticated dogs.

  16. DNA Sequence Variants in the Five Prime Untranslated Region of the Cyclooxygenase-2 Gene Are Commonly Found in Healthy Dogs and Gray Wolves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of regional DNA variants upstream to the translation initiation site of the canine Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 gene in healthy dogs. Cox-2 plays a role in various disease conditions such as acute and chronic inflammation, osteoarthritis and malignancy. A role for Cox-2 DNA variants in genetic predisposition to canine renal dysplasia has been proposed and dog breeders have been encouraged to select against these DNA variants. We sequenced 272-422 bases in 152 dogs unaffected by renal dysplasia and found 19 different haplotypes including 11 genetic variants which had not been described previously. We genotyped 7 gray wolves to ascertain the wildtype variant and found that the wolves we analyzed had predominantly the second most common DNA variant found in dogs. Our results demonstrate an elevated level of regional polymorphism that appears to be a feature of healthy domesticated dogs.

  17. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy progressive supranuclear palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Hoglinger (Gunter); N.M. Melhem (Nadine); D. Dickson (Dennis); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); L.-S. Wang; L. Klei (Lambertus); R. Rademakers (Rosa); R. de Silva (Rohan); I. Litvan (Irene); D.E. Riley (David); J.C. van Swieten (John); P. Heutink (Peter); Z.K. Wszolek (Zbigniew); R.J. Uitti (Ryan); J. Vandrovcova (Jana); H.I. Hurtig (Howard); R.G. Gross (Rachel); W. Maetzler (Walter); S. Goldwurm (Stefano); E. Tolosa; B. Borroni (Barbara); P. Pastor (Pau); L.B. Cantwell (Laura); M.R. Han; A. Dillman (Allissa); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); J. Gibbs (Raphael); M.R. Cookson (Mark); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); M.J. Farrer (Matthew); C.-E. Yu (Changen); L.I. Golbe (Lawrence); T. Revesz (Tamas); J. Hardy (John); A.J. Lees (Andrew); B. Devlin (Bernie); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); U. Müller (Ulrich); G.D. Schellenberg (Gerard); R.L. Albin (Roger); E. Alonso (Elena); M. Apfelbacher (Manuela); S.E. Arnold (Steven); J. Avila (Jesús); T.G. Beach (Thomas); S. Beecher (Sherry); D. Berg (Daniela); T.D. Bird (Thomas); N. Bogdanović (Nenad); A.J.W. Boon (Andrea); Y. Bordelon (Yvette); A. Brice (Alexis); H. Budka (Herbert); M. Canesi (Margherita); W.Z. Chiu (Wang Zheng); R. Cilia (Roberto); C. Colosimo (Carlo); P.P. de Deyn (Peter); J.G. de Yebenes; L. Donker Kaat (Laura); R. Duara (Ranjan); A. Durr; S. Engelborghs (Sebastiaan); G. Fabbrini (Giovanni); N.A. Finch (Nicole); R. Flook (Robyn); M.P. Frosch (Matthew); C. Gaig; D. Galasko (Douglas); T. Gasser (Thomas); M. Gearing (Marla); E.T. Geller (Evan); B. Ghetti (Bernardino); N.R. Graff-Radford (Neill); M. Grossman (Murray); D.A. Hall (Deborah); L.-N. Hazrati; M. Höllerhage (Matthias); J. Jankovic (Joseph); J.L. Juncos (Jorge); A. Karydas (Anna); H.A. Kretzschmar (Hans); I. Leber (Isabelle); V.M.Y. Lee (Virginia); A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); K.E. Lyons (Kelly); C. Mariani (Claudio); E. Masliah (Eliezer); L.A. Massey (Luke); C.A. McLean (Catriona); N. Meucci (Nicoletta); B.L. Miller (Bruce); B. Mollenhauer (Brit); J.C. Möller (Jens); H. Morris (Huw); S.S. O'Sullivan (Sean); W. Oertel; D. Ottaviani (Donatella); A. Padovani (Alessandro); R. Pahwa (Rajesh); G. Pezzoli (Gianni); S. Pickering-Brown (Stuart); W. Poewe (Werner); A. Rabano (Alberto); A. Rajput (Alex); S.G. Reich (Stephen); G. Respondek (Gesine); S. Roeber (Sigrun); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan Daniel); O.A. Ross (Owen); M. Rossor (Martin); G. Sacilotto (Giorgio); W.W. Seeley (William); K. Seppi (Klaus); L. Silveira-Moriyama (Laura); S. Spina (Salvatore); K. Srulijes (Karin); P. St. George-Hyslop (Peter); M. Stamelou (Maria); D.G. Standaert (David); S. Tesei (Silvana); W.W. Tourtellotte (Wallace); C. Trenkwalder (Claudia); C. Troakes (Claire); J.Q. Trojanowski (John); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); V.M. Deerlin (Vivianna); J.P.G. Vonsattel; G.K. Wenning (Gregor); C.L. White III (Charles); P. Winter (Pia); C. Zarow (Chris); A.L. Zecchinelli (Anna); A. Antonini (Angelo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractProgressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated

  18. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy progressive supranuclear palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Hoglinger (Gunter); N.M. Melhem (Nadine); D. Dickson (Dennis); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); L.-S. Wang; L. Klei (Lambertus); R. Rademakers (Rosa); R. de Silva (Rohan); I. Litvan (Irene); D.E. Riley (David); J.C. van Swieten (John); P. Heutink (Peter); Z.K. Wszolek (Zbigniew); R.J. Uitti (Ryan); J. Vandrovcova (Jana); H.I. Hurtig (Howard); R.G. Gross (Rachel); W. Maetzler (Walter); S. Goldwurm (Stefano); E. Tolosa; B. Borroni (Barbara); P. Pastor (Pau); L.B. Cantwell (Laura); M.R. Han; A. Dillman (Allissa); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); J. Gibbs (Raphael); M.R. Cookson (Mark); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); M.J. Farrer (Matthew); C.-E. Yu (Changen); L.I. Golbe (Lawrence); T. Revesz (Tamas); J. Hardy (John); A.J. Lees (Andrew); B. Devlin (Bernie); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); U. Müller (Ulrich); G.D. Schellenberg (Gerard); R.L. Albin (Roger); E. Alonso (Elena); M. Apfelbacher (Manuela); S.E. Arnold (Steven); J. Avila (Jesús); T.G. Beach (Thomas); S. Beecher (Sherry); D. Berg (Daniela); T.D. Bird (Thomas); N. Bogdanović (Nenad); A.J.W. Boon (Andrea); Y. Bordelon (Yvette); A. Brice (Alexis); H. Budka (Herbert); M. Canesi (Margherita); W.Z. Chiu (Wang Zheng); R. Cilia (Roberto); C. Colosimo (Carlo); P.P. de Deyn (Peter); J.G. de Yebenes; L. Donker Kaat (Laura); R. Duara (Ranjan); A. Durr; S. Engelborghs (Sebastiaan); G. Fabbrini (Giovanni); N.A. Finch (Nicole); R. Flook (Robyn); M.P. Frosch (Matthew); C. Gaig; D. Galasko (Douglas); T. Gasser (Thomas); M. Gearing (Marla); E.T. Geller (Evan); B. Ghetti (Bernardino); N.R. Graff-Radford (Neill); M. Grossman (Murray); D.A. Hall (Deborah); L.-N. Hazrati; M. Höllerhage (Matthias); J. Jankovic (Joseph); J.L. Juncos (Jorge); A. Karydas (Anna); H.A. Kretzschmar (Hans); I. Leber (Isabelle); V.M.Y. Lee (Virginia); A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); K.E. Lyons (Kelly); C. Mariani (Claudio); E. Masliah (Eliezer); L.A. Massey (Luke); C.A. McLean (Catriona); N. Meucci (Nicoletta); B.L. Miller (Bruce); B. Mollenhauer (Brit); J.C. Möller (Jens); H. Morris (Huw); S.S. O'Sullivan (Sean); W. Oertel; D. Ottaviani (Donatella); A. Padovani (Alessandro); R. Pahwa (Rajesh); G. Pezzoli (Gianni); S. Pickering-Brown (Stuart); W. Poewe (Werner); A. Rabano (Alberto); A. Rajput (Alex); S.G. Reich (Stephen); G. Respondek (Gesine); S. Roeber (Sigrun); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan Daniel); O.A. Ross (Owen); M. Rossor (Martin); G. Sacilotto (Giorgio); W.W. Seeley (William); K. Seppi (Klaus); L. Silveira-Moriyama (Laura); S. Spina (Salvatore); K. Srulijes (Karin); P. St. George-Hyslop (Peter); M. Stamelou (Maria); D.G. Standaert (David); S. Tesei (Silvana); W.W. Tourtellotte (Wallace); C. Trenkwalder (Claudia); C. Troakes (Claire); J.Q. Trojanowski (John); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); V.M. Deerlin (Vivianna); J.P.G. Vonsattel; G.K. Wenning (Gregor); C.L. White III (Charles); P. Winter (Pia); C. Zarow (Chris); A.L. Zecchinelli (Anna); A. Antonini (Angelo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractProgressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated

  19. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common

  20. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, R.; Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common...

  1. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  2. Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals no gain in power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fransen, Erik; Hannula, Samuli; Van Laer, Lut; Van Eyken, Els; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Aikio, Pekka; Stephan, Dietrich A; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-05-01

    The Saami from Fennoscandia are believed to represent an ancient, genetically isolated population with no evidence of population expansion. Theoretical work has indicated that under this demographic scenario, extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) is generated by genetic drift. Therefore, it has been suggested that the Saami would be particularly suited for genetic association studies, offering a substantial power advantage and allowing more economic study designs. However, no study has yet assessed this claim. As part of a GWAS for a complex trait, we evaluated the relative power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami. LD patterns in the Saami were very similar to those in the non-African HapMap reference panels. Haplotype diversity was reduced and, on average, levels of LD were higher in the Saami as compared with those in the HapMap panels. However, using a 'hidden' SNP approach we show that this does not translate into a power gain in association studies. Contrary to earlier claims, we show that for a given set of common SNPs, genomic coverage attained in the Saami is similar to that in the non-African HapMap panels. Nevertheless, the reduced haplotype diversity could potentially facilitate gene identification, especially if multiple rare variants play a role in disease etiology. Our results further indicate that the HapMap is a useful resource for genetic studies in the Saami.

  3. Copy number variants and common disorders: filling the gaps and exploring complexity in genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Estivill

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association scans (GWASs using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been completed successfully for several common disorders and have detected over 30 new associations. Considering the large sample sizes and genome-wide SNP coverage of the scans, one might have expected many of the common variants underpinning the genetic component of various disorders to have been identified by now. However, these studies have not evaluated the contribution of other forms of genetic variation, such as structural variation, mainly in the form of copy number variants (CNVs. Known CNVs account for over 15% of the assembled human genome sequence. Since CNVs are not easily tagged by SNPs, might have a wide range of copy number variability, and often fall in genomic regions not well covered by whole-genome arrays or not genotyped by the HapMap project, current GWASs have largely missed the contribution of CNVs to complex disorders. In fact, some CNVs have already been reported to show association with several complex disorders using candidate gene/region approaches, underpinning the importance of regions not investigated in current GWASs. This reveals the need for new generation arrays (some already in the market and the use of tailored approaches to explore the full dimension of genome variability beyond the single nucleotide scale.

  4. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations. PMID:22037553

  5. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  6. A common Greenlandic TBC1D4 variant confers muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels; Jørgensen, Marit E.

    2014-01-01

    carriers of this variant have markedly higher concentrations of plasma glucose (β = 3.8 mmol l(-1), P = 2.5 × 10(-35)) and serum insulin (β = 165 pmol l(-1), P = 1.5 × 10(-20)) 2 hours after an oral glucose load compared with individuals with other genotypes (both non-carriers and heterozygous carriers......). Furthermore, homozygous carriers have marginally lower concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (β = -0.18 mmol l(-1), P = 1.1 × 10(-6)) and fasting serum insulin (β = -8.3 pmol l(-1), P = 0.0014), and their T2D risk is markedly increased (odds ratio (OR) = 10.3, P = 1.6 × 10(-24)). Heterozygous carriers have...... transporter GLUT4, with increasing number of p.Arg684Ter alleles. These findings are concomitant with a severely decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle, leading to postprandial hyperglycaemia, impaired glucose tolerance and T2D. The observed effect sizes are several times larger than any...

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-08-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS.We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls.The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs.The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population.

  8. Susceptibility of several floriculture crops to three common species of meloidogyne in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current and pending restriction on the use of soil fumigants and other nematicides effective in controlling nematodes in field grown floriculture crops has increased the importance of determining the relative susceptibility of these crops to important species of root-knot nematodes. Greenhouse ...

  9. The impact of a Dysbindin schizophrenia susceptibility variant on fiber tract integrity in healthy individuals: a TBSS-based diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickl-Jockschat, Thomas; Stöcker, Tony; Markov, Valentin; Krug, Axel; Huang, Ruihuang; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute; Zerres, Klaus; Nöthen, Markus M; Treutlein, Jens; Rietschel, Marcella; Shah, N Jon; Kircher, Tilo

    2012-04-02

    Schizophrenia is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder with high heritability, though its exact etiopathogenesis is yet unknown. An increasing number of studies point to the importance of white matter anomalies in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. While several studies have identified the impact of schizophrenia susceptibility gene variants on gray matter anatomy in both schizophrenia patients and healthy risk variant carriers, studies dealing with the impact of these gene variants on white matter integrity are still scarce. We here present a study on the effects of a Dysbindin schizophrenia susceptibility gene variant on fiber tract integrity in healthy young subjects. 101 subjects genotyped for Dysbindin-gene variant rs1018381, though without personal or first degree relative history of psychiatric disorders underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), 83 of them were included in the final analysis. We used Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) analysis to delineate the major fiber tracts. Carriers of the minor allele T of the rs1018381 in the Dysbindin gene showed two clusters of reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the perihippocampal region of the right temporal lobe compared to homozygote carriers of the major allele C. Clusters of increased FA values in T-allele carriers were found in the left prefrontal white matter, the right fornix, the right midbrain area, the left callosal body, the left cerebellum and in proximity of the right superior medial gyrus. Dysbindin has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and morphology. Impairments in anatomic connectivity as found associated with the minor Dysbindin allele in our study may result in increased risk for schizophrenia due to altered fiber tracts. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Genome wide association identifies common variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influencing plasma cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma, and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG. Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136 influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.

  11. miRNA Copy Number Variants Confer Susceptibility to Acute Anterior Uveitis With or Without Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Du, Liping; Yue, Yingying; Huang, Yike; Zhou, Qingyun; Cao, Shuang; Qi, Jian; Liang, Liang; Wu, Lili; Wang, Chaokui; Ye, Zi; Tian, Yuan; Kijlstra, Aize; Hou, Shengping; Yang, Peizeng

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the association of microRNA (miRNA) copy number variants (CNVs) with acute anterior uveitis (AAU) with or without ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to assess underlying disease mechanisms. This study included 768 patients with AAU+AS+ or AAU+AS- and 660 controls from a Chinese Han population. Genotyping of CNVs was performed by TaqMan PCR. The expression of miRNAs, transfection efficiency of miR-9-3, and cytokine production were measured by real-time PCR, flow cytometry, or ELISA. The frequency of low copy numbers of miR-143, miR-146a, miR-9-3, and miR-205 and of high copy numbers of miR-301a and miR-23a was increased in patients with AAU+AS+ (P = 3.725 × 10-5 to 8.033 × 10-9). Additionally, the frequency of a low copy number of miR-146a and a high copy number of miR-23a and miR-205 was significantly increased in AAU+AS- patients (P = 0.002-0.001). The frequency of low copy number of miR-205 was increased in AAU+AS+ compared with AAU+AS- (P = 0.001). The mRNA expression of miR-9-3 was significantly decreased in patients with AAU+AS+ compared with controls and positively associated with its copy number. Additionally, the production of IL-1β and IL-6 was shown to be regulated by miR-9-3 in human primary retinal pigment epithelial cells. Low gene copy numbers of miR-143, miR-146a, miR-9-3, miR-205 and high gene copy numbers of miR-301a and miR-23a were associated with susceptibility to AAU+AS+. A low copy number of miR-146a and a high copy number of miR-23a and miR-205 were associated with AAU+AS-.

  12. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H. [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osafune, Kenji [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Morito, Daisuke [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto (Japan); Miyamoto, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakao, Kazuwa [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Koizumi, Akio, E-mail: koizumi.akio.5v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. •R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. •iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. •RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability.

  13. Identification of Common Genetic Variants Influencing Spontaneous Dizygotic Twinning and Female Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarek, Hamdi; Steinberg, Stacy; Nyholt, Dale R; Gordon, Scott D; Miller, Michael B; McRae, Allan F; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Day, Felix R; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Davies, Gareth E; Martin, Hilary C; Penninx, Brenda W; Jansen, Rick; McAloney, Kerrie; Vink, Jacqueline M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Plomin, Robert; Spector, Tim D; Magnusson, Patrik K; Reversade, Bruno; Harris, R Alan; Aagaard, Kjersti; Kristjansson, Ragnar P; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Iacono, William G; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Montgomery, Grant W; McGue, Matt; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Martin, Nicholas G; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kari; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning occurs in 1%-4% of women, with familial clustering and unknown physiological pathways and genetic origin. DZ twinning might index increased fertility and has distinct health implications for mother and child. We performed a GWAS in 1,980 mothers of spontaneous DZ twins and 12,953 control subjects. Findings were replicated in a large Icelandic cohort and tested for association across a broad range of fertility traits in women. Two SNPs were identified (rs11031006 near FSHB, p = 1.54 × 10(-9), and rs17293443 in SMAD3, p = 1.57 × 10(-8)) and replicated (p = 3 × 10(-3) and p = 1.44 × 10(-4), respectively). Based on ∼90,000 births in Iceland, the risk of a mother delivering twins increased by 18% for each copy of allele rs11031006-G and 9% for rs17293443-C. A higher polygenic risk score (PRS) for DZ twinning, calculated based on the results of the DZ twinning GWAS, was significantly associated with DZ twinning in Iceland (p = 0.001). A higher PRS was also associated with having children (p = 0.01), greater lifetime parity (p = 0.03), and earlier age at first child (p = 0.02). Allele rs11031006-G was associated with higher serum FSH levels, earlier age at menarche, earlier age at first child, higher lifetime parity, lower PCOS risk, and earlier age at menopause. Conversely, rs17293443-C was associated with later age at last child. We identified robust genetic risk variants for DZ twinning: one near FSHB and a second within SMAD3, the product of which plays an important role in gonadal responsiveness to FSH. These loci contribute to crucial aspects of reproductive capacity and health.

  14. Analysis of common PTPN1 gene variants in type 2 diabetes, obesity and associated phenotypes in the French population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marre Michel

    2006-05-01

    for the SNPs tested in the family sample. Conclusion In our study, PTPN1 variants showed moderate association with T2D and obesity. However, consistent associations with metabolic variables reflecting insulin resistance and dyslipidemia are found for two intronic SNPs as previously reported. Thus, our data indicate that PTPN1 variants may modulate the lipid profile, thereby influencing susceptibility to metabolic disease.

  15. A common variant in DRD3 receptor is associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, M. de; Staal, W.G.; Ophoff, R.A.; Hendriks, J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Franke, B.; Jonge, M.V. de; Bolton, P.; Collier, D.A.; Curran, S.; Engeland, H.M. van; Ree, J.M. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of specific and common genetic etiologies for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was investigated for 132 candidate genes in a two-stage design-association study. METHODS: 1,536 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering

  16. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common va

  17. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorderspi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Boelte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Ines; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, J. A. S.; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, StephenW.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Proje

  18. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  19. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common va...

  20. The effects of common genetic variants in oncogenes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, L.; Gayther, S.A.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The 5-year survival rate for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer is <35%. It has been suggested that common, germline genetic variation may influence survival after cancer diagnoses, which might enable the prediction of response to treatment and survival in the clinical setting. The aim o...

  1. [Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from animals to ofloxacin and commonly used antimicrobial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, I; Yoshida, T; Higashide, Y; Sakano, T

    1990-01-01

    Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from chickens, pigs and cattle to ofloxacin (OFLX) and commonly used antimicrobial agents were investigated. 1. E. coli (28 isolates) demonstrated the highest level of susceptibility of OFLX (MIC 0.10-0.39 micrograms/ml for all the isolates) among all the test drugs. Commonly used antimicrobial agents to which these isolates responded with relatively high susceptibilities (MIC50 0.78-6.25 micrograms/ml) included oxolinic acid (OXA), ampicillin (ABPC), kanamycin (KM) and chloramphenicol (CP) with their MIC50 values in the increasing order as above. Drugs to which these isolates responded with moderate to weak susceptibilities (MIC50 25 approximately greater than 800 micrograms/ml) were doxycycline (DOXY), streptomycin (SM), spectinomycin (SPCM) and sulfadimethoxine (SDMX) in the increasing order of MIC50. E. coli isolates with resistances to all the test drugs other than OFLX and OXA amounted to 7.1-57.1% of the isolates examined and 20 isolates (71.4%) in total. 2. Susceptibilities to OFLX and 4 existing pyridonecarboxylic acid derivatives of E. coli (48 samples) isolated recently from diarrheal pigs were compared. When evaluated in terms of MIC50, the values of OFLX and norfloxacin were both 0.10 micrograms/ml. The values increased by differences of 0.39-3.13 micrograms/ml in an order of OXA, pipemidic acid and nalidixic acid. 3. Salmonella (28 isolates) demonstrated the highest level of susceptibility to OFLX (MIC 0.20-0.39 micrograms/ml for all the isolates) among all the test drugs. The drugs to which these isolates responded with relatively high to moderate susceptibilities (MIC50 0.78-12.5 micrograms/ml) included ABPC, OXA, DOXY, KM, CP and SM with their MIC50 values increasing in this order. The drugs to which the isolates responded with low susceptibilities (MIC50 above 100 micrograms/ml) were SPCM and SDMX. Of all the 28 Salmonella isolates tested, 7.1-32.1% were resistant

  2. Association of obesity susceptibility gene variants with metabolic syndrome and related traits in 1,443 Czech adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dušátková, L; Zamrazilová, H; Sedláčková, B; Včelák, J; Hlavatý, P; Aldhoon Hainerová, I; Korenková, V; Bradnová, O; Bendlová, B; Kunešová, M; Hainer, V

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several gene variants associated with obesity; however, only a few studies have further investigated their association with metabolic syndrome. We performed a study of eleven variants in/near genes TMEM18, SH2B1, KCTD15, PCSK1, BDNF, SEC16B, MC4R, and FTO in Czech adolescents and analysed their association with obesity, metabolic syndrome and related traits. Genotyping was performed in 1,443 adolescents aged 13.0-17.9 years. Anthropometric parameters, biochemical parameters and blood pressure were assessed. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. The FTO rs9939609 variant was associated with overweight/obesity (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.21-1.63, P metabolic syndrome (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.14-2.04, P = 0.005; 1.51, 95% CI 1.12-2.04, P = 0.009). The PCSK1 rs6235 variant was negatively related to increased blood glucose (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.97, P = 0.040). In conclusion, the FTO variant was associated with overweight/obesity in Czech adolescents. Moreover, MC4R and BDNF variants increased the risk of metabolic syndrome, probably through their effect on abdominal obesity. The PCSK1 variant may have a protective role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

  3. In vitro susceptibility pattern of acinetobacter species to commonly used cephalosporins, quinolones, and aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Acinetobacter spp. is an emerging important nosocomial pathogen. Clinical isolates of this genus are often resistant to many antibiotics. The in vitro susceptibility of Acinetobacter isolates obtained from patients were tested for currently used antibiotics. In addit