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Sample records for combination therapy agents

  1. Combination of vascular targeting agents with thermal or radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, Michael R.; Murata, Rumi

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The most likely clinical application of vascular targeting agents (VTAs) is in combination with more conventional therapies. In this study, we report on preclinical studies in which VTAs were combined with hyperthermia and/or radiation. Methods and Materials: A C3H mammary carcinoma grown in the right rear foot of female CDF1 mice was treated when at 200 mm 3 in size. The VTAs were combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP, 25 mg/kg), flavone acetic acid (FAA, 150 mg/kg), and 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA, 20 mg/kg), and were all injected i.p. Hyperthermia and radiation were locally administered to tumors of restrained, nonanesthetized mice, and response was assessed using either a tumor growth or tumor control assay. Results: Heating tumors at 41.5 degree sign C gave rise to a linear relationship between the heating time and tumor growth with a slope of 0.02. This slope was increased to 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08, respectively, by injecting the VTAs either 30 min (CA4DP), 3 h (FAA), or 6 h (DMXAA) before heating. The radiation dose (±95% confidence interval) that controls 50% of treated tumors (the TCD 50 value) was estimated to be 53 Gy (51-55 Gy) for radiation alone. This was decreased to 48 Gy (46-51 Gy), 45 Gy (41-49 Gy), and 42 Gy (39-45 Gy), respectively, by injecting CA4DP, DMXAA, or FAA 30-60 min after irradiating. These values were further decreased to around 28-33 Gy if the tumors of VTA-treated mice were also heated to 41.5 degree sign C for 1 h, starting 4 h after irradiation, and this effect was much larger than the enhancement seen with either 41.5 degree sign C or even 43 degree sign C alone. Conclusions: Our preclinical studies and those of others clearly demonstrate that VTAs can enhance tumor response to hyperthermia and/or radiation and support the concept that such combination studies should be undertaken clinically for the full potential of VTAs to be realized

  2. Synergistic combination therapy of antitumor agents, membrane modification agents and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarai, Jiro; Itagaki, Takatomo; Akutsu, Thoru; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Kato, Isao

    1983-01-01

    Larygeal cancer were treated with synergistic combination therapy of Futraful in suppository, vitamin A, cepharanthin and irradiation from April 1981 to June 1982. This combination therapy resulted in high percentage of the tumor regression in the case of the invading laryngeal cancer and negligible complication. (author)

  3. Effect of Combination Therapy with Neuroprotective and Vasoprotective Agents on Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiping; Yang, Bei; Xiu, Baoxin; Qi, Jinchong; Liu, Huaijun

    2018-05-01

    Because most tested drugs are active against only one of the damaging processes associated with stroke, other mechanisms may cause cellular death. Thus, a combination of protective agents targeting different pathophysiological mechanisms may obtain better effects than a single agent. The major objective of this study was to investigate the effect of combination therapy with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) after controlled ischemic brain injury in rabbits. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: sham group, saline-treated control group or NGF+VEGF-treated group. Animals received an intracerebral microinjection of VEGF and NGF or saline at 5 or 8 hours after ischemia. The two specified time points of administration were greater than or equal to the existing therapeutic time window for monoterapy with VEGF or NGF alone (3 or 5 hours of ischemia). Infarct volume, water content, neurological deficits, neural cell apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were measured. Compared with saline-treated controls, the combination therapy of VEGF and NGF significantly reduced infarct volume, water content, neural cell apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3, up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and improved functional recovery (both ple « facteur de croissance des nerfs » (ou « NGF » en anglais). Méthodes: Les animaux ont été attribués au hasard à l'un des groupes suivants : ceux ayant reçu un traitement fictif ; ceux, du groupe témoin, ayant bénéficié d'un traitement à base de solution saline ; et finalement ceux ayant été traités au moyen des VEGF et NGF. À noter que les lapins ont reçu une micro-injection intracérébrale de VEGF et de NGF ou de solution saline 5 heures ou 8 heures à la suite de leur AVC. Ces deux délais d'administration des VEGF et NGF sont équivalents ou supérieurs aux délais actuels d'administration des VEGF ou NGF à titre de monothérapie (3 heures ou 5

  4. Aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy combined with topically applied vascular disrupting agent vadimezan leads to enhanced antitumor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Allison; Becker, Theresa; Sunar, Ulas; Morgan, Janet; Bellnier, David

    2011-01-01

    The tumor vascular-disrupting agent (VDA) vadimezan (5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, DMXAA) has been shown to potentiate the antitumor activity of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using systemically administered photosensitizers. Here, we characterized the response of subcutaneous syngeneic Colon26 murine colon adenocarcinoma tumors to PDT using the locally applied photosensitizer precursor aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in combination with a topical formulation of vadimezan. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a noninvasive method for monitoring blood flow, was utilized to determine tumor vascular response to treatment. In addition, correlative CD31-immunohistochemistry to visualize endothelial damage, ELISA to measure induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tumor weight measurements were also examined in separate animals. In our previous work, DCS revealed a selective decrease in tumor blood flow over time following topical vadimezan. ALA-PDT treatment also induced a decrease in tumor blood flow. The onset of blood flow reduction was rapid in tumors treated with both ALA-PDT and vadimezan. CD31-immunostaining of tumor sections confirmed vascular damage following topical application of vadimezan. Tumor weight measurements revealed enhanced tumor growth inhibition with combination treatment compared with ALA-PDT or vadimezan treatment alone. In conclusion, vadimezan as a topical agent enhances treatment efficacy when combined with ALA-PDT. This combination could be useful in clinical applications. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  6. Tamsulosin Monotherapy versus Combination Therapy with Antibiotics or Anti-Inflammatory Agents in the Treatment of Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyo Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS is treated by use of various protocols. We compared tamsulosin monotherapy with tamsulosin in combination with antibiotics or anti-inflammatory agents and evaluated the efficacy of these treatments in patients with CPPS. Methods Patients (n=107 who were younger than 55 years and diagnosed with CPPS were randomly assigned to treatment with tamsulosin at 0.2 mg (group A, tamsulosin at 0.2 mg plus anti-inflammatory drugs (group B or tamsulosin at 0.2 mg plus antibiotics (group C daily. We applied the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS to evaluate 100 patients who were treated for 12 weeks (7 withdrew. Scores of the three groups were compared by analysis of variance and we also evaluated subscores, which included pain, voiding and quality of life (QoL. Results All three groups showed statistically significant decreases in NIH-CPSI score, IPSS and subscore scores (P<0.05. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups except for the QoL domain of the IPSS (group A vs. C; P<0.01. Conclusions Tamsulosin monotherapy for 12 weeks was effective for treating patients with CPPS, compared with combination therapy with antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs.

  7. How should immunomodulators be optimized when used as combination therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents in the management of inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Mark G; Irving, Peter M; Sparrow, Miles P

    2015-10-28

    In the last 15 years the management of inflammatory bowel disease has evolved greatly, largely through the increased use of immunomodulators and, especially, anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologic agents. Within this time period, confidence in the use of anti-TNFs has increased, whilst, especially in recent years, the efficacy and safety of thiopurines has been questioned. Yet despite recent concerns regarding the risk: benefit profile of thiopurines, combination therapy with an immunomodulator and an anti-TNF has emerged as the recommended treatment strategy for the majority of patients with moderate-severe disease, especially those who are recently diagnosed. Concurrently, therapeutic drug monitoring has emerged as a means of optimizing the dosage of both immunomodulators and anti-TNFs. However the recommended therapeutic target levels for both drug classes were largely derived from studies of monotherapy with either agent, or studies underpowered to analyze outcomes in combination therapy patients. It has been assumed that these target levels are applicable to patients on combination therapy also, however there are few data to support this. Similarly, the timing and duration of treatment with immunomodulators when used in combination therapy remains unknown. Recent attention, including post hoc analyses of the pivotal registration trials, has focused on the optimization of anti-TNF agents, when used as either monotherapy or combination therapy. This review will instead focus on how best to optimize immunomodulators when used in combination therapy, including an evaluation of recent data addressing unanswered questions regarding the optimal timing, dosage and duration of immunomodulator therapy in combination therapy patients.

  8. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung; Yang, Ying-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor

  9. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and

  10. Rituximab, alkylating agents or combination therapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: a monocentric non-randomised observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, A; Lévy, M; Copie-Bergman, C; Dupuis, J; Szablewski, V; Le Baleur, Y; Baia, M; Belhadj, K; Sobhani, I; Leroy, K; Haioun, C; Delchier, J-C

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus on the standard treatment of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma for Helicobacter pylori-negative patients and for patients with persistent disease despite H. pylori eradication. To evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of alkylating agents and rituximab alone or in combination. In this monocentric retrospective study, which included 106 patients who had not been previously treated with anti-cancer agents, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral alkylating agents monotherapy (n = 48), rituximab monotherapy (n = 28) and the therapy combining both drugs (n = 30). Evaluations were performed at weeks 6 (W6), 25 (W25), and 52 (W52) and after 2 years (W104). After a median follow-up period of 4.9 years (range 0.4-17.2 years), complete remission and overall response were significantly higher in patients in the combination therapy group at W104 (92% and 100% respectively) compared with patients treated with alkylating agents alone (66% and 68%) and rituximab alone (64% and 73%). The 5-year progression-free survival probabilities were 68%, 70% and 89% in patients treated with alkylating agents alone, rituximab alone and combination therapy respectively. Haematological adverse events were reported in 32 (30%) patients (mostly grade 1) and were more frequent in the two groups receiving alkylating agents (P = 0.05 and P alkylating agents alone. Rituximab has a better safety profile than regimens containing alkylating agents. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Combination chemotherapy versus single-agent therapy as first- and second-line treatment in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensuu, H; Holli, K; Heikkinen, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report results of a randomized prospective study that compared single agents of low toxicity given both as the first-line and second-line chemotherapy with combination chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer with distant metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients in the single-agent arm...... (n = 153) received weekly epirubicin (E) 20 mg/m2 until progression or until the cumulative dose of 1,000 mg/m2, followed by mitomycin (M) 8 mg/m2 every 4 weeks, and those in the combination chemotherapy arm (n = 150) were first given cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2, E 60 mg/m2, and fluorouracil 500 mg/m2...... younger than 50. RESULTS: An objective response (complete [CR] or partial [PR]) was obtained in 55%, 48%, 16%, and 7% of patients treated with CEF, E, M, and MV, respectively. A response to CEF tended to last longer than a response to E (median, 12 v 10.5 months; P = .07). Treatment-related toxicity...

  12. Predicting the impact of combined therapies on myeloma cell growth using a hybrid multi-scale agent-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiwei; Su, Jing; Wu, Dan; Peng, Huiming; Zhao, Weiling; Nlong Zhao, Brian; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2017-01-31

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant still incurable plasma cell disorder. This is due to refractory disease relapse, immune impairment, and development of multi-drug resistance. The growth of malignant plasma cells is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment and evasion of the host's anti-tumor immune response. Hence, we hypothesized that targeting tumor-stromal cell interaction and endogenous immune system in BM will potentially improve the response of multiple myeloma (MM). Therefore, we proposed a computational simulation of the myeloma development in the complicated microenvironment which includes immune cell components and bone marrow stromal cells and predicted the effects of combined treatment with multi-drugs on myeloma cell growth. We constructed a hybrid multi-scale agent-based model (HABM) that combines an ODE system and Agent-based model (ABM). The ODEs was used for modeling the dynamic changes of intracellular signal transductions and ABM for modeling the cell-cell interactions between stromal cells, tumor, and immune components in the BM. This model simulated myeloma growth in the bone marrow microenvironment and revealed the important role of immune system in this process. The predicted outcomes were consistent with the experimental observations from previous studies. Moreover, we applied this model to predict the treatment effects of three key therapeutic drugs used for MM, and found that the combination of these three drugs potentially suppress the growth of myeloma cells and reactivate the immune response. In summary, the proposed model may serve as a novel computational platform for simulating the formation of MM and evaluating the treatment response of MM to multiple drugs.

  13. PUVA combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, W L

    1985-08-01

    Various adjunctive treatments are now frequently used in combination with PUVA therapy with the aims of limiting adverse effects, improving efficacy and decreasing the cost of treatment. In the management of psoriasis, PUVA plus retinoids, PUVA plus methotrexate and PUVA plus UVB phototherapy are the most frequently used combinations. PUVA plus topical corticosteroids and PUVA plus anthralin are also efficacious but adverse effects and poor acceptance by patients are limiting factors. Combinations of PUVA plus nitrogen mustard and ionizing radiation are used in mycosis fungoides to treat tumors and residual disease in secluded sites. In the management of photodermatoses with PUVA therapy, prednisone is often required to prevent exacerbation of disease. A combination of prednisone and PUVA therapy can also be useful in lichen planus and atopic eczema. The selection of a suitable combination treatment, will depend upon the preferences of the clinician, the disease being treated, and the characteristics of the patient.

  14. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  15. Effects of boron neutron capture therapy using borocaptate sodium in combination with a tumor-selective vasoactive agent in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Takagaki, Masao; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Baba, Hideo.

    1998-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) destroys tumor cells by means of α particles and recoil protons emitted by 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction. For BNCT to be effective, the tumor/normal tissue concentration ratio of 10 B must be larger than 1.0, because neutron distribution is not selective. We examined the combination of 10 B-enriched borocaptate sodium (BSH) with flavone acetic acid (FAA) as a model compound which causes vascular collapse in squamous cell carcinoma in mice (SCCVII tumors) and would increase the tumor/normal tissue concentration ratio of 10 B. FAA (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected, and 5 min later BSH (75 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered, followed 15 to 180 min later by irradiation with thermal neutrons. The 10 B concentrations were measured by prompt gamma ray spectrometry. Without FAA, tumor 10 B concentrations were less than or equal to normal tissue concentrations at all time intervals, except that the concentrations were 1.7- to 2.7-fold greater in tumor than muscle at 15 and 180 min after injection of BSH. With FAA, 10 B concentrations 2.1- to 6.9-fold greater in tumor than in muscle were achieved at all intervals tested. For blood and skin, significant differential accumulations were found in tumors at 120 and 180 min. Tumor/liver ratios were less than 1 at all times. Cell survival was determined by in vivo/in vitro colony assay, and increasing radiosensitization correlated with increasing tumor 10 B concentrations, whether or not they were achieved with FAA. Tumor control rates, determined at 180 days after BNCT, similarly appeared to depend only on 10 B levels at the time of irradiation. Because 10 B levels correlate with the radiation response of tissues, a therapeutic gain would be expected whenever the tumor levels exceed normal tissue levels, such as in tumors located in muscle irradiated at 15-180 min after FAA+BSH, or in those in skin irradiated at 120 and 180 min. (author)

  16. Preparation, characterization and in vitro release kinetics of polyaspartamide-based conjugates containing antimalarial and anticancer agents for combination therapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderibigbe, BA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is treated by combination of two drugs in order to overcome drug resistance. Antimalarials have been found to be more effective by combining them with low doses of anticancer drugs. Polymer-drug conjugates containing aminoquinoline...

  17. Patterns of relapse and outcome of elderly multiple myeloma patients treated as front-line therapy with novel agents combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio Lopez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the characteristics of relapse, treatment response, and outcomes of 145 elderly patients with multiple myeloma in first relapse after front-line treatment with VMP or VTP. Reappearance of CRAB symptoms (113 patients and more aggressive forms of disease (32 patients were the most common patterns of relapse. After second-line therapy, 75 (51.7% patients achieved at partial response and 16 (11% complete response (CR. Overall survival was longer among patients receiving VMP as front-line induction (21.4 vs. 14.4 months, P=0.037, in patients achieving CR (28.3 vs. 14.8 months; P=0.04, and in patients without aggressive relapse (28.6 vs. 7.6 months; P=0.0007.

  18. SU-E-T-256: Optimizing the Combination of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Agents Using a Multi-Scale Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Dosimetry Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besemer, A; Bednarz, B; Titz, B; Grudzinski, J; Weichert, J; Hall, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Combination targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is appealing because it can potentially exploit different mechanisms of action from multiple radionuclides as well as the variable dose rates due to the different radionuclide half-lives. The work describes the development of a multiobjective optimization algorithm to calculate the optimal ratio of radionuclide injection activities for delivery of combination TRT. Methods: The ‘diapeutic’ (diagnostic and therapeutic) agent, CLR1404, was used as a proof-of-principle compound in this work. Isosteric iodine substitution in CLR1404 creates a molecular imaging agent when labeled with I-124 or a targeted radiotherapeutic agent when labeled with I-125 or I-131. PET/CT images of high grade glioma patients were acquired at 4.5, 24, and 48 hours post injection of 124I-CLR1404. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 and 125ICLR1404 absorbed dose (AD) and biological effective dose (BED) were calculated for each patient using a patient-specific Monte Carlo dosimetry platform. The optimal ratio of injection activities for each radionuclide was calculated with a multi-objective optimization algorithm using the weighted sum method. Objective functions such as the tumor dose heterogeneity and the ratio of the normal tissue to tumor doses were minimized and the relative importance weights of each optimization function were varied. Results: For each optimization function, the program outputs a Pareto surface map representing all possible combinations of radionuclide injection activities so that values that minimize the objective function can be visualized. A Pareto surface map of the weighted sum given a set of user-specified importance weights is also displayed. Additionally, the ratio of optimal injection activities as a function of the all possible importance weights is generated so that the user can select the optimal ratio based on the desired weights. Conclusion: Multi-objective optimization of radionuclide injection activities

  19. Strategies for combinational cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khleif, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The countless pre-clinical studies and many clinical trials that have applied tumor antigen-based therapies for the cancer treatment, and although the necessary tumor-specific immune response may be elicited in tumor-bearing hosts, this was not sufficient for the positive therapeutic outcome since there are multiple mechanisms that tumors develop to escape immune surveillance. The tumor-mediated inhibitory mechanisms involve co-inhibitory receptor-ligand interactions, such as PD-1/ PD-L1, secretion of inhibitory molecules, such as TGFb, and recruitment of suppressive cells, such as regulatory T cells (Treg), myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC), etc. Therefore, we hypothesized that successful cancer immunotherapy requires not only induction and enhancement of effector immune response but also simultaneous targeting of suppressor arm of immune system, thus in addition to enhancing antigen-specific immunity using vaccines or radiation therapy, one should also target tumor-mediated immune suppression to improve the overall efficacy of therapy. We developed multiple strategies to target various tumor-mediated immune inhibitory mechanisms that can enhance anti-tumor immunity and restructure tumor microenvironment to allow effector cells generated due to vaccination or radiation therapy to function potently. We evaluated the immune and therapeutic efficacy of multiple combinational therapies, including blocking and agonist antibodies to co-inhibitory/co-stimulatory molecules, such as PD-1, PD-L1, OX40, CTLA-4, GITR, inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies to inhibitory cytokines/molecules, such as IL-10, TGFb, IDO, and small molecules for selective inhibition of Tregs. In addition to evaluation of anti-tumor efficacy we are also investigated cellular and molecular mechanisms of action for these agents when combined with vaccine or radiation therapy and exploring the interactions between compounds within combinational therapies in animal tumor models. We are

  20. Sonodynamic therapy combined with novel anti-cancer agents, sanguinarine and ginger root extract: Synergistic increase in toxicity in the presence of PANC-1 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Matthew; Mitchell, James; Totti, Stella; Lee, Judy; Velliou, Eirini; Bussemaker, Madeleine

    2018-01-01

    The presence of ultrasound-induced cavitation in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) treatments has previously enhanced the activity and delivery of certain sonosensitisers in biological systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential for two novel anti-cancer agents from natural derivatives, sanguinarine and ginger root extract (GRE), as sonosensitisers in an SDT treatment with in vitro PANC-1 cells. Both anti-cancer compounds had a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in the presence of PANC-1 cells. A range of six discreet ultrasound power-frequency configurations were tested and it was found that the cell death caused directly by ultrasound was likely due to the sonomechanical effects of cavitation. Combined treatment used dosages of 100μM sanguinarine or 1mM of GRE with 15s sonication at 500kHz and 10W. The sanguinarine-SDT and GRE-SDT treatments showed a 6% and 17% synergistic increase in observed cell death, respectively. Therefore both sanguinarine and GRE were found to be effective sonosensitisers and warrant further development for SDT, with a view to maximising the magnitude of synergistic increase in toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  2. Prophylaxis and Therapy Against Chemical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Hematopoietic Consequences F. Dorandeu 5) pH Dependent Toxicity of Sulphur Mustard In Vitro J. Mikler Nerve Agents / Scavengers 1) Mutagenesis...symptoms such as salivation or shortness of breath and lower level exposures could be rendered inconsequential. B.2 CURRENT THERAPY FOR NERVE AGENT

  3. Combination therapy with biofeedback, loperamide, and stool-bulking agents is effective for the treatment of fecal incontinence in women - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Jenny; Walter, Susanna A; Johansson, Elin; Ingemansson, Anna; Ryn, Ann-Katrine; Hallböök, Olof

    2015-08-01

    Biofeedback and medical treatments have been extensively used for moderate fecal incontinence (FI). There is limited data comparing and combining these two treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofeedback and medical treatments, separately and in combination. Sixty-four consecutive female patients, referred to a tertiary centre for FI, were included. The patients were randomized to start with either biofeedback (4-6 months) or medical treatment with loperamide and stool-bulking agents (2 months). Both groups continued with a combination of treatments, i.e. medical treatment was added to biofeedback and vice versa. A two-week prospective bowel symptom diary and anorectal physiology were evaluated at baseline, after single- and combination treatments. Fifty-seven patients completed the study. Median number of leakage episodes during two weeks decreased from 6 to 3 (p biofeedback and medical treatment is effective for symptom relief in FI. The symptom improvement was associated with improved fecal consistency, reduced urgency, and increased rectal sensory thresholds.

  4. Beta-Blocking Agents and Electroconvulsive Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. van den Broek (Walter); T.H.N. Groenland (Theo); A. Kusuma (Ari); T.K. Birkenhäger (Tom); E.M. Pluijms (Esther); J.A. Bruijn (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn this review we want to summarize the results of the placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials with betablocking adrenergic agents during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and review the effect on seizure duration and cardiovascular variables. We searched for studies in the

  5. In-vivo luminescence model for the study of tumor regression and regrowth following combination regimens with differentiation-promoting agents and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollakanti, K.; Anand, S.; Maytin, E. V.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid can be modified by pretreatment regimens with drugs such as 5- Fluorouracil (5-FU) or Vitamin D (calcitriol) that enhance accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) within tumor tissue which presumably will enhance the therapeutic response to light. However, histological approaches for monitoring therapeutic responses are poorly suited for studying long term survival because large numbers of mice need to be sacrificed. To address this limitation, a non-invasive model to monitor tumor regression and regrowth has been established. Breast cancer cells, stably transfected with firefly luciferase (MDA-Luc cell line), are implanted orthotopically in nude mice (0.25 - 1 x 106 cells/site), and monitored 0-60 min after s.c. injection of luciferin, with Xenogen in-vivo imaging system. Luminescence is detectable at day 1 post-implantation. Tumors are suitable for experimentation on day 6, when daily injections of pretreatment agents (5-FU, 300 mg/kg; calcitriol, 1 μg/kg) begin. On day 9, ALA (75 mg/kg i.p.) is given for 4 hr, followed by illumination (633 nm, 100 J/cm2). Tumor luminescence post- PDT is monitored daily and compared with caliper measurements. Pretreatments (5-FU, calcitriol) by themselves do not inhibit luciferase expression, and all tumors grow at a similar rate during the pretreatment period. Results from in vivo survival experiments can be correlated to survival responses of MDA-Luc cells grown in monolayer cultures +/- PDT and +/- pretreatments, and additional mechanistic information (e.g. Ki67 and E-cadherin expression) obtained. In summary, this noninvasive model will permit testing of the therapeutic survival advantages of various pretreatments during cPDT.

  6. A phase 1b trial of the combination of the antiangiogenic agent sunitinib and radiation therapy for patients with primary and metastatic central nervous system malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J; Kamrava, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Camphausen, Kevin A; Hyslop, Terry; Axelrod, Rita; Andrews, David W; Glass, Jon; Machtay, Mitchell; Dicker, Adam P

    2011-12-15

    In this phase 1 trial, the authors evaluated sunitinib combined with radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of primary or metastatic central nervous system (CNS) malignancies. Eligible patients had CNS malignancies that required a (minimum) 2-week course of RT. Sunitinib (37.5 mg) was administered daily for the duration of RT with optional treatment extension of 1 month. Urine was collected at 3 time points for correlative biomarker studies. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity defined according to Common Toxicity Criteria version 3. Fifteen patients were enrolled (12 with CNS metastasis and 3 with primary tumors). RT doses ranged from 14 Gray (Gy) to 70 Gy (1.8-3.5 Gy per fraction). Acute toxicities included hematologic, nausea, hyperglycemia, fatigue, hypocalcemia, and diarrhea. Six patients (40%) developed grade ≤ 2 toxicities. Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 7 patients (47%) and included hematologic toxicity, fatigue, deep vein thrombosis, dysphasia, hyperglycemia, and hyponatremia. No grade 3 through 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. Two grade 5 adverse events attributed to disease progression occurred. The median follow-up was 34.2 months. Two patients (13%) achieved a partial response, 9 patients (60%) had stable disease, and 2 patients (13%) patients had progressive disease. The 6-month progression-free survival rate for patients who had brain metastasis was 58%. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was correlated with greater changes in vascular endothelial growth factor levels changes between baseline and the completion of RT. Continuous 37.5-mg sunitinib combined with RT in patients who had CNS malignancies yielded acceptable toxicities and adverse events. The current results indicated that changes in urine vascular endothelial growth factor levels are associated with hematologic toxicity, and this association should be analyzed in a larger cohort. The feasibility, safety, and early response results warrant a phase 2 trial

  7. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC in combination with paclitaxel.HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2 every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (% reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI estimated Gadolinium (Gd enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated.Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001 for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04.The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment, especially in ER-/HER2

  8. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  9. Performance Evaluation of the Combined Agent Fire Fighting System (CAFFS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalberer, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    ... of the location. The Combined Agent Fire Fighting System (CAFFS) employs innovations in nozzle design, lightweight composites and combination agents to design a system with extinguishment capabilities of much larger ARFF vehicles...

  10. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  11. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  12. Novel agents for anti-platelet therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xuebin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anti-platelet therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with thrombotic diseases. The most commonly used anti-platelet drugs, namely, aspirin, ticlopidine, and clopidogrel, are effective in the prevention and treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists (e.g., abciximab, eptifibatide and tirofiban have demonstrated good clinical benefits and safety profiles in decreasing ischemic events in acute coronary syndrome. However, adverse events related to thrombosis or bleeding have been reported in cases of therapy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. Cilostazol is an anti-platelet agent used in the treatment of patients with peripheral ischemia, such as intermittent claudication. Presently, platelet adenosine diphosphate P2Y(12 receptor antagonists (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, cangrelor, and ticagrelor are being used in clinical settings for their pronounced protective effects. The new protease-activated receptor antagonists, vorapaxar and atopaxar, potentially decrease the risk of ischemic events without significantly increasing the rate of bleeding. Some other new anti-platelet drugs undergoing clinical trials have also been introduced. Indeed, the number of new anti-platelet drugs is increasing. Consequently, the efficacy of these anti-platelet agents in actual patients warrants scrutiny, especially in terms of the hemorrhagic risks. Hopefully, new selective platelet inhibitors with high anti-thrombotic efficiencies and low hemorrhagic side effects can be developed.

  13. Quorum Quenching Agents: Resources for Antivirulence Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihao Tang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is a concern to human health and highlights the urgent need for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Quorum sensing (QS regulates virulence in many bacterial pathogens, and thus, is a promising target for antivirulence therapy which may inhibit virulence instead of cell growth and division. This means that there is little selective pressure for the evolution of resistance. Many natural quorum quenching (QQ agents have been identified. Moreover, it has been shown that many microorganisms are capable of producing small molecular QS inhibitors and/or macromolecular QQ enzymes, which could be regarded as a strategy for bacteria to gain benefits in competitive environments. More than 30 species of marine QQ bacteria have been identified thus far, but only a few of them have been intensively studied. Recent studies indicate that an enormous number of QQ microorganisms are undiscovered in the highly diverse marine environments, and these marine microorganism-derived QQ agents may be valuable resources for antivirulence therapy.

  14. Study of the Possible Effects of Combined Therapy of Vitamin E with Certain Anti osteoporotic Agents on Changes Induced in Gamma-Irradiated Female Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heba Mohamed Atef Mostafa Gheita

    2015-01-01

    Whole body gamma irradiation (total dose 15 Gy / week for 5 weeks) induced bone injury in rats manifested as histopathological alterations confirmed by certain biochemical changes including urinary calcium, phosphorous and hydroxyproline, serum osteocalcin, oxidative stress bio markers, as well as pain perception. Vitamin E was effective by virtue of its antioxidant activity. Although, olive oil was studied as a vehicle for vitamin E, it could ameliorate the bone injury produced by gamma irradiation. Calcitonin and clodronate each alone was effective in retarding the bone injury induced by gamma-irradiation. Combination of calcitonin or clodronate with vitamin E showed better results than each of them alone. Serum osteocalcin of the irradiated rats was unaffected by vitamin E, olive oil, calcitonin or clodronate while combination of vitamin E with either calcitonin or clodronate was showed significant effects.

  15. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal.

  16. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal

  17. Rosiglitazone evaluated for cardiovascular outcomes in oral agent combination therapy for type 2 diabetes (RECORD): a multicentre, randomised, open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Home, Philip D; Pocock, Stuart J; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2009-01-01

    .80-1.63) for myocardial infarction, and 0.72 (0.49-1.06) for stroke. Heart failure causing admission to hospital or death occurred in 61 people in the rosiglitazone group and 29 in the active control group (HR 2.10, 1.35-3.27, risk difference per 1000 person-years 2.6, 1.1-4.1). Upper and distal lower limb fracture rates...... failure and of some fractures, mainly in women. Although the data are inconclusive about any possible effect on myocardial infarction, rosiglitazone does not increase the risk of overall cardiovascular morbidity or mortality compared with standard glucose-lowering drugs. FUNDING: GlaxoSmithKline plc, UK.......BACKGROUND: Rosiglitazone is an insulin sensitiser used in combination with metformin, a sulfonylurea, or both, for lowering blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes. We assessed cardiovascular outcomes after addition of rosiglitazone to either metformin or sulfonylurea compared...

  18. Is there really no benefit to combination therapy with colistin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Jason M; Kaye, Keith S

    2013-09-01

    Despite many theoretical and in vitro advantages, clinical data comparing combination therapy with colistin + rifampicin to colistin alone for infection due to extremely-drug resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumanni are scarce and limited by small numbers and/or low quality evidence. This article represents the first large, randomized, controlled, prospective study comparing colistin monotherapy and combination therapy. The reviewed article found no difference in all cause or infection related mortality, though there was an improved rate of microbiological clearance in the combination therapy arm. This study adds important new data to the literature and sets the stage for future studies that can be designed to overcome the limitations of this study, which are discussed in detail below. Based on this study, we cannot say definitively that combination therapy is not warranted for treatment of invasive infection due to A. baumannii, but the results do suggest that rifampicin is not an ideal agent to be combined with colistin.

  19. Combination Therapy for Airflow Limitation In COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Aslani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study Existing evidence confirms that no pharmacologic agent ameliorates the decline in the lung function or changes the prognosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We tried a critical combination therapy for management of COPD. Methods Current or past smoker (passive or active COPD patients with moderate to severe COPD who did not respond to primitive therapy (i.e., oral prednisolone (50 mg in the morning for 5 days; with Beclomethasone Fort (3 puff q12h, totally 1500 micrograms/day, Salmeterol (2 puffs q12h, 50 micrograms/puff and ipratropium bromide (4 puffs q8h for two months, enrolled to study. Furthermore they were received N-Acetylcysteine (1200 mg/daily, Azithromycin (tablet 250 mg/every other day and Theophylline (100 mg BD.Results The study group consisted of 44 men and 4 women, with a mean age and standard deviation of 63.6+/-12.7 years (range 22-86 years. Thirteen of 48 patients (27.0% was responder based on 15% increasing in FEV 1 (27.7+/-7.9 after 6.7+/-6.1 months (57.9+/-12.9 year old. There were statistically significant differences in age and smoking between responders and nonresponders (P value was 0.05 and 0.04 respectively. There was no difference in emphysema and air trapping between two groups (p=0.13. Conclusion Interestingly considerable proportion of patients with COPD can be reversible using combination drug therapy and patients will greatly benefit from different and synergic action of the drugs. The treatment was more effective in younger patients who smoke less.

  20. Combining Rational and Biological Factors in Virtual Agent Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Gerritsen, C.; Treur, J.

    2011-01-01

    To enhance believability of virtual agents, this paper presents an agent-based modelling approach for decision making, which integrates rational reasoning based on means-end analysis with personal psychological and biological aspects. The agent model developed is a combination of a BDI-model and a

  1. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, Kathryn; Abrey, Lauren E; Gutin, Philip H

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%), achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p < 0.0001). On the basis of these results and those from another phase II trial, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of single-agent bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma that has progressed following prior therapy. Potential antiangiogenic agents-such as cilengitide and XL184-also show evidence of single-agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma. Moreover, the use of antiangiogenic agents with radiation at disease progression may improve the therapeutic ratio of single-modality approaches. Overall, these agents appear to be well tolerated, with adverse event profiles similar to those reported in studies of other solid tumors. Further research is needed to determine the role of antiangiogenic therapy in frontline treatment and to identify the optimal schedule and partnering agents for use in combination therapy

  2. Quantal health effects of three toxic agents combined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Quantal health effects such as cancer, correlated with the combined action of three toxic agents, are considered. Data on the combined effects of two agents are scarce and no such data exist for three toxicants, yet concerns have arisen about simultaneous exposure of radiation workers to three different agents. Using models developed from the analysis of health effects involving two toxicants, equations for the combined effects of three agents are derived from a more general formalism. An application of practical interest is the incidence of cancer of the esophagus and its correlation with concurrent exposures to alcohol, tobacco, and either low- or high-LET radiation. (author)

  3. Efficacy and safety comparison of add-on therapy with liraglutide, saxagliptin and vildagliptin, all in combination with current conventional oral hypoglycemic agents therapy in poorly controlled Chinese type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C-J; Yu, Q; Yu, P; Zhang, Q-M; Ding, M; Liu, X-J; Yu, D-M

    2014-09-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of adding liraglutide, saxagliptin and vildagliptin to current therapy in Chinese type 2 diabetes subjects with poor glycemic control.A 24-week, randomized, open-label, parallel clinical trial was performed. A total 178 patients completed the trial who had been randomly assigned to add-on once daily liraglutide (1.2 mg/day injected subcutaneously), to saxagliptin (5 mg once daily) or to vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily). Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values, fasting and postprandial blood glucose (FBG and P2BG), body weight, body mass index (BMI), episodes of hypoglycemia and adverse events were evaluated.Over the 24-week treatment period, greater lowering of mean of HbA1c was achieved with 1.2 mg liraglutide (-1.50%, 95% CI [-1.67, -1.34]) than with saxagliptin (-1.23%, 95% CI [-1.36, -1.11]) and vildagliptin (-1.25%, 95% CI [-1.37, -1.13]). There was no significant between-group difference of percentages of subjects who reached a target HbA1cvildagliptin. The mean reduction of FBG value from baseline was 2.23 mmol/L with liraglutide, much greater than 1.83 mmol/L with saxagliptin (p=0.013), but similar to 2.03 mmol/L with -vildaglitpin group. As to the P2BG value, greater reductions was found with liraglutide (-4.80 mmol/L) than -3.56 mmol/L with saxagliptin (p=0.000) and -3.57 mmol/L with vildagliptin (p=0.000). Moreover, greater mean reductions of body weight and BMI with liraglutide (-6.0 kg and -2.1 kg/m(2)) were achieved than with saxagliptin and vildagliptin (both pvildagliptin group. The incidence of hypoglycemia was recorded low and similar in each treatment group. Nausea was more common with liraglutide (27%) than with saxagliptin (3.2%) and vildagliptin (5.2%), but no significant between-group difference was reported in other AEs.Adding liraglutide demonstrated superiority to saxagliptin and vildagliptin for reductions of HbA1c and weight loss in Chinese subjects with T2DM who had inadequate glycemic

  4. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Combination drug therapy in leprosy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio de las Aguas, J

    1983-01-01

    The importance of polichemotherapy in multibacilar leprosy (LL and LD) in patients without any previous therapy as in those diagnosticated and under monotherapy most of all in the resistance patients is presented. Sulphones, clofazimine and rifampicine are selected as first rate drugs and protionamide-etionamide as second rate drugs. The therapy plans with the association of two and three drugs and the convenience of continuing indefinitely with at least one of the drugs are presented insisting on the advantages of the clofazimine-sulphones and rifampicine-sulphones associations. The necessity of immunotherapy for recover of celular immunity against the bacilus, is the only form of preventing relapses and drug resistance.

  6. Beta-blocking agents during electroconvulsive therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boere, E; Birkenhäger, T K; Groenland, T H N; van den Broek, W W

    2014-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with at least transient episodes of hypertension and tachycardia. Beta-blocking agents may be indicated to prevent cardiovascular complications and may shorten seizure duration. This review evaluates studies that used beta-blocking agents during ECT to determine which agent has the most favourable outcomes on cardiovascular variables and seizure duration. A Medline database search was made using the combined keywords 'adrenergic beta-antagonists' and 'electroconvulsive therapy'. The search was restricted to double-blind randomized controlled trials and yielded 29 original studies. With the use of esmolol, significant attenuating effects were found on cardiovascular parameters in the first 5 min after stimulation; its shortening effects on seizure duration may be dose-related. With the use of labetalol, findings on cardiovascular effects were inconsistent during the first minutes after stimulation but were significant after 5 min and thereafter; seizure duration was scarcely studied. Landiolol attenuates heart rate but with inconsistent findings regarding arterial pressure (AP); seizure duration was mostly unaffected. Esmolol appears to be effective in reducing the cardiovascular response, although seizure duration may be affected with higher dosages. Landiolol can be considered a suitable alternative, but effects on AP need further investigation. Labetalol has been studied to a lesser extent and may have prolonged cardiovascular effects. The included studies varied in design, methodology, and the amount of exact data provided in the publications. Further study of beta-blocking agents in ECT is clearly necessary. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. In vitro susceptibilities of zygomycetes to combinations of antimicrobial agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danaoui, E.; Afeltra, J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Verweij, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Combinations of antimicrobial agents were tested against 35 strains of zygomycetes. The interaction between amphotericin B and rifampin was synergistic or additive. Flucytosine alone was inactive and, upon combination with amphotericin B, synergy was not achieved. The combination of amphotericin B

  8. Quantal health effects for a combination of several toxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, F A

    1988-12-01

    Quantal health effects caused by the combined action of a number of toxic agents are modeled using the information available for each toxicant acting in isolation. Two basic models are used; one assumes no interaction, the other postulates a separable kind of interaction in which each agent contributes an enhancement factor independent of all other agents. These two models provide yardsticks by which to measure synergisms and antagonisms in the interaction between the effects of toxic agents. Equations are given in approximations for small and large values of the risk. (author)

  9. Quantal health effects for a combination of several toxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Quantal health effects caused by the combined action of a number of toxic agents are modeled using the information available for each toxicant acting in isolation. Two basic models are used; one assumes no interaction, the other postulates a separable kind of interaction in which each agent contributes an enhancement factor independent of all other agents. These two models provide yardsticks by which to measure synergisms and antagonisms in the interaction between the effects of toxic agents. Equations are given in approximations for small and large values of the risk. (author)

  10. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  11. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy......, including small molecule drugs and biopharmaceuticals, which make the optimization of dosing and administration schedule challenging. This article reviews the recent advances in the design and development of combinations of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of lung cancer. Focus is primarily on rationales...... for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials....

  12. Newer agents in antiplatelet therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Yeung, Michael HolinstatCardeza Foundation for Hematologic Research, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Antiplatelet therapy remains the mainstay in preventing aberrant platelet activation in pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction, ischemia, and stroke. Although there has been significant advancement in antiplatelet therapeutic approaches, aspirin still remains the gold standard treatment in the clinical setting. Limitations in safety, efficacy, and tolerability have precluded many of the antiplatelet inhibitors from use in patients. Unforeseen incidences of increased bleeding risk and recurrent arterial thrombosis observed in patients have hampered the development of superior next generation antiplatelet therapies. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles have also limited the effectiveness of a number of antiplatelet inhibitors currently in use due to variability in metabolism, time to onset, and reversibility. A focused effort in the development of newer antiplatelet therapies to address some of these shortcomings has resulted in a significant number of potential antiplatelet drugs which target enzymes (phosphodiesterase, cyclooxygenase, receptors (purinergic, prostaglandins, protease-activated receptors, thromboxane, and glycoproteins (αIIbß3, GPVI, vWF, GPIb in the platelet. The validation and search for newer antiplatelet therapeutic approaches proven to be superior to aspirin is still ongoing and should yield a better pharmacodynamic profile with fewer untoward side-effects to what is currently in use today.Keywords: platelet aggregation inhibitors, blood platelets, purinergic P2Y receptor antagonists, receptor, PAR-1, platelet glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa, thrombosis

  13. Radiotherapy in combination with vascular-targeted therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciric, Eva; Sersa, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Given the critical role of tumor vasculature in tumor development, considerable efforts have been spent on developing therapeutic strategies targeting the tumor vascular network. A variety of agents have been developed, with two general approaches being pursued. Antiangiogenic agents (AAs) aim to interfere with the process of angiogenesis, preventing new tumor blood vessel formation. Vascular-disrupting agents (VDAs) target existing tumor vessels causing tumor ischemia and necrosis. Despite their great therapeutic potential, it has become clear that their greatest clinical utility may lie in combination with conventional anticancer therapies. Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment modality for cancer with its distinct therapeutic challenges. Thus, combining the two approaches seems reasonable. Strong biological rationale exist for combining vascular-targeted therapies with radiation. AAs and VDAs were shown to alter the tumor microenvironment in such a way as to enhance responses to radiation. The results of preclinical and early clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic potential of this new treatment strategy in the clinical setting. However, concerns about increased normal tissue toxicity, have been raised

  14. Combination stem cell therapy for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichim Thomas E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF that are not eligible for transplantation have limited therapeutic options. Stem cell therapy such as autologous bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or purified cells thereof has been used clinically since 2001. To date over 1000 patients have received cellular therapy as part of randomized trials, with the general consensus being that a moderate but statistically significant benefit occurs. Therefore, one of the important next steps in the field is optimization. In this paper we discuss three ways to approach this issue: a increasing stem cell migration to the heart; b augmenting stem cell activity; and c combining existing stem cell therapies to recapitulate a "therapeutic niche". We conclude by describing a case report of a heart failure patient treated with a combination stem cell protocol in an attempt to augment beneficial aspects of cord blood CD34 cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells.

  15. Artificial intelligence in drug combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F

    2018-02-09

    Currently, the development of medicines for complex diseases requires the development of combination drug therapies. It is necessary because in many cases, one drug cannot target all necessary points of intervention. For example, in cancer therapy, a physician often meets a patient having a genomic profile including more than five molecular aberrations. Drug combination therapy has been an area of interest for a while, for example the classical work of Loewe devoted to the synergism of drugs was published in 1928-and it is still used in calculations for optimal drug combinations. More recently, over the past several years, there has been an explosion in the available information related to the properties of drugs and the biomedical parameters of patients. For the drugs, hundreds of 2D and 3D molecular descriptors for medicines are now available, while for patients, large data sets related to genetic/proteomic and metabolomics profiles of the patients are now available, as well as the more traditional data relating to the histology, history of treatments, pretreatment state of the organism, etc. Moreover, during disease progression, the genetic profile can change. Thus, the ability to optimize drug combinations for each patient is rapidly moving beyond the comprehension and capabilities of an individual physician. This is the reason, that biomedical informatics methods have been developed and one of the more promising directions in this field is the application of artificial intelligence (AI). In this review, we discuss several AI methods that have been successfully implemented in several instances of combination drug therapy from HIV, hypertension, infectious diseases to cancer. The data clearly show that the combination of rule-based expert systems with machine learning algorithms may be promising direction in this field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Biocompatibility of Portland cement combined with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Duarte, Marco A H; Lima, Marta C; Machado, Maria A A M; Abdo, Ruy C C; Oliveira, Thais M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of rat subcutaneous tissue to Portland cement combined with two different radiopacifying agents, iodoform (CHI3) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2). These materials were placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted into the dorsal connective tissue of Wistar rats for 7 and 15 days. The specimens were then stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and inflammatory reaction parameters were evaluated by light microscopy. The intensity of the inflammatory response to the sealants was analyzed by two blind calibrated observers throughout the experimental period. Histological analysis showed that all the materials caused a moderated inflammatory reaction at 7 days, which then diminished with time. At 15 days, the inflammatory reaction was almost absent, and fibroblasts and collagen fibers were observed indicating normal tissue healing. The degrees of the inflammatory reaction on different days throughout the experimental period were compared using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant differences amongst the groups, and Portland cement associated with radiopacifying agents gave satisfactory results. Therefore, Portland cement used in combination with radiopacifying agents can be considered a biocompatible material. Although our results are very encouraging, further studies are needed in order to establish safe clinical indications for Portland cement combined with radiopacifying agents.

  17. [Combination drug therapy in patients with BPH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, A V; Kuzmenko, V V; Gyaurgiev, T A

    2018-03-01

    Introuction. One of the risk factors for LUTS is an infravesical obstruction, which is most often caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH symptoms are formed due to three components: static (mechanical), dynamic, and impaired functional capacity of the bladder. Medical treatment with 1-blockers decreases the outflow obstruction. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors are used to inhibit the static component of BPH. To investigate the effectiveness of various modifications of medical therapy of BPH using -blockers and 5-reductase inhibitors and combinations thereof. The study comprised 90 BPH patients who were divided into three groups, with each group containing 30 people. Patients of group I, II and III received monotherapy with -blockers, a combination of 5-reductase and -blockers, and fixed-dose combination drug Duodart, respectively. Evaluation of the treatment effectiveness included filling out voiding diaries, completing the I-PSS and QL questionnaires, uroflowmetry, transrectal ultrasonography of the prostate and estimation of the incidence of adverse effects. Also, compliance with the treatment was evaluated, and the number of patients who had episodes of acute urinary retention and required surgical treatment during the 12 month treatment course was registered. Compared to monotherapy, combination therapy with -blockers and 5-reductase inhibitors more effectively reduces the LUTS, increases Qmax and prevents the disease progression, which manifests in a lower incidence of AUR and fewer surgical interventions in groups II and III. However, the combination therapy can be associated with some side effects. Patients who received fixed-dose combination drug Duodart had a greater compliance rate than patients on the combination of drugs, which, in our opinion, is associated with fewer cases of AUR and surgical interventions. The use of Duodart in patients with BPH effectively alleviates LUTS and reduces the risk of the disease progression, which manifests itself

  18. Modification of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells by means of hyperthermia and chemical agent. Coordinated programme on improvement of cancer therapy by the combination of treatment by conventional radiation and physical or chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, O.

    1984-11-01

    The effect of the treatment of the cultured mammalian cells with a relatively new anti-cancer drug teniposide (VM26), radiation (4 Gy), hyperthermia (42 deg. C and 45 deg. C) and caffeine, in various combinations, has been studied. The following conclusions can be drawn from the data obtained: The cultured mammalian cells respond to the anti-cancer drug VM26 treatment in a dose and time dependent manner. Significant potentiation of cell killing was demonstrated when they are exposed simultaneously to VM26 and hyperthermia. Post-treatment incubation of the cells in non-toxic concentration of caffeine (2 mM) has produced a marked potentiation of the lethal effect, indicating that caffeine interferes with the repair processes in these cells. Combination of VM26, hyperthermia and caffeine produced a maximum killing effect compared to VM26 treatment only. When the cells are exposed to initial (90 min. at 42 deg. C or 40 min. at 45 deg. C) and subsequent hyperthermia (60 min. at 42 deg. C or 60 min. at 45 deg. C) the thermotolerance will develop depending on the degree of initial and subsequent temperature. The combination of hyperthermia with irradiation results in a potentiation of the effect of treatment compared to the treatment with only irradiation or hyperthermia. Maximum killing of the cells will be obtained when irradiation is applied immediately after hyperthermia. The results obtained should be regarded as useful in case of clinical application of the tested agents

  19. [Combination therapy of chronic bacterial prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khryanin, A A; Reshetnikov, O V

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the possible etiological factors in the development of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The authors presented a comparative long-term analysis of morbidity from non-viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Russia. Against the background of general decline in STIs incidence, a significant percentage of them is made up by urogenital trichomoniasis. The findings substantiated the advantages of combination therapy (ornidazole and ofloxacin) for bacterial urinary tract infections.

  20. Two drugs are better than one. A short history of combined therapy of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Barbara; Gajek, Arkadiusz; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Combined therapy of ovarian cancer has a long history. It has been applied for many years. The first drug which was commonly combined with other chemotherapeutics was cisplatin. It turned out to be effective given together with alkylating agents as well as with taxanes. Another drug which is often the basis of first-line therapy is doxorubicin. The use of traditional chemotherapy is often limited due to side effects. This is why new drugs, targeted specifically at cancer cells (e.g. monoclonal antibodies or epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors), offer a welcome addition when used in combination with conventional anticancer agents. Drugs applied in combination should be synergistic or at least additive. To evaluate the type of interaction between drugs in a plausible sequence, isobolographic analysis is used. This method allows one to assess whether the two agents could make an efficient combination, which might improve the therapy of ovarian cancer.

  1. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eDasgupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in low-grade gliomas is being exploited with targeted inhibitors. These agents are also being combined with XRT to increase their efficacy. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in low-grade gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. B-Raf is a kinase in the Ras/Raf/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival and metabolism. In low-grade pediatric gliomas, point mutations in BRAF (BRAF V600E or a BRAF fusion mutation (KIAA1549:BRAF causes overactivation of the MEK/MAPK pathway. Pre-clinical data shows cooperation between XRT and tagrgeted inhibitors of BRAF V600E, and MEK and mTOR inhibitors in the gliomas with the BRAF fusion. A second important signaling cascade in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3 kinase (PI3K/mTOR pathway. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis. Several inhibitors of immunomodulators are currently being evaluated in in clinical trials for the treatment of recurrent or refractory pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors. In summary, combinations of these targeted inhibitors with radiation are currently under investigation in both translational bench research and early clinical trials. We summarize the molecular rationale for, and the pre-clinical data supporting the combinations of these targeted agents with other anti-cancer agents and XRT in pediatric gliomas. Parallels are drawn to adult gliomas, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of these agents is discussed

  2. Combination antiretroviral therapy and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the newest research about the effects of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on cancer risk. RECENT FINDINGS: HIV+ persons are at increased risk of cancer. As this risk is higher for malignancies driven by viral and bacterial coinfections, classifying malignanci......ART initiation in reducing cancer risk, understand the relationship between long-term cART exposure and cancer incidence and assess whether adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies can reduce cancer risk during treated HIV infection.......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the newest research about the effects of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on cancer risk. RECENT FINDINGS: HIV+ persons are at increased risk of cancer. As this risk is higher for malignancies driven by viral and bacterial coinfections, classifying malignancies...... into infection-related and infection-unrelated has been an emerging trend. Cohorts have detected major reductions in the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) following cART initiation among immunosuppressed HIV+ persons. However, recent randomized data indicate that cART reduces risk...

  3. Severe Rhabdomyolysis Associated with the Cerivastatin-Gemfibrozil Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Theodore K.; Leachman, D. Richard; Lufschanowski, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Cerivastatin is the new 3rd-generation of the synthetic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, the 1st drugs of choice for treating hypercholesterolemia. A potent inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, it possesses a high affinity for liver tissue and decreases plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at microgram doses. Cerivastatin produces reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of 31.3% and 36.1% at doses of 0.3 and 0.4 mg/day, respectively. It is an uncomplicated agent with regard to its pharmacokinetic profile, low potential for interaction with other drugs, and suitability for use in those with impaired renal function. Most other statins have been implicated in causing rhabdomyolysis, either as mono-therapy or in combination with other agents. We report what to our knowledge is the most profound case yet in the literature of rhabdomyolysis in association with ceriva-statin-gemfibrozil combination therapy, in regard both to the extreme elevation in serum creatinine kinase and to the patient's near-paralytic weakness. PMID:11453128

  4. Trial of radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegawa, Y; Fujiwara, K; Oe, J; Nagase, M; Akiyama, H [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-08-01

    Nine patients were treated by the combination therapy of external irradiation and hyperthermia, 5 patients with metastatic lesions; two breast cancer, one lung cancer, one malignant melanoma, one vulva cancer, 1 patient with recurrent lesion of skin cancer and 3 patients with bladder cancer. All patients were treated by heating locally (42/sup 0/C, 30 min) followed by external irradiation with 4,000 - 5,000 rad over 4 to 5 weeks. No local recurrence was found in 4 of 9 patients.

  5. Combinational chelation therapy abrogates lead-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Saxena, Geetu; Mehta, Ashish; Mishra, Deepshikha; Flora, Swaran J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Lead, a ubiquitous and potent neurotoxicant causes oxidative stress which leads to numerous neurobehavioral and physiological alterations. The ability of lead to bind sulfhydryl groups or compete with calcium could be one of the reasons for its debilitating effects. In the present study, we addressed: i) if chelation therapy could circumvent the altered oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis in chronic lead-intoxicated rats, ii) whether chelation therapy could reverse biochemical and behavioral changes, and iii) if mono or combinational therapy with captopril (an antioxidant) and thiol chelating agents (DMSA/MiADMSA) is more effective than individual thiol chelator in lead-exposed rats. Results indicated that lead caused a significant increase in reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and intracellular free calcium levels along with altered behavioral abnormalities in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, learning, and memory that were supported by changes in neurotransmitter levels. A fall in membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and DNA damage indicated mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Most of these alterations showed significant recovery following combined therapy with captopril with MiADMSA and to a smaller extend with captopril + DMSA over monotherapy with these chelators. It could be concluded from our present results that co-administration of a potent antioxidant (like captopril) might be a better treatment protocol than monotherapy to counter lead-induced oxidative stress. The major highlight of the work is an interesting experimental evidence of the efficacy of combinational therapy using an antioxidant with a thiol chelator in reversing neurological dystrophy caused due to chronic lead exposure in rats.

  6. Nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations for cancer therapy - Strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui Xue; Wong, Ho Lun; Xue, Hui Yi; Eoh, June Young; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2016-10-28

    Nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations has shown increasing significance in cancer therapy due to its promise in providing superior therapeutic benefits to the current drug combination therapy used in clinical practice. In this article, we will examine the rationale, principles, and advantages of applying nanocarriers to improve anticancer drug combination therapy, review the use of nanocarriers for delivery of a variety of combinations of different classes of anticancer agents including small molecule drugs and biologics, and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of the nanocarrier-based combination therapy. The goal of this review is to provide better understanding of this increasingly important new paradigm of cancer treatment and key considerations for rational design of nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Combination Therapy Strategies Against Multiple-Resistant Streptococcus Suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen, an emerging zoonotic agent responsible for meningitis, endocarditis and septicaemia followed by deafness in humans. The development of antimicrobial resistance in S. suis increases the risk for therapeutic failure in both animals and humans. In this study, we report the synergism of combination therapy against multi-resistant S. suis isolates from swine. Twelve antibiotic profiles were determined against 11 S. suis strains. To investigate their synergistic/antagonistic activity, checkerboard assay was performed for all the possible combinations. In-vitro killing curves and in-vivo treatment trials were used to confirm the synergistic activity of special combinations against S. suis dominant clones. In this study, 11 S. suis isolates were highly resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline with ratios of 80–100%, and the resistance percentages to enrofloxacin, florfenicol, and spectinomycin were ~50%. The checkerboard data identified two combination regimens, ampicillin plus apramycin and tiamulin plus spectinomycin which gave the greatest level of synergism against the S. suis strains. In-vitro kill-curves showed a bacterial reduction of over 3-logCFU with the use of combination treatments, whilst the application of mono-therapies achieve less than a 2-logCFU cell killing. In-vivo models confirm that administration of these two combinations significantly reduced the number of bacterial cells after 24 h of treatment. In conclusions, the combinations of ampicillin plus apramycin and tiamulin plus spectinomycin showed the greatest synergism and may be potential strategies for treatment of multi-resistant S. suis in animal.

  8. The safety and pharmacokinetics of single-agent and combination therapy with megestrol acetate and dronabinol for the treatment of HIV wasting syndrome. The DATRI 004 Study Group. Division of AIDS Treatment Research Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpone, J G; Wright, D J; Li, N; Egorin, M J; Enama, M E; Mayers, J; Galetto, G

    1997-03-01

    This randomized, open-labeled, multicenter study was designed to assess safety and pharmacokinetics of dronabinol (Marinol) tablets and megestrol acetate (Megace) micronized tablets, alone and in combination, for treatment of HIV wasting syndrome. Weight and quality of life data were also collected. Fifty-two patients (mean CD4+ count, 59 cells/microliter) were randomized to one of four treatment arms: dronabinol 2.5 mg twice/day (D); megestrol acetate 750 mg/day (M750); megestrol acetate 750 mg/day+dronabinol 2.5 mg twice/day (M750+D); or megestrol acetate 250 mg/day+dronabinol 2.5 mg twice/day (M250+D). After therapy initiation, 47 patients returned for at least one visit, and 39 completed the planned 12 weeks of study visits. Occurrence of adverse events, drug discontinuation, new AIDS-defining conditions, or CD4+ T lymphocyte changes were not statistically significantly different among arms. Serious adverse events assessed as related to dronabinol included CNS events (e.g., confusion, anxiety, emotional lability, euphoria, hallucinations) and those assessed as related to megestrol acetate included dyspnea, liver enzyme changes, and hyperglycemia. The mean weight change +/- SE over 12 weeks was as follows: D, -2.0 +/- 1.3 kg; M750, +6.5 +/- 1.1 kg; M750+D, +6.0 +/- 1.0 kg; and M250+D, -0.3 +/- 1.0 kg (difference among treatment arms, p = 0.0001). Pharmacokinetic parameters measured after 2 weeks of therapy for M750 were Cmax = 985 ng/ml and AUC = 22,487 ng x hr/ml, and for dronabinol and its active metabolite (HO-THC), respectively, were Cmax = 2.01; 4.61 ng/ml and AUC = 5.3; 23.7 ng x hr/ml. For megestrol acetate, but not dronabinol, there was a positive correlation at week 2 between both Cmax and AUC with each of the following: (1) weight change, (2) breakfast visual analog scale for hunger (VASH) score, and (3) dinner VASH score.

  9. Sacubitril/Valsartan: A Novel Cardiovascular Combination Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sible, Alexandra M; Nawarskas, James J; Alajajian, David; Anderson, Joe R

    2016-01-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan [LCZ696 (Entresto), Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.] is the first in a new class of drugs that combines neprilysin inhibition with angiotensin II receptor antagonism, the combination of which acts to increase endogenous natriuretic peptides while inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Sacubitril/valsartan has been studied in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and has demonstrated clinical efficacy in blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with and without HFpEF and a reduction in hospitalizations and mortality for patients with HFrEF. Research to evaluate clinical outcomes in HFpEF is ongoing. Sacubitril/valsartan is approved to reduce hospitalization and risk of cardiovascular death for patients with HFrEF in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II-IV. The product is as well tolerated as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, with the most common side effect being hypotension. Expectedly, it is much more costly than generic angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists, which will be a factor in determining how widespread the use of this agent will be. In summary, although the number of published studies evaluating its use is limited, sacubitril/valsartan represents a promising new treatment option for patients with HFrEF. Ongoing studies will continue to refine the role of this agent in clinical practice.

  10. Possible artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant malaria in Nigeria: a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnennaya Anthony Ajayi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant malaria is rare in Sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization identifies monitoring and surveillance using day-3 parasitaemia post-treatment as the standard test for identifying suspected artemisinin resistance. We report three cases of early treatment failure due to possible artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. All cases showed adequate clinical and parasitological responses to quinine. This study reveals a need to re-evaluate the quality and efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy agents in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa.

  11. Aliskiren and valsartan combination therapy for the management of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Epstein

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin J EpsteinDepartments of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research and Medicine, Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA and East Coast Institute for Research, Jacksonville, Florida, USAAbstract: Combination therapy is necessary for most patients with hypertension, and agents that inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS are mainstays in hypertension management, especially for patients at high cardiovascular and renal risk. Single blockade of the RAAS with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB confers some cardiorenal protection; however, these agents do not extinguish the RAAS as evidenced by a reactive increase in plasma renin activity (PRA, a cardiovascular risk marker, and incomplete cardiorenal protection. Dual blockade with an ACE inhibitor and an ARB offers no additional benefit in patients with hypertension and normal renal and left ventricular function. Indeed, PRA increases synergistically with dual blockade. Aliskiren, the first direct renin inhibitor (DRI to become available has provided an opportunity to study the merit of DRI/ARB combination treatment. By blocking the first and rate-limiting step in the RAAS, aliskiren reduces PRA by at least 70% and buffers the compensatory increase in PRA observed with ACE inhibitors and ARBs. The combination of a DRI and an ARB or an ACE inhibitor is an effective approach for lowering blood pressure; available data indicate that such combinations favorably affect proteinuria, left ventricular mass index, and brain natriuretic peptide in patients with albuminuria, left ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure, respectively. Ongoing outcome studies will clarify the role of aliskiren and aliskiren-based combination RAAS blockade in patients with hypertension and those at high cardiorenal risk.Keywords: aliskiren, valsartan, single-pill combination, hypertension, renin

  12. Cyclophosphamide/x-ray: combined mode preparation for transplantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.; Okunewick, J.; Shadduck, R.; Raikow, R.; Brozovich, B.; Seeman, P.

    1979-01-01

    Use of total body irradiation (TBI) and/or chemotherapy as a preparation for marrow transplantation in the treatment of leukemia has been only moderately successful in the clinic. Although cyclophosphamide (CY) has shown promise as a marrow ablative agent, leukemia relapses are often found, and optimal therapeutic protocols have not been established. Our transplantation therapy studies of murine leukemia with parental recipients and hybrid donors provide an excellent model for research aimed at improved survival of human transplant patients. Utilizing a murine leukemia induced by a virus, various doses of CY in combination with sub-lethal irradiation were compared to determine the optimal pretreatment for transplantation therapy. Both normal and leukemic mice were engrafted with virus resistant, histocompatible marrow following these preparations, then monitored for survival and long term effects. Leukemic mice were also evaluated for pluripotent as well as myeloid committed stem cells as a measure of the effectiveness of the treatment in elimination of leukemic cells. Leukemic groups were also compared for the percentage and time of leukemia relapse. All CY/X-ray combinations were more effective in elimination of stem cell populations than supralethal TBI alone. However, the best survival was obtained with lethal TBI alone or low dose CY in combination with 550 R

  13. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates [relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22]. The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents

  14. Spillover adherence effects of fixed-dose combination HIV therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauf TL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Kauf1, Keith L Davis2, Stephanie R Earnshaw2, E Anne Davis31Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Independent consultant, Pittsboro, NC, USAAbstract: The impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC products on adherence to other, non-fixed regimen components has not been examined. We compared adherence to a third antiretroviral (ART component among patients receiving a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone consisting of the FDC Epzicom®, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, Research Triangle Park, NC (abacavir sulfate 600 mg + lamivudine 300 mg; FDC group versus NRTI combinations taken as two separate pills (NRTI Combo group using data from a national sample of 30 health plans covering approximately 38 million lives from 1997 to 2005. Adherence was measured as the medication possession ratio (MPR. Multivariate logistic regression compared treatment groups based on the likelihood of achieving ≥95% adherence, with sensitivity analyses using alternative thresholds. MPR was assessed as a continuous variable using multivariate linear regression. Covariates included age, gender, insurance payer type, year of study drug initiation, presence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and third agent class. The study sample consisted of 650 FDC and 1947 NRTI Combo patients. Unadjusted mean adherence to the third agent was higher in the FDC group than the NRTI Combo group (0.92 vs 0.85; P < 0.0001. In regression analyses, FDC patients were 48% and 39% more likely to achieve 95% and 90% third agent adherence, respectively (P ≤ 0.03. None of the other MPR specifications achieved comparable results. Among managed care patients, use of an FDC appears to substantially improve adherence to a third regimen component and thus the likelihood of achieving the accepted standard for adherence to HIV therapy of 95%.Keywords

  15. Second-line combination therapies in nonsmall cell lung cancer without known driver mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Virginia Bluthgen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, platinum-based combination chemotherapy is standard treatment in the first-line setting; however, the large majority of patients ultimately progress. For more than a decade, single-agent therapy with docetaxel, pemetrexed or erlotinib has been the standard of care after failure with platinum salts, showing some benefit over best supportive care. Nonetheless, prognosis remains poor and new second-line strategies are urgently needed. Combinations of cytotoxic agents, including rechallenge with platinum salts, do not offer clear benefit over single-agent therapy for the majority of patients. In patients without a known tumoural oncogenic driver mutation, regimens based on combinations of targeted agents have shown promising results; however, a clear role in therapeutic management is yet to be established. Some success has been reported in recent research combining a cytotoxic agent with targeted therapies. In this review, we summarise published data for the various strategies evaluated over the past decade in second-line treatment of NSCLC patients without a known driver mutation. We focus on combination treatments and consider future perspectives, including the need to identify predictive markers to support personalised therapeutic strategies.

  16. Effects of combined traditional Chinese medicine with immunosuppressive agents for patients with myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Gu, Shanshan; Liu, Peng; Yang, Hongxia; Dong, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a kind of autoimmune disease induced by transferring dysfunction of neuromuscular junction. In the present study, we developed an integrated therapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine and immuno suppressive agents to seek for an effective treatment of MG. 220 MG patients were randomly divided into two groups with different therapies. Plasma levels of acetylcholine receptors antibodies (AchRAb) and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Treg) were conducted through ELISA and flow cytometry. The amount of AchRAb (8.52±0.96 vs. 5.22±0.46) and CD4+CD25+Treg (1.94±1.21 vs. 3.21±0.96) in Group A receiving integrated therapy were significantly improved compared with Group B; the clinical performance of group treated with the integrated therapy was also much better. The integrated therapy in the present study could significantly improve the condition of MG with high recovery rate and low recurrence rate, which can be employed in future clinical treatment of MG. PMID:26770531

  17. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, N.; Ellebaek, E.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination...

  18. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in combination with conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination...

  19. Organic molecule-based photothermal agents: an expanding photothermal therapy universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Sung; Verwilst, Peter; Sharma, Amit; Shin, Jinwoo; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2018-04-03

    Over the last decade, organic photothermal therapy (PTT) agents have attracted increasing attention as a potential complement for, or alternative to, classical drugs and sensitizers involving inorganic nanomaterials. In this tutorial review, we provide a structured description of the main classes of organic photothermal agents and their characteristics. Representative agents that have been studied in the context of photothermal therapy since 2000 are summarized and recent advances in using PTT agents to address various cancers indications are highlighted.

  20. Combining Immunotherapy with Standard Glioblastoma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This clinical trial is testing standard therapy (surgery, radiation and temozolomide) plus immunotherapy with pembrolizumab with or without a cancer treatment vaccine for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, a common and deadly type of brain tumor.

  1. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature data and clinical of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%) [ru

  2. Human-Agent Decision-making: Combining Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Kraus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive work has been conducted both in game theory and logic to model strategic interaction. An important question is whether we can use these theories to design agents for interacting with people? On the one hand, they provide a formal design specification for agent strategies. On the other hand, people do not necessarily adhere to playing in accordance with these strategies, and their behavior is affected by a multitude of social and psychological factors. In this paper we will consider the question of whether strategies implied by theories of strategic behavior can be used by automated agents that interact proficiently with people. We will focus on automated agents that we built that need to interact with people in two negotiation settings: bargaining and deliberation. For bargaining we will study game-theory based equilibrium agents and for argumentation we will discuss logic-based argumentation theory. We will also consider security games and persuasion games and will discuss the benefits of using equilibrium based agents.

  3. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  4. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  5. Are gadolinium contrast agents suitable for gadolinium neutron capture therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Rajesh, Deepika; Casalbore, Patrizia; Daniels, Matthew J; Erhardt, Robert J; Frazer, Bradley H; Wiese, Lisa M; Richter, Katherine L; Sonderegger, Brandon R; Gilbert, Benjamin; Schaub, Sebastien; Cannara, Rachel J; Crawford, John F; Gilles, Mary K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Fowler, John F; Larocca, Luigi M; Howard, Steven P; Mercanti, Delio; Mehta, Minesh P; Pallini, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is a potential treatment for malignant tumors based on two steps: (1) injection of a tumor-specific (157)Gd compound; (2) tumor irradiation with thermal neutrons. The GdNC reaction can induce cell death provided that Gd is proximate to DNA. Here, we studied the nuclear uptake of Gd by glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cells after treatment with two Gd compounds commonly used for magnetic resonance imaging, to evaluate their potential as GdNCT agents. Using synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy, we analyzed the Gd distribution at the subcellular level in: (1) human cultured GBM cells exposed to Gd-DTPA or Gd-DOTA for 0-72 hours; (2) intracerebrally implanted C6 glioma tumors in rats injected with one or two doses of Gd-DOTA, and (3) tumor samples from GBM patients injected with Gd-DTPA. In cell cultures, Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA were found in 84% and 56% of the cell nuclei, respectively. In rat tumors, Gd penetrated the nuclei of 47% and 85% of the tumor cells, after single and double injection of Gd-DOTA, respectively. In contrast, in human GBM tumors 6.1% of the cell nuclei contained Gd-DTPA. Efficacy of Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA as GdNCT agents is predicted to be low, due to the insufficient number of tumor cell nuclei incorporating Gd. Although multiple administration schedules in vivo might induce Gd penetration into more tumor cell nuclei, a search for new Gd compounds with higher nuclear affinity is warranted before planning GdNCT in animal models or clinical trials.

  6. [Control of blood pressure in hypertensive patients on combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Lucas, Silvia

    2015-02-20

    The impact of antihypertensive treatment on blood pressure (BP) control is fairly unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the degree of BP control and its relationship with treatment-related factors in hypertensive patients treated with 2 or 3 agents and attended in referral units. We studied 1,337 hypertensive subjects (41% women) with a mean age (SD) of 63 (12) years, who were receiving 2 or 3 antihypertensive drugs. The degree of BP control was estimated in a single visit by the proportion of patients with BP below 140/90mmHg. BP was controlled in 767 patients (57%). Lack of BP control was related to older age (12% risk for each 10-year increase) and the presence of microalbuminuria (64% risk increase). In those treated with 2 agents, BP control was 61%, without differences between those treated with fixed-drug or free combinations. BP control in those treated with 3 agents was 55%, higher in those receiving 3 agents in a fixed-drug combination (68%) compared with those on 3 agents administered separately (52%; P=.025). Drug classes used in combinations did not influence the degree of BP control. The degree of BP control in patients treated with 2 or 3 agents is 57%. Microalbuminuria is related to a lack of BP control. In those receiving 3 agents, the use of fixed-drug combinations is associated with better BP control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. External Qi therapy to treat symptoms of Agent Orange Sequelae in Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Woo, Won-Hong; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Hong, Sung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Moon, Sun-Rock

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Qi therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for various symptoms presented by Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War with Agent Orange Sequelae. Nine subjects volunteered to receive 30 minutes of Qi therapy, twice per day for 7 days. There was marked improvement in 89% of the patients with impaired physical activity, 86% of those with psychological disorder, 78% of those with heavy drug use, and 67% of those with fatigue, indigestion and high blood glucose levels. This data suggests that Qi therapy combined with conventional treatment has positive effects in reducing and managing the pain, psychosomatic disorders, and substance abuse in patients with Agent Orange Sequelae. We cannot completely discount the possible influence of the placebo effect, and more objective, clinical measures are needed to study the long-term effects of Qi therapy.

  8. Pharmacogenetics of hepatitis C: transition from interferon-based therapies to direct-acting antiviral agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal SM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanaa M Kamal1,21Department of Medicine, Division of Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Tropical Medicine, Ain Shams Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt, 2Department of Medicine, Salman Bin Abdul Aziz College of Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV has emerged as a major viral pandemic over the past two decades, infecting 170 million individuals, which equates to approximately 3% of the world's population. The prevalence of HCV varies according to geographic region, being highest in developing countries such as Egypt. HCV has a high tendency to induce chronic progressive liver damage in the form of hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, or liver cancer. To date, there is no vaccine against HCV infection. Combination therapy comprising PEGylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin has been the standard of care for patients with chronic hepatitis C for more than a decade. However, many patients still do not respond to therapy or develop adverse events. Recently, direct antiviral agents such as protease inhibitors, polymerase inhibitors, or NS5A inhibitors have been used to augment PEGylated interferon and ribavirin, resulting in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. However, most clinical trials have focused on assessing the efficacy and safety of direct antiviral agents in patients with genotype 1, and the response of other HCV genotypes has not been elucidated. Moreover, the prohibitive costs of such triple therapies will limit their use in patients in developing countries where most of the HCV infection exists. Understanding the host and viral factors associated with viral clearance is necessary for individualizing therapy to maximize sustained virologic response rates, prevent progression to liver disease, and increase the overall benefits of therapy with respect to its costs. Genome wide studies have shown significant associations between a set of polymorphisms in the region of the interleukin-28B (IL

  9. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNF-α therapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNF-α therapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNF-α therapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  10. Improved evaluation of antivascular cancer therapy using constrained tracer-kinetic modeling for multi-agent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, Stefanie; Jacobs, Igor; Lok, Jasper; Peters, Johannes; Bussink, Johan; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Keizer, Henk; Janssen, Henk M.; Nicolay, Klaas; Schabel, Matthias; Strijkers, Gustav

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a promising technique for assessing the response of tumor vasculature to anti-vascular therapies. Multi-agent DCE-MRI employs a combination of low and high molecular weight contrast agents, which potentially improves the accuracy of estimation of tumor

  11. Asthma Severity in patients initiating controller monotherapy versus combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diette, Gregory B; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L; Allen-Ramey, Felicia; Hopper, April; Sajjan, Shiva G; Markson, Leona E

    2011-04-01

    Asthma treatment guidelines recommend medications based on the level of asthma control. To evaluate differences in asthma control between patients who initiated asthma controller monotherapy versus combination therapy. Children (5-16 years; n = 488) and adults (17-80 years; n = 530) with asthma and no controller therapy in the prior 6 months were included. Telephone surveys were conducted within 5 days of filling a new asthma controller prescription with either the caregiver of children or the adult patient. Demographics, asthma control before therapy, and asthma-related resource use were assessed for patients initiating monotherapy (filling one asthma controller prescription) and combination therapy (filling more than one controller medication or a fixed-dose combination). Mean pediatric age was 10 years; 53% were male. Mean adult age was 47 years; 25% were male. There were no significant differences in asthma control score between patients receiving monotherapy and combination therapy. Children on combination therapy did not have more nighttime awakening or short-acting β-agonist use but were more likely to have been hospitalized due to asthma attack (p = .05) and have more unscheduled (p = .0374) and scheduled (p = .009) physician visits. Adults on combination therapy were more likely to have been hospitalized due to asthma attack (p asthma (p asthma control scores in the 4 weeks before index medication suggests that asthma severity during a treatment-free period did not differ significantly for patients initiating controller monotherapy versus combination therapy. From these findings, it appears that although physicians may not focus on asthma control when choosing the intensity of initial controller therapy, the intensity of health-care encounters may be an influence.

  12. Combination therapies in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthi, S.; Shanta, V.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical trials are reported involving combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Bleomycin was the only drug that potentiated radiation response in buccal squamous cell carcinomas. The response of the primary tumors was consistent, predictable and reproducible. The following drugs or chemicals were used: synkavit, methotrexate, metronidazole, bleomycin, pepleomycin, and hyperbaric oxygen. The results and their comparison is given in tables

  13. Combination of radiation injuries: pathogenesis, clinic, therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyba, A.F.; Farshatova, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    Modern notions on combined radiation injuries (CRI) are presented. Characteristic of injurious factors of nuclear explosion and common regularities of the CRI origination is given. The data on the CRI clinical peculiarities, diagnostics and treatment, principles of medical assistance for the injured on the stages of medical evacuation and recommendations on rehabilitation are presented

  14. Survival of lung cancer patients after combined therapy with hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, V.V.; Demidchik, Yu.E.; Khodina, T.V.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a randomized study of combined therapy of lung cancer patients including large field radiotherapy (total irradiation of 20 Gy, daily fractionation of 4 Gy) and induced hyperglycemia (22-23 mmol/1) are presented. The use of new variants of combined therapy was shown to increase significantly the survival of patients, however therapeutic efficacy was different depending on the time of hyperglycemia: wheter it was used before radiotherapy sessions of after their discontinuation

  15. Integrated analysis of the molecular action of Vorinostat identifies epi-sensitised targets for combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jodie F; Lappin, Katrina; Liberante, Fabio; Kettyle, Laura M; Matchett, Kyle B; Thompson, Alexander; Mills, Ken I

    2017-09-15

    Several histone deacetylase inhibitors including Vorinostat have received FDA approval for the treatment of haematological malignancies. However, data from these trials indicate that Vorinostat has limited efficacy as a monotherapy, prompting the need for rational design of combination therapies. A number of epi-sensitised pathways, including sonic hedgehog (SHH), were identified in AML cells by integration of global patterns of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) acetylation with transcriptomic analysis following Vorinostat-treatment. Direct targeting of the SHH pathway with SANT-1, following Vorinostat induced epi-sensitisation, resulted in synergistic cell death of AML cells. In addition, xenograft studies demonstrated that combination therapy induced a marked reduction in leukemic burden compared to control or single agents. Together, the data supports epi-sensitisation as a potential component of the strategy for the rational development of combination therapies in AML.

  16. Voglibose in Combination of Three Hypoglycemic Agents in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Pankivn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study — clinical and metabolic rationale for the selection of the third hypoglycemic agent to enhance the effectiveness of treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM type 2, assessment of the impact of the therapy intensification due to the addition of voglibose on carbohydrate metabolism parameters, which have not reached target levels during the combination therapy with metformin and glimepiride. Materials and methods. We observed 45 patients with DM type 2, who have not reached the targets of carbohydrate metabolism under the influence of previous treatments (metformin and glimepiride. After the initial clinical examination, patients were divided into two groups. In the first group (n = 30, wе added to the treatment the drug voglibose (Voxid, production of Kusum Pharm Ltd, Ukraine 0.2 mg before breakfast, lunch and dinner for 12 weeks. Results. After 12 weeks of treatment, the level of glycated hemoglobin (НbА1с in the first group decreased by 1.5 [1.1; 1.9] % (p  0.05. 80 % of patients achieved target levels of glycemia. The first group of patients showed a significant increase in HOMA-β index by 24.9 %, as well as a reduction of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR by 31.5 %. After 12 weeks of therapy, there was a statistically significant decrease in body weight by 2.1 kg in the first group of patients and no response in patients of the second group. Safety has been proveв in terms of the functional state of the liver and kidneys in this therapy. Conclusions. Adding voglibose for intensification of therapy in patients with type 2 DM, who had previously received metformin and glimepiride, has led to a significant improvement in carbohydrate metabolism (decrease in HbA1c by 1.5 %. Better control of carbohydrate metabolism during the combination therapy with metformin, glimepiride, and voglibose is accompanied by an increase of functional activity of pancreatic β-cells, a decrease in insulin resistance in the

  17. Current concepts in combination therapy for the treatment of hypertension: combined calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto F Rubio-Guerra

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alberto F Rubio-Guerra1, David Castro-Serna2, Cesar I Elizalde Barrera2, Luz M Ramos-Brizuela21Metabolic and Research Clinic, 2Internal Medicine Department, Hospital General de Ticomán SS DF, MéxicoAbstract: Recent guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend target blood pressures <140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients, or <130/80 mmHg in subjects with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or coronary artery disease. Despite the availability and efficacy of antihypertensive drugs, most hypertensive patients do not reach the recommended treatment targets with monotherapy, making combination therapy necessary to achieve the therapeutic goal. Combination therapy with 2 or more agents is the most effective method for achieving strict blood pressure goals. Fixed-dose combination simplifies treatment, reduces costs, and improves adherence. There are many drug choices for combination therapy, but few data are available about the efficacy and safety of some specific combinations. Combination therapy of calcium antagonists and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS are efficacious and safe, and have been considered rational by both the JNC 7 and the 2007 European Society of Hypertension – European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. The aim of this review is to discuss some relevant issues about the use of combinations with calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors in the treatment of hypertension.Keywords: hypertension, calcium channel blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, fixed-dose combination, adherence

  18. Circumvention of inherent or acquired cytotoxic drug resistance in vitro using combinations of modulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadagan, David; Merry, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Modulating agents are used to circumvent drug resistance in the clinical setting. However achievable serum concentrations are often lower than those which are optimal in vitro. Combination of modulating agents with non-overlapping toxicities may overcome this obstacle. We have investigated combinations of three modulating agents (quinine, verapamil, and cinnarizine) to circumvent inherent or acquired resistance to the cytotoxic drugs doxorubicin, vincristine and paclitaxel. Dose-response curves to cytotoxic drugs in the presence/absence of modulating agents were determined using colony formation and cell proliferation assays. Doxorubicin accumulation into cell monolayers was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Greater (1.9-fold) sensitisation to particular cytotoxic drugs was observed for certain combinations of modulating agents compared to individual effects. The most effective combination was quinine-plus-verapamil with the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin. This increase in sensitivity was associated with increased doxorubicin accumulation. Such enhanced activity was, however, not observed for all combinations of modulating agents or for all studied cytotoxic drugs. The findings of the present study suggest certain combinations of modulating agents to have a clinical role in circumventing drug resistance. Particular combinations of modulating agents must be carefully chosen to suit particular cytotoxic drug treatments.

  19. Valsartan combination therapy in the management of hypertension – patient perspectives and clinical utility

    OpenAIRE

    Nash, David T; McNamara, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality benefits of lowering blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients are well established, with most individuals requiring multiple agents to achieve BP control. Considering the important role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in the pathophysiology of hypertension, a key component of combination therapy should include a RAAS inhibitor. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) lower BP, reduce cardiovascular risk, provide organ protection, and are among t...

  20. Potential utility of combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan for metabolic derangements in Zucker Fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajioka, T; Miura, K; Kitahara, Y; Yamagishi, S

    2007-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with insulin resistance and has been recognized as a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance and/or impaired early-phase insulin secretion are major determinants of postprandial hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the potential utility of combination therapy with telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker and nateglinide, a rapid-onset/short-duration insulinotropic agent, for the treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia and metabolic derangements in Zucker Fatty (ZF) rats. ZF rats fed twice daily were given vehicle, 50 mg/kg of nateglinide, 5 mg/kg of telmisartan, or both for 6 weeks. Combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan for 2 weeks ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia in ZF rats fed twice daily. Furthermore, 6-week treatment with nateglinide and telmisartan not only decreased fasting plasma insulin, triglycerides, and free fatty acid levels, but also improved the responses of blood glucose to insulin and subsequently reduced the decremental glucose areas under the curve in the ZF rats. Combination therapy also restored the decrease of plasma adiponectin levels in the ZF rats. Monotherapy with nateglinide or telmisartan alone didnot significantly improve these metabolic parameters. These observations demonstrate that combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan may improve the metabolic derangements by ameliorating early phase of insulin secretion as well as insulin resistance in ZF rats fed twice daily. Our present findings suggest that the combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  2. Effect of alpha-interferon alone and combined with other antineoplastic agents on renal cell carcinoma determined by the tetrazolium microculture assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Y; Aso, Y

    1994-01-01

    The antiproliferative effect of various alpha-interferons (alpha-IFNs), alone or combined with other agents, on a renal cell carcinoma cell line was evaluated by the tetrazolium microculture assay to examine the rationale for combination therapies. Cells incubated in 96-week microculture plates at 5 x 10(3)/well were exposed to various agents for 3 days. There were no obvious differences in the growth inhibition caused by the 5 kinds of alpha-IFN examined as single agents. The combination of alpha-IFN with the following agents was also assessed: 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), mitomycin C, bleomycin, cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (CDDP), vinblastine, etoposide (ETOP), alpha-IFN, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and alpha-difluoromethylornithine. Synergism was observed for the combination of alpha-IFN+TNF, while the other combinations had additive or subadditive effects. No interference or antagonism was found. Trimodal combinations of alpha-IFN+MTX with either 5FU, ETOP, or CDDP all showed subadditive effects. These results indicated that an increased antiproliferative effect, although not necessarily synergistic, was obtained by the combination of alpha-IFN with a variety of antineoplastic agents, providing a rationale to seek for combination therapies including alpha-IFN for treating renal cell carcinoma.

  3. Activation of the human immune system by chemotherapeutic or targeted agents combined with the oncolytic parvovirus H-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehler, Markus; Sieben, Maike; Roth, Susanne; Springsguth, Franziska; Leuchs, Barbara; Zeidler, Maja; Dinsart, Christiane; Rommelaere, Jean; Galle, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    release and cytotoxic T-cell activation compared with agents alone. Thus, the clinical assessment of H-1PV oncolytic tumor therapy not only alone but also in combination strategies is warranted

  4. Oral Candida in Patients with Fixed Orthodontic Appliance: In Vitro Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamadi, Wisam; Al-Saigh, Rafal J; Al-Dabagh, Nebras N; Al-Humadi, Hussam W

    2017-01-01

    Fixed orthodontic appliance (FOA) increases the cariogenic microorganisms of mouth including candida. The aim was to evaluate the pharmacodynamic effects of some antibacterial drugs in combination with most applicable antifungal agents on candida isolated from patients with FOA. Three antifungal agents (amphotericin B (AMB), ketoconazole (KET), and itraconazole (ITZ)) and three antibacterial drugs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), doxycycline (DOX), and metronidazole (MET)) with serial concentrations have been used and microdilution broth method has been done for single and combination therapy, then fungal growth was assessed spectrophotometrically, and the combinations were evaluated by bliss independent analysis. According to bliss independent interaction, the synergistic interactions depended on Δ E values that showed the best for CIP was with AMB (Δ E = 55.14) followed with KET (Δ E = 41.23) and lastly ITR (Δ E = 39.67) at CIP = 150 mg/L. DOX was optimal with KET (Δ E = 42.11) followed with AMB (Δ E = 40.77) and the lowest with ITR (Δ E = 9.12) at DOX = 75 mg/L. MET is the best with AMB (Δ E = 40.95) and then with ITR (Δ E = 35.45) and finally KET (Δ E = 15.15) at MET 200 mg/L. Moreover, usage of higher concentrations of antibacterial agents revealed inhibitory effects. This study uncovers the optimum antibiotic combination therapy against cariogenic candida with FOA by usage of low therapeutic concentrations.

  5. Combination therapy of gastric carcinoma with radiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Yamada, Shogo; Matsumoto, Ko [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1982-08-01

    The concurrent combination therapy of radiation and chemotherapy was performed in a total of 134 cases of stomach cancer. Radiation response of tumor was remarkable in 35 (37%) of 95 cases, irradiated more than 5,000 rad. Yearly survival rates in 81 cases, in which the scheduled curative treatment was completed, were 63% in one, 31% in two, 21% in three, 17% in four and 13% in five years. These rates were intimately correlated to tumor size and cancer type. However, this combination therapy accompanied some fatal complications in a few percent. From the results, it was concluded that this combination therapy should be valuable to prolong the life of patients with gastric cancer, and that the curable indications for this treatment should be T1-T3: M0 cases with radio-responsive tumor.

  6. Combination therapies for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer: current and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Mariana; Pondé, Noam F; Poggio, Francesca; Kotecki, Nuria; Salis, Mauren; Lambertini, Matteo; de Azambuja, Evandro

    2018-05-24

    HER2-positive disease is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that has been revolutionized by anti-HER2 directed therapies. Multiple drugs have been developed and are currently in clinical use, including trastuzumab, lapatinib, pertuzumab, T-DM1, and neratinib, alone or combined in 'dual HER2-blockade' regimens. Areas covered: A comprehensive literature review was performed regarding the current state and the future of combination regimens containing anti-HER2 agents, focusing on their efficacy, toxicity, and cost-effectiveness. Expert commentary: The combination of trastuzumab/pertuzumab is approved in all disease settings, while trastuzumab/neratinib is approved in the adjuvant setting and trastuzumab/lapatinib in metastatic disease. Meanwhile, as breast cancer biology and resistance mechanisms become clearer, combinations with drugs like PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors, CDK4/6 inhibitors, anti-PD(L)1 antibodies, endocrine therapy, and new anti-HER2 agents (panHER and HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bispecific antibodies, anti-HER3 antibodies, and antibody-drug conjugates) are being extensively tested in clinical trials. More specific strategies for the 'triple-positive' (estrogen receptor-positive/HER2-positive) disease are also being explored. However, there is an urgent need for the development of predictive biomarkers for a better tailoring of anti-HER2 directed therapy. This is the only way to further improve clinical outcomes and quality of life and to decrease costs and toxicities of unnecessary treatments.

  7. Combining biological agents and chemotherapy in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Jakobsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    is not always possible. Chemotherapy is effective and the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine is considered a standard treatment of inoperable cholangiocarcinoma. Biological targeted treatment to date has minor effect when given as monotherapy, but some of the drugs hold promise as an adjunct...... to chemotherapy. It should, however, be noted that most of the trials are based on few patients, and thus far the literature does not allow for a conclusion as to the role of biological treatment on cholangiocarcinoma. This situation calls for well-designed randomized trials, and international cooperation as well...

  8. Treating Hypothyroidism with Thyroxine/Triiodothyronine Combination Therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsson, Luba Freja; Medici, Bjarke Borregaard; la Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Five to ten percent of patients with hypothyroidism describe persistent symptoms despite being biochemically well regulated on levothyroxine (L-T4). Thyroxine (T4)/triiodothyronine (T3) combination therapy [L-T4/liothyronine (L-T3) or desiccated thyroid] are still regarded as experime......BACKGROUND: Five to ten percent of patients with hypothyroidism describe persistent symptoms despite being biochemically well regulated on levothyroxine (L-T4). Thyroxine (T4)/triiodothyronine (T3) combination therapy [L-T4/liothyronine (L-T3) or desiccated thyroid] are still regarded...

  9. Advances in radioprotection through the use of combined agent regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J F; Kumar, K S; Walden, T L; Neta, R; Landauer, M R; Clark, E P [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1990-04-01

    Improved radioprotection and reduced lethal toxicity of the phosphorothioate WR 2721 was observed after administration with metals (selenium, zinc or copper). A number of receptor-mediated protectors and other biological compounds, including endotoxin, eicosanoids and cytokines, have at least an additive effect when administered with thiol protectors. Eicosanoids and other bioactive lipids must be administered before exposure, whereas some immunomodulators have activity when administered either before or after exposure, e.g. interleukin administered simultaneously with WR 2721 before or after irradiation enhances the efficacy of WR 2721. The most effective single or combinations of protectors result in a decrement in locomotor activity (index of behavioural toxicity). Recent evidence indicates that caffeine mitigates toxicity of an effective dose of phosphorothioate WR 3689 without altering its efficacy. (UK).

  10. Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator

  11. Combined statin-fibrate therapy-induced rhabdomyolysis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozić Tanja L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious and potentially fatal adverse reaction of the statin application that may be developed in any time of therapy. It is characterized by massive destruction of muscles associated with the large increase of creatine kinase (CK leading to myoglobinuria and potential acute renal failure. Combined statin-fibrate therapy increases the risk of rhabdomyolysis, especially in elderly and diabetic patients. Case report An 81-year-old male was admitted to Coronary Care Unit of the Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia (CCS with the clinical picture and electrocardiogram of the acute anterior wall myocardial infarction complicated with pulmonary edema. Laboratory tests on admission showed higher elevated values of serum creatinine 179 μmol/L and BUN 9.2 mmol/L (eGFR 32 mL/min/1.73m2, CK 309 U/L (on day 2: 3476 U/L and mixed hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol 10.3 mmol/L, HDL 2.26 mmol/L, TG 4.85 mmol/L. The patient was treated with thrombolysis medication therapy (Alteplase, anticoagulant and dual antiplatelet therapy, diuretics, organic nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, antibiotics, and proton pump inhibitors. During seven days, his therapy included combined pravastatin 20 mg and fenofibrate (160 mg, which was discontinued due to pains and weakness of muscles and significantly elevated CC to 7080 U/L (upper limit 200 U/L, but no significant deterioration of renal function was observed. Discontinuation of therapy resulted in CC level normalization and improvement of clinical condition. Conclusion Combined statin and fibrate therapy requires strict clinical control and monitoring of CK i transaminases. Four-time or higher increase of CK requires discontinuation of therapy. In addition, patients are advised to report immediately any pains in muscles, sensibility, weakness or cramps.

  12. Combination of FVIII and by-passing agent potentiates in vitro thrombin production in haemophilia A inhibitor plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintman, Jenny; Astermark, Jan; Berntorp, Erik

    2010-11-01

    The by-passing agents, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) and activated prothrombin complex concentrate (APCC), are important tools in the treatment of patients with haemophilia A and high-responding inhibitory antibodies. It has been observed clinically that in some patients undergoing immune tolerance induction the bleeding frequency decreases, hypothetically caused by a transient haemostatic effect of infused FVIII not measurable ex vivo. We evaluated how by-passing agents and factor VIII (FVIII) affect thrombin generation (TG) in vitro using plasma from 11 patients with severe haemophilia A and high titre inhibitors. Samples were spiked with combinations of APCC, rFVIIa and five different FVIII products. Combination of APCC and FVIII showed a synergistic effect in eliciting TG (Pproducts. When rFVIIa and FVIII were combined the interaction between the preparations was found to be additive. APCC and rFVIIa were then combined without FVIII, resulting in an additive effect on thrombin production. Each product separately increased TG above baseline. In conclusion, the amount of thrombin formed in vitro by adding a by-passing agent, was higher in the presence of FVIII. Our findings support the use of FVIII in by-passing therapy to optimize the haemostatic effect. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. "Smart" nickel oxide based core-shell nanoparticles for combined chemo and photodynamic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Shazia; Nazir, Samina; Munir, Saeeda; AlAjmi, Mohamed Fahad; Afzal, Muhammad; Mazhar, Kehkashan

    2016-01-01

    We report "smart" nickel oxide nanoparticles (NOPs) as multimodal cancer therapy agent. Water-dispersible and light-sensitive NiO core was synthesized with folic acid (FA) connected bovine serum albumin (BSA) shell on entrapped doxorubicin (DOX). The entrapped drug from NOP-DOX@BSA-FA was released in a sustained way (64 hours, pH=5.5, dark conditions) while a robust release was found under red light exposure (in 1/2 hour under λmax=655 nm, 50 mW/cm(2), at pH=5.5). The cell viability, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and diphenylisobenzofuran assays conducted under light and dark conditions revealed a high photodynamic therapy potential of our construct. Furthermore, we found that the combined effect of DOX and NOPs from NOP-DOX@BSA-FA resulted in cell death approximately eightfold high compared to free DOX. We propose that NOP-DOX@BSA-FA is a potential photodynamic therapy agent and a collective drug delivery system for the systemic administration of cancer chemotherapeutics resulting in combination therapy.

  14. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  15. Risks and safety of combination therapy for hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline

    2016-08-01

    Hypothyroidism is currently a condition that can be treated, but not cured. Although levothyroxine reverses stigmata of hypothyroidism in most individuals, some patients feel dissatisfied with 'monotherapy', and this has stimulated interest in 'combination therapy' with both levothyroxine and liothyronine. A search of PubMed was conducted using terms including hypothyroidism, treatment, benefits, risks, and safety. Based on the articles identified, the body of evidence regarding the efficacy of traditional levothyroxine is reviewed. Concerns with levothyroxine therapy including impaired quality of life in treated patients, thyroxine-predominant hormone ratios, and inadvertent iatrogenic thyroid disease are discussed. The trials of combination therapy performed since 1999 were reviewed. The heterogeneity of these trials, both in terms of design and results, is discussed. The potential for new trials to determine whether combination therapy can reverse the dissatisfaction associated with monotherapy, while avoiding non-physiologic hormone ratios, inadvertent thyrotoxicosis, and unacceptable side effects is discussed. Expert commentary: Research regarding which therapy fully reverses hypothyroidism at a tissue and cellular level is ongoing. The field would be advanced by the development of an extended release preparation of liothyronine. In the future regeneration of functional thyroid follicles from stem cells may offer hope for curing hypothyroidism.

  16. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Response to combination antiretroviral therapy: variation by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    -naive individuals starting combination antiretroviral therapy from 1998 to 2006. OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from combination antiretroviral therapy initiation to HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml (virological response), CD4 increase of more than 100 cells/microl (immunological response) and new AIDS/death were analysed...... response. The probability of virological response was lower in those aged 6-12 (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.87) and 13-17 (0.78) years, but was higher in those aged 50-54 (1.24), 55-59 (1.24) and at least 60 (1.18) years. The probability of immunological response was higher in children and younger adults...... and reduced in those 60 years or older. Those aged 55-59 and 60 years or older had poorer clinical outcomes after adjusting for the latest CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: Better virological responses but poorer immunological responses in older individuals, together with low precombination antiretroviral therapy...

  18. Combined Therapy at Persistent Herpes Virus Infection in Sickly Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kharlamova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 40 sickly children with recurrent croup (RC — 28 and bronchial obstruction (ROB — 8, (RC + ROB — 4 aged from 18 months till 14 years. We found that high frequency of persistent herpes viruses usually occurs as associations with CMV, EBV and human herpes virus 6 type. We substantiated anti viral and immune corrective therapy in two schemes compared in efficacy: the 1st group was administered monotherapy with Viferon, and the 2nd group received combined therapy Viferon + Arbidol in doses according to the age during three months. We received a more expressed clinical immunologic effect from the therapy with decreased antigenic load and frequency of recurrence of RC and ROB with Viferon application in suppositories in combination with Arbidol per orally in the intermittent scheme during three months. 

  19. Atorvastatin/trimetazidine combination therapy in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the outcomes and safety of atorvastatin/trimetazidine combination therapy in patients with chronic cardiac failure. Methods: A total of 144 patients with chronic cardiac failure were divided into test group (n = 72) and control group (n = 72). In addition to conventional anti-heart failure treatment, all patients ...

  20. Combination therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tršinar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of observational program of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH (LUTS/BPH was to acquire additional pharmaco-epidemiological data on the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin.Methods: Observational program of men with BPH was conducted in urological outpatient clinics in Slovenia from April 2004 until November 2005. In open-label, non-interventional program 1173 patients were observed, who had been treated because of LUTS/BPH with combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin, in the framework of common treatment. At baseline and after six months of treatment for each patient the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS questionnaire and assessment of quality of life (QL were filled in. In addition, urinary flow rate and prostate volume were determined. Adverse effects of drugs were reported spontaneously. For statistical analysis the Student’s t-test was performed.Results: Combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin was well tolerated. 89 (7.6 % patients discontinued with medication because of lack of efficacy or because of adverse effects of drugs. Symptom score, assessment of quality of patients’ lives and volume of prostates were significantly lower (p < 0.0001, while urinary flow rate was significantly higher (p < 0.0001 after six months of treatment with finasteride and tamsulosin.Conclusions: Combination therapy of patients with LUTS/BPH with finasteride and tamsulosin is effective and safe.

  1. In vitro and in vivo analysis of antimicrobial agents alone and in combination against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhe eHE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.MethodsAn in vitro susceptibility test of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs. A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii,established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities.Results Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition, polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition, and minocycline (74.2% inhibition. However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin and D (minocycline + rifampicin were significantly higher than in groups A (tigecycline and B (polymyxin B (P < 0.05, after administration of the drugs 24h post-infection. Lung tissue inflammation gradually increased in the model group during the first 24h after ultrasonic atomization infection; vasodilation, congestion with hemorrhage were observed 48h post infection. After three days of anti-infective therapy in groups A, B, C and D, lung tissue inflammation in each group gradually recovered with clear structures. The mortality rates in drug combination groups (groups C and D were much lower than in groups A and B.ConclusionThe combination of minocycline with either rifampicin or amikacin is more effective against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii than single-agent tigecycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the mouse lung infection by ultrasonic atomization is a suitable model for drug screening and analysis of infection mechanism.

  2. Valsartan combination therapy in the management of hypertension – patient perspectives and clinical utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T; McNamara, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality benefits of lowering blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients are well established, with most individuals requiring multiple agents to achieve BP control. Considering the important role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in the pathophysiology of hypertension, a key component of combination therapy should include a RAAS inhibitor. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) lower BP, reduce cardiovascular risk, provide organ protection, and are among the best tolerated class of antihypertensive therapy. In this article, we discuss two ARB combinations (valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ] and amlodipine/valsartan), both of which are indicated for the treatment of hypertension in patients not adequately controlled on monotherapy and as initial therapy in patients likely to need multiple drugs to achieve BP goals. Randomized, double-blind studies that have assessed the antihypertensive efficacy and safety of these combinations in the first-line treatment of hypertensive patients are reviewed. Both valsartan/HCTZ and amlodipine/valsartan effectively lower BP and are well tolerated in a broad range of patients with hypertension, including difficult-to-treat populations such as those with severe BP elevations, prediabetes and diabetes, patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome, and individuals who are obese, elderly, or black. Also discussed herein are patient-focused perspectives related to the use of valsartan/HCTZ and amlodipine/valsartan, and the rationale for use of single-pill combinations as one approach to enhance patient compliance with antihypertensive therapy. PMID:21949614

  3. Building a roadmap for developing combination therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Daniel; Sperling, Reisa; Katz, Russell; Berry, Donald; Dilts, David; Hanna, Debra; Salloway, Stephen; Trojanowski, John Q; Bountra, Chas; Krams, Michael; Luthman, Johan; Potkin, Steven; Gribkoff, Val; Temple, Robert; Wang, Yaning; Carrillo, Maria C; Stephenson, Diane; Snyder, Heather; Liu, Enchi; Ware, Tony; McKew, John; Fields, F Owen; Bain, Lisa J; Bens, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Combination therapy has proven to be an effective strategy for treating many of the world's most intractable diseases. A growing number of investigators in academia, industry, regulatory agencies, foundations and advocacy organizations are interested in pursuing a combination approach to treating Alzheimer's disease. A meeting co-hosted by the Accelerate Cure/Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease Coalition, the Critical Path Institute and the Alzheimer's Association addressed challenges in designing clinical trials to test multiple treatments in combination and outlined a roadmap for making such trials a reality.

  4. Biologic agents therapy for Saudi children with rheumatic diseases: indications and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Alenazi, Abdullatif; AlJasser, Hind

    2016-06-01

    To report the indications and safety of biologic agents in childhood rheumatic diseases at a tertiary hospital. Children with rheumatic diseases treated with biologic agents at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January 2001 to December 2011 were included. All patients were reviewed for: demographic characteristics, diagnosis, concomitant treatment and indications of using biologic agents, age at start of therapy and side effects during the treatment period. In all, 134 children (89 female) with various rheumatic diseases were treated with biologic agents. Mean age at starting biologic treatment was 9.3 (4.25-14) years and mean therapy duration was 14.7 (3-88) months. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was the most frequent diagnosis (70.1%) followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (12.7%) and vasculitis (4.5%). All patients received concomitant therapy (corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs). In total, 273 treatments with biologic agents were used, (95 etanercept, 52 rituximab, 47 adalimumab, 37 infliximab, 23 anakinra, 10 tocilizumab and nine abatacept). Therapy was switched to another agent in 57 (42.5%) patients, mainly because of inefficacy (89.4%) or adverse event (10.6%). A total of 95 (34.8%) adverse events were notified; of these, the most frequent were infusion-related reactions (33.7%) followed by infections (24.2%) and autoantibody positivity (10.6%). One patient developed macrophage activation syndrome. Biologic agents were used in children with a range of rheumatic diseases. Of these, the most frequent was JIA. Off-label use of biologic agents in our cohort is common. These agents seem safe. However, they may associated with various adverse events. Sequential therapy seems well tolerated. However, this should be carefully balanced and considered on an individual basis. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Effectiveness of medication / auricular therapy / phyto-therapy combination in the treatment of hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Martínez Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: hypertension is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors, so its control improves the life expectancy of patients.Objective: to assess the effects of a treatment combining medication with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy in hypertensive patients assisted at the health area of ”Romárico Oro” Polyclinic, in Puerto Padre, Las Tunas province.Methods: an intervention study was carried out in 68 hypertensive patients of the health area of “Romárico Oro” Polyclinic in Puerto Padre from April, 2013 to April, 2014. The patients were distributed at random into two equal groups; the first received medication combined with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy, while the second one received only medication. The statistical analysis was done by means of Statistic system, t-student and Chi-Square tests were used and p< or =0.05 was considered as level of statistical significance.Results: by the end of the intervention, 73, 53% of the patients of the group with the combination of drug treatment and auricular therapy and phyto-therapy were controlled. In this group, the diastolic filling pressure diminished to 2, 2 mm Hg and the systolic gradient to 3, 66 mm, regarding the group treated only with drugs. Only one patient, representing the 2, 94% showed adverse reaction to the natural and traditional treatment.Conclusions: the combination of medication with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy proved to be effective, corroborated by a significant decrease of quantity of crisis, diastolic and systolic filling pressure values and increase of number of patients with their disease controlled; the report of only one complication shows the innocuousness of the auricular therapy and phyto-therapy treatment.

  6. Targeted Therapy of Cancer Using Photodynamic Therapy in Combination with Multi-faceted Anti-Tumor Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Olivo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has emerged as one of the important therapeutic options in the management of cancer and other diseases. PDT involves a tumor-localized photosensitizer (PS, which when appropriately illuminated by visible light converts oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, that attack key structural entities within the targeted cells, ultimately resulting in necrosis or apoptosis. Though PDT is a selective modality, it can be further enhanced by combining other targeted therapeutic strategies that include the use of synthetic peptides and nanoparticles for selective delivery of photosensitizers. Another potentially promising strategy is the application of targeted therapeutics that exploit a myriad of critical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Vascular disrupting agents that eradicate tumor vasculature during PDT and anti-angiogenic agents that targets specific molecular pathways and prevent the formation of new blood vessels are novel therapeutic approaches that have been shown to improve treatment outcome. In addition to the well-documented mechanisms of direct cell killing and damage to the tumor vasculature, PDT can also activate the body’s immune response against tumors. Numerous pre-clinical studies and clinical observations have demonstrated the immuno-stimulatory capability of PDT. Herein, we aim to integrate the most important findings with regard to the combination of PDT and other novel targeted therapy approaches, detailing its potential in cancer photomedicine.

  7. Antibody-Based Cancer Therapy : Successful Agents and Novel Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, D; Choi, G; de Bruyn, M; Wiersma, V R; Bremer, E; Galluzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, antibodies have been viewed as ideal candidates or "magic bullets" for use in targeted therapy in the fields of cancer, autoimmunity, and chronic inflammatory disorders. A wave of antibody-dedicated research followed, which resulted in the clinical approval of a first

  8. Combination antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infective endocarditis due to enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Sebastiano; Noviello, Silvana; Esposito, Silvano

    2016-06-01

    Enterococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) in both health care and community-based setting. Enterococcal IE requires bactericidal therapy for an optimal outcome. For decades, cell-wall-active antimicrobial agents (penicillins or vancomycin) in combination with aminoglycosides were the cornerstone of the treatment; however, the emergence of antibiotic resistance has significantly reduced the efficacy of these regimens. Data for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE and references from relevant articles on antibiotic combination regimens for the treatment of enterococcal IE. Abstracts presented in scientific conferences were not searched for. New effective and safe combination treatments, including double-β-lactam and daptomycin/β-lactam combination, are proving useful for the management of IE due to enterococci.

  9. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Combined With Physical Therapy in Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Inglés, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the treatment effectiveness of the combination of manual therapy (MT) with other physical therapy techniques. Systematic searches of scientific literature were undertaken on PubMed and the Cochrane Library (2004-2014). The following terms were used: "patellofemoral pain syndrome," "physical therapy," "manual therapy," and "manipulation." RCTs that studied adults diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) treated by MT and physical therapy approaches were included. The quality of the studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Five RCTs with an acceptable methodological quality (Jadad ≥ 3) were selected. The studies indicated that MT combined with physical therapy has some effect on reducing pain and improving function in PFPS, especially when applied on the full kinetic chain and when strengthening hip and knee muscles. The different combinations of MT and physical therapy programs analyzed in this review suggest that giving more emphasis to proximal stabilization and full kinetic chain treatments in PFPS will help better alleviation of symptoms.

  10. Enhanced degradation of chitosan by applying plasma treatment in combination with oxidizing agents for potential use as an anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokradjaroen, Chayanaphat; Rujiravanit, Ratana; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Theeramunkong, Sewan; Saito, Nagahiro; Yamashita, Kazuko; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2017-07-01

    Solution plasma (SP) treatment in combination with oxidizing agents, i.e., hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), potassium persulfate (K 2 S 2 O 8 ) and sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) were adopted to chitosan degradation in order to achieve fast degradation rate, low chemicals used and high yield of low-molecular-weight chitosan and chitooligosaccharide (COS). Among the studied oxidizing agents, H 2 O 2 was found to be the best choice in terms of appreciable molecular weight reduction without major change in chemical structure of the degraded products of chitosan. By the combination with SP treatment, dilute solution of H 2 O 2 (4-60mM) was required for effective degradation of chitosan. The combination of SP treatment and dilute solution of H 2 O 2 (60mM) resulted in the great reduction of molecular weight of chitosan and water-soluble chitosan was obtained as a major product. The resulting water-soluble chitosan was precipitated to obtain COS. An inhibitory effect against cervical cancer cell line (HeLa cells) of COS was also examined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempuraj Duraisamy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT, a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. Results AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Conclusion Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  12. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Koreaki; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Conti, Pio

    2007-10-12

    Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT), a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG)-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  13. Combined EGFR and VEGFR versus single EGFR signaling pathways inhibition therapy for NSCLC: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinji Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple signaling pathways influencing tumor cell survival and proliferation, and it is likely that blocking only one of these pathways allows others to act as salvage or escape mechanisms for cancer cells. Whether combined inhibition therapy has greater anti-tumor activity than single inhibition therapy is a matter of debate. Hence, a meta-analysis comparing therapy inhibiting both VEGFR and EGFR signaling pathways with that inhibiting EGFR signaling pathway alone was performed. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE database and the proceedings of major conferences for relevant clinical trials. Outcomes analyzed were objective tumor response rate (ORR, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and toxicity. Besides, subgroup analyses were performed to investigate whether the combined inhibition therapy is best performed using combination of selective agents or a single agent with multiple targets. Six trials recruiting 3,302 patients were included in the analysis. Combined inhibition therapy was associated with a 3% improvement in OS as compared with single-targeted therapy, but this difference was not statistically significant (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89-1.05; P=0.472. Patients receiving combined inhibition therapy had significant longer PFS than the group with single-targeted therapy (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95; P=0.011. There was no difference in the ORR between the groups (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.95-2.18; P=0.085. Subgroup analysis revealed that combined inhibition therapy using combination regimens was associated with statistically significant improvement in both ORR and PFS. Toxicity was greater in combined inhibition therapy. CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence to support the use of combined inhibition therapy in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC. However, given the significant advantage in ORR and PFS, combined inhibition therapy using combination

  14. Efficacy and safety of combining intra-articular methylprednisolone and anti-TNF agent to achieve prolonged remission in patients with recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To control local inflammation, the role of intra-articular corticosteroid is well established; similarly, with time there are more reports on the experience of intra-articular anti-TNF agent for localized joint inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the safety, local tolerability and clinical response after combining intra-articular administration of corticosteroids and anti-TNF agents for recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis. METHODS: Patients with recurrent monoarthritis of the knee were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. These patients required intra-articular corticosteroids every 8-12 weeks, with good short-term results. Five such consecutive patients were invited to partake in this study. Patients were maintained on their baseline immunosuppressive therapy. After aspiration of knee joint, the involved joint was injected with 80mg of methylprednisolone mixed with 5ml of lignocaine 1%; this was followed by the injection of an anti-TNF agent. RESULTS: In majority of our patients (three out of five), combining anti-TNF agent and methylprednisolone led to prolonged anti-inflammatory response, and these patients remain in remission to date (mean follow-up of 12 months). These responders were noted to be naive to anti-TNF therapy. Conversely, the remaining two patients were found to be on baseline systemic anti-TNF therapy, and both of them failed to respond either partly or completely. CONCLUSION: Combining intra-articular corticosteroid and anti-TNF agent has proved to be safe in our cohort of patients. We conclude that in particular subset of patients who suffer from recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis or oligoarthritis, combination therapy of intra-articular corticosteroids and anti-TNF agents appears attractive and promising.

  15. Combined-modality treatment of solid tumors using radiotherapy and molecular targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Brigette B Y; Bristow, Robert G; Kim, John; Siu, Lillian L

    2003-07-15

    Molecular targeted agents have been combined with radiotherapy (RT) in recent clinical trials in an effort to optimize the therapeutic index of RT. The appeal of this strategy lies in their potential target specificity and clinically acceptable toxicity. This article integrates the salient, published research findings into the underlying molecular mechanisms, preclinical efficacy, and clinical applicability of combining RT with molecular targeted agents. These agents include inhibitors of intracellular signal transduction molecules, modulators of apoptosis, inhibitors of cell cycle checkpoints control, antiangiogenic agents, and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors. Molecular targeted agents can have direct effects on the cytoprotective and cytotoxic pathways implicated in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). These pathways involve cellular proliferation, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, nuclear transcription, tumor angiogenesis, and prostanoid-associated inflammation. These pathways can also converge to alter RT-induced apoptosis, terminal growth arrest, and reproductive cell death. Pharmacologic modulation of these pathways may potentially enhance tumor response to RT though inhibition of tumor repopulation, improvement of tumor oxygenation, redistribution during the cell cycle, and alteration of intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity. Combining RT and molecular targeted agents is a rational approach in the treatment of solid tumors. Translation of this approach from promising preclinical data to clinical trials is actively underway.

  16. Combination photodynamic therapy of human breast cancer using salicylic acid and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Khorsandi, Khatereh; Jahanshiri, Maryam

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combination therapy with methylene blue (MB) assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) and salicylic acid (SA) as chemo-therapy anticancer agent. The binding of salicylic acid to methylene blue was studied using spectrophotometric method. The results show the 1:2 complex formation between SA and MB. The binding constants and related Gibbs free energies o are obtained (Kb1 = 183.74, Kb2 = 38.13 and ∆ Gb1° = 12.92 kJ·mol- 1, ∆ Gb2° =9.02 kJ·mol- 1). The spectrophotometric results show the improvement in solubilization and reduction prevention for SA and MB in the complex form. These results are in agreements with cellular experiments. The dark toxicity measurements represent the improve efficacy of chemotherapy using combination of SA and MB. The photodynamic therapy results (using red LED as light source (630 nm; power density: 30 mW cm- 2)) show that the cancer cell killing efficiency of MB increases in the combination with SA due to reduction prevention and stabilization of monomeric form of MB.

  17. Fixed-functional appliance treatment combined with growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the effects of growth hormone (GH) therapy and fixed functional appliance treatment in a 13-year-old Class II malocclusion patient without GH deficiency. GH has been shown to effectively increase endochondral growth and induce a more prognathic skeletal pattern. Although a major concern in Class II retrognathic patients is chin deficiency, long-term studies have shown that the mandibular growth enhancement effects of functional appliances are clinically insignificant. This case report demonstrates that the mandible grew significantly during fixed functional appliance treatment combined with GH therapy, with stable results during 2 years 11 months of retention. More studies are needed to evaluate GH therapy as a supplement in Class II treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Orthodontics-surgical combination therapy for Class III skeletal malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with severe mandibular prognathism in an adult individual requires surgical and Othodontic combination therapy. The inter disciplinary approach is the treatment of choice in most of the skeletal malocclusions. A case report of an adult individual with Class III malocclusion, having mandibular excess in sagittal and vertical plane and treated with orthodontics,, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and Le - Forte I osteotomy for the correction of skeletal, dental and soft tissue discrepancies is herewith presented. The surgical-orthodontic combination therapy has resulted in near-normal skeletal, dental and soft tissue relationship, with marked improvement in the facial esthetics in turn, has helped the patient to improve the self-confidence level.

  19. Cancer treatment: the combination of vaccination with other therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.H.; Sorensen, R.B.; Schrama, D.

    2008-01-01

    approach to fight cancer, the combination with additional therapy could create a number of synergistic effects. Herein we discuss the possibilities and prospects of vaccination when combined with other treatments. In this regard, cell death upon drug exposure may be immunogenic or non-immunogenic depending...... and endothelial cells. The efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against cancer will over the next few years be studied in settings taking advantage of strategies in which vaccination is combined with other treatment modalities. These combinations should be based on current knowledge not only regarding the biology...... of the cancer cell per se, but also considering how treatment may influence the malignant cell population as well as the immune system Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  20. Combined Effects of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles and Chemotherapeutic Agents on Prostate Cancer Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Kojima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC have poor outcomes. Docetaxel (DTX-based therapy is a current standard treatment for patients with mCRPC. Approaches combining conventional chemotherapeutic agents and nanoparticles (NPs, particularly iron oxide NPs, may overcome the serious side effects and drug resistance, resulting in the establishment of new therapeutic strategies. We previously reported the combined effects of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs with DTX on prostate cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of Fe3O4 NPs and rapamycin or carboplatin on prostate cancer cells in vitro. Treatment of DU145 and PC-3 cells with Fe3O4 NPs increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of both cell lines with 100 μg/mL Fe3O4 NPs for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition of cell viability with a different inhibitory effect. Combination treatments with 100 µg/mL Fe3O4 NPs and 10 µM carboplatin or 10 nM rapamycin in DU145 and PC-3 cells significantly decreased cell viability. Synergistic effects on apoptosis were observed in PC-3 cells treated with Fe3O4 NPs and rapamycin and in DU145 cells with Fe3O4 NPs and carboplatin. These results suggest the possibility of combination therapy with Fe3O4 NPs and various chemotherapeutic agents as a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with mCRPC.

  1. Combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: adding empagliflozin to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ahmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM management is complex, with few patients successfully achieving recommended glycemic targets with monotherapy, most progressing to combination therapy, and many eventually requiring insulin. Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are an emerging class of antidiabetes agents with an insulin-independent mechanism of action, making them suitable for use in combination with any other class of antidiabetes agents, including insulin. This review evaluates a 78-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the impact of empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, as add-on to basal insulin in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin, with or without metformin and/or a sulfonylurea. Empagliflozin added on to basal insulin resulted in significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels compared with placebo. Empagliflozin has previously been shown to induce weight loss, and was associated with sustained weight loss in this study. This combination therapy was well tolerated, with similar levels of hypoglycemic adverse events in the empagliflozin and placebo groups over the 78-week treatment period. Urinary tract infections and genital infections, side effects associated with SGLT2 inhibitors, were reported more commonly in the empagliflozin group; however, such events led to treatment discontinuation in very few patients. These findings suggest that, with their complementary mechanisms of action, empagliflozin added on to basal insulin may be a useful treatment option in patients on basal insulin who need additional glycemic control without weight gain.

  2. "Smart" nickel oxide based core–shell nanoparticles for combined chemo and photodynamic cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bano S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shazia Bano,1–3,* Samina Nazir,2,* Saeeda Munir,3 Mohamed Fahad AlAjmi,4 Muhammad Afzal,1 Kehkashan Mazhar3 1Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, 2Nanosciences and Technology Department, National Centre for Physics, Islamabad, 3Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering, Islamabad, Pakistan; 4College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We report “smart” nickel oxide nanoparticles (NOPs as multimodal cancer therapy agent. Water-dispersible and light-sensitive NiO core was synthesized with folic acid (FA connected bovine serum albumin (BSA shell on entrapped doxorubicin (DOX. The entrapped drug from NOP-DOX@BSA-FA was released in a sustained way (64 hours, pH=5.5, dark conditions while a robust release was found under red light exposure (in 1/2 hour under λmax=655 nm, 50 mW/cm2, at pH=5.5. The cell viability, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and diphenylisobenzofuran assays conducted under light and dark conditions revealed a high photodynamic therapy potential of our construct. Furthermore, we found that the combined effect of DOX and NOPs from NOP-DOX@BSA-FA resulted in cell death approximately eightfold high compared to free DOX. We propose that NOP-DOX@BSA-FA is a potential photodynamic therapy agent and a collective drug delivery system for the systemic administration of cancer chemotherapeutics resulting in combination therapy. Keywords: light-triggered drug release, cancer, bovine serum albumin, multi-model therapy

  3. Combined immunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy of cancer with microencapsulated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Pasquale; Bourgeois, Jacqueline M; Shen, Feng; Chang, Patricia L

    2004-10-01

    An alternative form of gene therapy involves immunoisolation of a nonautologous cell line engineered to secrete a therapeutic product. Encapsulation of these cells in a biocompatible polymer serves to protect these allogeneic cells from host-versus-graft rejection while recombinant products and nutrients are able to pass by diffusion. This strategy was applied to the treatment of cancer with some success by delivering either interleukin 2 or angiostatin. However, as cancer is a complex, multifactorial disease, a multipronged approach is now being developed to attack tumorigenesis via multiple pathways in order to improve treatment efficacy. A combination of immunotherapy with angiostatic therapy was investigated by treating B16-F0/neu melanoma-bearing mice with intraperitoneally implanted, microencapsulated mouse myoblasts (C2C12) genetically modified to deliver angiostatin and an interleukin 2 fusion protein (sFvIL-2). The combination treatment resulted in improved survival, delayed tumor growth, and increased histological indices of antitumor activity (apoptosis and necrosis). In addition to improved efficacy, the combination treatment also ameliorated some of the undesirable side effects from the individual treatments that have led to the previous failure of the single treatments, for example, inflammatory response to IL-2 or vascular mimicry due to angiostatin. In conclusion, the combination of immuno- and antiangiogenic therapies delivered by immunoisolated cells was superior to individual treatments for antitumorigenesis activity, not only because of their known mechanisms of action but also because of unexpected protection against the adverse side effects of the single treatments. Thus, the concept of a "cocktail" strategy, with microencapsulation delivering multiple antitumor recombinant molecules to improve efficacy, is validated.

  4. Cancer nanomedicine: gold nanoparticle mediated combined cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Bromma, Kyle; Chithrani, B. D.

    2018-02-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology has provided new tools for cancer therapy and diagnosis. Among other nanomaterial systems, gold nanoparticles are being used as radiation dose enhancers and anticancer drug carriers in cancer therapy. Fate of gold nanoparticles within biological tissues can be probed using techniques such as TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) due to their high electron density. We have shown for the first time that cancer drug loaded gold nanoparticles can reach the nucleus (or the brain) of cancer cells enhancing the therapeutic effect dramatically. Nucleus of the cancer cells are the most desirable target in cancer therapy. In chemotherapy, smart delivery of highly toxic anticancer drugs through packaging using nanoparticles will reduce the side effects and improve the quality and care of cancer patients. In radiation therapy, use of gold nanoparticles as radiation dose enhancer is very promising due to enhanced localized dose within the cancer tissue. Recent advancement in nanomaterial characterization techniques will facilitate mapping of nanomaterial distribution within biological specimens to correlate the radiobiological effects due to treatment. Hence, gold nanoparticle mediated combined chemoradiation would provide promising tools to achieve personalized and tailored cancer treatments in the near future.

  5. Sitagliptin as combination therapy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon A Miller

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Shannon A Miller1, Erin L St Onge2, J Roger Accardi31Pharmacotherapy Faculty, Florida Hospital East Family Practice Residency, Orlando, Florida, USA; 2University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Orlando Campus, Florida, USA; 3Accardi Clinical Pharmacy, Orange City, Florida, USAAbstract: The American Diabetes Association and The European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommend metformin as the initial agent of choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, most patients require multiple medications to obtain glycemic control. One of the newest additions to the antidiabetic armamentarium is the class of drugs known as dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitors. This novel approach focuses on harnessing the beneficial effects of GLP-1, an incretin hormone released from the gut postprandially. The first DPP-IV inhibitor approved in the United States was sitagliptin. It has been studied in both monotherapy and combination therapy. Combination studies with metformin realize a hemoglobin A1c reduction of 0.65%–1.1%. The combination of the two has a modest positive effect on body weight with the convenience of an oral route of administration. It has also been shown to be highly tolerable, efficacious and with little risk of hypoglycemia. This review will focus on combination therapy with sitagliptin with emphasis on combination with metformin. Keywords: DPP-IV inhibitor, sitagliptin, metformin, type 2 diabetes, incretins

  6. Synergistic Enhancement of Cancer Therapy Using a Combination of Ceramide and Docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xia Feng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide (CE-based combination therapy (CE combination as a novel therapeutic strategy has attracted great attention in the field of anti-cancer therapy. The principal purposes of this study were to investigate the synergistic effect of CE in combination with docetaxel (DTX (CE + DTX and to explore the synergy mechanisms of CE + DTX. The 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and combination index (CI assay showed that simultaneous administration of CE and DTX with a molar ratio of 0.5:1 could generate the optimal synergistic effect on murine malignant melanoma cell (B16, CI = 0.31 and human breast carcinoma cell (MCF-7, CI = 0.48. The apoptosis, cell cycle, and cytoskeleton destruction study demonstrated that CE could target and destruct the microfilament actin, subsequently activate Caspase-3 and induce apoptosis. Meanwhile, DTX could target and disrupt the microtubules cytoskeleton, leading to a high proportion of cancer cells in G2/M-phase arrest. Moreover, CE plus DTX could cause a synergistic destruction of cytoskeleton, which resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis and a significantly higher arrest in G2/M arrest comparing with either agent alone (p < 0.01. The in vivo antitumor study evaluated in B16 tumor-bearing mice also validated the synergistic effects. All these results suggested that CE could enhance the antitumor activity of DTX in a synergistic manner, which suggest promising application prospects of CE + DTX combination treatment.

  7. Analysis of combination drug therapy to develop regimens with shortened duration of treatment for tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L Drusano

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, particularly with the advent of multi-drug resistance. Shortening therapy duration for Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major goal, requiring generation of optimal kill rate and resistance-suppression. Combination therapy is required to attain the goal of shorter therapy.Our objective was to identify a method for identifying optimal combination chemotherapy. We developed a mathematical model for attaining this end. This is accomplished by identifying drug effect interaction (synergy, additivity, antagonism for susceptible organisms and subpopulations resistant to each drug in the combination.We studied the combination of linezolid plus rifampin in our hollow fiber infection model. We generated a fully parametric drug effect interaction mathematical model. The results were subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to extend the findings to a population of patients by accounting for between-patient variability in drug pharmacokinetics.All monotherapy allowed emergence of resistance over the first two weeks of the experiment. In combination, the interaction was additive for each population (susceptible and resistant. For a 600 mg/600 mg daily regimen of linezolid plus rifampin, we demonstrated that >50% of simulated subjects had eradicated the susceptible population by day 27 with the remaining organisms resistant to one or the other drug. Only 4% of patients had complete organism eradication by experiment end.These data strongly suggest that in order to achieve the goal of shortening therapy, the original regimen may need to be changed at one month to a regimen of two completely new agents with resistance mechanisms independent of the initial regimen. This hypothesis which arose from the analysis is immediately testable in a clinical trial.

  8. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  9. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Joyce T.; Robinson, Joshua D.; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  10. Cancer Nanomedicine: From Targeted Delivery to Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of a variety of diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as large surface-to volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate a variety of drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, gives them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make nanoparticles a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This article highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using nanoparticles as drug-delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. PMID:25656384

  11. Biological basis of combination therapy with radiation and bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Yokoyama, Kumiko; Okuyama, Shinichi; Yamaura, Hiroshi

    1976-01-01

    The biological basis for combination therapy with radiation and bleomycin (BLM) was studied on C 2 W cells growing in vitro. When BLM was added to the medium before or after irradiation, a potentiating effect was observed. The potentiation remained for 4-6 hours after irradiation. To make clear the mechanism, both type of repair from radiation damage (Elkind type and PLD) by BLM were examined. BLM didn't inhibit the Elkind type recovery but it did inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD repair). Plateau phase C 2 W cells were irradiated, incubated at 37 0 C for a various number of hours, then trypsinized for colony formation. PLD repair was inhibited when BLM was added immediately after irradiation. Based on such experimental results, we treated lung cancer with combination of radiation and BLM. BLM was injected intravenously within 30 minutes after irradiation. Although it seems too early to discuss the result of the combination therapy, it is very promising. (J.P.N.)

  12. Biological basis of combination therapy with radiation and bleomycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, H; Matsuzawa, T; Yokoyama, K; Okuyama, S; Yamaura, H [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Cancer

    1976-01-01

    The biological basis for combination therapy with radiation and bleomycin (BLM) was studied on C/sub 2/W cells growing in vitro. When BLM was added to the medium before or after irradiation, a potentiating effect was observed. The potentiation remained for 4-6 hours after irradiation. To make clear the mechanism, both type of repair from radiation damage (Elkind type and PLD) by BLM were examined. BLM didn't inhibit the Elkind type recovery but it did inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD repair). Plateau phase C/sub 2/W cells were irradiated, incubated at 37/sup 0/C for a various number of hours, then trypsinized for colony formation. PLD repair was inhibited when BLM was added immediately after irradiation. Based on such experimental results, we treated lung cancer with combination of radiation and BLM. BLM was injected intravenously within 30 minutes after irradiation. Although it seems too early to discuss the result of the combination therapy, it is very promising.

  13. Combined aquaretic and diuretic therapy in acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyfman M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Goyfman,1 Paul Zamudio,2 Kristine Jang,3 Jennifer Chee,3 Catherine Miranda,2 Javed Butler,1 Nand K Wadhwa2 1Division of Cardiology, 2Division of Nephrology, 3Department of Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA Introduction: Acute heart failure (AHF is a leading cause of hospitalization and readmission in the US. The present study evaluated maximum diuresis while minimizing electrolyte imbalances, hemodynamic instability, and kidney dysfunction, to achieve a euvolemic state safely in a shorter period of time.Methods and results: A protocol of combined therapy with furosemide, metolazone, and spironolactone, with or without tolvaptan and acetazolamide, was used in 17 hospitalized patients with AHF. The mean number of days on combination diuretic protocol was 3.8 days. The mean daily fluid balance was 3.0±2.1 L negative. The mean daily urine output (UOP was 4.1±2.0 L (range 1.8–10.5 L. There were minimal fluctuations in serum electrolyte levels and serum creatinine over the duration of diuretic therapy. There was no statistically significant change in patients’ creatinine from immediately prior to therapy to the last day of therapy, with a mean increase in creatinine of 0.14 mg/dL (95% CI −0.03, +0.30, p=0.10.Conclusion: Our strategy of treating AHF by achieving high UOP, while maintaining stable electrolytes and creatinine in a short period to euvolemic state, is safe. Keywords: diuretics, aquaretic, acute heart failure, volume overload

  14. Combination phenylbutyrate/gemcitabine therapy effectively inhibits in vitro and in vivo growth of NSCLC by intrinsic apoptotic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schniewind Bodo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard chemotherapy protocols in NSCLC are of limited clinical benefit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors represent a new strategy in human cancer therapy. In this study the combination of the HDAC inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB and the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (GEM was evaluated and the mechanisms underlying increased cell death were analyzed. Methods Dose escalation studies evaluating the cytotoxicity of PB (0.01–100 mM, GEM (0.01–100 μg/ml and a combination of the two were performed on two NSCLC cell lines (BEN and KNS62. Apoptotic cell death was quantified. The involvement of caspase-dependent cell death and MAP-kinase activation was analyzed. Additionally, mitochondrial damage was determined. In an orthotopic animal model the combined effect of PB and GEM on therapy was analyzed. Results Applied as a single drug both GEM and PB revealed limited potential to induce apoptosis in KNS62 and Ben cells. Combination therapy was 50–80% (p = 0.012 more effective than either agent alone. On the caspase level, combination therapy significantly increased cleavage of the pro-forms compared to single chemotherapy. The broad spectrum caspase-inhibitor zVAD was able to inhibit caspase cleavage completely, but reduced the frequency of apoptotic cells only by 30%. Combination therapy significantly increased changes in MTP and the release of cyto-c, AIF and Smac/Diabolo into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the inhibitors of apoptosis c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 were downregulated and it was shown that in combination therapy JNK activation contributed significantly to induction of apoptosis. The size of the primary tumors growing orthotopically in SCID mice treated for 4 weeks with GEM and PB was significantly reduced (2.2–2.7 fold compared to GEM therapy alone. The Ki-67 (KNS62: p = 0.015; Ben: p = 0.093 and topoisomerase IIα (KNS62: p = 0.008; Ben: p = 0.064 proliferation indices were clearly reduced in tumors treated by combination

  15. The study of combination therapy for arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy in unresectable gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Takuma; Saito, Hiroya; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated an effective strategy of treatment for unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC) by the retrospective analysis of prognostic factors and anti-tumor therapies, especially combination therapy of arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy (AI+PT). Forty-three patients with unresectable GBC were enrolled, and prognostic factors were investigated by multivariate analysis using a proportional hazard model. In addition, we examined the indication and after-therapy by analyzing the each factor cumulative survival rates and anti-tumor effect about the AI + RT group (n=24). AI + RT and the responders to the first-line therapy were significant prognostic factors. In AI + RT group, median survival time, progression-free survival and the 1-year survival rate, the response and disease control rates was 15.5 months, 7.1 months, 62.5%. 54.2% and 95.8%, respectively; which suggested prolonged survival and high anti-tumor effect. Cumulative survival rate was significantly shorter in cases with distant metastasis except liver metastases, and has been tendency to extend in the group who underwent systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy. The treatment strategy, using the Al + RT as first-line with the systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy, suggested contribute to the prolonged survival in locally advanced and liver metastases cases of GBC. (author)

  16. Combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Masaharu; Sawamura, Yoshikatsu; Kase, Takahisa

    1991-01-01

    The combined effects of cisplatin and irradiation were investigated in 44 patients with bladder cancer accompanied by the infiltration of T 2 ∼T 4 cells, in a study commencing in September 1985. The antitumor effect and adverse reactions to the therapy were recorded. The majority of these patients had not undergone total bladder excision, for a variety of reasons. Thirty-two patients were male and 12 were female; the average age was 66.7 years, with ranging from 33∼83 years of age. Irradiation was performed using table cobalt 60 or a linear accelerator at a dose of 2 Gy per day, 5 days a week. The total radiation dose ranged from 40 to 70 Gy. Cisplatin was administered systemically at a dose of 20∼30 mg/day for 5 consecutive days during the first and fourth weeks of irradiation. At the time of final assessment of the antitumor effect, 24 out of 40 eligible patients (60%) had achieved complete remission (CR). The duration of CR averaged 18.8 months, with a range of 1∼50 months. The actual survival rates were as follows: 81% at 1 year, 69% at 2 years, and 52% at 3 and 4 years. Regarding adverse reactions, anorexia occurred in 28 patients (70%), nausea and vomiting in 21 (53%), diarrhea in 8 (20%), leukopenia in 16 (40%), mild thrombocytopenia in 5 (13%), and dermatitis in 8 (20%). All of these adverse reactions were mild and were alleviated after completion of the combined therapy. The present investigation demonstrated that combined therapy with cisplatin and irradiation is effective for the regional treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (author)

  17. Myxedema coma associated with combination aripiprazole and sertraline therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Chelsea O; Callen, Erin C

    2009-12-01

    To describe a case of myxedema coma (MC) associated with combination aripiprazole and sertraline therapy. A 41-year-old male presented to the emergency department with confusion, right-sided numbness and tingling, slurred speech, dizziness, and facial edema. His blood pressure was 160/113 mm Hg, with a pulse of 56 beats/min and temperature of 35.4 degrees C. Initial abnormal laboratory values included creatine kinase (CK) 439 U/L; serum creatinine 1.6 mg/dL; aspartate aminotransferase 85 U/L; and alanine aminotransferase 35 U/L. Repeat cardiac markers revealed an elevated CK level of 3573 U/L with a CK-MB of 24 ng/mL. Thyroid function tests showed thyroid-stimulating hormone 126.4 microIU/mL and free thyroxine 0.29 ng/dL. Home medications of unknown duration were sertraline 200 mg and aripiprazole 20 mg daily. He was admitted to the intensive care unit and initially treated with intravenous levothyroxine and dexamethasone. By hospital day 4, the patient was clinically stable and discharged to home. Myxedema coma, the most significant form of hypothyroidism (HT), is a rare but potentially fatal condition. The known precipitating causes of MC were ruled out in this patient, which left his home medications as the likely cause. Cases of HT caused by certain atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants are found in the literature, but none was reported with aripiprazole therapy. There are also no reported cases of sertraline or aripiprazole inducing MC. Use of the Naranjo probability scale indicates that the combination of aripiprazole and sertraline was a probable inducer of MC in this patient. Due to the widespread use of psychotropic medications, clinicians should be reminded of the rare, yet life-threatening, occurrence of MC when treating patients, especially with combination therapies such as sertraline and aripiprazole.

  18. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Effects of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Conventional Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rapper, Stephanie; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (lavender) essential oil in combination with four commercial antimicrobial agents. Stock solutions of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nystatin, and fusidic acid were tested in combination with L. angustifolia essential oil. The antimicrobial activities of the combinations were investigated against the Gram-positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27858) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) was selected to represent the yeasts. The antimicrobial effect was performed using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) microdilution assay. Isobolograms were constructed for varying ratios. The most prominent interaction was noted when L. angustifolia essential oil was combined with chloramphenicol and tested against the pathogen P. aeruginosa (ΣFIC of 0.29). Lavendula angustifolia essential oil was shown in most cases to interact synergistically with conventional antimicrobials when combined in ratios where higher volumes of L. angustifolia essential oil were incorporated into the combination. PMID:27891157

  19. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Effects of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Conventional Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie de Rapper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (lavender essential oil in combination with four commercial antimicrobial agents. Stock solutions of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nystatin, and fusidic acid were tested in combination with L. angustifolia essential oil. The antimicrobial activities of the combinations were investigated against the Gram-positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27858 and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231 was selected to represent the yeasts. The antimicrobial effect was performed using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC microdilution assay. Isobolograms were constructed for varying ratios. The most prominent interaction was noted when L. angustifolia essential oil was combined with chloramphenicol and tested against the pathogen P. aeruginosa (ΣFIC of 0.29. Lavendula angustifolia essential oil was shown in most cases to interact synergistically with conventional antimicrobials when combined in ratios where higher volumes of L. angustifolia essential oil were incorporated into the combination.

  20. A combination of biocontrol agents improves the management of dry root rot (Macrophomina phaseolina in greengram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thilagavathi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol agents Trichoderma viride (strains Tv1 and Tv13, Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf1 and Py15 and Bacillus subtilis (Bs16 were tested individually and in combination for their effectiveness against root rot of greengram caused by Macrophomina phaseolina. As regards the compatibility of the biocontrol agents with each other, T. viride strains were not compatible with B. subtilis (Bs16, but P. fluorescens strains were compatible with B. subtilis and T. viride. Of the biocontrol agents tested in vitro against M. phaseolina, combinations of P. fluorescens+T. viride (Pf1+Tv1, Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1 inhibited mycelial growth of the pathogen and they also promoted the growth of the greengram seedlings. A combination of Pf1+Tv1 was most effective in reducing root rot incidence under glass-house and field conditions as compared with other single or combined treatments or the untreated control. The activity of the defense-related enzymes peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenyl alanine ammonia lyase was significantly greater in greengram plants treated with a talc based formulation containing Pf1+Tv1 followed by Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1, than in plants receiving other treatments or the untreated control. Moreover, a combination of Pf1+Tv1 followed by Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1 significantly increased yield under glass house and field conditions.

  1. DNA repair in mammalian cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cells defective in one or more aspects of repair are killed and often mutagenized more readily than normal cells by DNA damaging agents, and humans whose cells are deficient in repair are at an increased carcinogenic risk compared to normal individuals. The excision repair of uv induced pyrimidine dimers is a well studied system, but the details of the steps in this repair system are far from being understood in human cells. We know that there are a number of chemicals that mimic uv in that normal human cells repair DNA damage from both these agents and from uv by a long patch excision repair system, and that xeroderma pigmentosum cells defective in repair of uv are also defective in the repair of damage from these chemicals. The chemicals we have investigated are AAAF, 4-NQO, DMBA-epoxide, and ICR-170. We describe experiments, using several techniques, in which DNA excision repair is measured after treatment of various human cell strains with combinations of uv and these agents. If two agents have a common rate limiting step then, at doses high enough to saturate the repair system, one would expect the observed repair after a treatment with a combination of agents to be equal to that from one agent alone. Such is not the case for normal human or excision-deficient XP cells. In the former repair is additive and in the latter repair is usually appreciably less than that observed with either agent alone. Models that attempt to explain these surprising results involve complexes of enzymes and cofactors

  2. Combination therapy of acne in women: searching for optimum solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Goryachkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current data on the acne pathogenesis are given. According to the authors, dermatosis is becoming more prevalent among women of mature age. Issues related to the clinical picture, effect of exogenous and endogenous factors on the course of acne, and psychosocial characteristics of delayed acne manifestations in women are described in detail. The essential role of medical and cosmetic products for the complex therapy of acne is discussed. The authors describe their own experience of treating delayed acne using the Hyseac line of medical and cosmetic products in a combination with microdermabrasion and no-needle mesotherapy using the vitaPeel/vital О2 device.

  3. Combined effect of environmental radiation and other agents: Is there a synergism trap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornhardt, S.; Jung, T.; Burkart, W.

    2002-01-01

    Most assessments of possible deleterious outcomes from environmental and occupational exposures concentrate on single agents and neglect the potential for combined effects, i.e. synergisms or antagonisms. Biomechanistic considerations based on multistep processes such as carcinogenesis indicate the potential for highly detrimental interactions, if two or more consecutive rate limiting steps are specifically effected by different agents. However, low specificity towards molecular structure or DNA-sequence - and therefore exchangeability - of many genotoxic agents indicate little functional specificity and therefore little vulnerability towards synergism at most occupational and environmental exposure situations. The low potential for significant combined effects for those common low exposure situations where non-genotoxic agents with highly non-linear dose effect relationships and apparent thresholds are involved, is also evident. Nevertheless, a quantitative assessment of the contribution of synergistic interactions to the total detriment from natural and man-made toxicants based on experimental data is far away. The existing database on combined effects is rudimentary, mainly descriptive and rarely covers exposure ranges large enough to make direct inferences to present day low dose exposure situations. In view of the multitude of possible interactions between the large number of potentially harmful agents in the human environment, descriptive approaches will have to be supplemented by the use of mechanistic models for critical health endpoints such as cancer. Finally an important question considering the shape of dose effect relationships for ionizing radiation arises from the unresolved question whether real or apparent thresholds may be used for any genotoxic agent separately or only one time for an exposed genome. (author)

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Intra Urban Growth Modeling using socio economic agents by combining cellular automata model with agent based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V. K.; Jha, A. K.; Gupta, K.; Srivastav, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that there is a significant improvement in the urban land use dynamics through modeling at finer spatial resolutions. Geo-computational models such as cellular automata and agent based model have given evident proof regarding the quantification of the urban growth pattern with urban boundary. In recent studies, socio- economic factors such as demography, education rate, household density, parcel price of the current year, distance to road, school, hospital, commercial centers and police station are considered to the major factors influencing the Land Use Land Cover (LULC) pattern of the city. These factors have unidirectional approach to land use pattern which makes it difficult to analyze the spatial aspects of model results both quantitatively and qualitatively. In this study, cellular automata model is combined with generic model known as Agent Based Model to evaluate the impact of socio economic factors on land use pattern. For this purpose, Dehradun an Indian city is selected as a case study. Socio economic factors were collected from field survey, Census of India, Directorate of economic census, Uttarakhand, India. A 3X3 simulating window is used to consider the impact on LULC. Cellular automata model results are examined for the identification of hot spot areas within the urban area and agent based model will be using logistic based regression approach where it will identify the correlation between each factor on LULC and classify the available area into low density, medium density, high density residential or commercial area. In the modeling phase, transition rule, neighborhood effect, cell change factors are used to improve the representation of built-up classes. Significant improvement is observed in the built-up classes from 84 % to 89 %. However after incorporating agent based model with cellular automata model the accuracy improved from 89 % to 94 % in 3 classes of urban i.e. low density, medium density and commercial classes

  5. Newer Clinical Strategies for Combining Interferon and Cytotoxic Agents Against Solid Tumours and Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Wadler

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of interferons in the treatment of cancer continues to evolve. Despite limited single agent activity against solid tumours, interferons now appear to have an important role as modulators of the activity of a variety of cytotoxic drugs. Clinical benefits have been observed for combinations of interferons and alkylating agents against low grade lymphomas, interferons and dacarbazine against malignant melanoma, and interferons and 5-fluorouracil against gastrointestinal and genitourinary malignancies. Further progress will depend on a grealer understanding of the biology of the interaction.

  6. Emerging combination therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer – impact of trifluridine/tipiracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthiamadathil, Jeevan M; Weinberg, Benjamin A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) are surviving longer now than ever before, but mortality rates are still high and more effective therapies are clearly needed. For patients with disease that is refractory to fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and biologic agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, novel treatment options trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102) and regorafenib can be effective disease stabilizers. However, objective clinical responses are rare and toxicities are manageable but common. In order to tackle poor clinical responses to TAS-102, there is an ongoing effort to effectively combine this drug with other agents, particularly those targeting angiogenesis. Certain subpopulations appear to benefit more than others from TAS-102; those that benefit often have underlying genetic defects in DNA repair pathways and/or develop neutropenia. In this review, we focus on the role of TAS-102 in the treatment of mCRC, including its use in combination with other agents, potential predictive biomarkers of response to TAS-102, and possible future directions. PMID:29056855

  7. Emerging combination therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer – impact of trifluridine/tipiracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puthiamadathil JM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeevan M Puthiamadathil,1 Benjamin A Weinberg1,2 1Department of Medicine, 2Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancers, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC are surviving longer now than ever before, but mortality rates are still high and more effective therapies are clearly needed. For patients with disease that is refractory to fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and biologic agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, novel treatment options trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102 and regorafenib can be effective disease stabilizers. However, objective clinical responses are rare and toxicities are manageable but common. In order to tackle poor clinical responses to TAS-102, there is an ongoing effort to effectively combine this drug with other agents, particularly those targeting angiogenesis. Certain subpopulations appear to benefit more than others from TAS-102; those that benefit often have underlying genetic defects in DNA repair pathways and/or develop neutropenia. In this review, we focus on the role of TAS-102 in the treatment of mCRC, including its use in combination with other agents, potential predictive biomarkers of response to TAS-102, and possible future directions. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer, trifluridine, tipiracil, TAS-102, regorafenib

  8. Enhancing Photodynamyc Therapy Efficacy by Combination Therapy: Dated, Current and Oncoming Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postiglione, Ilaria; Chiaviello, Angela; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy is a common practice in many medical disciplines. It is defined as the use of more than one drug to treat the same disease. Sometimes this expression describes the simultaneous use of therapeutic approaches that target different cellular/molecular pathways, increasing the chances of killing the diseased cell. This short review is concerned with therapeutic combinations in which PDT (Photodynamyc Therapy) is the core therapeutic partner. Besides the description of the principal methods used to assess the efficacy attained by combinations in respect to monotherapy, this review describes experimental results in which PDT was combined with conventional drugs in different experimental conditions. This inventory is far from exhaustive, as the number of photosensitizers used in combination with different drugs is very large. Reports cited in this work have been selected because considered representative. The combinations we have reviewed include the association of PDT with anti-oxidants, chemotherapeutics, drugs targeting topoisomerases I and II, antimetabolites and others. Some paragraphs are dedicated to PDT and immuno-modulation, others to associations of PDT with angiogenesis inhibitors, receptor inhibitors, radiotherapy and more. Finally, a look is dedicated to combinations involving the use of natural compounds and, as new entries, drugs that act as proteasome inhibitors

  9. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Klysner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.

  10. Synergy of irofulven in combination with other DNA damaging agents: synergistic interaction with altretamine, alkylating, and platinum-derived agents in the MV522 lung tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Michael J; McMorris, Trevor C; Rojas, Rafael J; Estes, Leita A; Suthipinijtham, Pharnuk

    2008-12-01

    Irofulven (MGI 114, NSC 683863) is a semisynthetic derivative of illudin S, a natural product present in the Omphalotus illudins (Jack O'Lantern) mushroom. This novel agent produces DNA damage, that in contrast to other agents, is predominately ignored by the global genome repair pathway of the nucleotide excision repair (NER)(2) system. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of irofulven when administered in combination with 44 different DNA damaging agents, whose damage is in general detected and repaired by the genome repair pathway. The human lung carcinoma MV522 cell line and its corresponding xenograft model were used to evaluate the activity of irofulven in combination with different DNA damaging agents. Two main classes of DNA damaging agents, platinum-derived agents, and select bifunctional alkylating agents, demonstrated in vivo synergistic or super-additive interaction with irofulven. DNA helicase inhibiting agents also demonstrated synergy in vitro, but an enhanced interaction with irofulven could not be demonstrated in vivo. There was no detectable synergistic activity between irofulven and agents capable of inducing DNA cleavage or intercalating into DNA. These results indicate that the antitumor activity of irofulven is enhanced when combined with platinum-derived agents, altretamine, and select alkylating agents such as melphalan or chlorambucil. A common factor between these agents appears to be the production of intrastrand DNA crosslinks. The synergistic interaction between irofulven and other agents may stem from the nucleotide excision repair system being selectively overwhelmed at two distinct points in the pathway, resulting in prolonged stalling of transcription forks, and subsequent initiation of apoptosis.

  11. Atypical and Typical Winter Depressive Symptoms and Responsiveness to Light Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, or Combination Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Leigh G; Rohan, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    ...), group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or combination therapy (CBT+LT). Atypical and typical symptoms were assessed using subscales of the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - SAD Version (SIGH-SAD...

  12. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klysner, René; Bjerg Bendsen, Birgitte; Hansen, Maja Soon

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.......The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine....

  13. Combined preoperative therapy for oral cancer with nedaplatin and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masatoshi; Shibata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Munehiro [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    We performed preoperative combined therapy using nedaplatin (CDGP) and radiation in 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the oral cavity and maxillary sinus, and examined for any adverse events that may have occurred during this therapeutic regimen. Regarding the irradiation, external irradiation utilizing a 6 MV linac (linear accelerator) at a dose of 2.0 Gy/day was performed 5 times a week, with the target total radiation dose set at 40 Gy. In addition, CDGP was intravenously administered 30 minutes before irradiation at a dose of 5 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Mucositis was observed in all 12 subjects, however, the severity was observed to be grade 1-2 with no major differences in comparison to the patients given standard radiation monotherapy. Two subjects developed grade 3 leucopenia and were thus given granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In addition, grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were both observed in one subject each. The subject with grade 3 thrombocytopenia required a platelet transfusion during surgery. No marked changes in serum creatinine levels were noted. These findings are therefore considered to provide evidence supporting the safety of this combination therapy. (author)

  14. Improved outcome in solitary bone plasmacytomata with combined therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, A; Huerta-Guzmán, J; Delgado, S; Fernández, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    1996-09-01

    Solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP) is a rare presentation of plasma cell dyscrasias. Radiotherapy has been considered the treatment of choice, however, most patients will develop multiple myeloma, 3 to 10 years after initial diagnosis and treatment. No innovations have been introduced in the treatment of SBP in the last 30 years. We began a prospective clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy with low doses of melphalan and prednisone administered to patients with SBP after radiation therapy in an attempt to improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. Between 1982 and 1989, 53 patients with SBP were randomly assigned to be treated with either local radiotherapy with doses ranged from 4000 to 5000 cGy to achieve local control of disease (28 patients) or the same radiotherapy schedule followed by melphalan and prednisone given every 6 weeks for 3 years (25 patients). After a median follow-up of 8.9 years, disease-free survival and overall survival were improved in patients who were treated with combined therapy, 22 patients remain alive and free of disease in the combined treatment group compared to only 13 patients in the radiotherapy group (p radiotherapy in patients with SBP improved duration of remission and survival without severe side-effects. However, as with other studies in SBP, the group was too small to draw definitive conclusions and more controlled clinical trials are necessary to define the role of this therapeutic approach in patients with SBP.

  15. Multicomponent Pharmaceutical Cocrystals: A Novel Approach for Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Zeeshan; Srivastava, Dipti; Kaur, Chanchal Deep

    2018-03-05

    Cocrystallization is a technique for modifying the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) embodying the concept of supramolecular synthon. Most of the examples cited in the literature are of cocrystals formed between an API and a coformer chosen from the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substance list, however, few examples exist where a cocrystal consists of two or more APIs. These cocrystals are commonly known as multi API, multi drug or drug- drug cocrystals. The formation of such cocrystals is feasible by virtue of non covalent interactions between the APIs, which help them in retaining their biologic activity. In addition, drug- drug cocrystals also offer the potential solution to the limitations such as solubility, stability differences and chemical interaction between the APIs which is often faced during the traditional combination therapy. Cocrystallization of two or more APIs can be employed for delivery of combination drugs for the better and efficacious management of many complex disorders where existing monotherapies do not furnish the desired therapeutic effect. This review on the existing drug-drug cocrystals is to gain insight for better designing of multi API cocrystals with improved physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile and its application in multiple target therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. A study on radiation therapy combined with superselective intraarterial infusion therapy for maxillary sinus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Isaku; Ito, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Akira; Shimizu, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Mamoru; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki

    2010-01-01

    The data of 14 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus who were admitted to our hospital and received radiation therapy and concurrent superselective intraarterial infusion therapy between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed to determine the effect of the primary treatment and the adverse events. The subjects were between 43 and 79 years old (median, 61 years old), and there were 10 male and 4 female patients. Superselective intraarterial infusion therapy was administered using the Seldinger method, and cisplatin (CDDP) was administered by intraarterial infusion at a total of 200 mg/m 2 . 5-fluorouracil (FU) was systemically administered by intravenous infusion at the dose of 800 mg/m 2 from day 2 to day 5. In addition, radiation therapy was given concurrently, beginning on day 2. At 4 weeks after completion of the scheduled radiation therapy combined with superselective intraarterial infusion therapy, the treatment effect was judged based on macroscopic, radiological and histopathological findings. The response rates to the primary treatment were as follows: 57.1%, complete response (CR) (8 patients) and 42.9%, partial response (PR) (6 patients). Thus, the overall response rate was 100%. As for the adverse events, while grade 4 cerebral infarction occurred in one patient, all of the other adverse events were reversible and not serious. The safety of the treatment was therefore considered to be acceptable. We are planning to investigate the long-term outcomes in a future study. (author)

  17. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  18. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS AND PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN COMBINED TREATMENT OF CHOLANGIOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shiryaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the pilot study of combined treatment for non-resectable cholangiocarcinoma complicated with obstructive jaundice are represented this paper. Method included percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, endoscopic fluorescence diagnosis, photodynamic therapy of tumor stricture, and stenting of bile ducts. Fourteen patients who underwent the treatment in the surgery department clinic of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University were enrolled in the study. Fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy were carried out using photosensitizers photosens (0.5 mg/kg, fotolon (1 mg/kg, and radachlorin (1 mg/kg. The average light dose for one session was 115±5 J/cm2. Fluorescence diagnosis using endoscopic video-fluorescence system for endoscopy and minimally invasive surgery allowed to obtain videoassisted fluorescence image of the tumor and to measure level of photosensitizer fluorescence in tumor in all patients. Malignant tumor was confirmed by morphological study in 12 patients, biopsy of material for morphological study failed in 2 patients with Klatskin tumor. The preliminary results of combined minimally invasive treatment were assessed as promising. The survival time in 4 patients after treatment accounted for 21, 17, 13 and 11 months, respectively. For now 5 patients are under follow-up. Follow-up periods are 13 and 19 months in 2 of them and from 4 to 6 months in 3 of them. Five patients with multiple distant metastases before the treatment died in 3±1 months after therapy. The average lifetime in the treatment group is 9.5 months up to date, however the duration is expected to belonger because 5 of 14 patients are alive.

  19. Successful recovery of infective endocarditis-induced rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis by steroid therapy combined with antibiotics: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikkawa Ryuichi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mortality rate among patients with infective endocarditis, especially associated with the presence of complications or coexisting conditions such as renal failure and the use of combined medical and surgical therapy remains still high. Prolonged parenteral administration of a bactericidal antimicrobial agent or combination of agents is usually recommended, however, the optimal therapy for infective endocarditis associated with renal injury is not adequately defined. Case presentation Patient was a 24-years old man who presented to our hospital with fever, fatigue, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. He had a history of ventricular septum defect (VSD. A renal biopsy specimen revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis and echocardiogram revealed VSD with vegetation on the tricuspid valve. Specimens of blood demonstrated Propionibacterium Acnes. The intensive antibiotic therapy with penicillin G was started without clinical improvement of renal function or resolution of fever over the next 7 days. After the short-term treatment of low dose of corticosteroid combined with continuous antibiotics, high fever and renal insufficiency were dramatically improved. Conclusion Although renal function in our case worsened despite therapy with antibiotics, a short-term and low dose of corticosteroid therapy with antibiotics was able to recover renal function and the patient finally underwent tricuspid valve-plasty and VSD closure. We suggest that the patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis associated with infective endocarditis might be treated with a short-term and low dose of corticosteroid successfully.

  20. Dual combination therapy targeting DR5 and EMMPRIN in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunki; Zhai, Guihua; Samuel, Sharon L; Rigell, Christopher J; Umphrey, Heidi R; Rana, Samir; Stockard, Cecil R; Fineberg, Naomi S; Zinn, Kurt R

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the efficacy of combined extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer (EMMPRIN)- and death receptor 5 (DR5)-targeted therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in orthotopic mouse models with multimodal imaging. Cytotoxicity of anti-EMMPRIN antibody and anti-DR5 antibody (TRA-8) in MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cell lines was measured by ATPlite assay in vitro. The distributions of Cy5.5-labeled TRA-8 and Cy3-labeled anti-EMMPRIN antibody in the 2 cell lines were analyzed by fluorescence imaging in vitro. Groups 1 to 12 of severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing orthotopic MIA PaCa-2 (groups 1-8) or PANC-1 (groups 9-12) tumors were used for in vivo studies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was applied in group 1 (untreated) or group 2 (anti-EMMPRIN antibody). The tumor uptake of Tc-99m-labeled TRA-8 was measured in group 3 (untreated) and group 4 (anti-EMMPRIN antibody). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging with (18)F-FDG was applied in groups 5 to 12. Groups 5 to 8 (or groups 9 to 12) were untreated or treated with anti-EMMPRIN antibody, TRA-8, and combination, respectively. TRA-8 showed high killing efficacy for both MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells in vitro, but additional anti-EMMPRIN treatment did not improve the cytotoxicity. Cy5.5-TRA-8 formed cellular caps in both the cell lines, whereas the maximum signal intensity was correlated with TRA-8 cytotoxicity. Anti-EMMPRIN therapy significantly enhanced the tumor delivery of the MR contrast agent, but not Tc-99m-TRA-8. Tumor growth was significantly suppressed by the combination therapy, and the additive effect of the combination was shown in both MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 tumor models.

  1. Utilization of a selective tumour artery catheterization technique for the intra-arterial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals in a combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy clinical research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, A.L. Jr.; Wirtanen, G.W.; Holden, J.E.; Polcyn, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Combined intra-arterial chemotherapeutic agents (principally actinomycin-D) and radiation therapy has been utilized in the treatment of 35 patients with massive unresectable malignancies. The goals may be separated into three distinct categories. An attempt has been made to convert unresectable malignancies to surgical resectability, to provide a definitive therapy for massive tumours in patients who either refuse surgery or are not surgery candidates, and to provide palliation. Twelve of 15 initially unresectable tumours treated with actinomycin-D became surgically resectable (no resection was attempted in the other four because they either developed metastasis during therapy or did not complete the therapy), 4 of 6 massive tumours treated definitively have remained locally controlled from 18 to 108 months, and 7 of 9 patients treated palliatively were significantly benefited by the therapy. Impressive responses were also achieved in several patients treated with intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil and 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. The authors therefore consider combined, concurrent radiation therapy and intra-arterially administered chemotherapeutic agents worthy of further clinical investigation as a means of treating massive malignancies. They also suggest that the best chance of optimizing the therapeutic ratio of such therapy is dependent primarily on a proper understanding of clinical tumour vascularity and of its subsequent effect on drug and oxygen distributions within the radiation treatment volume. Accordingly, tumour vascularity has been clinically evaluated by the use of intra-arterially administered radiopharmaceuticals. Such clinical data, in conjunction with radiobiological data, might in the future be utilized to optimize both low and high LET combined therapy by allowing for correction of the physical isodose for drug and oxygen concentration variations. (author)

  2. Clinical Advances of Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs in Combination With Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Ishna N; Thomas, Matthew; Calder, Ewen D D; Conway, Stuart J; Hammond, Ester M

    2017-08-01

    With the increasing incidence of cancer worldwide, the need for specific, effective therapies is ever more urgent. One example of targeted cancer therapeutics is hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs), also known as bioreductive prodrugs. These prodrugs are inactive in cells with normal oxygen levels but in hypoxic cells (with low oxygen levels) undergo chemical reduction to the active compound. Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with a more aggressive phenotype and resistance to all modes of therapy. Therefore, the combination of radiation therapy and bioreductive drugs presents an attractive opportunity for synergistic effects, because the HAP targets the radiation-resistant hypoxic cells. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs have typically been precursors of DNA-damaging agents, but a new generation of molecularly targeted HAPs is emerging. By targeting proteins associated with tumorigenesis and survival, these compounds may result in greater selectivity over healthy tissue. We review the clinical progress of HAPs as adjuncts to radiation therapy and conclude that the use of HAPs alongside radiation is vastly underexplored at the clinical level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Locally advanced cervix carcinoma - innovation in combined modality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Patrick S.

    1996-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical carcinoma continues to be a challenge to the clinician due to local failure as well as systemic metastases. Standard intracavitary and external beam techniques result in local control rates of only 35-65%, with long term survival rates of 25-60% in patients with state IIIA-IVA disease, indicating the need to identify new treatment strategies. Optimization programs for remote-afterloading interstitial brachytherapy allow the delivery of higher local doses of radiation to volumes that more closely approximate tumor target volumes as identified on MR scans, leading to improved therapeutic ratios. Identification of subsets of patients more likely to fail standard therapy, either locally or systemically, may be possible through such techniques as in vivo measurements of hypoxia with Eppendorf oxygen electrodes, interstitial fluid pressure measurements, the Comet assay, and nitroimidazole binding methods. Traditional chemotherapies, administered in either a neoadjuvant role or concomitantly with radiation have been disappointing in prospective trials. A variety of new agents are being investigated to determine if they can increase the frequency or duration of complete response. The taxanes, with response rates of 17-23% by themselves, are being assessed as potential radiosensitizers. The camptotheicin CRT-11 (Irinotecan) has demonstrated activity in platinum resistant cervix cancer, with response rates of 24%. Bioradiotherapeutic approaches, using 13-cis-retinoic acid and interferon-2a, are undergoing phase II studies. Neoangiogenesis inhibitors and vaccines against HPV are also being examined. The aggressive pursuit of techniques that help identify those patients most likely to fail, that allow the delivery of higher radiation doses more safely to the target volume, and that incorporate the use of more effective systemic therapies is necessary to improve the outcome for this disease

  4. Modern dose-finding designs for cancer phase I trials drug combinations and molecularly targeted agents

    CERN Document Server

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Daimon, Takashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with advanced methods for adaptive phase I dose-finding clinical trials for combination of two agents and molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) in oncology. It provides not only methodological aspects of the dose-finding methods, but also software implementations and practical considerations in applying these complex methods to real cancer clinical trials. Thus, the book aims to furnish researchers in biostatistics and statistical science with a good summary of recent developments of adaptive dose-finding methods as well as providing practitioners in biostatistics and clinical investigators with advanced materials for designing, conducting, monitoring, and analyzing adaptive dose-finding trials. The topics in the book are mainly related to cancer clinical trials, but many of those topics are potentially applicable or can be extended to trials for other diseases. The focus is mainly on model-based dose-finding methods for two kinds of phase I trials. One is clinical trials with combinations of tw...

  5. Combination therapy of apatinib with icotinib for primary acquired icotinib resistance in patients with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pinghui; Cao, Jinlin; Lv, Xiayi; Wang, Luming; Lv, Wang; Hu, Jian

    2018-05-01

    Multi-targeted agents represent the next generation of targeted therapies for solid tumors, and patients with acquired resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) may also benefit from their combination with TKI therapy. Third-generation targeted drugs, such as osimertinib, are very expensive, thus a more economical solution is required. The aim of this study was to explore the use of apatinib combined with icotinib therapy for primary acquired resistance to icotinib in three patients with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutations. We achieved favorable oncologic outcomes in all three patients, with progression-free survival of four to six months. Unfortunately, the patients ultimately had to cease combination therapy because of intolerable adverse effects of hand and foot syndrome and oral ulcers. Combination therapy of apatinib with icotinib for primary acquired resistance to icotinib may be an option for patients with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutations, but physicians must also be aware of the side effects caused by such therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Hydrotherapy combined with Snoezelen multi-sensory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Efrat; Shapiro, Michele; Julius, Mona

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a new and challenging model of treatment that combines two therapeutic interventions: hydrotherapy and Snoezelen or controlled multisensory stimulation. The combination of the two therapeutic approaches enhances the treatment effect by utilizing the unique characteristics of each approach. We believe that this combined model will further enhance each media to the benefit of the clients and create a new intervention approach. This article relates to a hydrotherapy swimming pool facility that has been established at the Williams Island Therapeutic Swimming and Recreation Center, Beit Issie Shapiro, Raanana in Israel, after acquiring many years of experience and gaining substantial knowledge both in the field of hydrotherapy and Snoezelen intervention. Beit Issie Shapiro is a non-profit community organization providing a range of services for children with developmental disabilities and their families. The organization provides direct services for nearly 6,000 children and adults each year. This article provides an overview of hydrotherapy and Snoezelen and presents a case study, which will demonstrate the new model of treatment and show how this new and innovative form of therapy can be used as a successful intervention. We believe it will open a path to enriching the repertoire of therapists helping people with special needs. This article is also addressed to researchers to provide ideas for further studies in this area.

  7. Evaluation of Danazol, Cyclosporine, and Prednisolone as Single Agent or in Combination for Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjaksha Ghosh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The responses of 32 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH were assessed after the patients were put on various combinations of danazol, prednisolone, and cyclosporine. METHODS: Nineteen males and 13 females aged between 14 and 60 years with confirmed diagnosis of PNH were treated with danazol (4, danazol + cyclosporine (7, cyclosporine (1, and prednisolone + danazol (20. Response to these interventions was assessed regularly. Danazol was added to cyclosporine in patients with aplastic bone marrow after 3 months of cyclocporine use only unless the former therapy was successful. Four patients with aplastic marrow received only danazol because they had renal insufficiency at presentation. Patients were evaluated with regular complete blood count and routine liver and renal function tests. RESULTS: One patient responded to cyclosporine only. Thirteen of 32 patients (40% had complete response, 12/32 patients (37% had partial response leading to freedom from red cell transfusion, and 2/32 (7% had no response. Five patients (16% died due to thrombosis or hemorrhage within 3 months of therapy before their response to therapy could be assessed. The median period of review of the cases was 4 years and 6 months. CONCLUSION: Danazol is a useful addition to PNH therapy both in combination with cyclosporine for hypoplastic PNH and with prednisolone for other forms of PNH, and this therapy could be a good alternative where eculizumab and anti-lymphocyte globulin cannot be used for various reasons.

  8. DNA repair in human cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP 2 fibroblasts were treated with uv plus uv-mimetic chemicals. The uv dose used was sufficient to saturate the uv excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a uv specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from uv and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of uv and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from uv or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170

  9. Combined riluzole and sodium phenylbutyrate therapy in transgenic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Signore, Steven J; Amante, Daniel J; Kim, Jinho; Stack, Edward C; Goodrich, Sarah; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Cudkowicz, Merit E; Ferrante, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that transcriptional dysregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The histone deacetylase inhibitor, sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPB), is neuroprotective and corrects aberrant gene transcription in ALS mice and has recently been shown to be safe and tolerable in ALS patients while improving hypoacetylation. Since many patients are already on riluzole, it is important to ensure that any proposed therapy does not result in negative synergy with riluzole. The combined treatment of riluzole and NaPB significantly extended survival and improved both the clinical and neuropathological phenotypes in G93A transgenic ALS mice beyond either agent alone. Combination therapy increased survival by 21.5%, compared to the separate administration of riluzole (7.5%) and NaPB (12.8%), while improving both body weight loss and grip strength. The data show that the combined treatment was synergistic. In addition, riluzole/NaPB treatment ameliorated gross lumbar and ventral horn atrophy, attenuated lumbar ventral horn neuronal cell death, and decreased reactive astrogliosis. Riluzole/NaPB administration increased acetylation at H4 and increased NF-kappaB p50 translocation to the nucleus in G93A mice, consistent with a therapeutic effect. These data suggest that NaPB may not interfere with the pharmacologic action of riluzole in ALS patients.

  10. Efficacy of dacarbazine imidazole carboxamide and mitomycin C combination therapy in patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon refractory to 5-fluorouracil therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, J.F.; Roda, P.I.; Brodsky, I.; Kahn, S.B.; Bulova, S.I.; Pequignot, E.

    1981-01-01

    Therapy for metastatic cancer of the colon is a major problem for the medical oncologist. The nonrandomized study which we here report was designed to evaluate the toxicity of combining two agents which individually had a low order of response and to determine how the response rate of this combination compared with historical data: Dacarbazine (DTIC) is a multifunctional agent similar to the alkylating agents in method of action as well as inhibiting DNA synthesis. Mitomycin C is an antitumor antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces caespitosus. This agent acts as an alkylator via DNA cross-linkage and has activity in a large variety of adenocarcinomas. Patients with advanced measurable adenocarcinoma of the colon who had not responded to conventional therapy were eligible for treatment. Patients were required to have histologic evidence of adenocarcinoma arising from a large-bowel (colon or rectal) primary lesion. A response to chemotherapy was seen in 13 of 26 patients. Five had a complete response with resolution of all measurable disease and normalization of previously abnormal laboratory parameters. An additional eight patients showed a partial response. This was characterized by a 50% or greater shrinkage of abdominal mass (area calculated from perpendicular diameters) and/or marked reduction in size of malignant hepatomegaly with demonstratrable shrinkage of tumor nodules seen an isotope liver scan. (orig./BWU)

  11. Radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia in advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Akiko; Terashima, Hiromi; Torii, Yoshikuni; Nakata, Hajime; Inatomi, Hisato

    1986-01-01

    Radiation therapy combined with radiofrequency (RF) hyperthermia was performed on 5 advanced cancer patients. Included were one each with urinary bladder cancer, hepatoma with left axillary node metastasis, breast cancer, tongue cancer with left cervical metastasis, and mandibular cancer. All had large tumors, which were judged to be uncontrollable by radiotherapy alone. They were treated with irradiation (Linac: 10 MV X-ray 1.8 - 2.0 Gy/day, 5 days/week), followed within an hour by RF hyperthermia once or twice a week. Partial response was obtained in the urinary bladder cancer patient. Surface overheating around the margin of electrodes occurred in all but no severe complications were observed. (author)

  12. Therapeutic Advances using Combinational Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor in adults. Median survival is only about 15 months despite aggressive treatment, consisting of surgery followed by radio- and chemotherapy, stressing the need for new therapies. Development of glioblastoma is thought to be a result of both genetic...... and epigenetic alterations, ultimately leading to oncogenic transformation of normal glia cells. Several features are suggested to give rise to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma including treatment resistance, a high degree of abnormal blood vessels, and high heterogeneity, both within the single tumor and from...... patient to patient. Thus, investigations are needed to identify the genetic-molecular alterations that glioblastoma tumors depend on in order to overcome treatment and regrow after initial surgery. The findings presented in this thesis illustrate the promising potential of combinational treatments...

  13. Dosage and dose schedule screening of drug combinations in agent-based models reveals hidden synergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Corina Barros de Andrade e Sousa1

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Candida albicans is the most common causative agent of human fungal infections and better drugs or drug combination strategies are urgently needed. Here, we present an agent-based model of the interplay of C. albicans with the host immune system and with the microflora of the host. We took into account the morphological change of C. albicans from the yeast to hyphae form and its dynamics during infection. The model allowed us to follow the dynamics of fungal growth and morphology, of the immune cells and of microflora in different perturbing situations. We specifically focused on the consequences of microflora reduction following antibiotic treatment. Using the agent-based model, different drug types have been tested for their effectiveness, namely drugs that inhibit cell division and drugs that constrain the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Applied individually, the division drug turned out to successfully decrease hyphae while the transition drug leads to a burst in hyphae after the end of the treatment. To evaluate the effect of different drug combinations, doses, and schedules, we introduced a measure for the return to a healthy state, the infection score. Using this measure, we found that the addition of a transition drug to a division drug treatment can improve the treatment reliability while minimizing treatment duration and drug dosage. In this work we present a theoretical study. Although our model has not been calibrated to quantitative experimental data, the technique of computationally identifying synergistic treatment combinations in an agent based model exemplifies the importance of computational techniques in translational research.

  14. Effective chemotherapy of acute myelocytic leukemia occurring after alkylating agent or radiation therapy for prior malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, W.P.; Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven consecutive patients with acute myelocytic leukemia occurring as a second malignancy were treated with high-dose, timed, sequential chemotherapy. Eight of the patients were felt to have ''secondary'' acute leukemia because they had received an alkylating agent or radiation therapy. The other three patients were considered controls. Despite a median age of 65, four of the eight secondary leukemia patients achieved complete remission with this regimen. One of the three control patients also achieved complete remission. This remission rate and duration are comparable to what was achieved with this treatment of ''primary'' acute myelocytic leukemia during the same period of time. These results suggest that patients with leukemia occurring after an alkylating agent or radiation therapy are not at especially high risk if treated aggressively

  15. Case report of a KIT-mutated melanoma patient with an excellent response to apatinib and temozolomide combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo C

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cong Luo,1 Jiayu Shen,2 Jieer Ying,1 Xianhua Fang,3 Xiaohong Wang,1 Zhixuan Fu,4 Peng Liu5 1Department of Abdominal Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 2The Second Clinical Medical College, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Colorectal Surgery, 5Department of Radiotherapy, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Malignant melanoma is one kind of malignant disease which has high rates of mortality, metastasis, and poor prognosis. The therapeutic landscape is rapidly changing with the development of novel agents in recent decades, such as anti-PD-1 agents, anti-CTLA-4 agents, and BRAF inhibitors. However, since most of these novel agents are very expensive, not all patients can afford them. Apatinib is a novel oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the intracellular domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2 and may also be effective on Ret, c-KIT, and c-src. Temozolomide (TMZ is a second-generation alkylating agent and a cytotoxic drug for melanoma treatment. In this work, we reported a case of metastatic melanoma with an excellent response to apatinib/TMZ combination therapy with progression-free survival for more than one year. This patient showed high expression of CD117, VEGFR-3, and KIT mutation in exon 11, suggesting that apatinib may induce clinical response via inhibiting VEGFR and c-KIT. Apatinib/TMZ combination therapy could be a new option for the treatment of advanced melanoma with KIT mutation. Keywords: advanced melanoma, KIT mutation, apatinib, temozolomide, combination therapy

  16. Superparamagnetic Bifunctional Bisphosphonates Nanoparticles: A Potential MRI Contrast Agent for Osteoporosis Therapy and Diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lalatonne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A bone targeting nanosystem is reported here which combined magnetic contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and a therapeutic agent (bisphosphonates into one drug delivery system. This new targeting nanoplatform consists of superparamagnetic γFe2O3 nanoparticles conjugated to 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5,5-tris-phosphono-pentyl-phosphonic acid (di-HMBPs molecules with a bisphosphonate function at the outer of the nanoparticle surface for bone targeting. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated as a specific MRI contrast agent by adsorption study onto hydroxyapatite and MRI measurment. The strong adsorption of the bisphosphonates nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite and their use as MRI T2∗ contrast agent were demonstrated. Cellular tests performed on human osteosarcoma cells (MG63 show that γFe2O3@di-HMBP hybrid nanomaterial has no citoxity effect in cell viability and may act as a diagnostic and therapeutic system.

  17. Refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia successfully treated with combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and tamibarotene: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Kojima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old male developed refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL after various treatments including all-trans retinoic acid, tamibarotene, arsenic trioxide (As2O3, conventional chemotherapy, and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. We attempted to use both tamibarotene and As2O3 as a combination therapy, and he achieved molecular complete remission. Grade 2 prolongation of the QTc interval on the electrocardiogram was observed during the therapy. The combination therapy of As2O3 and tamibarotene may be effective and tolerable for treating refractory APL cases who have no treatment options, even when they have previously been treated with tamibarotene and As2O3 as a single agent.

  18. Combination therapy in the management of atrophic acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5% patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5% patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7% patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1% patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2% patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100% patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars.

  19. Potential role for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in combined-modality therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Choy, Hak

    2004-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in the translation of discoveries in molecular biology into clinically relevant therapies in the field of hematology/oncology. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been a molecular target of significant interest and investigation, and preclinical and clinical studies support a role for targeted therapy in a variety of cancers, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) via compounds that specifically inhibit EGFR. ZD1839, IMC-C225, and OSI-774 are the most clinically developed of these compounds. Interestingly, preclinical studies have demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors may have radiation-sensitizing properties, as well as increased cytotoxic activity in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, suggesting a potential role for EGFR inhibitors as an adjunct to the current combined-modality approach for therapy of Stage III NSCLC. Therefore, clinical trials have been proposed and initiated to address the issue of determining the impact of the addition of EGFR inhibitors to the standard combined-modality regimen (chemotherapy/radiation therapy ± surgery) for Stage III NSCLC. This article reviews preclinical and clinical data supporting the role for EGFR inhibitors alone or in combination with chemotherapy/radiation therapy for locally advanced NSCLC. Also, it will provide an overview of ongoing and proposed clinical studies investigating the potential role for EGFR inhibitors in Stage III NSCLC

  20. Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning with a Combination of Intravenous Glucagon, Digoxin and Antioxidant Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Oghabian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is used to protect stored grains from rodents. It produces phosphine gas (PH3, a mitochondrial poison thought to cause toxicity by blocking the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme and inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation, which results in cell death. AlP poisoning has a high mortality rate among humans due to the rapid onset of cardiogenic shock and metabolic acidosis, despite aggressive treatment. We report a 21-yearold male who was referred to the Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, in 2015 after having intentionally ingested a 3 g AlP tablet. He was successfully treated with crystalloid fluids, vasopressors, sodium bicarbonate, digoxin, glucagon and antioxidant agents and was discharged from the hospital six days after admission in good clinical condition. For the treatment of AlP poisoning, the combination of glucagon and digoxin with antioxidant agents should be considered. However, evaluation of further cases is necessary to optimise treatment protocols.

  1. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  2. Epigenetic polypharmacology: from combination therapy to multitargeted drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lera, Angel R; Ganesan, A

    The modern drug discovery process has largely focused its attention in the so-called magic bullets, single chemical entities that exhibit high selectivity and potency for a particular target. This approach was based on the assumption that the deregulation of a protein was causally linked to a disease state, and the pharmacological intervention through inhibition of the deregulated target was able to restore normal cell function. However, the use of cocktails or multicomponent drugs to address several targets simultaneously is also popular to treat multifactorial diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders. We review the state of the art with such combinations that have an epigenetic target as one of their mechanisms of action. Epigenetic drug discovery is a rapidly advancing field, and drugs targeting epigenetic enzymes are in the clinic for the treatment of hematological cancers. Approved and experimental epigenetic drugs are undergoing clinical trials in combination with other therapeutic agents via fused or linked pharmacophores in order to benefit from synergistic effects of polypharmacology. In addition, ligands are being discovered which, as single chemical entities, are able to modulate multiple epigenetic targets simultaneously (multitarget epigenetic drugs). These multiple ligands should in principle have a lower risk of drug-drug interactions and drug resistance compared to cocktails or multicomponent drugs. This new generation may rival the so-called magic bullets in the treatment of diseases that arise as a consequence of the deregulation of multiple signaling pathways provided the challenge of optimization of the activities shown by the pharmacophores with the different targets is addressed.

  3. Combined radio- and hormone therapy of the prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papic, R.

    1979-08-01

    Intention of this study is to detect in 49 patients suffering from prostate carcinomas, effects and side effects of radiotherapy. According to the present results, there is not any doubt that prostate carcinomas are radiosensitive. In all patients radiotherapy induced a prostate shrinkage and an increasing of consistency. It resulted that a prostate biopsy must be carried out in order to control the success of therapy. The success of the treatment depends upon tumour spreading and on its degree of differentiation. Within the observation period only in four cases metastasation of the prostate carcinoma occurred after radiotherapy. According to literature, the 5-year survival rate with an organ-defined prostate carcinoma ranges between 70 and 80% when radiotherapeutic methods are applied. The same authors indicate a 5-year survival rate between 42 and 48% for scattered carcinomas. Only minor side effects are provoked by radiotherapy. In 75% of the patients pollakisuria and dysuria resulted. After irradiation was finished, the symptoms disappeared and did not cause in any case any late complications. In 12% of the cases proctitic pain occurred during irradiation, which in 6% remained even after the treatment was terminated. We could prove unequivocally on our patients that passage impairments caused by a prostate carcinoma are improved by radiotherapy. Finally it can be said that this treatment is applicable for curing carcinoma which is localised on the prostate. In the case of an undefined, scattered carcinoma radiotherapy combined with hormone therapy is the treatment of choice. With regards to undesired side effects radiotherapy is superior to other therapeutic measures. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Outcome of urinary bladder cancer after combined therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, R M; Gales, L N; Trifanescu, O G

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Urinary bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and the eighth in women, being an important public health issue. Methods: : Medical files of 155 patients (132M/ 23F) with urinary bladder cancer treated between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years (range: 19-85 years). Disease free survival (DFS) for patients with complete tumor resection receiving adjuvant treatment and progression free survival (PFS) for patients with post-operative residual disease was estimated. Results: The distribution of the stage disease was: 50 patients (32.2%) stage II, 47 (30.3%) stage III, 58 (37.4%) stage IV. Radical cystectomy was performed in 56 patients (36.1%), while 99 patients (63.9%) underwent repeated transurethral resection of the urinary bladder tumor (TURBT). Postoperative treatment included multimodal therapy in 47 patients (30.3%) (chemotherapy and external beam radiation), external beam radiation alone in 57 patients (36.8%) and chemotherapy alone (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin-MVAC or gemcitabine+platinum) in 51 patients (32.9%). After a median follow-up of 31 months (range: 3-79 months), 51 patients (32.9%) presented local recurrence, 32 patients (21%) distant recurrence (metastases), 10 patients (6.4%) both local and distant recurrence, and 62 patients (40%) were free of disease. The median duration until progression was 27 months. Discussion: Despite the combined therapy approaches, urinary bladder carcinoma remains an aggressive disease, with a high relapse rate. Earlier diagnosis, aggressive radical surgery in intention to cure (cystectomy), and adjuvant multimodal treatment (radiotherapy and chemotherapy) are needed for survival improvement.

  5. Natural Product-Derived Treatments for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Safety, Efficacy, and Therapeutic Potential of Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, James; Ahn, Hyung Seok; Cheong, Jae Hoon; dela Peña, Ike

    2016-01-01

    Typical treatment plans for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) utilize nonpharmacological (behavioral/psychosocial) and/or pharmacological interventions. Limited accessibility to behavioral therapies and concerns over adverse effects of pharmacological treatments prompted research for alternative ADHD therapies such as natural product-derived treatments and nutritional supplements. In this study, we reviewed the herbal preparations and nutritional supplements evaluated in clinical studies as potential ADHD treatments and discussed their performance with regard to safety and efficacy in clinical trials. We also discussed some evidence suggesting that adjunct treatment of these agents (with another botanical agent or pharmacological ADHD treatments) may be a promising approach to treat ADHD. The analysis indicated mixed findings with regard to efficacy of natural product-derived ADHD interventions. Nevertheless, these treatments were considered as a “safer” approach than conventional ADHD medications. More comprehensive and appropriately controlled clinical studies are required to fully ascertain efficacy and safety of natural product-derived ADHD treatments. Studies that replicate encouraging findings on the efficacy of combining botanical agents and nutritional supplements with other natural product-derived therapies and widely used ADHD medications are also warranted. In conclusion, the risk-benefit balance of natural product-derived ADHD treatments should be carefully monitored when used as standalone treatment or when combined with other conventional ADHD treatments. PMID:26966583

  6. Nanoscaled red blood cells facilitate breast cancer treatment by combining photothermal/photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guoyun; Chen, Bowei; Li, Ling; Wang, Dan; Shi, Shurui; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Lianyun; Wang, Yinsong

    2018-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs)-based vesicles have been widely used for drug delivery due to their unique advantages. Intact RBCs contain a large amount of oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb), which can assist with photodynamic therapy (PDT). Indocyanine green (ICG), a photosensitizer both for photothermal therapy (PTT) and PDT, shows potent anticancer efficacy when combined with chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX). In this study, we prepared nanoscaled RBCs (RAs) containing oxyHb and gas-generating agent ammonium bicarbonate (ABC) for co-loading and controlled release of ICG and DOX, thus hoping to achieve synergistic effects of PTT/PDT and chemotherapy against breast cancer. Compared to free ICG, ICG and DOX co-loaded RAs (DIRAs) exhibited nearly identical PTT efficiency both in vitro and in vivo, but meanwhile their PDT efficiency was enhanced significantly. In mouse breast cancer cells, DIRAs significantly inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis after laser irradiation. In breast tumor-bearing mice, intratumoral injection of DIRAs and followed by local laser irradiation almost completely ablated breast tumor and further suppressed tumor recurrence and metastasis. In conclusion, this biomimetic multifunctional nanosystem can facilitate breast cancer treatment by combining PTT/PDT and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipid nano-bubble combined with ultrasound for anti-keloids therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Qing; Li, Zhou-Na; Wang, Qi-Ming; Jin, Hong-Yan; Gao, Zhonggao; Jin, Zhe-Hu

    2018-03-01

    Keloids were characterized by excessive growth of fibrous tissues, and shared several pathological characteristics with cancer. They did put physical and emotional stress on patients in that keloids could badly change appearance of patients. N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (4HPR) showed cytotoxic activity on a wide variety of invasive-growth cells. Our work was aim to prepare N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide-loaded lipid microbubbles (4HPR-LM) combined with ultrasound for anti-keloid therapy. 4HPR-loaded liposomes (4HPR-L) were first prepared by film evaporation method, and then 4HPR-LM were manufactured by mixing 4HPR-L and perfluoropentane (PFP) with ultrasonic cavitation method. The mean particle size and entrapment efficiency 4HPR-LM were 113 nm and 95%, respectively. The anti-keloids activity of 4HPR-LM was assessed with BALB/c nude mice bearing subcutaneous xenograft keloids model. 4HPR-LM, combined with ultrasound, could significantly induce apoptosis of keloid fibroblasts in vitro and inhibited growth of keloids in vivo. Thus, 4HPR-LM could be considered as a promising agent for anti-keloids therapy.

  8. Suspension culture combined with chemotherapeutic agents for sorting of breast cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hai-zhi; Yi, Tong-bo; Wu, Zheng-yan

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has not been well demonstrated by the lack of the most convincing evidence concerning a single cell capable of giving rise to a tumor. The scarcity in quantity and improper approaches for isolation and purification of CSCs have become the major obstacles for great development in CSCs. Here we adopted suspension culture combined with anticancer regimens as a strategy for screening breast cancer stem cells (BrCSCs). BrCSCs could survive and be highly enriched in non-adherent suspension culture while chemotherapeutic agents could destroy most rapidly dividing cancer cells and spare relatively quiescent BrCSCs. TM40D murine breast cancer cells were cultured in serum-free medium. The expression of CD44 + CD24 - was measured by flow cytometry. Cells of passage 10 were treated in combination with anticancer agents pacilitaxel and epirubicin at different peak plasma concentrations for 24 hours, and then maintained under suspension culture. The rate of apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry with Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) double staining method. Selected cells in different amounts were injected subcutaneously into BALB/C mice to observe tumor formation. Cells of passage 10 in suspension culture had the highest percentage of CD44 + CD24 - (about 77 percent). A single tumor cell in 0.35 PPC could generate tumors in 3 of 20 BALB/C mice. Suspension culture combined with anticancer regimens provides an effective means of isolating, culturing and purifying BrCSCs

  9. Impact of Therapy Sequence with Alkylating Agents and MGMT Status in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Sebastian; Boch, Michael; Rexin, Peter; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick; Rinke, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Alkylating chemotherapeutics with either a streptozotocin-(STZ) or temozolomide-(TEM) backbone are routinely used in patients with progressive and unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET). In addition, dacarbazine (DTIC) was described as an alternative alkylating therapy option for PNETs. The optimal treatment sequence with alkylating compounds and a potential use of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) level as predictive biomarker have not yet been sufficiently elucidated. The aim of our study was the evaluation of therapy sequence with either STZ-based treatment followed by DTIC (group A) or the inverse schedule with upfront DTIC (group B) and to correlate MGMT status with clinicopathological characteristics and response to therapy. We retrospectively analyzed 28 patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) who were treated with STZ-based therapy and DTIC. Additionally, in a second group MGMT immunohistochemistry was performed from primary and metastatic tumor sites. For statistical evaluation Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression methods and Fisher's exact test were used. There was no difference of objective response and disease control between either STZ-based therapy followed by DTIC treatment (group A) after progression or the reverse sequence (group B). Median time to progression (TTP) was estimated to be 21 months in both arms. First-line STZ-based chemotherapy was not superior to first-line DTIC treatment (16 vs. 13 months; p=0.8). MGMT status did not correlate with clinicopathological characteristics or response to therapy with these alkylating agents. Upfront chemotherapy with either STZ-based treatment or DTIC monotherapy showed similar efficacy and median TTP rates. In this study, MGMT protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry did not play an important role as a predictive marker for alkylating agents. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Colonic exclusion and combined therapy for refractory constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Yun; Xu, Ai-Zhong

    2006-12-28

    To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of colonic exclusion and combined therapy for refractory constipation. Thirty-two patients with refractory constipation were randomly divided into treatment group (n = 14) and control group (n = 18). Fourteen patients in treatment group underwent colonic exclusion and end-to-side colorectal anastomosis. Eighteen patients in control group received subtotal colectomy and end-to-end colorectal anastomosis. The therapeutic effects of the operations were assessed by comparing the surgical time, incision length, volume of blood losses, hospital stay, recovery rate and complication incidence. All patients received long-term follow-up. All operations were successful and patients recovered fully after the operations. In comparison of treatment group and control group, the surgical time (h), incision length (cm), volume of blood losses (mL), hospital stay (d) were 87 +/- 16 min vs 194 +/- 23 min (t = 9.85), 10.4 +/- 0.5 cm vs 21.2 +/- 1.8 cm (t = 14.26), 79.5 +/- 31.3 mL vs 286.3 +/- 49.2 mL (t = 17.24), and 11.8 +/- 2.4 d vs 18.6 +/- 2.6 d (t = 6.91), respectively (P 0.05), 21.4% vs 33.3% (P = 0.73 > 0.05), respectively. Colonic exclusion has better therapeutic efficacy on refractory constipation. It has many advantages such as shorter surgical time, smaller incision, fewer blood losses and shorter hospital stay.

  11. Combined therapy for 129 patients with second primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Feng Qinfu; Wang Luhua; Zhang Yaohong; Zhao Hongfa; Weng Xinran

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical characteristics and prognosis of the second primary lung cancer. Methods: The interval between the second primary lung cancer and the previous primary cancer ranged from 10 days to 317 months (median 49 months). Of the 129 patients treated from 1971 to 1997 by surgery only, radiotherapy only and chemotherapy only or combined therapy, 11 (8.5%) patients had stage I, 29 (22.5%) stage II, 75 (58.1%) stage III and 14 (10.9%) stage IV; 30 patients received surgery alone, 54 radiotherapy alone, 8 chemotherapy alone, 12 surgery plus radiotherapy, 20 radiotherapy plus chemotherapy, 4 surgery plus chemotherapy and 1 surgery plus radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Results: The overall 2-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 40.2%, 27.2% and 15.3%. The stage I, II, III and IV 2-year survival rates were 71.6%, 60.7%, 32.9% and 0%, respectively (P 49 and ≤49 months of the interval between the second primary lung cancer and the previous primary cancer (P>0.05). Conclusions: Second primary lung cancer are similar to the first primary lung cancer in clinical characteristics and prognosis. The main cause of failure is lung cancer perse. Stage and being able to operation are prognostic factors

  12. Correlating HIV tropism with immunological response under combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, J; Schöni-Affolter, F; Böni, J; Gorgievski-Hrisoho, M; Martinetti, G; Battegay, M; Klimkait, T

    2016-09-01

    A significant percentage of patients infected with HIV-1 experience only suboptimal CD4 cell recovery while treated with combination therapy (cART). It is still unclear whether viral properties such as cell tropism play a major role in this incomplete immune response. This study therefore intended to follow the tropism evolution of the HIV-1 envelope during periods of suppressive cART. Viruses from two distinct patient groups, one with good and another one with poor CD4 recovery after 5 years of suppressive cART, were genotypically analysed for viral tropism at baseline and at the end of the study period. Patients with CCR5-tropic CC-motif chemokine receptor 5 viruses at baseline tended to maintain this tropism to the study end. Patients who had a CXCR4-tropic CXC-motif chemokine receptor 4 virus at baseline were overrepresented in the poor CD4 recovery group. Overall, however, the majority of patients presented with CCR5-tropic viruses at follow-up. Our data lend support to the hypothesis that tropism determination can be used as a parameter for disease progression even if analysed long before the establishment of a poorer immune response. Moreover, the lasting predominating CCR5-tropism during periods of full viral control suggests the involvement of cellular mechanisms that preferentially reduce CXCR4-tropic viruses during cART. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  13. Biological effects of radiation in combination with other physical, chemical or biological agents. Annex L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Annex considers the combined action of radiation with potentially important environmental conditions. Since there is a scarcity of systematic data on which an analysis of combined effects can be based, this Annex will be more hypothetical and will attempt to suggest definitions, to identify suitable methods of analysis, to select from a large amount of diffuse information the conditions and the data of importance for further consideration and to provide suggestions for future research. For humans in environmental circumstances the UNSCEAR Committee has been unable to document any clear case of synergistic interaction between radiation and other agents, which could lead to substantial modifications of the risk estimates for significant sections of the population.

  14. The combined effect of interferon synthesis inductors, radiosensitizing and antitumoral agents on solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonidze, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments with mice bearing solid sarcoma 37 a study was conducted on the combined effect of radiation and inductors of endogenous inerferon synthesis (IEIS), together with hyperthermia or together with an alkylating and carbomoilating agent, dimethinur. The effect was estimated by the tumor growth coefficient and by the number of animals with the regressed tumors. Poly I; polyC was not shiown to influence the efficiency of hyperthermia combined with radiation with radiation; dextransulphate and tiloron increased the radiosensitizing effect of hyperthermia. Dimethinur aggravated the effect of radiation, but with IEIS used together with dimethynur and radiation, the response of the tumor increased insignificantly as compared to the effect of IEIS together with radiation

  15. Nanoparticle delivered vascular disrupting agents (VDAs): use of TNF-alpha conjugated gold nanoparticles for multimodal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Mithun M; Iltis, Isabelle; Choi, Jeunghwan; Koonce, Nathan A; Metzger, Gregory J; Griffin, Robert J; Bischof, John C

    2013-05-06

    Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy remain the mainstay of current cancer therapy. However, treatment failure persists due to the inability to achieve complete local control of the tumor and curtail metastatic spread. Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) are a class of promising systemic agents that are known to synergistically enhance radiation, chemotherapy or thermal treatments of solid tumors. Unfortunately, there is still an unmet need for VDAs with more favorable safety profiles and fewer side effects. Recent work has demonstrated that conjugating VDAs to other molecules (polyethylene glycol, CNGRCG peptide) or nanoparticles (liposomes, gold) can reduce toxicity of one prominent VDA (tumor necrosis factor alpha, TNF-α). In this report, we show the potential of a gold conjugated TNF-α nanoparticle (NP-TNF) to improve multimodal cancer therapies with VDAs. In a dorsal skin fold and hindlimb murine xenograft model of prostate cancer, we found that NP-TNF disrupts endothelial barrier function and induces a significant increase in vascular permeability within the first 1-2 h followed by a dramatic 80% drop in perfusion 2-6 h after systemic administration. We also demonstrate that the tumor response to the nanoparticle can be verified using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a technique in clinical use. Additionally, multimodal treatment with thermal therapies at the perfusion nadir in the sub- and supraphysiological temperature regimes increases tumor volumetric destruction by over 60% and leads to significant tumor growth delays compared to thermal therapy alone. Lastly, NP-TNF was found to enhance thermal therapy in the absence of neutrophil recruitment, suggesting that immune/inflammatory regulation is not central to its power as part of a multimodal approach. Our data demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle-conjugated VDAs to significantly improve cancer therapy by preconditioning tumor vasculature to a secondary insult in a targeted

  16. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as a Sole Agent Is Not Immunosuppressant in a Highly Immunogenic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gassas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy, which is used for many conditions, may also have immunosuppressive effects and could be used for prevention or treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. If HBO is immunosuppressant, then we hypothesize that HBO therapy will delay the T-cell mediated skin graft rejection. Methods. C57/BL6 black-coated (H2B mice received skin graft from CBA (H2D white-coated mice. Mice were treated with either 19 session of 240 kpa oxygen or 29 session of 300 kpa oxygen, for 90 minutes. Mice were housed either 4 per cage or separately, to prevent friction and mechanical factors that may affect graft survival. Skin grafts were assessed daily. Results. There was no difference in length of graft survival between mice that received either regimens of HBO therapy and mice that did not receive HBO therapy. Conclusions. HBO therapy, as a sole agent, did not delay skin graft rejection in a highly immunogenic mouse model.

  17. Treatment of selective mutism based on cognitive behavioural therapy, psychopharmacology and combination therapy - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Kasper Rud

    2018-02-15

    Selective mutism (SM) is a debilitating childhood anxiety disorder characterized by a persistent lack of speech in certain social settings and is considered hard to treat. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatments are the best described treatments in the literature. To test whether there is evidence on treatment based on CBT, medication or a combination of these. Systematic and critical review of the literature on CBT and/or pharmacological treatments of SM. Literature was sought on PubMed, Embase and Psycinfo in March 2017. Of the included studies, six examined CBT, seven pharmacologic treatment and two a combination of these. Using CBT 53/60 children improved symptomatically whilst respectively 55/67 and 6/7 improved using pharmacologic- and combination-treatment. Pharmacologic treatment and especially CBT showed promising results supported by some degree of evidence, which combination treatment lacks. Yet small numbers, few RCTs, heterogeneous study designs, lack of consistent measures, short treatment and follow-up periods, generally limits the evidence. This needs focus in future research.

  18. Combining Bayesian Networks and Agent Based Modeling to develop a decision-support model in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, Bao Anh; Ertsen, Maurits; Schoups, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Complexity and uncertainty in natural resources management have been focus themes in recent years. Within these debates, with the aim to define an approach feasible for water management practice, we are developing an integrated conceptual modeling framework for simulating decision-making processes of citizens, in our case in the Day river area, Vietnam. The model combines Bayesian Networks (BNs) and Agent-Based Modeling (ABM). BNs are able to combine both qualitative data from consultants / experts / stakeholders, and quantitative data from observations on different phenomena or outcomes from other models. Further strengths of BNs are that the relationship between variables in the system is presented in a graphical interface, and that components of uncertainty are explicitly related to their probabilistic dependencies. A disadvantage is that BNs cannot easily identify the feedback of agents in the system once changes appear. Hence, ABM was adopted to represent the reaction among stakeholders under changes. The modeling framework is developed as an attempt to gain better understanding about citizen's behavior and factors influencing their decisions in order to reduce uncertainty in the implementation of water management policy.

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy. Synthesis of boronated amines- and DNA intercalating agents for potential use in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaneolhosseini, H.

    1998-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary cancer treatment modality, involving the delivery of a suitable boron compound to tumour cells followed by irradiation of the tumour by thermal neutrons. Boronated agents can selectively be delivered to tumour cells either directly with tumour-specific boron compounds, or by use of targeting strategies. However, the efficacy of this method would increase if the boron agents are localised in the cell nucleus rather than in the cell cytoplasm when neutron irradiation takes place. With these considerations in mind, some boronated DNA intercalating/interacting agents such as phenanthridine- acridine- spermidine- and naphthalimide derivatives were synthesised. Aminoalkyl-o-carboranes were synthesised in order to be used both for coupling to macromolecules and also for halogenation of their corresponding nido-derivatives. The amino groups were introduced using the Gabriel reagent N, N-dibenzyl iminodicarboxylate to provide 1-(aminomethyl)- and 1-(2-aminoethyl)-o-carboranes. The first attempt to achieve the possibility to accumulate a higher concentration of boron atoms in the cell nucleus was to synthesize carboranyl phenanthridinium analogues by reacting a p- or o-carboranyl moiety with phenanthridine, a chromophore with a planar aromatic ring system as DNA intercalator. Boronated acridine-spermidine, boronated diacridine, and boronated dispermidine were obtained in order to increase water solubility to avoid the interaction of these agents with non-DNA sides of the cell, especially membranes; and to enhance the feasibility of a higher DNA-binding constant and also decrease the DNA-drug dissociation rate. Finally, the synthesis of a boronated naphthalimide derivative was carried out by nucleophilic reaction of a primary aminoalkyl-p-carborane with naphthalic anhydride. Biological evaluations on DNA-binding, toxicity, and cellular binding with carboranyl phenanthridinium analogues, boronated acridine- and spermidine are described

  20. Regorafenib: Antitumor Activity upon Mono and Combination Therapy in Preclinical Pediatric Malignancy Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Daudigeos-Dubus

    Full Text Available The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib (BAY 73-4506 exerts both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activity in adult solid malignancies mainly advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We intended to explore preclinically the potential of regorafenib against solid pediatric malignancies alone and in combination with anticancer agents to guide the pediatric development plan. In vitro effects on cell proliferation were screened against 33 solid tumor cell lines of the Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC panel covering five pediatric solid malignancies. Regorafenib inhibited cell proliferation with a mean half maximal growth inhibition of 12.5 μmol/L (range 0.7 μmol/L to 28 μmol/L. In vivo, regorafenib was evaluated alone at 10 or 30 mg/kg/d or in combination with radiation, irinotecan or the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK inhibitor refametinib against various tumor types, including patient-derived brain tumor models with an amplified platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA gene. Regorafenib alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in all xenografts derived from nervous system and connective tissue tumors. Enhanced effects were observed when regorafenib was combined with irradiation and irinotecan against PDGFRA amplified IGRG93 glioma and IGRM57 medulloblastoma respectively, resulting in 100% tumor regressions. Antitumor activity was associated with decreased tumor vascularization, inhibition of PDGFR signaling, and induction of apoptotic cell death. Our work demonstrates that regorafenib exhibits significant antitumor activity in a wide spectrum of preclinical pediatric models through inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, radio- and chemosensitizing effects were observed with DNA damaging agents in PDGFR amplified tumors.

  1. Regorafenib: Antitumor Activity upon Mono and Combination Therapy in Preclinical Pediatric Malignancy Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudigeos-Dubus, Estelle; Le Dret, Ludivine; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Bawa, Olivia; Opolon, Paule; Vievard, Albane; Villa, Irène; Pagès, Mélanie; Bosq, Jacques; Vassal, Gilles; Zopf, Dieter; Geoerger, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib (BAY 73-4506) exerts both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activity in adult solid malignancies mainly advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We intended to explore preclinically the potential of regorafenib against solid pediatric malignancies alone and in combination with anticancer agents to guide the pediatric development plan. In vitro effects on cell proliferation were screened against 33 solid tumor cell lines of the Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC) panel covering five pediatric solid malignancies. Regorafenib inhibited cell proliferation with a mean half maximal growth inhibition of 12.5 μmol/L (range 0.7 μmol/L to 28 μmol/L). In vivo, regorafenib was evaluated alone at 10 or 30 mg/kg/d or in combination with radiation, irinotecan or the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor refametinib against various tumor types, including patient-derived brain tumor models with an amplified platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) gene. Regorafenib alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in all xenografts derived from nervous system and connective tissue tumors. Enhanced effects were observed when regorafenib was combined with irradiation and irinotecan against PDGFRA amplified IGRG93 glioma and IGRM57 medulloblastoma respectively, resulting in 100% tumor regressions. Antitumor activity was associated with decreased tumor vascularization, inhibition of PDGFR signaling, and induction of apoptotic cell death. Our work demonstrates that regorafenib exhibits significant antitumor activity in a wide spectrum of preclinical pediatric models through inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, radio- and chemosensitizing effects were observed with DNA damaging agents in PDGFR amplified tumors.

  2. Osteoarthritis: Key elements in its pathogenesis and current agents for pathogenetic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Olyunin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three main areas can be arbitrarily identified in the modern concept of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA; these are: 1 an impact on the progression of joint destruction; 2 suppression of peripheral pain mechanisms; and 3 inhibition of the central processes involved in the formation of pain sensation. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (CS have become the first agents that are able to retard the development of cartilage degeneration. They have been used in medical practice for more than 40 years. A number of clinical trials of these drugs have yielded favorable results during their use in patients with OA. Another agent containing amino sugars and CS – sea fish cartilage hydrolysate has more recently emerged. Clinical trials have demonstrated that it is able to significantly relieve OA-induced pain. To date, the main agent for the analgesic therapy of OA is considered to be nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs that act on the peripheral mechanisms of pain and are widely used to treat diseases that are accompanied by chronic pain. However, a large-scale meta-analysis dealing with the experience with NSAIDs used to treat OA has shown that pain relief due to this therapy averaged only about 10 mm on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. To enhance the efficiency of therapy for OA, drug and non-drug treatments that affect the central mechanisms of pain in this disease are also used.

  3. Neutron capture therapy of epidermal growth factor (+) gliomas using boronated cetuximab (IMC-C225) as a delivery agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Rolf F. E-mail: barth.1@osu.edu; Wu Gong; Yang Weilian; Binns, Peter J.; Riley, Kent J.; Patel, Hemant; Coderre, Jeffrey A.; Tjarks, Werner; Bandyopadhyaya, A.K.; Thirumamagal, B.T.S.; Ciesielski, Michael J.; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2004-11-01

    Cetuximab (IMC-C225) is a monoclonal antibody directed against both the wild-type and mutant vIII isoform of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the monoclonal antibody (MoAb), cetuximab, as a boron delivery agent for neutron capture therapy (NCT) of brain tumors. Twenty-four hours following intratumoral (i.t.) administration of boronated cetuximab (C225-G5-B{sub 1100}), the mean boron concentration in rats bearing either F98{sub EGFR} or F98{sub WT} gliomas were 92.3{+-}23.3 {mu}g/g and 36.5{+-}18.8 {mu}g/g, respectively. In contrast, the uptake of boronated dendrimer (G5-B{sub 1000}) was 6.7{+-}3.6 {mu}g/g. Based on its favorable in vivo uptake, C225-G5-B{sub 1100} was evaluated as a delivery agent for BNCT in F98{sub EGFR} glioma bearing rats. The mean survival time (MST) of rats that received C225-G5-B{sub 1100}, administered by convection enhanced delivery (CED), was 45{+-}3 d compared to 25{+-}3 d for untreated control animals. A further enhancement in MST to >59 d was obtained by administering C225-G5-B{sub 1100} in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA). These data are the first to demonstrate the efficacy of a boronated MoAb for BNCT of an intracerebral (i.c.) glioma and are paradigmatic for future studies using a combination of boronated MoAbs and low molecular weight delivery agents.

  4. Cytotoxic effects of the newly-developed chemotherapeutic agents 17-AAG in combination with oxaliplatin and capecitabine in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mahshid; Zeynali, Shima; Azarbaijani, Anahita Fathi; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2017-12-01

    The use of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors like 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-AAG) has been recently introduced as an attractive anticancer therapy. It has been shown that 17-AAG may potentiate the inhibitory effects of some classical anticolorectal cancer (CRC) agents. In this study, two panels of colorectal carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of 17-AAG in combination with capecitabine and oxaliplatin as double and triple combination therapies on the proliferation of CRC cell lines. HT-29 and all HCT-116 cell lines were seeded in culture media in the presence of different doses of the mentioned drugs in single, double, and triple combinations. Water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) assay was used to investigate cell proliferation 24 h after treatments. Then, dose-response curves were plotted using WST-1outputs, and IC 50 values were determined. For double and triple combinations respectively 0.5 × IC 50 and 0.25 × IC 50 were used. Data was analyzed with the software CompuSyn. Drug interactions were analyzed using Chou-Talalay method to calculate the combination index (CI).The data revealed that 17-AAG shows a potent synergistic interaction (CI 1) in HT-29 and a synergistic effect (CI AAG with oxaliplatin or capecitabine might be effective against HCT-116 and HT-29 cell lines. However, in triple combinations, positive results were seen only against HCT-116. Further investigation is suggested to confirm the effectiveness of these combinations in clinical trials.

  5. Cediranib, a pan-VEGFR inhibitor, and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, in combination therapy for high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, S Percy; Liu, Joyce F; Lee, Jung-Min; Matulonis, Ursula A; Kohn, Elise C

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 22,000 women are diagnosed annually with ovarian cancer in the United States. Initially chemo-sensitive, recurrent disease ultimately becomes chemoresistant and may kill ~14,000 women annually. Molecularly targeted therapy with cediranib (AZD2171), a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, 2, and 3 signaling blocker, and olaparib (AZD2281), a poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, administered orally in combination has shown anti-tumor activity in the treatment of high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). This combination has the potential to change the treatment of HGSOC. Preclinical and clinical studies of single agent cediranib and olaparib or their combination are reviewed. Data are presented from peer-reviewed published manuscripts, completed and ongoing early phase clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and related recent abstracts. Advances in the treatment of HGSOC that improve progression-free and overall survival have proven elusive despite examination of molecularly targeted therapy. HGSOC patients with deleterious germline or somatic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCAm) are most responsive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). PARPi combined with angiogenesis inhibition improved anti-cancer response and duration in both BRCAm and BRCA wild type HGSOC patients, compared to olaparib single agent treatment, demonstrating therapeutic chemical and contextual synthetic lethality.

  6. A nanomedicine based combination therapy based on QLPVM peptide functionalized liposomal tamoxifen and doxorubicin against Luminal A breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyou; Chen, Xianhui; Yang, Xiucong; Gao, Wei; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Zhifei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Though combination chemotherapy or antitumor nanomedicine is extensively investigated, their combining remains in infancy. Additionally, enhanced delivery of estrogen or its analogs to tumor with highly-expressed estrogen-receptor (ER) is seldom considered, despite its necessity for ER-positive breast cancer treatment. Here, nanomedicine based combination therapy using QLPVM conjugated liposomal tamoxifen (TAM) and doxorubicin (DOX) was designed and testified, where the penta-peptide was derived from Ku70 Bax-binding domain. Quantitative, semi-quantitative and qualitative approaches demonstrated the enhanced endocytosis and cytotoxicity of QLPVM conjugated sterically stabilized liposomes (QLPVM-SSLs) in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism studies of QLPVM excluded the possible electrostatic, hydrophobic or receptor-ligand interactions. However, as a weak cell-penetrating peptide, QLPVM significantly induced drug release from QLPVM-SSLs during their interaction with cells, which was favorable for drug internalization. These findings suggested that the nanomedicine based combination therapy using QLPVM-SSL-TAM and QLPVM-SSL-DOX might provide a rational strategy for Luminal A breast cancer. Breast cancer remains a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Although combined therapy using hormonal antagonist and chemotherapy is the norm nowadays, the use of these agents together in a single delivery system has not been tested. Here, the authors investigated this approach using QLPVM conjugated liposomes in in-vitro and in-vivo models. The positive findings may provide a novel direction for breast cancer treatment in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. BRAF inhibitors and radiotherapy for melanoma brain metastases: potential advantages and disadvantages of combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhary M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mudit Chowdhary,1,2 Kirtesh R Patel,1 Hasan H Danish,1 David H Lawson,3 Mohammad K Khan1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Melanoma is an aggressive malignancy that frequently spreads to the brain, resulting in rapid deterioration in both quality and quantity of life. Historically, treatment options for melanoma brain metastases (MBM have predominantly consisted of surgery and radiotherapy. While these options can help provide local control, the majority of patients still develop intracranial progression. Indeed, novel therapeutic options, including molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy, have improved outcomes and are now changing the role of radiotherapy. Up to 50% of melanomas contain an activating BRAF mutation, resulting in hyperactive cellular proliferation and survival. Drugs that target BRAF have been introduced for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and offer hope in improving disease outcomes; however, many of these trials either excluded or had a limited amount of patients with MBM. Recent studies have revealed that melanoma cell lines become more radiosensitive following BRAF inhibition, thus providing a potential synergistic mechanism when combining BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi and radiotherapy. However, neurotoxicity concerns also exist with this combination. This article reviews the efficacy and limitations of BRAFi therapy for MBM, describes current evidence for combining BRAFis with radiation, discusses the rationale and evidence for combination modalities, and highlights emerging clinical trials specifically investigating this combination in MBM. Keywords: brain metastases, melanoma, radiation, BRAF inhibitors, vemurafenib, dabrafenib

  8. Combination Therapy With Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi for the Treatment of Cancer: Achieving the Full Therapeutic Potential of HDACi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amila Suraweera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and epigenetic changes in DNA are involved in cancer development and tumor progression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are key regulators of gene expression that act as transcriptional repressors by removing acetyl groups from histones. HDACs are dysregulated in many cancers, making them a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi, a novel class of small-molecular therapeutics, are now approved by the Food and Drug Administration as anticancer agents. While they have shown great promise, resistance to HDACi is often observed and furthermore, HDACi have shown limited success in treating solid tumors. The combination of HDACi with standard chemotherapeutic drugs has demonstrated promising anticancer effects in both preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize the research thus far on HDACi in combination therapy, with other anticancer agents and their translation into preclinical and clinical studies. We additionally highlight the side effects associated with HDACi in cancer therapy and discuss potential biomarkers to either select or predict a patient’s response to these agents, in order to limit the off-target toxicity associated with HDACi.

  9. In vitro testing of drug combinations employing nilotinib and alkylating agents with regard to pretransplant conditioning treatment of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Luft, Thomas; Dreger, Peter; Ho, Anthony D; Jens Zeller, W; Fruehauf, Stefan; Topaly, Julian

    2014-08-01

    The prognosis of patients with advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) remains dismal despite the availability of targeted therapies and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Increasing the antileukemic efficacy of the pretransplant conditioning regimen may be a strategy to increase remission rates and duration. We therefore investigated the antiproliferative effects of nilotinib in combination with drugs that are usually used for conditioning: the alkylating agents mafosfamide, treosulfan, and busulfan. Drug combinations were tested in vitro in different imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL-positive cell lines. A tetrazolium-based MTT assay was used for the assessment and quantification of growth inhibition after exposure to alkylating agents alone or to combinations with nilotinib. Drug interaction was analyzed using the median-effect method of Chou and Talalay, and combination index (CI) values were calculated according to the classic isobologram equation. Treatment of imatinib-sensitive, BCR-ABL-positive K562 and LAMA84 cells with nilotinib in combination with mafosfamide, treosulfan, or busulfan resulted in synergistic (CI 1) effects, respectively. In imatinib-resistant K562-R and LAMA84-R cells, all applied drug combinations were synergistic (CI conditioning regimens for allo-SCT in advanced-phase CML.

  10. Calreticulin as cancer treatment adjuvant: combination with photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen eKorbelik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin is recognized as one of pivotal damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP molecules alerting the host of the presence of distressed cells. In this role, calreticulin becomes exposed on the surface of tumor cells treated by several types of cancer therapy including photodynamic therapy (PDT. The goal of the present study was to examine the potential of externally added calreticulin for augmenting antitumor effect mediated by PDT. Recombinant calreticulin was found to bind to mouse SCCVII tumor cells treated by PDT. Compared to the outcome with PDT alone, cure-rates of SCCVII tumors grown in immunocompetent C3H/HeN mice were elevated when calreticulin (0.4 mg/mouse was injected peritumorally immediately after PDT. Such therapeutic gain with PDT plus calreticulin combination was not obtained with SCCVII tumors growing in immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. In PDT vaccine protocol, where PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used for vaccination of SCCVII tumor-bearing mice, adding recombinant calreticulin to cells before their injection produced improved therapeutic effect. The expression of calreticulin gene was reduced in PDT-treated cells, while no changes were observed with the expression of this gene in tumor, liver, and spleen tissues in PDT vaccine-treated mice. These findings reveal that externally added recombinant calreticulin can boost antitumor responses elicited by PDT or PDT-generated vaccines, and can thus serve as an effective adjuvant for cancer treatment with PDT and probably other cancer cell stress-inducing modalities.

  11. Developing Optimal Combination of Bulking Agents in an In-Vessel Composting of Vegetable Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Monson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to determine the optimum combination of feed stock components for composting the organic solid waste, a prerequisite for effective microbial degradation and for obtaining quality compost. Combination of dry leaves with locally available bulking agents like sawdust, wood shavings, paddy straw, sugarcane bagasse and rice husk are composted along with vegetable waste in a laboratory scale reactor for the study. The central core of composting process is replicated in controlled conditions in the in-vessel by keeping initial feed stock C/N ratio fixed between 30 and 35. The study is monitored for 14 days for the variations in temperature, pH, moisture and macronutrients C and N of the compost. It is found that composting vegetable waste with the combination of paddy straw and dry leaves provided best results of C/N ratio of 17.58 confirming that, if right feedstock components are provided, an effective environment for the growth of microorganisms is achieved to accelerate the process to produce a resultant C/N ratio acceptable to be used as compost.

  12. Discordant perspectives of rheumatologists and patients on COBRA combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, L.H.D. van; Plass, A.M.C.; Lems, W.F.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Kerstens, P.J.S.M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The COBRA therapy (combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis) has proven to be an effective treatment for early RA, but is rarely prescribed. A survey showed reluctance of Dutch reumatologists to apply COBRA therapy in early RA. The present qualitative study was carried out to

  13. Zonisamide Combined with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Giovanni; Lo Sauro, Carolina; Rotella, Carlo M.; Faravelli, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Binge eating disorder is a serious, prevalent eating disorder that is associated with overweight. Zonisamide is an antiepileptic drug that can promote weight loss. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of zonisamide as augmentation to individual cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of binge eating disorder patients. Design: controlled open study. Participants: Twenty four threshold and subthreshold binge eating disorder patients were enrolled in the cognitive behavioral therapy treatment group, and 28 patients in the cognitive behavioral therapy plus zonisamide group. Measurements: At the beginning (T0), at the end (T1) of treatment, and one year after the end of treatment (T2), body mass index was measured and Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Binge Eating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were administered. Results. At T1 the cognitive behavioral therapy plus zonisamide group showed a higher mean reduction of body mass index, Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Binge Eating Scale scores. At T2, the cognitive behavior therapy group regained weight, while the cognitive behavioral therapy plus zonisamide group reduced their body mass and showed a higher reduction in binge eating frequency and Binge Eating Scale, Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Restraint, and State and Trait Anxiety Inventory scores. Conclusion. The zonisamide augmentation to individual cognitive behavior therapy can improve the treatment of binge eating disorder patients, reducing body weight and the number of binge eating episodes. These results are maintained one year after the end of treatment. PMID:20049147

  14. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matatagui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs. The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13, and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR. Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  15. Combination therapy versus gemcitabine monotherapy in the treatment of elderly pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin JM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Jiamin Jin, Chunbo Teng, Tao Li College of Life Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China Purpose: We aimed to compare the efficacy of combination therapy versus gemcitabine monotherapy in the treatment of elderly pancreatic cancer (PC by using a meta-analysis.Materials and methods: Databases were searched to identify relevant clinical trials. Hazard ratios (HRs were used to estimate overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Statistical analyses were conducted by using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software (version 2.0.Results: A total of 3,401 elderly PC patients from six randomized controlled trials were included for analysis. In comparison with gemcitabine alone, combination therapy in elderly PC patients did not significantly improve OS (HR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.82–1.06, p=0.29. Sub-group analysis according to treatment regimens showed that combined chemotherapy significantly improved OS in comparison with gemcitabine alone (HR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56–0.94, p=0.016, while gemcitabine plus targeted agents did not improve OS (HR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.87–1.19, p=0.83. Additionally, gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel significantly improved PFS in elderly PC patients (HR 0.69, 95% CI: 0.52–0.91, p=0.009 in comparison with gemcitabine alone. No publication bias was detected by Begg’s and Egger’s tests for OS.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that combined chemotherapy, but not for gemcitabine plus targeted agents, could be recommended for elderly PC patients due to its survival benefits. Further studies are still needed to assess the treatment tolerance of combination chemotherapy in these patient populations. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, elderly, randomized controlled trials, meta-analysis, targeted agents

  16. Aldosterone breakthrough during aliskiren, valsartan, and combination (aliskiren + valsartan) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomback, Andrew S; Rekhtman, Yelena; Klemmer, Philip J; Canetta, Pietro A; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-01-01

    Aldosterone levels increase in 30%-40% of patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers over the long term. This "aldosterone breakthrough" may carry important clinical consequences given aldosterone's nonepithelial, pro-fibrotic actions. The renin inhibitor, aliskiren, by suppressing the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) proximally, may limit breakthrough compared to conventional RAAS blockade. This open-label study (NCT01129557) randomized subjects to aliskiren 300 mg daily (A), valsartan 320 mg daily (V), or aliskiren 150 mg + valsartan 160 mg daily (A+V) for 9 months. Eligible subjects had proteinuria >300 mg/day, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and systolic blood pressure (BP) >130 or diastolic BP >80 mm Hg. Serum and 24-hour urine aldosterone (indexed to 24-hour urine Na) were checked before initiation of therapy and at 3, 6, and 9 months. Aldosterone breakthrough was defined as a sustained increase from baseline aldosterone by study end. The study was intended to enroll 120 subjects but was terminated early by the sponsor. We present here the results of 33 subjects who completed the protocol, of which 12 were randomized to A, 11 were randomized to V, and 10 were randomized to A+V. Mean baseline eGFR was 75.5 (±23.3) mL/min/1.73 m(2); baseline proteinuria was 3104 (±2943) mg/day; and baseline BP was 134.7 (±10.5)/84.8 (±8.4) mm Hg. Three (27%) subjects on V, three (25%) subjects on A, and three (30%) subjects on A+V had aldosterone breakthrough. Mean proteinuria reduction was 31% from baseline in all subjects: 30% in subjects with breakthrough vs. 32% in subjects without breakthrough. Mean BP reduction was 11.0/8.8 mm Hg in all subjects: 8.4/6.1 mm Hg in subjects with breakthrough vs. 12.0/9.8 mm Hg in subjects without breakthrough. Aliskiren, alone or in combination with valsartan, did not reduce the incidence of aldosterone breakthrough in subjects with hypertension

  17. Pancreatitis associated with potassium bromide/phenobarbital combination therapy in epileptic dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaskill, C L; Cribb, A E

    2000-01-01

    In a retrospective study, at least 10% of dogs receiving potassium bromide/phenobarbital combination therapy, compared with 0.3% of dogs receiving phenobarbital monotherapy, had probable pancreatitis. Pancreatitis may be a more frequent and more serious adverse effect of potassium bromide/phenobarbital combination therapy than has been reported previously.

  18. Basic study for development of new tumor specific agents for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Akira; Nakagawa, Kunio; Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Nose, Tadao

    1994-01-01

    New tissue specific agents for neutron capture therapy was studied. Monoclonal labeled gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-MoAb) and porphyrin (ATN-10)-Gd-DTPA (Gd-ATN10) were studied as possible agents by using 9-L experimental brain tumor model. The tissue concentration were analyzed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyzer. Gd-MoAb showed persistent retention in the tumor on MRI, but tissue gadolinium concentration was not detectable in the tumor by ICP analyzer, while there was high accumulation of Gd-MoAb in the liver. Gd-ATN10 showed prolonged and high accumulation in the tumor up to 48 hours on MRI. Gadolinium concentration reached up to 9 ppm in the tumor by 0.02 mmol/kg administration, but it disappeared within 6 hours after administration. This dissociation between MRI and ICP analysis was due to separation of ATN-10 and Gd-DTPA. As conclusions, the porphyrin compounds are potential agents for delivering gadolinium or boron specific to the tumor tissue, thus further improvement such as more stable conjugation between porphyrinfic to the tumor tissue, thus further improvement such as more stable conjugation between porphyrin and Gd-DTPA is needed. (author)

  19. Small molecules as therapy for uveitis: a selected perspective of new and developing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleyer, Uwe; Algharably, Engi Abdel-Hady; Feist, Eugen; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2017-09-01

    Intraocular inflammation (uveitis) remains a significant burden of legal blindness. Because of its immune mediated and chronic recurrent nature, common therapy includes corticosteroids, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and more recently biologics as immune modulatory agents. The purpose of this article is to identify the role of new treatment approaches focusing on small molecules as therapeutic option in uveitis. Areas covered: A MEDLINE database search was conducted through February 2017 using the terms 'uveitis' and 'small molecule'. To provide ongoing and future perspectives in treatment options, also clinical trials as registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were included. Both, results from experimental as well as clinical research in this field were included. Since this field is rapidly evolving, a selection of promising agents had to be made. Expert opinion: Small molecules may interfere at different steps of the inflammatory cascade and appear as an interesting option in the treatment algorithm of uveitis. Because of their highly targeted molecular effects and their favorable bioavailability with the potential of topical application small molecules hold great promise. Nevertheless, a careful evaluation of these agents has to be made, since current experience is almost exclusively based on experimental uveitis models and few registered trials.

  20. SGLT2 inhibitors: a novel choice for the combination therapy in diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Honghong; Zhou, Baoqin; Xu, Gaosi

    2017-05-16

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of end stage renal disease. The comprehensive management of DKD depends on combined target-therapies for hyperglycemia, hypertension, albuminuria, and hyperlipaemia, etc. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, the most recently developed oral hypoglycemic agents acted on renal proximal tubules, suppress glucose reabsorption and increase urinary glucose excretion. Besides improvements in glycemic control, they presented excellent performances in direct renoprotective effects and the cardiovascular (CV) safety by decreasing albuminuria and the independent CV risk factors such as body weight and blood pressure, etc. Simultaneous use of SGLT-2 inhibitors and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers are novel strategies to slow the progression of DKD via reducing inflammatory and fibrotic markers induced by hyperglycaemia more than either drug alone. The available population and animal based studies have described SGLT2 inhibitors plus RAAS blockers. The present review was to systematically review the potential renal benefits of SGLT2 inhibitors combined with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and especially the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers.

  1. Pneumothorax as a complication of combination antiangiogenic therapy in children and young adults with refractory/recurrent solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interiano, Rodrigo B; McCarville, M Beth; Wu, Jianrong; Davidoff, Andrew M; Sandoval, John; Navid, Fariba

    2015-09-01

    Antiangiogenic agents show significant antitumor activity against various tumor types. In a study evaluating the combination of sorafenib, bevacizumab, and low-dose cyclophosphamide in children with solid tumors, an unexpectedly high incidence of pneumothorax was observed. We evaluated patient characteristics and risk factors for the development of pneumothorax in patients receiving this therapy. Demographics, clinical course, and radiographic data of 44 patients treated with sorafenib, bevacizumab and cyclophosphamide were reviewed. Risk factors associated with the development of pneumothorax were analyzed. Pneumothorax likely related to study therapy developed in 11 of 44 (25%) patients of whom 33 had pulmonary abnormalities. Median age of patients was 14.7 years (range, 1.08-24.5). Histologies associated with pneumothorax included rhabdoid tumor, synovial sarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Wilms tumor, and renal cell carcinoma. Cavitation of pulmonary nodules in response to therapy was associated with pneumothorax development (Ppneumothorax was 5.7 weeks (range, 2.4-31). The development of cavitary pulmonary nodules in response to therapy is a risk factor for pneumothorax. As pneumothorax is a potentially life-threatening complication of antiangiogenic therapy in children with solid tumors, its risk needs to be evaluated when considering this therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined use of Dexa-Scheroson and Primobolan-Depot in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, J [Shizuoka Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    1976-05-01

    Dexa-Scheroson and Primobolan-Depot were used together with radiation therapy (Linac therapy) required in 13 cases. The following results were obtained. The decrease in white cell counts, which often occurs in radiation therapy, was inhibited by the drugs. There was no case in which radiation therapy should necessarily withdraw because the number of leuckocytes was decreased to less than 3,000. The patients whose liver function was poor should be treated with both drugs at the beginning of radiation therapy. It was found that the combined use of the drugs is effective in the prevention and the treatment of cerebral edema in radiation therapy of intracranial lesion.

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy integrated with systematic desensitization, cognitive behavioral therapy combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy combined with virtual reality exposure therapy methods in the treatment of flight anxiety: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triscari, Maria Teresa; Faraci, Palmira; Catalisano, Dario; D'Angelo, Valerio; Urso, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to compare the effectiveness of the following treatment methods for fear of flying: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) integrated with systematic desensitization, CBT combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and CBT combined with virtual reality exposure therapy. Overall, our findings have proven the efficacy of all interventions in reducing fear of flying in a pre- to post-treatment comparison. All groups showed a decrease in flight anxiety, suggesting the efficiency of all three treatments in reducing self-report measures of fear of flying. In particular, our results indicated significant improvements for the treated patients using all the treatment programs, as shown not only by test scores but also by participation in the post-treatment flight. Nevertheless, outcome measures maintained a significant effect at a 1-year follow-up. In conclusion, combining CBT with both the application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment and the virtual stimuli used to expose patients with aerophobia seemed as efficient as traditional cognitive behavioral treatments integrated with systematic desensitization.

  4. Effect of Polycosanol, a grape seed extract and its combined therapy on oxidation markers in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarzabal Yera, Ambar; Molina Cuevas, Vivian; Jimenez Despaigne, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    The Polycosanol, a mixture of superior primary aliphatic alcohols obtained from the sugarcane wax (Sacharum officinarum, L.) and the grape seeds extract (Vitis vinifera, L.) produces antioxidant effects experimentally and clinically demonstrated. The aim of present paper was to compare the effects of Polycosanol, the grape seed extract, and its combined therapy on oxidative markers in plasma and liver of rats. The rats were distributed into 4 groups: a control one and three treated with Polycosanol, grape seed extract and its combined therapy, respectively, using a 25 mg/kg dose over 4 weeks. The single-therapies significantly reduced the plasmatic concentrations of malonyldialdehyde and of protein-associated carbonyl groups regarding the control, showing a similar efficacy. Combined therapy reduced in a more effective way (p < 0,001) the malonyldialdehyde concentrations of carbonyl groups, and also decreased (p < 0,01) the concentrations of carbonyl groups, but no more than the single-therapies. Each single-therapy reduced the malonyldialdehyde concentrations generated by spontaneous oxidant system in liver homogenate. The effect of combined therapy was higher (p < 0,05) than the grape seed extract, but no more than that of polycosanol. We concluded that oral single-therapies using polycosanol and grape seed extract, administered during 4 weeks, decreased in a similar way, the lipid peroxidation in plasma and liver of rats. Combined therapy was more effective to inhibits the lipid peroxidation in plasma than each single-therapy, separately

  5. Gold Nanoparticles as a Photothermal Agent in Cancer Therapy: The Thermal Ablation Characteristic Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grosges

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer therapy, the thermal ablation of diseased cells by embedded nanoparticles is one of the known therapies. It is based on the absorption of the energy of the illuminating laser by nanoparticles. The resulting heating of nanoparticles kills the cell where these photothermal agents are embedded. One of the main constraints of this therapy is preserving the surrounding healthy cells. Therefore, two parameters are of interest. The first one is the thermal ablation characteristic length, which corresponds to an action distance around the nanoparticles for which the temperature exceeds the ablation threshold. This critical geometric parameter is related to the expected conservation of the body temperature in the surroundings of the diseased cell. The second parameter is the temperature that should be reached to achieve active thermal agents. The temperature depends on the power of the illuminating laser, on the size of nanoparticles and on their physical properties. The purpose of this paper is to propose behavior laws under the constraints of both the body temperature at the boundary of the cell to preserve surrounding cells and an acceptable range of temperature in the target cell. The behavior laws are deduced from the finite element method, which is able to model aggregates of nanoparticles. We deduce sensitivities to the laser power and to the particle size. We show that the tuning of the temperature elevation and of the distance of action of a single nanoparticle is not significantly affected by variations of the particle size and of the laser power. Aggregates of nanoparticles are much more efficient, but represent a potential risk to the surrounding cells. Fortunately, by tuning the laser power, the thermal ablation characteristic length can be controlled.

  6. Clinical Evaluation of applying a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic bonding agent on the retention and durability of fissure sealant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa GHandi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: As in fissure sealant therapy the tooth surface is mostly enamel, the use of an enamel bonding agent (hydrophobic bonding agent may be more cost effective than that of newer generations of bonding (hydrophilic bonding agents. The aim of this study was to compare the retention and durability of fissure sealant therapy when applying an enamel bonding agent, a dentin bonding agent and no bonding agent during 4 years. Materials and Methods: This study was done on the first permanent molars of the upper and lower jaws of 24 students of the first grade of a primary school (6-7 years old. On 36 teeth, a dentin bonding agent (Excite was applied under the fissure sealant and on 36 teeth an enamel bonding agent (Margin bond was applied under the fissure sealant. Then, 24 teeth were selected from these two groups and were compared with a group (including 24 teeth with no bonding agent under the fissure sealant (as control group. All the fissures of the teeth were evaluated annually for 4 years to find out the presence or absence of fissure sealant substance. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon test. Results: From the statistical analysis, there was no significant difference in retention and durability of the fissure sealant substance comparing the group with dentin bonding agent (Excite and the group with enamel bonding agent (Margin bond. Also, using a bonding agent made no significant difference (P>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, using a bonding agent made no improvement in the retention and durability of fissure sealant substance.

  7. Betamethasone augments the antifungal effect of menadione--towards a novel anti-Candida albicans combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Ágnes; Emri, Tamás; Sipos, Lilla; Kiss, Ágnes; Kovács, Renátó; Dombrádi, Viktor; Kemény-Beke, Ádám; Balla, József; Majoros, László; Pócsi, István

    2015-08-01

    The fluorinated glucocorticoid betamethasone stimulated both the extracellular phospholipase production and hypha formation of the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans and also decreased the efficiency of the polyene antimycotics amphotericin B and nystatin against C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, betamethasone increased synergistically the anti-Candida activity of the oxidative stress generating agent menadione, which may be exploited in future combination therapies to prevent or cure C. albicans infections, in the field of dermatology. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Tumor therapy with a urokinase plasminogen activator-activated anthrax lethal toxin alone and in combination with paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Alexander N; Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; McKenzie, Andrew T; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-02-01

    PA-U2, an engineered anthrax protective antigen that is activated by urokinase was combined with wildtype lethal factor in the treatment of Colo205 colon adenocarcinoma in vitro and B16-BL6 mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. This therapy was also tested in combination with the small molecule paclitaxel, based on prior reports suggesting synergy between ERK1/2 inhibition and chemotherapeutics. Colo205 was sensitive to PA-U2/LF while B16-BL6 was not. For the combination treatment of B16-BL6, paclitaxel showed a dose response in vitro, but cells remained resistant to PA-U2/LF even in the presence of paclitaxel. In vivo, each therapy slowed tumor progression, and an additive effect between the two was observed. Since LF targets tumor vasculature while paclitaxel is an antimitotic, it is possible the agents were acting against different cells in the stroma, precluding a synergistic effect. The engineered anthrax toxin PA-U2/LF warrants further development and testing, possibly in combination with an antiangiogenesis therapy such as sunitinib or sorafinib.

  9. Is there a decline in cognitive functions after combined electroconvulsive therapy and antipsychotic therapy in treatment-refractory schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Kołodziej-Kowalska, Emilia; Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2015-03-01

    An analysis of literature shows that there is still little evidence concerning the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) combined with antipsychotic therapy in a group of treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients. More precisely, its influence on cognitive functions is still equivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of ECT combined with antipsychotic therapy on working memory, attention, and executive functions in a group of treatment-refractory schizophrenia patients. Twenty-seven patients completed the study: 14 men and 13 women, aged 21 to 55 years (mean age, 32.8 years), diagnosed with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Each patient underwent a course of ECT sessions and was treated with antipsychotic medications. Before the ECT and within 3 days after the last ECT session, the participants were assessed with the following neuropsychological tests: Trail Making Test (TMT) and Wisconsin Cart Sorting Test (WCST). There were no significant differences in the TMT and WCST results after combined ECT and antipsychotic therapy in treatment-refractory schizophrenia patients. According to the results of the neuropsychological tests, there was no decline in attention, executive functions, or working memory. The current study shows no significant difference in attention, working memory, or executive functions after treatment with a combination of electroconvulsive and antipsychotic therapy. This suggests that combined electroconvulsive therapy may not have a negative influence on the neuropsychological functioning of patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia.

  10. Self-assembled albumin nanoparticles for combination therapy in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Huibo Lian,1 Jinhui Wu,2 Yiqiao Hu,2 Hongqian Guo1 1Department of Urology, Drum Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, 2State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Resistance to regular treatment strategies is a big challenge in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Combination of photothermal and photodynamic therapy (PTT/PDT with chemotherapy offers unique advantages over monotherapy alone. However, free drugs, such as photosensitizers and chemotherapeutic agents, lack tumor-targeted accumulation and can be easily eliminated from the body. Moreover, most of the PTT drugs are hydrophobic and their organic solvents have in vivo toxicity, thereby limiting their potential in clinical translation. Herein, simple multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs using IR780 (a near-infrared dye and docetaxel (DTX-loaded nanoplatform based on human serum albumin (HSA (HSA@IR780@DTX was developed for targeted imaging and for PTT/PDT with chemotherapy for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer treatment. In this platform, HSA is a biocompatible nanocarrier that binds to both DTX and IR780. DTX and IR780, as hydrophobic drug, can induce the self-assembly of HSA proteins. Transmission electron microscopic imaging showed that NPs formed by self-assembly are spherical with a smooth surface with a hydrodynamic diameter of 146.5±10.8 nm. The cytotoxicity of HSA@IR780@DTX NPs with or without laser irradiation in prostate cancer cells (22RV1 was determined via CCK-8 assay. The antitumor effect of HSA@IR780@DTX plus laser irradiation was better than either HSA@IR780@DTX without laser exposure or single PTT heating induced by HSA@IR780 NPs under near-infrared laser, suggesting a significant combined effect in comparison to monotherapy. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging showed that HSA@IR780@DTX NPs could preferentially

  11. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanaugh, James A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory; Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94

  12. Effects of combinations of maternal agents on the fetal cerebrum in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Harumi; Iwasaki, Setsuo; Arima, Masataka; Nakazawa, Kazuharu

    1985-01-01

    Fetal cerebral development influenced by maternal ethanol or caffeine either singly or in combination with X-irradiation was investigated in rat. Female Wistar rats were given 20 % ethanol, 0.04 % caffeine and water during the premating period and pregnancy, and 0.03 % vitamin E only during pregnancy. Pregnant rats were X-irradiated with 100 R or sham-irradiated on gestational day 13. Ethanol-treatment alone much reduced the fetal body and cerebral weights, and X-irradiation alone resulted in great reductions in weight and DNA concentration in the fetal cerebrum. The reduction in body weight with ethanol exceeded that with X-irradiation, therefore, the addition of X-irradiation had no effect on that of ethanol. The reduction in cerebral weight on X-irradiation exceeded that with ethanol, thus the addition of ethanol had only a slight effect on that with X-irradiation. The decrease in body and cerebral weights and the increase in lipid peroxide (LP) formation on caffeine-treatment and the decrease in cerebral weight and the increase in LP on vitamin E-treatment were inhibited by X-irradiation as compared to the combined effects of the other drink treatments. The increase in placental weight and the decrease in cerebral weight on ethanol-treatment and the decrease in placental, body and cerebral weights on caffeine-treatment, which findings were covered by the addition of X-irradiation, became much clearer on single drink treatment. Independently of X-irradiation, ethanol-treatment resulted in increased fetal mortality and LP, and decreased body weight. These results suggest that the combined effects of maternal agents on live fetuses should be investigated as to whether they act independently of or dependently with each other and how the effects appear either singly or mixed. (author)

  13. Options for combination therapy in type 2 diabetes: comparison of the ADA/EASD position statement and AACE/ACE algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Treating patients with diabetes is one of the most challenging and important activities a physician (primary care physician or specialist) can undertake. A key to successful therapy for type 2 diabetes is the insight that this condition is progressive and that the need for additional agents over time is normative. The ability to individualize therapy by patient and medication characteristics comes from experience and knowledge of pertinent clinical studies. However, guidelines from expert bodies such as the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology can help clinicians of all levels of expertise to approach therapy choices more rationally. There is unity across these guidelines about the role and benefits of metformin as first-line pharmacological treatment, probability of good efficacy, low risk of hypoglycemia, modest weight loss, and overall long-term data. Unfortunately, this unity does not extend to recommendations for subsequent pharmacological agents and their use in combination to intensify treatment when insulin is not (yet) appropriate. Across both statements, some drug classes seem more prominent, and looking at their benefit-risk profile, it is clear why this is the case. The most profound recent change in diabetes therapy has been the introduction of incretin therapies. Incretin therapies minimize 2 important adverse effects seen with many other therapies: hypoglycemia and weight gain. These agents have increased the range of options available for early intensification of treatment of type 2 diabetes. In combination with more established therapies, there are more opportunities than ever to accommodate patient preferences while improving glycemic control and harnessing extraglycemic benefits of a second (or third) agent. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Facile integration of multiple magnetite nanoparticles for theranostics combining efficient MRI and thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoming; Zhu, Xianglong; Li, Hui; Wang, Lirong; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jiahe; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Zhong; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional nanostructures with both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities have attracted considerable attention in biomedical research because they can offer great advantages in disease management and prognosis. In this work, a facile way to transfer the hydrophobic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles into aqueous media by employing carboxylic graphene oxide (GO-COOH) as the transferring agent has been reported. In this one-step process, IO nanoparticles adhere to GO-COOH and form water-dispersible clusters via hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic ligands of IO nanoparticles and the basal plane of GO-COOH. The multiple IO nanoparticles on GO-COOH sheets (IO/GO-COOH) present a significant increase in T2 contrast enhancement. Moreover, the IO/GO-COOH nanoclusters also display a high photothermal conversion efficiency and can effectively inhibit tumor growth through the photothermal effects. It is envisioned that such IO/GO-COOH nanocomposites combining efficient MRI and photothermal therapy hold great promise in theranostic applications.Multifunctional nanostructures with both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities have attracted considerable attention in biomedical research because they can offer great advantages in disease management and prognosis. In this work, a facile way to transfer the hydrophobic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles into aqueous media by employing carboxylic graphene oxide (GO-COOH) as the transferring agent has been reported. In this one-step process, IO nanoparticles adhere to GO-COOH and form water-dispersible clusters via hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic ligands of IO nanoparticles and the basal plane of GO-COOH. The multiple IO nanoparticles on GO-COOH sheets (IO/GO-COOH) present a significant increase in T2 contrast enhancement. Moreover, the IO/GO-COOH nanoclusters also display a high photothermal conversion efficiency and can effectively inhibit tumor growth through the photothermal effects. It is envisioned

  15. Development of a Combination Therapy for Prostate Cancer by Targeting Stat3 and HIF-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    inflammation-induced cancer, making it an attractive target (25-27). A3. Innovation 1. TEL03 is a novel anti-cancer agent from Chinese herbal medicine ...agents from Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) that targets HIF-1α /2α for prostate cancer therapy. Hypoxia orchestrated by HIF-1αis crucial for tumor...Stat3 for treatment of prostate and other cancers. TEL03, which is a novel anti-cancer agent derived from Chinese herbal medicine (CHM: Hypocrella

  16. Combination neratinib (HKI-272) and paclitaxel therapy in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, L W-C; Xu, B; Gupta, S; Freyman, A; Zhao, Y; Abbas, R; Vo Van, M-L; Bondarenko, I

    2013-05-28

    ). Pharmacokinetic analyses indicated no interaction between neratinib and paclitaxel. The combination of neratinib and paclitaxel was associated with higher toxicity than that of neratinib as a single agent, but was manageable with antidiarrhoeal agents and dose reductions in general. The combination therapy also demonstrated a high rate of response in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. A phase III trial is ongoing to assess the benefit and risk of this combination in the first-line setting.

  17. Assessing the Risk of Birth Defects Associated with Exposure to Fixed-Dose Combined Antituberculous Agents during Pregnancy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Awodele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the risks of disease progression and transmission to the newborn, treatment of tuberculosis is often pursued during pregnancy and fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents have been found to be beneficial. Unfortunately, there is paucity of data on the safety of the fixed-dose combined antituberculous drugs during pregnancy. This study intends to assess the teratogenic effect of fixed-dose combined antituberculous drugs on the organogenesis stage of fetal development and also investigate the possible roles of vitamin C in modulating the teratogenic effects of these agents on the fetus using animal model. Pregnant rats were divided into 3 groups with 12 animals per group: group 1 received distilled water (10 mL/kg orally; group 2 received 51.4 mg/kg/day of fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents orally; group 3 received 51.4 mg/kg/day of fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents plus vitamin C (10 mg/kg/day orally. Six rats in each group were randomly selected and sacrificed on day 20 by cervical dislocation prior to day 21 of gestation, and the foetuses were harvested through abdominal incision for physical examination. Blood samples were collected from the 1st filial rats of the remaining six animals for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver, kidney, heart, and brain of all the sacrificed animals were used for histopathological examination. There were significant (≤0.05 low birth weights of the foetuses of the animals that were treated with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents. The haematological parameters also revealed a reduction in the platelets counts and neutrophiles at the first filial generation. Significant (≤0.05 elevations in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP in the foetuses of the animals treated with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents were also observed. However, the combination of vitamin C with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents

  18. Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Sonodynamic and Photodynamic Therapies in a Colon Carcinoma Tumor Model (CT26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Sazgarnia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive therapeutic method for tumors with a maximum depth of 5 mm. On the other hand, most photosensitizers are also susceptible to ultrasound waves (the basis of sonodynamic therapy. Therefore, it is expected that a combination of the two therapeutic methods will increase effectiveness of photodynamic therapies for lower doses of sensitizer and curing deeper tumors. This study evaluates the synergistic effects of photodynamic and sonodynamic therapies.     Materials and methods: The study was conducted on a colon carcinoma tumor model in Balb/c mice. The colon carcinoma tumors were induced in the mice by subcutaneous injection. Twenty four hours after intraperitoneal injection of Zinc Phthalocyanine liposome as a sensitizer, at first ultrasound irradiation with a known frequency and intensity was performed followed by illumination of the tumor area. Evaluation of the treatment efficacy was done using daily measurement of the tumors and calculation of their relative volumes. Also, all control groups were considered to confirm the effect of each therapeutic option in the study.   Results: In the first ten days post treatment, the relative volumes of all groups decreased significantly in comparison with the main control group, but the best response was observed in the photodynamic or sonodynamic therapy groups. The longest doubling time of tumor size was related to groups under photodynamic, sonodynamic and main therapies, and the shortest belonged to the control group.   Discussion and conclusion: Zinc phthalocyanine liposome is both a photosensitizer and sonsensitizer. Photodynamic and sonodynamic therapies can be efficient in retarding tumor growth rate. In this study, combination of the two methods did not cause improved therapeutic outcomes. It is predicted that this result is related to the choice of therapeutic agents and could be optimized in future.

  19. A retrospective study of treatment persistence and adherence to α-blocker plus antimuscarinic combination therapies, in men with LUTS/BPH in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus J; Bowditch, Sally; Arbe, Emilio; Hakimi, Zalmai; Guelfucci, Florent; Amri, Ikbel; Nazir, Jameel

    2017-05-22

    To assess treatment persistence and adherence in men ≥45 years of age with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), using prescription records from the Netherlands IMS Lifelink™ LRx database. In this retrospective, observational cohort study, we identified men who received combination therapy with an α-blocker plus an antimuscarinic (e.g. solifenacin or tolterodine) between 1 November 2013 and 31 October 2014. Treatment could be received as a fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablet or as two drugs administered together (concomitant therapy), if both combination drugs were prescribed within 30 days. The primary objective was to assess treatment persistence, defined as the time from initiation of combination therapy until first discontinuation of the FDC or at least one of the drugs given concomitantly (i.e. ≥30 days without prescription renewal). Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess persistence by antimuscarinic agent, and with different gap lengths used to define discontinuation (45, 60 and 90 days), respectively. A total of 1891 men received an α-blocker plus an antimuscarinic (FDC, N = 665; concomitant therapy, N = 1226). Median time to discontinuation was significantly longer with FDC versus concomitant therapy (414 vs. 112 days; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.04, 95% confidence interval 1.77, 2.35; p BPH treated with α-blocker plus antimuscarinic combination therapy in the Netherlands showed that treatment persistence was significantly greater in those who received a FDC tablet compared with combination therapy given concomitantly. The study also shows that treatment persistence was extended in men who received combination therapy containing solifenacin compared with other antimuscarinics. Overall, these findings may be useful for prescribers, as improved persistence on-treatment may translate into improved outcomes for men with LUTS/BPH. Further study is warranted to establish the key

  20. Combination Therapy in Asthma: A Review | Saleh | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma can be defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is reversible either spontaneously or by treatment. Despite the exponential increase in asthma research, the prevalence of asthma is on the increase, especially in children and young adults in the western societies. Inhaled therapies

  1. The use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of lymph node-positive prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Richard; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Machtay, Mitchell; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Barnes, Margaret M; Broderick, Gregory A; Wein, Alan J

    1997-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of tumor response and patterns of relapse following combined hormonal-radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate and to measure the survival in a group of men with tumor metastatic to pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: 66 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologically confirmed pelvic lymph node involvement were treated with combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy. An additional five patients declined hormonal therapy. The patients treated with combined therapy represented a group with locally advanced disease including 44 patients (67%) with T3 or T4 tumors and 51 patients (80%) had N2 or N3 lymph node metastases. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated to a dose of 45 Gy and the prostate was boosted to a dose of 65 to 71 Gy. Hormonal therapy began up to 2 months before radiation and continued indefinitely. Patients were allowed to select their hormonal therapy and could choose DES (2 patients), orchiectomy (21 patients), LHRH agonist (7 patients) or combined androgen blockade (34 patients). Results: Median follow-up is 49 months (range 12 to 131 months) and 21 patients have been followed for longer than 5 years. There have been 15 recurrences the entire group including three local recurrences in the prostate, seven patients with distant metastases, four patients with biochemical recurrences without clinical evidence of disease, and one patient where the location was unknown. Two of the PSA recurrences occurred in patients who elected to discontinue hormones after less than 3 years of therapy. The overall survival at 5 and 8 years is 94 and 84%, the clinical disease free survival is 85 and 67%, and the biochemical disease-free survival is 78 and 47%. There was no increased toxicity of the combined modality regimen compared to the expected effects of radiation and hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Combined hormonal and radiation therapy represents an effective treatment option for patients with

  2. The use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of lymph node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittington, Richard; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Machtay, Mitchell; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Barnes, Margaret M.; Broderick, Gregory A.; Wein, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of tumor response and patterns of relapse following combined hormonal-radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate and to measure the survival in a group of men with tumor metastatic to pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: 66 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologically confirmed pelvic lymph node involvement were treated with combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy. An additional five patients declined hormonal therapy. The patients treated with combined therapy represented a group with locally advanced disease including 44 patients (67%) with T3 or T4 tumors and 51 patients (80%) had N2 or N3 lymph node metastases. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated to a dose of 45 Gy and the prostate was boosted to a dose of 65 to 71 Gy. Hormonal therapy began up to 2 months before radiation and continued indefinitely. Patients were allowed to select their hormonal therapy and could choose DES (2 patients), orchiectomy (21 patients), LHRH agonist (7 patients) or combined androgen blockade (34 patients). Results: Median follow-up is 49 months (range 12 to 131 months) and 21 patients have been followed for longer than 5 years. There have been 15 recurrences the entire group including three local recurrences in the prostate, seven patients with distant metastases, four patients with biochemical recurrences without clinical evidence of disease, and one patient where the location was unknown. Two of the PSA recurrences occurred in patients who elected to discontinue hormones after less than 3 years of therapy. The overall survival at 5 and 8 years is 94 and 84%, the clinical disease free survival is 85 and 67%, and the biochemical disease-free survival is 78 and 47%. There was no increased toxicity of the combined modality regimen compared to the expected effects of radiation and hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Combined hormonal and radiation therapy represents an effective treatment option for patients with

  3. Optimization of therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the oral hypoglycemic agent glimepiride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ivanovna Romantsova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is believed to develop as a result of lowered insulin secretion and insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia. Sulfonylureas stimulateinsulin secretion and thereby decrease blood glucose level which accounts for their wide application in the treatment of diabetes. However, manyagents of this class produce side effects (increased body mass, hypoglycemia, resistance to therapy, etc. attributable to excess stimulation of insulinsecretion. Glimepiride is as efficient as traditionally used sulfonylureas but causes a smaller rise in insulin secretion. Sulfonylurea receptors showlower affinity for glimepiride than for glibenclamide. Formation and dissociation of glimepiride-receptor complexes occur faster than those of glibenclamide-receptor complexes. In addition, therapeutic effect of glimepiride was shown to be associated with improved insulin sensitivity. It is concludedthat glimepiride is an efficacious agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  4. Targeting apoptotic machinery as approach for anticancer therapy: Smac mimetics as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevine M.Y. Elsayed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a chief regulator of cellular homeostasis. Impairment of apoptotic machinery is a main characteristic of several diseases such as cancer, where the evasion of apoptosis is a cardinal hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis is regulated by contribution of pro- and anti- apoptotic proteins, where caspases are the main executioners of the apoptotic machinery. IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis proteins is a family of endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis, which perform their function through interference with the function of caspases. Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases is endogenous inhibitor of IAPs, thus it is one of the major proapoptotic endogenous proteins. Thus, the development of Smac mimetics has evolved as an approach for anticancer therapy. Several Smac mimetic agents have been introduced to clinical trial such as birinapanet 12. Herein, the history of development of Smac mimetics along with the recent development in this field is briefly discussed.

  5. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  6. Morphine and clonidine combination therapy improves therapeutic window in mice: synergy in antinociceptive but not in sedative or cardiovascular effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Stone

    Full Text Available Opioids are used to manage all types of pain including acute, cancer, chronic neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Unfortunately, opioid-related adverse effects such as respiratory depression, tolerance, physical dependence and addiction have led to an underutilization of these compounds for adequate pain relief. One strategy to improve the therapeutic utility of opioids is to co-administer them with other analgesic agents such as agonists acting at α2-adrenergic receptors (α2ARs. Analgesics acting at α2ARs and opioid receptors (ORs frequently synergize when co-administered in vivo. Multimodal analgesic techniques offer advantages over single drug treatments as synergistic combination therapies produce analgesia at lower doses, thus reducing undesired side effects. This inference presumes, however, that the synergistic interaction is limited to the analgesic effects. In order to test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of α2AR/OR combination therapy in acute antinociception and in the often-undesired side effects of sedation and cardiovascular depression in awake unrestrained mice. Morphine, clonidine or their combination was administered by spinal or systemic injection in awake mice. Antinociception was determined using the warm water tail flick assay (52.5°C. Sedation/motor impairment was evaluated using the accelerating rotarod assay and cardiovascular function was monitored by pulse oximetry. Data were converted to percent maximum possible effect and isobolographic analysis was performed to determine if an interaction was subadditive, additive or synergistic. Synergistic interactions between morphine and clonidine were observed in the antinociceptive but not in the sedative/motor or cardiovascular effects. As a result, the therapeutic window was improved ∼200-fold and antinociception was achieved at non-sedating doses with little to no cardiovascular depression. In addition, combination therapy resulted in greater maximum analgesic

  7. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  8. Overcoming tumor resistance by heterologous adeno-poxvirus combination therapy

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    Markus Vähä-Koskela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful cancer control relies on overcoming resistance to cell death and on activation of host antitumor immunity. Oncolytic viruses are particularly attractive in this regard, as they lyse infected tumor cells and trigger robust immune responses during the infection. However, repeated injections of the same virus promote antiviral rather than antitumor immunity and tumors may mount innate antiviral defenses to restrict oncolytic virus replication. In this article, we have explored if alternating the therapy virus could circumvent these problems. We demonstrate in two virus-resistant animal models a substantial delay in antiviral immune- and innate cellular response induction by alternating injections of two immunologically distinct oncolytic viruses, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Our results are in support of clinical development of heterologous adeno-/vaccinia virus therapy of cancer.

  9. Effect of combined radiotherapy, hyperthermia, radioprotective agent and hypoxic cell sensitizer on mice testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Yasuhiko

    1985-08-01

    Application of hyperthermia was executed by immersing pelvis, testes and legs of mice in a thermostatically controlled water bath. Irradiation was carried out using Toshiba KXC-18 type X-ray therapy machine. Mice were killed 30 days after treatment. The testis weights obtained after hypertheramia alone were compared with that of the control and the relative testis weight ratios were calculated. The testis weights of mice treated for 5, 10, 20 and 40 min. in 40 deg C water and for 5 and 10 min. in 43 deg C water were not significantly different from the control. Their weights were reduced when treated for 20 min. in 43 deg C water and for 5 min. in 46 deg C water and their testis weight ratios were 0.81 and 0.46, respectively. The testis weights of irradiated mice decreased to about 45 % of the control at 250 rad. Beyond this dose, reduction of their weights was slowed down and testis weight at 1,000 rad was 28 %. There was not significantly difference between the relative testis weight ratios of the irradiation alone and that of the radiotherapy combined with YM-08310 (S-2-)3-aminopropylamino) ethyl phosphorothioic acid monohydrate). But when hyperthermia was added to their treatment, the effectiveness of the YM-08310 was slightly increased. The relative testis weight ratio on 400 rad X-ray combined with YM-08310 was 0.32 of the control, while its ratio on the radiotherapy and YM-08310 combined with the hyperthermia (43 deg C, 10 min.) was 0.43. (p < 0.01). The misonidazole treatments at 50, 100 and 200 rads were found to be effectuve. Radiation alone gave the relative testis weight ratios of 0.78, 0.71 and 0.49, respectively. In contrast, its ratios on the irradiation combined with the misonidazole were 0.57 (p < 0.01), 0.46 (p < 0.01) and 0.41 (p < 0.001). But, the additional hyperthermia combined with their treatment was found to be ineffective. (J.P.N.).

  10. Combined therapeutic use of oral alitretinoin and narrowband ultraviolet-B therapy in the treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin A. Vanderbeck

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD is a chronic familial bullous disease characterized by recurrent blisters and erosions typically at friction-prone areas of the body accompanied by acantholysis upon histologic examination. There are a number of therapies used in the management of HHD. Its symptoms have been effectively treated with antimicrobial therapies, corticosteroids and other agents such as cyclosporine and prednisone. However, such treatments are not always effective. Therefore, there is a need for new treatments for the management of HHD. In this report, a patient with long-standing HHD responsive only to high levels of prednisone is described. After the successful tapering and cessation of oral prednisone the patient began a new combination therapy of complementary doses of oral alitretinoin, and narrowband UVB therapy, which yielded a favorable response within 2-3 weeks. After 6 weeks, a mono-therapy of daily (30 mg oral alitretinoin was sufficient to maintain successful near-complete remission of the disease.

  11. IMMUNOLOGICAL REACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH UROLOGICAL PROFILE UNDER COMBINED THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Esipov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and treatment of postoperative purulent-inflammatory complications in urological practice remains a subject for study and improvement in all medical centers. The principle of evidence must be taken as a basis of effectiveness of therapy. In this study the quality criteria of demonstrated therapy are immunological parameters.The purpose of this study is to identify the effectiveness of using monooxidase (NO containing a gas stream replenishing the deficiency of endogenous NO in a group of patients; and to investigate immunological reactivity in patients under complex therapy included nitrogen monoxide and immunomodulators.Materials and methods. In this experimental study we determined the functioning of the main links of the patient’s immunological system. They were determined on the basis of the levels of general T-lymphocytes (T-total, T-helper (T-h, T-suppressor (T-s, natural killer (NK, B-lymphocyte and immunoglobulin G, M, A, circulating immune complexes (CIC.Results. Based on the obtained data, we concluded that the traditional treatment of patients with postoperative complications was less effective than the one proposed in our study. Immunological picture of patient’s condition come back to normal almost from the first day of treatment, and under traditional treatment it was only on the 7th day. Under using complex treatment with nitrogen monoxide, parameters of humoral immunity corresponded to the norm already on the 7–14th day from the beginning of treatment.Conclusion. NO-containing gas flow application in complex prevention of purulent-inflammatory complications made possible to eliminate wound infection in shorter terms and to shorten the period of patient’s hospitalization. The best results were obtained in terms of immunological reactivity in a clinical trial in patients who received complex therapy included nitrogen monoxide and lymphotropic administration of the immunomodulators.

  12. Molecular Targeted Agents for Gastric Cancer: A Step Forward Towards Personalized Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Geldart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC represents a major cancer burden worldwide, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its insidious nature, presentation is usually late and often carries a poor prognosis. Despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for most patients only modest improvements have been seen in overall survival. Recent progress in understanding the molecular biology of GC and its signaling pathways, offers the hope of clinically significant promising advances for selected groups of patients. Patients with Her-2 overexpression or amplification have experienced benefit from the integration of monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab to the standard chemotherapy. Additionally, drugs targeting angiogenesis (bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib are under investigation and other targeted agents such as mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors are in preclinical or early clinical development. Patient selection and the development of reliable biomarkers to accurately select patients most likely to benefit from these tailored therapies is now key. Future trials should focus on these advances to optimize the treatment for GC patients. This article will review recent progress and current status of targeted agents in GC.

  13. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study

  14. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Christopher A., E-mail: barkerc@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Postow, Michael A. [Department of Medicine, Melanoma and Sarcoma Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study.

  15. Effect of insulin-sensitizing agents in combination with ezetimibe, and valsartan in rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assy, Nimer; Grozovski, Masha; Bersudsky, Ilana; Szvalb, Sergio; Hussein, Osamah

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents (ISAs) in combination with ezetimibe and valsartan have greater effect on hepatic fat content and lipid peroxidation compared to monotherapy in the methionine choline-deficient diet (MCDD) rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Rats (n = 6 per group) were treated with different drugs, including MCDD only, MCDD diet with either metformin (200 mg/kg), rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg), metformin plus rosiglitazone (M+R), ezetimibe (2 mg/kg), valsartan (2 mg/kg), or combination of all drugs for a total of 15 wk. Liver histology, lipids, parameters of oxidative stress and TNF-alpha were measured. RESULTS: Fatty liver (FL) rats demonstrated severe hepatic fatty infiltration (> 91% fat), with an increase in hepatic TG (+1263%, P < 0.001), hepatic cholesterol (+245%, P < 0.03), hepatic MDA levels (+225%, P < 0.001), serum TNF-alpha (17.8 ± 10 vs 7.8 ± 0.0, P < 0.001), but a decrease in hepatic alpha tocopherol (-74%, P < 0.001) as compared to the control rats. Combination therapy with all drugs produced a significant decrease in liver steatosis (-54%), hepatic TG (-64%), hepatic cholesterol (-31%) and hepatic MDA (-70%), but increased hepatic alpha tocopherol (+443%) as compared to FL rats. Combination therapy with ISA alone produced a smaller decrease in liver steatosis (-32% vs -54%, P < 0.001) and in hepatic MDA levels (-55% vs -70%, P < 0.01), but a similar decrease in hepatic lipids when compared with the all drugs combination. TNF-alpha levels decreased significantly in all treatment groups except in ISA group. CONCLUSION: Combination therapies have a greater effect on liver fat content as compared to monotherapy. Rosiglitazone appears to improve hepatic steatosis to a greater extent than metformin. PMID:16865780

  16. Trade-off between synergy and efficacy in combinations of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M

    2018-02-01

    Eradicating HIV-1 infection is difficult because of the reservoir of latently infected cells that gets established soon after infection, remains hidden from antiretroviral drugs and host immune responses, and retains the capacity to reignite infection following the cessation of treatment. Drugs called latency-reversing agents (LRAs) are being developed to reactivate latently infected cells and render them susceptible to viral cytopathicity or immune killing. Whereas individual LRAs have failed to induce adequate reactivation, pairs of LRAs have been identified recently that act synergistically and hugely increase reactivation levels compared to individual LRAs. The maximum synergy achievable with LRA pairs is of clinical importance, as it would allow latency-reversal with minimal drug exposure. Here, we employed stochastic simulations of HIV-1 transcription and translation in latently infected cells to estimate this maximum synergy. We incorporated the predominant mechanisms of action of the two most promising classes of LRAs, namely, protein kinase C agonists and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and quantified the activity of individual LRAs in the two classes by mapping our simulations to corresponding in vitro experiments. Without any adjustable parameters, our simulations then quantitatively captured experimental observations of latency-reversal when the LRAs were used in pairs. Performing simulations representing a wide range of drug concentrations, we estimated the maximum synergy achievable with these LRA pairs. Importantly, we found with all the LRA pairs we considered that concentrations yielding the maximum synergy did not yield the maximum latency-reversal. Increasing concentrations to increase latency-reversal compromised synergy, unravelling a trade-off between synergy and efficacy in LRA combinations. The maximum synergy realizable with LRA pairs would thus be restricted by the desired level of latency-reversal, a constrained optimum we elucidated with

  17. Are anti-inflammatory agents effective in treating gingivitis as solo or adjunct therapies? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, David; Martin, Conchita; Sanz-Sánchez, Ignacio; Beyth, Nurit; Shapira, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Systematically review the scientific evidence for efficiency of anti-inflammatory agents against gingivitis, either as solo treatments or adjunctive therapies. A protocol was developed aimed to answer the following focused question: "Are anti-inflammatory agents effective in treating gingivitis as solo or adjunct therapies?" RCTs and cohort studies on anti-inflammatory agents against gingivitis studies were searched electronically. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted. The primary outcome measures were indices of gingival inflammation. A sub-analysis was performed dividing the active agents into anti-inflammatory and other drugs. The search identified 3188 studies, of which 14 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The use of anti-inflammatory or other agents, in general showed a higher reduction in the test than in the control in terms of gingival indexes and bleeding scores. Only two RCTs on inflammatory drugs could be meta-analysed, showing a statistically significant reduction in the GI in the experimental group [WMD = -0.090; 95% CI (-0.105; -0.074); p = 0.000]. However, the contribution of both studies to the global result was unbalanced (% weight: 99.88 and 0.12 respectively). Most of the tested material showed beneficial effect as anti-inflammatory agents against gingivitis, either as a single treatment modality or as an adjunctive therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Combined therapy of radiation and hyperthermia on a metastatic tumor of angiosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Kitayama, Yoshiaki

    1987-01-01

    A combined therapy of radiation and hyperthermia is said to be fairly effective when applied to certain malignant tumors. However, the utility of this therapy for the treatment of angiosarcoma has not been well discussed. Recently, we have had a chance to treat a patient with metastatic angiosarcoma of the neck by using this combined therapy. In this paper, the clinical course of this patient and the availability of this combined therapy for angiosarcoma is reported. The patient was a 77-year-old man, having a primary lesion on the head and a metastatic tumor over the left cheek and neck. This combined therapy was used for the treatment of the metastatic tumor which caused severe pain and uncontrollable bleeding. The results were considered good ; the tumor decreased in size, pain disappeared and no further bleeding or severe side effects were observed. Though the patient died of another metastatic lesion which could not be treated with this combined therapy because the area of its localization could not allow placement in our hyperthermal apparatus, it is concluded that the combined therapy of radiation and hyperthermia is useful selectively for the treatment for angiosarcoma. (author)

  19. Diagnosis, antiretroviral therapy, and emergence of resistance to antiretroviral agents in HIV-2 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Hightower

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and type 2 (HIV-2 are the causative agents of AIDS. HIV-2 is prevalent at moderate to high rates in West African countries, such as Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, and Cape Verde. Diagnosis of HIV-2 is made with a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 ELISA or simple/rapid assay, followed by one or two confirmatory tests specific for HIV-2. Following CD4+ T cell counts, HIV-2 viral burden and clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency are beneficial in monitoring HIV-2 disease progression. Although non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are ineffective in treating HIV-2, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors can be effective in dual and triple antiretroviral regimens. Their use can decrease HIV-2 viral load, increase CD4+ T cell counts and improve AIDS-related symptoms. HIV-2 resistance to various nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, including zidovudine, lamivudine, ritonavir and indinavir, has been identified in some HIV-2 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The knowledge of HIV-2 peculiarities, when compared to HIV-1, is crucial to helping diagnose and guide the clinician in the choice of the initial antiretroviral regimen and for monitoring therapy success.

  20. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  1. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood–brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood–brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that

  2. Combining stereotactic radiosurgery and systemic therapy for brain metastases: a potential role for temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-09

    Brain metastases are unfortunately very common in the natural history of many solid tumors and remain a life-threatening condition, associated with a dismal prognosis, despite many clinical trials aimed at improving outcomes. Radiation therapy options for brain metastases include whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). SRS avoids the potential toxicities of WBRT and is associated with excellent local control (LC) rates. However, distant intracranial failure following SRS remains a problem, suggesting that untreated intracranial micrometastatic disease is responsible for failure of treatment. The oral alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ), which has demonstrated efficacy in primary malignant central nervous system tumors such as glioblastoma, has been used in early phase trials in the treatment of established brain metastases. Although results of these studies in established, macroscopic metastatic disease have been modest at best, there is clinical and preclinical data to suggest that TMZ is more efficacious at treating and controlling clinically undetectable intracranial micrometastatic disease. We review the available data for the primary management of brain metastases with SRS, as well as the use of TMZ in treating established brain metastases and undetectable micrometastatic disease, and suggest the role for a clinical trial with the aims of treating macroscopically visible brain metastases with SRS combined with TMZ to address microscopic, undetectable disease.

  3. Experimental study of chemical embolus therapy combined with radiotherapy for VX2 bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Ishii, Yoshiaki

    2000-01-01

    We conducted an experimental study, using a combination of coarse crystal cisplatin and radiotherapy for bone tumors, to evaluate the possibility of the clinical application of chemical embolus therapy in the field of orthopedic surgery. Experimental femoral bone tumors were produced, in rabbits, using VX2 carcinoma. The rabbits were allocated to five groups: untreated control, embolus, chemical embolus, irradiation alone, and chemical embolus and irradiation combination. These therapies were evaluated comparatively, in terms of local antitumor effects (including body weight, X-ray findings, angiography, and histopathology) and in terms of inhibition of pulmonary metastasis. Local antitumor effects, as evaluated by all parameters, except for body weight, were significantly greater for the chemical and irradiation combination group than for the chemical embolus, irradiation alone, untreated control, and embolus groups. There was no significant difference in the inhibition of pulmonary metastasis among the chemical embolus and irradiation combination, chemical embolus, and irradiation alone groups. These findings demonstrated the synergistic effect of the combination of chemical embolus therapy and radiotherapy. In this study, however, no significant difference was found between the chemical embolus therapy alone and the combination therapy groups in the inhibitory effect on pulmonary tumor metastasis, suggesting the need to conduct combination therapy repeatedly in the clinical setting. (author)

  4. Combining Voice Therapy and Physical Therapy: A Novel Approach to Treating Muscle Tension Dysphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jennifer; Tomlinson, Carey; Stevens, Kristin; Kotagal, Kiran; Fornadley, Judith; Jacobson, Barbara; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Francis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the role of a specialized physical therapy program for muscle tension dysphonia patients as an adjunct to standard of care voice therapy. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Study Methods Adult MTD patients seen between 2007 and 2012 were identified from the clinical database. They were prescribed voice therapy and, if concomitant neck pain, adjunctive physical therapy. In a pragmatic observational cohort design, patients underwent one of four potential treatment approaches: voice therapy alone (VT), voice therapy and physical therapy (VT+PT), physical therapy alone (PT), or incomplete/no treatment. Voice handicap outcomes were compared between treatment approaches. Results Of 153 patients meeting criteria (Median age 48 years, 68% female, and 30% had fibromyalgia, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, depression, and/or anxiety), there was a similar distribution of patients with moderate or severe pre-treatment VHI scores across treatment groups (VT 45.5%, VT+PT 43.8%, PT 50%, no treatment 59.1%; p=0.45). Patients treated with VT alone had significantly greater median improvement in VHI than those not treated: 10-point vs. 2-point (p=0.02). Interestingly, median VHI improvement in patients with baseline moderate-severe VHI scores was no different between VT (10), VT+PT (8) and PT alone (10; p=0.99). Conclusions Findings show voice therapy to be an effective approach to treating MTD. Importantly, other treatment modalities incorporating physical therapy had a similar, albeit not significant, improvement in VHI. This preliminary study suggests that physical therapy techniques may have a role in the treatment of a subset of MTD patients. Larger, comparative studies are needed to better characterize the role of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26012419

  5. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet@metal-organic framework core-shell nanoparticles for photo-chemo combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xianfeng; Zapien, J. Antonio; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) have started to be developed as a promising platform for bioimaging and drug delivery. On the other hand, combination therapies using multiple approaches are demonstrated to achieve much enhanced efficacy. Herein, we report, for the first time, core-shell nanoparticles consisting of a photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agent and a MOF shell while simultaneously carrying a chemotherapeutic drug for effective combination therapy. In this work, core-shell nanoparticles of zeolitic-imadazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) as shell embedded with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets as core are fabricated by growing ZIF-8 in the presence of g-C3N4 nanosheets. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is then loaded into the ZIF-8 shell of the core-shell nanoparticles. The combination of the chemotherapeutic effects of DOX and the PDT effect of g-C3N4 nanosheets can lead to considerably enhanced efficacy. Furthermore, the red fluorescence of DOX and the blue fluorescence of g-C3N4 nanosheets provide the additional function of dual-color imaging for monitoring the drug release process.Recently, nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) have started to be developed as a promising platform for bioimaging and drug delivery. On the other hand, combination therapies using multiple approaches are demonstrated to achieve much enhanced efficacy. Herein, we report, for the first time, core-shell nanoparticles consisting of a photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agent and a MOF shell while simultaneously carrying a chemotherapeutic drug for effective combination therapy. In this work, core-shell nanoparticles of zeolitic-imadazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) as shell embedded with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets as core are fabricated by growing ZIF-8 in the presence of g-C3N4 nanosheets. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is then loaded into the ZIF-8 shell of the core-shell nanoparticles. The combination of the chemotherapeutic effects of DOX

  6. Well-established and more recent aspects of combined therapy of gynaecological tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladner, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The question of superiority concerning operative or radiation therapy should not make us forget that the combined therapy of gynaecologic carcinomas was proven to be good. The differing therapy results are due to the problems of classifying the phases, the ages of the patients, the histology, and, not less important, the radiation sensibility of gynaecologic tumours. The psychological and psychosomatic aspects of treating gynaecologic tumours are discussed. (APR) [de

  7. Ethical hot spots of combined individual and group therapy: applying four ethical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabender, Virginia M; Fallon, April

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Combined therapy presents ethical quandaries that occur in individual psychotherapy and group psychotherapy, and dilemmas specifically associated with their integration. This paper examines two types of ethical frameworks (a classical principle-based framework and a set of context-based frameworks) for addressing the ethical hot spots of combined therapy: self-referral, transfer of information, and termination. The principle-based approach enables the practitioner to see what core values may be served or violated by different courses of action in combined therapy dilemmas. Yet, the therapist is more likely to do justice to the complexity and richness of the combined therapy situation by supplementing a principle analysis with three additional ethical frameworks. These approaches are: virtue ethics, feminist ethics, and casuistry. An analysis of three vignettes illustrates how these contrasting ethical models not only expand the range of features to which the therapist attends but also the array of solutions the therapist generates.

  8. Gametocyte carriage in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria following treatment with artemisinin combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Salim; Achan, Jane; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gametocytes are responsible for transmission of malaria from human to mosquito. Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) reduces post-treatment gametocyte carriage, dependent upon host, parasite and pharmacodynamic factors. The gametocytocidal properties of antimalarial drugs are importa...

  9. Combined therapy of corpus carcinoma with special regard to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, C.

    1980-01-01

    From 496 case reports of patients with a corpus carcinoma collected between 1970 and 1976, the clinical findings, separation into clinical stages and the various therapy forms were compiled and evaluated. As a mean age of 62.3 years, 56.9 per cent of patients reached an average five-year, recidivation-free survival periods. Metastases occurred in 19.1 per cent of all treated women, vaginal recidivations in 1.8 per cent. Particular attention was given to the side effects of radiation therapy and retarded harmful effects. In this connexion an increase in complications following treatment with newly introduced radiation qualities had to be recorded. 21.9 per cent of all radiation-treated patients differed side-effects, and in 11.7 per cent of all radiation-treated women retarded harmful effects were found. Owing to the experience collected meanwhile in radiotherapy with ultra-hard X-rays and to the use of computerized tomography establishing the adequate quantity of radiation, complications following radiation treatment are expected to occur less frequently in future. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Adjuvant combined ozone therapy for extensive wound over tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasham Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinfectant and antibacterial properties of ozone are utilized in the treatment of nonhealing or ischemic wounds. We present here a case of 59 years old woman with compartment syndrome following surgical treatment of stress fracture of proximal tibia with extensively infected wound and exposed tibia to about 4/5 of its extent. The knee joint was also infected with active pus draining from a medial wound. At presentation the patient had already taken treatment for 15 days in the form of repeated wound debridements and parenteral antibiotics, which failed to heal the wound and she was advised amputation. Topical ozone therapy twice daily and ozone autohemotherapy once daily were given to the patient along with daily dressings and parenteral antibiotics. Within 5 days, the wound was healthy enough for spilt thickness skin graft to provide biological dressing to the exposed tibia bone. Topical ozone therapy was continued for further 5 days till the knee wound healed. On the 15th day, implant removal, intramedullary nailing, and latissimus dorsi pedicle flap were performed. Both the bone and the soft tissue healed without further complications and at 20 months follow-up, the patient was walking independently with minimal disability.

  11. Resolution of orbitocerebral aspergillosis during combination treatment with voriconazole and amphotericin plus adjunctive cytokine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethell, Delia; Hall, Georgina; Goodman, T Robin; Klein, Nigel; Pollard, Andrew J

    2004-05-01

    Orbitocerebral aspergillosis has a very high fatality rate and cure is unusual. We describe the successful management of a child with cereberal aspergillosis who had a dramatic response to therapy with a combination of liposomal amphotericin and voriconazole with adjunctive cytokine therapy during immunosuppresive chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

  12. Combined spa-exercise therapy is effective in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tubergen, A.; Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.; Hidding, A.; Wolter, N.; Asscher, M.; Falkenbach, A.; Genth, E.; Thè, H. G.; van der Linden, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of combined spa-exercise therapy in addition to standard treatment with drugs and weekly group physical therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 120 Dutch outpatients with AS were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 40 patients each. Group 1 (mean

  13. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Neratinib Versus Lapatinib Plus Capecitabine For ErbB2 Positive Advanced Breast Cancer Active, not recruiting No Results Available YES neratinib -9...Drug: Neratinib |Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Capecitabine Efficacy and Safety of BMS-690514 in Combination With Letrozole to Treat Metastatic Breast Cancer

  14. In vitro synergistic combinations of pentamidine, polymyxin B, tigecycline and tobramycin with antifungal agents against Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzebon Venturini, Tarcieli; Rossato, Luana; Chassot, Francieli; Tairine Keller, Jéssica; Baldissera Piasentin, Fernanda; Morais Santurio, Janio; Hartz Alves, Sydney

    2016-08-01

    The genus Fusarium is characterized by hyaline filamentous fungi that cause infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. The remarkable primary resistance to antifungal agents of this genus requires a search for new therapeutic possibilities. This study assessed the in vitro susceptibility of 25 clinical isolates of Fusarium against antifungal agents (amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole and voriconazole) and antimicrobials (pentamidine, polymyxin B, tigecycline and tobramycin) according to the broth microdilution method (M38-A2). The interactions between antifungal and antimicrobial agents were evaluated by the microdilution checkerboard method. Pentamidine and polymyxin B showed MIC values ≥4 µg ml-1 against Fusarium spp. The highest rates of synergism were observed when amphotericin B or voriconazole was combined with tobramycin (80 % and 76 %, respectively), polymyxin B (76 % and 64 %) and pentamidine (72 % and 68 %). The most significant combinations deserve in vivo evaluations in order to verify their potential in the treatment of fusariosis.

  15. Combination of Bifunctional Alkylating Agent and Arsenic Trioxide Synergistically Suppresses the Growth of Drug-Resistant Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chih Lee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is a crucial factor in the failure of cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we explored the effect of combining alkylating agents and arsenic trioxide (ATO on the suppression of tumor cells with inherited or acquired resistance to therapeutic agents. Our results showed that combining ATO and a synthetic derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indenes (BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating agent causing DNA interstrand cross-links, was more effective in killing human cancer cell lines (H460, H1299, and PC3 than combining ATO and melphalan or thiotepa. We further demonstrated that the combination treatment of H460 cells with BO-1012 and ATO resulted in severe G2/M arrest and apoptosis. In a xenograft mouse model, the combination treatment with BO-1012 and ATO synergistically reduced tumor volumes in nude mice inoculated with H460 cells. Similarly, the combination of BO-1012 and ATO effectively reduced the growth of cisplatin-resistant NTUB1/P human bladder carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the repair of BO-1012-induced DNA interstrand cross-links was significantly inhibited by ATO, and consequently, γH2AX was remarkably increased and formed nuclear foci in H460 cells treated with this drug combination. In addition, Rad51 was activated by translocating and forming foci in nuclei on treatment with BO-1012, whereas its activation was significantly suppressed by ATO. We further revealed that ATO might mediate through the suppression of AKT activity to inactivate Rad51. Taken together, the present study reveals that a combination of bifunctional alkylating agents and ATO may be a rational strategy for treating cancers with inherited or acquired drug resistance.

  16. Evolution of systemic treatment for hormone-sensitive breast cancer: from sequential use of single agents to the upfront administration of drug combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Imyanitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current standards of treatment of endocrine-dependent cancers (breast cancer (BC, prostate cancer imply sequential use of endocrine therapy and cytotoxic agents: it is believed, that steroid hormone antagonists cease the division of transformed cells and therefore make them resistant to other therapeutic modalities. It is important to recognize that conceptual investigations in this field were carried out dozens of years ago, and often involved relatively non-efficient drugs, imperfect laboratory tests, etc. There are several recent examples of combined use of endocrine therapy and other compounds. The addition of docetaxel (6 cycles to androgen deprivation resulted in significant improvement of overall survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Clinical trial involving the combined use of exemestane and everolimus demonstrated promising results. There are ongoing studies on inhibitors of cycline-dependent kinases. Use of these drugs in the beginning of endocrine therapy may significantly delay resistance to the antagonists of estrogen signaling.

  17. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on the uptake of PSMA-targeted agents: Emerging opportunities challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakht, Martin K.; Oh, So Won; Youn, Hye Won; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kwak, Cheol; Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because of its high expression in the vast majority of prostate cancers. Development of small molecules for targeting PSMA is important for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer. Recent evidence implies that androgen-deprivation therapy increase PSMA-ligand uptake in some cases. The reported upregulations in PSMA-ligand uptake after exposure to second-generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide and abiraterone might disturb PSMA-targeted imaging for staging and response monitoring of patients undergoing treatment with antiandrogen-based drugs. On the other hand, second-generation antiandrogens are emerging as potential endoradio-/chemosensitizers. Therefore, the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of PSMA-targeted theranostic methods can be listed as a new capability of antiandrogens. In this manuscript, we will present what is currently known about the mechanism of increasing PSMA uptake following exposure to antiandrogens. In addition, we will discuss whether these above-mentioned antiandrogens could play the role of endoradio-/chemosensitizers in combination with the well-established PSMA-targeted methods for pre-targeting of prostate cancer.

  18. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on the uptake of PSMA-targeted agents: Emerging opportunities challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakht, Martin K.; Oh, So Won; Youn, Hye Won; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kwak, Cheol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2017-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because of its high expression in the vast majority of prostate cancers. Development of small molecules for targeting PSMA is important for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer. Recent evidence implies that androgen-deprivation therapy increase PSMA-ligand uptake in some cases. The reported upregulations in PSMA-ligand uptake after exposure to second-generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide and abiraterone might disturb PSMA-targeted imaging for staging and response monitoring of patients undergoing treatment with antiandrogen-based drugs. On the other hand, second-generation antiandrogens are emerging as potential endoradio-/chemosensitizers. Therefore, the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of PSMA-targeted theranostic methods can be listed as a new capability of antiandrogens. In this manuscript, we will present what is currently known about the mechanism of increasing PSMA uptake following exposure to antiandrogens. In addition, we will discuss whether these above-mentioned antiandrogens could play the role of endoradio-/chemosensitizers in combination with the well-established PSMA-targeted methods for pre-targeting of prostate cancer

  19. Combination therapy in chronic periodontitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Taherpour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of periodontal treatment is to provide healthy and functional dentition for the whole life.Cases Report: A 42 year old female with sever chronic periodontitis, treated medically and surgically, is reported. She initially received antibiotic, Scaling and root planning in addition to oral hygiene instruction. After four weeks, periodontal Surgery, root canal Therapy, extraction of excess tooth and restoration of some teeth were performed, because of remaining residual pockets, and bone loss, flap Surgery and Access flap, with papilla preservation flap method, also modified Widmann flap, were done. After one month, favorable clinical improvement was obtained.Conclusion: It can be concluded that high oral hygiene level in accompanied with Suitable medical and surgical treatment, enhanced the success of periodontal treatment outcomes even in sever disease. 

  20. Healing the wounded self: combining hypnotherapy with ego state therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to formulate a theoretical conceptualization for utilizing ego state therapy (EST) as an adjunct with cognitive hypnotherapy (CH) for depression. As the relationship between life events and onset of depression is very complex, it is not clear from current literature how stressors cause depressive symptoms. The notion of "wounded self," derived from the work of Wolfe (2005, 2006), is examined as a potential unifying concept for binding the role of risk factors in the precipitation of depression. By incorporating wounded self, the circular feedback model of depression, on which CH for depression is based, is expanded. This revised version provides conceptual and empirical underpinnings for integrating EST with CH in the management of depression.

  1. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  2. The Effects of Glucose Therapy Agents-Apple Juice, Orange Juice, and Cola-on Enteral Tube Flow and Patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Daphna J; Montreuil, Jasmine; Santoro, Andrea L; Zettas, Antonia; Lowe, Julia

    2016-06-01

    To develop evidence-based hypoglycemia treatment protocols in patients receiving total enteral nutrition, this study determined the effect on enteral tube flow of glucose therapy agents: apple juice, orange juice, and cola, and it also examined the effects of tube type and feed type with these glucose therapy agents. For this study, 12 gastrostomy tubes (6 polyethylene and 6 silicone) were set at 50 mL/h. Each feeding set was filled with Isosource HN with fibre or Novasource Renal. Each tube was irrigated with 1 glucose therapy agent, providing approximately 20 g of carbohydrate every 4 h. Flow-rate measurements were collected at 2 h intervals. The results showed that the glucose therapy agent choice affected flow rates: apple juice and cola had higher average flow rates than orange juice (P = 0.01). A significant difference was found between tube type and enteral formula: polyethylene tubes had higher average flow rates than silicone tubes (P orange juice, and thus may be considered as primary treatment options for hypoglycemia in enterally fed patients. Polyethylene tubes and Isosource HN with fibre were less likely to clog than silicone tubes and Novasource Renal.

  3. Cholelithiasis and Nephrolithiasis in HIV-Positive Patients in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Yin Lin

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis among HIV-positive patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy.We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of HIV-positive patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography for chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver, or elevated aminotransferases between January 2004 and January 2015. Therapeutic drug monitoring of plasma concentrations of atazanavir was performed and genetic polymorphisms, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT 1A1*28 and multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 G2677T/A, were determined in a subgroup of patients who received ritonavir-boosted or unboosted atazanavir-containing combination antiretroviral therapy. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and laboratory testing were collected and analyzed.During the 11-year study period, 910 patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography were included for analysis. The patients were mostly male (96.9% with a mean age of 42.2 years and mean body-mass index of 22.9 kg/m2 and 85.8% being on antiretroviral therapy. The anchor antiretroviral agents included non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (49.3%, unboosted atazanavir (34.4%, ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (20.4%, and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (5.5%. The overall prevalence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 12.5% and 8.2%, respectively. Among 680 antiretroviral-experienced patients with both baseline and follow-up sonography, the crude incidence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the independent factors associated with incident cholelithiasis were exposure to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir for >2 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-35.16 and older age (AOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.09. The positive association between duration of exposure to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir and incident

  4. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  5. Preoperative combination therapy of 5-fluorouracil suppository and radiation for carcinoma of the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizusawa, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Toshio

    1983-01-01

    Twelve cases of carcinoma of the rectum were treated preoperatively by combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository (100 mg twice a day consecutively, a total dose of more than 4,000 mg) and irradiation (300 rad x 3/week, a total dose of 3,000 rad). This group was compared with 34 cases given single preoperative 5-FU therapy and 24 control cases given no preoperative adjuvant modality. The group treated by preoperative combination therapy showed marked antitumor effects macroscopically and histologically. In addition, decrease in local recurrence was expected for this group, compared with the other two groups. (Chiba, N.)

  6. Nutraceuticals as an Important Part of Combination Therapy in Dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Angelo M; Toth, Peter P; Giglio, Rosaria V; Banach, Maciej; Noto, Marcello; Nikolic, Dragana; Montalto, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Manfredi

    2017-01-01

    Several risk factors such as abnormality of lipid metabolism (e.g. high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), elevated triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)) play a central role in the aetiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Nutraceutical combination together with a cholesterol- lowering action, when associated with suitable lifestyle, should furnish an alternative to pharmacotherapy in patients reporting statin-intolerance and in subjects at low cardiovascular risk. The present review is focused on nutraceuticals and their synergetic combinations demonstrating a beneficial effect in the management of dyslipidaemia. Several nutraceuticals have been shown to positively modulate lipid metabolism having different functions. Plant sterols and soluble fibres can, for example, decrease the intestinal assimilation of lipids and increase their elimination. Furthermore, berberine and soybean proteins improve the cholesterol uptake in the liver. Policosanols, monacolins and bergamot inhibit hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA reductase) enzyme action determining the cholesterol hepatic synthesis. Moreover, pomegranate can decrease LDL oxidation and positively affect subclinical atherosclerosis; red yeast rice and berberine play, instead, an important role on endothelial dysfunction and psyllium, plant sterols and bergamot have positive effects on LDL subclasses. To the best of our knowledge, there are no long-term large-scale studies on the anti-atherogenic effect of the nutraceuticals that are available on the market. Thus, further clinical studies should investigate in order to achieve long term tolerability and safety and to provide a better nutraceutical combination tailored to the patient needs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  8. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  9. The dataset from administration of single or combined immunomodulation agents to modulate anti-FVIII antibody responses in FVIII plasmid or protein primed hemophilia A mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A mice with pre-existing inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII were treated with single agents, AMD3100 and GCS-F, respectively. Inhibitor titers in treated mice and control HemA inhibitors mice were followed over time. Total B cells and plasma cells (PCs were characterized by flow cytometry. HemA inhibitor mice were then treated with a combination regimen of IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin and AMD3100. Finally, HemA inhibitor mice were treated with a new combination therapy using include IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + Anti-CD20+AMD3100+G-CSF. The timeline of combination therapy was illustrated. Inhibitor titers following treatment in FVIII plasmid or protein induced inhibitor mice were evaluated overtime. A representative figure and gating strategies to characterize the subsets of Treg cells and B cells are presented. Please see http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellimm.2016.01.005 [1] for interpretation and discussion of these data and results.

  10. Photodynamic Therapy Combined with Terbinafine Against Chromoblastomycosis and the Effect of PDT on Fonsecaea monophora In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Lu, Sha; Hamblin, Michael R.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Zhang, Junmin

    2014-01-01

    Chromoblastomycosis, a chronic fungal infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by dematiaceous fungi, is associated with low cure and high relapse rates. Among all factors affecting clinical outcome, etiological agents have an important position. In southern China, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Fonsecaea monophora are main causative agents causing Chromoblastomycosis. We treated one case of chromoblastomycosis by photodynamic therapy (PDT) of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) irradiation combined with terbinafine 250 mg a day. The lesions were improved after two sessions of ALA-PDT treatment, each including nine times, at an interval of 1 week, combined with terbinafine 250 mg/day oral, and clinical improvement could be observed. In the following study, based on the clinical treatment, the effect of PDT and antifungal drugs on this isolate was detected in vitro. It showed sensitivity to terbinafine, itraconazole or voriconazole, and PDT inhibited the growth. Both the clinic and experiments in vitro confirm the good outcome of ALA-PDT applied in the inhibition of F. monophora. It demonstrated that combination of antifungal drugs with ALA-PDT arises as a promising alternative method for the treatment of these refractory cases of chromoblastomycosis. PMID:25366276

  11. Efficacy of intense pulse light therapy and tripple combination cream versus intense pulse light therapy and tripple combination cream alone in epidermal melasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakeeb, N.; Noor, S.M.; Paracha, M.M.; Ullah, G.

    2018-01-01

    Objective:To compare the efficacy of intense pulse light therapy (IPL) and triple combination cream (TCC) versus intense pulse light therapy and triple combination cream alone in epidermal melasma treatment, downgrading MASI score to more than 10. Study Design:Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study:Dermatology Department, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from August 2014 to January 2015. Methodology:Patients of 18-45 years were included in the study with Fitzpatrick skin type II-V. Sample of 96 patients was divided in to three groups of 32 each, through consecutive (non-probability) sampling method. Detailed history was taken, Woods Lamp Examination done, and melasma area and severity index (MASI) score was calculated. TCC had to be applied daily at night for two months by group A patients while group B was consigned for IPL therapy fortnightly, and those in group C were given both for two months. Efficacy was compared by recalculating MASI score at treatment end as well as at follow-up after 4 weeks, using Chi-square test with significance at p < 0.05. Results:Male and female patients were 10 (31.2%) and 22 (68.8%) in group A, 7 (21.9%) and 25 (78.1%) in group B, while in group C were 12 (37.5%) and 20 (62.5%). The average age was 28.70 +8.70 years. MASI score reduction was achieved in 22 (68.8%) patients in group A; whereas, in 20 (62.5%) and 30(93.8%) patients in group B and C, respectively. Efficacy-wise distribution was significant (p=0.009). Conclusion:Intense pulse light therapy and triple combination cream are more efficacious in epidermal melasma treatment than intense pulse light therapy and triple combination cream alone. (author)

  12. Rethinking the Combination of Proton Exchanger Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Mizzoni, Davide; Di Raimo, Rossella; Supuran, Claudiu T; Fais, Stefano

    2017-12-23

    Microenvironmental acidity is becoming a key target for the new age of cancer treatment. In fact, while cancer is characterized by genetic heterogeneity, extracellular acidity is a common phenotype of almost all cancers. To survive and proliferate under acidic conditions, tumor cells up-regulate proton exchangers and transporters (mainly V-ATPase, Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), and carbonic anhydrases (CAs)), that actively extrude excess protons, avoiding intracellular accumulation of toxic molecules, thus becoming a sort of survival option with many similarities compared with unicellular microorganisms. These systems are also involved in the unresponsiveness or resistance to chemotherapy, leading to the protection of cancer cells from the vast majority of drugs, that when protonated in the acidic tumor microenvironment, do not enter into cancer cells. Indeed, as usually occurs in the progression versus malignancy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, following a transient initial response to a therapy, thus giving rise to more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. Recent studies are supporting the use of a cocktail of proton exchanger inhibitors as a new strategy against cancer.

  13. Understanding Acoustic Cavitation Initiation by Porous Nanoparticles: Toward Nanoscale Agents for Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Adem; Chattaraj, Rajarshi; Blum, Nicholas T; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2016-08-23

    Ultrasound is widely applied in medical diagnosis and therapy due to its safety, high penetration depth, and low cost. In order to improve the contrast of sonographs and efficiency of the ultrasound therapy, echogenic gas bodies or droplets (with diameters from 200 nm to 10 µm) are often used, which are not very stable in the bloodstream and unable to penetrate into target tissues. Recently, it was demonstrated that nanobubbles stabilized by nanoparticles can nucleate ultrasound responsive microbubbles under reduced acoustic pressures, which is very promising for the development of nanoscale (ultrasound agents. However, there is still very little understanding about the effects of nanoparticle properties on the stabilization of nanobubbles and nucleation of acoustic cavitation by these nanobubbles. Here, a series of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with sizes around 100 nm but with different morphologies were synthesized to understand the effects of nanoparticle porosity, surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and hydrophilic surface modification on acoustic cavitation inception by porous nanoparticles. The chemical analyses of the nanoparticles showed that, while the nanoparticles were prepared using the same silica precursor (TEOS) and surfactant (CTAB), they revealed varying amounts of carbon impurities, hydroxyl content, and degrees of silica crosslinking. Carbon impurities or hydrophobic modification with methyl groups is found to be essential for nanobubble stabilization by mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The acoustic cavitation experiments in the presence of ethanol and/or bovine serum albumin (BSA) demonstrated that acoustic cavitation is predominantly nucleated by the nanobubbles stabilized at the nanoparticle surface not inside the mesopores. Finally, acoustic cavitation experiments with rough and smooth nanoparticles were suggested that a rough nanoparticle surface is needed to largely preserve surface nanobubbles after coating the surface with hydrophilic

  14. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine combined with interventional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interventional therapy has become the first choice of non-surgical treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC due to its advantages such as little trauma and marked local effect. However, the clinical efficiency is less than expected. One of the possibilities is the resistance of cancer cells to anti-cancer drugs. Increasing attention has been paid to the combination of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and interventional therapy in HCC treatment. This paper reviews the progress in TCM combined with interventional therapy for HCC at animal experiment and clinical study levels in recent ten years. It is pointed out that the combination therapy with TCM and intervention for HCC has a unique advantage.

  15. Anti-tumor effects of Egr-IFN γ gene therapy combined with 125I-UdR radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingguo; Ni Yanjun; Song Xiangfu; Li Yanyi; Yang Wei; Sun Ting; Ma Qingjie; Gao Fengtong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the anti-tumor effects of Egr-IFNγ gene therapy combined with 125 I-UdR radionuclide therapy in mice bearing H22 hepatocarcinoma and its mechanism. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pcDNAEgr-IFNγ mixed with liposome was injected into tumor. 48 h later, 370 kBq 125 I-UdR was injected into tumor. The tumor growth rates at different times were observed. After 3 d gene-radionuclide therapy, the concentration of IFNγ in cytoplasm of H22 cells and cytotoxic activities of splenic CTL of the mice in different groups were examined. Results: The tumor growth rates of pcDNAEgr-IFNγ + 125 I-UdR group were obviously lower than those of control group, 125 I-UdR group and pcDNAEgr-1 + 125 I-UdR group 6-15 d after gene-radionuclide therapy. IFNγ protein was found in cytoplasm of H22 cells in pcDNAEgr-IFNγ + 125 I-UdR group after 3 d gene-radionuclide therapy. Cytotoxic activity of splenic CTL in pcDNAEgr-IFNγ + 125 I-UdR group was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P 125 I-UdR radionuclide therapy are better than those of 125 I-UdR therapy. (authors)

  16. Combined doxorubicin and radiation therapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinoff, C.; Falkson, G.; Sandison, A.G.; De Muelenaere, G.

    1982-01-01

    Ten patients with histologically confirmed inoperable malignant mesothelioma of the pleura were treated with doxorubicin and fractionated radiotherapy courses. Three patients derived significant clinical benefit from this treatment, although only one of the three had measureable tumor shrinkage that could be defined as partial response. Two of the ten patients showed only progressive disease, while the remaining five showed disease stabilization for 30--100 weeks. The treatment was subjectively well-tolerated and hematopoietic toxicity was acceptable. Radiation pneumonitis did not occur. Two of the four patients who lived greater than or equal to 94 weeks developed fibrosis of the irradiated hemithorax. The median survival time for all patients was 46 weeks. Although the combined treatment could be given with acceptable toxic effects and although four patients benefited from it, the best objective assessment, namely, survival time, did not appear to be adequately influenced to justify an extension of this series

  17. Combined Immune Therapy for the Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Faleiro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic disease caused by infections, cancer or autoimmunity can result in profound immune suppression. Immunoregulatory networks are established to prevent tissue damage caused by inflammation. Although these immune checkpoints preserve tissue function, they allow pathogens and tumors to persist, and even expand. Immune checkpoint blockade has recently been successfully employed to treat cancer. This strategy modulates immunoregulatory mechanisms to allow host immune cells to kill or control tumors. However, the utility of this approach for controlling established infections has not been extensively investigated. Here, we examined the potential of modulating glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor-related protein (GITR on T cells to improve anti-parasitic immunity in blood and spleen tissue from visceral leishmaniasis (VL patients infected with Leishmania donovani. We found little effect on parasite growth or parasite-specific IFNγ production. However, this treatment reversed the improved anti-parasitic immunity achieved by IL-10 signaling blockade. Further investigations using an experimental VL model caused by infection of C57BL/6 mice with L. donovani revealed that this negative effect was prominent in the liver, dependent on parasite burden and associated with an accumulation of Th1 cells expressing high levels of KLRG-1. Nevertheless, combined anti-IL-10 and anti-GITR mAb treatment could improve anti-parasitic immunity when used with sub-optimal doses of anti-parasitic drug. However, additional studies with VL patient samples indicated that targeting GITR had no overall benefit over IL-10 signaling blockade alone at improving anti-parasitic immune responses, even with drug treatment cover. These findings identify several important factors that influence the effectiveness of immune modulation, including parasite burden, target tissue and the use of anti-parasitic drug. Critically, these results also highlight potential negative effects of

  18. FIRST EXPERIENCE OF CYMEVEN IN THE COMBINED THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R M Balabanova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ummary Objective. To reveal J'reguency of accompaning virus infection and possibility to use antivirus therapy together in therapy RA. Material. 40 patients with RA at the age of 17-45 were studied. The duration of disease was not more than 6 months; patients had 2-3 degrees of activity. Every one had a positive rheumatoid factor. Results. 78,2% of the examined patients connected the beginning of the illness with virus infection they have had. The most difficalt variant of RA course and uneffectiveness of basic therapy were registerd among the patients with combination HSV and CMV infection. Inclusion of Cymevene in complex therapy RA has exerted positive influence on clinical-laboratory, signs stregthened effect of basic therapy. Conclusion. The most difficult variant of RA course was registered among the patients with virus infection. Inclusion of antivirus drugs had a positive influence on effectiveness of basic therapy.

  19. Combining human and machine intelligence to derive agents' behavioral rules for groundwater irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yao; Quinn, Christopher J.; Cai, Ximing; Garfinkle, Noah W.

    2017-11-01

    For agent-based modeling, the major challenges in deriving agents' behavioral rules arise from agents' bounded rationality and data scarcity. This study proposes a "gray box" approach to address the challenge by incorporating expert domain knowledge (i.e., human intelligence) with machine learning techniques (i.e., machine intelligence). Specifically, we propose using directed information graph (DIG), boosted regression trees (BRT), and domain knowledge to infer causal factors and identify behavioral rules from data. A case study is conducted to investigate farmers' pumping behavior in the Midwest, U.S.A. Results show that four factors identified by the DIG algorithm- corn price, underlying groundwater level, monthly mean temperature and precipitation- have main causal influences on agents' decisions on monthly groundwater irrigation depth. The agent-based model is then developed based on the behavioral rules represented by three DIGs and modeled by BRTs, and coupled with a physically-based groundwater model to investigate the impacts of agents' pumping behavior on the underlying groundwater system in the context of coupled human and environmental systems.

  20. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the skin treated successfully with single agent cetuximab therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seber S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selcuk Seber,1 Aylin Gonultas,2 Ozlem Ozturk,2 Tarkan Yetisyigit1 1Department of Medical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Namik Kemal University, 2Pathology Department, Tekirdag State Hospital, Tekirdag, Turkey Abstract: Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is a rare but difficult to treat condition. Frequently, the disease presents itself in elderly patients with poor performance status and bearing many comorbidities, thus the decision to administer systemic chemotherapy becomes difficult to make. In addition, current chemotherapeutic protocols response rates are far from satisfactory. Recently cetuximab, a chimeric antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor, is increasingly being reported as an alternative treatment. We therefore report this case of a recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in an elderly woman with poor performance status and who had an excellent clinical response to single agent cetuximab therapy with complete resolution of the disease and minimal toxicity during the course of the treatment to provide evidence for future prospective clinical trials. Keywords: cetuximab, EGFR inhibiton, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

  1. In vitro efficiency and mechanistic role of indocyanine green as photodynamic therapy agent for human melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamoon, A.M.; Miller, L.; Gamal-Eldeen, A. M.; Ruppel, M. E.; Smith, R. J.; Tsang, T.; Miller, L. M.

    2009-05-02

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for superficial cancer. However, poor therapeutic results have been reported for melanoma, due to the high melanin content. Indocyanine green (ICG) has near infrared absorption (700-800 nm) and melanins do not absorb strongly in this area. This study explores the efficiency of ICG as a PDT agent for human melanoma, and its mechanistic role in the cell death pathway. Human skin melanoma cells (Sk-Mel-28) were incubated with ICG and exposed to a low power Ti:Sapphire laser. Synchrotron-assisted Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to assess the cell damage and changes in lipid, protein, and nucleic acids. The cell death pathway was determined by analysis of cell viability and apoptosis and necrosis markers. In the cell death pathway, {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation evoked rapid multiple consequences that trigger apoptosis after laser exposure for only 15min including the release of cytochrome c, the activation of total caspases, caspase-3, and caspase-9, the inhibition of NF-{Kappa}B P65, and the enhancement of DNA fragmentation, and histone acetylation. ICG/PDT can efficiently and rapidly induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells and it can be considered as a new therapeutic approach for topical treatment of melanoma.

  2. Plasmon-resonant nanorods as multimodal agents for two-photon luminescent imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry B.; Hansen, Matthew N.; Tong, Ling; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Zweifel, Daniel A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Wei, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods have outstanding potential as multifunctional agents for image-guided therapies. Nanorods have large absorption cross sections at near-infrared (NIR) frequencies, and produce two-photon luminescence (TPL) when excited by fs-pulsed laser irradiation. The TPL signals can be detected with single-particle sensitivity, enabling nanorods to be imaged in vivo while passing through blood vessels at subpicomolar concentrations. Furthermore, cells labeled with nanorods become highly susceptible to photothermal damage when irradiated at plasmon resonance, often resulting in a dramatic blebbing of the cell membrane. However, the straightforward application of gold nanorods for cell-specific labeling is obstructed by the presence of CTAB, a cationic surfactant carried over from nanorod synthesis which also promotes their nonspecific uptake into cells. Careful exchange and replacement of CTAB can be achieved by introducing oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) units capable of chemisorption onto nanorod surfaces by in situ dithiocarbamate formation, a novel method of surface functionalization. Nanorods with a dense coating of methyl-terminated OEG chains are shielded from nonspecific cell uptake, whereas nanorods functionalized with folate-terminated OEG chains accumulate on the surface of tumor cells overexpressing their cognate receptor, with subsequent delivery of photoinduced cell damage at low laser fluence.

  3. Accumulation of MRI contrast agents in malignant fibrous histiocytoma for gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, T.; Ichikawa, H.; Akisue, T.; Fujita, I.; Kishimoto, K.; Hara, H.; Imabori, M.; Kawamitsu, H.; Sharma, P.; Brown, S.C.; Moudgil, B.M.; Fujii, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Kurosaka, M.; Fukumori, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron-capture therapy with gadolinium (Gd-NCT) has therapeutic potential, especially that gadolinium is generally used as a contrast medium in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The accumulation of gadolinium in a human sarcoma cell line, malignant fibrosis histiocytoma (MFH) Nara-H, was visualized by the MRI system. The commercially available MRI contrast medium Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, dimeglumine gadopentetate aqueous solution) and the biodegradable and highly gadopentetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (Gd-nanoCPs) were prepared as MRI contrast agents. The MFH cells were cultured and collected into three falcon tubes that were set into the 3-tesra MRI system to acquire signal intensities from each pellet by the spin echo method, and the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) was calculated. The amount of Gd in the sample was measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrography (ICP-AES). The accumulation of gadolinium in cells treated with Gd-nanoCPs was larger than that in cells treated with Gd-DTPA. In contrast, and compared with the control, Gd-DTPA was more effective than Gd-nanoCPs in reducing T1, suggesting that the larger accumulation exerted the adverse effect of lowering the enhancement of MRI. Further studies are warranted to gain insight into the therapeutic potential of Gd-NCT.

  4. Early use of negative pressure therapy in combination with silver dressings in a difficult breast abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Alastair J; Hagelstein, Sue M; Patel, Girish K; Ivins, Nicola M; Sweetland, Helen M; Harding, Keith G

    2011-12-01

    Combining silver-based dressings with negative pressure therapy after radical excision of chronically infected breast disease is a novel application of two technologies. One patient with complex, chronic, infected breast disease underwent radical excision of the affected area and was treated early with a combination of silver-based dressings and topical negative pressure therapy. The wound was then assessed sequentially using clinical measurements of wound area and depth, pain severity scores and level of exudation. It is possible to combine accepted techniques with modern dressing technologies that result in a positive outcome. In this case, the combination of a silver-based dressing with negative pressure therapy following radical excision proved safe and was well tolerated by the patient. Full epithelisation of the wound was achieved and there was no recurrence of the infection for the duration of the treatment. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  5. Assessment of immunomodulating action of combined therapy with UHF-hyperthermia in children with osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neprina, G.S.; Panteleeva, E.S.; Vatin, O.E.; Bizer, V.A.; Bojko, I.N.

    1989-01-01

    The paper is concerned with immunological evaluation of different stages of combined therapy with local UHF-hyperthermia in children with osteogenic sarcoma. Combined therapy (polychemo- and raditherapy) was shown to cause a decrease in the number of immunocompetent cells, to enhance dysbalance of immunoregulatory T-lymphocytes, to weaken T-lymphocyte function on PHA; immunosuppressive action of combined therapy did not depend on a tumor site. The incorporation of UHF-hyperthermia in the therapeutic scheme weakened the manifestations of secondary immunodeficiency, got back to normal structure of T-lymphocyte population. A favorable immunomodulating effect of hyperthermia was more frequently observed in patients with crural bone tumors. The effect of hyperthermia was revealed after direct influence of thermotherapy but it was absent in continuation of combined treatment

  6. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Therapy of Methotrexate and Etanercept versus Methotrexate as a Mono-Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Rexhepi, Blerta; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan

    2018-05-20

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of Methotrexate (MTX) alone and combined therapy with Etanercept (ETN) and Methotrexate in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the randomised control study, conducted in the period from March 2014 until March 2016, we evaluated the efficacy of the treatment of patients with RA with MTX as monotherapy and combination treatment with MTX and ETN. In the Clinic of Rheumatology in Prishtina, 90 adult patients with RA were treated in combination with ETN (doses of 50 mg subcutaneously/weekly), with oral MTX (doses up to 20 mg weekly), and MTX alone (doses up to 20 mg weekly) during this period of two years. Clinical response was assessed using European League against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Criteria and the Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Radiographic changes were measured in the beginning and at the end of the study using Larsen's method. Of the cohort groups of 90 patients, mean age of 55.63, 15 patients, (16.6 %) were treated with combined therapy (ETN plus MTX) and 75 patients (83.3%) with monotherapy (MTX). After two years of treatment the group with combined therapy resulted with improvement of acute phase reactants as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) for the first hour (41.1 vs. 10.3 mm/hour) and C - reactive protein (CRP) (40.8 vs. 6 mg/liter), and compared to the group treated with monotherapy, there were no significant changes (ESR: 45.7 vs 34.3 mm/hour; CRP: 48 vs 24 mg/liter). Before the treatment, the severity of the disease was high, wherein the group with combined therapy DAS28 was 5.32, compared to the monotherapy group whom DAS28 was 5.90. After 2 years of treatment, we had significant changes in the results of DAS28, wherein the group treated with ETN plus MTX DAS28 was 2.12 ± 0.15, while in the group of patients treated with MTX DAS28 were 3.75 ± 0.39 (t = 13.03; df = 58; p < 0.0001). The group with combined therapy showed no evidence of radiographic

  7. GE11 Peptide as an Active Targeting Agent in Antitumor Therapy: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Genta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A lot of solid tumors are characterized by uncontrolled signal transduction triggered by receptors related to cellular growth. The targeting of these cell receptors with antitumor drugs is essential to improve chemotherapy efficacy. This can be achieved by conjugation of an active targeting agent to the polymer portion of a colloidal drug delivery system loaded with an antitumor drug. The goal of this minireview is to report and discuss some recent results in epidermal growth factor receptor targeting by the GE11 peptide combined with colloidal drug delivery systems as smart carriers for antitumor drugs. The minireview chapters will focus on explaining and discussing: (i Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR structures and functions; (ii GE11 structure and biologic activity; (iii examples of GE11 conjugation and GE11-conjugated drug delivery systems. The rationale is to contribute in gathering information on the topic of active targeting to tumors. A case study is introduced, involving research on tumor cell targeting by the GE11 peptide combined with polymer nanoparticles.

  8. Effect of Combination Therapy on Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N.; Hubeck-Graudal, T.; Tarp, S.

    2014-01-01

    identified in a search of electronic archives of biomedical literature and included in a star-shaped network meta-analysis and reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement protocol. Effects are reported as standardized mean differences (SMD......). The effects of data from 39 trials published in the period 1989-2012 were as follows: Double DMARD: -0.32 SMD (CI: -0.42, -0.22); triple DMARD: -0.46 SMD (CI: -0.60, -0.31); 1 DMARD plus TNFi: -0.30 SMD (CI: -0.36, -0.25); 1 DMARD plus abatacept: -0.20 SMD (CI: -0.33, -0.07); 1 DMARD plus tocilizumab: -0.......34 SMD (CI: -0.48, -0.20); 1 DMARD plus CD20i: -0.32 SMD (CI: -0.40, -0.24). The indirect comparisons showed similar effects between combination treatments apart from triple DMARD being significantly better than abatacept plus methotrexate (2 0.26 SMD (CI: -0.45, -0.07)) and TNFi plus methotrexate (-0...

  9. Triple combination antibiotic therapy for carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David M; Safir, M Courtney; Huang, Dennis; Minhaj, Faisal; Parker, Adam; Rao, Gauri G

    2017-11-25

    The spread of carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (CPKP) has become a significant problem worldwide. Combination therapy for CPKP is encouraging, but polymyxin resistance to many antibiotics is hampering effective treatment. Combination therapy with three or more antibiotics is being increasingly reported, therefore we performed a systematic review of triple combination cases in an effort to evaluate their clinical effectiveness for CPKP infections. The PubMed database was searched to identify all published clinical outcomes of CPKP infections treated with triple combination therapy. Articles were stratified into two tiers depending on the level of clinical detail provided. A tier 1 study included: antibiotic regimen, regimen-specific outcome, patient status at onset of infection, and source of infection. Articles not reaching these criteria were considered tier 2. Thirty-three studies were eligible, 23 tier 1 and ten tier 2. Among tier 1 studies, 53 cases were included in this analysis. The most common infection was pneumonia (31%) followed by primary or catheter-related bacteremia (21%) and urinary tract infection (17%). Different combinations of antibiotic classes were utilized in triple combinations, the most common being a polymyxin (colistin or polymyxin B, 86.8%), tigecycline (73.6%), aminoglycoside (43.4%), or carbapenem (43.4%). Clinical and microbiological failure occurred in 14/39 patients (35.9%) and 22/42 patients (52.4%), respectively. Overall mortality for patients treated with triple combination therapy was 35.8% (19/53 patients). Triple combination therapy is being considered as a treatment option for CPKP. Polymyxin-based therapy is the backbone antibiotic in these regimens, but its effectiveness needs establishing in prospective clinical trials.

  10. Therapy of combined radiation injuries with hemopoietic growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudagov, R.; Oulianova, L.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation accidents of the 5-7 th levels according to IAEA scale lead to life-threatening acute radiation syndrome and many patients will probably suffer from additional thermal burns. These combined injuries (CI) will be among the most difficult to achieve survival. Present therapeutic means need to augment with new approaches to stimulate host defence mechanisms, blood system recovery and to enhance survival. The evaluation of therapeutic properties of human recombinant G-CSF, IL-1,IL-2 and other so called 'biological response modifiers' on survival and blood recovery after CI was the purpose of this work. Experiments carried out with mice CBA x C57BL6 receiving 7 Gy total body irradiation followed by a full-thickness thermal bum of 10% of body surface. It established that G-CSF does not exhibit a positive modifying action on the damage level and on hematopoietic recovery. I.p two-four/fold infusion of IL-2 during the initial 2 days has provided a significant statistically survival increase from 40% (untreated mice with CI) to 86%. Single s.c IL-1 injection resulted in abrupt deterioration of the outcome when dealing with CI; three/fold administration of IL-1 in 2,4 and 6 days after CI did not increase survival. Extracellular yeast polysaccharides resulted only a 15 to 30% increase in survival it given 1 h after CI. The best results obtained when mixture of heat-killed L.acidophilus injected s.c immediately alter CI - survival has increased from 27% (untreated mice) to 80%. Revealed beneficial effects of IL-2 and biological response modifiers did not accompany by a corresponding correction of depressed hematological parameters

  11. Combined Antirelapse Therapy in Patients with Schizoaffective Disorder: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna R. Gardanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most studies, patients with schizoaffective disorder (SAD are often combined into one group along with schizophrenia patients or less commonly with those suffering from affective disorders, which makes it difficult to obtain data about the peculiarities of SAD treatment. Articles dedicated to SAD treatment in the interictal period are rare. Methods and Results: The prospective cohort study was conducted from 2011 to 2015. The study involved 86 patients diagnosed with SAD according to ICD-10. Patients received neuroleptics (NLs as antirelapse therapy for 2 years (NL therapy; then mood stabilizers (MSs were added to the antirelapse treatment (NL+MS therapy. The results of this combined therapy with MSs were evaluated after 2 years of treatment. Our results suggest that the use of combination therapy that includes antipsychotics and MSs leads to maintenance of a higher quality remission. Remission becomes more prolonged and affective swings less pronounced, resulting in improved quality of life in SAD patients. Improving the quality of remission can be attributed to the following characteristics of the combined therapy: a the use of lower doses of neuroleptics; b a reduction in the frequency and severity of mood swings; and c an increase in patient compliance. Conclusion: The use of combined pharmacotherapy including antipsychotics and MSs produces a longer, high-quality remission. The inclusion of MSs in the scheme of treatment increases the patient adherence to a medication regimen. The use of MSs in combination therapy reduces affective fluctuations, thereby increasing the probability of maintaining remission with complete symptom relief.

  12. Combined miglustat and enzyme replacement therapy in two patients with type 1 Gaucher disease: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Dominick; Patterson, Mary Anne

    2018-01-27

    Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy is a first-line therapy for Gaucher disease type 1, and substrate reduction therapy represents an oral treatment alternative. Both enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy are generally used as monotherapies in Gaucher disease. However, one randomized study and several case reports have described combination therapy over short time periods. We report two female Gaucher disease type 1 patients of mainly Anglo-Saxon descent, where combined enzyme replacement therapy and miglustat substrate reduction therapy were administered to overcome refractory clinical symptoms. The first patient was diagnosed at age 17 and developed Gaucher disease-related bone manifestations that worsened despite starting imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy. After switching to miglustat substrate reduction therapy, her bone symptoms improved, but she developed tremors and eventually switched back to enzyme replacement therapy. Miglustat was later recommenced in combination with ongoing enzyme replacement therapy due to continued bone pain, and her bone symptoms improved along with maintained visceral manifestations. Enzyme replacement therapy was subsequently tapered off and the patient has since been successfully maintained on miglustat. The second patient was diagnosed aged 3, and commenced imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy aged 15. After 9 years on enzyme replacement therapy she switched to miglustat substrate reduction therapy and her core symptoms were maintained/stable for 3 years. Imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy was later added as a boost to therapy and her symptoms were subsequently maintained over a 2.3-year period. However, miglustat was discontinued due to her relocation, necessitating an increase in enzyme replacement therapy dose. Overall, both patients benefited from combination therapy. While the majority of Gaucher disease type 1 patients will not need treatment with both substrate reduction therapy

  13. Synergistic Effect of Combination Topotecan and Chronomodulated Radiation Therapy on Xenografted Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, YanLing; Chen, Xin; Ren, PeiRong; Su, Zhou; Cao, HongYing; Zhou, Jie; Zou, XiaoYan; Fu, ShaoZhi; Lin, Sheng; Fan, Juan; Yang, Bo; Sun, XiaoYang [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Zhou, Yan; Chen, Yue [Department of Medical Imaging, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Yang, LingLin, E-mail: yanglinglin2003@tom.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, JingBo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the in vivo chronomodulated radiosensitizing effect of topotecan (TPT) on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and its possible mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Xenografted BALB/c (nu/nu) NPC mice were synchronized with an alternation of 12 hours of light from 0 to 12 hours after light onset (HALO) and 12 hours of darkness to establish a unified biological rhythm. Chronomodulated radiosensitization of TPT was investigated by analysis of tumor regrowth delay (TGD), pimonidazole hydrochloride, histone H2AX phosphorylation, (γ-H2AX) topoisomerase I (Top I), cell cycle, and apoptosis after treatment with (1) TPT (10 mg/kg) alone; (2) radiation therapy alone (RT); and (3) TPT+RT at 3, 9, 15, and 21 HALO. The tumor-loaded mice without any treatment were used as controls. Results: The TPT+RT combination was more effective than TPT or RT as single agents. The TPT+RT combination at 15 HALO was best (TGD = 58.0 ± 3.6 days), and TPT+RT at 3 HALO was worst (TGD = 35.0 ± 1.5 days) among the 4 TPT+RT groups (P<.05). Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a significantly increased histone H2AX phosphorylation expression and decreased pimonidazole hydrochloride expression in the TPT+RT group at the same time point. The results suggested that the level of tumor hypoxia and DNA damage varied in a time-dependent manner. The expression of Top I in the TPT+RT group was also significantly different from the control tumors at 15 HALO (P<.05). Cell apoptosis index was increased and the proportion of cells in S phase was decreased (P<.05) with the highest value in 15 HALO and the lowest in 3 HALO. Conclusions: This study suggested that TPT combined with chronoradiotherapy could enhance the radiosensitivity of xenografted NPC. The TPT+RT group at 15 HALO had the best therapeutic effect. The chronomodulated radiosensitization mechanisms of TPT might be related to circadian rhythm of tumor hypoxia, cell cycle redistribution, DNA damage, and expression of Top I.

  14. Synergistic Effect of Combination Topotecan and Chronomodulated Radiation Therapy on Xenografted Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, YanLing; Chen, Xin; Ren, PeiRong; Su, Zhou; Cao, HongYing; Zhou, Jie; Zou, XiaoYan; Fu, ShaoZhi; Lin, Sheng; Fan, Juan; Yang, Bo; Sun, XiaoYang; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Yue; Yang, LingLin; Wu, JingBo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the in vivo chronomodulated radiosensitizing effect of topotecan (TPT) on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and its possible mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Xenografted BALB/c (nu/nu) NPC mice were synchronized with an alternation of 12 hours of light from 0 to 12 hours after light onset (HALO) and 12 hours of darkness to establish a unified biological rhythm. Chronomodulated radiosensitization of TPT was investigated by analysis of tumor regrowth delay (TGD), pimonidazole hydrochloride, histone H2AX phosphorylation, (γ-H2AX) topoisomerase I (Top I), cell cycle, and apoptosis after treatment with (1) TPT (10 mg/kg) alone; (2) radiation therapy alone (RT); and (3) TPT+RT at 3, 9, 15, and 21 HALO. The tumor-loaded mice without any treatment were used as controls. Results: The TPT+RT combination was more effective than TPT or RT as single agents. The TPT+RT combination at 15 HALO was best (TGD = 58.0 ± 3.6 days), and TPT+RT at 3 HALO was worst (TGD = 35.0 ± 1.5 days) among the 4 TPT+RT groups (P<.05). Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a significantly increased histone H2AX phosphorylation expression and decreased pimonidazole hydrochloride expression in the TPT+RT group at the same time point. The results suggested that the level of tumor hypoxia and DNA damage varied in a time-dependent manner. The expression of Top I in the TPT+RT group was also significantly different from the control tumors at 15 HALO (P<.05). Cell apoptosis index was increased and the proportion of cells in S phase was decreased (P<.05) with the highest value in 15 HALO and the lowest in 3 HALO. Conclusions: This study suggested that TPT combined with chronoradiotherapy could enhance the radiosensitivity of xenografted NPC. The TPT+RT group at 15 HALO had the best therapeutic effect. The chronomodulated radiosensitization mechanisms of TPT might be related to circadian rhythm of tumor hypoxia, cell cycle redistribution, DNA damage, and expression of Top I

  15. Combination therapy with lercanidipine and enalapril in the management of the hypertensive patient: an update of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antza C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Christina Antza,1 Stella Stabouli,2 Vasilios Kotsis1 1Hypertension Center, Third Department of Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, 2First Department of Pediatrics, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece Abstract: Hypertension is an important risk factor for premature death as it increases the probability of stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Antihypertensive drugs can decrease cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality. The majority of hypertensive patients need more than one antihypertensive agent to attain blood pressure (BP targets. Monotherapy can effectively reduce BP only in 20%–40% of patients. Multiple mechanisms including increased peripheral vascular resistance, increased cardiac work, and hypervolemia are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Targeting multiple pathways may more potently reduce BP. Increasing the dose of a single agent in many cases does not provide the expected BP-lowering effect because the underlying mechanism of the BP increase is either different or already corrected with the lower dose. Moreover, drugs acting on different pathways may have synergistic effects and thus better control hypertension. It is well known that diuretics enhance the actions of renin–angiotensin aldosterone system and activate it as a feedback to the reduced circulated blood volume. The addition of a renin–angiotensin aldosterone system blocker to a diuretic may more effectively reduce BP because the system is upregulated. Reducing the maximal dose of an agent may also reduce possible side effects if they are dose dependent. The increased prevalence of peripheral edema with higher doses of calcium channel blockers (CCBs is reduced when renin–angiotensin aldosterone system blockers are added to CCBs through vein dilation. The effectiveness of the combination of enalapril with lercanidipine in reducing BP, the safety profile, and the use of the combination of angiotensin

  16. Effects of Hormone Deprivation, 2-Methoxyestradiol Combination Therapy on Hormone-Dependent Prostate Cancer In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Sato

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME has potent anti proliferative effects on cancer cells. Its utility alone or in combination with other therapies for treating prostate cancer, however, has not been fully explored. Androgendependent, independent human prostate cancer cells were examined in vivo for their response to combination therapy. Efficacy was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, measuring microvessel density (MVD in excised tumors. Animals harboring hormonedependent tumors treated with 2-ME alone, androgen deprivation therapy alone, or the combination of the two had a 3.1-fold, 5.3-fold, 10.1-fold increase in apoptosis, respectively. For hormone-independent tumors, treatment with 2-ME resulted in a 2.43-fold increase in apoptosis, a 73% decrease in MVD. 2-ME was most effective against hormone-dependent tumors in vivo, combination therapy resulted in a significant increase in efficacy compared to no treatment controls, trended toward greater efficacy than either 2-ME or androgen deprivation alone. Combination therapy should be investigated further as an additional therapeutic option for early prostate cancer.

  17. Fixed-dose combination for adults accessing antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA HIV Clinicians Society

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This document serves to guide clinicians and programme managers on how to switch from 3 separate antiretroviral (ARV drugs to the new, single, fixed-dose combination (FDC tablet containing tenofovir (TDF, emtricitabine (FTC and efavirenz (EFV. Summary Transitioning from individual drugs to an FDC tablet needs to be managed carefully, particularly regarding stock management, ordering processes, supply-chain integrity and comprehensive patient counselling. Priority groups • Initially, FDC supply will be insufficient to provide for all FDC-suitable patients • Therefore, the National Department of Health (NDoH has recommended that the following patient groups be prioritized for FDC initiation/switch: • Priority group 1: All HIV-positive patients newly initiating ART – adults, adolescents and pregnant women (regardless of CD4 count (amendment to the guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT anticipated in April 2013 – and who do not have contra-indications to the FDC component drugs • Priority group 2: HIV-positive pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers currently stable on lamivudine (3TC, TDF and EFV • Priority group 3: Virologically suppressed patients on a stavudine (d4T-based regimen and who have normal renal function • Priority group 4: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have tuberculosis (TB co-infection • Priority group 5: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have other co-morbidites (e.g. hypertension, diabetes • Priority group 6: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who request to switch to the FDC treatment • Priority group 7: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who, after counselling, agree to switch to the FDC treatment. Important: Clinic staff must co-ordinate this process and only switch as many patients to the FDC tablet as stock allows. This should avoid patients being switched back and forth

  18. Combination of Multi-Agent Systems and Wireless Sensor Networks for the Monitoring of Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriuso, Alberto L; Villarrubia González, Gabriel; De Paz, Juan F; Lozano, Álvaro; Bajo, Javier

    2018-01-02

    Precision breeding techniques have been widely used to optimize expenses and increase livestock yields. Notwithstanding, the joint use of heterogeneous sensors and artificial intelligence techniques for the simultaneous analysis or detection of different problems that cattle may present has not been addressed. This study arises from the necessity to obtain a technological tool that faces this state of the art limitation. As novelty, this work presents a multi-agent architecture based on virtual organizations which allows to deploy a new embedded agent model in computationally limited autonomous sensors, making use of the Platform for Automatic coNstruction of orGanizations of intElligent Agents (PANGEA). To validate the proposed platform, different studies have been performed, where parameters specific to each animal are studied, such as physical activity, temperature, estrus cycle state and the moment in which the animal goes into labor. In addition, a set of applications that allow farmers to remotely monitor the livestock have been developed.

  19. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharmacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCT agents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron

  20. A clinical study on combined modality therapy, radio-hyperthermo-chemotherapy, for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshikazu

    1989-01-01

    A new multimodality therapy, radio-hyperthermo-chemotherapy, has been performed in a total of 31 pancreatic cancer patients with the purpose of improving treatment outcome. Combination of hyperthermia and chemotherapy was given as a pre-irradiation therapy in 7 resectable cancer patients. Among 24 unresectable cancer patients, 17 had irradiation in combination with hyperthermia and chemotherpay. Although both degeneration and necrosis of cancer cells were observed in all resectable cases at biopsy, these were not predictive of a better outcome. Of evaluable 17 patients with unresectable cancer, tumor regression was observed in 5 (29.4%). Although 22 patients had pain before therapy, 8 and 5 patients had remarkable and moderate pain relief, respectively, with therapy. Performance status was improved in 7 patients (29.2%). Survival rate at 12 months was still low (8.3%). However, the radio-hyperthermo-chemotherapy appears to help in increasing the quality of life in view of pain relief. (N.K.)

  1. Inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong DJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dao-Jun Gong,1 Jia-Min Zhang,1 Min Yu,1 Bo Zhuang,1 Qing-Qu Guo21Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Pancreatic carcinoma possesses one of the highest lethality rates, highest drug-resistance, and highest incidence rates. The objective of this research was to enhance the efficacy and drug-resistance for pancreatic carcinoma by using inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy methods.Methods: Three pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1 cells, BxPC-3 cells, and SW1990 cells received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vitro; then BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice also received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo.Results: The cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP-1 effect of drug in pancreatic carcinoma cells was significantly different (P < 0.05 and the efficacy in descending order was the combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine, inhibition of SIRT1, and gemcitabine. The BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo and the results showed that the tumor volumes decreased and the survival rate within 45 days increased according to the order of the given drugs and the difference was significant (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine could improve efficacy and survival time in a BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model, compared with single inhibition of SIRT1, or single

  2. Parainfluenza Virus Infection Sensitizes Cancer Cells to DNA-Damaging Agents: Implications for Oncolytic Virus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Candace R; Parks, Griffith D

    2018-04-01

    A parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) with mutations in the P/V gene (P/V-CPI - ) is restricted for spread in normal cells but not in cancer cells in vitro and is effective at reducing tumor burdens in mouse model systems. Here we show that P/V-CPI - infection of HEp-2 human laryngeal cancer cells results in the majority of the cells dying, but unexpectedly, over time, there is an emergence of a population of cells that survive as P/V-CPI - persistently infected (PI) cells. P/V-CPI - PI cells had elevated levels of basal caspase activation, and viability was highly dependent on the activity of cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins (IAPs) such as Survivin and XIAP. In challenge experiments with external inducers of apoptosis, PI cells were more sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and cell death. This increased cisplatin sensitivity correlated with defects in DNA damage signaling pathways such as phosphorylation of Chk1 and translocation of damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) to the nucleus. Cisplatin-induced killing of PI cells was sensitive to the inhibition of wild-type (WT) p53-inducible protein 1 (WIP1), a phosphatase which acts to terminate DNA damage signaling pathways. A similar sensitivity to cisplatin was seen with cells during acute infection with P/V-CPI - as well as during acute infections with WT PIV5 and the related virus human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2). Our results have general implications for the design of safer paramyxovirus-based vectors that cannot establish PI as well as the potential for combining chemotherapy with oncolytic RNA virus vectors. IMPORTANCE There is intense interest in developing oncolytic viral vectors with increased potency against cancer cells, particularly those cancer cells that have gained resistance to chemotherapies. We have found that infection with cytoplasmically replicating parainfluenza virus can result in increases in the killing of cancer cells by agents that induce DNA damage, and this is linked

  3. Oral combination therapy: repaglinide plus metformin for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, P

    2008-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by decreases in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. Several classes of oral antidiabetic medications are currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A stepwise treatment approach from monotherapy to combination therapy is traditionally used; however, the frequency of treatment failure with monotherapy has resulted in a move towards earlier treatment with combination therapies that target the two principal defects in glycaemic control. One such combination regimen is repaglinide (a prandial glucose regulator that increases insulin release) plus metformin (an insulin sensitizer that inhibits hepatic glucose output, increases peripheral glucose uptake and utilization and minimizes weight gain). Findings from several clinical trials have shown that combination therapy with repaglinide plus metformin is well tolerated and results in greater reductions of haemoglobin A(1c) and fasting plasma glucose values compared with either monotherapy. Repaglinide may also provide a more suitable alternative to combination therapy with sulphonylureas and metformin because of its reduced propensity for hypoglycaemia. The combination regimen of repaglinide plus metformin should therefore be considered as a valuable option in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes when monotherapy is no longer adequate.

  4. Nonstent Combination Interventional Therapy for Treatment of Benign Cicatricial Airway Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Jian Qiu; Jie Zhang; Ting Wang; Ying-Hua Pei; Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benign cicatricial airway stenosis (BCAS) is a life-threatening disease. While there are numerous therapies, all have their defects, and stenosis can easily become recurrent. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and complications of nonstent combination interventional therapy (NSCIT) when used for the treatment of BCAS of different causes and types. Methods: This study enrolled a cohort of patients with BCAS resulting from tuberculosis, intubation, tracheotomy, and othe...

  5. The combined application of biological therapy and methotrexate in case of escape phenomenon progressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponich E.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the study of the efficacy of methotrexate in patients with the "escape effect" during the ustekinumab therapy. Materials and Methods. The results of methotrexate at a dose of 15-20mg/week in treatment of 4 patients receiving biologic and developed "escape effect". Ustekinumab is used as a hypodermic injection at a dose of 45 mg for a body weight of a patient no more than 100 kg, and 90 mg of body weight over 100 kg, at the zero week, the 4th week and then every 12 weeks. Patients control meets the standard management of patients in biological therapy. Results. The study shows that in the case of the resistance progressing when applying preparations of biological therapy, methotrexate is useful at a dose of 15-20mg/week for up to 6 months. The combined use of biologic therapy and methotrexate in the treatment of patients with psoriasis vulgaris, "escape effect" contributes to the marked regression of clinical symptoms and allows to control the process long enough, which is confirmed by the dynamics of the index PASI, BRS and DLQI. The combined method is highly safe, as evidenced by the lack of inhibition of hematopoiesis, the normal level of hepatic transaminases and serum creatinine, which greatly improves patient compliance in this type of therapy. Conclusion. The article presents the data of the combined application of biological medication therapy (ustekinumab and methotrexate for the treatment of patients with the common form of psoriasis vulgaris. In the case of the development of resistance of biological therapy recommended the appointment of methotrexate. The combined use of methotrexate and biologic therapy in the treatment of patients with psoriasis vulgaris contributes to marked regression of clinical symptoms and allows to control the process for a long time.

  6. The acitretin and methotrexate combination therapy for psoriasis vulgaris achieves higher effectiveness and less liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingang; Zhang, Dingwei; Wu, Jiawen; Li, Jiong; Teng, Xiu; Gao, Xiaomin; Li, Ruilian; Wang, Xiuying; Xia, Linlin; Xia, Yumin

    2017-07-01

    Both acitretin and methotrexate are effective in ameliorating psoriatic lesion. However, their combination has been seldom reported in the treatment of psoriasis because of the warning regarding the potential hepatotoxicity of the drug interactions. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of such combination therapy for psoriasis vulgaris, and the potential benefit as well as side effect during the treatment. Thirty-nine patients with psoriasis vulgaris were treated with acitretin, methotrexate or their combination or as control. Similarly, K14-VEGF transgenic psoriasis-like mice were treated with these drugs. Human primary keratinocytes and hepatic stellate cells were used for analyzing their effect in vitro. The results showed that the combination therapy exhibited higher effectiveness in remitting skin lesion, but did not significantly affect the liver function of both patients and mice. Moreover, the combination groups showed less elevation of profibrotic factors in sera when compared with methotrexate alone groups accordingly. Furthermore, primary keratinocytes expressed more involucrin as well as loricrin and proliferated more slowly on the combined stimulation. Interestingly, such combination treatment induced lower expression of profibrotic factors in hepatic stellate cells. In conclusion, the acitretin-methotrexate combination therapy for psoriasis vulgaris can achieve higher effectiveness and result in less liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A hybrid approach to decision making and information fusion: Combining humans and artificial agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Frans C.A.; Pavlin, Gregor; Winterboer, Andi; Evers, Vanessa

    This paper argues that hybrid human–agent systems can support powerful solutions to relevant problems such as Environmental Crisis management. However, it shows that such solutions require comprehensive approaches covering different aspects of data processing, model construction and the usage. In

  8. The role of combination medical therapy in the treatment of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dawn Shao Ting; Fleseriu, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Uncontrolled acromegaly results in approximately 2-fold excess mortality. Pituitary surgery is first-line therapy, and medical treatment is indicated for persistent disease. While cabergoline and pegvisomant are used in select patients, somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) remain the cornerstone of medical treatment. Management of patients poorly responsive to SRLs is therefore, challenging. The purpose of this review is to highlight the options for combination medical therapy in the treatment of acromegaly, with an emphasis on efficacy and safety. All original articles/abstracts detailing combination medical therapy in acromegaly were identified from a PubMed search. Studies reviewed included retrospective and open-label prospective studies. While the combination of SRL and cabergoline was generally well tolerated, a lower baseline insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) level was the best predictor of efficacy; this combination may be most effective in patients with mildly elevated IGF-1. SRL-pegvisomant combination normalized IGF-1 in the majority of patients; continued efficacy despite individual drug dosing reduction was also reported. The risk of significant liver enzyme elevation was, however, higher than that reported with SRL monotherapy; close monitoring is recommended. Data on pegvisomant-cabergoline combination is limited, but this may be an option in the setting of SRL intolerance. Reports on temozolomide used in combination with other medical therapies in patients with aggressive GH-secreting tumors are also summarized. While more prospective, randomized controlled trials on long-term efficacy and safety are needed, combination medical therapy remains a treatment strategy that should be considered for acromegaly patients poorly responsive to SRLs.

  9. Atelocollagen sponge and recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor combination therapy for resistant wounds with deep cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Asako; Hakamada, Arata; Isoda, Ken-ichi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in bioengineering have introduced materials that enhance wound healing. Even with such new tools, some deep ulcers surrounded by avascular tissues, including bone, tendon, and fascia, are resistant to various therapies and easily form deep cavities with loss of subcutaneous tissue. Atelocollagen sponges have been used as an artificial dermis to cover full-thickness skin defects. Topical recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor has been introduced as a growth factor to induce fibroblast proliferation in skin ulcers. We applied these materials in combination in two patients with deep resistant wounds: one with a cavity reaching the mediastinum through a divided sternum and one with deep necrotic wounds caused by electric burns. These wounds did not respond to the topical basic fibroblast growth factor alone. In contrast, the combination therapy closed the wounds rapidly without further surgical treatment. This combination therapy is a potent treatment for resistant wounds with deep cavities.

  10. Combination treatment with T4 and T3: toward personalized replacement therapy in hypothyroidism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2012-07-01

    Levothyroxine therapy is the traditional lifelong replacement therapy for hypothyroid patients. Over the last several years, new evidence has led clinicians to evaluate the option of combined T(3) and T(4) treatment to improve the quality of life, cognition, and peripheral parameters of thyroid hormone action in hypothyroidism. The aim of this review is to assess the physiological basis and the results of current studies on this topic. We searched Medline for reports published with the following search terms: hypothyroidism, levothyroxine, triiodothyronine, thyroid, guidelines, treatment, deiodinases, clinical symptoms, quality of life, cognition, mood, depression, body weight, heart rate, cholesterol, bone markers, SHBG, and patient preference for combined therapy. The search was restricted to reports published in English since 1970, but some reports published before 1970 were also incorporated. We supplemented the search with records from personal files and references of relevant articles and textbooks. Parameters analyzed included the rationale for combination treatment, the type of patients to be selected, the optimal T(4)/T(3) ratio, and the potential benefits of this therapy on symptoms of hypothyroidism, quality of life, mood, cognition, and peripheral parameters of thyroid hormone action. The outcome of our analysis suggests that it may be time to consider a personalized regimen of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. Further prospective randomized controlled studies are needed to clarify this important issue. Innovative formulations of the thyroid hormones will be required to mimic a more perfect thyroid hormone replacement therapy than is currently available.

  11. Natural Forms of Vitamin E as Effective Agents for Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qing

    2017-11-01

    Initial research on vitamin E and cancer has focused on α-tocopherol (αT), but recent clinical studies on cancer-preventive effects of αT supplementation have shown disappointing results, which has led to doubts about the role of vitamin E, including different vitamin E forms, in cancer prevention. However, accumulating mechanistic and preclinical animal studies show that other forms of vitamin E, such as γ-tocopherol (γT), δ-tocopherol (δT), γ-tocotrienol (γTE), and δ-tocotrienol (δTE), have far superior cancer-preventive activities than does αT. These vitamin E forms are much stronger than αT in inhibiting multiple cancer-promoting pathways, including cyclo-oxygenase (COX)- and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)-catalyzed eicosanoids, and transcription factors such as nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3). These vitamin E forms, but not αT, cause pro-death or antiproliferation effects in cancer cells via modulating various signaling pathways, including sphingolipid metabolism. Unlike αT, these vitamin E forms are quickly metabolized to various carboxychromanols including 13'-carboxychromanols, which have even stronger anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects than some vitamin precursors. Consistent with mechanistic findings, γT, δT, γTE, and δTE, but not αT, have been shown to be effective for preventing the progression of various types of cancer in preclinical animal models. This review focuses on cancer-preventive effects and mechanisms of γT, δT, γTE, and δTE in cells and preclinical models and discusses current progress in clinical trials. The existing evidence strongly indicates that these lesser-known vitamin E forms are effective agents for cancer prevention or as adjuvants for improving prevention, therapy, and control of cancer. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Targeting the NF-κB Pathway as a Combination Therapy for Advanced Thyroid Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Pozdeyev

    Full Text Available NF-κB signaling plays an important role in tumor cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and drug/radiation resistance. Combination therapy involving NF-κB pathway inhibition is an attractive strategy for the treatment of advanced forms of thyroid cancer. This study was designed to test the efficacy of NF-κB pathway inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, using docetaxel and ionizing radiation in in vitro models of thyroid cancer. We found that while both docetaxel and ionizing radiation activated NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cells, there was no synergistic effect on cell proliferation and/or programmed cell death with either genetic (transduction of a dominant negative mutant form of IκBα or pharmacologic (proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and IKKβ inhibitor GO-Y030 inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines BCPAP, 8505C, THJ16T and SW1736. Docetaxel plus bortezomib synergistically decreased in vitro invasion of 8505C cells, but not in the other cell lines. Screening of a panel of clinically relevant targeted therapies for synergy with genetic NF-κB inhibition in a proliferation/cytotoxicity assay identified the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA as a potential candidate. However, the synergistic effect was confirmed only in the BCPAP cells. These results indicate that NF-κB inhibitors are unlikely to be beneficial as combination therapy with taxane cytotoxic chemotherapy, external radiation therapy or radioiodine therapy. There may be unique circumstances where NF-κB inhibitors may be considered in combination with docetaxel to reduce tumor invasion or in combination with HDAC inhibitors to reduce tumor growth, but this does not appear to be a combination therapy that could be broadly applied to patients with advanced thyroid cancer. Further research may identify which subsets of patients/tumors may respond to this therapeutic

  13. Photothermal and biodegradable polyaniline/porous silicon hybrid nanocomposites as drug carriers for combined chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Wang, Bin; Shi, Jisen; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Zhenyu; Li, Jiachen

    2017-03-15

    To develop photothermal and biodegradable nanocarriers for combined chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer, polyaniline/porous silicon hybrid nanocomposites had been successfully fabricated via surface initiated polymerization of aniline onto porous silicon nanoparticles in our experiments. As-prepared polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites could be well dispersed in aqueous solution without any extra hydrophilic surface coatings, and showed a robust photothermal effect under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. Especially, after an intravenous injection into mice, these biodegradable porous silicon-based nanocomposites as non-toxic agents could be completely cleared in body. Moreover, these polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites as drug carriers also exhibited an efficient loading and dual pH/NIR light-triggered release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a model anticancer drug). Most importantly, assisted with NIR laser irradiation, polyaniline/PSiNPs nanocomposites with loading DOX showed a remarkable synergistic anticancer effect combining chemotherapy with photothermal therapy, whether in vitro or in vivo. Therefore, based on biodegradable PSiNPs-based nanocomposites, this combination approach of chemo-photothermal therapy would have enormous potential on clinical cancer treatments in the future. Considering the non-biodegradable nature and potential long-term toxicity concerns of photothermal nanoagents, it is of great interest and importance to develop biodegradable and photothermal nanoparticles with an excellent biocompatibility for their future clinical applications. In our experiments, we fabricated porous silicon-based hybrid nanocomposites via surface initiated polymerization of aniline, which showed an excellent photothermal effect, aqueous dispersibility, biodegradability and biocompatibility. Furthermore, after an efficient loading of DOX molecules, polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites exhibited the remarkable synergistic anticancer

  14. Adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy for murine liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Daoyan; Dai Bingbing; Wang Zhonghe; Chen Shishu

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the synergistic antitumor effects of adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy in mice bearing liver cancer. Methods: Balb/c mice bearing liver cancer received the treatment at day 1 with tumor local irradiation (TLI) of 20 Gy or mask irradiation when tumor size reached 0.6-1.0 cm. Within 1 hour after irradiation, adenovirus containing IL-12 gene or PBS was intra-tumor injected once a week. Forty-eight hours after the second injection, IFN-γ levels in sera and the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were assayed by ELISA, CTL activity of spleen cells was measured by 3 H-TdR release assay, and phenotypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were analysed by immunohistochemical staining. Results: The growth of tumors in animals treated with a combination of IL-12 gene therapy and TLI was inhibited more significantly than those with either single treatment (P + and CD8 + lymphocyte infiltration and tumor-specific cytolytic activities, and the levels of IFN-γ in sera were higher in IL-12 gene therapy and IL-12 gene therapy combined with TLI groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that IL-12 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than both single treatment modalities and can induce specific antitumor immuno-response greatly

  15. ROLE OF ENTEROSORPTION IN COMPREHENSIVE THERAPY FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES COMBINED DAMAGE TO WITH GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Belan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of acute respiratory infections remains high in childhood. It is impossible to identify etiology most accurately in each particular case. However, according to multiple studies, viruses, their associations with each other and bacteria prevail as causative agents. In addition, it is quite often that a respiratory infection, especially in minor children, is combined with a condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Apart from symptomatic and antiviral therapies in these cases, as the authors of this article demonstrated, it is advisable to use enterosorbents. This tactics results in a decreased level of intoxication, lower intensity and duration of diarrheal syndrome, i.e. more speedy recovery.Key words: acute respiratory infections, condition of gastro tract, intoxication, diarrheal syndrome, treatment, enterosorbents, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:88-90

  16. Feasibility Study Combining Art Therapy or Cognitive Remediation Therapy with Family-based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Agras, William S; Weinbach, Noam; Jo, Booil

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa who have obsessive-compulsive (OC) features respond poorly to family-based treatment (FBT). This study evaluated the feasibility of combining FBT with either cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) or art therapy (AT) to improve treatment response in this at-risk group. Thirty adolescents with anorexia nervosa and OC features were randomized to 15 sessions of FBT + CRT or AT. Recruitment rate was 1 per month, and treatment attrition was 16.6% with no differences between groups. Suitability, expectancy and therapeutic relationships were acceptable for both combinations. Correlations between changes in OC traits and changes in cognitive inefficiencies were found for both combinations. Moderate changes in cognitive inefficiencies were found in both groups but were larger in the FBT + AT combination. This study suggests that an RCT for poor responders to FBT because of OC traits combining FBT with either CRT or AT is feasible to conduct. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. Trigeminal neuralgia: successful antiepileptic drug combination therapy in three refractory cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisco L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lara Prisco1, Mario Ganau2, Federica Bigotto1, Francesca Zornada11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, University Hospital of Cattinara, 2Graduate School of Nanotechnology, University of Trieste, ItalyAbstract: Antiepileptic drug combination therapy remains an empirical second-line treatment approach in trigeminal neuralgia, after treatment with one antiepileptic drug or other nonantiepileptic drugs have failed. The results in three patients followed in our clinic are not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions, but suggest the possibility of developing this type of therapeutic approach further.Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, antiepileptic drugs, combination therapy

  18. Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cates, Angharad N; Farr, Matthew RB; Rees, Karen; Casas, Juan P; Huffman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the effectiveness of fixed-dose combination therapy on optimising CVD risk factors and reducing CVD fatal and non-fatal events for both primary and secondary prevention of CVD. Details of CVD events and risk factors included are listed in the methods. We will also determine any adverse events associated with taking fixed-dose combination therapy. This will include studies conducted in both developed and developing regions of the world. PMID:25267903

  19. The ways of improvement of combination therapy results in patients with local cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumilo, A.O.

    2010-01-01

    A new solutions of a scientific task of modern oncogynecology, improvement of the efficacy of treatment for local cervical cancer on the account of expansion of the indications to operative treatment is presented on the clinical material (275 patients with stage II-III CC). The use of the developed technique of multimodality therapy based on the split course of combination radiation therapy against a background of neoadjuvant chemotherapy allowed to convert in 49.6% of cases of immobile tumor process to an operable stage followed by uterus and adnexae removal while at the traditional combination radiotherapy the resectability index was 6.9%.

  20. Antioxidant activity of dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination in neuroprotective therapy in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Kurysheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the antioxidant activity of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol fixed combinations and to compare it with other fixed combinations.Methods: Antioxidant activity (AOA of dorzolamide/timolol (Cosopt, dorzolamide/timolol (Dorzopt Plus, latanoprost/timolol, brimonidine/timolol, travoprost/timolol and bimatoprost/timolol fixed combinations was measured in vitro using the model of oxida- tive hemolysis.Results: Dorzolamide/timolol (Cosopt AOA was higher than that of other fixed combinations and increased with the quantity of the drugs added to the model system: 40%, 52% and 75% in 30 μl, 60 μl and 90 μl respectively.Conclusion: these findings suggest that dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination has potential advantages over the other fixed combinations due to its high antioxidant activity and might be used as the neuroptotective agent for glaucoma treatment.

  1. Combination therapy of ifenprodil with piroxicam may be an effective therapeutic intervention in cerebral stroke: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2012-10-01

    Owing to the intricate and multifaceted pathology of cerebral stroke, multiple drug therapy had long been suggested for effective stroke treatment. Therefore, the development of a potential new combination of drug is necessitated which can bring about desirable improved neuroprotection targeting different pathways against ischemic stroke. In this context, we hypothesize the combination effect of Piroxicam, a Non steroidal anti inflammatory drug with Ifenprodil, a NR2b selective NMDAR antagonist in animal model of cerebral ischemia. A few past studies have enumerated the neuroprotective roles of Piroxicam and Ifenprodil administered in singlet against cerebral ischemia in animal model, hence we hypothesized that by using Piroxicam and Ifenprodil in combination would provide additive neuroprotection than either of the agents used alone. In this article, we discuss our hypothesis regarding the possibility of Piroxicam and Ifenprodil as a potent combination which may have a positive therapeutic role in treatment of cerebral ischemia through its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative characteristics of Piroxicam with Ifenprodil which has been proved to have neuroprotective, anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects and has potentials for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson's disease alcoholism and drug addiction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A smart drug: a pH-responsive photothermal ablation agent for Golgi apparatus activated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fengfeng; Wen, Ying; Wei, Peng; Gao, Yilin; Zhou, Zhiguo; Xiao, Shuzhang; Yi, Tao

    2017-06-13

    We report a pH-responsive photothermal ablation agent (pH-PTT) based on cyanine dyes for photothermal therapy (PTT). The nanoparticles formed by BSA and pH-PTT preferentially accumulated in the Golgi apparatus of cancer cells compared to normal cells, and thus can be specifically activated by the acidic Golgi apparatus in cancer cells for effective PTT both ex vivo and in vivo.

  3. In Vitro Efficacy and Mechanistic Role of Indocyanine Green as a Photodynamic Therapy Agent for Human Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamoon, A.; Gamal-Eldeen, A; Ruppel, M; Smith, R; Tsang, T; Miller, L

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for superficial cancer. However, poor therapeutic results have been reported for melanoma, due to the high melanin content. Indocyanine green (ICG) has near infrared absorption (700-800nm) and melanins do not absorb strongly in this area. This study explores the efficiency of ICG as a PDT agent for human melanoma, and its mechanistic role in the cell death pathway.

  4. [Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy for semen collection from infertile males in whom masturbation fails].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Hao; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Lu-Lin; Hong, Kai; Zhao, Lian-Ming; Liu, De-Feng; Mao, Jia-Ming; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ju; Gao, Ling; Qiao, Jie

    2013-05-01

    To study the effect of Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy in helping obtain semen from infertile men in whom masturbation has failed. Sixty male infertile patients from whom masturbation had failed to obtain semen were equally assigned to receive Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy (combination group) or Tadalafil only (control group). All the patients took Tadalafil 20 mg orally the night before the day of semen collection by masturbation. Before this procedure, the patients of the combination group practiced masturbation 16 - 24 times at home. The average ages of the patients were (37.0 +/- 5.1) yr and (37.5 +/- 5.2) yr and their IIEF-5 scores were 16.50 +/- 1.25 and 16.90 +/- 1.09 in the combination and the control group, respectively, neither with statistically significant difference between the two groups. Semen was successfully obtained from 9 patients (30.0%) of the combination group and 1 patient (3.33%) of the control group, with statistically significant difference between the two groups (chi2 = 7.680, P masturbation, Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy can significantly increase the success rate of semen collection from the male infertile patients in whom masturbation fails.

  5. Combined therapy with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis: a multicenter retrospective observational cohort study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yukio; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Nakayama, Masaaki; Higuchi, Chieko; Sanaka, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshihide; Sakai, Ken; Mizuiri, Sonoo; Otsuka, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Satoru; Maeba, Teruhiko; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Nakao, Toshiyuki; Hosoya, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Combining peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) has been common treatment option in Japan. In this retrospective, multicenter, observational study, the clinical characteristics and outcomes of 104 patients (57 ± 11 years, males 72%) who had switched from PD alone to combined therapy with PD and HD were studied. Clinical parameters were measured at baseline and after 3 months of combined therapy. At baseline, urine volume, dialysate-to-plasma ratio of creatinine (D/P Cr), and total Kt/V were 150 ml/day (range: 0-2,000 ml/day), 0.67 ± 0.11, and 1.8 ± 0.4, respectively. During the first 3 months of combined therapy, body weight, urine volume, serum creatinine level, and D/P Cr decreased, whereas hemoglobin levels increased. In patients where PD does not result in acceptable outcomes, combined therapy with PD and HD may have potential benefits in terms of dialysis adequacy and hydration status. Video Journal Club “Cappuccino with Claudio Ronco” at http://www.karger.com/?doi=368389 © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Measuring the effects of topically applied skin optical clearing agents and modeling the effects and consequences for laser therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Khan, Misbah; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Human skin prepared with an optical clearing agent manifests reduced scattering as a result of de-hydration and refractive index matching. This has potentially large effects for laser therapies of several skin lesions such as port wine stain, hair removal and tattoo removal. With most topically applied clearing agents the clearing effect is limited because they penetrate poorly through the intact superficial skin layer (stratum corneum). Agent application modi other than topical are impractical and have limited the success of optical clearing in laser dermatology. In recent reports, however, a mixture of lipofylic and hydrofylic agents was shown to successfully penetrate through the intact stratum corneum layer which has raised new interest in this field. Immediately after application, the optical clearing effect is superficial and, as the agent diffuses through the skin, reduced scattering is manifested in deeper skin layers. For practical purposes as well as to maximize therapeutic success, it is important to quantify the reduced scattering as well as the trans-cutaneous transport dynamics of the agent. We determined the time and tissue depth resolved effects of optically cleared skin by inserting a microscopic reflector array in the skin. Depth dependent light intensity was measured by quantifying the signal of the reflector array with optical coherence tomography. A 1-dimensional mass diffusion model was used to estimate a trans-cutaneous transport diffusion constant for the clearing agent mixture. The results are used in Monte Carlo modeling to determine the optimal time of laser treatment after topical application of the optical clearing agent.

  7. Combination therapy in a patient with chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceravolo, Ferdinando; Grisolia, Michele; Sestito, Simona; Falvo, Francesca; Moricca, Maria Teresa; Concolino, Daniela

    2017-01-20

    The variants of neuronopathic Gaucher disease may be viewed as a clinical phenotypic continuum divided into acute and chronic forms. The chronic neuronopathic form of Gaucher disease is characterized by a later onset of neurological symptoms and protracted neurological and visceral involvement. The first-choice treatment for nonneuronopathic Gaucher disease is enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant analogues of the deficient human enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to improve hematological and bone manifestations associated with Gaucher disease, but, as with most proteins, recombinant enzymes cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, which prevents effects on neurological manifestations. Substrate reduction therapy with miglustat (N-butyldeoxynojirimycin) inhibits glucosylceramide synthase, which catalyzes the first step in glycosphingolipid synthesis. Because miglustat can cross the blood-brain barrier, it has been suggested that, combined with enzyme replacement therapy, it might be effective in treating neurological symptoms in patients with neuronopathic Gaucher disease. We report observed effects of combined enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy in a 7-year-old Caucasian boy with neuronopathic Gaucher disease who was homozygous for L444P mutations. He had received enzyme replacement therapy from the age of 18 months, and concomitant miglustat treatment was commenced, with dosing according to body surface area uptitrated over 1 month with dietary modifications when he reached the age of 30 months. He experienced mild diarrhea after commencing miglustat therapy, which decreased in frequency/severity over time. His splenomegaly was reduced, and his hematological values and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity normalized. Plasma chitotriosidase also showed substantial and sustained decreases. After 5 years of combination therapy, the patient showed no signs of neurological impairment. This case

  8. Combination of nitric oxide therapy, anti-oxidative therapy, low level laser therapy, plasma rich platelet therapy and stem cell therapy as a novel therapeutic application to manage the pain and treat many clinical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Salaheldin; Dickinson, Eva

    2014-02-01

    From hypertension to diabetes, cancer to HIV, stroke to memory loss and learning disorders to septic shock, male impotence to tuberculosis, there is probably no pathological condition where nitric oxide does not play an important role. Nitric oxide is an analgesic, immune-modulator, vasodilator, anti-apoptotic, growth modulator, angiogenetic, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and neuro-modulator. Because of the above actions of nitric oxide, many clinical conditions associated with abnormal Nitric oxide (NO) production and bioavailability. Our novel therapeutic approach is to restore the homeostasis of nitric oxide and replace the lost cells by combining nitric oxide therapy, anti-oxidative therapy, low level laser therapy, plasma rich platelet therapy and stem cell therapy.

  9. EFFECTS OF COMBINATION THERAPY ON PLATELET COUNT IN PATIENTS OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin and clopidogrel are usually used individually to prevent adverse cardiovascular events and stroke. They are used in stabilizing the blood pressure in patients of myocardial infarction while combination therapy of aspirin and Clopidogrel (dual anti-platelet therapy is used for preventing adverse cardiovascular events in myocardial infarction patients. A cross-sectional observational study is conducted through a structured questionnaire from 110 patients of K.I.H.D (Karachi Institute of Heart Disease hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Indoor/admitted patients with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTE-MI, ST elevation myocardial infarction (STE-MI, supra ventricular tachycardia (SVT were included along with those with previous or current onset of angina pectoris or heart attack. Information from the test reports of these patients was included in the data. Patients without proper test reports were excluded from the study. Combination therapy duration is considered as key tool for evaluation. Out of 100 patients (after exclusion criteria applied almost 18% patients were using the combination therapy for 10 to 25 years while 52% of patients were using the combination therapy for 1 to 10 years. Platelet count of 88% patients was found to be in between 1,50,000–3,50,000/µl. Remaining patients had less than 1,50,000 µl to more than 3,50,000 to 4,50,000 µl. Most frequently reported side effects were chest pain, respiratory issues, headache and depression. On the basis of our data analysis it is concluded that long duration dual anti-platelet therapy will not harm platelet count in human blood but it can create drug dependency in patients. Hypertension is not completely cured with this therapy but can help in stabilizing blood pressure.

  10. Safety of Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin Combination Therapy in a Patient Who Developed Anemia due to Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Suii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy was previously the standard of care for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 2 infection. But, it often induced hemolytic anemia. In 2014, sofosbuvir (SOF was approved for the treatment of chronic HCV genotype 2 in Japan. SOF/RBV therapy is more effective against genotype 2 than IFN/RBV therapy. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic HCV genotype 2b infection. She received five treatments including RBV and IFN therapy before SOF was approved and all of them were ineffective. Therapies that included RBV induced severe anemia and led to discontinuation of treatment. With pegylated IFN/RBV therapy, the maximum change in hemoglobin (Hb from baseline was −3.7 g/dL. However, SOF/RBV therapy was effective and she achieved sustained virologic response (SVR with a maximum change in Hb from baseline of only −1.2 g/dL. We also found reticulocyte count was very low during treatment in this case and speculate it was one of the reasons that she developed hemolytic anemia with RBV. In conclusion, SOF/RBV therapy is effective and allowed the patient to achieve SVR. An SOF/RBV regimen is safe and effective for patients who have or are at risk of anemia induced by RBV.

  11. Combination of Multi-Agent Systems and Wireless Sensor Networks for the Monitoring of Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriuso, Alberto L.; De Paz, Juan F.; Lozano, Álvaro

    2018-01-01

    Precision breeding techniques have been widely used to optimize expenses and increase livestock yields. Notwithstanding, the joint use of heterogeneous sensors and artificial intelligence techniques for the simultaneous analysis or detection of different problems that cattle may present has not been addressed. This study arises from the necessity to obtain a technological tool that faces this state of the art limitation. As novelty, this work presents a multi-agent architecture based on virtual organizations which allows to deploy a new embedded agent model in computationally limited autonomous sensors, making use of the Platform for Automatic coNstruction of orGanizations of intElligent Agents (PANGEA). To validate the proposed platform, different studies have been performed, where parameters specific to each animal are studied, such as physical activity, temperature, estrus cycle state and the moment in which the animal goes into labor. In addition, a set of applications that allow farmers to remotely monitor the livestock have been developed. PMID:29301310

  12. Synergistic combinations of antifungals and antivirulence agents to fight against Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Jinhui; Ren, Biao; Tong, Yaojun

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, one of the pathogenic Candida species, causes high mortality rate in immunocompromised and high-risk surgical patients. In the last decade, only one new class of antifungal drug echinocandin was applied. The increased therapy failures, such as the one caused by multi-drug resist...

  13. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-01-01

    Combination effect of lentinan with X-ray irradiation on the metastatic mouse tumors, L1210, KLN205 and Lewis lung carcinoma were studied. Combination use of lentinan with X-ray therapy prolonged the life of BDF 1 mice bearing L1210 leukemia in the suitable combination conditions. Combination effects of lentinan with X-ray therapy were also observed on the suppression of the growth of KLN205 squamus cell carcinoma and on the suppression of the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma. Especially, in the case that lentinan was administered before or after X-ray local irradiation in the pulmorary metastasis system of Lewis lung carcinoma, a marked suppressin of pulmonary metastasis was observed and 2 to 4 mice among 8 tested mice were tumor free. (author)

  14. Evaluation of carboranylporphyrins as boron delivery agents for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Shinji; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Wu, Gong; Binns, Peter J.; Riley, Kent J.; Ongayi, Owendi; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Vicente, Graca H.

    2006-01-01

    The goals of the present study were two-fold. First, to determine the biodistribution of three carboranyl-porphyrins, designated H 2 DCP, H 2 TCP and H 2 TBP following intracerebral (i.c.) administration by means of convection enhanced delivery (CED) to F98 glioma bearing rats. Tumor boron concentrations immediately after CED were 36 and 88 μg/g for H 2 DCP and H 2 TCP, respectively, and were 103 and 62 μg/g for H 2 TCP and H 2 TBP, respectively, 24h after termination of CED. The corresponding normal brain concentrations were 5.2, 3.3 and 0.8 μg/g, and blood and liver concentrations all were 2 TCP and H 2 TBP as boron delivery agents in F98 glioma bearing rats. BNCT was carried out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITRR) 24 h after CED of 200 μl of either 0.5 mg of H 2 TCP or H 2 TBP. Untreated control rats all died within 29 days after tumor implantation and had a mean survival time (MST) of 23±3 days and irradiated controls had a MST of 27±3 days. Animals that received H 2 TCP by CED, followed by BNCT, had a MST of 35±4 days and animals received H 2 TBP had a MST of 44±10 days. Further studies were carried out using H 2 TBP at a dose of 0.2 mg administered by a Harvard pump, either alone or in combination with i.v. BPA, and the corresponding MSTs were 34±3 d and 43±9 d, respectively. Histopathologic examination of the brains of animals that died revealed large numbers of porphyrin laden macrophages and extracellular accumulations of free porphyrin indicating that tumor cell uptake was suboptimal. Further studies are planned to synthesize and evaluate new compounds that will have enhanced cellular uptake and efficacy as boron delivery agents for NCT. (author)

  15. Regorafenib with a fluoropyrimidine for metastatic colorectal cancer after progression on multiple 5-FU-containing combination therapies and regorafenib monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Eric I; Tan, Carlyn; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Lanlan; Yang, Zhaohai; Scicchitano, Angelique; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-01-01

    We present 2 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had progressed despite treatment with first-line FOLFOX and second-line FOLFIRI combination chemotherapy regimens. After failing these fluoropyrimidine-based regimens, both patients received additional cytotoxic and targeted therapies with eventual disease progression. These therapies included capecitabine plus dabrafenib and trametinib, regorafenib monotherapy, and regorafenib with panitumumab. After exhausting available options, both patients were offered regorafenib with either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine. These therapies are individually approved for the treatment of colorectal cancer but have not yet been studied in combination. This regimen produced stable disease in both patients with acceptable toxicity. One patient continued therapy for 17 months. Although these patients previously progressed during treatment with regorafenib, capecitabine or 5-FU, the combination had some activity in both cases of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer and may be considered in the palliative setting. In bedside-to-bench cell culture experiments performed after the clinical observations, we observed sensitivity of human colorectal cancer cell lines (N = 4) to single agent regorafenib or 5-FU and evidence of synergy with the combination therapy. Synergistic effects were noted in colorectal cancer cells with KRAS mutation, BRAF mutation, and p53 mutation, as well as mismatch repair deficient cells. Regorafenib suppressed Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL in treated cancer cells that may have contributed to the anticancer efficacy including in combination with 5-FU. The safety and efficacy of regorafenib with 5-FU or capecitabine in combination should be further investigated as a therapy for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, including individuals who had progressed on regorafenib monotherapy.

  16. Combinations of biocontrol agents for management of plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Susan L F; Roberts, Daniel P

    2002-03-01

    Numerous microbes are antagonistic to plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi, but few of these organisms are commercially available for management of these pathogens. Inconsistent performance of applied biocontrol agents has proven to be a primary obstacle to the development of successful commercial products. One of the strategies for overcoming inconsistent performance is to combine the disease-suppressive activity of two (or more) beneficial microbes in a biocontrol preparation. Such combinations have potential for more extensive colonization of the rhizosphere, more consistent expression of beneficial traits under a broad range of soil conditions, and antagonism to a larger number of plant pests or pathogens than strains applied individually. Conversely, microbes applied in combination also may have antagonistic interactions with each other. Increased, decreased, and unaltered suppression of the target pathogen or pest has been observed when biocontrol microbes have been applied in combination. Unfortunately, the ecological basis for increased or decreased suppression has not been determined in many cases and needs further consideration. The complexity of interactions involved in the application of multiple organisms for biological control has slowed progress toward development of successful formulations. However, this approach has potential for overcoming some of the efficacy problems that occur with application of individual biocontrol agents.

  17. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  18. Clinical investigation of 131I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haiqing; Wu Bian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical curative effects of 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease. Methods: Patients with Graves disease took lithium carbonate (250 mg, once per day) orally for 5 weeks. Then they were treated with 131 I (doses=3.15 MBq(80 uCi)/g, based on 60%-70% of the thyroid size). We kept track from 6 to 24 months (averaging 14 months) and classified the results into three: cured, improved or no effect. Results: After a single cycle of 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate, 106 patients with Graves disease were cured, 28 were improved and 8 saw no effects, respectively 74.6%, 19.7% and 5.6% among the 142 patients. We then treated 23 of them with another 131 I therapy (without lithium carbonate). 10 of such were cured (43.5%), 8 were improved (34.8%) and the other 5 saw no effects. Among all patients, hypothyroidism was observed from 25(17.6%), 6 months after the first 131 I therapy. Conclusions: Notable curative results were observed from 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease. Moreover, the dosage of 131 I was therefore decreased, which also lowered the toxicity response. (authors)

  19. The value of hysterosalpingography using non-ionic contrast agent combined with low-tensive drug in diagnosis of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Qiwei; Liu Xiaojun; Shi Jianfen; Jiang Guohua; Ye Jinqing; Shen Jun; Song Ting

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the value of nonionic contrast agent combined with low tensive drug in the hysterosalpingography in diagnosis of infertility. Methods: 203 patients with infertility were randomly classified into two groups. Group 1 contained 108 patients administrated intramuscularly anisodamine (654-2) 30 minutes before hysterosalpingography. 95 patients in group 2 did not use 654-2. Non-ionic contrast agent was used in all patients. The image quality and post-contrast displaying status of uterus and uterine tube between the two groups were analyzed. Results: No allergic response occurred in all patients. The image quality and post-contrast displaying status of uterus and uterine tube of group 1 were obviously superior to that of group 2 (P<0.01). Conclusion: Hysterosalpingography clearly showed lesions of uterus and uterine tube when using non-ionic contrast agent combined with low-tensive drug. It is more safety with less side effects. The contraction of uterine tube can be relieved by the low-tensive drug effectively, so as to decrease the false positive rate, raise the diagnostic accuracy, and lessen patients sufferings. It is deserved to be applied generally. (authors)

  20. Boron microquantification in oral mucosa and skin following administration of a neutron capture therapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiger, S.W. III; Micca, P.L.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for intracranial tumours using boronphenylalanine-fructose undertaken at Harvard-MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory have observed acute normal tissue reactions in the skin and oral mucosa. Because the range of the 10 B(n,a) 7 Li reaction products is very short, 10-14 μm combined, knowledge of the 10B microdistribution in tissue is critical for understanding the microdosimetry and radiobiology of BNCT. This paper reports measurements of the microdistribution of 10 B in an animal model, rat skin and tongue, using high resolution quantitative autoradiography (HRQAR), a neutron-induced track etch autoradiographic technique. The steep spatial gradient and high absolute value relative to blood of the 10 B concentration observed in some strata of the rat tongue epithelium and skin are important for properly evaluating the radiobiology and the biological effectiveness factors for normal tissue reactions such as oral mucositis, which are generally assessed using the blood boron concentration rather than the tissue boron concentration. (author)

  1. In vivo evaluation of neutron capture therapy effectivity using calcium phosphate-based nanoparticles as Gd-DTPA delivery agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Novriana; Mi, Peng; Yanagie, Hironobu; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Masashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Cabral, Horacio; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ono, Koji; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    A more immediate impact for therapeutic approaches of current clinical research efforts is of major interest, which might be obtained by developing a noninvasive radiation dose-escalation strategy, and neutron capture therapy represents one such novel approach. Furthermore, some recent researches on neutron capture therapy have focused on using gadolinium as an alternative or complementary for currently used boron, taking into account several advantages that gadolinium offers. Therefore, in this study, we carried out feasibility evaluation for both single and multiple injections of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent incorporated in calcium phosphate nanoparticles as neutron capture therapy agent. In vivo evaluation was performed on colon carcinoma Col-26 tumor-bearing mice irradiated at nuclear reactor facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute with average neutron fluence of 1.8 × 10(12) n/cm(2). Antitumor effectivity was evaluated based on tumor growth suppression assessed until 27 days after neutron irradiation, followed by histopathological analysis on tumor slice. The experimental results showed that the tumor growth of irradiated mice injected beforehand with Gd-DTPA-incorporating calcium phosphate-based nanoparticles was suppressed up to four times higher compared to the non-treated group, supported by the results of histopathological analysis. The results of antitumor effectivity observed on tumor-bearing mice after neutron irradiation indicated possible effectivity of gadolinium-based neutron capture therapy treatment.

  2. MaLT - Combined Motor and Language Therapy Tool for Brain Injury Patients Using Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagkar, Maitreyee; McCrindle, Rachel; Robson, Holly; Meteyard, Lotte; Sperrin, Malcom; Smith, Andy; Pugh, Moyra

    2017-03-23

    The functional connectivity and structural proximity of elements of the language and motor systems result in frequent co-morbidity post brain injury. Although rehabilitation services are becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and "integrated", treatment for language and motor functions often occurs in isolation. Thus, behavioural therapies which promote neural reorganisation do not reflect the high intersystem connectivity of the neurologically intact brain. As such, there is a pressing need for rehabilitation tools which better reflect and target the impaired cognitive networks. The objective of this research is to develop a combined high dosage therapy tool for language and motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation therapy tool developed, MaLT (Motor and Language Therapy), comprises a suite of computer games targeting both language and motor therapy that use the Kinect sensor as an interaction device. The games developed are intended for use in the home environment over prolonged periods of time. In order to track patients' engagement with the games and their rehabilitation progress, the game records patient performance data for the therapist to interrogate. MaLT incorporates Kinect-based games, a database of objects and language parameters, and a reporting tool for therapists. Games have been developed that target four major language therapy tasks involving single word comprehension, initial phoneme identification, rhyme identification and a naming task. These tasks have 8 levels each increasing in difficulty. A database of 750 objects is used to programmatically generate appropriate questions for the game, providing both targeted therapy and unique gameplay every time. The design of the games has been informed by therapists and by discussions with a Public Patient Involvement (PPI) group. Pilot MaLT trials have been conducted with three stroke survivors for the duration of 6 to 8 weeks. Patients' performance is monitored through MaLT's reporting facility

  3. Vitamin D: considerations in the continued development as an agent for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Deeb, Kristin K; Johnson, Candace S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable preclinical and epidemiologic data suggest that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis, progression, and therapy for cancer. Numerous epidemiologic studies support the hypothesis that individuals with lower serum vitamin D levels have a higher risk of a number of cancers. Measures of vitamin D level in such studies include both surrogate estimates of vitamin D level (residence in more northern latitudes, history of activity, and sun exposure) as well as measured serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol levels. Perhaps, the most robust of these epidemiologic studies is that of Giovannucci et al, who developed and validated an estimate of serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol level and reported that among >40,000 individuals in the Health Professionals Study, an increase in 25(OH) cholecalciferol level of 62.5 ng/mL was associated with a reduction in the risk of head/neck, esophagus, pancreas cancers, and acute leukemia by >50%. Unfortunately, very limited data are available to indicate whether or not giving vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of cancer. Many preclinical studies indicate that exposing cancer cells, as well as vascular endothelial cells derived from tumors, to high concentrations of active metabolites of vitamin D halts progression through cell cycle, induces apoptosis and will slow or stop the growth of tumors in vivo. There are no data that one type of cancer is more or less susceptible to the effects of vitamin D. Vitamin D also potentiates the antitumor activity of a number of types of cytotoxic anticancer agents in in vivo preclinical models. Vitamin D analogues initiate signaling through a number of important pathways, but the pathway(s) essential to the antitumor activities of vitamin D are unclear. Clinical studies of vitamin D as an antitumor agent have been hampered by the lack of a suitable pharmaceutical preparation for clinical study. All commercially available formulations are inadequate because of the necessity to administer large

  4. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells. (author)

  5. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells. (author)

  6. Efficacy and safety of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) for non-falciparum malaria: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Benjamin J.; Wieten, Rosanne W.; Kroon, Daniëlle; Nagel, Ingeborg M.; Bélard, Sabine; van Vugt, Michèle; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is recommended as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, whereas chloroquine is still commonly used for the treatment of non-falciparum species (Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae). A more simplified, more

  7. Failure of daptomycin β-Lactam combination therapy to prevent resistance emergence in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vidthiya; Davis, Rebecca; Shackel, Nick; Espedido, Bjorn A; Beukers, Alicia G; Jensen, Slade O; van Hal, Sebastiaan J

    2018-02-01

    Daptomycin β-Lactam combination therapy offers "protection" against daptomycin non-susceptibility (DNS) development in Enterococcus faecium. We report failure of this strategy and the importance of source control. Mutations were detected in the LiaF and cls genes in DNS isolates. A single DNS isolate contained an unrecognized mutation, which requires confirmation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS: Vi...... rates Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6...

  9. Systems biology analysis unravels the complementary action of combined rosuvastatin and ezetimibe therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, L.; Radonjic, M.; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kelder, T.; Kooistra, T.; Ommen, B. van; Kleemann, R.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Combination-drug therapy takes advantage of the complementary action of their individual components, thereby potentiating its therapeutic effect. Potential disadvantages include side effects that are not foreseen on basis of the data available from drug monotherapy. Here, we used a systems

  10. Progress in research on combination treatment of cancer with radiation therapy and immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hao; Jia Rui; Yan Jinqi; Yu Jiyun

    2007-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important local treatment for tumors, and immunotherapy is a systematic treatment. Combination of RT with immunotherapy may bring about an obvious synergistic anti-tumor effort. Here the research progress in this aspect is reviewed. (authors)

  11. The effect of combined antiretroviral therapy on the overall mortality of HIV-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, A. N.; Gilson, R.; Easterbrook, P.; Fisher, M.; Gazzard, B.; Johnson, M.; Walsh, J.; Leen, C.; Orkin, C.; Anderson, J.; Pillay, D.; Delpech, V.; Schwenk, A.; Dunn, D.; Gompels, M.; Hill, T.; Porter, K.; Babiker, A.; Sabin, C.; Waters, A.; Crates, D.; Mohamed-Saad, S.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Harris, W.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Dodds, J.; Rider, A.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Gumley, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani, D.; Weber, J.; Cashin, S.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Gann, S.; Wilson, A.; Ainsworth, J.; de Wolf, F.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L. A. J.; Kesselring, A. M.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zhang, S.; Zaheri, S.; Prins, J. M.; Bos, J. C.; Eeftinck-Schattenkerk, J. K. M.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Lange, J. M. A.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Olszyna, D. P.; van der Poll, M.; Reiss, P.; Sankatsing, S. U. C.; Steingrover, R.; van der Valk, M.; Vermeulen, J. N.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Schreij, G.; van der Geest, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Lowe, S.; Verbon, A.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Pajkrt, D.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Ende, M. E.; Bax, H.; van der Feltz, M.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Schurink, C. A. M.; de Vries, T. E. M. S.; Driessen, G.; van der Flier, M.; Hartwig, N. G.; Branger, J.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; den Hollander, J. G.; Bronsveld, W.; Vriesendorp, R.; Jeurissen, F. J. F.; Leyten, E. M. S.; van Houte, D.; Polée, M. B.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Wagenaar, J.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Veenstra, J.; Vasmel, W. L. E.; Koopmans, P. P.; Brouwer, A. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; de Groot, R.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; van Assen, S.; van Leeuwen, J. T. M.; Stek, C. J.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; Mudrikova, T.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Weijer, S.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Hillebrand, M. E.; de Jong, E. V.; Kortmann, W.; Perenboom, R. M.; bij de Vaate, E. A.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; Gisolf, E. H.; Tanis, A. A.; Duits, A. J.; Winkel, K.; Elisabeth, S. T.; Abgrall, S.; Barin, F.; Bentata, M.; Billaud, E.; Boué, F.; Burty, C.; Cabié, A.; Costagliola, D.; Cotte, L.; de Truchis, P.; Duval, X.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Gaud, C.; Gilquin, J.; Grabar, S.; Katlama, C.; Khuong, M. A.; Lang, J. M.; Lascaux, A. S.; Launay, O.; Mahamat, A.; Mary-Krause, M.; Matheron, S.; Meynard, J. L.; Pavie, J.; Pialoux, G.; Pilorgé, F.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Pradier, C.; Reynes, J.; Rouveix, E.; Simon, A.; Tattevin, P.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Viard, J. P.; Viget, N.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Liévre, L.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J. M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P. M.; Meyohas, M. C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Clauvel, J. P.; Decazes, J. M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J. M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Roudière, L.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, P. H.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J. P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M. F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J. P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Daures, J. P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J. L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Legrand, M. F. Thiercelin; Pontonnier, G.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Delmont, J. P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J. A.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J. M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P. A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J. P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J. M.; Touraine, J. L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Contant, M.; Aebi, C.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Brazzola, P.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, P. H.; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Cavassini, M.; Cheseaux, J.-J.; Drack, G.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H. J.; Fux, C.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Gerber, S.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Gyr, T. H.; Hirsch, H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Hüsler, M.; Kaiser, L.; Kahlert, C. H.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T. H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Raio, L.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Wyler, C.-A.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Miró, J. M.; Alquézar, A.; Isern, V.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J. M.; Agüero, F.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Romero, A.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Ortega, N.; Lazzari, E.; Puchol, E.; Sanchez, M.; Blanco, J. L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J. F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M. C.; Olmo, M.; Barragan, P.; Saumoy, M.; Bolao, F.; Cabellos, C.; Peña, C.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Amengual, M. J.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Berenguer, J.; del Amo, J.; García, F.; Gutiérrez, F.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Muñoz, M. A.; Caro-Murillo, A. M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Sirvent, J. L. Gómez; Rodríguez, P.; Alemán, M. R.; Alonso, M. M.; López, A. M.; Hernández, M. I.; Soriano, V.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M. E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; de Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, R. I.; Iribarren, J. A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M. J.; Camino, X.; Rodríguez-Arrondo, F.; von Wichmann, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M. A.; Masiá, M.; Ramos, J. M.; Padilla, S.; Sánchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; López, J. C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sánchez, M.; Gutiérrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Viladés, C.; López-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J. L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; de los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J. A.; Blanco, J. R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M. J.; Irigoyen, C.; Antela, A.; Casado, J. L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M. J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L. F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A. C.; Fiellin, D. A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K. A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J. L.; Hernán, M. A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J. M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Phillips, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Fidler, S.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; McLean, K.; Porter, Kholoud; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Lodi, Sara; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Gwynedd, Ysbyty; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, A. J.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, D. N.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; DeSouza, C. B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; Franca, A.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Mazhude, C.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; Mchale, J.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Rice, P.; Mullaney, S. A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M. R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A. M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, S. V.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Luzzi, G.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, J.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M. T.; Bergmann, J. F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Parrinello, M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A. P.; Allègre, T.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; de Boever, C. Merle; Tramoni, C.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Morelon, S.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J. D.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumaître, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M. C.; Drenou, B.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Tubiana, R.; Mohand, H. Ait; Chermak, A.; Abdallah, S. Ben; Touam, F.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J. M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Bornarel, D.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Amirat, N.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Belan, A. Greder; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A. M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J. G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; Szmania, I. De Lacroix; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Drogoul, M. P.; Martin, I. Poizot; Fabre, G.; de Cursay, G. Lambert; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J. L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A. S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J. J.; Quinsat, D. T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G. A.; Levy, A.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M. S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne- Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Colasante, U.; Nouaouia, W.; Vilde, J. L.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J. L.; Pietrie, M. P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Bourdillon, F.; Lelievre, J. D.; Obenga, G.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Schneider, L.; Iguertsira, M.; Tomei, C.; Dhiver, C.; Dupont, H. Tissot; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J. P.; Karsenti, J. M.; Venti, H.; Ceppi, C.; Krivitsky, J. A.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Hoyos, S. Pérez; Ferreros, I.; Hurtado, I.; González, C.; Caro, A. M.; Muga, R.; Sanvicens, A.; Tor, J.; del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; García, Soledad; Alastrue, I.; Belda, J.; Trullen, P.; Fernández, E.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Zafra, T.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Ruiz, I.; Nuñez, R.; Pérez, R.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; de Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) on mortality among HIV-infected individuals after appropriate adjustment for time-varying confounding by indication. DESIGN: A collaboration of 12 prospective cohort studies from Europe and the United States (the HIV-CAUSAL

  12. Opportunistic infections and AIDS malignancies early after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodi, Sara; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Bucher, Heiner C.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Logan, Roger; Sterne, Jonathan; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Jarrín, Inma; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Jose, Sophie; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; Miró, José M.; Ferrer, Elena; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Rémonie; Vourli, Georgia; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Dabis, Francois; Vandenhede, Mari-Anne; Costagliola, Dominique; Abgrall, Sophie; Hernán, Miguel A.; Hernan, Miguel; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Sabin, C.; Dunn, D.; Porter, K.; Glabay, A.; Orkin, C.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Fisher, M.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Gazzard, B.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Delpech, V.; Anderson, J.; Munshi, S.; Post, F.; Easterbrook, P.; Khan, Y.; Patel, P.; Karim, F.; Duffell, S.; Gilson, R.; Man, S.-L.; Williams, I.; Gompels, M.; Dooley, D.; Schwenk, A.; Ainsworth, J.; Johnson, M.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani Puradiredja, D.; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Phillips, A.; Sabin, C.; Walsh, J.; Weber, J.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Leen, C.; Wilson, A.; Bezemer, D.O.; Gras, L.A.J.; Kesselring, A.M.; Van Sighem, A.I.; Zaheri, S.; Van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Branger, J.; Prins, J.M.; Kuijpers, T.W.; Scherpbier, H.J.; Van Der Meer, J.T.M.; Wit, F.W.M.N.; Godfried, M.H.; Reiss, P.; Van Der Poll, T.; Nellen, F.J.B.; Lange, J.M.A.; Geerlings, S.E.; Van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J.C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M.L.; Wiersinga, W.J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W.L.; Frissen, P.H.J.; Schouten, W.E.M.; Van Den Berk, G.E.L.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K.D.; Mulder, J.W.; Vrouenraets, S.M.E.; Lauw, F.N.; Van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D.W.M.; Van Agtmael, M.A.; Perenboom, R.M.; Claessen, F.A.P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E.J.G.; Richter, C.; Van Der Berg, J.P.; Gisolf, E.H.; Schippers, E.F.; Van Nieuwkoop, C.; Van Elzakker, E.P.; Leyten, E.M.S.; Gelinck, L.B.S.; Pronk, M.J.H.; Bravenboer, B.; Kootstra, G.J.; Delsing, C.E.; Sprenger, H.G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E.H.; Van Assen, S.; Bierman, W.F.W.; Soetekouw, R.; Ten Kate, R.W.; Van Vonderen, M.G.A.; Van Houte, D.P.F.; Kroon, F.P.; Van Dissel, J.T.; Arend, S.M.; De Boer, M.G.J.; Jolink, H.; Ter Vollaard, H.J.M.; Bauer, M.P.; Weijer, S.; El Moussaoui, R.; Lowe, S.; Schreij, G.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Koopmans, P.P.; Keuter, M.; Van Der Ven, A.J.A.M.; Ter Hofstede, H.J.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Warris, A.; Van Crevel, R.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; De Vries-Sluijs, T.E.M.S.; Schurink, C.A.M.; Nouwen, J.L.; Nispen Tot Pannerden, M.H.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B.J.A.; Van Gorp, E.C.M.; Hassing, R.J.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Driessen, G.J.A.; Den Hollander, J.G.; Pogany, K.; Juttmann, J.R.; Van Kasteren, M.E.E.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M.M.E.; Jaspers, C.A.J.J.; Ellerbroek, P.M.; Oosterheert, J.J.; Arends, J.E.; Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Barth, R.E.; Geelen, S.P.M.; Wolfs, T.F.W.; Bont, L.J.; Van Den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Groeneveld, P.H.P.; Alleman, M.A.; Bouwhuis, J.W.; Barin, F.; Burty, C.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Khuong, M.A.; Mahamat, A.; Pilorgé, F.; Tattevin, P.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Abgrall, S.; Costagliola, D.; Grabar, S.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Lièvre, L.; Mary-Krause, M.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J.M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Katlama, C.; Simon, A.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P.M.; Meynard, J.L.; Meyohas, M.C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Pialoux, G.; Clauvel, J.P.; Decazes, J.M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J.M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Bentata, M.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J.L.; Matheron, S.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; De Truchis, P.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Gilquin, J.; Roudière, L.; Viard, J.P.; Boué, F.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, Ph.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Lang, J.M.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J.P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M.F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J.P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Reynes, J.; Daures, J.P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J.L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M.F.; Pontonnier, G.; Viget, N.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pradier, C.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Delmont, J.P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J.A.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J.M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P.A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J.P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Billaud, E.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J.M.; Touraine, J.L.; Cotte, L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Cabié, A.; Gaud, C.; Contant, M.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Haerry, D.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez De Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Gallois, A.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J.M.; Manzardo, C.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Cifuentes, C.; Dalmau, D.; Jaen, À.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Pérez, I.; Gargoulas, Freyra; Blanco, J.L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; Mallolas, J.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J.F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M.C.; Saumoy, M.; Imaz, A.; Tiraboschi, J.M.; Murillo, O.; Bolao, F.; Peña, C.; Cabellos, C.; Masó, M.; Vila, A.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Jose Amengual, Ma.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Bejarano, G.; Molina, J.; Guadarrama, M.; Alvaro, M.; Mercadal, J.; Fernandez, Juanse; Ospina, Jesus E.; Muñoz, M.A.; Caro-Murillo, A.M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Gomez Sirvent, J.L.; Rodríguez, P.; Aleman, M.R.; Alonso, M.M.; Lopez, A.M.; Hernandez, M.I.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M.E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; De Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, Rl.; Iribarren, J.A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M.J.; Camino, X.; Rodrí-guez-Arrondo, F.; Von Wichmann, M.A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M.A.; Gutierrez, F.; Masia, M.; Ramos, J.M.; Padilla, S.; Sanchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; Berenguer, J.; Lopez, J.C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sanchez, M.; Gutierrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Vilades, C.; Lopez-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J.L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; De Los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J.A.; Blanco, J.R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M.J.; Irigoyen, C.; Moreno, S.; Antela, A.; Casado, J.L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M.J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; García, F.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L.F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A.C.; Fiellin, D.A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K.A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J.L.; Hernán, M.A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J.M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Babiker, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Gilson, R.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; Johnson, A.; McLean, K.; Pillay, D.; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Louisa Gnatiuc, S.L.; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S.P.R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, J.A.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Roberts, M.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, N.D.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; De Souza, C.B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; McLean, K.; Franca, A.; Hawkins, D.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Peters, B.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P.J.; Mazhude, C.; Gilson, R.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; McHale, J.; Waters, A.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Johnson, M.; Rice, P.; Fidler, S.; Mullaney, S.A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Tayal, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Das, R.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M.R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A.M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, V.S.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Wilkins, E.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Roberts, M.; Williams, O.; Luzzi, G.; FitzGerald, M.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Molina, J.M.; Loze, B.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, I.; Raffi, F.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M.T.; Bergmann, J.F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Diemer, M.; Parrinello, M.; Girard, P.M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Livrozet, J.M.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A.P.; Allègre, T.; Reynes, J.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; Merle De Boever, C.; Tramoni, C.; Cabié, A.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Pialoux, G.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Trepo, C.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Thomas, R.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Gourdon, F.; Rouveix, E.; Morelon, S.; Dupont, C.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J.M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J.D.; Lascaux, A.S.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumâitre, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Salmon, D.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M.C.; Drenou, B.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Katlama, C.; Tubiana, R.; Ait Mohand, H.; Chermak, A.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Bentata, M.; Touam, F.; Hoen, B.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Massip, P.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J.M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Boué, F.; Bornarel, D.; Verdon, R.; Bazin, C.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Weiss, L.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Herson, S.; Amirat, N.; Simon, A.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Picard, O.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Choutet, P.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; May, T.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; De Truchis, P.; Berthé, H.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Greder Belan, A.; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A.M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Dellamonica, P.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; De Lacroix Szmania, I.; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Poizot Martin, I.; Fabre, G.; Lambert De Cursay, G.; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J.L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A.S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J.J.; Quinsat, D.T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Caron, F.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Lepeu, G.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Galanaud, P.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G.A.; Levy, A.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M.S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Weiss, L.; Buisson, M.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Batisse, D.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Leport, C.; Colasante, U.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Duval, X.; Nouaouia, W.; Boucherit, S.; Vilde, J.L.; Girard, P.M.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Meyohas, M.C.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J.L.; Salmon, D.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Launay, O.; Pietrie, M.P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Bourdillon, F.; Lascaux, A.S.; Lelievre, J.D.; Dumont, C.; Dupont, B.; Obenga, G.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Vittecoq, D.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Bricaire, F.; Katlama, C.; Schneider, L.; Herson, S.; Simon, A.; Iguertsira, M.; Stein, A.; Tomei, C.; Ravaux, I.; Dhiver, C.; Tissot Dupont, H.; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Fabre, G.; Dellamonica, P.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J.P.; Karsenti, J.M.; Venti, H.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Rosenthal, E.; Ceppi, C.; Quaranta, M.; Krivitsky, J.A.; Bentata, M.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Del Amo, J.; Alvarez, D.; Monge, S.; Muga, R.; Sanvisens, A.; Clotet, B.; Tor, J.; Bolao, F.; Rivas, I.; Vallecillo, G.; Del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; Vera, M.; Hurtado, I.; Belda, J.; Fernandez, E.; Alastrue, I.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Juan, A.; Trullen, J.; Garcia De Olalla, P.; Cayla, J.; Masdeu, E.; Knobel, H.; Mirò, J.M.; Sambeat, M.A.; Guerrero, R.; Rivera, E.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; De Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.; Ortíz, M.; Paraskevis, D.; Touloumi, G.; Pantazis, N.; Bakoyannis, G.; Gioukari, V.; Antoniadou, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Petrikkos, G.; Daikos, G.; Psichogiou, M.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Katsarou, O.; Kouramba, A.; Ioannidou, P.; Kordossis, T.; Kontos, A.; Lazanas, M.; Chini, M.; Tsogas, N.; Panos, G.; Paparizos, V.; Leuow, K.; Kourkounti, S.; Sambatakou, H.; Mariolis, I.; Skoutelis, A.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Baraboutis, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is little information on the incidence of AIDS-defining events which have been reported in the literature to be associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation. These events include tuberculosis,

  13. Variable impact on mortality of AIDS-defining events diagnosed during combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Egger, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started...... studies, and patient management....

  14. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with conventional endodontic treatment to eliminate root canal biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Ribeiro, Martha S; Tegos, George P; Núñez, Silvia C; Jorge, Antonio O C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-micro fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (Ptreatment. Bioluminescence imaging is an efficient way to monitor endodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Preliminary results in combined therapy (polychemotherapy and radiotherapy) of small cell bronchial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaertner, C.; Rjabuchin, J.S.; Michina, Z.P.; Motorina, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    The effective therapy of small cell lung cancer is the combination of polychemotherapy and radiation treatment. A randomized small cell lung cancer study of 141 patients revealed that with an agressive treatment more than 50 % complete remissions and nearly 90 % complete and partial remissions can be achieved by corresponding selection of patients. (author)

  16. Combination therapy with interferon and JAK1-2 inhibitor is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, M E; de Stricker, K; Kjær, L

    2014-01-01

    We report a 55 year old woman with post-ET PV for 12 years, who experienced resolution of severe constitutional symptoms within 3 days, a marked reduction in splenomegaly and a rapid decline in the JAK2V617F allele burden during combination therapy with interferon-alpha2a and ruxolitinib. Within ...

  17. Small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus with regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.A.; Levine, M.S.; Silberg, D.G.; Phillipe, L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus, which manifested on double-contrast esophagography as an ulcerated submucosal mass. The lesion underwent dramatic regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which has occasionally been used as an alternative to surgery in patients with this rare but aggressive esophageal neoplasm. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  18. N-feruloylserotonin in preventive combination therapy with methotrexate reduced inflammation in adjuvant arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuncírová, V.; Poništ, S.; Mihalová, D.; Dráfi, F.; Nosáľ, R.; Acquaviva, A.; Gardi, C.; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, I.; Bauerová, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 6 (2014), s. 616-626 ISSN 0767-3981 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : arthritis * inflammation * oxidative stress * combination therapy * methotrexate * N-feruloylserotonin Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 2.121, year: 2014

  19. The Efficacy of Single-Agent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Biologically Selected Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guifang; Gao, Shunji; Sheng, Zhixin; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of first-generation single-agent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with known EGFR mutation status, we undertook this pooled analysis. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, the Science Citation Index, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings. Out of 2,129 retrieved articles, 19 RCTs enrolling 2,016 patients with wild-type EGFR tumors and 1,034 patients with mutant EGFR tumors were identified. For these EGFR mutant patients, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) over chemotherapy: the summary hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.41 (p well as chemotherapy in the first-line setting (HR = 1.65, p = 0.03) and in the second-/third-line setting (HR = 1.27, p = 0.006). No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of overall survival (OS). Using platinum-based doublet chemotherapy as a common comparator, indirect comparison showed the superior efficacy of single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy over EGFR-TKIs added to chemotherapy in PFS [HR = 1.35 (1.03, 1.77), p = 0.03]. Additionally, a marginal trend towards the same direction was found in the OS analysis [HR = 1.16 (0.99, 1.35), p = 0.06]. Interestingly, for those EGFR wild-type tumors, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy was inferior to EGFR-TKIs added to chemotherapy in PFS [HR = 0.38 (0.33, 0.44), p chemotherapy. However, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy was inferior to chemotherapy in PFS for those EGFR wild-type patients. Single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy could improve PFS over the combination of EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy in these EGFR mutant patients. However, EGFR-TKIs combined with chemotherapy could provide additive PFS and OS benefit over single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy in those EGFR wild-type patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Acupuncture combined with magnetic therapy for treatment of temple-jaw joint dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Wen

    2009-04-01

    To compare clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture combined with magnetic therapy and simple magnetic therapy on temple-jaw joint dysfunction. Eighty-two cases were randomly divided into an observation group (n = 52) and a control group (n = 30). The observation group was treated with acupuncture at Xiaguan (ST 7), Jiache (ST 6), Hegu (LI 4), etc. and AL-2 low frequency electromagnetic comprehensive treatment instrument; the control group was treated with AL-2 low frequency electromagnetic comprehensive treatment instrument. The cured and markedly effective rate of 90.4% in the observation group was significantly better than 66.7% in the control group (P magnetic therapy is significantly better than that of the simple magnetic therapy on temple-jaw joint dysfunction.

  1. Combination chemotherapy concurrent with small dose radiation therapy for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Toshihiko; Fujita, Hiroji; Shintomi, Takenori

    1987-01-01

    Forty consecutive patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. Of 34 patients treated with chemotherapy, 24 were treated with combination chemotherapy, containing cyclophosphamide vincristine methotrexate and procarbazine, concurrent with small dose radiation therapy (500 cGy/5 fraction) as a chemosensitizer (COMPrt). The response rate to this regimen was 81 % (29 % complete) and the 2 year survival rate was 28.6 %. These results have been superior to other regimens and the toxicity was not see to be any higher. After completion of COMPrt regimen, 10 patients were treated with intrathoracic radiation therapy (average dose 3000 cGy) and 3 recieved surgical treatment. Radiation therapy improved the 2-year survival rate (42.2 %) when compared with those patients who received no radiation therapy (18.2 %). Three patients received surgical treatment were considered to be disease-free for 23, 17, and 9 months respectively, after induction of chemotherapy. (author)

  2. Cognitive and affective benefits of combination therapy with galantamine plus cognitive rehabilitation for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuchi, Ryo; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Matsuzono, Kosuke; Takao, Yoshiki; Wakutani, Yosuke; Sato, Kota; Kono, Syoichiro; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Deguchi, Kentaro; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of a galantamine only therapy and a combination therapy with galantamine plus ambulatory cognitive rehabilitation for Alzheimer's disease patients. For this retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 86 patients with Alzheimer's disease, dividing them into two groups - a galantamine only group (group G, n = 45) and a combination with galantamine plus ambulatory rehabilitation group (group G + R, n = 41). The present cognitive rehabilitation included a set of physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy for 1-2 h once or twice a week. We compared the Mini-Mental State Examination and Frontal Assessment Battery for cognitive assessment, and Geriatric Depression Scale, Apathy Scale, and Abe's Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia score for affective assessment in two groups over 6 months. The baseline Mini-Mental State Examination score was 20.2 and 18.7 in groups G and G + R, respectively. Other baseline data (Frontal Assessment Battery, Geriatric Depression Scale, Apathy Scale, and Abe's Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia) were not different between the two groups. Although group G kept all the scores stable until 6 months of the treatment, the Apathy Scale score showed a significant improvement in group G + R as early as 3 months, followed by the Mini-Mental State Examination and Frontal Assessment Battery improvements at 6 months (*P = 0.04 and *P = 0.02, respectively). The Geriatric Depression Scale and Abe's Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia did not show any changes. The combination therapy of galantamine plus ambulatory cognitive rehabilitation showed a superior benefit both on cognitive and affective functions than galantamine only therapy in Alzheimer's disease patients. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  4. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2017-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy

  5. Color stabilization of porcine hemoglobin during spray-drying and powder storage by combining chelating and reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, P; Toldrà, M; Parés, D; Carretero, C; Saguer, E

    2009-10-01

    This work focuses on the effects of adding a chelating agent - such as nicotinic acid (NA, 2% w/v) or nicotinamide (Nam, 2.5% w/v) - along with glucose as a reducing agent (G, 10% w/v) to fresh porcine hemoglobin in order to stabilize its red color during spray-drying and powder storage at room temperature. Correlations between the CIELAB color parameters and the relative percentages of the different hemoglobin derivatives (liganded and deliganded ferrohemoglobin, and methemoglobin) were analyzed. The results indicate that, although little effects could be observed for any of the combined treatments on fresh hemoglobin, they were effective against pigment autoxidation during dehydration and subsequent storage. From the results, it can also be concluded that glucose was the main contributor to the color stabilization of the hemoglobin powder, probably due to its high water retention capacity.

  6. Photodynamic therapy combined with antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment for recalcitrant chronic central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asahi MG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Masumi G Asahi,1 Andrew T Chon,1 Esmeralda Gallemore,1 Ron P Gallemore1,2 1Clinical Research Department, Retina Macula Institute, Torrance, CA, USA; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Purpose: To determine whether combination photodynamic therapy (PDT and antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy is effective in the management of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC recalcitrant to conventional therapy. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of eight patients with chronic CSC unresponsive to topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, focal photocoagulation, anti-VEGF alone, or PDT alone. All patients were evaluated with a full ophthalmic examination, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, fluorescein angiography (FA, and most with indocyanine green angiography (ICGA followed by treatment with half-fluence PDT and intravitreal anti-VEGF injection (seven bevacizumab, one aflibercept. Patients were seen in follow-up 1 month after treatment. Results: All eight patients achieved complete resolution in subretinal fluid following combination treatment. Average duration of CSC prior to initiation of combination therapy was 7.5 months. Mean central macular thickness on OCT decreased significantly from 401.2±52.7 µm to 297.9±18.2 µm (p=0.0010 by 4 months after treatment (1.63±1.18 months. Seven of eight patients were followed up for an average of 13 months with no recurrence during that time. One case recurred at 8 months and was treated with repeat combination at that time. Frank choroidal neovascularization (CNV was not identified in these cases on FA or ICGA studies. Eight of eight patients showed significant improvement in vision from a logMAR of 0.1125±0.099 to 0.0125±0.064 (p=0.019. Conclusion: Combination PDT and anti-VEGF is effective for chronic CSC which has failed conventional therapy. Associated CNV and/or inflammation may be reasons for greater success in

  7. Effect of Smilax China Capsules and azithromycin combined therapy on chronic annexitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jun Cong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the mechanism of Smilax China (Chinese spelling: Jingangteng Capsules and Azithromycin combined therapy for chronic annexitis, and offer help to patients with chronic annexitis on relevant clinical therapies. Methods: A total of 170 cases of patients with chronic annexitis were selected from the gynecological department in our hospital, and randomly divided to be the combination therapy group and the control group by digital table, 85 cases for each group. Patients in control group were treated with Azithromycin. Patients in combination therapy group were treated by giving Smilax China capsules based on the Azithromycin treatment. Relevant indexes of lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ , CD4+ , CD8+ and CD4+ /CD8+ , cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 and hemorheology (blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation index in patients of the two groups were detected before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, no statistical significance found on the differences of lymphocyte subsets, cytokines and hemorheology between the two groups of patients (P>0.05; After treatment received on the two groups of patients, indexes of CD3+ , CD4+ and CD4+ /CD8+ were dramatically increased, CD8+ , cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 and hemorheology in the combination therapy group were significantly decreased compared with patients in the control group; Statistical significance existed in differences between the two groups (P<0.05. Conclusions: Patients who received Azithromycin therapy added with Smilax China capsules concurrently could be significantly improved levels of lymphocyte subsets, cytokines and hemorheology index. It is of clinical importance for treatment of patients with chronic annexitis.

  8. Ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C virus patients undergoing combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja M Krishnan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection - combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin - elicits sustained responses in only ∼50% of the patients treated. No alternatives exist for patients who do not respond to combination therapy. Addition of ribavirin substantially improves response rates to interferon and lowers relapse rates following the cessation of therapy, suggesting that increasing ribavirin exposure may further improve treatment response. A key limitation, however, is the toxic side-effect of ribavirin, hemolytic anemia, which often necessitates a reduction of ribavirin dosage and compromises treatment response. Maximizing treatment response thus requires striking a balance between the antiviral and hemolytic activities of ribavirin. Current models of viral kinetics describe the enhancement of treatment response due to ribavirin. Ribavirin-induced anemia, however, remains poorly understood and precludes rational optimization of combination therapy. Here, we develop a new mathematical model of the population dynamics of erythrocytes that quantitatively describes ribavirin-induced anemia in HCV patients. Based on the assumption that ribavirin accumulation decreases erythrocyte lifespan in a dose-dependent manner, model predictions capture several independent experimental observations of the accumulation of ribavirin in erythrocytes and the resulting decline of hemoglobin in HCV patients undergoing combination therapy, estimate the reduced erythrocyte lifespan during therapy, and describe inter-patient variations in the severity of ribavirin-induced anemia. Further, model predictions estimate the threshold ribavirin exposure beyond which anemia becomes intolerable and suggest guidelines for the usage of growth hormones, such as erythropoietin, that stimulate erythrocyte production and avert the reduction of ribavirin dosage, thereby improving treatment response. Our model thus facilitates, in

  9. Effects of low-level laser therapy in combination with physiotherapy in the management of rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Fariba; Shakouri, Seyyed Kazem; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Nobari, Ozra Eslampanah; Eftekharsadat, Bina

    2012-09-01

    Rotator cuff tendinitis is one of the main causes of shoulder pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible additive effects of low-power laser treatment in combination with conventional physiotherapy endeavors in these patients. A total of 50 patients who were referred to the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic with shoulder pain and rotator cuff disorders were selected. Pain severity measured with visual analogue scale (VAS), abduction, and external rotation range of motion in shoulder joint was measured by goniometry, and evaluation of daily functional abilities of patients was measured by shoulder disability questionnaire. Twenty-five of the above patients were randomly assigned into the control group and received only routine physiotherapy. The other 25 patients were assigned into the experimental group and received conventional therapy plus low-level laser therapy (4 J/cm(2) at each point over a maximum of ten painful points of shoulder region for total 5 min duration). The above measurements were assessed at the end of the third week of therapy in each group and the results were analyzed statistically. In both groups, statistically significant improvement was detected in all outcome measures compared to baseline (p rotation (78.0 ± 19.5 vs. 76.3 ± 19.1) had no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.20 and 0.77, respectively). As one of physical modalities, gallium-arsenide low-power laser combined with conventional physiotherapy has superiority over routine physiotherapy from the view of decreasing pain and improving the patient's function, but no additional advantages were detected in increasing shoulder joint range of motion in comparison to other physical agents.

  10. Boosted Hyperthermia Therapy by Combined AC Magnetic and Photothermal Exposures in Ag/Fe3O4 Nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R; Rinaldi-Montes, N; Alonso, J; Amghouz, Z; Garaio, E; García, J A; Gorria, P; Blanco, J A; Phan, M H; Srikanth, H

    2016-09-28

    Over the past two decades, magnetic hyperthermia and photothermal therapy are becoming very promising supplementary techniques to well-established cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These techniques have dramatically improved their ability to perform controlled treatments, relying on the procedure of delivering nanoscale objects into targeted tumor tissues, which can release therapeutic killing doses of heat either upon AC magnetic field exposure or laser irradiation. Although an intense research effort has been made in recent years to study, separately, magnetic hyperthermia using iron oxide nanoparticles and photothermal therapy based on gold or silver plasmonic nanostructures, the full potential of combining both techniques has not yet been systematically explored. Here we present a proof-of-principle experiment showing that designing multifunctional silver/magnetite (Ag/Fe3O4) nanoflowers acting as dual hyperthermia agents is an efficient route for enhancing their heating ability or specific absorption rate (SAR). Interestingly, the SAR of the nanoflowers is increased by at least 1 order of magnitude under the application of both an external magnetic field of 200 Oe and simultaneous laser irradiation. Furthermore, our results show that the synergistic exploitation of the magnetic and photothermal properties of the nanoflowers reduces the magnetic field and laser intensities that would be required in the case that both external stimuli were applied separately. This constitutes a key step toward optimizing the hyperthermia therapy through a combined multifunctional magnetic and photothermal treatment and improving our understanding of the therapeutic process to specific applications that will entail coordinated efforts in physics, engineering, biology, and medicine.

  11. [Influence of Saccharomyces boulardii Sachets combined with bismuth quadruple therapy for initial Helicobacter pylori eradication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X Y; Du, J; Wu, J; Zhao, L W; Meng, X; Liu, G F

    2017-08-08

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Saccharomyces boulardii Sachets combined with bismuth quadruple therapy for initial Helicobacter pylori ( H . pylori ) eradication. Methods: From March 2014 to March 2015, 240 participants from the third hospital of Hebei medical university with H . pylori infection were recruited and randomized into three groups: Quadruple therapy group received bismuth potassium citrate 220 mg bid + Rabeprazole 10 mg bid + amoxicillin 1 000 mg bid+ furazolidone 100 mg bid for 10 days. Short-term group and long-term group received the same quadruple therapy for 10 days as above, as well as Saccharomyces boulardii Sachets 500 mg bid for 14 days and 28 days, respectively. H . pylori eradication was confirmed by (13)C/(14)C-UBT at least 4 weeks after completion of therapy. And side effects were investigated during the therapy. Results: The H . pylori eradication rates in quadruple therapy, short-term and long-term group were 80%, 87.5% and 87.5% by ITT analysis ( P =0.321) and 92.8%, 94.6% and 95.9% by PP analysis ( P =0.717), respectively. The overall side effect rate and occurrence of diarrhea and abdominal distension were significantly lower in short-term or long-term group as compared with quadruple therapy group( P =0.007, 0.003, 0.004), but there was no significant difference between the two probiotics groups. Conclusions: Both short and long-term Saccharomyces boulardii Sachets reduced the overall side effect rate and occurrence of diarrhea or abdominal distension when combined with bismuth quadruple therapy for initial H . pylori eradication and no difference was observed in efficacy or safety between the two groups.

  12. A Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines' Recommendations on Levothyroxine Therapy Alone versus Combination Therapy (LT4 plus LT3) for Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Eyal; Farahani, Pendar

    2015-12-04

    Patients with hypothyroidism are increasingly enquiring about the benefit of using combination therapy of levothyroxine (LT4) and liothyronine (LT3) as a potential treatment for hypothyroidism. Combination therapy, however, remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to systematically review available hypothyroidism treatment recommendations from clinical practice guidelines from around the world to identify the consensus regarding combination therapy. Clinical practice guidelines were obtained from searches of PubMed, EMBASE, and MEDLINE, using several combinations of MeSH terms. The search was limited to clinical guidelines in English-language publications, published between January 1, 1990 and May 1, 2015. A quantitative approach was utilized for data synthesis. Thirteen guidelines were identified, including three regarding pregnancy, two regarding pediatric populations and eight regarding adult populations. There were six guidelines from North America, four guidelines from Europe and three guidelines from South America. Twelve of the guidelines were published after 2010. Nine guidelines addressed combination therapy of LT4 plus LT3, and all nine concluded that LT4 therapy alone is the standard of care, with insufficient evidence to recommend widespread combination therapy. Only the 2012 ETA Guidelines and the 2015 BTA Guidelines concluded that combination therapy could be used, although only in certain circumstances and as an experimental treatment. This systematic review illustrates that clinical practice guidelines worldwide do not recommend and do not support routine use of combination LT4 and LT3 therapy to treat hypothyroidism.

  13. In Vitro Bioactivity and Setting Times of White Portland Cement Combined with Different Radio Pacifying Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Nichola Jayne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial formulations based on 80:20 mixtures of Portland cement and bismuth oxide (a radiopacifying agent are used in dentistry as root-filling materials. This study compares the impact of two alternative radiopacifiers, barium sulphate and zirconium oxide, with that of bismuth oxide, on the setting times and bioactivity of white Portland cement. The findings indicate that bismuth oxide prolongs both the initial and final setting times of the cement, and that barium sulphate and zirconium oxide have no effect on this parameter. Hydroxyapatite (HA formed on the surfaces of all test samples within 7 days of exposure to simulated body fluid, indicating that they possess the potential to stimulate new hard tissue formation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the traditional technique for the identification of HA, was not appropriate for the analysis of these cement systems owing to the overlap of signals from each of the radiopacifiers with the characteristic P-O bending modes of HA in the 570 – 610 cm−1 region. In this respect, the P-O band at 965 cm−1 of HA in the Raman spectrum was found to be a suitable means of detection since it is discrete with respect to all signals arising from the radiopacifying agents and cement phases.

  14. [Clinical study of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy treated with massage therapy combined with Magnetic sticking therapy at the auricular points and the cost comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Saina; Sheng, Feng; Pan, Yunhua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Zhichao; Cheng, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy on cervical spondylotic radiculopathy between the combined therapy of massage and magnetic-sticking at the auricular points and the simple massage therapy, and conduct the health economics evaluation. Seventy-two patients of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were randomized into a combined therapy group, and a simple massage group, 36 cases in each one. Finally, 35 cases and 34 cases were met the inclusive criteria in the corresponding groups separately. In the combined therapy group, the massage therapy and the magnetic sticking therapy at auricular points were combined in the treatment. Massage therapy was mainly applied to Fengchi (GB 20), Jianjing (GB 21), Jianwaishu (SI 14), Jianyu (LI 15) and Quchi (LI 11). The main auricular points for magnetic sticking pressure were Jingzhui (AH13), Gan (On12) Shen (CO10), Shenmen (TF4), Pizhixia (AT4). In the simple massage group, the simple massage therapy was given, the massage parts and methods were the same as those in the combined therapy group. The treatment was given once every two days, three times a week, for 4 weeks totally. The cervical spondylosis effect scale and the simplified McGill pain questionnaire were adopted to observe the improvements in the clinical symptoms, clinical examination, daily life movement, superficial muscular pain in the neck and the health economics cost in the patients of the two groups. The effect was evaluated in the two groups. The effective rate and the clinical curative rate in the combined therapy group were better than those in the control group [100. 0% (35/35) vs 85. 3% (29/34), 42. 9% (15/35) vs 17. 6% (6/34), both Pmassage therapy, the massage therapy combined with magnetic sticking therapy at auricular points achieves the better effect and lower cost in health economics.

  15. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Andreas; Aicher, Bernhard; Fiebich, Bernd L; Haag, Gunther

    2011-03-31

    Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect.As an example the fixed-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic options, enable the completeness

  16. Combined analgesics in (headache pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiebich Bernd L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix" are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, paracetamol (acetaminophen and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden

  17. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic

  18. Antihypertensive combination therapy in primary care offices: results of a cross-sectional survey in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roas S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Roas,1 Felix Bernhart,2 Michael Schwarz,3 Walter Kaiser,4 Georg Noll5 1Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Zurich, 2Private Practice, Biberist, 3Ambulatorium Wiesendamm, Basel, 4Healthworld (Schweiz AG, Steinhausen, 5HerzKlinik Hirslanden, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Most hypertensive patients need more than one substance to reach their target blood pressure (BP. Several clinical studies indicate the high efficacy of antihypertensive combinations, and recent guidelines recommend them in some situations even as initial therapies. In general practice they seem widespread, but only limited data are available on their effectiveness under the conditions of everyday life. The objectives of this survey among Swiss primary care physicians treating hypertensive patients were: to know the frequency of application of different treatment modalities (monotherapies, free individual combinations, single-pill combinations; to see whether there are relationships between prescribed treatment modalities and patient characteristics, especially age, treatment duration, and comorbidities; and to determine the response rate (percentage of patients reaching target BP of different treatment modalities under the conditions of daily practice. Methods: This cross-sectional, observational survey among 228 randomly chosen Swiss primary care physicians analyzed data for 3,888 consecutive hypertensive patients collected at one single consultation. Results: In this survey, 31.9% of patients received monotherapy, 41.2% two substances, 20.9% three substances, and 4.7% more than three substances. By combination mode, 34.9% took free individual combinations and 30.0% took fixed-dose single-pill combinations. Combinations were more frequently given to older patients with a long history of hypertension and/or comorbidities. In total, 67.8% of patients achieved their BP target according to their physician's judgment. When compared, single

  19. Research about combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiation therapy to treat hypophysoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yueming; Zhao Xinping; Song Xiang; Wu Wei; Huang Bai

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effectiveness of combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiotherapy. Methods: 80 Hypophysoma patients who have been randomly grouped into two groups. Combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiotherapy group and single Gamma knife group. Results: The therapeutic effectiveness of combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiation therapy group was higher than that of single Gamma Knife group. Conclusion: The hospital that treat Hypophysoma with single Gamma Knife should add cobalt-60 radiotherapy in order to increase the local Hypophysoma dose

  20. Maintenance Therapy in Ovarian Cancer with Targeted Agents Improves PFS and OS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Qian

    Full Text Available Maintenance therapy with targeted agents for prolonging remission for ovarian cancer patients remains controversial. As a result, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of using maintenance therapy with targeted agents for the treatment of ovarian cancer.From inception to January 2015, we searched for randomized, controlled trials (RCTs using the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrials.gov and EBSCO. Eligible trials included RCTs that evaluated standard chemotherapy which was either followed or not followed by targeted maintenance in patients with ovarian cancer who had been previously receiving adjunctive treatments, such as cytoreductive surgery and standard chemotherapy. The outcome measures included progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and incidence of adverse events.A total of 13 RCTs, which were published between 2006 and 2014, were found to be in accordance with our inclusion criteria. The primary meta-analysis indicated that both PFS and OS were statistically and significantly improved in the targeted maintenance therapy group as compared to the control group (PFS: HR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.75 to 0.95, p = 0.001; OS: HR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.84 to 0.98, p = 0.02. When taking safety into consideration, the use of targeted agents was significantly correlated with increased risks of fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and hypertension. However, no significant differences were found in incidence rates of abdominal pain, constipation or joint pain.Our results indicate that targeted maintenance therapy clearly improves the survival of ovarian cancer patients but may also increase the incidence of adverse events. Additional randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter investigations will be required on a larger cohort of patients to verify our findings.

  1. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  2. Efficacy and safety of statin and fibrate combination therapy in lipid management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Rao, Epari Sanjeeva; Jammula, Sruti; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-01-01

    Adequate control of hyperlipidemia is of paramount importance for prevention of vascular events. Statins and fibrates are well established treatments for hyperlipidemia. Combination therapy with a statin and fibrate offers significant therapeutic advantage for the treatment of severe or refractory mixed hyperlipidemia. Although such a combination does increase the risk of myopathy, with an incidence of approximately 0.12%, this small risk of myopathy rarely outweighs the established morbidity and mortality benefits of achieving lipid goals. Nevertheless, a higher incidence of myopathy has been reported with statin monotherapy. Statin+fibrate therapy should be considered if monotherapy or adding other drugs (e.g. cholesterol absorption inhibitors, omega-3 fatty acids or nicotinic acid) did not achieve lipid targets or is impractical. The current article focuses on recent studies highlighting the beneficial effects of this combination. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase II study of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Sorensen, Morten; Gaziel, Tine Bernhardtsen

    2013-01-01

    standard temozolomide chemoradiotherapy and bevacizumab-containing second-line therapy, received temsirolimus (25 mg i.v.) on days 1 and 8 and bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) on day 8, every two weeks. Assessments were performed every eight weeks. Blood samples for biomarkers were collected weekly for the first...... eight weeks and at progression. The primary end-point was median progression-free survival (PFS) and secondary end-points were radiographic response, overall survival (OS), and safety of the bevacizumab-temsirolimus combination. RESULTS: Thirteen patients were included, whereof three went off....../10), infection (1/10), hypertension (1/10), and hyperglycemia (1/10). CONCLUSION: Temsirolimus can be safely administered in combination with bevacizumab. This study failed to detect activity of such a combination in patients with progressive GBM beyond bevacizumab therapy....

  4. Valsartan combination therapy in the management of hypertension – patient perspectives and clinical utility

    OpenAIRE

    David T Nash; Michael S McNamara

    2009-01-01

    David T Nash1, Michael S McNamara21Syracuse Preventive Cardiology, Syracuse, New York, USA; 2Oxford PharmaGenesis Inc., Newtown, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: The morbidity and mortality benefits of lowering blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients are well established, with most individuals requiring multiple agents to achieve BP control. Considering the important role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in the pathophysiology of hypertension, a key component of combination t...

  5. Combined therapy of major depression with concomitant borderline personality disorder: comparison of interpersonal and cognitive psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Silvio; Zizza, Monica; Rinaldi, Camilla; Bogetto, Filippo

    2007-11-01

    The combination of antidepressants and brief psychotherapies has been proven more efficacious in treating major depression and is particularly recommended in patients with concomitant personality disorders. We compare the effects of 2 combined therapies, fluoxetine and interpersonal therapy (IPT) or fluoxetine and cognitive therapy (CT), on major depression in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Thirty-five consecutive outpatients with a diagnosis of BPD and a major depressive episode (not bipolar and not psychotic) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 combined treatments and treated for 24 weeks. Assessment included a semistructured interview, Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P) for quality of life (QOL), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64). Statistical analysis was performed using the univariate General Linear Model to calculate the effects of duration and type of treatment. No significant differences between treatments were found at CGI, HDRS, BDI-II, and SOFAS score. Combined treatment with CT had greater effects on HARS score and on psychological functioning factor of SAT-P. Combined treatment with IPT was more effective on social functioning factor of SAT-P and on domains domineering or controlling and intrusive or needy of IIP-64. Both combined therapies are efficacious in treating major depression in patients with BPD. Differences between CT and IPT concern specific features of subjective QOL and interpersonal problems. These findings lack reliable comparisons and need to be replicated.

  6. Rationale for combination therapy in hypertension management: focus on angiotensin receptor blockers and thiazide diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T

    2007-04-01

    Despite recognition that hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality, blood pressure control rates remain low in the US population. Reflecting clinical trial results, hypertension management guidelines assert the clinical benefit of achieving current blood pressure goals and indicate that most patients will require 2 or more drugs to reach goal. Well-designed drug combinations counter hypertension via complementary mechanisms that increase antihypertensive efficacy, potentially with lower rates of adverse events than higher dose monotherapy regimens. Lower adverse event rates, in turn, may contribute to greater adherence with treatment. The combination of a low-dose diuretic with agents that block the effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), such as angiotensin receptor blockers, has been found in numerous clinical trials to be highly effective for lowering blood pressure in patients with uncomplicated as well as high-risk hypertension, with a comparable favorable side effect profile compared with monotherapy. Moreover, agents that block the RAS are associated with a lower risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus than other antihypertensive classes. Complementary combinations of antihypertensive agents provide an efficient and effective approach to hypertension management.

  7. Immunological changes following a combined effect of chromic small dose γ-irradiation and toxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubik, V.M.; Zykova, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Immunologic changes under conditions of durable effect of low dose γ-radiation on people in the case of combining radiation with the effect of low concentrations of toxic substances, are studied. Under the above effect, the appearance of deviations from the side of immunologic status is possible. Taking into account the important role of the immunity system in homeostasis preservation and the formation of a series of pathological states it is advisable to use figures, and characteristics inherent in the state of the cell immunity to autoallergic processes to estimate a combined effect of radiation and toxic substances on the organism of people [ru

  8. Combination therapy with DPP-4 inhibitors and pioglitazone in type 2 diabetes: theoretical consideration and therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Mikhail

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasser MikhailEndocrinology Division, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, David-Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USAAbstract: Sitagliptin and vildagliptin represent a new class of anti-diabetic agents that enhance the action of incretin hormones through inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4, the enzyme that normally inactivates incretin hormones. Because of their distinct mechanism of action, DPP-4 inhibitors can be used as add-on therapy to other classes of drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes. The objective of this review is to critically evaluate clinical trials of sitagliptin and vildagliptin in combination with pioglitazone. The addition of either sitagliptin or vildagliptin to ongoing pioglitazone therapy is associated with reduction in average hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels of approximately 0.7% compared with placebo and 1% compared with baseline after 24 weeks. When started concomitantly in drug-naïve patients, the combination of pioglitazone 30 mg and vildagliptin 100 mg qd reduces HbA1c by 1.9% after 24 weeks, compared with 1.1% with pioglitazone monotherapy. In general, the addition of DPP-4 inhibitors to pioglitazone was well tolerated, did not increase the incidence of hypoglycemia, and did not substantially worsen the weight-gain induced by pioglitazone. The combination of sitagliptpin or vildagliptin with pioglitazone can be a useful therapeutic approach in patients with type 2 diabetes who cannot tolerate metformin or a sulfonylurea.Keywords: incretins, sitagliptin, vildagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, type 2 diabetes

  9. Theranostic GO-based nanohybrid for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Feng, Jun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Liu, Xiang-Ji; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-02-12

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based theranostic nanohybrid is designed for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy. The anti-tumor drug, Doxorubicin (DOX) is chemically conjugated to the poly(ethylenimine)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG) grafted GO via a MMP2-cleavable PLGLAG peptide linkage. The therapeutic efficacy of DOX is chemically locked and its intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by GO under normal physiological condition. Once stimulated by the MMP2 enzyme over-expressed in tumor tissues, the resulting peptide cleavage permits the unloading of DOX for tumor therapy and concurrent fluorescence recovery of DOX for in situ tumor cell imaging. Attractively, this PEI-bearing nanohybrid can mediate efficient DNA transfection and shows great potential for combinational drug/gene therapy. This tumor induced imaging and potential combinational therapy will open a window for tumor treatment by offering a unique theranostic approach through merging the diagnostic capability and pathology-responsive therapeutic function. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José Manuel; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Wrobel, Boris; Carnicer, Fernando; del Olmo, Juan; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-08-26

    We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  11. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Cuevas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  12. Dynamics of tumor growth and combination of anti-angiogenic and cytotoxic therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohandel, M.; Kardar, M.; Milosevic, M.; Sivaloganathan, S.

    2007-07-01

    Tumors cannot grow beyond a certain size (about 1-2 mm in diameter) through simple diffusion of oxygen and other essential nutrients into the tumor. Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a crucial and observed step, through which a tumor obtains its own blood supply. Thus, strategies that interfere with the development of this tumor vasculature, known as anti-angiogenic therapy, represent a novel approach to controlling tumor growth. Several pre-clinical studies have suggested that currently available angiogenesis inhibitors are unlikely to yield significant sustained improvements in tumor control on their own, but rather will need to be used in combination with conventional treatments to achieve maximal benefit. Optimal sequencing of anti-angiogenic treatment and radiotherapy or chemotherapy is essential to the success of these combined treatment strategies. Hence, a major challenge to mathematical modeling and computer simulations is to find appropriate dosages, schedules and sequencing of combination therapies to control or eliminate tumor growth. Here, we present a mathematical model that incorporates tumor cells and the vascular network, as well as their interplay. We can then include the effects of two different treatments, conventional cytotoxic therapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. The results are compared with available experimental and clinical data.

  13. Influence of Interferon-Alpha Combined with Chemo (Radio Therapy on Immunological Parameters in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Karakhanova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy.

  14. Enhancing the efficacy of cytotoxic agents for cancer therapy using photochemical internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Pinillos Bayona, Alejandra; Moore, Caroline M; Loizidou, Marilena; MacRobert, Alexander J; Woodhams, Josephine H

    2016-03-01

    Photochemical internalisation (PCI) is a technique for improving cellular delivery of certain bioactive agents which are prone to sequestration within endolysosomes. There is a wide range of agents suitable for PCI-based delivery including toxins, oligonucleotides, genes and immunoconjugates which demonstrates the versatility of this technique. The basic mechanism of PCI involves triggering release of the agent from endolysosomes within the target cells using a photosensitiser which is selectively retained with the endolysosomal membranes. Excitation of the photosensitiser by visible light leads to disruption of the membranes via photooxidative damage thereby releasing the agent into the cytosol. This treatment enables the drugs to reach their intended subcellular target more efficiently and improves their efficacy. In this review we summarise the applications of this technique with the main emphasis placed on cancer chemotherapy. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  15. The combination of suicide gene therapy and radiation enhances the killing of nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiahui; Xia Kun; Feng Yong

    2004-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is very common in Southern China and Southeast Asian countries. To explore a novel and more effective approach to NPC therapy, a combined strategy of suicide genes and radiation was designed in this study. Five suicide gene expression cassettes, yeast cytosine deaminase (CD), yeast CD/uracil phosphoribosyl-transferase (UPRT), and yeast CDglyTK gene controlled by CMV, and Egr-1 and a synthetic CMV-enhanced Egr-1 promoter (CE) were constructed in an expression vector p11MS. The expression of suicide genes in NPC CNE-2 cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. The cytotoxicity of suicide gene therapy and radiation were analyzed by MTT assay. An animal study in which yeast CD/UPRT-expressing CNE-2 tumors in nude mice were treated with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and radiation was also developed. Our results revealed that p11MSCEyCD/UPRT and p11MSCEyCDglyTK are superior over three other constructs in the killing of NPC cells in vitro. We combined suicide gene-expressing tumors, 5-FC treatment, and radiation in vivo and found that the tumors greatly regressed, some disappeared completely in 3 nude mice in the yCD/UPRT group, and a significant difference of tumor volumes was observed between this group and the other four groups (p<0.05). Our results indicated that suicide gene therapy and radiation have a synergic effect on NPC therapy, and the combined strategy of radiogene therapy is of great potential as a substitute for the traditional method, radiation alone, in NPC therapies. (author)

  16. Combination therapy of chitosan, gynostemma, and motherwort alleviates the progression of experimental rat chronic renal failure by inhibiting STAT1 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wenxia; Wang, Shudong; An, Shanshan; Guo, Mengjie; Gong, Guangming; Liu, Wenya; Ma, Shaoxin; Li, Xin; Fu, Jihua; Yao, Wenbing

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of single and combination therapy using chitosan (K), gynostemma (J), and motherwort (Y) on an experimental rat model of chronic renal failure (CRF) induced by adenine and the underlying mechanisms. CRF rats were treated with individual or combinational therapy with two or three of these agents. Biochemical indicators showed that the levels of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and uric acid decreased and the levels of albumin and hemoglobin increased by single or combination therapy of these drugs. Drug treatment also decreased oxidative stress damage of renal tissues in CRF rats. Histopathological lesions were attenuated in each drug treatment group by various degrees. Additionally, drug treatment affected the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, collagen I, matrix metalloprotease-1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1. In particular, the combination therapy of K, J, and Y was superior to the respective monotherapy, which supported the prescription of KJY combination. We further studied the inhibitory effect of KJY on LPS-induced inflammation in RAW264.7 macrophages. The results showed that KJY inhibited LPS-induced secretion of inflammatory cytokines (Interferon-gamma, Interleukin-1 Beta, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10, cyclooxygenase-2 and Tumor necrosis factor-α in RAW264.7 macrophages. Combination therapy of KJY suppressed the protein expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in vivo and in vitro. Further study indicated that KJY inhibited STAT1 activation by down regulating p-STAT1 to exert anti-inflammatory effect and improve renal function in rats with chronic renal failure. PMID:29643988

  17. Targeting chemotherapy-resistant leukemia by combining DNT cellular therapy with conventional chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Jong Bok; Kang, Hyeonjeong; Minden, Mark D; Zhang, Li

    2018-04-24

    While conventional chemotherapy is effective at eliminating the bulk of leukemic cells, chemotherapy resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a prevalent problem that hinders conventional therapies and contributes to disease relapse, and ultimately patient death. We have recently shown that allogeneic double negative T cells (DNTs) are able to target the majority of primary AML blasts in vitro and in patient-derived xenograft models. However, some primary AML blast samples are resistant to DNT cell therapy. Given the differences in the modes of action of DNTs and chemotherapy, we hypothesize that DNT therapy can be used in combination with conventional chemotherapy to further improve their anti-leukemic effects and to target chemotherapy-resistant disease. Drug titration assays and flow-based cytotoxicity assays using ex vivo expanded allogeneic DNTs were performed on multiple AML cell lines to identify therapy-resistance. Primary AML samples were also tested to validate our in vitro findings. Further, a xenograft model was employed to demonstrate the feasibility of combining conventional chemotherapy and adoptive DNT therapy to target therapy-resistant AML. Lastly, blocking assays with neutralizing antibodies were employed to determine the mechanism by which chemotherapy increases the susceptibility of AML to DNT-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we demonstrate that KG1a, a stem-like AML cell line that is resistant to DNTs and chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-resistant primary AML samples both became more susceptible to DNT-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro following pre-treatment with daunorubicin. Moreover, chemotherapy treatment followed by adoptive DNT cell therapy significantly decreased bone marrow engraftment of KG1a in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, daunorubicin increased the expression of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands on KG1a; blocking of these pathways attenuated DNT-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of using DNTs as

  18. Initial paclitaxel improves outcome compared with CMFP combination chemotherapy as front-line therapy in untreated metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J F; Dewar, J; Toner, G C; Smith, J; Tattersall, M H; Olver, I N; Ackland, S; Kennedy, I; Goldstein, D; Gurney, H; Walpole, E; Levi, J; Stephenson, J; Canetta, R

    1999-08-01

    To determine the place of single-agent paclitaxel compared with nonanthracycline combination chemotherapy as front-line therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Patients with previously untreated metastatic breast cancer were randomized to receive either paclitaxel 200 mg/m(2) intravenously (IV) over 3 hours for eight cycles (24 weeks) or standard cyclophosphamide 100 mg/m(2)/d orally on days 1 to 14, methotrexate 40 mg/m(2) IV on days 1 and 8, fluorouracil 600 mg/m(2) IV on days 1 and 8, and prednisone 40 mg/m(2)/d orally on days 1 to 14 (CMFP) for six cycles (24 weeks) with epirubicin recommended as second-line therapy. A total of 209 eligible patients were randomized with a median survival duration of 17.3 months for paclitaxel and 13.9 months for CMFP. Multivariate analysis showed that patients who received paclitaxel survived significantly longer than those who received CMFP (P =.025). Paclitaxel produced significantly less severe leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, mucositis, documented infections (all P = .07). Initial paclitaxel was associated with significantly less myelosuppression and fewer infections, with longer survival and similar quality of life and control of metastatic breast cancer compared with CMFP.

  19. Radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors and binding agents targeting PSMA: Effective theranostic tools for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Nanabala, Raviteja; Joy, Ajith; Sasikumar, Arun; Knapp, Furn F.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the broad incidence, morbidity and mortality associated with prostate-derived cancer, the development of more effective new technologies continues to be an important goal for the accurate detection and treatment of localized prostate cancer, lymphatic involvement and metastases. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA; Glycoprotein II) is expressed in high levels on prostate-derived cells and is an important target for visualization and treatment of prostate cancer. Radiolabeled peptide targeting technologies have rapidly evolved over the last decade and have focused on the successful development of radiolabeled small molecules that act as inhibitors to the binding of the N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) substrate to the PSMA molecule. A number of radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors have been described in the literature and labeled with SPECT, PET and therapeutic radionuclides. Clinical studies with these agents have demonstrated the improved potential of PSMA-targeted PET imaging agents to detect metastatic prostate cancer in comparison with conventional imaging technologies. Although many of these agents have been evaluated in humans, by far the most extensive clinical literature has described use of the 68 Ga and 177 Lu agents. This review describes the design and development of these agents, with a focus on the broad clinical introduction of PSMA targeting motifs labeled with 68 Ga for PET-CT imaging and 177 Lu for therapy. In particular, because of availability from the long-lived 68 Ge (T 1/2 = 270 days)/ 68 Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min) generator system and increasing availability of PET-CT, the 68 Ga-labeled PSMA targeted agent is receiving widespread interest and is one of the fastest growing radiopharmaceuticals for PET-CT imaging.

  20. EFFICACY OF FIXED COMBINATION OF VALSARTAN, AMLODIPINE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF THE PATIENT OF VERY HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Sokolov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of arterial hypertension in association with high and very high cardiovascular risk requires widespread use of combined therapy. Current approaches to selection of combination components of antihypertensive drugs are based the efficacy of these drugs proven in multicenter randomized clinical trials. The triple combination of calcium antagonist, angiotensin II receptor blocker and thiazide diuretic is regarded as the best option for combined therapy in patients with arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease to reduce cardiovascular risk.

  1. Combined effect of gamma radiation and some fungal control agents on the greasy cut- worm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd EL- Wahed, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    The greasy cut worm, Agrotis ipsilon (Lepidoptera- Noctuidae) is widely distributed all over the world, particularly in moderate and subtropical countries of the northern and southern hemispheres (Kononenko ,2003). The greasy cut worm causes damage to vegetables, cucurbitaceous and industrial crops. The greatest damage is caused to cotton, essential-oil cultures, maize, tobacco, sunflower, tomatoes, sugar beet and potato. The pest can strongly harm vegetables, and also damage seedlings of tree species (pine, maple, and nut). This pest has solitary habits. They commonly feed on seedlings at ground level, cutting off the stem and sometimes dragging the plants into their burrows. The continuous use of chemical pesticides against pests, resistance to the action of pesticides had dramatically evolved. Also, the extensive use of these chemicals has given rise to problems such as residual toxicity (pollution) and harmful effects on beneficial insects, which are natural enemies of target or nontarget pest species. Such problems have become a cause of search for safety pesticides including microbial agents as fungi, bacteria and viruses (Rashed, 1993). The use of radiation to induce dominate lethal mutations in the sterile insect technique (SIT) is now as the major component of many large and successful programs for pest suppression and eradication. Adult insects, and their different developmental stages, differ in their sensitivity to the induction of dominate lethal mutation. Care has to be taken to identify the appropriate dose of radiation that produces the required level of sterility without impairing the overall fitness of the released insects.(Sawires, 2005). This technique would be successful control device for suppressing and combating many lepidopteraus insect pests, including A. Ipsilon has been studied (EL- kady et al., 1983, EL-Naggar et al., 1984, Abd El -Hamid 2004 and Gabarty, 2008). Entomopathogenic fungi that infect insects have received considerable

  2. Nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy overcomes tumor drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdair, Ayman; Chen, Di; Patil, Yogesh; Ma, Linan; Dou, Q Ping; Shekhar, Malathy P V; Panyam, Jayanth

    2010-01-25

    Tumor drug resistance significantly limits the success of chemotherapy in the clinic. Tumor cells utilize multiple mechanisms to prevent the accumulation of anticancer drugs at their intracellular site of action. In this study, we investigated the anticancer efficacy of doxorubicin in combination with photodynamic therapy using methylene blue in a drug-resistant mouse tumor model. Surfactant-polymer hybrid nanoparticles formulated using an anionic surfactant, Aerosol-OT (AOT), and a naturally occurring polysaccharide polymer, sodium alginate, were used for synchronized delivery of the two drugs. Balb/c mice bearing syngeneic JC tumors (mammary adenocarcinoma) were used as a drug-resistant tumor model. Nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved animal survival. Nanoparticle-mediated combination treatment resulted in enhanced tumor accumulation of both doxorubicin and methylene blue, significant inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, and increased induction of apoptosis. These data suggest that nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy using doxorubicin and methylene blue has significant therapeutic potential against drug-resistant tumors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of combination therapies for visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Meheus

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is a systemic parasitic disease that is fatal unless treated. We assessed the cost and cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent. In particular we examined whether