WorldWideScience

Sample records for color vision deficiencies

  1. Genetics Home Reference: color vision deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of L or M cones or to the production of abnormal opsin pigments in these cones that affect red-green color vision. Blue-yellow color vision defects result from mutations in the ... the production of defective S cones. Impaired S cone function alters perception ...

  2. Hypoxia, color vision deficiencies, and blood oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Chromatic thresholds were measured using the Cambridge Color Test (CCT), Color Assessment and Diagnosis : (CAD) test, and Cone Specific Contrast Test at ground and 3780 m (12,400 ft) for subjects with normal color : vision and red-green color vision ...

  3. Individualization of 2D color maps for people with color vision deficiencies

    KAUST Repository

    Waldin, Nicholas

    2016-12-13

    2D color maps are often used to visually encode complex data characteristics such as heat or height. The comprehension of color maps in visualization is affected by the display (e.g., a monitor) and the perceptual abilities of the viewer. People with color vision deficiencies, such as red-green blindness, face difficulties when using conventional color maps. We propose a novel method for adapting a color map to an individual person, by having the user sort lines extracted from a given color map.

  4. Screening for Congenital Color Vision Deficiency in Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The teachers were randomly selected from 13 schools in Port Harcourt City (PHC) and given a six hours training workshop on vision disorders in children and congenital color vision screening. They were given a self administered pre and post test questionnaires before and after training respectively. Subsequently ...

  5. Functional Reflective Polarizer for Augmented Reality and Color Vision Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-03

    optics in multilayer polymer mirrors,” Science 287(5462), 2451–2456 (2000). 10. M. Alpern and T. Wake, “Cone pigments in human deutan colour vision...distinguish between more saturated colors. Last but not least, because of the Helmholtz- Kohlrausch (H-K) effect [30, 31], people psychologically

  6. Addressing the Needs of Students with Color Vision Deficiencies in the Elementary School Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karla Bame

    2013-01-01

    Color vision deficiencies affect approximately eight percent of the male population (Birch & Chisholm, 2008; Cole, 2007; Jenny & Kelso, 2007; Neitz & Neitz, 2000), yet the condition is often overlooked in the educational setting despite the pervasiveness of color in the school (Suero et al., 2004). The purpose of this study was to…

  7. Color vision deficiency compensation for Visual Processing Disorder using Hardy-Rand-Rittler test and color transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin, Jessie R.; Pinugu, Jasmine Nadja J.; Bautista, Joshua Ian C.; Nebres, Pauline D.; Rey Hipolito, Cipriano M.; Santella, Jose Anthony A.

    2017-06-01

    Visual processing skill is used to gather visual information from environment however, there are cases that Visual Processing Disorder (VPD) occurs. The so called visual figure-ground discrimination is a type of VPD where color is one of the factors that contributes on this type. In line with this, color plays a vital role in everyday living, but individuals that have limited and inaccurate color perception suffers from Color Vision Deficiency (CVD) and still not aware on their case. To resolve this case, this study focuses on the design of KULAY, a Head-Mounted Display (HMD) device that can assess whether a user has a CVD or not thru the standard Hardy-Rand-Rittler (HRR) test. This test uses pattern recognition in order to evaluate the user. In addition, color vision deficiency simulation and color correction thru color transformation is also a concern of this research. This will enable people with normal color vision to know how color vision deficient perceives and vice-versa. For the accuracy of the simulated HRR assessment, its results were validated thru an actual assessment done by a doctor. Moreover, for the preciseness of color transformation, Structural Similarity Index Method (SSIM) was used to compare the simulated CVD images and the color corrected images to other reference sources. The output of the simulated HRR assessment and color transformation shows very promising results indicating effectiveness and efficiency of the study. Thus, due to its form factor and portability, this device is beneficial in the field of medicine and technology.

  8. A Call for Considering Color Vision Deficiency When Creating Graphics for Psychology Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although color vision deficiency (CVD) is fairly common, it is often not adequately considered when data is presented in color graphics. This study found that CVD tends to be mentioned neither in the author guidelines of psychology journals nor in the standard publication manuals of the field (e.g., the publication manuals of the American Psychological Association and the American Medical Association). To illustrate the relevance of this problem, a panel of scholars with CVD was used to evaluate the color figures in three respected psychological science journals. Results suggested that a substantial proportion of those figures were needlessly confusing for viewers with CVD and could have been easily improved through simple adjustments. Based on prior literature and on feedback from the panelists, recommendations are made for improving the accessibility of graphics in psychology reports.

  9. Predictive Validity of the Aviation Lights Test for Testing Pilots With Color Vision Deficiencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milburn, Nelda

    2004-01-01

    The color filters of the Farnsworth Lantern (FALANT) were changed to meet the Federal Aviation Administration s signal color specifications, thereby creating a job-sample color vision test called the Aviation Lights Test (ALT...

  10. Prevalence of refractive errors in students with and without color vision deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ostadimoghaddam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate refractive errors in school age children with color vision deficiency (CVD and those with normal color vision (NCV in order to make a better understanding of the emmetropization process. Methods: A total of 4,400 primary school students aged 7-12 years were screened for color vision using Ishihara pseudoisochromatic color vision plate sets. Of these, 160 (3.6% students had CVD. A total of 400 age- and sex-matched students with NCV were selected as controls. Refractive status was evaluated using objective cyclorefraction. Results: The CVD group included 136 male (85% and 24 female (15% subjects with mean age of 10.1 ± 1.8 years. The NCV group comprised of 336 male (84% and 64 female (16% subjects with mean age of 10.5 ± 1.2 years. The prevalence of myopia (7.7% vs. 13.9%, P < 0.001 and hyperopia (41% vs. 57.4%, P = 0.03 was significantly lower in the CVD group. Furthermore, subjects with CVD subjects demonstrated a lower magnitude of refractive errors as compared to the CVD group (mean refractive error: +0.54 ± 0.19 D versus + 0.74 ± 1.12 D, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Although the lower prevalence of myopia in subjects with CVD group supports the role of longitudinal chromatic aberration in the development of refractive errors; the lower prevalence of hyperopia in this group is an opposing finding. Myopia is a multifactorial disorder and longitudinal chromatic aberration is not the only factor influencing the emmetropization process.

  11. Color vision deficiencies and the child's willingness for visual activity: preliminary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geniusz, Malwina; Szmigiel, Marta; Geniusz, Maciej

    2017-09-01

    After a few weeks a newborn baby can recognize high contrasts in colors like black and white. They reach full color vision at the age of circa six months. Matching colors is the next milestone. Most children can do it at the age of two. Good color vision is one of the factors which indicate proper development of a child. Presented research shows the correlation between color vision and visual activity. The color vision of a group of children aged 3-8 was examined with saturated Farnsworth D-15. Fransworth test was performed twice - in a standard version and in a magnetic version. The time of completing standard and magnetic tests was measured. Furthermore, parents of subjects answered questions checking the children's visual activity in 1 - 10 scale. Parents stated whether the child willingly watched books, colored coloring books, put puzzles or liked to play with blocks etc. The Fransworth D-15 test designed for color vision testing can be used to test younger children from the age of 3 years. These are preliminary studies which may be a useful tool for further, more accurate examination on a larger group of subjects.

  12. Reexamination of Color Vision Standards, Part 3: Analysis of the Effects of Color Vision Deficiencies in Using ATC Displays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Jing

    2006-01-01

    ...) allows certain types of CDs to enter the ATC workforce. Many guidelines for color use in visual displays state that color use should be accompanied by achromatic redundant cues to avoid misinterpretation by CD users...

  13. Colour vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  14. Operational Assessment of Color Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-20

    reported as the average of the right and left eye . The CCT result was the score of the affected cone for color deficient subjects and the average of...unlimited. STINFO COPY AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2016-0008 Operational Assessment of Color Vision Steve Wright, O.D.; James Gaska, Ph.D...drawings, specifications, or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation or convey any rights or permission to manufacture

  15. [Retinitis pigmentosa and color vision deficiency in Kamigoto island, Nagasaki Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, S

    1997-08-01

    I studied two genetic diseases, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and color vision anomaly, in Kamigoto, one of the off-shore islands in Nagasaki Prefecture. The Prevalance of RP patients in this island was estimated to be one in 473 persons. Among the RP patients observed, familial cases whose disorders are transmitted through successive generations comprised 25.7%. Although it seems that the inheritance mode of RP in these familial cases is autosomal dominant, an autosomal recessive fashion showing quasi-dominance cannot be ruled out, because inbreeding frequently occurs on this island. There were at least two types of RP, one with late onset (40 years of age or later) and the other with early onset, and patients with the latter RP tended to have a poor prognosis. Only a few RP patients had posterior subcapsular cataract, and none had pseudexfoliation in spite of advanced age. Color vision anomalies were found in 3.86% of high-school boys and in 0.41% of girls in this island, and they included protanopia (4.2%), protanomaly (10.4%), deuteranopia (37.5%), and deuteranomaly (47.9%). The prevalence in boys was comparable to that in the general Japanese population, but the prevalence in girls was higher in Kamigoto than in other districts. It is most likely that the unique findings regarding the two disorders reflect geographical and/or social features in Kamigoto island.

  16. Light Vision Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valberg, Arne

    2005-04-01

    Light Vision Color takes a well-balanced, interdisciplinary approach to our most important sensory system. The book successfully combines basics in vision sciences with recent developments from different areas such as neuroscience, biophysics, sensory psychology and philosophy. Originally published in 1998 this edition has been extensively revised and updated to include new chapters on clinical problems and eye diseases, low vision rehabilitation and the basic molecular biology and genetics of colour vision. Takes a broad interdisciplinary approach combining basics in vision sciences with the most recent developments in the area Includes an extensive list of technical terms and explanations to encourage student understanding Successfully brings together the most important areas of the subject in to one volume

  17. [Investigation of color vision using a web-based color vision test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbecker, J; Wecke, T; Wiermer, R; Röhl, F W; Lindner, H; Behrens-Baumann, W

    2004-03-01

    Screening tests of visual functions using the Internet are theoretically possible. To use these tests as a screening test, they must deliver comparable results with conventional test procedures. A web-based color vision test was developed based on pseudoisochromatic color plates. The web-based color vision test was developed according to the pseudoisochromatic color plates by Velhagen and Broschmann using the programming-languages HTML, Java, and Perl. Sixty-five voluntary subjects, including nine color-deficient subjects, were examined by luminescence color plates (via web-based color vision test) and pigment color plates (via book). The statistical analysis was performed by determining the correspondence and the 95%-confidence interval. The correspondence of the test results for all subjects was 0.98 and the 95%-confidence interval was within 0.91 and 0.99. The correspondence of the test results in the group of color-deficient subjects was 1.0 and because of the limited number the 95%-confidence interval was within 0.71 and 1.0. The web-based color vision test with luminescence color plates for color-efficient and color-deficient subjects delivers test results comparable to pigment color plates under standardized examination conditions. Further studies are needed to examine if the web-based color vision test can also be used as an Internet screening test.

  18. Cone photoreceptor structure in patients with x-linked cone dysfunction and red-green color vision deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/ M opsin gene mutations...

  19. Progress in color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused

  20. Sensory Drive, Color, and Color Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Trevor D

    2017-08-01

    Colors often appear to differ in arbitrary ways among related species. However, a fraction of color diversity may be explained because some signals are more easily perceived in one environment rather than another. Models show that not only signals but also the perception of signals should regularly evolve in response to different environments, whether these primarily involve detection of conspecifics or detection of predators and prey. Thus, a deeper understanding of how perception of color correlates with environmental attributes should help generate more predictive models of color divergence. Here, I briefly review our understanding of color vision in vertebrates. Then I focus on opsin spectral tuning and opsin expression, two traits involved in color perception that have become amenable to study. I ask how opsin tuning is correlated with ecological differences, notably the light environment, and how this potentially affects perception of conspecific colors. Although opsin tuning appears to evolve slowly, opsin expression levels are more evolutionarily labile but have been difficult to connect to color perception. The challenge going forward will be to identify how physiological differences involved in color vision, such as opsin expression levels, translate into perceptual differences, the selection pressures that have driven those differences, and ultimately how this may drive evolution of conspecific colors.

  1. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  2. Dynamic simulation of color blindness for studying color vision requirements in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a dynamic simulation of defective color vision. Using an RGB video camera connected to a PC or laptop, the captured and displayed RGB colors are translated by our software into modified RGB values that simulate the color appearance of a person with a color deficiency. Usually, the

  3. Temporary effects of alcohol on color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geniusz, Maciej K.; Geniusz, Malwina; Szmigiel, Marta; Przeździecka-Dołyk, Joanna

    2017-09-01

    The color vision has been described as one to be very sensitive to the intake of several chemicals. The present research reviews the published literature that is concerned with color vision impairment due to alcohol. Most of this research considers people under long-term effects of alcohol. However, there is little information about temporary effects of alcohol on color vision. A group of ten volunteers aged 18-40 was studied. During the study levels of alcohol in the body were tested with a standard breathalyzer while color vision were studied using Farnsworth Munsell 100 Hue Color Vision Tests. Keywords: Col

  4. Reexamination of color vision standards, part II. a computational method to assess the effect of color deficiencies in using ATC displays : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    The previous study showed that many colors were used in air traffic control displays. We also found that colors were used mainly for three purposes: capturing controllers immediate attention, identifying targets, and segmenting information. This r...

  5. Color in Computer Vision Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gevers, Theo; van de Weijer, Joost; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark

    2012-01-01

    While the field of computer vision drives many of today’s digital technologies and communication networks, the topic of color has emerged only recently in most computer vision applications. One of the most extensive works to date on color in computer vision, this book provides a complete set of tools for working with color in the field of image understanding. Based on the authors’ intense collaboration for more than a decade and drawing on the latest thinking in the field of computer science, the book integrates topics from color science and computer vision, clearly linking theor

  6. Schopenhauer on vision and the colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, R A

    1997-01-01

    Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) published his book, On Vision and the Colors in 1816. He started from Aristotle's linear color system and Goethe's three pairs of contrast colors. His work preceded Hering's theory of opponent colors but his path to insight was blocked by his anti-Newtonianism and his neo-Hellenistic attitude toward science. Because of his theory of the subjectivity of colors he was a forerunner of the psycho-physiological variant of neo-Kantianism.

  7. Color vision and fatigue: an incidental finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jeffery K; Ramaswamy, Shankaran

    2007-11-01

    Because there is little information available as to how fatigue and color vision interact, we present some incidental findings on how a protanope and a color-normal perform on several color vision tests after 1 night of sleep deprivation. A series of clinically and occupationally based color vision tests were administered to a protanope and a color-normal subject after they had stayed awake all night and after a regular night's sleep. There was essentially no change in their performance on the clinical color vision tests; however, both did worse on the occupationally based color vision tests after 1 night of sleep deprivation. The color-normal made numerous errors in identifying colors displayed on a video display terminal, whereas the protanope had a large increase in errors on the CN Lantern Test. Both subjects passed these respective tests after a regular night's sleep. The primary reason for color-normal's poor performance on the video display terminal test was probably due to a decrement in his visuo-motor control rather than a loss in color discrimination. In contrast, the protanope's poor performance on the lantern test was probably due to the additive effects of the inherent limitations of his visual system and fatigue.

  8. Color universal design: analysis of color category dependency on color vision type (3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Natsuki; Ichihara, Yasuyo G.; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Kamachi, Miyuki G.; Ito, Kei

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results of a study investigating the color perception characteristics of people with red-green color confusion. We believe that this is an important step towards achieving Color Universal Design. In Japan, approximately 5% of men and 0.2% of women have red-green confusion. The percentage for men is higher in Europe and the United States; up to 8% in some countries. Red-green confusion involves a perception of colors different from normal color vision. Colors are used as a means of disseminating clear information to people; however, it may be difficult to convey the correct information to people who have red-green confusion. Consequently, colors should be chosen that minimize accidents and that promote more effective communication. In a previous survey, we investigated color categories common to each color vision type, trichromat (C-type color vision), protan (P-type color vision) and deuteran (D-type color vision). In the present study, first, we conducted experiments in order to verify a previous survey of C-type color vision and P-type color vision. Next, we investigated color difference levels within "CIE 1976 L*a*b*" (the CIELAB uniform color space), where neither C-type nor P-type color vision causes accidents under certain conditions (rain maps/contour line levels and graph color legend levels). As a result, we propose a common chromaticity of colors that the two color vision types are able to categorize by means of color names common to C-type color vision. We also offer a proposal to explain perception characteristics of color differences with normal color vision and red-green confusion using the CIELAB uniform color space. This report is a follow-up to SPIE-IS & T / Vol. 7528 7528051-8 and SPIE-IS & T /vol. 7866 78660J-1-8.

  9. Color vision: introduction by the feature editors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Steven L; Baraas, Rigmor; Lee, Barry B; Lindsey, Delwin T; Uchikawa, Keiji; Webster, Michael A; Werner, John S

    2016-03-01

    This feature issue of the Journal of the Optical Society of America A (JOSA A) reflects the basic and applied research interests of members of the color vision community. Most of the articles stem from presentations at the 23rd Biennial Symposium of the International Colour Vision Society (ICVS).

  10. Number of discernible colors for color-deficient observers estimated from the MacAdam limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Esther; Martínez-Verdú, Francisco Miguel; Linhares, João Manuel Maciel; Nascimento, Sérgio Miguel Cardoso

    2010-10-01

    We estimated the number of colors perceived by color normal and color-deficient observers when looking at the theoretic limits of object-color stimuli. These limits, the optimal color stimuli, were computed for a color normal observer and CIE standard illuminant D65, and the resultant colors were expressed in the CIELAB and DIN99d color spaces. The corresponding color volumes for abnormal color vision were computed using models simulating for normal trichromatic observers the appearance for dichromats and anomalous trichomats. The number of colors perceived in each case was then computed from the color volumes enclosed by the optimal colors also known as MacAdam limits. It was estimated that dichromats perceive less than 1% of the colors perceived by normal trichromats and that anomalous trichromats perceive 50%-60% for anomalies in the medium-wavelength-sensitive and 60%-70% for anomalies in the long-wavelength-sensitive cones. Complementary estimates obtained similarly for the spectral locus of monochromatic stimuli suggest less impairment for color-deficient observers, a fact that is explained by the two-dimensional nature of the locus.

  11. Railroad signal color and orientation : effects of color blindness and criteria for color vision field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report concerns two issues: 1) whether color vision is necessary for locomotive crews who work on railroads where the signal system is either completely redundant with regard to signal color and signal orientation or the signal system only uses ...

  12. Colour Vision Deficiency and Physics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of "colourblindness" most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision…

  13. Acquired colour vision deficiency in patients receiving digoxin maintenance therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrenson, J G; Kelly, C; Lawrenson, A L; Birch, J

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: Disturbances of colour vision are a frequently reported sign of digoxin toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of acquired colour vision deficiency in elderly hospitalised patients receiving maintenance digoxin therapy.

  14. The adaptive value of primate color vision for predator detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Daniel Marques Almeida; Maia, Rafael; de Albuquerque Ajuz, Rafael Cavalcanti; De Moraes, Pedro Zurvaino Palmeira Melo Rosa; Spyrides, Maria Helena Constantino; Pessoa, Valdir Filgueiras

    2014-08-01

    The complex evolution of primate color vision has puzzled biologists for decades. Primates are the only eutherian mammals that evolved an enhanced capacity for discriminating colors in the green-red part of the spectrum (trichromatism). However, while Old World primates present three types of cone pigments and are routinely trichromatic, most New World primates exhibit a color vision polymorphism, characterized by the occurrence of trichromatic and dichromatic females and obligatory dichromatic males. Even though this has stimulated a prolific line of inquiry, the selective forces and relative benefits influencing color vision evolution in primates are still under debate, with current explanations focusing almost exclusively at the advantages in finding food and detecting socio-sexual signals. Here, we evaluate a previously untested possibility, the adaptive value of primate color vision for predator detection. By combining color vision modeling data on New World and Old World primates, as well as behavioral information from human subjects, we demonstrate that primates exhibiting better color discrimination (trichromats) excel those displaying poorer color visions (dichromats) at detecting carnivoran predators against the green foliage background. The distribution of color vision found in extant anthropoid primates agrees with our results, and may be explained by the advantages of trichromats and dichromats in detecting predators and insects, respectively. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Validity and Acceptance of Color Vision Testing on Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Omar K; Emborgo, Trisha S; Vieyra, Mark B; Huselid, Rebecca F; Banik, Rudrani

    2018-03-01

    Ishihara color plates (ICP) are the most commonly used color vision test (CVT) worldwide. With the advent of new technologies, attempts have been made to streamline the process of CVT. As hardware and software evolve, smartphone-based testing modalities may aid ophthalmologists in performing more efficient ophthalmic examinations. We assess the validity of smartphone color vision testing (CVT) by comparing results using the Eye Handbook (EHB) CVT application with standard Ishihara color plates (ICP). Prospective case-control study of subjects 18 years and older with visual acuity of 20/100 or better at 14 inches. The study group included patients with any ocular pathology. The color vision deficient (CVD) group was patients who failed more than 2 plates. The control group had no known ocular pathology. CVT was performed with both ICP and EHB under standardized background illuminance. Eleven plates were tested with each modality. Validity of EHB CVT and acceptance of EHB CVT were analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using Bland-Altman plot with limits of agreement (LOA) at the 95th percentile of differences in score, independent samples t tests with 95% confidence interval (CI), and Pearson χ tests. The Bland-Altman plot showed agreement between correct number of plates in EHB and ICP for the study subjects (bias, -0.25; LOA, -1.92 to 1.42). Agreement was also observed between the correct number of plates in EHB and ICP for the controls (bias, -0.01; LOA, -0.61 to 0.59) and CVD (bias, -0.50; LOA, -4.64 to 3.64) subjects. The sensitivity of EHB was 0.92 (95% CI 0.76-1.07) and the specificity of EHB was 1.00 (95% CI 1.00-1.00). Fifty-nine percent preferred EHB, 12% preferred ICP, and 29% had no preference. In healthy controls and patients with ocular pathology, there was an agreement of CVT results comparing EHB with ICP. Overall, the majority preferred EHB to ICP. These findings demonstrate that further testing is required to understand and improve the

  16. Epistatic adaptive evolution of human color vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Yokoyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Establishing genotype-phenotype relationship is the key to understand the molecular mechanism of phenotypic adaptation. This initial step may be untangled by analyzing appropriate ancestral molecules, but it is a daunting task to recapitulate the evolution of non-additive (epistatic interactions of amino acids and function of a protein separately. To adapt to the ultraviolet (UV-free retinal environment, the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1 visual pigment in human (human S1 switched from detecting UV to absorbing blue light during the last 90 million years. Mutagenesis experiments of the UV-sensitive pigment in the Boreoeutherian ancestor show that the blue-sensitivity was achieved by seven mutations. The experimental and quantum chemical analyses show that 4,008 of all 5,040 possible evolutionary trajectories are terminated prematurely by containing a dehydrated nonfunctional pigment. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests that human ancestors achieved the blue-sensitivity gradually and almost exclusively by epistasis. When the final stage of spectral tuning of human S1 was underway 45-30 million years ago, the middle and long wavelength-sensitive (MWS/LWS pigments appeared and so-called trichromatic color vision was established by interprotein epistasis. The adaptive evolution of human S1 differs dramatically from orthologous pigments with a major mutational effect used in achieving blue-sensitivity in a fish and several mammalian species and in regaining UV vision in birds. These observations imply that the mechanisms of epistatic interactions must be understood by studying various orthologues in different species that have adapted to various ecological and physiological environments.

  17. Molecular evolution of bat color vision genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daryi; Oakley, Todd; Mower, Jeffrey; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Yim, Sokchea; Honeycutt, Rodney L; Tsao, Hsienshao; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-02-01

    The two suborders of bats, Megachiroptera (megabats) and Microchiroptera (microbats), use different sensory modalities for perceiving their environment. Megabats are crepuscular and rely on a well-developed eyes and visual pathway, whereas microbats occupy a nocturnal niche and use acoustic orientation or echolocation more than vision as the major means of perceiving their environment. In view of the differences associated with their sensory systems, we decided to investigate the function and evolution of color vision (opsin genes) in these two suborders of bats. The middle/long wavelength (M/L) and short wavelength (S) opsin genes were sequenced from two frugivorous species of megabats, Haplonycteris fischeri and Pteropus dasymallus formosus, and one insectivorous species of microbat, Myotis velifer. Contrary to the situation in primates, where many nocturnal species have lost the functional S opsin gene, both crepuscular and strictly nocturnal species of bats that we examined have functional M/L and S opsin genes. Surprisingly, the S opsin in these bats may be sensitive to UV light, which is relatively more abundant at dawn and at dusk. The M/L opsin in these bats appears to be the L type, which is sensitive to red and may be helpful for identifying fruits among leaves or for other purposes. Most interestingly, H. fischeri has a recent duplication of the M/L opsin gene, representing to date the only known case of opsin gene duplication in non-primate mammals. Some of these observations are unexpected and may provide insights into the effect of nocturnal life on the evolution of opsin genes in mammals and the evolution of the life history traits of bats in general.

  18. Portable real-time color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a simple and fast lookup-table based method to derive and apply natural daylight colors to multi-band night-time images. The method deploys an optimal color transformation derived from a set of samples taken from a daytime color reference image. The colors in the resulting colorized

  19. Color Vision and the Railways: Part 1. The Railway LED Lantern Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Stephen J; Casolin, Armand; Long, Jennifer; Hilmi, Mohd Radzi

    2015-02-01

    Lantern tests and practical tests are often used in the assessment of prospective railway employees. The lantern tests rarely embody the actual colors used in signaling on the railways. Practical tests have a number of problems, most notably consistency of application and practicability. This work was carried out to provide the Railway LED Lantern Test (RLLT) as a validated method of assessing the color vision of railway workers. The RLLT, a simulated practical test using the same LEDs (light-emitting diodes) as are used in modern railway signals, was developed. It was tested on 46 color vision-normal (CVN) and 37 color vision-deficient (CVD) subjects. A modified prototype was then tested on 106 CVN subjects. All 106 CVN subjects and most mildly affected CVD subjects passed the modified lantern at 3 m. At 6 m, 1 of the 106 normal color vision subjects failed by missing a single red light. All the CVD subjects failed. The RLLT carried out at 3 m allowed mildly affected CVD subjects to pass and demonstrate adequate color vision for the less demanding railway tasks. Carried out at 6 m, it essentially reinforced normal color vision as the standard. The RLLT is a simply administered test that has a direct link to the actual visual task of the rail worker. The RLLT lantern has been adopted as an approved test in the Australian National Standard for Health Assessment of Rail Safety Workers in place of a practical test. It has the potential to be a valid part of any railway color vision standard.

  20. Considering the Influence of Nonadaptive Evolution on Primate Color Vision.

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    Rachel L Jacobs

    Full Text Available Color vision in primates is variable across species, and it represents a rare trait in which the genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic variation are fairly well-understood. Research on primate color vision has largely focused on adaptive explanations for observed variation, but it remains unclear why some species have trichromatic or polymorphic color vision while others are red-green color blind. Lemurs, in particular, are highly variable. While some species are polymorphic, many closely-related species are strictly dichromatic. We provide the first characterization of color vision in a wild population of red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer, Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar with a sample size (87 individuals; NX chromosomes = 134 large enough to detect even rare variants (0.95 probability of detection at ≥ 3% frequency. By sequencing exon 5 of the X-linked opsin gene we identified opsin spectral sensitivity based on known diagnostic sites and found this population to be dichromatic and monomorphic for a long wavelength allele. Apparent fixation of this long allele is in contrast to previously published accounts of Eulemur species, which exhibit either polymorphic color vision or only the medium wavelength opsin. This unexpected result may represent loss of color vision variation, which could occur through selective processes and/or genetic drift (e.g., genetic bottleneck. To indirectly assess the latter scenario, we genotyped 55 adult red-bellied lemurs at seven variable microsatellite loci and used heterozygosity excess and M-ratio tests to assess if this population may have experienced a recent genetic bottleneck. Results of heterozygosity excess but not M-ratio tests suggest a bottleneck might have occurred in this red-bellied lemur population. Therefore, while selection may also play a role, the unique color vision observed in this population might have been influenced by a recent genetic bottleneck. These results emphasize the

  1. Modelling, Measuring and Compensating Color Weak Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Rika; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2016-03-08

    We use methods from Riemann geometry to investigate transformations between the color spaces of color-normal and color weak observers. The two main applications are the simulation of the perception of a color weak observer for a color normal observer and the compensation of color images in a way that a color weak observer has approximately the same perception as a color normal observer. The metrics in the color spaces of interest are characterized with the help of ellipsoids defined by the just-noticable-differences between color which are measured with the help of color-matching experiments. The constructed mappings are isometries of Riemann spaces that preserve the perceived color-differences for both observers. Among the two approaches to build such an isometry, we introduce normal coordinates in Riemann spaces as a tool to construct a global color-weak compensation map. Compared to previously used methods this method is free from approximation errors due to local linearizations and it avoids the problem of shifting locations of the origin of the local coordinate system. We analyse the variations of the Riemann metrics for different observers obtained from new color matching experiments and describe three variations of the basic method. The performance of the methods is evaluated with the help of semantic differential (SD) tests.

  2. Simulated night vision goggle wear and colored aftereffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jeffery K; Pilecki, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Surveys of military pilots report that between 1.6% and 65% of the respondents experienced altered color vision after night vision goggle (NVG) wear. For the majority of these pilots, the aftereffect was a brownish afterimage that lasted less than 10 min. Given the large disparity in the surveys, we asked subjects to wear goggles which simulated NVGs to determine the nature and duration of any color aftereffects after removing the goggles. Two separate experiments were conducted after wearing the goggles for 30 continuous minutes. The first measured the adaptation effects on color appearance by determining the spectral locations of unique blue and unique yellow. The second measured the adaptation effects on color discrimination using the Lanthony Desaturated D15 (Desat D15) color vision test. The location of unique blue shifted to a longer wavelength by 4 nm immediately after removing the goggles and returned to baseline by 12 min post-wear. The unique yellow location was unaffected by the color aftereffect. In the second experiment, the time to complete the Desat D15 was 13% longer than baseline for the first 6 min post-wear. There was also a decrease in the frequency of errors relative to baseline. Only one subject reported an afterimage in either experiment. The results showed that the color aftereffects were subtle and unlikely to cause major color vision problems. The time course of the color aftereffect in this experiment resembled short-term adaptation effects.

  3. Color Vision 2018: Introduction by the feature editors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Steven L; Baraas, Rigmor; Kremers, Jan; Lindsey, Delwin T; Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Webster, Michael A; Werner, John S

    2018-04-01

    This feature issue of the Journal of the Optical Society of America A (JOSA A) reflects the basic and applied research interests of members of the color vision community. Most of the articles stem from presentations at the 24th Biennial Symposium of the International Colour Vision Society (ICVS).

  4. Color vision abnormality as an initial presentation of the complete type of congenital stationary night blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan X

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Xue Tan, Aya Aoki, Yasuo YanagiDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Patients with the complete form of congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB often have reduced visual acuity, myopia, impaired night vision, and sometimes nystagmus and strabismus, however, they seldom complain of color vision abnormality. A 17-year-old male who was at technical school showed abnormalities in the color perception test for employment, and was referred to our hospital for a detailed examination. He had no family history of color vision deficiency and no other symptoms. During the initial examination, his best-corrected visual acuity was 1.2 in both eyes. His fundus showed no abnormalities except for somewhat yellowish reflex in the fovea of both eyes. Electroretinogram (ERG showed a good response in cone ERG and 30 Hz flicker ERG, however, the bright flash, mixed rod and cone ERG showed a negative type with a reduced b-wave (positive deflection. There was no response in the rod ERG, either. From the findings of the typical ERG, the patient was diagnosed with complete congenital stationary night blindness. This case underscores the importance of ERG in order to diagnose the cause of a color vision anomaly.Keywords: congenital stationary night blindness, CSNB, electroretinogram, ERG, color vision defect

  5. Central Brain Circuitry for Color-Vision-Modulated Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longden, Kit D

    2016-10-24

    Color is famous for not existing in the external world: our brains create the perception of color from the spatial and temporal patterns of the wavelength and intensity of light. For an intangible quality, we have detailed knowledge of its origins and consequences. Much is known about the organization and evolution of the first phases of color processing, the filtering of light in the eye and processing in the retina, and about the final phases, the roles of color in behavior and natural selection. To understand how color processing in the central brain has evolved, we need well-defined pathways or circuitry where we can gauge how color contributes to the computations involved in specific behaviors. Examples of such pathways or circuitry that are dedicated to processing color cues are rare, despite the separation of color and luminance pathways early in the visual system of many species, and despite the traditional definition of color as being independent of luminance. This minireview presents examples in which color vision contributes to behaviors dominated by other visual modalities, examples that are not part of the canon of color vision circuitry. The pathways and circuitry process a range of chromatic properties of objects and their illumination, and are taken from a variety of species. By considering how color processing complements luminance processing, rather than being independent of it, we gain an additional way to account for the diversity of color coding in the central brain, its consequences for specific behaviors and ultimately the evolution of color vision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Red-Green Color Vision Impairment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcelo Fernandes ; Oliveira, Andre Gustavo Fernandes ; Feitosa-Santana, Claudia ; Zatz, Mayana ; Ventura, Dora Fix 

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the color vision of 44 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) (mean age 14.8 years; SD 4.9) who were submitted to a battery of four different color tests: Cambridge Colour Test (CCT), Neitz Anomaloscope, Ishihara, and American Optical Hardy-Rand-Rittler (AO H-R-R). Patients were divided into two groups according to the region of deletion in the dystrophin gene: upstream of exon 30 (n=12) and downstream of exon 30 (n=32). The control group was composed of 70 age-matched healthy male subjects with no ophthalmological complaints. Of the patients with DMD, 47% (21/44) had a red-green color vision defect in the CCT, confirmed by the Neitz Anomaloscope with statistical agreement (P.05). Of the patients with deletion downstream of exon 30, 66% had a red-green color defect. No color defect was found in the patients with deletion upstream of exon 30. A negative correlation between the color thresholds and age was found for the controls and patients with DMD, suggesting a nonprogressive color defect. The percentage (66%) of patients with a red-green defect was significantly higher than the expected <10% for the normal male population (P<.001). In contrast, patients with DMD with deletion upstream of exon 30 had normal color vision. This color defect might be partially explained by a retina impairment related to dystrophin isoform Dp260. PMID:17503325

  7. The evolution of concepts of color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barry B

    2008-07-01

    The evolution of ideas about the way we see color was closely linked to physical theories of light. Proponents of both corpuscular and wave theories viewed light as a continuous spectrum. This was not easily reconciled with the fact that, for the human eye, all colors can be matched by mixture of three primaries. Physicists such as Mayer who described trichromatic color matching often assumed that there were just three types of rays in the spectrum. This argument was finally resolved by Thomas Young, who noted that trichromatic color matching was consistent with a continuous spectrum if there were just three receptors in the eye. This kind of conceptual mistake, in this case the confusion of the properties of the visual system with physical properties of light, has been common in the history of color science. As another example, the idea of trichromacy was disputed by those who viewed color sensations as opponent processes, red-green, blue-yellow and black-white. The discovery of color-opponent neurons in the visual pathway has partly resolved this dilemma. Much of the physiological substrate of the way we detect and distinguish colors is now established, but the link between the signals leaving the retina and the way we name and order colors is still poorly defined.

  8. Reduced Discrimination in the Tritanopic Confusion Line for Congenital Color Deficiency Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcelo F.; Goulart, Paulo R. K.; Barboni, Mirella T. S.; Ventura, Dora F.

    2016-01-01

    In congenital color blindness the red–green discrimination is impaired resulting in an increased confusion between those colors with yellow. Our post-receptoral physiological mechanisms are organized in two pathways for color perception, a red–green (protanopic and deuteranopic) and a blue–yellow (tritanopic). We argue that the discrimination losses in the yellow area in congenital color vision deficiency subjects could generate a subtle loss of discriminability in the tritanopic channel considering discrepancies with yellow perception. We measured color discrimination thresholds for blue and yellow of tritanopic channel in congenital color deficiency subjects. Chromaticity thresholds were measured around a white background (0.1977 u′, 0.4689 v′ in the CIE 1976) consisting of a blue–white and white–yellow thresholds in a tritanopic color confusion line of 21 congenital colorblindness subjects (mean age = 27.7; SD = 5.6 years; 14 deuteranomalous and 7 protanomalous) and of 82 (mean age = 25.1; SD = 3.7 years) normal color vision subjects. Significant increase in the whole tritanopic axis was found for both deuteranomalous and protanomalous subjects compared to controls for the blue–white (F2,100 = 18.80; p < 0.0001) and white–yellow (F2,100 = 22.10; p < 0.0001) thresholds. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) found a weighting toward to the yellow thresholds induced by deuteranomalous subjects. In conclusion, the discrimination in the tritanopic color confusion axis is significantly reduced in congenital color vision deficiency compared to normal subjects. Since yellow discrimination was impaired the balance of the blue–yellow channels is impaired justifying the increased thresholds found for blue–white discrimination. The weighting toward the yellow region of the color space with the deuteranomalous contributing to that perceptual distortion is discussed in terms of physiological mechanisms. PMID:27065909

  9. John dalton: though in error, he still influenced our understanding of congenital color deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald A

    2008-12-01

    John Dalton was born in the 18th century and was recognized mainly for his work on the chemical atomic theory and "Dalton's Law" for the partial pressure of gases. However, during his lifetime he was already recognized for his theories on "colorblindness," with which he was afflicted. He was perhaps the first to report personal observations from experimentation on his color vision deficiency. His theory regarding its pathogenesis was posthumously proven to be incorrect after observations performed on his enucleated eyes. Further generations later, DNA analyses by PCR conclusively recorded the specific color deficiency (deuteranopia) with which Dalton was affected.

  10. A physiological analysis of color vision in batoid elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedore, Christine N; Loew, Ellis R; Frank, Tamara M; Hueter, Robert E; McComb, D Michelle; Kajiura, Stephen M

    2013-12-01

    The potential for color vision in elasmobranchs has been studied in detail; however, a high degree of variation exists among the group. Evidence for ultraviolet (UV) vision is lacking, despite the presence of UV vision in every other vertebrate class. An integrative physiological approach was used to investigate color and ultraviolet vision in cownose rays and yellow stingrays, two batoids that inhabit different spectral environments. Both species had peaks in UV, short, medium, and long wavelength spectral regions in dark-, light-, and chromatic-adapted electroretinograms. Although no UV cones were found with microspectrophotometric analysis, both rays had multiple cone visual pigments with λ max at 470 and 551 nm in cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) and 475, 533, and 562 nm in yellow stingrays (Urobatis jamaicensis). The same analysis demonstrated that both species had rod λ max at 500 and 499 nm, respectively. The lens and cornea of cownose rays maximally transmitted wavelengths greater than 350 nm and greater than 376 nm in yellow stingrays. These results support the potential for color vision in these species and future investigations should reveal the extent to which color discrimination is significant in a behavioral context.

  11. Did trichromatic color vision and red hair color coevolve in primates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilar, Jason M; Heesy, Christopher P; Bradley, Brenda J

    2013-07-01

    Reddish pelage and red hair ornaments have evolved many times, independently, during primate evolution. It is generally assumed that these red-coat phenotypes, like red skin phenotypes, play a role in sociosexual signaling and, thus evolved in tandem with conspecific color vision. This study examines the phylogenetic distribution of color vision and pelage coloration across the primate order to ask: (1) did red pelage and trichromacy coevolve; or (2) did trichromacy evolve first, and then subsequently red pelage evolved as an exaptation? We collected quantitative, color-corrected photographic color data for 142 museum research skins from 92 species representing 41 genera spanning all major primate lineages. For each species, we quantified the ratio of Red/Green values (from a RGB color model) at 20 anatomical landmarks. For these same species, we compiled data on color vision type (routine trichromatic, polymorphic, routine dichromatic, monochromatic) and data on variables that potentially covary with visual system (VS) and coloration, including activity pattern and body mass dimorphism (proxy for sexual selection). We also considered whether the long-term storage of research skins might influence coloration. Therefore, we included the time since the specimen was collected as an additional predictor. Analyzing the data with phylogenetic generalized least squares models, we found that the amount of red hair present in primates is associated with differences in VSs, but not in the direction expected. Surprisingly, trichromatic primate species generally exhibited less red hair compared to red-green colorblind species. Thus, our results do not support the general assumption that color vision and red pelage coloration are a coevolutionary product of sociosexual signaling in primates. In addition, we did not find an effect of activity pattern, body mass dimorphism, or time since collection on the redness of primate hair. Our results have important implications for the

  12. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: Associated changes in color vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpern, M.; Zhang, H. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Sack, G.H. Jr.; Moser, H.W. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Krantz, D.H. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-10-15

    A patient from a large kindred with adrenoleukodystrophy showed profound disturbance of color ordering, color matching, increment thresholds, and luminosity. Except for color matching, his performance was similar to blue-cone [open quotes]monochromacy,[close quotes] an X chromosome-linked recessive retinal dystrophy in which color vision is dichromatic, mediated by the visual pigments of rods and short-wave-sensitive cones. Color matching, however, indicated that an abnormal rudimentary visual pigment was also present. This may reflect the presence of a recombinant visual pigment protein or altered regulation of residual pigment genes, due to DNA changes - deletion of the long-wave pigment gene and reorganized sequence 5[prime] to the pigment gene cluster - that segregate with the metabolic defect in this kindred. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Information obtaining and fusion of color night vision system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lianfa; Gu, Guohua; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Baomin

    2001-09-01

    Color night vision technology is a new kind of night vision means. In this paper, on the base of the study on two-color false color low light level(CLLL) TV technology, the principle and experiment study on single-channel false CLLL TV system are carried out. Deeply, the disadvantages of dual-channel false CLLL TV system are pointed out, LLL image geometric segment technique and spectrum gray-scale compensation technique are researched into. The single-channel CLLL TV system is established. Experiment results show that through the fusion of two spectrum LLL images, the image resolution and the recognizing capability of human eyes can be increased significantly, and the high sensitivity and resolution of single-channel as well as that of the dua-channel technology are realized successfully.

  14. The organization of shape and color in vision and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Baingio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the phenomenal organization of shape and color in vision and art in terms of microgenesis of the object perception and creation. The idea of "microgenesis" is that the object perception and creation takes time to develop. Our hypothesis is that the roles of shape and color are extracted in sequential order and in the same order these roles are also used by artists to paint objects. Boundary contours are coded before color contours. The microgenesis of the object formation was demonstrated (i) by introducing new conditions derived from the watercolor illusion, where the juxtaposed contours are displaced horizontally or vertically, and based on variations of Matisse's Woman, (ii) by studying descriptions and replications of visual objects in adults and children of different ages, and (iii) by analyzing the linguistic sequence and organization in a free naming task of the attributes related to shape and color. The results supported the idea of the microgenesis of the object perception, namely the temporal order in the formation of the roles of the object properties (shape before color). Some general principles were extracted from the experimental results. They can be a starting point to explore a new domain focused on the microgenesis of shape and color within the more general problem of object organization, where integrated and multidisciplinary studies based on art and vision science can be very useful.

  15. The organization of shape and color in Vision and Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baingio ePinna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the phenomenal organization of shape and color in vision and art in terms of microgenesis of the object perception and creation. The idea of ‘microgenesis’ is that the object perception and creation takes time to develop. Our hypothesis is that the roles of shape and color are extracted in sequential order and in the same order these roles are also used by artists to paint objects. Boundary contours are coded before color contours. The microgenesis of the object formation was demonstrated (i by introducing new conditions derived from the watercolor illusion, where the juxtaposed contours are displaced horizontally or vertically, and based on variations of Matisse’s Woman, (ii by studying descriptions and replications of visual objects in adults and children of different ages, and (iii by analyzing the linguistic sequence and organization in a free naming task of the attributes related to shape and color. The results supported the idea of the microgenesis of the object perception, namely the temporal order in the formation of the roles of the object properties (shape before color. Some general principles were extracted from the experimental results. They can be a starting point to explore a new domain focused on the microgenesis of shape and color within the more general problem of object organization, where integrated and multidisciplinary studies based on art and vision science can be very useful.

  16. Prediction of pork color attributes using computer vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Young, Jennifer; Liu, Jeng Hung; Bachmeier, Laura; Somers, Rose Marie; Chen, Kun Jie; Newman, David

    2016-03-01

    Color image processing and regression methods were utilized to evaluate color score of pork center cut loin samples. One hundred loin samples of subjective color scores 1 to 5 (NPB, 2011; n=20 for each color score) were selected to determine correlation values between Minolta colorimeter measurements and image processing features. Eighteen image color features were extracted from three different RGB (red, green, blue) model, HSI (hue, saturation, intensity) and L*a*b* color spaces. When comparing Minolta colorimeter values with those obtained from image processing, correlations were significant (P<0.0001) for L* (0.91), a* (0.80), and b* (0.66). Two comparable regression models (linear and stepwise) were used to evaluate prediction results of pork color attributes. The proposed linear regression model had a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.83 compared to the stepwise regression results (R(2)=0.70). These results indicate that computer vision methods have potential to be used as a tool in predicting pork color attributes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Color vision test to differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-01

    Arnaoutoglou et al. (2017) reported that "Ishihara Color Vision Test - 38 Plate" was useful for the differential diagnosis of dementia between Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Vascular Dementia (VaD). The authors used sensitivity/specificity analysis, presenting 80.6% and 87.5% to discriminate AD and VaD patients when an optimal (32.5) cut-off value of performance was used. The authors cited a reference of the fact that AD patients suffered from a non-specific type of color blindness (Pache et al., 2003), and I have a query on their study with special reference to statistical method.

  18. Preferred memory color difference between the deuteranomalous and normal color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, YeSeul; Kwak, Youngshin; Woo, Sungjoo; Park, Chongwook

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the difference of the preferred hues of familiar objects between the color deficient observer and the normal observer. Thirteen test color images were chosen covering fruit colors, natural scene and human faces. It contained red, yellow, green, blue, purple and skin color. Two color deficient observer (deuteranomal) and two normal observers were participated in this experiment. They controlled the YCC hue of the objects in the images to obtain the most preferred and the most natural image. The selected images were analyzed using CIELAB values of each pixel. Data analysis results showed that in the case of naturalness, both groups selected the similar hues for the most of image, while, in the case of preference, the color deficient observer preferred more reddish or more greenish images. Since the deuteranomalous observer has relatively week perception for red and green region, they may prefer more reddish or greenish color. The color difference between natural hue and preferred hue of deuteranomal observer is bigger than those of normal observer.

  19. Image Transform Based on the Distribution of Representative Colors for Color Deficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Fukashi; Kudo, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Ohnishi, Noboru

    This paper proposes the method to convert digital image containing distinguishing difficulty sets of colors into the image with high visibility. We set up four criteria, automatically processing by a computer, retaining continuity in color space, not making images into lower visible for people with normal color vision, and not making images not originally having distinguishing difficulty sets of colors into lower visible. We conducted the psychological experiment. We obtained the result that the visibility of a converted image had been improved at 60% for 40 images, and we confirmed the main criterion of the continuity in color space was kept.

  20. Physiological modeling for detecting degree of perception of a color-deficient person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, T; Prince, Shanthi

    2017-04-01

    Physiological modeling of retina plays a vital role in the development of high-performance image processing methods to produce better visual perception. People with normal vision have an ability to discern different colors. The situation is different in the case of people with color blindness. The aim of this work is to develop a human visual system model for detecting the level of perception of people with red, green and blue deficiency by considering properties like luminance, spatial and temporal frequencies. Simulation results show that in the photoreceptor, outer plexiform and inner plexiform layers, the energy and intensity level of the red, green and blue component for a normal person is proved to be significantly higher than for dichromats. The proposed method explains with appropriate results that red and blue color blindness people could not perceive red and blue color completely.

  1. Color vision in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelling, Angela S; Snyder, Rebecca J; Marr, M Jackson; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Gardner, Wendy; Maple, Terry L

    2006-05-01

    Hue discrimination abilities of giant pandas were tested, controlling for brightness. Subjects were 2 adult giant pandas (1 male and 1 female). A simultaneous discrimination procedure without correction was used. In five tasks, white, black, and five saturations each of green, blue, and red served as positive stimuli that were paired with one or two comparison stimuli consisting of 16 saturations of gray. To demonstrate discrimination, the subjects were required to choose the positive stimulus in 16 of 20 trials (80% correct) for three consecutivesessions. Both subjects reached criterion forgreen and red. The female subject also reached criterion for blue. The male was not tested for blue. This study is a systematic replication of Bacon and Burghardt's (1976) color discrimination experiment on black bears. The results suggest that color vision in the giant panda is comparable to that of black bears and other carnivores that are not strictly nocturnal.

  2. Color vision loss in patients treated with chloroquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventura Dora F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients that make use of chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, drugs which are frequently administered for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erithromatosus or malaria, may suffer alterations in color vision and in contrast sensitivity. The present work evaluates the visual function of these patients in a joint study of the University of São Paulo (USP, in São Paulo, and of the Federal University of Pará (UFPA, in Belém. Thirty two chloroquine user patients without alterations in the eye fundus exam were evaluated in São Paulo (n=10; aged 38 to 71 years; mean=55,8 years and in Belém (n=22; aged 20 to 67; mean=40 years. The prescribed accumulated chloroquine dose was 45 to 430 g (mean=213 g; sd = 152 g for the São Paulo group, and 36 to 540 g (mean=174 g; sd=183 g for the Belém group. Tests were performed monocularly with corrected eye refractive state. Color discrimination was evaluated using the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT: the color discrimination threshold was measured first in the protan, deutan and tritan axes and, in succession, three MacAdam's ellipses were determined. The patient's color vision was also evaluated with color arrangement tests: the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue (FM100, the Farnsworth-Munsell D15, and the Lanthony Desaturated (D15d tests. We also measured the contrast sensitivity for black-and-white sine wave grating of twenty two patients. The results were compared with controls without ophthalmologic or neuro-ophthalmologic pathologies. Twenty four patients presented acquired dyschromatopsia. There were cases of selective loss (11 patients and of diffuse loss (13 patients. Although losses were present in the FM100 there was no correlation between the FM100 error score and the ellipse area measured by the CCT. Moreover, three patients that scored normal in the FM100, failed to reach normal threshold in the CCT. The Lanthony test was less sensitive than the other two tests, since it failed to indicate loss in about

  3. Color Vision and the Railways: Part 3. Comparison of FaLant, OPTEC 900, and Railway LED Lantern Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Stephen J; Casolin, Armand; Long, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    The Farnsworth Lantern (FaLant) and the OPTEC 900 are nominated in the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) Color Vision Standard 2. Neither test uses the railway signal color code of red, yellow, and green, and only the OPTEC 900 is commercially available. The Railway LED Lantern Test (RLLT) is based on railway signaling practices in New South Wales, Australia, and is nominated in the Australian railway medical standard. The objective of this study is to compare the performance of the three lantern tests. The RLLT, FaLant, and OPTEC 900 were administered to 46 color vision-normal and 37 color vision-deficient (CVD) subjects. The pattern of errors on the RLLT was different from that of the FaLant and OPTEC 900. This may be accounted for, at least in part, by the different colors and the use of blank presentations in the RLLT. The three lanterns showed agreement in failing 21 and passing 6 of the CVD subjects (72.9%). The lanterns gave different results for 10 CVD subjects (27.9%): n = 5 passed only the RLLT and n = 3 passed only the FaLant; n = 1 failed only the FaLant and n = 1 failed only the RLLT. The overall failure rate by CVD for each lantern was 67.6% (RLLT), 73.0% (FaLant), and 78.4% (OPTEC 900). Despite the different construction principles, the pass/fail levels of the RLLT, FaLant, and OPTEC 900 are comparable and consistent with the performance of other lanterns listed by the CIE for Color Vision Standard 2. The RLLT may be a little easier to pass and is based on the signal color code used and actual signaling practice. We propose that the RLLT is also an appropriate lantern for CIE Color Vision Standard 2.

  4. Color vision and image intensities: when are changes material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, J M; Richards, W A

    1982-01-01

    The difficulty in understanding a biological system or its components without some idea of its goals has been emphasized by Marr. In this paper, a preliminary goal for color vision is proposed and analyzed. That goal is to determine where changes of material occur in a scene (using only spectral information). The goal is challenging because the effects of many processes (shadowing, shading from surface orientation changes, highlights, variations in pigment density) are confounded with the effects of material changes in the available image intensities. We show there is a minimal and unique condition, the spectral crosspoint that rejects instances of these confounding processes. (If plots are made of image intensity versus wavelength from two image regions, and the plots intersect, we say that there is a spectral crosspoint.) An operator is designed to detect crosspoints; it turns out to resemble double-opponent cells described in primate visual cortex.

  5. DIAGNOSTIC COLOR DIFFERENTIATION PLATES FOR HEREDITARY RESPIRATION DEFICIENCY IN YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Susumu

    1963-01-01

    Nagai, Susumu (National Women's University, Nara, Japan). Diagnostic color differentiation plates for hereditary respiration deficiency in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 86:299–302. 1963.—Color differentiation between normal yeasts and their respiration-deficient mutants was improved by growing yeast colonies on nutrient agar plates containing several selected dyes and their mixtures. Magdala red (5 to 8 mg/liter) was good for single-color plates, giving deep-red sheen to the mutant colonies in contrast to the normal ones which tinted light red. A mixture of eosin (8 to 15 mg/liter, either Y or B) with trypan blue (15 to 20 mg/liter) was excellent in color and convenient to prepare, giving brilliant purple sheen to the mutant colonies contrasted to the normal ones which tinted grayish violet. These color plates were good over a broad range of Saccharomyces species, although the colony shades and suitable dye concentrations varied depending on the species and strains. Images PMID:14058956

  6. Defects of colour vision: A review of congenital and acquired colour vision deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeela Hasrod

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colour vision deficiencies (CVDs can be categorised as being congenital or acquired. Some CVDs are already present at birth, as inherited conditions that are the result of changes at the photo-pigment level and are non-pathological, incurable and do not change over time. Examples are red-green defects which are inherited as an X-linked recessive trait. Acquired CVD develops secondary to ocular and systemic conditions or as a side effect of certain medications or sometimes toxic effects of chemicals, and trauma and ageing can also be important in some CVDs.

  7. Defects of colour vision: A review of congenital and acquired colour vision deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeela Hasrod

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Colour vision deficiencies (CVDs can be categorised as being congenital or acquired. Some CVDs are already present at birth, as inherited conditions that are the result of changes at the photo-pigment level and are non-pathological, incurable and do not change over time. Examples are red-green defects which are inherited as an X-linked recessive trait. Acquired CVD develops secondary to ocular and systemic conditions or as a side effect of certain medications or sometimes toxic effects of chemicals, and trauma and ageing can also be important in some CVDs.

  8. Quantifying nonhomogeneous colors in agricultural materials. Part II: comparison of machine vision and sensory panel evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, M O; Aparicio, J; Zotarelli, M; Sims, C

    2008-11-01

    The average colors of mangos and apples were measured using machine vision. A method to quantify the perception of nonhomogeneous colors by sensory panelists was developed. Three colors out of several reference colors and their perceived percentage of the total sample area were selected by untrained panelists. Differences between the average colors perceived by panelists and those from the machine vision were reported as DeltaE values (color difference error). Effects of nonhomogeneity of color, and using real samples or their images in the sensory panels on DeltaE were evaluated. In general, samples with more nonuniform colors had higher DeltaE values, suggesting that panelists had more difficulty in evaluating more nonhomogeneous colors. There was no significant difference in DeltaE values between the real fruits and their screen image, therefore images can be used to evaluate color instead of the real samples.

  9. Impact of Congenital Color Vision Defect on Color‑related Tasks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the difficulties encountered by students with congenital color vision defects in daily living and school activities. Methods: A cross-sectional ... of color matching and color recognition. Results: A total of 1635 students .... used the “Stanford Achievement Test” assessing word meaning, paragraph meaning, word.

  10. Machine vision analysis for industrial beet color change kinetics and total soluble solid content

    Science.gov (United States)

    A machine vision system (MVS) for the measurement of color change kinetics in crushed industrial beet to evaluate the total soluble solid content (°Brix) was developed in this study. It is expected that higher the °Brix faster the color change and modeling this color change kinetics helps in assessi...

  11. Molecular patterns of X chromosome-linked color vision genes among 134 menof European ancestry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond-Borg, M.; Deeb, S.S.; Motulsky, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors used Southern blot hybridization to study X chromosome-linked color vision genes encoding the apoproteins of red and green visual pigments in 134 unselected Caucasian men. One hundred and thirteen individuals (84.3%) had a normal arrangement of their color vision pigment genes. All had one red pigment gene; the number of green pigment genes ranged from one to five with a mode of two. The frequency of molecular genotypes indicative of normal color vision (84.3%) was significantly lower than had been observed in previous studies of color vision phenotypes. Color vision defects can be due to deletions of red or green pigment genes or due to formation of hybrid genes comprising portions of both red and green pigment genes. Characteristic anomalous patterns were seen in 15 (11.2%) individuals: 7 (5.2%) had patterns characteristic of deuteranomaly, 2 (1.5%) had patterns characteristic of deuteranopia, and 6 (4.5%) had protan patterns. Previously undescribed hybrid gene patterns consisting of both green and red pigment gene fragments in addition to normal red and green genes were observed in another 6 individuals (4.5%). Thus, DNA testing detected anomalous color vision pigment genes at a higher frequency than expected from phenotypic color vision tests

  12. The evolution of color vision in nocturnal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huabin; Rossiter, Stephen J; Teeling, Emma C; Li, Chanjuan; Cotton, James A; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-06-02

    Nonfunctional visual genes are usually associated with species that inhabit poor light environments (aquatic/subterranean/nocturnal), and these genes are believed to have lost function through relaxed selection acting on the visual system. Indeed, the visual system is so adaptive that the reconstruction of intact ancestral opsin genes has been used to reject nocturnality in ancestral primates. To test these assertions, we examined the functionality of the short and medium- to long-wavelength opsin genes in a group of mammals that are supremely adapted to a nocturnal niche: the bats. We sequenced the visual cone opsin genes in 33 species of bat with diverse sensory ecologies and reconstructed their evolutionary history spanning 65 million years. We found that, whereas the long-wave opsin gene was conserved in all species, the short-wave opsin gene has undergone dramatic divergence among lineages. The occurrence of gene defects in the short-wave opsin gene leading to loss of function was found to directly coincide with the origin of high-duty-cycle echolocation and changes in roosting ecology in some lineages. Our findings indicate that both opsin genes have been under purifying selection in the majority bats despite a long history of nocturnality. However, when spectacular losses do occur, these result from an evolutionary sensory modality tradeoff, most likely driven by subtle shifts in ecological specialization rather than a nocturnal lifestyle. Our results suggest that UV color vision plays a considerably more important role in nocturnal mammalian sensory ecology than previously appreciated and highlight the caveat of inferring light environments from visual opsins and vice versa.

  13. Computer vision-based sorting of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets according to their color level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misimi, E; Mathiassen, J R; Erikson, U

    2007-01-01

    Computer vision method was used to evaluate the color of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets. Computer vision-based sorting of fillets according to their color was studied on 2 separate groups of salmon fillets. The images of fillets were captured using a digital camera of high resolution. Images of salmon fillets were then segmented in the regions of interest and analyzed in red, green, and blue (RGB) and CIE Lightness, redness, and yellowness (Lab) color spaces, and classified according to the Roche color card industrial standard. Comparisons of fillet color between visual evaluations were made by a panel of human inspectors, according to the Roche SalmoFan lineal standard, and the color scores generated from computer vision algorithm showed that there were no significant differences between the methods. Overall, computer vision can be used as a powerful tool to sort fillets by color in a fast and nondestructive manner. The low cost of implementing computer vision solutions creates the potential to replace manual labor in fish processing plants with automation.

  14. Nonstationary color tracking for vision-based human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Huang, T S

    2002-01-01

    Skin color offers a strong cue for efficient localization and tracking of human body parts in video sequences for vision-based human-computer interaction. Color-based target localization could be achieved by analyzing segmented skin color regions. However, one of the challenges of color-based target tracking is that color distributions would change in different lighting conditions such that fixed color models would be inadequate to capture nonstationary color distributions over time. Meanwhile, using a fixed skin color model trained by the data of a specific person would probably not work well for other people. Although some work has been done on adaptive color models, this problem still needs further studies. We present our investigation of color-based image segmentation and nonstationary color-based target tracking, by studying two different representations for color distributions. We propose the structure adaptive self-organizing map (SASOM) neural network that serves as a new color model. Our experiments show that such a representation is powerful for efficient image segmentation. Then, we formulate the nonstationary color tracking problem as a model transduction problem, the solution of which offers a way to adapt and transduce color classifiers in nonstationary color distributions. To fulfill model transduction, we propose two algorithms, the SASOM transduction and the discriminant expectation-maximization (EM), based on the SASOM color model and the Gaussian mixture color model, respectively. Our extensive experiments on the task of real-time face/hand localization show that these two algorithms can successfully handle some difficulties in nonstationary color tracking. We also implemented a real-time face/hand localization system based on such algorithms for vision-based human-computer interaction.

  15. Hypoxia, Color Vision Deficiencies, and Blood Oxygen Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    using the Dvorine Pseudoisochromatic Plate Test (2nd edition, Psychological Corporation, Baltimore, MD) illuminated by True Daylight Illuminator T8...Plant, G.T. (1994). Insights into the different exploits of colour in the visual cortex. Proc Biol Sci, 258 (1353), 327-334. Barbur, J.L...Aviat Space Environ Med, 80, 933-940. Crow, T.J.,& Kelman, G.R.(1973). Psychological effects of mild acute hypoxia. Br J Anaesth, 45, 335-337

  16. Performance of Color Camera Machine Vision in Automated Furniture Rough Mill Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Agus Widoyoko; Janice K. Wiedenbeck; Philip A. Araman

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of color camera machine vision for lumber processing in a furniture rough mill. The study used 134 red oak boards to compare the performance of automated gang-rip-first rough mill yield based on a prototype color camera lumber inspection system developed at Virginia Tech with both estimated optimum rough mill...

  17. Suitability of School Textbooks for 5 to 7 Year Old Children with Colour Vision Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrents, Aurora; Bofill, Francesc; Cardona, Genis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine, through colorimetric analysis, whether school textbooks for children aged 5 to 7 years contained tasks requiring normal colour vision discrimination for their resolution. In addition, the performance of a group of observers with diverse colour vision deficiencies was evaluated while…

  18. Color vision tests comparison: Farnsworth D-15 versus Lanthony D-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigiel, Marta; Geniusz, Malwina; Geniusz, Maciej K.

    2017-09-01

    Disorder of color vision in humans is the inability to perceive differences between some or all of the colors that are normally perceived by others. Color blindness is usually a birth defect, a genetically determined. For this reason it is much more common in men than women. This paper presents the results of the test FarnsworthD-15 and Lanthony D-15 on a group of volunteers, both adults and children. The study was conducted to compare the results of both tests.

  19. A Vision Chip for Color Segmentation and Pattern Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Etienne-Cummings

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 128(H × 64(V × RGB CMOS imager is integrated with region-of-interest selection, RGB-to-HSI transformation, HSI-based pixel segmentation, (36bins × 12bits-HSI histogramming, and sum-of-absolute-difference (SAD template matching. Thirty-two learned color templates are stored and compared to each image. The chip captures the R, G, and B images using in-pixel storage before passing the pixel content to a multiplying digital-to-analog converter (DAC for white balancing. The DAC can also be used to pipe in images for a PC. The color processing uses a biologically inspired color opponent representation and an analog lookup table to determine the Hue (H of each pixel. Saturation (S is computed using a loser-take-all circuit. Intensity (I is given by the sum of the color components. A histogram of the segments of the image, constructed by counting the number of pixels falling into 36 Hue intervals of 10 degrees, is stored on a chip and compared against the histograms of new segments using SAD comparisons. We demonstrate color-based image segmentation and object recognition with this chip. Running at 30 fps, it uses 1 mW. To our knowledge, this is the first chip that integrates imaging, color segmentation, and color-based object recognition at the focal plane.

  20. Acquired Color Vision Defects and Hexane Exposure: A Study of San Francisco Bay Area Automotive Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Stella; Eisen, Ellen A; Bates, Michael N; Liu, Sa; Haegerstrom-Portnoy, Gunilla; Hammond, S Katharine

    2016-06-01

    Occupational exposure to solvents, including n-hexane, has been associated with acquired color vision defects. Blue-yellow defects are most common and may be due to neurotoxicity or retinal damage. Acetone may potentiate the neurotoxicity of n-hexane. We present results on nonhexane solvent and hexane exposure and color vision from a cross-sectional study of 835 automotive repair workers in the San Francisco Bay Area, California (2007-2013). Cumulative exposure was estimated from self-reported work history, and color vision was assessed using the Lanthony desaturated D-15 panel test. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios for color vision defects. Acquired color vision defects were present in 29% of participants, of which 70% were blue-yellow. Elevated prevalence ratios were found for nonhexane solvent exposure, with a maximum of 1.31 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86, 2.00) for blue-yellow. Among participants aged ≤50 years, the prevalence ratio for blue-yellow defects was 2.17 (95% CI: 1.03, 4.56) in the highest quartile of nonhexane solvent exposure and 1.62 (95% CI: 0.97, 2.72) in the highest category of exposure to hexane with acetone coexposure. Cumulative exposures to hexane and nonhexane solvents in the highest exposure categories were associated with elevated prevalence ratios for color vision defects in younger participants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Does context or color improve object recognition in patients with low vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucart, Muriel; Despretz, Pascal; Hladiuk, Katrine; Desmettre, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Most studies on people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been focused on investigations of low-level processes with simple stimuli like gratings, letters, and in perception of isolated faces or objects. We investigated the ability of people with low vision to analyze more complex stimuli like photographs of natural scenes. Fifteen participants with AMD and low vision (acuity on the better eye colored or achromatic gray level scenes in one condition and with photographs of natural scenes versus isolated objects extracted from these scenes in another condition. The photographs were centrally displayed for 300 ms. In both conditions, observers were instructed to press a key when they saw a predefined target (a face or an animal). The target was present in half of the trials. Color facilitated performance in people with low vision, while equivalent performance was found for colored and achromatic pictures in normally sighted participants. Isolated objects were categorized more accurately than objects in scenes in people with low vision. No difference was found for normally sighted observers. The results suggest that spatial properties that facilitate image segmentation (e.g., color and reduced crowding) help object perception in people with low vision.

  2. Comparison of a multispectral vision system and a colorimeter for the assessment of meat color

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Jensen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The color assessment ability of a multispectral vision system is investigated by a comparison study with color measurements from a traditional colorimeter. The experiment involves fresh and processed meat samples. Meat is a complex material; heterogeneous with varying scattering and reflectance...... properties, so several factors can influence the instrumental assessment of meat color. In order to assess whether two methods are equivalent, the variation due to these factors must be taken into account. A statistical analysis was conducted and showed that on a calibration sheet the two instruments...... accounting for other sources of variation leading to the conclusion that color assessment using a multispectral vision system is superior to traditional colorimeter assessments. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. True RGB line scan camera for color machine vision applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstrom, Guy F.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper a true RGB 3-chip color line scan camera is described. The camera was mainly developed for accurate color measuring in industrial applications. Due to the camera's modularity it's also possible to use it as a B/W-camera. The color separation is made with a RGB-beam splitter. The CCD linear arrays are fixed with a high accuracy to the beam splitters output in order to match the pixels of the three different CCDs on each other. This makes the color analyses simple compared to color line arrays where line or pixel matching has to be done. The beam splitter can be custom made to separate spectral components other than standard RGB. The spectral range is from 200 to 1000 nm for most CCDs and two or three spectral areas can be separately measured with the beam splitter. The camera is totally digital and has a 16-bit parallel computer interface to communicate with a signal processing board. Because of the open architecture of the camera it's possible for the customer to design a board with some special functions handling the preprocessing of the data (for example RGB - HSI conversion). The camera can also be equipped with a high speed CPU-board with enough local memory to do some image processing inside the camera before sending the data forward. The camera has been used in real industrial applications and has proven that its high resolution and high dynamic range can be used to measure color differences of small amounts to separate or grade objects such as minerals, food or other materials that can't be measured with a black and white camera.

  4. Color Vision Changes and Effects of High Contrast Visor Use at Simulated Cabin Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-08

    contrast by blocking short wavelength colors from entering the eye , thus increasing the contrast of non-blue objects when seen against a blue...AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2016-0017 Color Vision Changes and Effects of High Contrast Visor Use at Simulated Cabin Altitudes Lt Col Tory... person or corporation or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified

  5. Comparison of a multispectral vision system and a colorimeter for the assessment of meat color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinderup, Camilla H; Dahl, Anders; Jensen, Kirsten; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Conradsen, Knut

    2015-04-01

    The color assessment ability of a multispectral vision system is investigated by a comparison study with color measurements from a traditional colorimeter. The experiment involves fresh and processed meat samples. Meat is a complex material; heterogeneous with varying scattering and reflectance properties, so several factors can influence the instrumental assessment of meat color. In order to assess whether two methods are equivalent, the variation due to these factors must be taken into account. A statistical analysis was conducted and showed that on a calibration sheet the two instruments are equally capable of measuring color. Moreover the vision system provides a more color rich assessment of fresh meat samples with a glossier surface, than the colorimeter. Careful studies of the different sources of variation enable an assessment of the order of magnitude of the variability between methods accounting for other sources of variation leading to the conclusion that color assessment using a multispectral vision system is superior to traditional colorimeter assessments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Color vision and learning in the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus (Nymphalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackiston, Douglas; Briscoe, Adriana D; Weiss, Martha R

    2011-02-01

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is well known for its intimate association with milkweed plants and its incredible multi-generational trans-continental migrations. However, little is known about monarch butterflies' color perception or learning ability, despite the importance of visual information to butterfly behavior in the contexts of nectar foraging, host-plant location and mate recognition. We used both theoretical and experimental approaches to address basic questions about monarch color vision and learning ability. Color space modeling based on the three known spectral classes of photoreceptors present in the eye suggests that monarchs should not be able to discriminate between long wavelength colors without making use of a dark orange lateral filtering pigment distributed heterogeneously in the eye. In the context of nectar foraging, monarchs show strong innate preferences, rapidly learn to associate colors with sugar rewards and learn non-innately preferred colors as quickly and proficiently as they do innately preferred colors. Butterflies also demonstrate asymmetric confusion between specific pairs of colors, which is likely a function of stimulus brightness. Monarchs readily learn to associate a second color with reward, and in general, learning parameters do not vary with temporal sequence of training. In addition, monarchs have true color vision; that is, they can discriminate colors on the basis of wavelength, independent of intensity. Finally, behavioral trials confirm that monarchs do make use of lateral filtering pigments to enhance long-wavelength discrimination. Our results demonstrate that monarchs are proficient and flexible color learners; these capabilities should allow them to respond rapidly to changing nectar availabilities as they travel over migratory routes, across both space and time.

  7. [Colors and their meaning in culture and psychology--a historical outline and contemporary status of color vision theories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Lewicka, Romana; Torlińska, Teresa; Stelcer, Bogusław

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of color perception has intrigued scholars from antiquity. However, the understanding of this phenomena only came with the recognition of the nature of light and visual perception. Ancient concepts, present in science until the Renaissance, were based more on philosophical considerations and theoretical speculations than on anatomical studies and a matter-of-fact assessment of physiological functions of the visual system. From antiquity to 17th century scientific approach to the concept of vision was dominated by two theories: intromission and extramission (emanation). Intromission theory, propagated by Alhazen (lbn al.-Haythama), Vitello, John Peckham, Roger Bacon and Leonardo da Vinci, assumed that the light was transmitted from the observed object perpendicularly to the transparent eye structures. Johannes Kepler was the first scholar to propose that the retina was the receptive part of the eye. In the first half of the 17th century, Kepler's groundbreaking optical achievements and anatomical discoveries of many other scientists cast new light on the understanding of the role of different eye structures, finally wiping out the intromission theory. A further major achievement contributing to the recognition of the true nature of colors was a theory presented by Newton in 1688. He argued that they were colored rays, and not white light, that were composed of homogenous and pure light. It was, however, not until the 19th century when two modern theories of color appeared, i.e. a trichromatic theory mostly associated with the names of Young and Hemlholtz, and an opponent colors theory of Hering. In the 20th century, the two theories--previously assumed as contradictory--were joined into the zone theories of color vision. Colors have their cultural and social meanings, as far as a very individual and personal interpretation. In the former function they are used to illustrate some cultural and sociological phenomena; in the latter, they are helpful in

  8. A model of color vision with a robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haihui

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to generalize the saccade target method and state that perceptual stability in general arises by learning the effects one's actions have on sensor responses. The apparent visual stability of color percept across saccadic eye movements can be explained by positing that perception involves observing how sensory input changes in response to motor activities. The changes related to self-motion can be learned, and once learned, used to form stable percepts. The variation of sensor data in response to a motor act is therefore a requirement for stable perception rather than something that has to be compensated for in order to perceive a stable world. In this paper, we have provided a simple implementation of this sensory-motor contingency view of perceptual stability. We showed how a straightforward application of the temporal difference enhancement learning technique yielding color percepts that are stable across saccadic eye movements, even though the raw sensor input may change radically.

  9. Seeing the Light: Optics in Nature, Photography, Color, Vision, and Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, David R.; Brill, Dieter R.; Stork, David G.

    1985-11-01

    The most complete and lucid nonmathematical study of light available. Chapters are self-contained, making the book flexible and easy to read. Coverage includes such non-traditional topics as processes of vision and the eye, atmospherical optical phenomena, color perception and illusions, color in nature and in art, Kirilian photography, and holography. Includes experiments that can be carried out with simple equipment. Chapters contain optional advanced sections, and appendixes review the mathematics for quantitative aspects. Illustrated, including a four-color insert.

  10. Impact of congenital color vision defect on color‑related tasks among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the difficulties encountered by students with congenital color vision defects in daily living and school activities. Methods: A cross‑sectional descriptive study conducted among students of public secondary schools in Ibadan, Nigeria. Structured questionnaires were administered to all consenting students to ...

  11. Computer vision system in real-time for color determination on flat surface food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Saldaña

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial vision systems also known as computer vision are potent quality inspection tools, which can be applied in pattern recognition for fruits and vegetables analysis. The aim of this research was to design, implement and calibrate a new computer vision system (CVS in real-time for the color measurement on flat surface food. For this purpose was designed and implemented a device capable of performing this task (software and hardware, which consisted of two phases: a image acquisition and b image processing and analysis. Both the algorithm and the graphical interface (GUI were developed in Matlab. The CVS calibration was performed using a conventional colorimeter (Model CIEL* a* b*, where were estimated the errors of the color parameters: eL* = 5.001%, and ea* = 2.287%, and eb* = 4.314 % which ensure adequate and efficient automation application in industrial processes in the quality control in the food industry sector.

  12. Computer vision system in real-time for color determination on flat surface food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Saldaña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial vision systems also known as computer vision are potent quality inspection tools, which can be applied in pattern recognition for fruits and vegetables analysis. The aim of this research was to design, implement and calibrate a new computer vision system (CVS in real - time f or the color measurement on flat surface food. For this purpose was designed and implemented a device capable of performing this task (software and hardware, which consisted of two phases: a image acquisition and b image processing and analysis. Both th e algorithm and the graphical interface (GUI were developed in Matlab. The CVS calibration was performed using a conventional colorimeter (Model CIEL* a* b*, where were estimated the errors of the color parameters: e L* = 5.001%, and e a* = 2.287%, and e b* = 4.314 % which ensure adequate and efficient automation application in industrial processes in the quality control in the food industry sector.

  13. Optical quality and vision with iris-coloring soft contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Carolina; Jiménez, Raimundo

    2014-05-01

    To study the influence of iris-coloring soft contact lenses, designed for changing apparent iris color, on optical quality and vision. Eighty subjects were included in this study. All participants were classified as emmetropic, with monocular best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better. For 40 subjects, we measured the optical quality (aberrations, the Strehl ratio, and the objective scattering index) and visual performance before and after wearing the cosmetic soft contact lenses. We also measured the optical quality and visual performance for the other 40 subjects but with a different kind of lens (fantasy soft contact lenses). Iris-coloring soft contact lenses significantly increased coma-like and total higher-order aberrations and objective scattering index (p Iris-coloring soft contact lenses deteriorate the optical quality and worsen the contrast sensitivity function. Iris-coloring soft contact lens wearers should be informed about the effects on optical quality and visual function.

  14. A new technique for robot vision in autonomous underwater vehicles using the color shift in underwater imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FOR ROBOT VISION IN AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING by Jake A. Jones June 2017 Thesis Advisor... VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jake A. Jones 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...underwater vehicles (AUVs), robot vision, autonomy, visual odometry, underwater color shift, optical properties of water 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 75 16

  15. Applications of color machine vision in the agricultural and food industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Ludas, Laszlo I.; Morgan, Mark T.; Krutz, Gary W.; Precetti, Cyrille J.

    1999-01-01

    Color is an important factor in Agricultural and the Food Industry. Agricultural or prepared food products are often grade by producers and consumers using color parameters. Color is used to estimate maturity, sort produce for defects, but also perform genetic screenings or make an aesthetic judgement. The task of sorting produce following a color scale is very complex, requires special illumination and training. Also, this task cannot be performed for long durations without fatigue and loss of accuracy. This paper describes a machine vision system designed to perform color classification in real-time. Applications for sorting a variety of agricultural products are included: e.g. seeds, meat, baked goods, plant and wood.FIrst the theory of color classification of agricultural and biological materials is introduced. Then, some tools for classifier development are presented. Finally, the implementation of the algorithm on real-time image processing hardware and example applications for industry is described. This paper also presented an image analysis algorithm and a prototype machine vision system which was developed for industry. This system will automatically locate the surface of some plants using digital camera and predict information such as size, potential value and type of this plant. The algorithm developed will be feasible for real-time identification in an industrial environment.

  16. The evolution of opsins and color vision: connecting genotype to a complex phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha I Bloch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissecting the genetic basis of adaptive traits is key to our understanding of evolutionary processes. A major and essential step in the study of evolutionary genetics is drawing link between genotype and phenotype, which depends on the difficult process of defining the phenotype at different levels, from functional to organismal. Visual pigments are a key component of the visual system and their evolution could also provide important clues on the evolution of visual sensory system in response to sexual and natural selection. As a system in which genotype can be linked to phenotype, I will use visual pigments and color vision, particularly in birds, as a case of a complex phenotype. I aim to emphasize the difficulties in drawing the genotype-phenotype relationship for complex phenotypes and to highlight the challenges of doing so for color vision. The use of vision-based receiver models to quantify animal colors and patterns is increasingly important in many fields of evolutionary research, spanning studies of mate choice, predation, camouflage and sensory ecology. Given these models impact on evolution and ecology, it is important to provide other researchers with the opportunity to better understand animal vision and the corresponding advantages and limitations of these models.

  17. Polymorphic color vision in captive Uta Hick's cuxiús, or bearded sakis (Chiropotes utahickae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Eldianne Moreira; Pessoa, Daniel Marques Almeida; Sena, Leonardo; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes; Oliveira-Mendes, Ana Cristina; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Pessoa, Valdir Filgueiras

    2015-01-01

    The pitheciines (Chiropotes, Pithecia, and Cacajao) are frugivorous Neotropical primates that specialize on the predation of seeds from unripe fruits, usually cryptic against the foliage. However, little is known about the color vision distribution within this taxon, and even less about the abilities shared by these animals regarding discrimination of chromatic targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the color vision perception of captive Uta Hick's cuxiús, or bearded sakis (Chiropotes utahickae) through a behavioral paradigm of color visual discrimination, as well as to estimate, by genetic studies, the number and kinds of medium to long wavelength cone photopigment (opsins) encoded by this species. Among 12 cuxiús (7 males and 5 females) studied only 1 female was diagnosed as a trichromat. Results from genotyping were in line with our behavioral data and showed that cuxiús carried one (dichromat) or two (trichromat) medium to long wavelength pigments alleles, demonstrating a color vision polymorphism in C. utahickae similar to the majority of Neotropical Primates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exploring visual plasticity: dietary carotenoids can change color vision in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandkam, Benjamin A; Deere-Machemer, Kerry A; Johnson, Ashley M; Grether, Gregory F; Helen Rodd, F; Fuller, Rebecca C

    2016-07-01

    Differences in color vision can play a key role in an organism's ability to perceive and interact with the environment across a broad range of taxa. Recently, species have been shown to vary in color vision across populations as a result of differences in regulatory sequence and/or plasticity of opsin gene expression. For decades, biologists have been intrigued by among-population variation in color-based mate preferences of female Trinidadian guppies. We proposed that some of this variation results from variation in color vision caused by plasticity in opsin expression. Specifically, we asked about the role of dietary carotenoid availability, because carotenoids (1) are the precursors for vitamin A, which is essential for the creation of photopigments and (2) have been linked to variation in female mate choice. We raised guppies on different carotenoid-level diets and measured opsin expression. Guppies raised on high-carotenoid diets expressed higher levels of long wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS) opsins than those raised on lower levels of carotenoids. These results suggest that dietary effects on opsin expression represent a previously unaccounted for mechanism by which ecological differences across populations could lead to mate choice differences.

  19. Olfaction and color vision identify impending neurodegeneration in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-François; Vendette, Mélanie; Desjardins, Catherine; Montplaisir, Jacques Y

    2011-05-01

    For development of neuroprotective therapy, neurodegenerative disease must be identified as early as possible. However, current means of identifying "preclinical" neurodegeneration are limited. Patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) are at >50% risk of synuclein-mediated neurodegenerative disease--this provides a unique opportunity to directly observe preclinical synucleinopathy and to test potential markers of preclinical disease. Patients with RBD without neurodegenerative disease were enrolled in a prospective cohort starting in 2004. Olfaction and color vision were tested at baseline, then annually for 5 years. Test results were compared between patients who developed neurodegenerative disease and those who remained disease-free. Out of 64 patients, 62 (97%) participated in annual follow-up. During follow-up, 21 developed disease, and 41 remained disease-free. Out of 21, 16 developed a combination of parkinsonism and dementia, 4 developed isolated parkinsonism (all with tremor), and 1 developed isolated dementia. Compared to those remaining disease-free, patients destined to develop disease had worse baseline olfaction (University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test [UPSIT] = 58.3 ± 27.0% age/sex-adjusted normal vs 80.2 ± 26.3%; p = 0.003) and color vision (Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue color test [FM-100] errors 153.0 ± 82.2% normal vs 120.2 ± 26.5%; p = 0.022). Kaplan-Meier 5-year-disease-free survival in those with normal olfaction was 86.0%, vs 35.4% with impaired olfaction (p = 0.029). Disease-free survival with normal color vision was 70.3%, vs 26.0% with impaired vision (p = 0.009). Both olfaction and color vision were reduced as much as 5 years before disease diagnosis, with only slight decline in preclinical stages. Olfaction and color vision identify early-stage synuclein-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. In most cases, abnormalities are measurable at least 5 years before disease onset, and progress

  20. The photochemical determinants of color vision: revealing how opsins tune their chromophore's absorption wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a variety of important chromophore-dependent biological processes, including microbial light sensing and mammalian color vision, relies on protein modifications that alter the spectral characteristics of a bound chromophore. Three different color opsins share the same chromophore, but have three distinct absorptions that together cover the entire visible spectrum, giving rise to trichromatic vision. The influence of opsins on the absorbance of the chromophore has been studied through methods such as model compounds, opsin mutagenesis, and computational modeling. The recent development of rhodopsin mimic that uses small soluble proteins to recapitulate the binding and wavelength tuning of the native opsins provides a new platform for studying protein-regulated spectral tuning. The ability to achieve far-red shifted absorption in the rhodopsin mimic system was attributed to a combination of the lack of a counteranion proximal to the iminium, and a uniformly neutral electrostatic environment surrounding the chromophore. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated With Color Vision but not Olfactory Function in Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Ke; Liu, Feng-Tao; Chen, Kui; Bu, Lu-Lu; Yang, Ke; Chen, Chen; Liu, Zhen-Yang; Tang, Yi-Lin; Zhao, Jue; Sun, Yi-Min; Wang, Jian; Wu, Jian-Jun

    2018-02-20

    Depressive symptoms and sensory dysfunction, such as reduction in visual and olfactory function, are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have suggested that depressive symptoms are associated with visual impairments and potentially with hyposmia in several types of mood disorders. However, the relationship between depressive symptoms and sensory dysfunction remains unclear in PD. To examine the association of depressive symptoms with color vision and olfactory function in PD, the authors conducted a cross-sectional study in 159 patients with PD. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30); color vision was tested with the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test (FMT); and olfactory function was tested with the Sniffin' Sticks Screening 12 Test. Results showed that the total error score (TES) for the FMT was significantly and independently correlated with scores on both the BDI-II and GDS-30 in a positive manner, suggesting that more severe depressive symptoms are associated with poorer color vision in PD. In addition, both somatic and effective subscores for the BDI-II were correlated with the TES on the FMT, while no significant correlation was observed between total scores on the Sniffin' Sticks Screening 12 Test and BDI-II or GDS-30. The decrease in color vision but not olfactory function was found to be associated with the severity of depressive symptoms in PD patients, supporting the idea that the occurrence of depressive symptoms in PD is linked with disruption of the visual system.

  2. Recognition memory for colored and black-and-white scenes in normal and color deficient observers (dichromats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Serge; Cornet, Alyssa; Rakic, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Color deficient (dichromat) and normal observers' recognition memory for colored and black-and-white natural scenes was evaluated through several parameters: the rate of recognition, discrimination (A'), response bias (B"D), response confidence, and the proportion of conscious recollections (Remember responses) among hits. At the encoding phase, 36 images of natural scenes were each presented for 1 sec. Half of the images were shown in color and half in black-and-white. At the recognition phase, these 36 pictures were intermixed with 36 new images. The participants' task was to indicate whether an image had been presented or not at the encoding phase, to rate their level of confidence in his her/his response, and in the case of a positive response, to classify the response as a Remember, a Know or a Guess response. Results indicated that accuracy, response discrimination, response bias and confidence ratings were higher for colored than for black-and-white images; this advantage for colored images was similar in both groups of participants. Rates of Remember responses were not higher for colored images than for black-and-white ones, whatever the group. However, interestingly, Remember responses were significantly more often based on color information for colored than for black-and-white images in normal observers only, not in dichromats.

  3. Assessment of Color Vision Among School Children: A Comparative Study Between The Ishihara Test and The Farnsworth D-15 Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kishor Shrestha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Color vision is one of the important attribute of visual perception. The study was conducted at different schools of Kathmandu to compare the  ndings of the Ishihara Pseudoisochromatic test and the Farnsworth D-15 test.  Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2120 students of four schools of Kathmandu. Assessment included visual acuity measurement, slit lamp examination of anterior segment and fundus examination with direct ophthalmoscopy. Each student was assessed with the Ishihara pseudoisochromatic test and the Farnsworth D-15 test. The Chi-square test was performed to analyse color vision defect detected by the Ishihara test and the Farnsworth D-15 test. Results: A total of 2120 students comprising of 1114 males (52.5% and 1006 females (47.5% were recruited in the study with mean age of 12.2 years (SD 2.3 years. The prevalence of color vision defect as indicated by the Ishihara was 2.6 and as indicated by the D-15 test was 2.15 in males.  Conclusion: For school color vision screening, the Ishihara color test and the Farnsworth D-15 test have equal capacity to detect congenital color vision defect and they complement each other.  Keywords: color vision; children; defect; Farnsworth D-15; Ishihara.

  4. Visual function and color vision in adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Samantha; Tannock, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Color vision and self-reported visual function in everyday life in young adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) were investigated. Participants were 30 young adults with ADHD and 30 controls matched for age and gender. They were tested individually and completed the Visual Activities Questionnaire (VAQ), Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test (FMT) and A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT). The ADHD group reported significantly more problems in 4 of 8 areas on the VAQ: depth perception, peripheral vision, visual search and visual processing speed. Further analyses of VAQ items revealed that the ADHD group endorsed more visual problems associated with driving than controls. Color perception difficulties on the FMT were restricted to the blue spectrum in the ADHD group. FMT and AQT results revealed slower processing of visual stimuli in the ADHD group. A comprehensive investigation of mechanisms underlying visual function and color vision in adults with ADHD is warranted, along with the potential impact of these visual problems on driving performance. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. A sensory origin for color-word stroop effects in aging: simulating age-related changes in color-vision mimics age-related changes in Stroop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Schneider, Bruce A

    2010-11-01

    An increase in Stroop effects with age can be interpreted as reflecting age-related reductions in selective attention, cognitive slowing, or color-vision. In the present study, 88 younger adults performed a Stroop test with two color-sets, saturated and desaturated, to simulate an age-related decrease in color perception. This color manipulation with younger adults was sufficient to lead to an increase in Stroop effects that mimics age-effects. We conclude that age-related changes in color perception can contribute to the differences in Stroop effects observed in aging. Finally, we suggest that the clinical applications of Stroop take this factor into account.

  6. [Historical Development of the Wool and Colour Plate Tests for Screening for Colour Vision Deficiencies in German Speaking Countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbecker, J

    2017-07-01

    Colour vision is a complex visual function that can be affected by congenital and/or acquired disorders. The frequency of congenital colour vision deficiencies has been investigated in rail and navy staff since the 1870s. Various test methods have been developed. Wool tests, flor contrast tests and colour plate tests have been used. A published colour plate test, based on Stilling's pseudo-isochromatic plates in combination with a flor contrast test, has been a common screening method for colour vision testing in German-speaking countries. This test is intended to detect congenital and acquired colour vision deficiencies in a simple and safe manner. More modern options, such as Internet and tablet PC have technical limitations, but will increasingly be used for screening for colour vision deficiencies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Visual contents adaptation for colour vision deficiency using customised ICC profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Gun; Choi, Hoon Il; Hong, Kyoung Soon

    2010-07-01

    Approximately, 1 of 12 persons in the world has colour vision deficiency (CVD), named colour blindness. While the amount of graphic information in digital contents is continuing to increase dramatically, assistive tools for colour vision deficiencies remain scarce. We developed a method to generate customised International Colour Consortium (ICC) colour profiles for patients suffering from CVD, which could adjust graphic contents according to individual needs. Compensation rules for the pale or dark range of red and green colours were established, and an ICC profile was generated using this set of rules. The passing rate for Ishihara test was 99.5% when the generated profile was applied to 10 Ishihara plates and tested on individuals suffering from red deficiency, and green deficiency (5, and 15 participants, respectively). The time used to generate the compensation profile was 12.9 min on average, including the time taken to explain the test to the participants. Reliable results were achieved with a relatively low effort in comparison with methods currently utilised in professional clinics, and does not need expensive instruments.

  8. Color vision impairment with low-level methylmercury exposure of an Amazonian population - Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa-Santana, Claudia; Souza, Givago da Silva; Sirius, Esaú Ventura Pupo; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Cortes, Maria Izabel Tentes; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2018-02-09

    Land exploitation that follows deforestation and mining can result in soil erosion and the release of mercury to the waters of rivers in the Amazon Basin. Inorganic mercury is methylated by bacteria that are present in the environment and it serves as a source of human contamination through fish consumption in the form of methylmercury. Long-term exposure to low-level methylmercury in the riverside populations can lead to nervous system alterations, some of which are visual impairments such as loss of luminance contrast sensitivity, restricted visual fields and color vision defects. The present study sought to examine color vision in a group of adults living in the central Brazilian Amazon who were exposed to low-levels of methylmercury. Total Hg concentrations were measured from hair collected at the time of the testing. The D15d and FM100 color vision arrangement tests were applied in a population of 36 (22 males) and 42 (25 males), respectively. Controls were healthy volunteers from the cities of São Paulo for the D15d and Belém for the FM100. There was a statistically significant difference in performance between those who were exposed and controls for both tests (p meaning that adults living in this region of the Amazon made more mistakes on both tests when compared to controls. A linear regression was performed using Hg concentrations and test scores. Hg concentrations accounted for 7% and 2% of color D15d and FM100 arrangement test errors, respectively. Although other studies have previously found color vision impairment in the Amazon, they tested inhabitants on the east side of the Amazon, while this study was conducted in the central Amazon region and it is the first study in a population with no direct contact with the Hg source of contamination. These results suggest that long-term exposure to low-level methylmercury in riverside populations is more widely spread in the Amazon Basin than previously reported. This information is needed to implement

  9. Partial reversal of color vision impairment in type 2 diabetes associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rajiv; Verma, Aditya; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Bhojwani, Deepak

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Tritan anomaly is a known acquired color defect seen in diabetic patients, with or without the evidence of clinical signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We report a case of a 45-year-old diabetic patient with tritan pattern color defect associated with obstructive sleep apnea and its partial reversal with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation. Methods: A 45-year-old male with diabetes, wildlife photographer by profession, presented with specific complaints of seeing all objects in the surrounding with a greenish tinge in both the eyes. He underwent a comprehensive eye examination including Farnsworth-Munsel 100 (FM 100) hue test, multifocal electroretinogram, microperimetry, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), and arterial oxygen saturation. Results: The subject was found to have a low arterial oxygen saturation (PaO2) of 86%. He was then advised inhalation of 100% oxygen for 15 min, following which he reported improvement in his visual symptoms. FM 100, OCT, and microperimetry were repeated after oxygenation. He was referred to a specialty hospital for further evaluation of the cause for reduced blood oxygen saturation and was further advised for sleep study, where he was diagnosed to have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with an apnea-hypopnea index of 20.9. Conclusion: The subject was advised weight loss measures and oral application of continuous positive airway pressure. Since then, he is under our regular follow-up and has never experienced or complained of any color vision problems. This case report highlights the presence of associated systemic disorders like obstructive sleep apnea in individuals with diabetes that can present with color vision problems.

  10. Chromatic aberration and the roles of double-opponent and color-luminance neurons in color vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, Tony

    How does the visual cortex encode color? I summarize a theory in which cortical double-opponent color neurons perform a role in color constancy and a complementary set of color-luminance neurons function to selectively correct for color fringes induced by chromatic aberration in the eye. The theory

  11. Color machine vision system for process control in the ceramics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaranda Marques, Jose A.; Briones, Leoncio; Florez, Julian

    1997-08-01

    This paper is focused on the design of a machine vision system to solve a problem found in the manufacturing process of high quality polished porcelain tiles. This consists of sorting the tiles according to the criteria 'same appearance to the human eye' or in other words, by color and visual texture. In 1994 this problem was tackled and led to a prototype which became fully operational at production scale in a manufacturing plant, named Porcelanatto, S.A. The system has evolved and has been adapted to meet the particular needs of this manufacturing company. Among the main issues that have been improved, it is worth pointing out: (1) improvement to discern subtle variations in color or texture, which are the main features of the visual appearance; (2) inspection time reduction, as a result of algorithm optimization and the increasing computing power. Thus, 100 percent of the production can be inspected, reaching a maximum of 120 tiles/sec.; (3) adaptation to the different types and models of tiles manufactured. The tiles vary not only in their visible patterns but also in dimensions, formats, thickness and allowances. In this sense, one major problem has been reaching an optimal compromise: The system must be sensitive enough to discern subtle variations in color, but at the same time insensitive thickness variations in the tiles. The following parts have been used to build the system: RGB color line scan camera, 12 bits per channel, PCI frame grabber, PC, fiber optic based illumination and the algorithm which will be explained in section 4.

  12. Wavelength Discrimination in Drosophila Suggests a Role of Rhodopsin 1 in Color Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Among the five photoreceptor opsins in the eye of Drosophila, Rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) is expressed in the six outer photoreceptors. In a previous study that combined behavioral genetics with computational modeling, we demonstrated that flies can use the signals from Rh1 for color vision. Here, we provide an in-depth computational analysis of wildtype Drosophila wavelength discrimination specifically considering the consequences of different choices of computations in the preprocessing of the behavioral data. The results support the conclusion that Drosophila wavelength discrimination behavior can best be explained by a contribution of Rh1. These findings are corroborated by results of an information-theoretical analysis that shows that Rh1 provides information for discrimination of natural reflectance spectra.

  13. Space grating optical structure of the retina and RGB-color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Diffraction of light at the spatial cellular phase grating outer nuclear layer of the retina could produce Fresnel near-field interferences in three RGB diffraction orders accessible to photoreceptors (cones/rods). At perpendicular light incidence the wavelengths of the RGB diffraction orders in photopic vision-a fundamental R-wave with two G+B-harmonics-correspond to the peak wavelengths of the spectral brightness sensitivity curves of the cones at 559 nmR, 537 nmG, and 447 nmB. In scotopic vision the R+G diffraction orders optically fuse at 512 nm, the peak value of the rod's spectral brightness sensitivity curve. The diffractive-optical transmission system with sender (resonator), space waves, and receiver antennae converts the spectral light components involved in imaging into RGB space. The colors seen at objects are diffractive-optical products in the eye, as the German philosopher A. Schopenhauer predicted. They are second related to the overall illumination in object space. The RGB transmission system is the missing link optically managing the spectral tuning of the RGB photopigments.

  14. Color-vision polymorphism in wild capuchins (Cebus capucinus) and spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Tsutsui, Toko; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Aureli, Filippo; Fedigan, Linda M; Kawamura, Shoji

    2005-12-01

    New World monkeys are unique in exhibiting a color-vision polymorphism due to an allelic variation of the red-green visual pigment gene. This makes these monkeys excellent subjects for studying the adaptive evolution of the visual system from both molecular and ecological viewpoints. However, the allele frequencies of the pigments within a natural population have not been well investigated. As a first step toward understanding the relationship between vision and behavior, we conducted color-vision typing by analyzing fecal DNA from two wild groups of white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) and one group of black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) inhabiting Santa Rosa National Park of Costa Rica. All color-typed monkeys were individually identified. In C. capucinus and A. geoffroyi we found three and two pigment types, respectively, and the spectral mechanism that created one of the two Ateles pigments was found to be novel. In one Cebus group and the Ateles group, all alleles were present, whereas in the other Cebus group only two alleles were found, with one allele predominating. This was likely due to the effect of close inbreeding, indicating that wild populations can exhibit a variety of allele compositions. This result also suggests that the color-vision polymorphism can be easily distorted by natural factors, such as inbreeding, skewing the population structure. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Color-based scale-invariant feature detection applied in robot vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Huang, Xinhan; Peng, Gang; Wang, Min; Li, Xinde

    2007-11-01

    The scale-invariant feature detecting methods always require a lot of computation yet sometimes still fail to meet the real-time demands in robot vision fields. To solve the problem, a quick method for detecting interest points is presented. To decrease the computation time, the detector selects as interest points those whose scale normalized Laplacian values are the local extrema in the nonholonomic pyramid scale space. The descriptor is built with several subregions, whose width is proportional to the scale factor, and the coordinates of the descriptor are rotated in relation to the interest point orientation just like the SIFT descriptor. The eigenvector is computed in the original color image and the mean values of the normalized color g and b in each subregion are chosen to be the factors of the eigenvector. Compared with the SIFT descriptor, this descriptor's dimension has been reduced evidently, which can simplify the point matching process. The performance of the method is analyzed in theory in this paper and the experimental results have certified its validity too.

  16. Multi-capability color night vision HD camera for defense, surveillance, and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Francis; Powell, Gareth; Fereyre, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    e2v has developed a family of high performance cameras based on our next generation CMOS imagers that provide multiple features and capabilities to meet the range of challenging imaging applications in defense, surveillance, and security markets. Two resolution sizes are available: 1920x1080 with 5.3 μm pixels, and an ultra-low light level version at 1280x1024 with 10μm pixels. Each type is available in either monochrome or e2v's unique bayer pattern color version. The camera is well suited to accommodate many of the high demands for defense, surveillance, and security applications: compact form factor (SWAP+C), color night vision performance (down to 10-2 lux), ruggedized housing, Global Shutter, low read noise (<6e- in Global shutter mode and <2.5e- in Rolling shutter mode), 60 Hz frame rate, high QE especially in the enhanced NIR range (up to 1100nm). Other capabilities include active illumination and range gating. This paper will describe all the features of the sensor and the camera. It will be followed with a presentation of the latest test data with the current developments. Then, it will conclude with a description of how these features can be easily configured to meet many different applications. With this development, we can tune rather than create a full customization, making it more beneficial for many of our customers and their custom applications.

  17. Intelligent Color Vision System for Ripeness Classification of Oil Palm Fresh Fruit Bunch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidi Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ripeness classification of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFBs during harvesting is important to ensure that they are harvested during optimum stage for maximum oil production. This paper presents the application of color vision for automated ripeness classification of oil palm FFB. Images of oil palm FFBs of type DxP Yangambi were collected and analyzed using digital image processing techniques. Then the color features were extracted from those images and used as the inputs for Artificial Neural Network (ANN learning. The performance of the ANN for ripeness classification of oil palm FFB was investigated using two methods: training ANN with full features and training ANN with reduced features based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA data reduction technique. Results showed that compared with using full features in ANN, using the ANN trained with reduced features can improve the classification accuracy by 1.66% and is more effective in developing an automated ripeness classifier for oil palm FFB. The developed ripeness classifier can act as a sensor in determining the correct oil palm FFB ripeness category.

  18. Intelligent color vision system for ripeness classification of oil palm fresh fruit bunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadilah, Norasyikin; Mohamad-Saleh, Junita; Abdul Halim, Zaini; Ibrahim, Haidi; Syed Ali, Syed Salim

    2012-10-22

    Ripeness classification of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFBs) during harvesting is important to ensure that they are harvested during optimum stage for maximum oil production. This paper presents the application of color vision for automated ripeness classification of oil palm FFB. Images of oil palm FFBs of type DxP Yangambi were collected and analyzed using digital image processing techniques. Then the color features were extracted from those images and used as the inputs for Artificial Neural Network (ANN) learning. The performance of the ANN for ripeness classification of oil palm FFB was investigated using two methods: training ANN with full features and training ANN with reduced features based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) data reduction technique. Results showed that compared with using full features in ANN, using the ANN trained with reduced features can improve the classification accuracy by 1.66% and is more effective in developing an automated ripeness classifier for oil palm FFB. The developed ripeness classifier can act as a sensor in determining the correct oil palm FFB ripeness category.

  19. Preparing medical students with congenital colour vision deficiency for safe practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Rajat; Rohatgi, Jolly; Dhaliwal, Upreet

    2017-01-01

    Colour vision of candidates is tested in many medical colleges in India at the time of admission to undergraduate courses; however, there are no guidelines, and therefore no counselling, on how students with congenital colour vision deficiency (CCVD) should negotiate the medical course, and how best they can practise safely after graduation. Problems in interpreting coloured signs may lead to misdiagnosis. This study aimed to explore difficulties during clinical work that requires colour discrimination, and to offer suggestions on safe practice based on the findings and a review of the literature. We did a cross-sectional study after obtaining institutional ethical clearance and written informed consent. Thirty volunteer medical students with CCVD (≥3 errors on Ishihara chart) were matched with 30 volunteers from their own batch who made no errors. All participants interpreted colour-dependent clinical and laboratory photographs. Students with CCVD made more errors (range 5-26; mean [SD] 13.17 [5.873] out of 75 items in 35 colour-dependent photographs) than colour-normal students (range 2-13; mean [SD] 5.53 [3.037], p<0.001). The nature of the errors suggested that medical students with CCVD could have problems in learning histology, pathology, haematology, microbiology, dermatology, paediatrics, medicine, biochemistry and during ophthalmoscopy. Screening at the time of admission will make students aware of their CCVD status and, through conscious practice thereafter, they may understand their limitations. Faculty could guide and prepare such students for safe practice.

  20. A Novel Mechanism for Color Vision: Pupil Shape and Chromatic Aberration Can Provide Spectral Discrimination for Color Blind Organisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Stubbs, Christopher; Stubbs, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We present a mechanism by which organisms with only a single photoreceptor, that have a monochromatic view of the world, can achieve color discrimination. The combination of an off axis pupil and the principle of chromatic aberration (where light of different colors focus at different distances behind a lens) can combine to provide color-blind animals with a way to distinguish colors. As a specific example we constructed a computer model of the visual system of cephalopods, (octopus, squid, a...

  1. A Novel Mechanism for Color Vision: Pupil Shape and Chromatic Aberration Can Provide Spectral Discrimination for Color Blind Organisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Stubbs, Alexander L; Stubbs, Christopher William

    2016-01-01

    We present a mechanism by which organisms with only a single photoreceptor, that have a monochromatic view of the world, can achieve color discrimination. The combination of an off axis pupil and the principle of chromatic aberration (where light of different colors focus at different distances behind a lens) can combine to provide color-blind animals with a way to distinguish colors. As a specific example we constructed a computer model of the visual system of cephalopods, (octopus, squid, a...

  2. Visual modelling suggests a weak relationship between the evolution of ultraviolet vision and plumage coloration in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, O; Delhey, K

    2015-03-01

    Birds have sophisticated colour vision mediated by four cone types that cover a wide visual spectrum including ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Many birds have modest UV sensitivity provided by violet-sensitive (VS) cones with sensitivity maxima between 400 and 425 nm. However, some birds have evolved higher UV sensitivity and a larger visual spectrum given by UV-sensitive (UVS) cones maximally sensitive at 360-370 nm. The reasons for VS-UVS transitions and their relationship to visual ecology remain unclear. It has been hypothesized that the evolution of UVS-cone vision is linked to plumage colours so that visual sensitivity and feather coloration are 'matched'. This leads to the specific prediction that UVS-cone vision enhances the discrimination of plumage colours of UVS birds while such an advantage is absent or less pronounced for VS-bird coloration. We test this hypothesis using knowledge of the complex distribution of UVS cones among birds combined with mathematical modelling of colour discrimination during different viewing conditions. We find no support for the hypothesis, which, combined with previous studies, suggests only a weak relationship between UVS-cone vision and plumage colour evolution. Instead, we suggest that UVS-cone vision generally favours colour discrimination, which creates a nonspecific selection pressure for the evolution of UVS cones. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. Machine Vision System for Color Sorting Wood Edge-Glued Panel Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang Lu; S. Srikanteswara; W. King; T. Drayer; Richard Conners; D. Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic color sorting system for hardwood edge-glued panel parts. The color sorting system simultaneously examines both faces of a panel part and then determines which face has the "better" color given specified color uniformity and priority defined by management. The real-time color sorting system software and hardware are briefly...

  4. Evaluating color deficiency simulation and daltonization methods through visual search and sample-to-match: SaMSEM and ViSDEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Liedtke, Joschua T.; Farup, Ivar; Laeng, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Color deficient people might be confronted with minor difficulties when navigating through daily life, for example when reading websites or media, navigating with maps, retrieving information from public transport schedules and others. Color deficiency simulation and daltonization methods have been proposed to better understand problems of color deficient individuals and to improve color displays for their use. However, it remains unclear whether these color prosthetic" methods really work and how well they improve the performance of color deficient individuals. We introduce here two methods to evaluate color deficiency simulation and daltonization methods based on behavioral experiments that are widely used in the field of psychology. Firstly, we propose a Sample-to-Match Simulation Evaluation Method (SaMSEM); secondly, we propose a Visual Search Daltonization Evaluation Method (ViSDEM). Both methods can be used to validate and allow the generalization of the simulation and daltonization methods related to color deficiency. We showed that both the response times (RT) and the accuracy of SaMSEM can be used as an indicator of the success of color deficiency simulation methods and that performance in the ViSDEM can be used as an indicator for the efficacy of color deficiency daltonization methods. In future work, we will include comparison and analysis of different color deficiency simulation and daltonization methods with the help of SaMSEM and ViSDEM.

  5. Generalization of color-difference formulas for any illuminant and any observer by assuming perfect color constancy in a color-vision model based on the OSA-UCS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleari, Claudio; Melgosa, Manuel; Huertas, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    The most widely used color-difference formulas are based on color-difference data obtained under D65 illumination or similar and for a 10° visual field; i.e., these formulas hold true for the CIE 1964 observer adapted to D65 illuminant. This work considers the psychometric color-vision model based on the Optical Society of America-Uniform Color Scales (OSA-UCS) system previously published by the first author [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 21, 677 (2004); Color Res. Appl. 30, 31 (2005)] with the additional hypothesis that complete illuminant adaptation with perfect color constancy exists in the visual evaluation of color differences. In this way a computational procedure is defined for color conversion between different illuminant adaptations, which is an alternative to the current chromatic adaptation transforms. This color conversion allows the passage between different observers, e.g., CIE 1964 and CIE 1931. An application of this color conversion is here made in the color-difference evaluation for any observer and in any illuminant adaptation: these transformations convert tristimulus values related to any observer and illuminant adaptation to those related to the observer and illuminant adaptation of the definition of the color-difference formulas, i.e., to the CIE 1964 observer adapted to the D65 illuminant, and then the known color-difference formulas can be applied. The adaptations to the illuminants A, C, F11, D50, Planckian and daylight at any color temperature and for CIE 1931 and CIE 1964 observers are considered as examples, and all the corresponding transformations are given for practical use.

  6. Colors vision effect: learning and teaching strategies based on reading nature images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, D.; Jiménez, Y.; Vivanco, O.; Cuenca, L.; Granda, C.; Sánchez, A.

    2017-09-01

    The present work shows the teaching and motivation of University students to think about optics and color effects. The methodology consists of studying the different optical phenomena that occur through the sunsets and then do a correlation of this information with the phenomena and optical effects of the color of class presentations; to determine the motivation and attention of students.

  7. A simple modification of the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test for much faster assessment of color vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo Ghose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Farnsworth-Munsell (FM 100-hue test is well known but is also time consuming, especially its analytical component. To reduce this needless time-waste during precious working hours, a simple modification was devised. Design: Prospective, comparative, observational study. Materials and Methods: A transparent clear plastic carrier box replaced the opaque one, allowing ready digital photodocumentation of top and bottom without even opening the box, or handling/inverting the caps -200 reportedly normals and 50 known color vision defectives could be easily tested on this modified-FM and results stored, allowing rapid turnover. The captured scores with patient ID were analyzed, at leisure, outside hospital time, saving 45-60 minutes/patient. After recording, the box was promptly handed over to the next subject for rearrangement. Times taken for test/patient were recorded. Results: Running time was reduced from 60-75 min to ~15 min/patient with no waste of invaluable lab hours. Turnover time is limited to capturing two photographs (~60 sec. The box is relatively cheap and easy to maintain. Conclusions: Our simplified FM 100-hue test allowed rapid assessment of color visions with easy data storage of both top and bottom.

  8. Color vision in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot visual evoked potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyeon; Banaschewski, Tobias; Tannock, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are reported to manifest visual problems (including ophthalmological and color perception, particularly for blue-yellow stimuli), but findings are inconsistent. Accordingly, this study investigated visual function and color perception in adolescents with ADHD using color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which provides an objective measure of color perception. Thirty-one adolescents (aged 13-18), 16 with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD, and 15 healthy peers, matched for age, gender, and IQ participated in the study. All underwent an ophthalmological exam, as well as electrophysiological testing color Visual Evoked Potentials (cVEP), which measured the latency and amplitude of the neural P1 response to chromatic (blue-yellow, red-green) and achromatic stimuli. No intergroup differences were found in the ophthalmological exam. However, significantly larger P1 amplitude was found for blue and yellow stimuli, but not red/green or achromatic stimuli, in the ADHD group (particularly in the medicated group) compared to controls. Larger amplitude in the P1 component for blue-yellow in the ADHD group compared to controls may account for the lack of difference in color perception tasks. We speculate that the larger amplitude for blue-yellow stimuli in early sensory processing (P1) might reflect a compensatory strategy for underlying problems including compromised retinal input of s-cones due to hypo-dopaminergic tone. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. True RGB line-scan camera for color machine vision applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstrom, Guy F.

    1994-10-01

    The design and technical capabilities of a true RGB 3 CCD chip color line scan camera are presented within this paper. The camera was developed for accurate color monitoring and analysis in industrial applications. A black & white line scan camera has been designed and built utilizing the same modular architecture of the color line scan camera. Color separation is made possible with a tri-chromatic RGB beam splitter. Three CCD linear arrays are precisely mounted to the output surfaces of the prism and the outputs of each CCD are exactly matched pixel by pixel. The beam splitter prism can be tailored to separate other spectral components than the standard RGB. A typical CCD can detect between 200 and 100 nm. Either two or three spectral regions can be separated using a beam splitter prism. The camera is totally digital and has a 16-bit parallel computer interface to communicate with a signal processing board. Because of the open architecture of the camera it's possible for the customer to design a board with some special functions handling the preprocessing of the data (for example RGB - HSI conversion). The camera can also be equipped with a high speed CPU-board with enough of local memory to do some image processing inside the camera before sending the data forward. The camera has been used in real industrial applications and has proven that its high resolution and high dynamic range can be used to measure minute color differences, enabling the separation or grading of objects such as minerals, food or other materials that could not otherwise be measured with a black and white camera.

  10. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Associations with Skin Color in Pregnant Women in the First Trimester in a Sample from Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Aline; Rohrmann, Sabine; Quack Lötscher, Katharina C

    2017-03-10

    Vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy has negative clinical consequences, such as associations with glucose intolerance, and has been shown to be distributed differently in certain ethnic groups. In some countries, a difference in the rate of vitamin D deficiency was detected in pregnant women depending on their skin color. We examined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (Switzerland and evaluated the association of skin color with vitamin D deficiency. In a single-center cohort study, the validated Fitzpatrick scale and objective melanin index were used to determine skin color. Of the 204 pregnant women included, 63% were vitamin D deficient. The mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was 26.1 ng/mL (95% confidence interval (CI) 24.8-27.4) in vitamin D-sufficient women and 10.5 ng/mL (95% CI 9.7-11.5) in women with deficiency. In the most parsimonious model, women with dark skin color were statistically significantly more often vitamin D deficient compared to women with light skin color (OR 2.60; 95% CI 1.08-6.22; adjusted for age, season, vitamin D supplement use, body mass index, smoking, parity). This calls for more intense counseling as one policy option to improve vitamin D status during pregnancy, i.e., use of vitamin D supplements during pregnancy, in particular for women with darker skin color.

  11. Color vision versus pattern visual evoked potentials in the assessment of subclinical optic pathway involvement in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih C Gundogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optic pathway involvement in multiple sclerosis is frequently the initial sign in the disease process. In most clinical applications, pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP is used in the assessment of optic pathway involvement. Objective: To question the value of PVEP against color vision assessment in the diagnosis of subclinical optic pathway involvement. Materials and Methods: This prospective, cross-sectional study included 20 multiple sclerosis patients without a history of optic neuritis, and 20 healthy control subjects. Farnsworth-Munsell (FM 100-Hue testing and PVEPs to 60-min arc and 15-min arc checks by using Roland-Consult RetiScan® system were performed. P 100 amplitude, P 100 latency in PVEP and total error scores (TES in FM 100-Hue test were assessed. Results: Expanded Disability Status Scale score and the time from diagnosis were 2.21 ± 2.53 (ranging from 0 to 7 and 4.1 ± 4.4 years. MS group showed significantly delayed P 100 latency for both checks (P 0.05 for all. 14 MS patients (70% had an increased TESs in FM-100 Hue, 11 (55% MS patients had delayed P 100 latency and 9 (45% had reduced P 100 amplitude. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.944 for FM-100 Hue test, 0.753 for P 100 latency, and 0.173 for P 100 amplitude. Conclusions: Color vision testing seems to be more sensitive than PVEP in detecting subclinical visual pathway involvement in MS.

  12. Color vision in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A pilot visual evoked potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyeon Kim

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Larger amplitude in the P1 component for blue–yellow in the ADHD group compared to controls may account for the lack of difference in color perception tasks. We speculate that the larger amplitude for blue–yellow stimuli in early sensory processing (P1 might reflect a compensatory strategy for underlying problems including compromised retinal input of s-cones due to hypo-dopaminergic tone.

  13. Developing a machine vision system for simultaneous prediction of freshness indicators based on tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) pupil and gill color during storage at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ce; Qian, Jianping; Han, Shuai; Fan, Beilei; Yang, Xinting; Wu, Xiaoming

    2018-03-15

    The study assessed the feasibility of developing a machine vision system based on pupil and gill color changes in tilapia for simultaneous prediction of total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid (TBA) and total viable counts (TVC) during storage at 4°C. The pupils and gills were chosen and color space conversion among RGB, HSI and L ∗ a ∗ b ∗ color spaces was performed automatically by an image processing algorithm. Multiple regression models were established by correlating pupil and gill color parameters with TVB-N, TVC and TBA (R 2 =0.989-0.999). However, assessment of freshness based on gill color is destructive and time-consuming because gill cover must be removed before images are captured. Finally, visualization maps of spoilage based on pupil color were achieved using image algorithms. The results show that assessment of tilapia pupil color parameters using machine vision can be used as a low-cost, on-line method for predicting freshness during 4°C storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Central serous chorioretinopathy resulting in altered vision and color perception after glenohumeral corticosteroid injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Andrew P; Hodapp, Kristin L; Jadgchew, Jason; Solomon, Daniel J; Stolldorf, Hunter S; Provencher, Matthew T

    2009-08-01

    Complications from shoulder corticosteroid injections are uncommon. This article presents a case of altered color perception and visual disturbances in a 29-year-old male active duty Navy SEAL following an intra-articular glenohumeral corticosteroid injection, previously unreported in the orthopedic literature. The corticosteroid injection was administered for the treatment of right-shoulder stiffness occurring approximately 3 months following an arthroscopic superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) repair and subacromial decompression of the ipsilateral shoulder. The patient experienced immediate relief after the injection. Seven days later, however, he began to notice visual disturbances with color and image distortion of his right eye. He also developed a papular, nonpruritic rash on his upper trunk that eventually extended down his legs. He was diagnosed by an ophthalmologist as having central serous chorioretinopathy, a condition in which serous fluid accumulates in the subretinal space of the eye, causing detachment of the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. The reaction spontaneously resolved within approximately 10 to 12 weeks without treatment. Although intra-articular corticosteroid injections are frequently performed with a low rate of complication, clinicians should be familiar with this rare yet distressing condition. Furthermore, patients with increased production of endogenous corticosteroids (eg, those with Cushing's syndrome, type A personality, hypertension, or obstructive sleep apnea) should be warned of the potential of chorioretinopathy after an intra-articular corticosteroid injection.

  15. Self-organized criticality and color vision: A guide to water-protein landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2013-02-01

    We focus here on the scaling properties of small interspecies differences between red cone opsin transmembrane proteins, using a hydropathic elastic roughening tool previously applied to the rhodopsin rod transmembrane proteins. This tool is based on a non-Euclidean hydropathic metric realistically rooted in the atomic coordinates of 5526 protein segments, which thereby encapsulates universal non-Euclidean long-range differential geometrical features of water films enveloping globular proteins in the Protein Data Bank. Whereas the rhodopsin blue rod water films are smoothest in humans, the red cone opsins’ water films are optimized for smoothness in cats and elephants, consistent with protein species landscapes that evolve differently in different contexts. We also analyze red cone opsins in the chromatophore-containing family of chameleons, snakes, zebrafish and goldfish, where short- and long-range (BLAST and hydropathic) amino acid (aa) correlations are found with values as large as 97%-99%. We use hydropathic aa optimization to estimate the maximum number Nmax of color shades that the human eye can discriminate, and obtain 106

  16. Perception of color emotions for single colors in red-green defective observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Keiko; Inoue, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that inherited red-green color deficiency, which involves both the protan and deutan deficiency types, is common in men. For red-green defective observers, some reddish colors appear desaturated and brownish, unlike those seen by normal observers. Despite its prevalence, few studies have investigated the effects that red-green color deficiency has on the psychological properties of colors (color emotions). The current study investigated the influence of red-green color deficiency on the following six color emotions: cleanliness, freshness, hardness, preference, warmth, and weight. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1) reveal differences between normal and red-green defective observers in rating patterns of six color emotions; (2) examine differences in color emotions related to the three cardinal channels in human color vision; and (3) explore relationships between color emotions and color naming behavior. Thirteen men and 10 women with normal vision and 13 men who were red-green defective performed both a color naming task and an emotion rating task with 32 colors from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP). Results revealed noticeable differences in the cleanliness and hardness ratings between the normal vision observers, particularly in women, and red-green defective observers, which appeared mainly for colors in the orange to cyan range, and in the preference and warmth ratings for colors with cyan and purple hues. Similarly, naming errors also mainly occurred in the cyan colors. A regression analysis that included the three cone-contrasts (i.e., red-green, blue-yellow, and luminance) as predictors significantly accounted for variability in color emotion ratings for the red-green defective observers as much as the normal individuals. Expressly, for warmth ratings, the weight of the red-green opponent channel was significantly lower in color defective observers than in normal participants. In addition, the analyses for individual warmth ratings in

  17. Perception of color emotions for single colors in red-green defective observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Sato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that inherited red-green color deficiency, which involves both the protan and deutan deficiency types, is common in men. For red-green defective observers, some reddish colors appear desaturated and brownish, unlike those seen by normal observers. Despite its prevalence, few studies have investigated the effects that red-green color deficiency has on the psychological properties of colors (color emotions. The current study investigated the influence of red-green color deficiency on the following six color emotions: cleanliness, freshness, hardness, preference, warmth, and weight. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1 reveal differences between normal and red-green defective observers in rating patterns of six color emotions; (2 examine differences in color emotions related to the three cardinal channels in human color vision; and (3 explore relationships between color emotions and color naming behavior. Thirteen men and 10 women with normal vision and 13 men who were red-green defective performed both a color naming task and an emotion rating task with 32 colors from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP. Results revealed noticeable differences in the cleanliness and hardness ratings between the normal vision observers, particularly in women, and red-green defective observers, which appeared mainly for colors in the orange to cyan range, and in the preference and warmth ratings for colors with cyan and purple hues. Similarly, naming errors also mainly occurred in the cyan colors. A regression analysis that included the three cone-contrasts (i.e., red-green, blue-yellow, and luminance as predictors significantly accounted for variability in color emotion ratings for the red-green defective observers as much as the normal individuals. Expressly, for warmth ratings, the weight of the red-green opponent channel was significantly lower in color defective observers than in normal participants. In addition, the analyses for individual warmth

  18. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Colored Contact Lenses Julian: Teenager Blinded In One Eye By Non-Prescription Contact Lens Laura: Vision ... Robyn: Blurry Vision and Daily Eye Drops After One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety ...

  19. Interleukin-6 Deficiency Attenuates Retinal Ganglion Cell Axonopathy and Glaucoma-Related Vision Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin D. Echevarria

    2017-05-01

    axons—likely occur via independent mechanisms. Our data suggest that IL-6 is part of a mechanism that specifically leads to structural degeneration of axons. Furthermore, its absence is sufficient to prevent both structural degeneration of the optic nerve and vision loss. Overall, our work supports the proposition that functional deficits in axon transport represent a therapeutic window for RGC axonopathy and identify IL-6 signaling as a strong target for such a therapeutic.

  20. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... Costume Contact Lenses Can Ruin Vision Eye Makeup Safety In fact, it is illegal to sell colored ...

  1. Psychophysical Evaluation of Congenital Colour Vision Deficiency: Discrimination between Protans and Deutans Using Mollon-Reffin's Ellipses and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento-Torres, Natáli Valim Oliver; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Côrtes, Maria Izabel Tentes; Bonci, Daniela Maria de Oliveira; Ventura, Dora Fix; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue (FM 100) test and Mollon-Reffin (MR) test to evaluate the colour vision of 93 subjects, 30.4 ± 9.7 years old, who had red-green congenital colour vision deficiencies. All subjects lived in Belém (State of Pará, Brazil) and were selected by the State of Pará Traffic Department. Selection criteria comprised the absence of visual dysfunctions other than Daltonism and no history of systemic diseases that could impair the visual system performance. Results from colour vision deficient were compared with those from 127 normal trichromats, 29.3 ± 10.3 years old. For the MR test, measurements were taken around five points of the CIE 1976 colour space, along 20 directions irradiating from each point, in order to determine with high-resolution the corresponding colour discrimination ellipses (MacAdam ellipses). Three parameters were used to compare results obtained from different subjects: diameter of circle with same ellipse area, ratio between ellipse's long and short axes, and ellipse long axis angle. For the FM 100 test, the parameters were: logarithm of the total number of mistakes and positions of mistakes in the FM diagram. Data were also simultaneously analysed in two or three dimensions as well as by using multidimensional cluster analysis. For the MR test, Mollon-Reffin Ellipse #3 (u' = 0.225, v' = 0.415) discriminated more efficiently than the other four ellipses between protans and deutans once it provided larger angular difference in the colour space between protan and deutan confusion lines. The MR test was more sensitive than the FM 100 test. It separated individuals by dysfunctional groups with greater precision, provided a more sophisticated quantitative analysis, and its use is appropriate for a more refined evaluation of different phenotypes of red-green colour vision deficiencies.

  2. Psychophysical Evaluation of Congenital Colour Vision Deficiency: Discrimination between Protans and Deutans Using Mollon-Reffin’s Ellipses and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento-Torres, Natáli Valim Oliver; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Côrtes, Maria Izabel Tentes; Bonci, Daniela Maria de Oliveira; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue (FM 100) test and Mollon-Reffin (MR) test to evaluate the colour vision of 93 subjects, 30.4 ± 9.7 years old, who had red-green congenital colour vision deficiencies. All subjects lived in Belém (State of Pará, Brazil) and were selected by the State of Pará Traffic Department. Selection criteria comprised the absence of visual dysfunctions other than Daltonism and no history of systemic diseases that could impair the visual system performance. Results from colour vision deficient were compared with those from 127 normal trichromats, 29.3 ± 10.3 years old. For the MR test, measurements were taken around five points of the CIE 1976 colour space, along 20 directions irradiating from each point, in order to determine with high-resolution the corresponding colour discrimination ellipses (MacAdam ellipses). Three parameters were used to compare results obtained from different subjects: diameter of circle with same ellipse area, ratio between ellipse’s long and short axes, and ellipse long axis angle. For the FM 100 test, the parameters were: logarithm of the total number of mistakes and positions of mistakes in the FM diagram. Data were also simultaneously analysed in two or three dimensions as well as by using multidimensional cluster analysis. For the MR test, Mollon-Reffin Ellipse #3 (u’ = 0.225, v’ = 0.415) discriminated more efficiently than the other four ellipses between protans and deutans once it provided larger angular difference in the colour space between protan and deutan confusion lines. The MR test was more sensitive than the FM 100 test. It separated individuals by dysfunctional groups with greater precision, provided a more sophisticated quantitative analysis, and its use is appropriate for a more refined evaluation of different phenotypes of red-green colour vision deficiencies. PMID:27101124

  3. Cross-orientation masking in human color vision: application of a two-stage model to assess dichoptic and monocular sources of suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Jin; Gheiratmand, Mina; Mullen, Kathy T

    2013-05-28

    Cross-orientation masking (XOM) occurs when the detection of a test grating is masked by a superimposed grating at an orthogonal orientation, and is thought to reveal the suppressive effects mediating contrast normalization. Medina and Mullen (2009) reported that XOM was greater for chromatic than achromatic stimuli at equivalent spatial and temporal frequencies. Here we address whether the greater suppression found in binocular color vision originates from a monocular or interocular site, or both. We measure monocular and dichoptic masking functions for red-green color contrast and achromatic contrast at three different spatial frequencies (0.375, 0.75, and 1.5 cpd, 2 Hz). We fit these functions with a modified two-stage masking model (Meese & Baker, 2009) to extract the monocular and interocular weights of suppression. We find that the weight of monocular suppression is significantly higher for color than achromatic contrast, whereas dichoptic suppression is similar for both. These effects are invariant across spatial frequency. We then apply the model to the binocular masking data using the measured values of the monocular and interocular sources of suppression and show that these are sufficient to account for color binocular masking. We conclude that the greater strength of chromatic XOM has a monocular origin that transfers through to the binocular site.

  4. Color-discrimination threshold determination using pseudoisochromatic test plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiva eJurasevska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We produced a set of pseudoisochromatic plates for determining individual color-difference thresholds to assess test performance and test properties, and analyzed the results. We report a high test validity and classification ability for the deficiency type and severity level (comparable to that of the fourth edition of the Hardy–Rand–Rittler (HRR test. We discuss changes of the acceptable chromatic shifts from the protan and deutan confusion lines along the CIE xy diagram, and the high correlation of individual color-difference thresholds and the red–green discrimination index. Color vision was tested using an Oculus HMC anomaloscope, a Farnsworth D15, and an HRR test on 273 schoolchildren, and 57 other subjects with previously diagnosed red–green color-vision deficiency.

  5. Color-discrimination threshold determination using pseudoisochromatic test plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurasevska, Kaiva; Ozolinsh, Maris; Fomins, Sergejs; Gutmane, Ausma; Zutere, Brigita; Pausus, Anete; Karitans, Varis

    2014-01-01

    We produced a set of pseudoisochromatic plates for determining individual color-difference thresholds to assess test performance and test properties, and analyzed the results. We report a high test validity and classification ability for the deficiency type and severity level [comparable to that of the fourth edition of the Hardy–Rand–Rittler (HRR) test]. We discuss changes of the acceptable chromatic shifts from the protan and deutan confusion lines along the CIE xy diagram, and the high correlation of individual color-difference thresholds and the red–green discrimination index. Color vision was tested using an Oculus HMC anomaloscope, a Farnsworth D15, and an HRR test on 273 schoolchildren, and 57 other subjects with previously diagnosed red–green color-vision deficiency. PMID:25505891

  6. [The evaluation of color vision and its diagnostic value in predicting the risk of diabetic retinopathy in patients with glucose metabolism disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jończyk-Skórka, Katarzyna; Kowalski, Jan

    2017-07-21

    The aim of the study was to evaluate color vision and its diagnostic value in predicting the risk of diabetic retinopathy in patients with glucose metabolism disorders. The study involved 197 people, 92 women and 105 men aged 63.21 ± 8.74 years. In order to assess glucose metabolism disorders, patients were divided into three groups. The first group (DM) consisted of 60 people (16 women and 44 men aged 61.92 ± 8.46 years). These were people with type 2 diabetes. Second group (IFG IGT) consisted of 67 people (35 women and 32 men aged 65 ± 8.5 years). These were people who were diagnosed with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. The third group, the control one (K) consisted of 70 people (41 women and 29 men aged 62.6 ± 9.06 years). They were healthy individuals. In order to assess diabetic retinopathy study population was divided into two groups. The first group (BZ) consisted of 177 patients (84 women and 93 men aged 62.9 ± 8.78 years) without diabetic retinopathy. The second group (NPDR) consisted of 20 patients (8 women and 12 men aged 65.95 ± 8.17 years) with diabetic retinopathy. Glucose metabolism disorders were diagnosed with glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Evaluation of retinopathy was based on eye examination. All patients underwent binocular Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue color vision test (test result is a Total Error Score - TES). In the healthy control group (K) there were less patients with diabetic retinopathy (p = 0,0101), and less patients with abnormal color vision test (p = 0,0001) than in other groups. Majority of patients in K group had generalized abnormalities of color vision while other groups demonstrated tritanomalią (p = 0,0018). It was discovered that sTES value adequately distinguishes group K from group IFG, IGT, DM (AUC = 0,673), group K from group DM (AUC = 0,701), and group K from group IFG IGT (AUC = 0,648) sTES does not differentiate groups IGT, IFG and DM (AUC = 0,563). It was shown that in IGT, IFG group s

  7. Part I: Sound color in the music of Gyorgy Kurtag, Part II: "Leopard's Path," thirteen visions for chamber ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachimciuc, Igor

    The dissertation is in two parts, a theoretical study and a musical composition. In Part I the music of Gyorgy Kurtag is analyzed from the point of view of sound color. A brief description of what is understood by the term sound color, and various ways of achieving specific coloristic effects, are presented in the Introduction. An examination of Kurtag's approaches to the domain of sound color occupies the chapters that follow. The musical examples that are analyzed are selected from Kurtag's different compositional periods, showing a certain consistency in sound color techniques, the most important of which are already present in the String Quartet, Op. 1. The compositions selected for analysis are written for different ensembles, but regardless of the instrumentation, certain principles of the formation and organization of sound color remain the same. Rather than relying on extended instrumental techniques, Kurtag creates a large variety of sound colors using traditional means such as pitch material, register, density, rhythm, timbral combinations, dynamics, texture, spatial displacement of the instruments, and the overall musical context. Each sound color unit in Kurtag's music is a separate entity, conceived as a complete microcosm. Sound color units can either be juxtaposed as contrasting elements, forming sound color variations, or superimposed, often resulting in a Klangfarbenmelodie effect. Some of the same gestural figures (objets trouves) appear in different compositions, but with significant coloristic modifications. Thus, the principle of sound color variations is not only a strong organizational tool, but also a characteristic stylistic feature of the music of Gyorgy Kurtag. Part II, Leopard's Path (2010), for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, cimbalom, and piano, is an original composition inspired by the painting of Jesse Allen, a San Francisco based artist. The composition is conceived as a cycle of thirteen short movements. Ten of these movements are

  8. A combined GIS and stereo vision approach to identify building pixels in images and determine appropriate color terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip James Bartie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Color information is a useful attribute to include in a building's description to assist the listener in identifying the intended target. Often this information is only available as image data, and not readily accessible for use in constructing referring expressions for verbal communication. The method presented uses a GIS building polygon layer in conjunction with street-level captured imagery to provide a method to automatically filter foreground objects and select pixels which correspond to building facades. These selected pixels are then used to define the most appropriate color term for the building, and corresponding fuzzy color term histogram. The technique uses a single camera capturing images at a high frame rate, with the baseline distance between frames calculated from a GPS speed log. The expected distance from the camera to the building is measured from the polygon layer and refined from the calculated depth map, after which building pixels are selected. In addition significant foreground planar surfaces between the known road edge and building facade are identified as possible boundary walls and hedges. The output is a dataset of the most appropriate color terms for both the building and boundary walls. Initial trials demonstrate the usefulness of the technique in automatically capturing color terms for buildings in urban regions.

  9. A combined GIS and stereo vision approach to identify building pixels in images and determine appropriate color terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip James Bartie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Color information is a useful attribute to include in a building's description to assist the listener in identifying the intended target. Often this information is only available as image data, and not readily accessible for use in constructing referring expressions for verbal communication. The method presented uses a GIS building polygon layer in conjunction with street-level captured imagery to provide a method to automatically filter foreground objects and select pixels which correspond to building facades. These selected pixels are then used to define the most appropriate color term for the building, and corresponding fuzzy color term histogram. The technique uses a single camera capturing images at a high frame rate, with the baseline distance between frames calculated from a GPS speed log. The expected distance from the camera to the building is measured from the polygon layer and refined from the calculated depth map, after which building pixels are selected. In addition significant foreground planar surfaces between the known road edge and building facade are identified as possible boundary walls and hedges. The output is a dataset of the most appropriate color terms for both the building and boundary walls. Initial trials demonstrate the usefulness of the technique in automatically capturing color terms for buildings in urban regions.

  10. Response saturation of monochromatic increments on intense achromatic backgrounds: implications for color-opponent organization in human vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Bruce; Sternheim, Charles E.

    2005-10-01

    We present evidence that steady achromatic adapting fields can produce response saturation in color-opponent pathways. We measured tvi (log increment threshold illuminance versus log background illuminance) functions at four test wavelengths (430, 490, 575, and 660 nm) and nine background illuminances from 4.0 to 5.6 log Td. Foveal, 2° diameter, 1 s duration test stimuli were presented on a concentric, perceptually white (5128°K color temperature), 7° diameter, steady background. Thresholds were obtained by the method of adjustment, after which the test stimulus illuminances were increased 0.6 log unit and the subject estimated percentages of red, yellow, green, blue, and white. Average tvi slopes for two subjects were 2.06 for 430 nm, 1.6 for 490 nm, 1.11 for 575 nm and 1.34 for 660 nm, consistent with the estimated ratios of chromatic to achromatic sensitivity at the same wavelengths. Also, the percentage of white seen in the suprathreshold increments increased with increasing background illuminance despite increases in excitation purity. These findings imply that steady, intense, achromatic backgrounds can produce response saturation in color-opponent mechanisms at wavelengths across the visible spectrum. The saturation was more extreme at short wavelengths than at middle or long wavelengths, producing a tritanopic condition at the highest background illuminances. The tritanopia reduced color space to a predominately red-blue dichromacy, in agreement with previous findings. The results support a multistage opponent-color model in which precortical koniocellular and parvocellular opponent pathways interact to produce the observed red-green and yellow-blue color-opponent channels at a cortical level.

  11. Realtime Color Stereovision Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Formwalt, Bryon

    2000-01-01

    .... This research takes a step forward in real time machine vision processing. It investigates techniques for implementing a real time stereovision processing system using two miniature color cameras...

  12. Encyclopedia of color science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Color Science and Technology provides an authoritative single source for understanding and applying the concepts of color to all fields of science and technology, including artistic and historical aspects of color. Many topics are discussed in this timely reference, including an introduction to the science of color, and entries on the physics, chemistry and perception of color. Color is described as it relates to optical phenomena of color and continues on through colorants and materials used to modulate color and also to human vision of color. The measurement of color is provided as is colorimetry, color spaces, color difference metrics, color appearance models, color order systems and cognitive color. Other topics discussed include industrial color, color imaging, capturing color, displaying color and printing color. Descriptions of color encodings, color management, processing color and applications relating to color synthesis for computer graphics are included in this work. The Encyclo...

  13. Visão das cores em escolares: avaliação de um novo teste Color vision in school-age children: evalution a new test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme M. Martins

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar os resultados de um teste de visão de cores padrão (teste de Ishihara com um teste criado pelos autores (teste do giz de cera na detecção da discromatopsia congênita. MÉTODOS: foi realizado um estudo transversal com 712 crianças da rede escolar pública (3 escolas e privada (1 escola de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. Desta amostra aleatória, haviam sido excluídas crianças com dificuldades na alfabetização e doenças sistêmicas e oculares reconhecidas. Foram aplicados seqüencialmente os testes de Ishihara (versão resumida de 14 pranchas e o teste do giz de cera (desenvolvido pelos autores. Cada teste foi aplicado por examinadores diferentes e avaliados por um terceiro examinador. RESULTADOS: o teste do giz de cera apresentou especificidade de 100% (99,3-100% e sensibilidade de 38,5% (15,1-67,7%, quando comparado ao teste de Ishihara. A prevalência da discromatopsia congênita nesta amostra populacional foi de 2,6% nos meninos e 0,9% nas meninas. CONCLUSÕES: o teste do giz de cera apresentou especificidade superior ao teste de Ishihara no grupo estudado, mas sua sensibilidade não se mostrou adequada para um teste de rastreamento. Há necessidade de aperfeiçoá-lo para aumentar sua sensibilidade, isto é, sua capacidade de detectar a discromatopsia congênita.OBJECTIVE: To compare standard color vision test results (Ishihara test with a new test developed by the authors ("crayon" test for the detection of congenital dyschromatopsia. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 712 children from three public schools and one private school in the city of Porto Alegre, state of Rio Grande do Sul. Children with learning disabilities, or systemic and ocular diseases were excluded from this random sample. Two color vision tests, Ishihara test (short version with 14 plates and crayon test (developed by the authors were sequentially applied. Each test was applied by different evaluators and analyzed by a third evaluator

  14. Basic design principles of colorimetric vision systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumzhiu, Alex M.

    1998-10-01

    Color measurement is an important part of overall production quality control in textile, coating, plastics, food, paper and other industries. The color measurement instruments such as colorimeters and spectrophotometers, used for production quality control have many limitations. In many applications they cannot be used for a variety of reasons and have to be replaced with human operators. Machine vision has great potential for color measurement. The components for color machine vision systems, such as broadcast quality 3-CCD cameras, fast and inexpensive PCI frame grabbers, and sophisticated image processing software packages are available. However the machine vision industry has only started to approach the color domain. The few color machine vision systems on the market, produced by the largest machine vision manufacturers have very limited capabilities. A lack of understanding that a vision based color measurement system could fail if it ignores the basic principles of colorimetry is the main reason for the slow progress of color vision systems. the purpose of this paper is to clarify how color measurement principles have to be applied to vision systems and how the electro-optical design features of colorimeters have to be modified in order to implement them for vision systems. The subject of this presentation far exceeds the limitations of a journal paper so only the most important aspects will be discussed. An overview of the major areas of applications for colorimetric vision system will be discussed. Finally, the reasons why some customers are happy with their vision systems and some are not will be analyzed.

  15. Expanding Dimensionality in Cinema Color: Impacting Observer Metamerism through Multiprimary Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David L.

    Television and cinema display are both trending towards greater ranges and saturation of reproduced colors made possible by near-monochromatic RGB illumination technologies. Through current broadcast and digital cinema standards work, system designs employing laser light sources, narrow-band LED, quantum dots and others are being actively endorsed in promotion of Wide Color Gamut (WCG). Despite artistic benefits brought to creative content producers, spectrally selective excitations of naturally different human color response functions exacerbate variability of observer experience. An exaggerated variation in color-sensing is explicitly counter to the exhaustive controls and calibrations employed in modern motion picture pipelines. Further, singular standard observer summaries of human color vision such as found in the CIE's 1931 and 1964 color matching functions and used extensively in motion picture color management are deficient in recognizing expected human vision variability. Many researchers have confirmed the magnitude of observer metamerism in color matching in both uniform colors and imagery but few have shown explicit color management with an aim of minimized difference in observer perception variability. This research shows that not only can observer metamerism influences be quantitatively predicted and confirmed psychophysically but that intentionally engineered multiprimary displays employing more than three primaries can offer increased color gamut with drastically improved consistency of experience. To this end, a seven-channel prototype display has been constructed based on observer metamerism models and color difference indices derived from the latest color vision demographic research. This display has been further proven in forced-choice paired comparison tests to deliver superior color matching to reference stimuli versus both contemporary standard RGB cinema projection and recently ratified standard laser projection across a large population of

  16. Colorful Collage: Visions of Flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The technique of what people today call "collage" is not new. In Victorian times, elaborate art was created from bristly horsehair as a type of collage. The modern collage dates to the early 1900s when Picasso pasted newspaper on a drawing. In 1919 Karl Schwitters, a German artist, developed collage into an art form that was as important as…

  17. Facts About Color Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer ... a green chalkboard when yellow chalk is used. Art classes, which require selecting appropriate colors of paint ...

  18. Industrial Color Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Georg A

    2010-01-01

    This unique book starts with a short historical overview of the development of the theories of color vision and applications of industrial color physics. The three dominant factors producing color - light source, color sample, and observer - are described in detail. The standardized color spaces are shown and related color values are applied to characteristic color qualities of absorption as well as of effect colorants. The fundamentals of spectrometric and colorimetric measuring techniques together with specific applications are described. Theoretical models for radiative transfer in transparent, translucent, and opaque layers are detailed; the two, three, and multi-flux approximations are presented for the first time in a coherent formalism. These methods constitute the fundamentals not only for the important classical methods, but also modern methods of recipe prediction applicable to all known colorants. The text is supplied with 52 tables, more than 200 partially colored illustrations, an appendix, and a...

  19. Development, Validation, and Deployment of a Revised Air Traffic Control Color Vision Test: Incorporating Advanced Technologies and Oceanic Procedures and En Route Automation Modernization Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    through direct sampling of form and content of critical display data. Evidence of construct validity is provided by correlation with the Colour ...measured by the Colour Assessment and Diagnosis (CAD; ARTS Background Colors STARS Background Colors ERAM Background Colors Figure 3...Gelade, G. (1980). A feature-integration theory of attention. Cognitive Psychology , 12, 97–136. Xing, J. & Schroeder, D.J. (2006). Reexamination of

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  1. Do type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy or subjects with impaired fasting glucose have impaired colour vision? The Okubo Color Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, T; Sakurai, Y; Sato, H; Chihara, E; Takeuchi, M

    2011-07-01

    To investigate associations between fasting plasma glucose level and the prevalence of acquired colour vision impairment in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy. Participants in this cross-sectional study of male officials aged 20-60 yr in the Japanese Self Defence Force, underwent colour vision testing, ophthalmic examination, a standardized interview and examination of venous blood samples. Ishihara plates, a Lanthony 15-hue desaturated panel and Standard Pseudoisochromatic Plates Part 2 were used to examine colour vision. The Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test was performed to define acquired colour vision impairment. Cardiovascular disease risk factors were determined from serum blood samples, physical records and an interview. We performed logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, diagnosed hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cataract, glaucoma, being overweight, smoking status and alcohol intake. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for three glucose levels, which included normal fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. Out of a total of 1042 men enrolled, 872 were eligible for the study, and 31 were diagnosed with acquired colour vision impairment. As compared with the subjects with normal fasting glucose (colour vision impairment was 0.93 (95% CI 0.32-2.74) for the subjects with impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol/l) and 8.07 (95% CI 2.48-26.22) for the patients with type 2 diabetes. The multiple-adjusted odds ratios were 0.77 (95% CI 0.25-2.34) for the subjects with impaired fasting glucose and 5.89 (95% CI 1.55-22.40) for the patients with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that there is a dramatically increased prevalence of acquired colour vision impairment in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy which might be attributable to another pathogenesis associated with diabetic retinopathy. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  2. Measurement of Color Texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, M.A.; Geusebroek, J.M.; Deprettere, E.F.; Belloum, A.; Heijnsdijk, J.W.J.; van der Stappen, F.

    2002-01-01

    In computer vision, measurement of image properties such as color or texture is essential. However, existing methods for measuring color and texture in combination are not well-defined neither from a measurement theoretical basis nor from a physical point of view. We propose a solid framework for

  3. Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevalence Rates for Low Vision by Age, and Race/Ethnicity Table for 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence ... Ethnicity 2010 Prevalence Rates of Low Vision by Race Table for 2010 Prevalence Rates of Low Vision ...

  4. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  5. Color naming deficits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A retinal dopaminergic hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannock Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD have unexplained difficulties on tasks requiring speeded processing of colored stimuli. Color vision mechanisms, particularly short-wavelength (blue-yellow pathways, are highly sensitive to various diseases, toxins and drugs that alter dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, slow color processing might reflect subtle impairments in the perceptual encoding stage of stimulus color, which arise from hypodopaminergic functioning. Presentation of hypotheses 1 Color perception of blue-yellow (but not red-green stimuli is impaired in ADHD as a result of deficient retinal dopamine; 2 Impairments in the blue-yellow color mechanism in ADHD contribute to poor performance on speeded color naming tasks that include a substantial proportion of blue-yellow stimuli; and 3 Methylphenidate increases central dopamine and is also believed to increase retinal dopamine, thereby normalizing blue-yellow color perception, which in turn improves performance on the speeded color naming tasks. Testing the hypothesis Requires three approaches, including:1 direct assessment of color perception in individuals with ADHD to determine whether blue-yellow color perception is selectively impaired; 2 determination of relationship between performance on neuropsychological tasks requiring speeded color processing and color perception; and 3 randomized, controlled pharmacological intervention with stimulant medication to examine the effects of enhancing central dopamine on color perception and task performance Implications of hypothesis If substantiated, the findings of color perception problems would necessitate a re-consideration of current neuropsychological models of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, guide psycho-education, academic instruction, and require consideration of stimulus color in many of the widely used neuropsychological tests.

  6. Feedback from horizontal cells to cones mediates color induction and may facilitate color constancy in rainbow trout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbah, Shai; Zhu, Changhai; Hornsby, Mark A. W.; Kamermans, Maarten; Hawryshyn, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    Color vision is most beneficial when the visual system is color constant and can correct the excitations of photoreceptors for differences in environmental irradiance. A phenomenon related to color constancy is color induction, where the color of an object shifts away from the color of its

  7. The molecular basis of color vision in colorful fish: Four Long Wave-Sensitive (LWS opsins in guppies (Poecilia reticulata are defined by amino acid substitutions at key functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Pam R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparisons of functionally important changes at the molecular level in model systems have identified key adaptations driving isolation and speciation. In cichlids, for example, long wavelength-sensitive (LWS opsins appear to play a role in mate choice and male color variation within and among species. To test the hypothesis that the evolution of elaborate coloration in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata is also associated with opsin gene diversity, we sequenced long wavelength-sensitive (LWS opsin genes in six species of the family Poeciliidae. Results Sequences of four LWS opsin genes were amplified from the guppy genome and from mRNA isolated from adult guppy eyes. Variation in expression was quantified using qPCR. Three of the four genes encode opsins predicted to be most sensitive to different wavelengths of light because they vary at key amino acid positions. This family of LWS opsin genes was produced by a diversity of duplication events. One, an intronless gene, was produced prior to the divergence of families Fundulidae and Poeciliidae. Between-gene PCR and DNA sequencing show that two of the guppy LWS opsins are linked in an inverted orientation. This inverted tandem duplication event occurred near the base of the poeciliid tree in the common ancestor of Poecilia and Xiphophorus. The fourth sequence has been uncovered only in the genus Poecilia. In the guppies surveyed here, this sequence is a hybrid, with the 5' end most similar to one of the tandem duplicates and the 3' end identical to the other. Conclusion Enhanced wavelength discrimination, a possible consequence of opsin gene duplication and divergence, might have been an evolutionary prerequisite for color-based sexual selection and have led to the extraordinary coloration now observed in male guppies and in many other poeciliids.

  8. The molecular basis of color vision in colorful fish: four long wave-sensitive (LWS) opsins in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) are defined by amino acid substitutions at key functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew N; Churcher, Allison M; Dick, Kevin J; Laver, Chris R J; Owens, Greg L; Polack, Megan D; Ward, Pam R; Breden, Felix; Taylor, John S

    2008-07-18

    Comparisons of functionally important changes at the molecular level in model systems have identified key adaptations driving isolation and speciation. In cichlids, for example, long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsins appear to play a role in mate choice and male color variation within and among species. To test the hypothesis that the evolution of elaborate coloration in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is also associated with opsin gene diversity, we sequenced long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsin genes in six species of the family Poeciliidae. Sequences of four LWS opsin genes were amplified from the guppy genome and from mRNA isolated from adult guppy eyes. Variation in expression was quantified using qPCR. Three of the four genes encode opsins predicted to be most sensitive to different wavelengths of light because they vary at key amino acid positions. This family of LWS opsin genes was produced by a diversity of duplication events. One, an intronless gene, was produced prior to the divergence of families Fundulidae and Poeciliidae. Between-gene PCR and DNA sequencing show that two of the guppy LWS opsins are linked in an inverted orientation. This inverted tandem duplication event occurred near the base of the poeciliid tree in the common ancestor of Poecilia and Xiphophorus. The fourth sequence has been uncovered only in the genus Poecilia. In the guppies surveyed here, this sequence is a hybrid, with the 5' end most similar to one of the tandem duplicates and the 3' end identical to the other. Enhanced wavelength discrimination, a possible consequence of opsin gene duplication and divergence, might have been an evolutionary prerequisite for color-based sexual selection and have led to the extraordinary coloration now observed in male guppies and in many other poeciliids.

  9. 77 FR 75494 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... least 70[deg] in the horizontal meridian in each eye, and the ability to recognize the colors of traffic... vision, iris damage, and complete loss of vision. In most cases, their eye conditions were not recently...

  10. VISION development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.; Whitman, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    VISION is a flexible and extensible object-oriented programming environment for prototyping computer-vision and pattern-recognition algorithms. This year's effort focused on three major areas: documentation, graphics, and support for new applications

  11. Computational vision

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Harry

    1990-01-01

    The book is suitable for advanced courses in computer vision and image processing. In addition to providing an overall view of computational vision, it contains extensive material on topics that are not usually covered in computer vision texts (including parallel distributed processing and neural networks) and considers many real applications.

  12. The color lexicon of the Somali language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela M; Isse, Abdirizak; Lindsey, Delwin T

    2016-01-01

    This empirical study had three goals: (a) to describe Somali color naming and its motifs, (b) to relate color naming by Somali informants to their color vision, and (c) to search for historical and demographic clues about the diversity of Somali color naming. Somali-speaking informants from Columbus, Ohio provided monolexemic color terms for 83 or 145 World Color Survey (WCS) color samples. Proximity analysis reduced the 103 color terms to the eight chromatic color meanings from the WCS plus black, white, and gray. Informants' data sets were grouped by spectral clustering analysis into four WCS color naming motifs named after the terms for the cool colors: (a) Green-Blue, (b) Grue (a single term meaning "green or blue"), (c) Gray, and (d) Dark. The results show that, first, the Somali language has about four motifs among its speakers. Second, individuals' color vision test results and their motifs were not correlated, suggesting that multiple motifs do not arise from individual variation in color vision. Last, the Somali color lexicon has changed over the past century. New color terms often came from the names of familiar colored objects, and informants' motifs were closely related to their ages and genders, suggesting that the diversity of color naming across speakers of Somali probably results from ongoing language change.

  13. Computer vision based room interior design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nasir; Hussain, Saddam; Ahmad, Kashif; Conci, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a new application of computer vision. To the best of the author's knowledge, it is the first attempt to incorporate computer vision techniques into room interior designing. The computer vision based interior designing is achieved in two steps: object identification and color assignment. The image segmentation approach is used for the identification of the objects in the room and different color schemes are used for color assignment to these objects. The proposed approach is applied to simple as well as complex images from online sources. The proposed approach not only accelerated the process of interior designing but also made it very efficient by giving multiple alternatives.

  14. Color-induced graph colorings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of color-induced graph colorings is presented in this book, emphasizing vertex colorings induced by edge colorings. The coloring concepts described in this book depend not only on the property required of the initial edge coloring and the kind of objects serving as colors, but also on the property demanded of the vertex coloring produced. For each edge coloring introduced, background for the concept is provided, followed by a presentation of results and open questions dealing with this topic. While the edge colorings discussed can be either proper or unrestricted, the resulting vertex colorings are either proper colorings or rainbow colorings. This gives rise to a discussion of irregular colorings, strong colorings, modular colorings, edge-graceful colorings, twin edge colorings and binomial colorings. Since many of the concepts described in this book are relatively recent, the audience for this book is primarily mathematicians interested in learning some new areas of graph colorings...

  15. Object recognition algorithm based on inexact graph matching and its application in a color vision system for recognition of electronic components on PCBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupnova, Natalia H.; Korsten, Maarten J.

    1997-04-01

    The paper describes a framework for fast objects recognition and its application in a system for recognition of certain electronic components on printed circuit boards (PCB) for recycling purposes. Objects in the DB and in the image are represented as attributed graph, where vertices are regions with attributes (color, shape) and edges are spatial relations between the regions (adjacent, surrounds). The task of finding model objects in the input data thus becomes a problem of inexact subgraph isomorphism finding. The suggested algorithm finds all the occurrences of all model graphs in the input graph in the presence of the low-level processing errors and model uncertainty. Using the ideas of inexact network algorithm (INA) we build a network from the model graphs, so that in cases when the models share identical substructures these substructures have to be matched only once. Because different models share the same substructures mostly in case when they belong to the same more general class, we incorporate the possibility of attribute refining in our model network. To further speed up the matching, we introduce the notion of a `key' vertex, so that recognition goes from easily recognizable substructures to more ambiguous ones. The algorithm was applied to real images of PCB's. The results show the effectiveness of INA and suggested modifications in this application.

  16. Validação clínica de teste psicofísico computadorizado para avaliação de visão de cores e sensibilidade ao contraste Clinical validation of a computerized psychophysical test for color vision and contrast sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia K. Kjaer

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a confiabilidade do teste computadorizado Two Docs para a determinação da visão de cores e sensibilidade ao contraste em indivíduos adultos normais. Métodos: Trinta voluntários normais, com idades variando de 20 a 30 anos (média de 23,3 anos foram submetidos ao TwoDocs Test para determinação de sua sensibilidade ao contraste e classificação de sua visão de cores. Seus resultados foram comparados com os dados obtidos pelas tabelas de Pelli-Robson e Farnsworth-Munsell 100 cores. Resultados: O teste TwoDocs mostrou total concordância com os resultados da sensibilidade ao contraste obtidos com a tabela de Pelli-Robson. Os testes para determinação da visão de cores não concordaram em seus resultados pois a avaliação dessa função visual por meio do teste TwoDocs foi superestimada tendo como base os resultados apresentados pelo teste Farnsworth-Munsell. Conclusão: Concluiu-se que o TwoDocs é um método confiável para a determinação da sensibilidade ao contraste em pacientes normais entre 20 e 30 anos de idade. Na avaliação clínica da visão de cores, os resultados obtidos com o teste computadorizado TwoDocs devem ser criteriosamente analisados, tendo em vista a superestimação da classificação da visão de cores. Estudos adicionais em pacientes com defeitos na visão de cores são importantes para melhor compreensão da utilidade clínica do método.Purpose: To determine the reliability of TwoDocs compu-terized test for the evaluation of color vision and contrast sensitivity in normal adults. Methods: Thirty normal volunteers aged from 20 to 30 years (mean 23.3 years had their color vision and contrast sensitivity tested by a new computerized test (TwoDocs test. Informed consent was obtained from all participants before testing. Inclusion criteria were: absence of visual com-plaints, absence of previous ophthalmic surgery, absence of family history of ophthalmologic diseases, best corrected visual

  17. Living with vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - vision loss; Retinopathy - vision loss; Low vision; Blindness - vision loss ... Low vision is a visual disability. Wearing regular glasses or contacts does not help. People with low vision have ...

  18. Discriminação de cores em profissionais da área técnica de empresa de material fotográfico Color vision discrimination in employees of a photographic laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Berezovsky

    2007-12-01

    group. Color discrimination was evaluated by the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test. The inclusion criteria were visual acuity > 0.1 logMAR, normal fundus, absence of hereditary eye disease, absence of visual symptoms or ocular surgery. RESULTS: Twenty-four people (51% of the professional group presented superior color discrimination when compared to 18% of the control group. Twenty people (42% presented average discrimination and 3 (7% presented inferior discrimination. Color vision discrimination was statistically better in professionals when compared to controls (T=968.000, P=0.011. There was no correlation between the period working in the function and color discrimination. CONCLUSIONS: Technical professionals working in a photographic laboratory showed better color discrimination than controls.

  19. Colorism/Neo-Colorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel

    2017-01-01

    There are numerous aspects to being non-Caucasian that may not be known by Whites. Persons of color suggest folks who are African, South Americans, Native Americans, Biracial, Asians and others. The question is what do these individuals feel relative to their color and facial characteristics. Eugene Robinson suggest that the future favorable color…

  20. Effect of absence of vision on posture

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Abdullah Z.; Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen A.; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The visual system is one of the sensory systems that enables the body to assess and process information about the external environment. In the absence of vision, a blind person loses contact with the outside world and develops faulty motor patterns, which results in postural deficiencies. However, literature regarding the development of such deficiencies is limited. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of absence of vision on posture, the possible biomechanics behind the ...

  1. An Investigation of the Effects of Practice on Color Memory as a Function of Condition, Dimension and Color

    OpenAIRE

    Remus, Britten Grace

    2001-01-01

    Forty-two college aged participants took part in a mixed repeated measures factorial design experiment that assessed color memory as a function of condition (practice with feedback, practice without feedback and no practice), dimension (hue, saturation and lightness) and color (red, yellow, green and blue). Attention was focused on the distinction between memory color and color memory, color experience and preference, mechanisms of color perception and theories of color vision (see below). ...

  2. Micro Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Kohtaro; Ohara, Kenichi

    2007-01-01

    In the field of the micro vision, there are few researches compared with macro environment. However, applying to the study result for macro computer vision technique, you can measure and observe the micro environment. Moreover, based on the effects of micro environment, it is possible to discovery the new theories and new techniques.

  3. Vision defects in albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Carpinell, J; Capilla, P; Illueca, C; Morales, J

    1992-08-01

    We have examined the possible presence of color vision anomalies in 9 individuals (17 eyes, 1 blind) with fundus findings suggesting ocular albinism using the Ishihara plates, the 28-hue Roth test, and the Davico anomaloscope. Results indicate that four of these individuals show no sign of the anomalies expected in an albino in either of the two eyes. Of the remaining cases, two are simple deuteranomals in both eyes, according to Pickford's classification criteria. The rest have protanomaly; however, in these the deviation toward red appears in both eyes in only one subject, whereas in the other two subjects it appears in only one eye, their binocular color vision being basically normal. Our study shows that a large proportion of these albinos have photophobia, pendular nystagmus, strabismus, noticeable refractive errors (astigmatism and high myopia), and poor visual acuity [usually less than 6/30 (20/100) with correction]. The measurement of contrast sensitivity function (CSF) indicates that the frequency of 12 cpd cannot be perceived, even in binocular vision.

  4. Color constancy in Japanese animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Yasuyo G.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we measure the colors used in a Japanese Animations. The result can be seen on CIE-xy color spaces. It clearly shows that the color system is not a natural appearance system but an imagined and artistic appearance system. Color constancy of human vision can tell the difference in skin and hair colors between under moonlight and day light. Human brain generates a match to the memorized color of an object from daylight viewing conditions to the color of the object in different viewing conditions. For example, Japanese people always perceive the color of the Rising Sun in the Japanese flag as red even in a different viewing condition such as under moonlight. Color images captured by a camera cannot present those human perceptions. However, Japanese colorists in Animation succeeded in painting the effects of color constancy not only under moonlight but also added the memory matching colors. They aim to create a greater impact on viewer's perceptions by using the effect of the memory matching colors. In this paper, we propose the Imagined Japanese Animation Color System. This system in art is currently a subject of research in Japan. Its importance is that it could also provide an explanation on how human brain perceives the same color under different viewing conditions.

  5. Representing vision and blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Patrick L; Cox, Alexander P; Jensen, Mark; Allen, Travis; Duncan, William; Diehl, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    There have been relatively few attempts to represent vision or blindness ontologically. This is unsurprising as the related phenomena of sight and blindness are difficult to represent ontologically for a variety of reasons. Blindness has escaped ontological capture at least in part because: blindness or the employment of the term 'blindness' seems to vary from context to context, blindness can present in a myriad of types and degrees, and there is no precedent for representing complex phenomena such as blindness. We explore current attempts to represent vision or blindness, and show how these attempts fail at representing subtypes of blindness (viz., color blindness, flash blindness, and inattentional blindness). We examine the results found through a review of current attempts and identify where they have failed. By analyzing our test cases of different types of blindness along with the strengths and weaknesses of previous attempts, we have identified the general features of blindness and vision. We propose an ontological solution to represent vision and blindness, which capitalizes on resources afforded to one who utilizes the Basic Formal Ontology as an upper-level ontology. The solution we propose here involves specifying the trigger conditions of a disposition as well as the processes that realize that disposition. Once these are specified we can characterize vision as a function that is realized by certain (in this case) biological processes under a range of triggering conditions. When the range of conditions under which the processes can be realized are reduced beyond a certain threshold, we are able to say that blindness is present. We characterize vision as a function that is realized as a seeing process and blindness as a reduction in the conditions under which the sight function is realized. This solution is desirable because it leverages current features of a major upper-level ontology, accurately captures the phenomenon of blindness, and can be

  6. Computational vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The range of fundamental computational principles underlying human vision that equally apply to artificial and natural systems is surveyed. There emerges from research a view of the structuring of vision systems as a sequence of levels of representation, with the initial levels being primarily iconic (edges, regions, gradients) and the highest symbolic (surfaces, objects, scenes). Intermediate levels are constrained by information made available by preceding levels and information required by subsequent levels. In particular, it appears that physical and three-dimensional surface characteristics provide a critical transition from iconic to symbolic representations. A plausible vision system design incorporating these principles is outlined, and its key computational processes are elaborated.

  7. Computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennery, D.; Cunningham, R.; Saund, E.; High, J.; Ruoff, C.

    1981-01-01

    The field of computer vision is surveyed and assessed, key research issues are identified, and possibilities for a future vision system are discussed. The problems of descriptions of two and three dimensional worlds are discussed. The representation of such features as texture, edges, curves, and corners are detailed. Recognition methods are described in which cross correlation coefficients are maximized or numerical values for a set of features are measured. Object tracking is discussed in terms of the robust matching algorithms that must be devised. Stereo vision, camera control and calibration, and the hardware and systems architecture are discussed.

  8. Determination of Colour Vision Using Ishihara and Dvorine Plates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colour vision is important in everyday life and colour vision deficiency generally lowers the quality of life. The objective of the study was to perform tests and measurements to investigate the prevalence of colour vision abnormalities within a normal sample population of the University of Jos. Methodology: ...

  9. Color image and video enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Lecca, Michela; Smolka, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    This text covers state-of-the-art color image and video enhancement techniques. The book examines the multivariate nature of color image/video data as it pertains to contrast enhancement, color correction (equalization, harmonization, normalization, balancing, constancy, etc.), noise removal and smoothing. This book also discusses color and contrast enhancement in vision sensors and applications of image and video enhancement.   ·         Focuses on enhancement of color images/video ·         Addresses algorithms for enhancing color images and video ·         Presents coverage on super resolution, restoration, in painting, and colorization.

  10. Personalized 2D color maps

    KAUST Repository

    Waldin, Nicholas

    2016-06-24

    2D color maps are often used to visually encode complex data characteristics such as heat or height. The comprehension of color maps in visualization is affected by the display (e.g., a monitor) and the perceptual abilities of the viewer. In this paper we present a novel method to measure a user\\'s ability to distinguish colors of a two-dimensional color map on a given monitor. We show how to adapt the color map to the user and display to optimally compensate for the measured deficiencies. Furthermore, we improve user acceptance of the calibration procedure by transforming the calibration into a game. The user has to sort colors along a line in a 3D color space in a competitive fashion. The errors the user makes in sorting these lines are used to adapt the color map to his perceptual capabilities.

  11. "APOPTOSIS COLOR." SCREENING STRATEGY FOR DIAGNOSIS EARLY STAGES OF PRIMARY OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kovalevskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a screening strategy for the early diagnosis of primary open-angle glaucoma.Patients and Methods: 1 group — 250 patients with suspected glaucoma (42–75 years, 2 — 250 with the 1st stage primary open-angle glaucoma (42–61, 3 — 3,000 healthy persons (35 to 50. Surveys: visometry, tonometry iCare, biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, pachymeria, ophthalmoscopy with a high dioptric lens of 60 D, standard automated perimetry of the SITA-Standard and SITA-SWAP program, assessing the color sensitivity according to the Famsworth-Munsell 100 HueTes method.Results: 1 group — SITA-SWAP: MD -2,55±0,7 dB, PSD 2,46±1,15 dB. Mansell test: TES = 58.6±18.7 (p<0.05, average level of color recognition; mild deficiency of color vision — 41–100 TES; by the RGB system: colors of the first order; tone in RGB (0–239: blue — 160; HCV: blue — 240; range of wavelengths: blue — 440–485 nm; frequency: blue — 620–680 THz. 2 group — on SITA-SWAP: MD — 5,13±1,3 dB, PSD 2,58±0,9 dB. Mansell test: TES = 86,9±21,8; average level of color recognition; mild deficiency of color vision; single deviations in the system of blue (azure, blue, blue; color I order (blue, III order (blue, azure; tone in RGB — (0–239: blue (azure, blue — 140, blue — 160; HCV — blue (azure, blue — 210, blue — 240; range of wavelengths: 450–500 nm (blue — 485–500, blue — 440–485; frequencies: 600–680 THz (blue — 600–620, blue — 620–680. Control group — SITA-SWAP within the norm, Mansell test: TES = 40,1±17,3 (p<0.05, medium level of color recognition, lack of color vision absent / mild, single deviations.Conclusion: in patients with glaucoma suspicion, the score of errors was higher than in the control group with Munsell test. In patients with glaucoma, the number of errors is greater than in patients with suspected glaucoma, and 2.2 times higher than in the control group.

  12. An innovative color LCD using three color bank scrolling backlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Chang; Lin, Jui-Lung

    2009-02-01

    In order to improve the approach of the conventional LCD colored image display that has been using color filter, this research is to lead a unique innovative design by using three colors bank scrolling backlight. The backlight scrolling uses Light-Emitting-Diodes (LEDs) to replace the conventional cold cathode fluorescent lamp for fleetly light alternating between Red, Green, and Blue. Images with bank segments can be displayed in terms of RGB colors in time series. According to the human persistence of vision effect, a colorful image can be demonstrated. The advantages of this three color bank scrolling can provide a cost saving because there is no color-filter of the display, resolution tripling with RGB on the same pixel, and abundant in color saturation for the selection of dedicating wavelength LEDs color mixture. Practically, this research contents the experiments of three color bank scrolling, a building up of the prototype for backlight system, optics adjustment for a proper color mixture. The results of this research show the system not only could displace the color filter but also triple the resolution. Consequently, the system is practicable and can be proposed as a new innovation to LCD industry.

  13. Evolution of color and vision of butterflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Butterfly eyes consist of three types of ommatidia, which are more or less randomly arranged in a spatially regular lattice. The corneal nipple array and the tapetum, Optical Structures that many but not all butterflies share with moths, Suggest that moths are ancestral to butterflies, in agreement

  14. Biological origins of color categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Alice E; Catchpole, Gemma; Abbott, Joshua T; Bosten, Jenny M; Franklin, Anna

    2017-05-23

    The biological basis of the commonality in color lexicons across languages has been hotly debated for decades. Prior evidence that infants categorize color could provide support for the hypothesis that color categorization systems are not purely constructed by communication and culture. Here, we investigate the relationship between infants' categorization of color and the commonality across color lexicons, and the potential biological origin of infant color categories. We systematically mapped infants' categorical recognition memory for hue onto a stimulus array used previously to document the color lexicons of 110 nonindustrialized languages. Following familiarization to a given hue, infants' response to a novel hue indicated that their recognition memory parses the hue continuum into red, yellow, green, blue, and purple categories. Infants' categorical distinctions aligned with common distinctions in color lexicons and are organized around hues that are commonly central to lexical categories across languages. The boundaries between infants' categorical distinctions also aligned, relative to the adaptation point, with the cardinal axes that describe the early stages of color representation in retinogeniculate pathways, indicating that infant color categorization may be partly organized by biological mechanisms of color vision. The findings suggest that color categorization in language and thought is partially biologically constrained and have implications for broader debate on how biology, culture, and communication interact in human cognition.

  15. Color discrimination with broadband photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaitmann, Christopher; Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2013-12-02

    Color vision is commonly assumed to rely on photoreceptors tuned to narrow spectral ranges. In the ommatidium of Drosophila, the four types of so-called inner photoreceptors express different narrow-band opsins. In contrast, the outer photoreceptors have a broadband spectral sensitivity and were thought to exclusively mediate achromatic vision. Using computational models and behavioral experiments, we demonstrate that the broadband outer photoreceptors contribute to color vision in Drosophila. The model of opponent processing that includes the opsin of the outer photoreceptors scored the best fit to wavelength discrimination data. To experimentally uncover the contribution of individual photoreceptor types, we restored phototransduction of targeted photoreceptor combinations in a blind mutant. Dichromatic flies with only broadband photoreceptors and one additional receptor type can discriminate different colors, indicating the existence of a specific output comparison of the outer and inner photoreceptors. Furthermore, blocking interneurons postsynaptic to the outer photoreceptors specifically impaired color but not intensity discrimination. Our findings show that receptors with a complex and broad spectral sensitivity can contribute to color vision and reveal that chromatic and achromatic circuits in the fly share common photoreceptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Industrial vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ole

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the introduction of vision-based application s in the ship building industry. The industrial research project is divided into a natural seq uence of developments, from basic theoretical projective image generation via CAD and subpixel analysis to a description...... is present ed, and the variability of the parameters is examined and described. The concept of using CAD together with vision information is based on the fact that all items processed at OSS have an associated complete 3D CAD model that is accessible at all production states. This concept gives numerous...... possibilities for using vision in applications which otherwise would be very difficult to automate. The requirement for low tolerances in production is, despite the huge dimensions of the items involved, extreme. This fact makes great demands on the ability to do robust sub pixel estimation. A new method based...

  17. Multispectral Imaging of Meat Quality - Color and Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup

    of meat quality parameters, especially with regards to meat color and texture. Several image modalities have been applied, all considering multi- or hyper spectral imaging. The work demonstrates the use of computer vision systems for meat color measurements. The color is assessed by suitable...... transformations to the CIELAB color space, the common color space within food science. The results show that meat color assessment with a multispectral imaging is a great alternative to the traditional colorimeter, i.e. the vision system meets some of the limitations that the colorimeter possesses. To mention one......, it is possible to assess color of very complicated structures, such as salamis, with a vision system. More importantly though, the vision system embraces the complicated scattering properties of meat. The images can also lead to other analyses, e.g. image texture analysis relating to the structure of the meat...

  18. Effects of Colored Filters on Visual Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    normal vision, yellow filters have been reported to reduce glare and improve overall visual performance.4-9 The claims of improved vision in dyslexia ...AFRL-RH-BR-TR-2008-0051 Effects of Colored Filters on Visual Function Thomas K. Kuyk Paul V. Garcia Northrop Grumman...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F41624-02-D-7003 Effects of Colored Filters on Visual Function 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 63231F 6. AUTHOR

  19. Vision Integrating Strategies in Ophthalmology and Neurochemistry (VISION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Figure 3 in Liu et al IOVS 2014) and functional changes to the retina by electroretinography ( ERG )) (Figures 6-7 in Kim et al. Mol Neurodegen 2013...7), decreased retinal function ( ERG b- waves) (Figure 9), and neuronal loss in the superior colliculus (vision center in the brain innervated by RGC...functionally ( ERG ) (Figure 7) in mice deficient in C1q (C1q+/- and C1q-/- mice) (Silverman et al., Mol Neurodegen 2016). C1q deficiency also suppressed

  20. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an efficient and cost-effective method to identify children with visual impairment or eye conditions that are likely to lead ... main goal of vision screening is to identify children who have or are at ... visual impairment unless treated in early childhood. Other problems that ...

  1. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids >> Healthy Vision Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  2. Robotic vision. [process control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. S.; Wilf, J. M.; Cunningham, R. T.; Eskenazi, R.

    1979-01-01

    Robotic vision, involving the use of a vision system to control a process, is discussed. Design and selection of active sensors employing radiation of radio waves, sound waves, and laser light, respectively, to light up unobservable features in the scene are considered, as are design and selection of passive sensors, which rely on external sources of illumination. The segmentation technique by which an image is separated into different collections of contiguous picture elements having such common characteristics as color, brightness, or texture is examined, with emphasis on the edge detection technique. The IMFEX (image feature extractor) system performing edge detection and thresholding at 30 frames/sec television frame rates is described. The template matching and discrimination approach to recognize objects are noted. Applications of robotic vision in industry for tasks too monotonous or too dangerous for the workers are mentioned.

  3. Lambda Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Michael

    2014-06-01

    There is an explosion in the quantity and quality of IMINT data being captured in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) today. While automated exploitation techniques involving computer vision are arriving, only a few architectures can manage both the storage and bandwidth of large volumes of IMINT data and also present results to analysts quickly. Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been actively researching in the area of applying Big Data cloud computing techniques to computer vision applications. This paper presents the results of this work in adopting a Lambda Architecture to process and disseminate IMINT data using computer vision algorithms. The approach embodies an end-to-end solution by processing IMINT data from sensors to serving information products quickly to analysts, independent of the size of the data. The solution lies in dividing up the architecture into a speed layer for low-latent processing and a batch layer for higher quality answers at the expense of time, but in a robust and fault-tolerant way. This approach was evaluated using a large corpus of IMINT data collected by a C-130 Shadow Harvest sensor over Afghanistan from 2010 through 2012. The evaluation data corpus included full motion video from both narrow and wide area field-of-views. The evaluation was done on a scaled-out cloud infrastructure that is similar in composition to those found in the Intelligence Community. The paper shows experimental results to prove the scalability of the architecture and precision of its results using a computer vision algorithm designed to identify man-made objects in sparse data terrain.

  4. Cartesian visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2008-12-01

    Few original portraits exist of René Descartes, yet his theories of vision were central to Enlightenment thought. French philosophers combined his emphasis on sight with the English approach of insisting that ideas are not innate, but must be built up from experience. In particular, Denis Diderot criticised Descartes's views by describing how Nicholas Saunderson--a blind physics professor at Cambridge--relied on touch. Diderot also made Saunderson the mouthpiece for some heretical arguments against the existence of God.

  5. Artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  6. Color Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    2017-01-01

    A color algebra refers to a system for computing sums and products of colors, analogous to additive and subtractive color mixtures. The difficulty addressed here is the fact that, because of metamerism, we cannot know with certainty the spectrum that produced a particular color solely on the basis of sensory data. Knowledge of the spectrum is not required to compute additive mixture of colors, but is critical for subtractive (multiplicative) mixture. Therefore, we cannot predict with certainty the multiplicative interactions between colors based solely on sensory data. There are two potential applications of a color algebra: first, to aid modeling phenomena of human visual perception, such as color constancy and transparency; and, second, to provide better models of the interactions of lights and surfaces for computer graphics rendering.

  7. Ocean Color

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellite-derived Ocean Color Data sets from historical and currently operational NASA and International Satellite missions including the NASA Coastal Zone Color...

  8. Color naming

    OpenAIRE

    Şahin, Ebru

    1998-01-01

    Ankara : Bilkent University, Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and Institute of Fine Arts, 1998. Thesis (Ph.D) -- Bilkent University, 1998 Includes bibliographical refences. In this study, visual aspects of color and neurophysiological processes involved in the phenomenon, language of color and color models were explained in addition to the discussion of different ideas, orientations and previous works behind the subject of matter. Available color ...

  9. Embodied Visions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    melodramas - from evolutionary and psychological perspectives, the author also reflects on social issues at the intersection of film theory and neuropsychology. These include moral problems in film viewing, ow we experience realism and character identification, and the value of the subjective forms......Embodied Visions presents a groundbreaking analysis of film through the lens of bioculturalism, revealing how human biology as well as human culture determine how films are made and experienced. Throughout the book the author uses the breakthroughs of modern brain science to explain general...

  10. Soft Computing Techniques in Vision Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yeon-Mo

    2012-01-01

    This Special Edited Volume is a unique approach towards Computational solution for the upcoming field of study called Vision Science. From a scientific firmament Optics, Ophthalmology, and Optical Science has surpassed an Odyssey of optimizing configurations of Optical systems, Surveillance Cameras and other Nano optical devices with the metaphor of Nano Science and Technology. Still these systems are falling short of its computational aspect to achieve the pinnacle of human vision system. In this edited volume much attention has been given to address the coupling issues Computational Science and Vision Studies.  It is a comprehensive collection of research works addressing various related areas of Vision Science like Visual Perception and Visual system, Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, Psychophysics and Ophthalmology, linguistic relativity, color vision etc. This issue carries some latest developments in the form of research articles and presentations. The volume is rich of contents with technical tools ...

  11. 76 FR 67246 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ...] in the horizontal meridian in each eye, and the ability to recognize the colors of traffic signals..., including enucleation, prosthesis, complete loss of vision, macular scarring, retinal and iris coloboma...

  12. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  13. Pediatric Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Pediatric Low Vision What is Low Vision? Partial vision loss that cannot be corrected causes ... and play. What are the signs of Low Vision? Some signs of low vision include difficulty recognizing ...

  14. Visions and visioning in foresight activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Grosu, Dan

    2007-01-01

    or not work. The theoretical part of the paper presents an actor-network theory approach to the analyses of visions and visioning processes, where the shaping of the visions and the visioning and what has made them work or not work is analysed. The empirical part is based on analyses of the roles of visions...... important aspect of visioning processes include the types of actors participating in the processes and the types of expertise included in the processes (scientific, lay, business etc.). The empirical part of the paper analyses eight national foresight activities from Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Malta...

  15. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  16. Color Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrolstad, Ronald E.; Smith, Daniel E.

    Color, flavor, and texture are the three principal quality attributes that determine food acceptance, and color has a far greater influence on our judgment than most of us appreciate. We use color to determine if a banana is at our preferred ripeness level, and a discolored meat product can warn us that the product may be spoiled. The marketing departments of our food corporations know that, for their customers, the color must be "right." The University of California Davis scorecard for wine quality designates four points out of 20, or 20% of the total score, for color and appearance (1). Food scientists who establish quality control specifications for their product are very aware of the importance of color and appearance. While subjective visual assessment and use of visual color standards are still used in the food industry, instrumental color measurements are extensively employed. Objective measurement of color is desirable for both research and industrial applications, and the ruggedness, stability, and ease of use of today's color measurement instruments have resulted in their widespread adoption.

  17. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  18. INVIS : Integrated night vision surveillance and observation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Dijk, J.; Son, R. van

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and first field trial results of the all-day all-weather INVIS Integrated Night Vision surveillance and observation System. The INVIS augments a dynamic three-band false-color nightvision image with synthetic 3D imagery in a real-time display. The night vision sensor suite

  19. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  20. Robot vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Almost all industrial robots use internal sensors such as shaft encoders which measure rotary position, or tachometers which measure velocity, to control their motions. Most controllers also provide interface capabilities so that signals from conveyors, machine tools, and the robot itself may be used to accomplish a task. However, advanced external sensors, such as visual sensors, can provide a much greater degree of adaptability for robot control as well as add automatic inspection capabilities to the industrial robot. Visual and other sensors are now being used in fundamental operations such as material processing with immediate inspection, material handling with adaption, arc welding, and complex assembly tasks. A new industry of robot vision has emerged. The application of these systems is an area of great potential

  1. Vision Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  2. Colored operads

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this book is the theory of operads and colored operads, sometimes called symmetric multicategories. A (colored) operad is an abstract object which encodes operations with multiple inputs and one output and relations between such operations. The theory originated in the early 1970s in homotopy theory and quickly became very important in algebraic topology, algebra, algebraic geometry, and even theoretical physics (string theory). Topics covered include basic graph theory, basic category theory, colored operads, and algebras over colored operads. Free colored operads are discussed in complete detail and in full generality. The intended audience of this book includes students and researchers in mathematics and other sciences where operads and colored operads are used. The prerequisite for this book is minimal. Every major concept is thoroughly motivated. There are many graphical illustrations and about 150 exercises. This book can be used in a graduate course and for independent study.

  3. Blindness and vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life. Alternative Names Loss of vision; No light perception (NLP); Low vision; Vision loss and blindness Images ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  4. Impairments to Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  5. All Vision Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevalence Rates for Vision Impairment by Age and Race/Ethnicity Table for 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence ... Ethnicity 2010 Prevalence Rates of Vision Impairment by Race Table for 2010 Prevalence Rates of Vision Impairment ...

  6. Color metallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasson, Raymond.

    1976-06-01

    After a short introduction explaining the reasons why color metallography was adopted, the various operations involved in this technique are described in turn and illustrated by colored photomicrographs. The sample preparation (cutting, covering) and surface preparation (trimming, polishing, finishing) are described briefly. The operations specific to color metallography are then detailed: revelation of the structure of polished surfaces, dye impregnation techniques, optical systems used in macrography, in micrography, different light sources used in microscopy, photographic methods [fr

  7. Vision requirements for driver's license examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris A

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the vision requirements for licensing and registration examiners (LREs) of motor vehicle drivers in the state of California. A comprehensive investigation was conducted that included a literature review, consideration of the Americans with Disabilities Act, analysis of materials with a subject matter expert panel, an overview of visual function tests, a formal job analysis, job audits and site visits to licensing offices, analysis of accidents and critical incidents, performance of simulation studies, and a review and evaluation of all materials collected during the study. Based on this analysis, three visual functions (best-corrected visual acuity, peripheral visual field extent, and color vision) were determined to be important for performing the essential job functions of an LRE. It was recommended that LREs demonstrate a best-corrected visual acuity of at least 20/20 in each eye, a peripheral visual field of at least 100 degrees diameter of horizontal and vertical extent in each eye (with no evidence of scotomas or pathologic areas of nonseeing within the visual field), and color vision capabilities that permit a passing score on the Farnsworth Panel D-15 color vision test. The findings of this investigation provide a strong basis for specifying and justifying vision requirements for performing essential job functions for an LRE in the state of California.

  8. A zone theory of colour vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, P.L.

    1966-01-01

    Arguments are put forward to explain the basic facts about color vision in the frame work of a zone theory, a combination of the Young-Helmholtz and the Hering theory. Data on wavelength discrimination in particular as a function of luminance, necessitate to assume separate mechanisms for red-green

  9. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  10. Effect of absence of vision on posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Abdullah Z; Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen A; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The visual system is one of the sensory systems that enables the body to assess and process information about the external environment. In the absence of vision, a blind person loses contact with the outside world and develops faulty motor patterns, which results in postural deficiencies. However, literature regarding the development of such deficiencies is limited. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of absence of vision on posture, the possible biomechanics behind the resulting postural deficiencies, and strategies to correct and prevent them. [Subjects and Methods] Various electronic databases including PubMed, Medline, and Google scholar were examined using the words "body", "posture", "blind" and "absence of vision". References in the retrieved articles were also examined for cross-references. The search was limited to articles in the English language. [Results] A total of 74 papers were shortlisted for this review, most of which dated back to the 1950s and 60s. [Conclusion] Blind people exhibit consistent musculoskeletal deformities. Absence of vision leads to numerous abnormal sensory and motor interactions that often limit blind people in isolation. Rehabilitation of the blind is a multidisciplinary task. Specialists from different fields need to diagnose and treat the deficiencies of the blind together as a team. Before restoring the normal mechanics of posture and gait, the missing link with the external world should be reestablished.

  11. Real-time vision systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; Hernandez, J.E.; Lu, Shin-yee [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Many industrial and defence applications require an ability to make instantaneous decisions based on sensor input of a time varying process. Such systems are referred to as `real-time systems` because they process and act on data as it occurs in time. When a vision sensor is used in a real-time system, the processing demands can be quite substantial, with typical data rates of 10-20 million samples per second. A real-time Machine Vision Laboratory (MVL) was established in FY94 to extend our years of experience in developing computer vision algorithms to include the development and implementation of real-time vision systems. The laboratory is equipped with a variety of hardware components, including Datacube image acquisition and processing boards, a Sun workstation, and several different types of CCD cameras, including monochrome and color area cameras and analog and digital line-scan cameras. The equipment is reconfigurable for prototyping different applications. This facility has been used to support several programs at LLNL, including O Division`s Peacemaker and Deadeye Projects as well as the CRADA with the U.S. Textile Industry, CAFE (Computer Aided Fabric Inspection). To date, we have successfully demonstrated several real-time applications: bullet tracking, stereo tracking and ranging, and web inspection. This work has been documented in the ongoing development of a real-time software library.

  12. Colored leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, H.

    1985-01-01

    If leptons are composite and if they contain colored preons, one expects the existence of heavy color-octet fermions with quantum numbers similar to those of ordinary leptons. Such a ''colored lepton'' should decay into a gluon and a lepton, yielding a unique experimental signature. Charged ''colored leptons'' probably have masses of the order of the compositeness scale Λ > or approx. 1 TeV. They may be copiously produced at future multi-TeV e + e - , ep and hadron colliders. ''Colored neutrinos'' may have both Dirac and Majorana masses. They could be much lighter than Λ, possibly as light as 100 GeV or less. In such a case they should be readily produced at the CERN anti pp collider, yielding spectacular monojet and dijet events. They may also be produced at LEP and HERA. (orig.)

  13. Vision, eye disease, and art: 2015 Keeler Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, M F

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine normal vision and eye disease in relation to art. Ophthalmology cannot explain art, but vision is a tool for artists and its normal and abnormal characteristics may influence what an artist can do. The retina codes for contrast, and the impact of this is evident throughout art history from Asian brush painting, to Renaissance chiaroscuro, to Op Art. Art exists, and can portray day or night, only because of the way retina adjusts to light. Color processing is complex, but artists have exploited it to create shimmer (Seurat, Op Art), or to disconnect color from form (fauvists, expressionists, Andy Warhol). It is hazardous to diagnose eye disease from an artist's work, because artists have license to create as they wish. El Greco was not astigmatic; Monet was not myopic; Turner did not have cataracts. But when eye disease is documented, the effects can be analyzed. Color-blind artists limit their palette to ambers and blues, and avoid greens. Dense brown cataracts destroy color distinctions, and Monet's late canvases (before surgery) showed strange and intense uses of color. Degas had failing vision for 40 years, and his pastels grew coarser and coarser. He may have continued working because his blurred vision smoothed over the rough work. This paper can barely touch upon the complexity of either vision or art. However, it demonstrates some ways in which understanding vision and eye disease give insight into art, and thereby an appreciation of both art and ophthalmology.

  14. Evolution of cichlid vision via trans-regulatory divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Quin Kelly E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution may occur through mutations that affect either the structure or expression of protein-coding genes. Although the evolution of color vision has historically been attributed to structural mutations within the opsin genes, recent research has shown that opsin regulatory mutations can also tune photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision. Visual sensitivity in African cichlid fishes varies as a result of the differential expression of seven opsin genes. We crossed cichlid species that express different opsin gene sets and scanned their genome for expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL responsible for these differences. Our results shed light on the role that different structural, cis-, and trans-regulatory mutations play in the evolution of color vision. Results We identified 11 eQTL that contribute to the divergent expression of five opsin genes. On three linkage groups, several eQTL formed regulatory “hotspots” associated with the expression of multiple opsins. Importantly, however, the majority of the eQTL we identified (8/11 or 73% occur on linkage groups located trans to the opsin genes, suggesting that cichlid color vision has evolved primarily via trans-regulatory divergence. By modeling the impact of just two of these trans-regulatory eQTL, we show that opsin regulatory mutations can alter cichlid photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision at least as much as opsin structural mutations can. Conclusions Combined with previous work, we demonstrate that the evolution of cichlid color vision results from the interplay of structural, cis-, and especially trans-regulatory loci. Although there are numerous examples of structural and cis-regulatory mutations that contribute to phenotypic evolution, our results suggest that trans-regulatory mutations could contribute to phenotypic divergence more commonly than previously expected, especially in systems like color vision, where compensatory changes in the

  15. Color tejido

    OpenAIRE

    Rius Tormo, Palmira

    2010-01-01

    Póster presentado en el IX Congreso Nacional del Color, Alicante, 29-30 junio, 1-2 julio 2010. La exposición que se propone tiene como núcleo principal el color y muestra las posibilidades expresivas que aporta a los diferentes materiales. Las 7 obras presentadas buscan la armonía estética y la fuerza simbólica.

  16. Color Space and Its Divisions: Color Order from Antiquity to the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehni, Rolf G.

    2003-03-01

    It has been postulated that humans can differentiate between millions of gradations in color. Not surprisingly, no completely adequate, detailed catalog of colors has yet been devised, however the quest to understand, record, and depict color is as old as the quest to understand the fundamentals of the physical world and the nature of human consciousness. Rolf Kuehni's Color Space and Its Divisions: Color Order from Antiquity to the Present represents an ambitious and unprecedented history of man's inquiry into color order, focusing on the practical applications of the most contemporary developments in the field. Kuehni devotes much of his study to geometric, three-dimensional arrangements of color experiences, a type of system developed only in the mid-nineteenth century. Color spaces are of particular interest for color quality-control purposes in the manufacturing and graphics industries. The author analyzes three major color order systems in detail: Munsell, OSA-UCS, and NCS. He presents historical and current information on color space developments in color vision, psychology, psychophysics, and color technology. Chapter topics include: A historical account of color order systems Fundamentals of psychophysics and the relationship between stimuli and experience Results of perceptual scaling of colors according to attributes History of the development of mathematical color space and difference formulas Analysis of the agreements and discrepancies in psychophysical data describing color differences An experimental plan for the reliable, replicated perceptual data necessary to make progress in the field Experts in academia and industry, neuroscientists, designers, art historians, and anyone interested in the nature of color will find Color Space and Its Divisions to be the authoritative reference in its field.

  17. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  18. [Research on developping the spectral dataset for Dunhuang typical colors based on color constancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Wan, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chan; Liang, Jin-Xing

    2013-11-01

    The present paper aims at developping a method to reasonably set up the typical spectral color dataset for different kinds of Chinese cultural heritage in color rendering process. The world famous wall paintings dating from more than 1700 years ago in Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes was taken as typical case in this research. In order to maintain the color constancy during the color rendering workflow of Dunhuang culture relics, a chromatic adaptation based method for developping the spectral dataset of typical colors for those wall paintings was proposed from the view point of human vision perception ability. Under the help and guidance of researchers in the art-research institution and protection-research institution of Dunhuang Academy and according to the existing research achievement of Dunhuang Research in the past years, 48 typical known Dunhuang pigments were chosen and 240 representative color samples were made with reflective spectral ranging from 360 to 750 nm was acquired by a spectrometer. In order to find the typical colors of the above mentioned color samples, the original dataset was devided into several subgroups by clustering analysis. The grouping number, together with the most typical samples for each subgroup which made up the firstly built typical color dataset, was determined by wilcoxon signed rank test according to the color inconstancy index comprehensively calculated under 6 typical illuminating conditions. Considering the completeness of gamut of Dunhuang wall paintings, 8 complementary colors was determined and finally the typical spectral color dataset was built up which contains 100 representative spectral colors. The analytical calculating results show that the median color inconstancy index of the built dataset in 99% confidence level by wilcoxon signed rank test was 3.28 and the 100 colors are distributing in the whole gamut uniformly, which ensures that this dataset can provide reasonable reference for choosing the color with highest

  19. Modeling human color categorization: Color discrimination and color memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskes, T.; van den Broek, Egon; Lucas, P.; Hendriks, Maria A.; Vuurpijl, L.G.; Puts, M.J.H.; Wiegerinck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Color matching in Content-Based Image Retrieval is done using a color space and measuring distances between colors. Such an approach yields non-intuitive results for the user. We introduce color categories (or focal colors), determine that they are valid, and use them in two experiments. The

  20. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  1. Cataract Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? Cataract Vision Simulator Leer en Español: Simulador: Catarata Jun. 11, 2014 How do cataracts affect your vision? A cataract is a clouding of the eye's ...

  2. Living with Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life TIPS To Its Fullest LIVING WITH LOW VISION Savings Medical Bills A VARIETY OF EYE CONDITIONS, ... which occupational therapy practitioners help people with low vision to function at the highest possible level. • Prevent ...

  3. Vision - night blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003039.htm Vision - night blindness To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. Night blindness is poor vision at night or in dim light. Considerations Night ...

  4. Chemicals Industry Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  5. DLP™-based dichoptic vision test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Russell L.; Apfelbaum, Henry L.; Peli, Eli

    2010-01-01

    It can be useful to present a different image to each of the two eyes while they cooperatively view the world. Such dichoptic presentation can occur in investigations of stereoscopic and binocular vision (e.g., strabismus, amblyopia) and vision rehabilitation in clinical and research settings. Various techniques have been used to construct dichoptic displays. The most common and most flexible modern technique uses liquid-crystal (LC) shutters. When used in combination with cathode ray tube (CRT) displays, there is often leakage of light from the image intended for one eye into the view of the other eye. Such interocular crosstalk is 14% even in our state of the art CRT-based dichoptic system. While such crosstalk may have minimal impact on stereo movie or video game experiences, it can defeat clinical and research investigations. We use micromirror digital light processing (DLP™) technology to create a novel dichoptic visual display system with substantially lower interocular crosstalk (0.3% remaining crosstalk comes from the LC shutters). The DLP system normally uses a color wheel to display color images. Our approach is to disable the color wheel, synchronize the display directly to the computer's sync signal, allocate each of the three (former) color presentations to one or both eyes, and open and close the LC shutters in synchrony with those color events.

  6. Occupational psychophysics to establish vision requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris A

    2008-10-01

    To develop and implement a comprehensive procedure for determining vision requirements for different vocational and occupational tasks. Evaluations performed for more than 10 state agencies and businesses were conducted over a period of approximately 9 years. The procedure included a literature review, an assessment of potential visual functions to address, a formal job analysis, interviews with incumbent workers, obtaining advice and recommendations from subject matter experts (experienced incumbents and administrators), development of job-related simulation studies, linkage of simulation results to the job analysis, a review of appeals and critical incidents, a thorough assessment of work environments and conditions, and final recommendations. Examples of occupational simulations for quantitative job-related task performance for best-corrected visual acuity, uncorrected visual acuity, color vision, peripheral vision, the use of one vs. two eyes, naïve vs. experienced incumbents, and impoverished visual conditions are presented. Changes in task performance and confidence ratings were obtained for various levels of degraded vision. This procedure, referred to as "occupational psychophysics," provides a quantitative systematic method of defining the vision requirements for various essential job functions. In conjunction with the frequency of performance, requirements at entry to the job, safety, reasonable accommodation, alteration of the work environment, and administrative issues, this approach provides a quantitative, rational basis for establishing job-related vision requirements.

  7. Robot Vision Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Andrew B.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Litwin, Todd E.; Goldberg, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Robot Vision Library (JPLV) provides real-time robot vision algorithms for developers who are not vision specialists. The package includes algorithms for stereo ranging, visual odometry and unsurveyed camera calibration, and has unique support for very wideangle lenses

  8. Comparing Active Vision Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  9. Comparing active vision models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  10. Derivation of Color Confusion Lines for Pseudo-Dichromat Observers from Color Discrimination Thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahiro Matsudaira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to develop a method of defining color confusion lines in the display RGB color space through color discrimination tasks. In the experiment, reference and test square patches were presented side by side on a CRT display. The subject's task is to set the test color where the color difference from the reference is just noticeable to him/her. In a single trial, the test color was only adjustable along one of 26 directions around the reference. Thus 26 colors with just noticeable difference (JND were obtained and made up a tube-like or an ellipsoidal shape around each reference. With color-anomalous subjects, the major axes of these shapes should be parallel to color confusion lines that have a common orientation vector corresponding to one of the cone excitation axes L, M, or S. In our method, the orientation vector was determined by minimizing the sum of the squares of the distances from JND colors to each confusion line. To assess the performance the method, the orientation vectors obtained by pseudo-dichromats (color normal observers with a dichromat simulator were compared to those theoretically calculated from the color vision model used in the simulator.

  11. Drying and radial shrinkage characteristics and changes in color ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drying and radial shrinkage characteristics and changes in color and shape of carrots tissues during air drying were studied. Slices dimensions were obtained by computer vision and the color was quantified by chroma, hue, whitening index and total carotenoids contents. The drying time became shorter of 1 h when ...

  12. Colour vision and computer-generated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramek, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Colour vision deficiencies affect approximately 8% of the male and approximately 0.4% of the female population. In this work, it is demonstrated that computer generated images oftentimes pose unnecessary problems for colour deficient viewers. Three examples, the visualization of molecular structures, graphs of mathematical functions, and colour coded images from numerical data are used to identify problematic colour combinations: red/black, green/black, red/yellow, yellow/white, fuchsia/white, and aqua/white. Alternatives for these combinations are discussed.

  13. Color transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Imagine shooting a beam of protons of high momentum P through an atomic nucleus. Usually the nuclear interactions prevent the particles from emerging with momentum ∼P. Further, the angular distribution of elastically scattered protons is close to the optical diffraction pattern produced by a black disk. Thus the nucleus acts as a black disk and is not transparent. However, certain high momentum transfer reactions in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus may be completely different. Suppose that the high momentum transfer process leads to the formation of a small-size color singlet wavepacket that is ejected from the nucleus. The effects of gluons emitted by color singlet systems of closely separated quarks and gluons tend to cancel. Thus the wavepacket-nuclear interactions are suppressed, the nucleus becomes transparant and one says that color transparency CT occurs. The observation of CT also requires that the wavepacket not expand very much while it moves through the nucleus. Simple quantum mechanical formulations can assess this expansion. The creation of a small-sized wavepacket is expected in asymptotic perturbative effects. The author reviews the few experimental attempts to observe color transparency in nuclear (e,e'p) and (p,pp) reactions and interpret the data and their implications

  14. Color Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heidi S. S.; Maki, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted by members of the WellU Academic Integration Subcommittee of The College of St. Scholastica's College's Healthy Campus Initiative plan whose purpose was to determine whether changing color in the classroom could have a measurable effect on students. One simple improvement a school can make in a classroom is…

  15. Learning disabilities, dyslexia, and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Sheryl M; Fierson, Walter M; Section on Ophthalmology

    2011-03-01

    , prisms, and colored lenses and filters are effective direct or indirect treatments for learning disabilities. There is no valid evidence that children who participate in vision therapy are more responsive to educational instruction than children who do not participate.

  16. Molecular Basis for Ultraviolet Vision in Invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo, Ernesto; Zheng, Lijun; Phistry, Meridee; Bagg, Eve E.; Britt, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    Invertebrates are sensitive to a broad spectrum of light that ranges from UV to red. Color sensitivity in the UV plays an important role in foraging, navigation, and mate selection in both flying and terrestrial invertebrate animals. Here, we show that a single amino acid polymorphism is responsible for invertebrate UV vision. This residue (UV: lysine vs blue:asparagine or glutamate) corresponds to amino acid position glycine 90 (G90) in bovine rhodopsin, a site affected in autosomal dominant...

  17. Computational approaches to vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Vision is examined in terms of a computational process, and the competence, structure, and control of computer vision systems are analyzed. Theoretical and experimental data on the formation of a computer vision system are discussed. Consideration is given to early vision, the recovery of intrinsic surface characteristics, higher levels of interpretation, and system integration and control. A computational visual processing model is proposed and its architecture and operation are described. Examples of state-of-the-art vision systems, which include some of the levels of representation and processing mechanisms, are presented.

  18. A child's vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Implementing standard vision screening techniques in the primary care practice is the most effective means to detect children with potential vision problems at an age when the vision loss may be treatable. A critical period of vision development occurs in the first few weeks of life; thus, it is imperative that serious problems are detected at this time. Although it is not possible to quantitate an infant's vision, evaluating ocular health appropriately can mean the difference between sight and blindness and, in the case of retinoblastoma, life or death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Color naming across languages reflects color use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward; Futrell, Richard; Jara-Ettinger, Julian; Mahowald, Kyle; Bergen, Leon; Ratnasingam, Sivalogeswaran; Gibson, Mitchell; Piantadosi, Steven T; Conway, Bevil R

    2017-10-03

    What determines how languages categorize colors? We analyzed results of the World Color Survey (WCS) of 110 languages to show that despite gross differences across languages, communication of chromatic chips is always better for warm colors (yellows/reds) than cool colors (blues/greens). We present an analysis of color statistics in a large databank of natural images curated by human observers for salient objects and show that objects tend to have warm rather than cool colors. These results suggest that the cross-linguistic similarity in color-naming efficiency reflects colors of universal usefulness and provide an account of a principle (color use) that governs how color categories come about. We show that potential methodological issues with the WCS do not corrupt information-theoretic analyses, by collecting original data using two extreme versions of the color-naming task, in three groups: the Tsimane', a remote Amazonian hunter-gatherer isolate; Bolivian-Spanish speakers; and English speakers. These data also enabled us to test another prediction of the color-usefulness hypothesis: that differences in color categorization between languages are caused by differences in overall usefulness of color to a culture. In support, we found that color naming among Tsimane' had relatively low communicative efficiency, and the Tsimane' were less likely to use color terms when describing familiar objects. Color-naming among Tsimane' was boosted when naming artificially colored objects compared with natural objects, suggesting that industrialization promotes color usefulness.

  20. Spatial imaging in color and HDR: prometheus unchained

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John J.

    2013-03-01

    The Human Vision and Electronic Imaging Conferences (HVEI) at the IS and T/SPIE Electronic Imaging meetings have brought together research in the fundamentals of both vision and digital technology. This conference has incorporated many color disciplines that have contributed to the theory and practice of today's imaging: color constancy, models of vision, digital output, high-dynamic-range imaging, and the understanding of perceptual mechanisms. Before digital imaging, silver halide color was a pixel-based mechanism. Color films are closely tied to colorimetry, the science of matching pixels in a black surround. The quanta catch of the sensitized silver salts determines the amount of colored dyes in the final print. The rapid expansion of digital imaging over the past 25 years has eliminated the limitations of using small local regions in forming images. Spatial interactions can now generate images more like vision. Since the 1950's, neurophysiology has shown that post-receptor neural processing is based on spatial interactions. These results reinforced the findings of 19th century experimental psychology. This paper reviews the role of HVEI in color, emphasizing the interaction of research on vision and the new algorithms and processes made possible by electronic imaging.

  1. [Functional vision assessment in children with low vision from two to six years of age - a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Luciana Drummond de Figueiredo; Vasconcelos, Galton Carvalho; Saliba, Grace Rego; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro; Soares, Angela Maria Anselmo; Cordeiro, Silvia Santiago; Amorim, Regina Helena Caldas de

    2011-01-01

    The Functional Vision Assessment (AVIF-2 to 6 years)'s capacity to differentiate visual ability levels in children with low vision was analyzed. The AVIF-2 to 6 years was created at the Infantile Low Vision Sector from São Geraldo Hospital, Brazil. After a debate among professionals from different areas regarding the appropriateness of the test items, AVIF-2 to 6 years was applied to 40 children aged from 2 to 6 years; twenty children with low vision (Group 1) and twenty without it (Group 2) were assessed. Group 1 was recruited from the Infantile Low Vision Sector from São Geraldo Hospital. Group 2 comprised children from two different public day care centers and children were matched by age, gender and social level with group 1. Seven domains were studied: visual fixation, visual following, visual field confrontation, eye-hand coordination and surrounding locomotion, contrast vision and color vision discrimination. Group 1 children were submitted to a complete ophthalmologic exam and group 2 to ophthalmologic screening. Children with low vision and neurologic disease were excluded. Comparative analyzes were performed for both groups and for distinct subgroups classified by age (24 to 35 months, 36 to 59 months and 60 to 78 months) and by visual acuity subgroups (ages. AVIF- 2 to 6 years can discriminate different levels of functional vision of low vision children, however the authors emphasize that although the results are encouraging, further studies shall be done until the test is ready for clinical use.

  2. Combining fine texture and coarse color features for color texture classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmin; Fan, Yangyu; Li, Ning

    2017-11-01

    Color texture classification plays an important role in computer vision applications because texture and color are two fundamental visual features. To classify the color texture via extracting discriminative color texture features in real time, we present an approach of combining the fine texture and coarse color features for color texture classification. First, the input image is transformed from RGB to HSV color space to separate texture and color information. Second, the scale-selective completed local binary count (CLBC) algorithm is introduced to extract the fine texture feature from the V component in HSV color space. Third, both H and S components are quantized at an optimal coarse level. Furthermore, the joint histogram of H and S components is calculated, which is considered as the coarse color feature. Finally, the fine texture and coarse color features are combined as the final descriptor and the nearest subspace classifier is used for classification. Experimental results on CUReT, KTH-TIPS, and New-BarkTex databases demonstrate that the proposed method achieves state-of-the-art classification performance. Moreover, the proposed method is fast enough for real-time applications.

  3. A validation study regarding a generative approach in choosing appropriate colors for impaired users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Luigi; Birtolo, Cosimo; Armenise, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In many circumstances, concepts, ideas and emotions are mainly conveyed by colors. Color vision disorders can heavily limit the user experience in accessing Information Society. Therefore, color vision impairments should be taken into account in order to make information and services accessible to a broader audience. The task is not easy for designers that generally are not affected by any color vision disorder. In any case, the design of accessible user interfaces should not lead to to boring color schemes. The selection of appealing and harmonic color combinations should be preserved. In past research we investigated a generative approach led by evolutionary computing in supporting interface designers to make colors accessible to impaired users. This approach has also been followed by other authors. The contribution of this paper is to provide an experimental validation to the claim that this approach is actually beneficial to designers and users.

  4. Color preference in red–green dichromats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro, Leticia; Moreira, Humberto; Lillo, Julio; Franklin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Around 2% of males have red–green dichromacy, which is a genetic disorder of color vision where one type of cone photoreceptor is missing. Here we investigate the color preferences of dichromats. We aim (i) to establish whether the systematic and reliable color preferences of normal trichromatic observers (e.g., preference maximum at blue, minimum at yellow-green) are affected by dichromacy and (ii) to test theories of color preference with a dichromatic sample. Dichromat and normal trichromat observers named and rated how much they liked saturated, light, dark, and focal colors twice. Trichromats had the expected pattern of preference. Dichromats had a reliable pattern of preference that was different to trichromats, with a preference maximum rather than minimum at yellow and a much weaker preference for blue than trichromats. Color preference was more affected in observers who lacked the cone type sensitive to long wavelengths (protanopes) than in those who lacked the cone type sensitive to medium wavelengths (deuteranopes). Trichromats’ preferences were summarized effectively in terms of cone-contrast between color and background, and yellow-blue cone-contrast could account for dichromats’ pattern of preference, with some evidence for residual red–green activity in deuteranopes’ preference. Dichromats’ color naming also could account for their color preferences, with colors named more accurately and quickly being more preferred. This relationship between color naming and preference also was present for trichromat males but not females. Overall, the findings provide novel evidence on how dichromats experience color, advance the understanding of why humans like some colors more than others, and have implications for general theories of aesthetics. PMID:26170287

  5. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... use of colored contact lenses , from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Are the colored lenses ...

  6. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Uniform backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Color vision is useful for detecting surface boundaries and identifying objects. Are the signals used to perform these two functions processed by common mechanisms, or has the visual system optimized its processing separately for each task? We measured the effect of mean chromaticity and luminance on color discriminability and on color appearance under well-matched stimulus conditions. In the discri...

  7. Consistency of color representation in smart phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Stephen J; Kwan, Benjamin; Wong, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    One of the barriers to the construction of consistent computer-based color vision tests has been the variety of monitors and computers. Consistency of color on a variety of screens has necessitated calibration of each setup individually. Color vision examination with a carefully controlled display has, as a consequence, been a laboratory rather than a clinical activity. Inevitably, smart phones have become a vehicle for color vision tests. They have the advantage that the processor and screen are associated and there are fewer models of smart phones than permutations of computers and monitors. Colorimetric consistency of display within a model may be a given. It may extend across models from the same manufacturer but is unlikely to extend between manufacturers especially where technologies vary. In this study, we measured the same set of colors in a JPEG file displayed on 11 samples of each of four models of smart phone (iPhone 4s, iPhone5, Samsung Galaxy S3, and Samsung Galaxy S4) using a Photo Research PR-730. The iPhones are white LED backlit LCD and the Samsung are OLEDs. The color gamut varies between models and comparison with sRGB space shows 61%, 85%, 117%, and 110%, respectively. The iPhones differ markedly from the Samsungs and from one another. This indicates that model-specific color lookup tables will be needed. Within each model, the primaries were quite consistent (despite the age of phone varying within each sample). The worst case in each model was the blue primary; the 95th percentile limits in the v' coordinate were ±0.008 for the iPhone 4 and ±0.004 for the other three models. The u'v' variation in white points was ±0.004 for the iPhone4 and ±0.002 for the others, although the spread of white points between models was u'v'±0.007. The differences are essentially the same for primaries at low luminance. The variation of colors intermediate between the primaries (e.g., red-purple, orange) mirror the variation in the primaries. The variation in

  8. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  9. FPGA Vision Data Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfopoulos, Arin C.; Pham, Thang D.

    2013-01-01

    JPL has produced a series of FPGA (field programmable gate array) vision algorithms that were written with custom interfaces to get data in and out of each vision module. Each module has unique requirements on the data interface, and further vision modules are continually being developed, each with their own custom interfaces. Each memory module had also been designed for direct access to memory or to another memory module.

  10. Vision, reanimated and reimagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The publication in 1982 of David Marr's Vision has delivered a singular boost and a course correction to the science of vision. Thirty years later, cognitive science is being transformed by the new ways of thinking about what it is that the brain computes, how it does that, and, most importantly, why cognition requires these computations and not others. This ongoing process still owes much of its impetus and direction to the sound methodology, engaging style, and unique voice of Marr's Vision.

  11. Vision and sketching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbus, Kenneth D

    2012-01-01

    This essay reflects on the revolution David Marr brought about in vision research, and in cognitive science more broadly. I start with an insider's view, then examine the methodological impact of his framework in cognitive science in general. My group's work on sketch understanding descends from Marr's approach to vision, a connection which I make to provide a concrete illustration. I close with a few thoughts about how research in vision and other areas of cognitive science might come together in the future.

  12. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  13. Biomimetic machine vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, William M; Barrett, Steven F; Wright, Cameron H G; Wilcox, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Real-time application of digital imaging for use in machine vision systems has proven to be prohibitive when used within control systems that employ low-power single processors without compromising the scope of vision or resolution of captured images. Development of a real-time machine analog vision system is the focus of research taking place at the University of Wyoming. This new vision system is based upon the biological vision system of the common house fly. Development of a single sensor is accomplished, representing a single facet of the fly's eye. This new sensor is then incorporated into an array of sensors capable of detecting objects and tracking motion in 2-D space. This system "preprocesses" incoming image data resulting in minimal data processing to determine the location of a target object. Due to the nature of the sensors in the array, hyperacuity is achieved thereby eliminating resolutions issues found in digital vision systems. In this paper, we will discuss the biological traits of the fly eye and the specific traits that led to the development of this machine vision system. We will also discuss the process of developing an analog based sensor that mimics the characteristics of interest in the biological vision system. This paper will conclude with a discussion of how an array of these sensors can be applied toward solving real-world machine vision issues.

  14. Do focal colors look particularly "colorful"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Christoph; Franklin, Anna

    2014-04-01

    If the most typical red, yellow, green, and blue were particularly colorful (i.e., saturated), they would "jump out to the eye." This would explain why even fundamentally different languages have distinct color terms for these focal colors, and why unique hues play a prominent role in subjective color appearance. In this study, the subjective saturation of 10 colors around each of these focal colors was measured through a pairwise matching task. Results show that subjective saturation changes systematically across hues in a way that is strongly correlated to the visual gamut, and exponentially related to sensitivity but not to focal colors.

  15. Predicting Visual Disability in Glaucoma With Combinations of Vision Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Stephanie; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; West, Sheila K; Johnson, Chris A; Friedman, David S; Kong, Xiangrong; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2018-04-01

    We characterized vision in glaucoma using seven visual measures, with the goals of determining the dimensionality of vision, and how many and which visual measures best model activity limitation. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 150 older adults with glaucoma, collecting seven visual measures: integrated visual field (VF) sensitivity, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity (CS), area under the log CS function, color vision, stereoacuity, and visual acuity with noise. Principal component analysis was used to examine the dimensionality of vision. Multivariable regression models using one, two, or three vision tests (and nonvisual predictors) were compared to determine which was best associated with Rasch-analyzed Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 (GQL-15) person measure scores. The participants had a mean age of 70.2 and IVF sensitivity of 26.6 dB, suggesting mild-to-moderate glaucoma. All seven vision measures loaded similarly onto the first principal component (eigenvectors, 0.220-0.442), which explained 56.9% of the variance in vision scores. In models for GQL scores, the maximum adjusted- R 2 values obtained were 0.263, 0.296, and 0.301 when using one, two, and three vision tests in the models, respectively, though several models in each category had similar adjusted- R 2 values. All three of the best-performing models contained CS. Vision in glaucoma is a multidimensional construct that can be described by several variably-correlated vision measures. Measuring more than two vision tests does not substantially improve models for activity limitation. A sufficient description of disability in glaucoma can be obtained using one to two vision tests, especially VF and CS.

  16. A Software Application to Detect Dental Color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan SÎMPĂLEAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Choosing dental color for missing teeth or tooth reconstruction is an important step and it usually raises difficulties for dentists due to a significant amount of subjective factors that can influence the color selection. Dental reconstruction presumes the combination between dentistry and chromatics, thus implying important challenges. Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and implement a software application for detecting dental color to come to the aid of dentists and largely to remove the inherent subjectiveness of the human vision. Basic Methods: The implemented application was named Color Detection and the application’s source code is written using the C++ language. During application development, for creating the GUI (graphical user interface the wxWidgets 2.8 library it was used. Results: The application displays the average color of the selected area of interest, the reference color from the key collection existent in the program and also the degree of similarity between the original (the selected area of interest and the nearest reference key. This degree of similarity is expressed as a percentage. Conclusions: The Color Detection Program, by eliminating the subjectivity inherent to human sight, can help the dentist to select an appropriate dental color with precision.

  17. Color blindness among multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease of young and middle aged individuals with a demyelinative axonal damage nature in central nervous system that causes various signs and symptoms. As color vision needs normal function of optic nerve and macula, it is proposed that MS can alter it via influencing optic nerve. In this survey, we evaluated color vision abnormalities and its relationship with history of optic neuritis and abnormal visual evoked potentials (VEPs among MS patients. Materials and Methods: The case group was included of clinically definitive MS patients and the same number of normal population was enrolled as the control group. Color vision of all the participants was evaluated by Ishihara test and then visual evoked potential (VEPs and history of optic neuritis (ON was assessed among them. Then, frequency of color blindness was compared between the case and the control group. Finally, color blinded patients were compared to those with the history of ON and abnormal VEPs. Results: 63 MS patients and the same number of normal populations were enrolled in this study. 12 patients had color blindness based on the Ishihara test; only 3 of them were among the control group, which showed a significant different between the two groups (P = 0.013. There was a significant relationship between the color blindness and abnormal VEP (R = 0.53, P = 0.023 but not for the color blindness and ON (P = 0.67. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a significant correlation between color blindness and multiple sclerosis including ones with abnormal prolonged VEP latencies. Therefore, in individuals with acquired color vision impairment, an evaluation for potentially serious underlying diseases like MS is essential.

  18. Jane Addams’ Social Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Kaspar

    2018-01-01

    resonated with key tenets of social gospel theology, which imbued her texts with an overarching vision of humanity’s progressive history. It is suggested that Addams’ vision of a major transition in industrial society, one involving a BChristian renaissance^ and individuals’ transformation into Bsocialized...

  19. Copenhagen Energy Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Connolly, David

    The short-term goal for The City of Copenhagen is a CO2 neutral energy supply by the year 2025, and the long-term vision for Denmark is a 100% renewable energy (RE) supply by the year 2050. In this project, it is concluded that Copenhagen plays a key role in this transition. The long-term vision...

  20. Contrast edge colors under different natural illuminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Juan Luis; Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Romero, Javier

    2012-02-01

    Essential to sensory processing in the human visual system is natural illumination, which can vary considerably not only across space but also along the day depending on the atmospheric conditions and the sun's position in the sky. In this work, edges derived from the three postreceptoral Luminance, Red-Green, and Blue-Yellow signals were computed from hyperspectral images of natural scenes rendered with daylights of Correlated Color Temperatures (CCTs) from 2735 to 25,889 K; for low CCT, the same analysis was performed using Planckian illuminants up to 800 K. It was found that average luminance and chromatic edge contrasts were maximal for low correlated color temperatures and almost constants above 10,000 K. The magnitude of these contrast changes was, however, only about 2% across the tested daylights. Results suggest that the postreceptoral opponent and nonopponent color vision mechanisms produce almost constant responses for color edge detection under natural illumination. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  1. Machine Vision Handbook

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The automation of visual inspection is becoming more and more important in modern industry as a consistent, reliable means of judging the quality of raw materials and manufactured goods . The Machine Vision Handbook  equips the reader with the practical details required to engineer integrated mechanical-optical-electronic-software systems. Machine vision is first set in the context of basic information on light, natural vision, colour sensing and optics. The physical apparatus required for mechanized image capture – lenses, cameras, scanners and light sources – are discussed followed by detailed treatment of various image-processing methods including an introduction to the QT image processing system. QT is unique to this book, and provides an example of a practical machine vision system along with extensive libraries of useful commands, functions and images which can be implemented by the reader. The main text of the book is completed by studies of a wide variety of applications of machine vision in insp...

  2. Generating Selected Color using RGB, Auxiliary Lights, and Simplex Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim HyungTae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixed light source generates various colors, with the potential to adjust intensities of multiple LEDs, which makes it possible to generate arbitrary colors. Currently, PCs and OSs provide color selection windows that can obtain the RGB or HSL color coordinates of a user’s selection. Mixed light sources are usually composed of LEDs in the primary colors, with LEDs in auxiliary colors such as white and yellow used in a few cases. When using auxiliary color LEDs, the number of LED inputs, the dimming levels, is larger than the number of elements in the color coordinate, which causes an under-determined problem. This study proposed how to determine the dimming levels of LEDs based on the selected color. Commercial LEDs have di_erent optical power values and impure color coordinates, even if they are RGB. Hence, the characteristics of the LEDs were described using a linear model derived from the tri-stimulus values (an XYZ color coordinate model and dimming levels. Color mixing models were derived for the arbitrary number of auxiliary color LEDs. The under-determined problem was solved using a simplex search method without an inverse matrix operation. The proposed method can be applied to a machine vision system and an RGBW light mixer for semiconductor inspection. The dimming levels, obtained using the proposed method were better than derived using other methods.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  4. Scene structure in the saturation component of color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Bruce A.; Strickland, Robin N.

    1996-04-01

    A tenet of a new class of color image enhancement algorithms involves the observation that the saturation component of color images often contains what appears to be valid image structure depicting the underlying scene. In this work we present the findings of a study of the structural correspondence between the saturation and luminance components of a large database of color images. Various statistical relationships are identified. The correspondence of edges at different scales in the sense of Marr's theory of vision is also observed. Several new color image enhancement algorithms which exploit these unique characteristics are described.

  5. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  6. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  7. Visions of the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinder, David

    Visions of the City is a dramatic account of utopian urbanism in the twentieth century. It explores radical demands for new spaces and ways of living, and considers their effects on planning, architecture and struggles to shape urban landscapes. Such visions, it shows, have played a crucial role...... to transform urban space and everyday life. He addresses in particular Constant's vision of New Babylon, finding within his proposals for future spaces produced through nomadic life, creativity and play a still powerful challenge to imagine cities otherwise. The book not only recovers vital moments from past...

  8. Anchoring visions in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the term 'anchoring' within systems development: Visions, developed through early systems design within an organization, need to be deeply rooted in the organization. A vision's rationale needs to be understood by those who decide if the vision should be implemented as well...... as by those involved in the actual implementation. A model depicting a recent trend within systems development is presented: Organizations rely on purchasing generic software products and/or software development outsourced to external contractors. A contemporary method for participatory design, where...

  9. Embedding Color Watermarks in Color Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tung-Lin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust watermarking with oblivious detection is essential to practical copyright protection of digital images. Effective exploitation of the characteristics of human visual perception to color stimuli helps to develop the watermarking scheme that fills the requirement. In this paper, an oblivious watermarking scheme that embeds color watermarks in color images is proposed. Through color gamut analysis and quantizer design, color watermarks are embedded by modifying quantization indices of color pixels without resulting in perceivable distortion. Only a small amount of information including the specification of color gamut, quantizer stepsize, and color tables is required to extract the watermark. Experimental results show that the proposed watermarking scheme is computationally simple and quite robust in face of various attacks such as cropping, low-pass filtering, white-noise addition, scaling, and JPEG compression with high compression ratios.

  10. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  11. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  12. Skin color - patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003224.htm Skin color - patchy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Patchy skin color is areas where the skin color is irregular. ...

  13. Os efeitos da aprendizagem psicomotora no controle das atividades de locomoção sobre obstáculos em crianças com deficiência da visão The effects of psychomotor learning on the control of locomotion during obstacle avoidance in children with low vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cezar dos Santos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerando que a visão é um dos sistemas sensoriais mais importantes na locomoção pois fornece informação tanto do ambiente quanto da postura e dos movimentos corporais, este estudo analisou os efeitos de um programa de treinamento perceptivo-motor no controle das atividades de locomoção em seis crianças com deficiências da visão. Para tanto, realizou-se a avaliação da locomoção durante a transposição de obstáculos com alturas diferentes, utilizando-se indicadores qualitativos: postura / equilíbrio / direção / velocidade / contato visual com o obstáculo / erro na tarefa, e indicadores cinemáticos, obtidos por meio de filmagem (SVHS através do sistema Peak Motus (Versão 7.0 - Vicon Peak para medir: a distância do pé de apoio em relação ao obstáculo / a elevação máxima do joelho / a altura do pé em relação à altura do obstáculo. Os indicadores foram novamente avaliados após a realização do programa de treinamento, fornecendo evidências de sua contribuição positiva tanto na estratégia de aproximação quanto na estratégia de ultrapassagem dos obstáculos. Durante a aproximação, a velocidade da locomoção tornou-se mais constante e as passadas foram realizadas de forma mais retilínea. Durante a ultrapassagem, o número de toques no obstáculo diminuiu. Os resultados auxiliam na reflexão sobre a importância da aprendizagem psicomotora nos programas educacionais, particularmente na Educação Física Especial, como uma forma de contribuir para uma melhor qualidade de vida das crianças com baixa visão.Since vision is one of the most important sensory systems called upon for locomotion because it provides information not only about the environment, but also about posture and movement of corporal segments, this study analyzed the effects of a psychomotor training program on the control of locomotion with six children with low vision. Thus, an assessment of locomotion during obstacle avoidance with

  14. Digital color imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine; Macaire, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    This collective work identifies the latest developments in the field of the automatic processing and analysis of digital color images.For researchers and students, it represents a critical state of the art on the scientific issues raised by the various steps constituting the chain of color image processing.It covers a wide range of topics related to computational color imaging, including color filtering and segmentation, color texture characterization, color invariant for object recognition, color and motion analysis, as well as color image and video indexing and retrieval. <

  15. Eyeglasses for Vision Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... light. Another option for vision correction with UV protection is prescription sunglasses . Also, for people who prefer one set of eyeglasses for both inside and outdoors, photochromatic lenses are ...

  16. Your Child's Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rubbing extreme light sensitivity poor focusing poor visual tracking (following an object) abnormal alignment or movement of ... MD Date reviewed: June 2014 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Amblyopia Can Vision Problems ...

  17. Vision Loss, Sudden

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the nerves that carry visual signals from the eye to the brain (the optic nerve and the visual pathways) Light ... of nerve impulses from the back of the eye to the brain will interfere with vision. Legal blindness is defined ...

  18. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an impulsive buy from a souvenir shop, but 10 hours after she first put in a pair ... Prescription Contact Lens Laura: Vision Loss After Just 10 Hours Robyn: Blurry Vision and Daily Eye Drops ...

  19. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to grow into the cornea. Even if you have perfect vision, you need to get an eye ... floaters) in their field of vision may soon have another option: a laser treatment called YAG vitreolysis. ...

  20. Vision under mesopic and scotopic illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has accumulated that rod activation under mesopic and scotopic light levels alters visual perception and performance. Here we review the most recent developments in the measurement of rod and cone contributions to mesopic color perception and temporal processing, with a focus on data measured using the four-primary photostimulator method that independently controls rod and cone excitations. We discuss the findings in the context of rod inputs to the three primary retinogeniculate pathways to understand rod contributions to mesopic vision. Additionally, we present evidence that hue perception is possible under scotopic, pure rod-mediated conditions that involves cortical mechanisms.

  1. Double vision: pigment genes do more than just color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Jackson, George

    2011-01-01

    The use of P element collections led to the discovery of unanticipated effects from common genetic background mutants white, brown, and rosy in our previously reported model of tauopathy that expresses full-length human tau in the fly eye, in which mutant rosy suppresses mutant white and brown worsening of tau-induced toxicity (Ambegaokar & Jackson, 2010, Genetics, v. 186, p. 435-42). Here we discuss further possible effects of mini-white and evidence for autophagy as a mediator of white enhancement of tau toxicity.

  2. Double vision: Pigment genes do more than just color

    OpenAIRE

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Jackson, George R

    2011-01-01

    The use of P element collections led to the discovery of unanticipated effects from common genetic background mutants white, brown and rosy in our previously reported model of tauopathy that expresses full-length human tau in the fly eye, in which mutant rosy suppresses mutant white and brown worsening of tau-induced toxicity.1 Here we discuss further possible effects of mini-white and evidence for autophagy as a mediator of white enhancement of tau toxicity.

  3. Memory for color reactivates color processing region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, Scott D

    2009-11-25

    Memory is thought to be constructive in nature, where features processed in different cortical regions are synthesized during retrieval. In an effort to support this constructive memory framework, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study assessed whether memory for color reactivated color processing regions. During encoding, participants were presented with colored and gray abstract shapes. During retrieval, old and new shapes were presented in gray and participants responded 'old-colored', 'old-gray', or 'new'. Within color perception regions, color memory related activity was observed in the left fusiform gyrus, adjacent to the collateral sulcus. A retinotopic mapping analysis indicated this activity occurred within color processing region V8. The present feature specific evidence provides compelling support for a constructive view of memory.

  4. Natural Colorants: Food Colorants from Natural Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Gregory T; Tang, Peipei; Giusti, M Mónica

    2017-02-28

    The color of food is often associated with the flavor, safety, and nutritional value of the product. Synthetic food colorants have been used because of their high stability and low cost. However, consumer perception and demand have driven the replacement of synthetic colorants with naturally derived alternatives. Natural pigment applications can be limited by lower stability, weaker tinctorial strength, interactions with food ingredients, and inability to match desired hues. Therefore, no single naturally derived colorant can serve as a universal alternative for a specified synthetic colorant in all applications. This review summarizes major environmental and biological sources for natural colorants as well as nature-identical counterparts. Chemical characteristics of prevalent pigments, including anthocyanins, carotenoids, betalains, and chlorophylls, are described. The possible applications and hues (warm, cool, and achromatic) of currently used natural pigments, such as anthocyanins as red and blue colorants, and possible future alternatives, such as purple violacein and red pyranoanthocyanins, are also discussed.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  7. Machine vision application in animal trajectory tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniar, Dušan; Hargaš, Libor; Loncová, Zuzana; Duchoň, František; Beňo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    This article was motivated by the doctors' demand to make a technical support in pathologies of gastrointestinal tract research [10], which would be based on machine vision tools. Proposed solution should be less expensive alternative to already existing RF (radio frequency) methods. The objective of whole experiment was to evaluate the amount of animal motion dependent on degree of pathology (gastric ulcer). In the theoretical part of the article, several methods of animal trajectory tracking are presented: two differential methods based on background subtraction, the thresholding methods based on global and local threshold and the last method used for animal tracking was the color matching with a chosen template containing a searched spectrum of colors. The methods were tested offline on five video samples. Each sample contained situation with moving guinea pig locked in a cage under various lighting conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. On the purposes of color for living beings: toward a theory of color organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Baingio; Reeves, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic and paleontological evidence indicates that in the animal kingdom the ability to perceive colors evolved independently several times over the course of millennia. This implies a high evolutionary neural investment and suggests that color vision provides some fundamental biological benefits. What are these benefits? Why are some animals so colorful? What are the adaptive and perceptual meanings of polychromatism? We suggest that in addition to the discrimination of light and surface chromaticity, sensitivity to color contributes to the whole, the parts and the fragments of perceptual organization. New versions of neon color spreading and the watercolor illusion indicate that the visual purpose of color in humans is threefold: to inter-relate each chromatic component of an object, thus favoring the emergence of the whole; to support a part-whole organization in which components reciprocally enhance each other by amodal completion; and, paradoxically, to reveal fragments and hide the whole-that is, there is a chromatic parceling-out process of separation, division, and fragmentation of the whole. The evolution of these contributions of color to organization needs to be established, but traces of it can be found in Harlequin camouflage by animals and in the coloration of flowers.

  9. The contribution of the outer retina to color constancy: a general model for color constancy synthesized from primate and fish data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanleeuwen, M. T.; Joselevitch, C.; Fahrenfort, I.; Kamermans, M.

    2007-01-01

    Color constancy is one of the most impressive features of color vision systems. Although the phenomenon has been studied for decades, its underlying neuronal mechanism remains unresolved. Literature indicates an early, possibly retinal mechanism and a late, possibly cortical mechanism. The early

  10. Advances in low-level color image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Smolka, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Color perception plays an important role in object recognition and scene understanding both for humans and intelligent vision systems. Recent advances in digital color imaging and computer hardware technology have led to an explosion in the use of color images in a variety of applications including medical imaging, content-based image retrieval, biometrics, watermarking, digital inpainting, remote sensing, visual quality inspection, among many others. As a result, automated processing and analysis of color images has become an active area of research, to which the large number of publications of the past two decades bears witness. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for single channel images are often not directly applicable to multichannel  ones. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the early stages of the color image processing pipeline.

  11. Texture affects color emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Gevers, T.; Gijsenij, A.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have recorded color emotions in subjects viewing uniform color (UC) samples. We conduct an experiment to measure and model how these color emotions change when texture is added to the color samples. Using a computer monitor, our subjects arrange samples along four scales: warm-cool,

  12. What is Color Blindness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Color Blindness Sections What Is Color Blindness? What Are ... Treatment How Color Blindness Is Tested What Is Color Blindness? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es el daltonismo? ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  16. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  17. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  18. Modeling color preference using color space metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Lessard, Laurent; Racey, Chris; Hurlbert, Anya C

    2017-07-27

    Studying color preferences provides a means to discover how perceptual experiences map onto cognitive and affective judgments. A challenge is finding a parsimonious way to describe and predict patterns of color preferences, which are complex with rich individual differences. One approach has been to model color preferences using factors from metric color spaces to establish direct correspondences between dimensions of color and preference. Prior work established that substantial, but not all, variance in color preferences could be captured by weights on color space dimensions using multiple linear regression. The question we address here is whether model fits may be improved by using different color metric specifications. We therefore conducted a large-scale analysis of color space models, and focused in-depth analysis on models that differed in color space (cone-contrast vs. CIELAB), coordinate system within the color space (Cartesian vs. cylindrical), and factor degrees (1st degree only, or 1st and 2nd degree). We used k-fold cross validation to avoid over-fitting the data and to ensure fair comparisons across models. The best model was the 2nd-harmonic Lch model ("LabC Cyl2"). Specified in CIELAB space, it included 1st and 2nd harmonics of hue (capturing opponency in hue preferences and simultaneous liking/disliking of both hues on an opponent axis, respectively), lightness, and chroma. These modeling approaches can be used to characterize and compare patterns for group averages and individuals in future datasets on color preference, or other measures in which correspondences between color appearance and cognitive or affective judgments may exist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Color: Physics and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Pupa

    Unless we are colorblind, as soon as we look at something, we know what color it is. Simple, isn't it? No, not really. The color we see is rarely just determined by the physical color, that is, the wavelength of visible light associated with that color. Other factors, such as the illuminating light, or the brightness surrounding a certain color, affect our perception of that color. Most striking, and useful, is understanding how the retina and the brain work together to interpret the color we see, and how they can be fooled by additive color mixing, which makes it possible to have color screens and displays. I will show the physical origin of all these phenomena and give live demos as I explain how they work. Bring your own eyes! For more information: (1) watch TED talk: ``Color: Physics and Perception'' and (2) read book: PUPA Gilbert and W Haeberli ``Physics in the Arts'', ISBN 9780123918789.

  20. [Migration and health--from deficiency analysis to diversity vision?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A; Hörmann, G

    2011-05-01

    In times of globalization the subjects migration and health are gaining more and more in importance. At the same time, one can observe a discrepancy between published opinions, politically intended messages and scientifically proved evidence. With approximately 15.4 million people with a migration background (this is equivalent to approximately 19% of the German population), migrants perform as an important "customer group" for health care and social security. In 2005, the category migrant background was introduced for the first time by the Federal Statistical Office. This category suggests homogeneity, which in fact is not given. Persons with migration background (including active immigrants, their children and grandchildren, repatriates, foreigners), have to be examined in a differentiated way concerning the consequences that the migration process has on health. Apart from potentially pathogenic influences associated with migration (e. g., ethnicity, national origin, cultural/religious characteristics, migration-related stressors), for example, education, social status, life-style and participation in work and society have to be taken into consideration as important "confounders". In this, a recent sociological approach (sinus migrant milieu) could be useful for socio-medical research and practice. Health-relevant information on migrants results on the one hand from scientific studies primarily designed for this purpose and, on the other hand, from routine data from official health reports. In the interpretation of secondary data, the problem arises that the definition of the target group (migrants) is different in the diverse data sources (for example, Germans, non-Germans, foreigners, migration background) and that important confounders (for example, from socio-cultural milieu) are not included. This may result in, among other things, an under- or overestimation of health risks or even incorrect conclusions. In consideration of these limitations, by means of data sets from official statistics (among others, Federal Statistical Office, social insurance agencies) and recent scientific research the present article analyses chosen aspects of migrant health (for example, health behaviour, morbidity, sickness absence, early retirement, health-care system, rehabilitation and mortality). Finally, possible implications for a more intensive discussion and further development of health care practice are pointed out. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Color Space Axioms and Fiber Bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Provenzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1974, H. L. Resnkikoff published an inspiring paper about the use of differential geometry to study, among others, the intrinsic shape of the space of perceived colors and the Riemannian metrics on it. The mathematical techniques that he used is shared with modern theories of theoretical physics, which are far from being a common background for scientists in color vision and processing. Due to this, Resnikoff’s paper remained unnoticed for decades. In this brief contribution, some insights about how to update Resnikoff’s ideas will be given and discussed in relationship with a modern theory of color spaces and to the mathematical concept of principal fiber bundle.

  2. IDA's Energy Vision 2050

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik; Hansen, Kenneth

    IDA’s Energy Vision 2050 provides a Smart Energy System strategy for a 100% renewable Denmark in 2050. The vision presented should not be regarded as the only option in 2050 but as one scenario out of several possibilities. With this vision the Danish Society of Engineers, IDA, presents its third...... contribution for an energy strategy for Denmark. The IDA’s Energy Plan 2030 was prepared in 2006 and IDA’s Climate Plan was prepared in 2009. IDA’s Energy Vision 2050 is developed for IDA by representatives from The Society of Engineers and by a group of researchers at Aalborg University. It is based on state......-of-the-art knowledge about how low cost energy systems can be designed while also focusing on long-term resource efficiency. The Energy Vision 2050 has the ambition to focus on all parts of the energy system rather than single technologies, but to have an approach in which all sectors are integrated. While Denmark...

  3. [Quality system Vision 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Evasio; Pitocchi, Oreste; de Luca, Italo; Ferrari, Roberto

    2002-12-01

    A recent document of the Italian Ministry of Health points out that all structures which provide services to the National Health System should implement a Quality System according to the ISO 9000 standards. Vision 2000 is the new version of the ISO standard. Vision 2000 is less bureaucratic than the old version. The specific requests of the Vision 2000 are: a) to identify, to monitor and to analyze the processes of the structure, b) to measure the results of the processes so as to ensure that they are effective, d) to implement actions necessary to achieve the planned results and the continual improvement of these processes, e) to identify customer requests and to measure customer satisfaction. Specific attention should be also dedicated to the competence and training of the personnel involved in the processes. The principles of the Vision 2000 agree with the principles of total quality management. The present article illustrates the Vision 2000 standard and provides practical examples of the implementation of this standard in cardiological departments.

  4. Colour, vision and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Cristina; da Silva, Fernando Moreira

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project - Visual Communication and Inclusive Design-Colour, Legibility and Aged Vision, developed at the Faculty of Architecture of Lisbon. The research has the aim of determining specific design principles to be applied to visual communication design (printed) objects, in order to be easily read and perceived by all. This study target group was composed by a selection of socially active individuals, between 55 and 80 years, and we used cultural events posters as objects of study and observation. The main objective is to overlap the study of areas such as colour, vision, older people's colour vision, ergonomics, chromatic contrasts, typography and legibility. In the end we will produce a manual with guidelines and information to apply scientific knowledge into the communication design projectual practice. Within the normal aging process, visual functions gradually decline; the quality of vision worsens, colour vision and contrast sensitivity are also affected. As people's needs change along with age, design should help people and communities, and improve life quality in the present. Applying principles of visually accessible design and ergonomics, the printed design objects, (or interior spaces, urban environments, products, signage and all kinds of visually information) will be effective, easier on everyone's eyes not only for visually impaired people but also for all of us as we age.

  5. Coloring local feature extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Van De Weijer, Joost; Schmid, Cordelia

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Although color is commonly experienced as an indispensable quality in describing the world around us, state-of-the art local feature-based representations are mostly based on shape description, and ignore color information. The description of color is hampered by the large amount of variations which causes the measured color values to vary significantly. In this paper we aim to extend the description of local features with color information. To accomplish a wide applic...

  6. Color models of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, O.W.; Nelson, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    The evidence for a three-valued 'color' degree of freedom in hadron physics is reviewed. The structure of color models is discussed. Consequences of color models for elementary particle physics are discussed, including saturation properties of hadronic states, π 0 →2γ and related decays, leptoproduction, and lepton pair annihilation. Signatures are given which distinguish theories with isolated colored particles from those in which color is permanently bound. (Auth.)

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees ... how patients respond to treatment. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ways we may support research over the ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... and how patients respond to treatment. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ways we may support research over ...

  9. Overview of sports vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda A.; Ferreira, Jannie T.

    2003-03-01

    Sports vision encompasses the visual assessment and provision of sports-specific visual performance enhancement and ocular protection for athletes of all ages, genders and levels of participation. In recent years, sports vision has been identified as one of the key performance indicators in sport. It is built on four main cornerstones: corrective eyewear, protective eyewear, visual skills enhancement and performance enhancement. Although clinically well established in the US, it is still a relatively new area of optometric specialisation elsewhere in the world and is gaining increasing popularity with eyecare practitioners and researchers. This research is often multi-disciplinary and involves input from a variety of subject disciplines, mainly those of optometry, medicine, physiology, psychology, physics, chemistry, computer science and engineering. Collaborative research projects are currently underway between staff of the Schools of Physics and Computing (DIT) and the Academy of Sports Vision (RAU).

  10. Interoperability Strategic Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Knight, Mark R.; Melton, Ronald B.; Narang, David; Martin, Maurice; Nordman, Bruce; Khandekar, Aditya; Hardy, Keith S.

    2018-02-28

    The Interoperability Strategic Vision whitepaper aims to promote a common understanding of the meaning and characteristics of interoperability and to provide a strategy to advance the state of interoperability as applied to integration challenges facing grid modernization. This includes addressing the quality of integrating devices and systems and the discipline to improve the process of successfully integrating these components as business models and information technology improve over time. The strategic vision for interoperability described in this document applies throughout the electric energy generation, delivery, and end-use supply chain. Its scope includes interactive technologies and business processes from bulk energy levels to lower voltage level equipment and the millions of appliances that are becoming equipped with processing power and communication interfaces. A transformational aspect of a vision for interoperability in the future electric system is the coordinated operation of intelligent devices and systems at the edges of grid infrastructure. This challenge offers an example for addressing interoperability concerns throughout the electric system.

  11. P1-9: Relationship between Color Shifts in Land's Two-Color Method and Higher- and Lower-Level Visual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Iwaida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Land's two-color method gives rise to apparent full-color perception, even though only two colors (e.g., red and gray are used. Previous studies indicate that chromatic adaptation, color memory, and inductive effects contribute to the shifts of color perception from real to illusory colors (e.g., Kuriki, 2006 Vision Research 46 3055–3066. This paper investigates the relationship between the color shifts induced by Land images and the skewness of the luminance histogram. In Experiment 1, several Land images are created based on a yellow ball, and the magnitude of the color shifts of the images are measured. The results of Experiment 1 show a significant correlation between the magnitude of the color shifts and skewness, suggesting that skewness is critical for the color shifts. In Experiment 2, we test the hypothesis that color shifts depends on just skewness; the color shifts should be invariant even if the Land images are scrambled. However, the results of Experiment 2 demonstrate that scrambled Land images exhibit less intense color shifts, suggesting that color shifts are determined by the object's overall shape or surface gloss, not just skewness. Taken together, we conclude that both low-level visual processes, such as those associated with luminance histogram skew, and high-level cognitive functions, such as object interpretation or understanding of surface gloss, are involved in the color shift of Land images.

  12. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departmento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Boston, MA (United States); Caruso, Paul A. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  13. Bio-inspired vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posch, C

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980's, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ''neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  14. Il colore delle cose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Vitiello

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tema di questo saggio è l’operare della riflessione. Vitiello, dopo essersi soffermato sulla «frattura» tra la riflessione (il «vedersi» e il suo operare in Valéry, si concentra sul processo, descritto da Hegel nella Fenomenologia dello spirito, dell’esperienza della coscienza che s’eleva a coscienza dell’esperienza. La conclusione è fortemente critica: Hegel fallisce la mèta nel punto stesso in cui la raggiunge. Infatti nel sapere assoluto, nella visione compiuta, perfetta di sé, della luce che vede luce, viene meno proprio l’esperienza della coscienza, il suo divenire, la sua «imperfezione». La critica a Hegel, passando attraverso Nietzsche, si amplia a critica del linguaggio, in particolare del linguaggio dell’«essere» e  dell’«è», e delle tautologie heideggeriane quali «das Ereignis ereignet», «das Ding dingt», «die Welt weltet». Un importante passaggio del testo è quello sul linguaggio teatrale in cui la parola sembra riacquistare il legame originale tra la voce e il gesto, che tuttavia restano divisi, perché proprio il medio che li lega, il «colore» della parola, è «fuori» della parola e del gesto. Resta la parola dell’agire, dei pragmata, in cui il fare si espone nella sua modalità più propria: nell’immediatezza del patire: il grido di dolore; o nella mediatezza riflessiva dell’imperativo morale: Handle! I due opposti «colori» delle cose.

  15. Computer vision and machine learning with RGB-D sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Ling; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an interdisciplinary selection of cutting-edge research on RGB-D based computer vision. Features: discusses the calibration of color and depth cameras, the reduction of noise on depth maps and methods for capturing human performance in 3D; reviews a selection of applications which use RGB-D information to reconstruct human figures, evaluate energy consumption and obtain accurate action classification; presents an approach for 3D object retrieval and for the reconstruction of gas flow from multiple Kinect cameras; describes an RGB-D computer vision system designed to assist t

  16. En vision for CBS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Kommentar. CBS’ ry for at være et moderne Business University med forskere fra hele verden og forskningsmæssig dynamik faldt på gulvet. Udfordringen er nu at få samlet CBS forskere om en fælles vision.......Kommentar. CBS’ ry for at være et moderne Business University med forskere fra hele verden og forskningsmæssig dynamik faldt på gulvet. Udfordringen er nu at få samlet CBS forskere om en fælles vision....

  17. Homeostatic study of the effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Qin; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Wu, Ren-Le; Ruan, Chang-Xiong; He, Li-Mei; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-12-01

    There are effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome. It has been explained from the psychological and perceptual viewpoints, respectively. It was studied by integrating the homeostatic theory of exercise training and autonomic nervous model of color vision in this paper. It was found that the effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome depend on autonomic nervous homeostasis (ANH). Color can be classified into hot color such as red, orange and yellow and cold color such as green, blue and violet. If the athletes have been in ANH, there are no effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome. If the autonomic nervous system is far from ANH due to exercise induced fatigue, wearing cold color had no predominance for cold-hot matches, and wearing white had no predominance for white-color matches.

  18. A novel vision-based PET bottle recycling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiangyu; He, Zaixing; Zhang, Shuyou; Zhao, Xinyue

    2017-01-01

    Post-consumer PET bottle recycling is attracting increasing attention due to its value as an energy conservation and environmental protection measure. Sorting by color is a common method in bottle recycling; however, manual operations are unstable and time consuming. In this paper, we design a vision-based facility to perform high-speed bottle sorting. The proposed facility consists mainly of electric and mechanical hardware and image processing software. To solve the recognition problem of isolated and overlapped bottles, we propose a new shape descriptor and utilize the support vector data description classifier. We use color names to represent the colors in the real world in order to avoid problems introduced by colors that are similar. The facility is evaluated by the target error, outlier error and total error. The experimental results demonstrate that the facility we developed is capable of recycling various PET bottles. (paper)

  19. Color-avoiding percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sebastian M.; Danziger, Michael M.; Zlatić, Vinko

    2017-08-01

    Many real world networks have groups of similar nodes which are vulnerable to the same failure or adversary. Nodes can be colored in such a way that colors encode the shared vulnerabilities. Using multiple paths to avoid these vulnerabilities can greatly improve network robustness, if such paths exist. Color-avoiding percolation provides a theoretical framework for analyzing this scenario, focusing on the maximal set of nodes which can be connected via multiple color-avoiding paths. In this paper we extend the basic theory of color-avoiding percolation that was published in S. M. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. X 6, 041022 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041022. We explicitly account for the fact that the same particular link can be part of different paths avoiding different colors. This fact was previously accounted for with a heuristic approximation. Here we propose a better method for solving this problem which is substantially more accurate for many avoided colors. Further, we formulate our method with differentiated node functions, either as senders and receivers, or as transmitters. In both functions, nodes can be explicitly trusted or avoided. With only one avoided color we obtain standard percolation. Avoiding additional colors one by one, we can understand the critical behavior of color-avoiding percolation. For unequal color frequencies, we find that the colors with the largest frequencies control the critical threshold and exponent. Colors of small frequencies have only a minor influence on color-avoiding connectivity, thus allowing for approximations.

  20. Scene recognition and colorization for vehicle infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junjie; Sun, Shaoyuan; Shen, Zhenyi; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    In order to make better use of infrared technology for driving assistance system, a scene recognition and colorization method is proposed in this paper. Various objects in a queried infrared image are detected and labelled with proper categories by a combination of SIFT-Flow and MRF model. The queried image is then colorized by assigning corresponding colors according to the categories of the objects appeared. The results show that the strategy here emphasizes important information of the IR images for human vision and could be used to broaden the application of IR images for vehicle driving.

  1. Color Image Quality Assessment Based on CIEDE2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the color difference formula of CIEDE2000 and the printing industry standard for visual verification, we present an objective color image quality assessment method correlated with subjective vision perception. An objective score conformed to subjective perception (OSCSP Q was proposed to directly reflect the subjective visual perception. In addition, we present a general method to calibrate correction factors of color difference formula under real experimental conditions. Our experiment results show that the present DE2000-based metric can be consistent with human visual system in general application environment.

  2. Operational Based Vision Assessment Automated Vision Test Collection User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-15

    14. ABSTRACT The U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Operational Based Vision Assessment Laboratory has developed a set of computer - based...Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Operational Based Vision Assessment (OBVA) Laboratory has developed a set of computer -based, automated vision ...username of your computer ]  “App Data”  “Roaming”  Automated Vision Test”  “Settings”  “Calibration.” Once inside the “Calibration” folder

  3. Binocular Vision and the Stroop Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, François; Kapoula, Zoï

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies report a link between optometric results, learning disabilities, and problems in reading. This study examines the correlations between optometric tests of binocular vision, namely, of vergence and accommodation, reading speed, and cognitive executive functions as measured by the Stroop test. Fifty-one students (mean age, 20.43 ± 1.25 years) were given a complete eye examination. They then performed the reading test L'Alouette and the Stroop interference test at their usual reading distance. Criteria for selection were the absence of significant refractive uncorrected error, strabismus, amblyopia, color vision defects, and other neurologic findings. The results show a correlation between positive fusional vergences (PFVs) at near distance and the interference effect (IE) in the Stroop test: the higher the PFV value is, the less the IE. Furthermore, the subgroup of 11 students presenting convergence insufficiency, according to Scheiman and Wick criteria (2002), showed a significantly higher IE during the Stroop test than the other students (N = 18) who had normal binocular vision without symptoms at near. Importantly, there is no correlation between reading speed and PFV either for the entire sample or for the subgroups. These results suggest for the first time a link between convergence capacity and the interference score in the Stroop test. Such a link is attributable to the fact that vergence control and cognitive functions mobilize the same cortical areas, for example, parietofrontal areas. The results are in favor of our hypothesis that vergence is a vector of attentional and cognitive functions.

  4. Addressing Diversity in the Decade of Behavior: Focus on Women of Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nancy Felipe; Vaz, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the lives of women of color, illustrating diversity-minded feminist principles that may inform research and program development related to other aspects of diversity. Notes perspectives and priorities of women of color in psychology. Considers why implementing feminist psychology's inclusive vision for research is a continuing struggle,…

  5. Visual Attention to Movement and Color in Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Maitre, Stacey Ann; Haerich, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of color and motion to elicit and maintain visual attention in a sample of children with cortical visual impairment (CVI). It found that colorful and moving objects may be used to engage children with CVI, increase their motivation to use their residual vision, and promote visual learning.

  6. Effects of visual skills training, vision coaching and sports vision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of three different approaches to improving sports performance through improvements in “sports vision:” (1) a visual skills training programme, (2) traditional vision coaching sessions, and (3) a multi-disciplinary approach identified as sports vision dynamics.

  7. Near vision spectacle coverage and barriers to near vision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    easily help to address this visual disability.7 An average cost of near vision spectacle in Ghana is approximately. $ 5.8 Near-vision spectacle could be dispensed as single vision, bifocal or progressive eye glasses to meet near vi- sion needs.2. Recent evidence suggests that the ageing population in. Ghana is increasing ...

  8. Grounding Our Vision: Brain Research and Strategic Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mike

    2011-01-01

    While recognizing the value of "vision," it could be argued that vision alone--at least in schools--is not enough to rally the financial and emotional support required to translate an idea into reality. A compelling vision needs to reflect substantive, research-based knowledge if it is to spark the kind of strategic thinking and insight…

  9. KiWi Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, Sebastian; Bry, Francois; Dolog, Peter

    This deliverable describes the common vision of the KiWi project, ranging from motivation over use cases and usage scenarios to user interaction, system architecture and technologies, and the research that is performed as part of the project. The deliverable is intended for a wide audience to give...

  10. Vision eller verklighet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas E

    2012-01-01

    and drawing analysis. This study suggests that there is a gap between reality and visions. Despite research-based guidelines, the architecture of contemporary residential care homes relies on universal qualities that are associated with the home environment rather than with the particular conditions...

  11. Tectonic vision in architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1999-01-01

    By introducing the concept; Tectonic Visions, The Dissertation discusses the interrelationship between the basic idea, the form principles, the choice of building technology and constructive structures within a given building. Includes Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Eames, Jorn Utzon, Louis Kahn...

  12. Giving Machines the Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Amherst Systems manufactures foveal machine vision technology and systems commercially available to end-users and system integrators. This technology was initially developed under NASA contracts NAS9-19335 (Johnson Space Center) and NAS1-20841 (Langley Research Center). This technology is currently being delivered to university research facilities and military sites. More information may be found in www.amherst.com.

  13. Direct vision internal urethrotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, H; Willumsen, H; Søndergaard Jensen, L

    1984-01-01

    During a five-year period, direct vision internal urethrotomy was used for the treatment of urethral strictures in 34 men. After the primary operation the patients were followed for an average period of 29 months (range 3-73 months). During this period 53% of the patients were found to have one...

  14. Vision: Essential Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph; Torre, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Few concepts are more noted in the leadership effects research than vision. It is a cardinal element in the school improvement equation as well. Yet, it remains one of the least well-specified components of that algorithm. Based on a comprehensive review of the research on effective leadership and school improvement from 1995 to 2012, we bring…

  15. Tectonic vision in architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1999-01-01

    By introducing the concept; Tectonic Visions, The Dissertation discusses the interrelationship between the basic idea, the form principles, the choice of building technology and constructive structures within a given building. Includes Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Eames, Jorn Utzon, Louis Kah...

  16. Home vision tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... missing areas. If any lines appear distorted or broken, note their location on the grid using a pen or pencil. DISTANCE VISION This is the standard eye chart doctors use, which has been adapted for home use. The chart is attached to a wall ...

  17. The Photodynamics of Vision

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rruion is one of our primary senses. It is the ability to identify, process and interpret what is seen by the eye. It is a powerful mechanism for parallel processing of information received at the speed of light from near and remote scenes. The volume of information received by vision is certainly more than that re- ceived by our ...

  18. MARR: active vision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podladchikova, Lubov N.; Gusakova, Valentina I.; Shaposhnikov, Dmitry G.; Faure, Alain; Golovan, Alexander V.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.

    1997-09-01

    Earlier, the biologically plausible active vision, model for multiresolutional attentional representation and recognition (MARR) has been developed. The model is based on the scanpath theory of Noton and Stark and provides invariant recognition of gray-level images. In the present paper, the algorithm of automatic image viewing trajectory formation in the MARR model, the results of psychophysical experiments, and possible applications of the model are considered. Algorithm of automatic image viewing trajectory formation is based on imitation of the scanpath formed by operator. Several propositions about possible mechanisms for a consecutive selection of fixation points in human visual perception inspired by computer simulation results and known psychophysical data have been tested and confirmed in our psychophysical experiments. In particular, we have found that gaze switch may be directed (1) to a peripheral part of the vision field which contains an edge oriented orthogonally to the edge in the point of fixation, and (2) to a peripheral part of the vision field containing crossing edges. Our experimental results have been used to optimize automatic algorithm of image viewing in the MARR model. The modified model demonstrates an ability to recognize complex real world images invariantly with respect to scale, shift, rotation, illumination conditions, and, in part, to point of view and can be used to solve some robot vision tasks.

  19. Preferred skin color enhancement for photographic color reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huanzhao; Luo, Ronnier

    2011-01-01

    Skin tones are the most important colors among the memory color category. Reproducing skin colors pleasingly is an important factor in photographic color reproduction. Moving skin colors toward their preferred skin color center improves the color preference of skin color reproduction. Several methods to morph skin colors to a smaller preferred skin color region has been reported in the past. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to further improve the result of skin color enhancement. An ellipsoid skin color model is applied to compute skin color probabilities for skin color detection and to determine a weight for skin color adjustment. Preferred skin color centers determined through psychophysical experiments were applied for color adjustment. Preferred skin color centers for dark, medium, and light skin colors are applied to adjust skin colors differently. Skin colors are morphed toward their preferred color centers. A special processing is applied to avoid contrast loss in highlight. A 3-D interpolation method is applied to fix a potential contouring problem and to improve color processing efficiency. An psychophysical experiment validates that the method of preferred skin color enhancement effectively identifies skin colors, improves the skin color preference, and does not objectionably affect preferred skin colors in original images.

  20. INL Vision and Strategy 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar

    2015-01-01

    This Laboratory vision and strategy presents INL's vision and strategy for the Laboratory and is our introduction to a special place dedicated to improving our nation's energy security future.

  1. What is vision Hampton Roads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    What is Vision Hampton Roads? : Vision Hampton Roads is... : A regionwide economic development strategy based on the collective strengths of all : localities of Hampton Roads, created with the input of business, academia, nonprofits, : government,...

  2. Color development and acrylamide content of pre-dried potato chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedreschi, Franco; León, Jorge; Mery, Domingo

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the development of color formation in pre-dried potato slices during frying and acrylamide formation in the final potato chips. Color measurement was done by using an inexpensive computer vision technique which allowed quantifying representatively and preci......The objective of this work was to study the development of color formation in pre-dried potato slices during frying and acrylamide formation in the final potato chips. Color measurement was done by using an inexpensive computer vision technique which allowed quantifying representatively...... to 1.8% (total basis) for color quantification. Acrylamide concentration was determined only in final chips fried at 120 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 180 degrees C and compared with that of two brands of commercial chips produced in Chile (Moms and Frito Lay). Color values in L*a*b* units were recorded......%, 44% lower acrylamide content than that of the control, Moms and Frito Lay chips, respectively....

  3. Mobile Atmospheric Sensing using Vision Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yuchun; Cui, Weihong; Rui, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Air quality monitoring, especially the atmospheric phenomenon of thick haze, has been an acute problem in most countries and a hot topic in the atmospheric sensing. Recently thick haze occurs more frequently in most cities of China due to the rapid growth of traffic, farming, wildfires, and industrial development. It forms a low-hanging shroud that impairs visibility and becomes a respiratory health threat. Traditionally the dust, smoke, and other particles in relatively dry sky are reported at fixed meteorological stations. The coverage of these sampling stations is limited and cannot accommodate with the emergent incidence of thick haze from industrial pollution. In addition, the visual effect of thick haze is not yet investigated in the current practice. Thick haze appears colorful veil (e.g., yellowish, brownish-grey, etc) in video log images and results in a loss of contrast in the subject due to the light scattering through haze particles. This paper proposes an intuitive and mobile atmospheric sensing using vision approach. Based on the video log images collected by a mobile sensing vehicle, a Haze Veil Index (HVI) is proposed to identify the type and severity level of thick haze from the color and texture perspective. HVI characterizes the overall veil effect of haze spatially. HVI first identifies the haze color from the color deviation histogram of the white-balanced hazy image. The white-balancing is conducted with the most haze-opaque pixels in the dark channel and seed growing strategy. Then pixel-wise haze severity level of atmospheric veil is inferred by approximating the upper veil limit with the dark color of each pixel in a hazy image. The proposed method is tested on a diverse set of actual hazy video log images under varying atmospheric conditions and backgrounds in Wuhan City, China. Experimental results show the proposed HVI is effective for visually atmospheric sensing. The proposed method is promising for haze monitoring and prediction in

  4. Vision in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, David A; Valentine, Emma L; Gibson, Georgina; Thomas, Hannah R; Oh, Sera; Pyo, Young Ah; Lacherez, Philippe; Mathur, Ankit

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of this study is to determine visual performance in water, including the influence of pupil size. The water environment was simulated by placing goggles filled with saline in front of the eyes with apertures placed at the front of the goggles. Correction factors were determined for the different magnification under this condition in order to estimate vision in water. Experiments were conducted on letter visual acuity (seven participants), grating resolution (eight participants), and grating contrast sensitivity (one participant). For letter acuity, mean loss of vision in water, compared to corrected vision in air, varied between 1.1 log min of arc resolution (logMAR) for a 1 mm aperture to 2.2 logMAR for a 7 mm aperture. The vision in min of arc was described well by a linear relationship with pupil size. For grating acuity, mean loss varied between 1.1 logMAR for a 2 mm aperture to 1.2 logMAR for a 6 mm aperture. Contrast sensitivity for a 2 mm aperture deteriorated as spatial frequency increased with a 2 log unit loss by 3 c/°. Superimposed on this deterioration were depressions (notches) in sensitivity with the first three notches occurring at 0.45, 0.8, and 1.3 c/° with estimates for water of 0.39, 0.70, and 1.13 c/°. In conclusion, vision in water is poor. It becomes worse as pupil size increases, but the effects are much more marked for letter targets than for grating targets.

  5. Improving access to vision screening in urban Philadelphia elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A; Mayro, Eileen L; Tran, Judie; Pond, Michael; Schneider, Rachel; Torosian, Justin; Snitzer, Melanie; Dabbish, Nooreen; Levin, Alex V

    2016-10-01

    The Wills Eye Vision Screening Program for Children is a community-based vision screening program for children in urban Philadelphia elementary schools that aims to provide vision screening, remedy refractive error by providing glasses, and refer children with suspected nonrefractive eye disease for eye care. Children in grades K-5 from 45 Philadelphia elementary schools were screened for distance and near visual acuity, stereopsis, and color vision from January 2014 to June 2015. Children who failed were assessed by an on-site optometrist. Two pairs of eyeglasses were provided at no cost. Children with suspected, nonrefractive disease were referred to Wills Eye Hospital Pediatric Ophthalmology and contacted by a social worker to schedule an appointment. Over 84 days, 10,726 children were screened for vision problems at 45 schools. A total of 1,321 children (12%) had refractive error and 1,015 children (77%) returned the consent form and received two pairs of glasses. Of the 509 children (5%) referred to Wills Eye, 177 returned consent forms and were not being followed by an ophthalmologist. Of these, 127 children (72%) completed an eye examination at Wills. The program described herein can provide comprehensive vision screening, with eyeglasses and/or referrals, to children within an underserved community. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Eye Vision Testing System and Eyewear Using Micromachines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel A. Riza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proposed is a novel eye vision testing system based on micromachines that uses micro-optic, micromechanic, and microelectronic technologies. The micromachines include a programmable micro-optic lens and aperture control devices, pico-projectors, Radio Frequency (RF, optical wireless communication and control links, and energy harvesting and storage devices with remote wireless energy transfer capabilities. The portable lightweight system can measure eye refractive powers, optimize light conditions for the eye under testing, conduct color-blindness tests, and implement eye strain relief and eye muscle exercises via time sequenced imaging. A basic eye vision test system is built in the laboratory for near-sighted (myopic vision spherical lens refractive error correction. Refractive error corrections from zero up to −5.0 Diopters and −2.0 Diopters are experimentally demonstrated using the Electronic-Lens (E-Lens and aperture control methods, respectively. The proposed portable eye vision test system is suited for children’s eye tests and developing world eye centers where technical expertise may be limited. Design of a novel low-cost human vision corrective eyewear is also presented based on the proposed aperture control concept. Given its simplistic and economical design, significant impact can be created for humans with vision problems in the under-developed world.

  7. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... new application of artificial intelligence shows whether a patient’s eyes point to high blood pressure or risk ...

  8. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of colored contact lenses , from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Are the colored lenses ... 2018 By Dan T. Gudgel Do you know what the difference is between ophthalmologists and optometrists? A ...

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  10. Antibacterial Structural Color Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoyue; Mo, Min; Fu, Fanfan; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Liu, Cihui; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-11-08

    Structural color hydrogels with lasting survivability are important for many applications, but they still lack anti-biodegradation capability. Thus, we herein present novel antibacterial structural color hydrogels by simply integrating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in situ into the hydrogel materials. Because the integrated AgNPs possessed wide and excellent antibacterial abilities, the structural color hydrogels could prevent bacterial adhesion, avoid hydrogel damage, and maintain their vivid structural colors during their application and storage. It was demonstrated that the AgNP-tagged poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) structural color hydrogels could retain their original thermal-responsive color transition even when the AgNP-free hydrogels were degraded by bacteria and that the AgNP-integrated self-healing structural color protein hydrogels could save their self-repairing property instead of being degraded by bacteria. These features indicated that the antibacterial structural color hydrogels could be amenable to a variety of practical biomedical applications.

  11. Fingers that change color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanching of the fingers; Fingers - pale; Toes that change color; Toes - pale ... These conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease. Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small ...

  12. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... an ophthalmologist — an eye medical doctor — who will measure each eye and talk to you about proper ...

  13. Fresh meat color evaluation using a structured light imaging system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup; Kim, Yuan H. Brad

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a computer vision system (CVS) with structured light for meat color assessment. Three muscles (longissimus dorsi (LD), semimembranosus (SM), and psoas major (PM)) from eight beef carcasses were obtained at 1 day postmortem, vacuum...... packaged and assigned to three aging periods (9, 16, and 23 days). After aging, steaks were cut and displayed for 7 days at 3 °C under light. The surface colors were evaluated by using a Minolta, the CVS and trained color panel. In general, the CVS was highly correlated to the sensory scores, and showed...... an equivalent meat color assessment compared to the colorimeter. The CVS had a significantly higher correlation with the panel scores for the lighter and more color stable samples compared to the colorimeter. These results indicate that the CVS with structured light could be an appropriate alternative...

  14. Role-play facilitates children’s mindreading of those with atypical color perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumikazu eFurumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of role-play experience on children’s mindreading ability. Forty-one primary school children (20 boys, 21 girls, mean age: 9.37 years, range: 8–11 years were introduced to a communication task in which the use of mindreading was essential. During each trial, participants viewed a shelf, presented on a laptop, which contained several familiar objects, and they were instructed to touch an object on the shelf following an order issued by a manager who stood at the opposite side of the shelf. There were two managers: one was a monkey manager with normal color vision, and the other was a dog manager with restricted color vision. The monkey manager could see all the objects in the same colors as the participants, whereas the dog manager saw some objects in different colors. Participants were required to respond according to the manager's instruction. In the restricted color vision condition, the dog manager saw the colors of objects differently; thus, participants had to work out his intentions, according to his different perspective. In the normal color vision condition, all objects were in the same colors as those seen by the monkey manager. Before the test phase, participants in the role-play group were provided a role-play experience in which they assumed the role of the dog manager with restricted color vision. The experimental data were analyzed using a 2 x 2 mixed-design ANOVA (role-play condition x communication partner condition to examine differences in the error rate. Both main effects and its interaction were significant. According to the post-hoc analyses, participants in the no-role-play condition made significantly more errors in the restricted color vision condition than in the normal color vision condition, whereas no such difference was found among participants in the role-play condition. These results suggest that role-play experience could facilitate mindreading of characters with

  15. A deblocking algorithm based on color psychology for display quality enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yu; Huang, Kai-Lin

    2012-12-01

    This article proposes a post-processing deblocking filter to reduce blocking effects. The proposed algorithm detects blocking effects by fusing the results of Sobel edge detector and wavelet-based edge detector. The filtering stage provides four filter modes to eliminate blocking effects at different color regions according to human color vision and color psychology analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better subjective and objective qualities for H.264/AVC reconstructed videos when compared to several existing methods.

  16. Color and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    After a brief review of the color hypothesis and the motivations for its introduction, the experimental tests are discussed. Colored states are assumed not to have been produced at present energies and the only experimental tests discussed apply below the color threshold, when color is a 'hidden symmetry'. Some of these tests offer the posibility of distinguishing between quark models with fractional and integral quark charges

  17. Color and experimental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    After a brief review of the color hypothesis and the motivations for its introduction, the experimental tests arare discussed. It is assumed that colored states have not been produced at present energies and only experimental tests which apply below the color threshold, when color is a ''hidden symmetry,'' are discussed. Some of these tests offer the possibility of distinguishing between quark models with fractional and integral quark charges. (auth)

  18. Retrospective data on causes of childhood vision impairment in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Rajendra; Bhayal, Bharat Kumar; Adhikary, Rabindra; Shrestha, Arjun; Sah, Rabindra Prasad

    2017-11-22

    Proper information on causes of childhood vision loss is essential in developing appropriate strategies and programs to address such causes. This study aimed at identifying the causes of vision loss in children attending the national referral eye hospital with the only pediatric ophthalmology service in Eritrea. A retrospective data review was conducted for all the children (Causes of vision loss for children with vision impairment (recorded visual acuity less than 6/18 for distance in the better eye) was classified by the anatomical site affected and by underlying etiology based on the timing of the insult and causal factor. The medical record cards of 22,509 children were reviewed, of whom 249 (1.1%) were visually impaired. The mean age of the participants was 7.82 ± 5.43 years (range: one month to 16 years) and male to female ratio was 1:0.65. The leading causes of vision loss were cataract (19.7%), corneal scars (15.7%), refractive error and amblyopia (12.1%), optic atrophy (6.4%), phthisis bulbi (6.4%), aphakia (5.6%) and glaucoma (5.2%). Childhood factors including trauma were the leading causes identified (34.5%) whereas other causes included hereditary factors (4%), intrauterine factors (2.0%) and perinatal factors (4.4%). In 55.0% of the children, the underlying etiology could not be attributed. Over two-thirds (69.9%) of vision loss was potentially avoidable in nature. This study explored the causes of vision loss in Eritrean children using hospital based data. Cataract corneal opacities, refractive error and amblyopia, globe damage due to trauma, infection and nutritional deficiency, retinal disorders, and other congenital abnormalities were the leading causes of childhood vision impairment in children attending the tertiary eye hospital in Eritrea. As majority of the causes of vision loss was due to avoidable causes, we recommended primary level public health strategies to prevent ocular injuries, vitamin A deficiency, perinatal infections and

  19. Reimagining the Color Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Color wheels are a traditional project for many teachers. The author has used them in art appreciation classes for many years, but one problem she found when her pre-service art education students created colored wheels was that they were boring: simple circles, with pie-shaped pieces, which students either painted or colored in. This article…

  20. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Cleveland. "This is far from the truth." Real People, Real Problems with Colored Contact Lenses Julian: Teenager Blinded ... use of colored contact lenses , from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Are the colored lenses ...

  1. EyeScreen: A Vision-Based Desktop Interaction System

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yihua; Lv, Jingjun; Li, Shanqing; Jia, Yunde

    2007-01-01

    EyeScreen provides a natural HCI interface with vision-based hand tracking and gesture recognition techniques. Multi-view video images captured from two cameras facing a computer screen are used to track and recognize finger and hand motions. Finger tracking is achieved by skin color detection and particle filtering, and is greatly enhanced by the proposed screen background subtraction method that removes the screen images in advance. Finger click on the screen can also be detected from multi...

  2. Vision Care and the Nation's Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    Aspects of vision and vision care considered are the following: extent and types of vision defects of American children; importance of vision care in pre-school years, elementary, and secondary school and beyond; and manpower resources in vision care today, the extent of vision testing and care, special problem areas, and governmental support.…

  3. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed “digital color fusion microscopy” (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available.

  4. Realisering af Vision 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    Repræsentanter for byggesektoren har på 11 dialogmøder drøftet Erhvervs- og Byggestyrelsens "Vision 2020 - Byggeri med mening". Drøftelserne førte til formulering af en lang række initiativforslag til realisering af visionen. Den mest centrale udfordring bliver at reducere fejl og mangler i...... byggeriet. Branchen lægger også vægt på, at styringen af Vision 2020s reaisering sker i byggesektoren. Initiativforslagene er i rapporten samlet under 3 hovedområder. Det første hovedområde lægger vægt på bygningerne, brugerbehov og det globale samfund. Det andet omhandler processen og leverancesystemet...

  5. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  6. Robotic Vision for Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  7. 2015 Enterprise Strategic Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    This document aligns with the Department of Energy Strategic Plan for 2014-2018 and provides a framework for integrating our missions and direction for pursuing DOE’s strategic goals. The vision is a guide to advancing world-class science and engineering, supporting our people, modernizing our infrastructure, and developing a management culture that operates a safe and secure enterprise in an efficient manner.

  8. Research for VISION 2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ackland

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We need good quality information to be able to carry out our eye care programmes in support of VISION 2020, to measure (and improve our performance, and to advocate for the resources and support we need to succeed. Much of this information can be collected, analysed, and used as part of our daily work, as many of the articles in this issue show.

  9. How colorful! A feature it is, isn't it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowsky, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    A display's color subpixel geometry provides an intriguing opportunity for improving readability of text. True type fonts can be positioned at the precision of subpixel resolution. With such a constraint in mind, how does one need to design font characteristics? On the other hand, display manufactures try hard in addressing the color display's dilemma: smaller pixel pitch and larger display diagonals strongly increase the total number of pixels. Consequently, cost of column and row drivers as well as power consumption increase. Perceptual color subpixel rendering using color component subsampling may save about 1/3 of color subpixels (and reduce power dissipation). This talk will try to elaborate the following questions, based on simulation of several different layouts of subpixel matrices: Up to what level are display device constraints compatible with software specific ideas of rendering text? How much of color contrast will remain? How to best consider preferred viewing distance for readability of text? How much does visual acuity vary at 20/20 vision? Can simplified models of human visual color perception be easily applied to text rendering on displays? How linear is human visual contrast perception around band limit of a display's spatial resolution? How colorful does the rendered text appear on the screen? How much does viewing angle influence the performance of subpixel layouts and color subpixel rendering?

  10. Changes in brown eggshell color as the hen ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaşi, A Z; Miles, R D; Balaban, M O; Portier, K M

    2007-02-01

    The color of eggshells from eggs laid by commercial-type Hy-Line brown hens 25 wk of age was studied over a period of 10 mo. Color measurements were made by a color machine vision system and were analyzed using a mixed model to calculate between and within hen variances and to investigate the effect of time on shell color. Hens laid eggs with lighter colored shells as the flock aged, as evidenced by the lightness (L*) values increasing in time. A decrease in pigmentation was associated with a decrease in the amount of redness (a*) in the eggshell. When L* and a* values were corrected for egg weight, the rate of change in the L* and a* values decreased, indicating that size of the egg was a major factor affecting the color of the eggshell. These findings quantified the observations that older hens lay lighter colored eggs due to an increase in egg size associated with no proportionate change in the quantity of pigment deposited over the shell surface. Using a 2-stage sampling analysis and the variances between and within hens, sample sizes required to estimate the color of eggshells within 5% of the true mean were calculated. Accordingly, 11 eggs would need to be collected from each of the 51 hens housed for a study of brown eggshell color using the L*, a*, and b* (yellowness) coordinates.

  11. Quality Parameters of Six Cultivars of Blueberry Using Computer Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Matiacevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blueberries are considered an important source of health benefits. This work studied six blueberry cultivars: “Duke,” “Brigitta”, “Elliott”, “Centurion”, “Star,” and “Jewel”, measuring quality parameters such as °Brix, pH, moisture content using standard techniques and shape, color, and fungal presence obtained by computer vision. The storage conditions were time (0–21 days, temperature (4 and 15°C, and relative humidity (75 and 90%. Results. Significant differences (P<0.05 were detected between fresh cultivars in pH, °Brix, shape, and color. However, the main parameters which changed depending on storage conditions, increasing at higher temperature, were color (from blue to red and fungal presence (from 0 to 15%, both detected using computer vision, which is important to determine a shelf life of 14 days for all cultivars. Similar behavior during storage was obtained for all cultivars. Conclusion. Computer vision proved to be a reliable and simple method to objectively determine blueberry decay during storage that can be used as an alternative approach to currently used subjective measurements.

  12. A robust embedded vision system feasible white balance algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Yu, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    White balance is a very important part of the color image processing pipeline. In order to meet the need of efficiency and accuracy in embedded machine vision processing system, an efficient and robust white balance algorithm combining several classical ones is proposed. The proposed algorithm mainly has three parts. Firstly, in order to guarantee higher efficiency, an initial parameter calculated from the statistics of R, G and B components from raw data is used to initialize the following iterative method. After that, the bilinear interpolation algorithm is utilized to implement demosaicing procedure. Finally, an adaptive step adjustable scheme is introduced to ensure the controllability and robustness of the algorithm. In order to verify the proposed algorithm's performance on embedded vision system, a smart camera based on IMX6 DualLite, IMX291 and XC6130 is designed. Extensive experiments on a large amount of images under different color temperatures and exposure conditions illustrate that the proposed white balance algorithm avoids color deviation problem effectively, achieves a good balance between efficiency and quality, and is suitable for embedded machine vision processing system.

  13. Color consilience: color through the lens of art practice, history, philosophy, and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Bevil R

    2012-03-01

    Paintings can be interpreted as the product of the complex neural machinery that translates physical light signals into behavior, experience, and emotion. The brain mechanisms responsible for vision and perception have been sculpted during evolution and further modified by cultural exposure and development. By closely examining artists' paintings and practices, we can discover hints to how the brain works, and achieve insight into the discoveries and inventions of artists and their impact on culture. Here, I focus on an integral aspect of color, color contrast, which poses a challenge for artists: a mark situated on an otherwise blank canvas will appear a different color in the context of the finished painting. How do artists account for this change in color during the production of a painting? In the broader context of neural and philosophical considerations of color, I discuss the practices of three modern masters, Henri Matisse, Paul Cézanne, and Claude Monet, and suggest that the strategies they developed not only capitalized on the neural mechanisms of color, but also influenced the trajectory of western art history. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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  15. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society ... Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society ...

  16. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... IRIS Registry Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki ... IRIS Registry Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki ...

  17. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive ... Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive ...

  18. Ecstasy and vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Hultgård

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we shall present some observations on the role played by ecstasy in the activity of the seer, as he emerges in ancient Jewish and Iranian texts. In the Jewish religious literature of the Hellenistic-Roman period, visions are described on almost every page, and visions were the most important means of divine revelation. Specific techniques for inducing the ecstatic state are not recorded in the Jewish sources. Some elements in the pattern leading up to the vision may be interpreted as parts of a method for inducing the final ecstasy; i.e. fasting and prayer. The Iranian material shows clearly the importance of ecstasy in the activity of the seer. The ecstatic seeing also means that the visionary shares with Ahura Mazda a divine quality, the "wisdom of omniscience". The granting of the "wisdom of omniscience" appears as a temporary and it conveys to the visionary a supernatural seeing. There is evidence to suggest that chanting was an important method of inducing ecstasy within the early Zoroastrian community. We do not find in the Jewish material a clear correspondence to the Iranian notion of "omniscient wisdom".

  19. Highly Scalable Monitoring System on Chip for Multi-Stream Auto-Adaptable Vision System

    OpenAIRE

    Isavudeen, Ali; Ngan, Nicolas; DOKLADALOVA, Eva; Akil , Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The integration of multiple and technologically heterogeneous sensors (infrared, color, etc) in vision systems tend to democratize. The objective is to benefit from the multi-modal perception allowing to improve the quality and ro-bustness of challenging applications such as the advanced driver assistance, 3-D vision, inspection systems or military observation equipment. However, the multiplication of heterogeneous processing pipelines makes the design of efficient com...

  20. Relating color working memory and color perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Sarah R; Flombaum, Jonathan I

    2014-11-01

    Color is the most frequently studied feature in visual working memory (VWM). Oddly, much of this work de-emphasizes perception, instead making simplifying assumptions about the inputs served to memory. We question these assumptions in light of perception research, and we identify important points of contact between perception and working memory in the case of color. Better characterization of its perceptual inputs will be crucial for elucidating the structure and function of VWM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcangelo eUccula

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e. who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g. color, shape or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12-14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature.

  2. Human V4 Activity Patterns Predict Behavioral Performance in Imagery of Object Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannert, Michael M; Bartels, Andreas

    2018-04-11

    Color is special among basic visual features in that it can form a defining part of objects that are engrained in our memory. Whereas most neuroimaging research on human color vision has focused on responses related to external stimulation, the present study investigated how sensory-driven color vision is linked to subjective color perception induced by object imagery. We recorded fMRI activity in male and female volunteers during viewing of abstract color stimuli that were red, green, or yellow in half of the runs. In the other half we asked them to produce mental images of colored, meaningful objects (such as tomato, grapes, banana) corresponding to the same three color categories. Although physically presented color could be decoded from all retinotopically mapped visual areas, only hV4 allowed predicting colors of imagined objects when classifiers were trained on responses to physical colors. Importantly, only neural signal in hV4 was predictive of behavioral performance in the color judgment task on a trial-by-trial basis. The commonality between neural representations of sensory-driven and imagined object color and the behavioral link to neural representations in hV4 identifies area hV4 as a perceptual hub linking externally triggered color vision with color in self-generated object imagery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans experience color not only when visually exploring the outside world, but also in the absence of visual input, for example when remembering, dreaming, and during imagery. It is not known where neural codes for sensory-driven and internally generated hue converge. In the current study we evoked matching subjective color percepts, one driven by physically presented color stimuli, the other by internally generated color imagery. This allowed us to identify area hV4 as the only site where neural codes of corresponding subjective color perception converged regardless of its origin. Color codes in hV4 also predicted behavioral performance in an

  3. Color Reproduction with a Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Lars-Jochen; Colicchia, Giuseppe; Girwidz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    The world is full of colors. Most of the colors we see around us can be created on common digital displays simply by superposing light with three different wavelengths. However, no mixture of colors can produce a fully pure color identical to a spectral color. Using a smartphone, students can investigate the main features of primary color addition…

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ...

  5. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refah Sayin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon syndrome (SS is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  9. Folate-deficiency anemia

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    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  10. Insect-vision inspired collision warning vision processor for automobiles

    OpenAIRE

    Liñán-Cembrano, G.; Carranza-González, L.; Rind, Claire; Zarandy, A.; Soininen, Martti; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Ángel

    2008-01-01

    Vision is expected to play important roles for car safety enhancement. Imaging systems can be used to enlarging the vision field of the driver. For instance capturing and displaying views of hidden areas around the car which the driver can analyze for safer decision-making. Vision systems go a step further. They can autonomously analyze the visual information, identify dangerous situations and prompt the delivery of warning signals. For instance in case of road lane departure, if an overtakin...

  11. Screening Diabetic Retinopathy Through Color Retinal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xue-Min; Gao, Quan-Xue; You, Jane; Bhattacharya, Prabir

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. Recognition DR as early as possible is very important to protect patients' vision. We propose a method for screening DR and distin-guishing Prolifetive Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR) from Non-Prolifetive Retino-pathy (NPDR) automatatically through color retinal images. This method evaluates the severity of DR by analyzing the appearnce of bright lesions and retinal vessel patterns. The bright lesions are extracted through morphlogical re-consturction. After that, the retinal vessels are automatically extracted using multiscale matched filters. Then the vessel patterns are analyzed by extracting the vessel net density. The experimental results domonstrate that it is a effective solution to screen DR and distinguish PDR from NPDR by only using color retinal images.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  17. Asymmetries in blue-yellow color perception and in the color of 'the dress'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Alissa D; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S; Webster, Michael A

    2015-06-29

    The perception of color poses daunting challenges, because the light spectrum reaching the eye depends on both the reflectance of objects and the spectrum of the illuminating light source. Solving this problem requires sophisticated inferences about the properties of lighting and surfaces, and many striking examples of 'color constancy' illustrate how our vision compensates for variations in illumination to estimate the color of objects (for example [1-3]). We discovered a novel property of color perception and constancy, involving how we experience shades of blue versus yellow. We found that surfaces are much more likely to be perceived as white or gray when their color is varied along bluish directions, compared with equivalent variations along yellowish (or reddish or greenish) directions. This selective bias may reflect a tendency to attribute bluish tints to the illuminant rather than the object, consistent with an inference that indirect lighting from the sky and in shadows tends to be bluish. The blue-yellow asymmetry has striking effects on the appearance of images when their colors are reversed, turning white to yellow and silver to gold, and helps account for the variation among observers in the colors experienced in 'the dress' image that recently consumed the internet. Observers variously describe the dress as blue-black or white-gold, and this has been explained by whether the dress appears to be in direct lighting or shade (for example [5]). We show that these individual differences and potential lighting interpretations also depend on the special ambiguity of blue, for simply reversing the image colors causes almost all observers to report the lighter stripes as yellowish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  19. Color features for quality control in ceramic tile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Saku; Kaelviaeinen, Heikki; Parkkinen, Jussi P.

    2001-02-01

    We study visual quality control in the ceramics industry. In the manufacturing, it is important that in each set of tiles, every single tile looks similar. Currently, the estimation is usually done by human vision. Our goal is to design a machine vision system that can estimate the sufficient similarity, or same appearance, to the human eye. Our main approach is to use accurate spectral representation of color, and compare spectral features to the RGB color features. A laboratory system for color measurements is built. Experimentations with five classes of brown tiles are presented and discussed. In addition to the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier, a neural network called the self-organizing map (SOM) is used to provide understanding of the spectral features. Every single spectrum in each tile of a training set is used as input to a 2D SOM. The SOM is analyzed to understand how spectra are clustered. As a result, tiles are classified using a trained 2D SOM. It is also of interest to know whether the order of spectral colors can be determined. In our approach, all spectra are clustered in a 1D SOM, and each pixel spectrum) is presented by pseudocolors according to the trained nodes. Finally, the results are compared to experiments with human vision.

  20. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bedřich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Company Vision and Organizational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Toman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a company is largely dependent on the company itself; it depends above all on its corporate governance, management, and implementation, as well as on decision-making processes and coordination. Many authors believe that organizational learning and knowledge are the most relevant aspects of company effectiveness. If a company wants to be effective it needs to create and realize its vision; to do this, it needs creativity, imagination, and knowledge, which can be obtained or enhanced through learning. This paper defines vision, learning, creativity and management and, above all, their relationships. The author argues that company vision influences the learning and knowledge of employees in the company through the vision’s content, through the vision-creating process, and through the vision enforcement process. Conversely, the influence of learning on company vision is explained. The paper is aimed at the use in the practice of companies and helps them to increase their effectiveness.

  2. Vision as subjective perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reppas, J.B.; Dale, A.; Sereno, M.; Tootell, R.

    1996-01-01

    The human brain is not very different of the monkey's one: at least, its visual cortex is organized as a similar scheme. Specialized areas in the movement analysis are found and others in the forms perception. In this work, the author tries to answer to the following questions: 1)why so many visual areas? What are exactly their role in vision? Thirteen years of experimentation have not allowed to answer to these questions. The cerebral NMR imaging gives the opportunity of understanding the subjective perception of the visual world. One step which is particularly described in this work is to know how the visual cortex reacts to the optical illusions. (O.M.)

  3. Quality Inspection and Grading of Canned Green Peas using Computer Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Jinesh V N

    2015-01-01

    Canned Green Peas are widely used vegetable and is the preferred food during emergency food supply in natural disaster for victims. It is highly nutritive and is rich in protein. The quality of these Canned Green Peas is determined by its color, smell and shape. A computer vision system is used to inspect the quality of peas. The sample for the experiment was acquired from proposed image acquisition system with image resolution 400X300. The proposed system facilitates the color and dimension ...

  4. Amblyopia and Binocular Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Eileen E.

    2012-01-01

    Amblyopia is the most common cause of monocular visual loss in children, affecting 1.3% to 3.6% of children. Current treatments are effective in reducing the visual acuity deficit but many amblyopic individuals are left with residual visual acuity deficits, ocular motor abnormalities, deficient fine motor skills, and risk for recurrent amblyopia. Using a combination of psychophysical, electrophysiological, imaging, risk factor analysis, and fine motor skill assessment, the primary role of binocular dysfunction in the genesis of amblyopia and the constellation of visual and motor deficits that accompany the visual acuity deficit has been identified. These findings motivated us to evaluate a new, binocular approach to amblyopia treatment with the goals of reducing or eliminating residual and recurrent amblyopia and of improving the deficient ocular motor function and fine motor skills that accompany amblyopia. PMID:23201436

  5. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  6. Identification of cichlid fishes from Lake Malawi using computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Deokjin; Kwan, Ye-seul; Song, Jongwoo; Pinho, Catarina; Hey, Jody; Won, Yong-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The explosively radiating evolution of cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi has yielded an amazing number of haplochromine species estimated as many as 500 to 800 with a surprising degree of diversity not only in color and stripe pattern but also in the shape of jaw and body among them. As these morphological diversities have been a central subject of adaptive speciation and taxonomic classification, such high diversity could serve as a foundation for automation of species identification of cichlids. Here we demonstrate a method for automatic classification of the Lake Malawi cichlids based on computer vision and geometric morphometrics. For this end we developed a pipeline that integrates multiple image processing tools to automatically extract informative features of color and stripe patterns from a large set of photographic images of wild cichlids. The extracted information was evaluated by statistical classifiers Support Vector Machine and Random Forests. Both classifiers performed better when body shape information was added to the feature of color and stripe. Besides the coloration and stripe pattern, body shape variables boosted the accuracy of classification by about 10%. The programs were able to classify 594 live cichlid individuals belonging to 12 different classes (species and sexes) with an average accuracy of 78%, contrasting to a mere 42% success rate by human eyes. The variables that contributed most to the accuracy were body height and the hue of the most frequent color. Computer vision showed a notable performance in extracting information from the color and stripe patterns of Lake Malawi cichlids although the information was not enough for errorless species identification. Our results indicate that there appears an unavoidable difficulty in automatic species identification of cichlid fishes, which may arise from short divergence times and gene flow between closely related species.

  7. Online color monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massen, Robert C.

    1999-09-01

    Monitoring color in the production line requires to remotely observe moving and not-aligned objects with in general complex surface features: multicolored, textured, non-flat, showing highlights and shadows. We discuss the use of color cameras and associated color image processing technologies for what we call 'imaging colorimetry.' This is a 2-step procedure which first uses color for segmentation and for finding Regions-of- Interest on the moving objects and then uses cluster-based color image processing for computing color deviations relative to previously trained references. This colorimetry is much more a measurement of aesthetic consistency of the visual appearance of a product then the traditional measurement of a more physically defined mean color vector difference. We show how traditional non-imaging colorimetry looses most of this aesthetic information due to the computation of a mean color vector or mean color vector difference, by averaging over the sensor's field-of-view. A large number of industrial applications are presented where complex inspection tasks have been solved based on this approach. The expansion to a higher feature space dimensions based on the 'multisensorial camera' concept gives an outlook to future developments.

  8. Colors in kindergarten software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montell, Ireivys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to address elements related to the use of color in educational software for early ages. The meaning of colors in pre-school age is presented from a theoretical perspective. A psychoeducational assessment of the influence of colors in educational software as a teaching aid to develop general intellectual abilities is explained. Likewise, the paper explains how achieving a balance between colors and software design leads to a proper interaction of children with new technology, a new resource for achieving objectives in educations and stimulating cognitive process development, both in institutions and in non-institutional channels.

  9. Sensory and cognitive contributions of color to the recognition of natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, K R; Rieger, J

    2000-06-29

    Although color plays a prominent part in our subjective experience of the visual world, the evolutionary advantage of color vision is still unclear [1] [2], with most current answers pointing towards specialized uses, for example to detect ripe fruit amongst foliage [3] [4] [5] [6]. We investigated whether color has a more general role in visual recognition by looking at the contribution of color to the encoding and retrieval processes involved in pattern recognition [7] [8] [9]. Recognition accuracy was higher for color images of natural scenes than for luminance-matched black and white images, and color information contributed to both components of the recognition process. Initially, color leads to an image-coding advantage at the very early stages of sensory processing, most probably by easing the image-segmentation task. Later, color leads to an advantage in retrieval, presumably as the result of an enhanced image representation in memory due to the additional attribute. Our results ascribe color vision a general role in the processing of visual form, starting at the very earliest stages of analysis: color helps us to recognize things faster and to remember them better.

  10. A simple principled approach for modeling and understanding uniform color metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Kevin A G; Webster, Michael A; Whitehead, Lorne A

    2016-03-01

    An important goal in characterizing human color vision is to order color percepts in a way that captures their similarities and differences. This has resulted in the continuing evolution of "uniform color spaces," in which the distances within the space represent the perceptual differences between the stimuli. While these metrics are now very successful in predicting how color percepts are scaled, they do so in largely empirical, ad hoc ways, with limited reference to actual mechanisms of color vision. In this article our aim is to instead begin with general and plausible assumptions about color coding, and then develop a model of color appearance that explicitly incorporates them. We show that many of the features of empirically defined color order systems (those of Munsell, Pantone, NCS, and others) as well as many of the basic phenomena of color perception, emerge naturally from fairly simple principles of color information encoding in the visual system and how it can be optimized for the spectral characteristics of the environment.

  11. Light, Imaging, Vision: An interdisciplinary undergraduate course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Philip

    Students in physical and life science, and in engineering, need to know about the physics and biology of light. In the 21st century, it has become increasingly clear that the quantum nature of light is essential both for the latest imaging modalities and even to advance our knowledge of fundamental processes, such as photosynthesis and human vision. But many optics courses remain rooted in classical physics, with photons as an afterthought. I'll describe a new undergraduate course, for students in several science and engineering majors, that takes students from the rudiments of probability theory to modern methods like fluorescence imaging and Förster resonance energy transfer. After a digression into color vision, students then see how the Feynman principle explains the apparently wavelike phenomena associated to light, including applications like diffraction limit, subdiffraction imaging, total internal reflection and TIRF microscopy. Then we see how scientists documented the single-quantum sensitivity of the eye seven decades earlier than `ought' to have been possible, and finally close with the remarkable signaling cascade that delivers such outstanding performance. A new textbook embodying this course will be published by Princeton University Press in Spring 2017. Partially supported by the United States National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1601894.

  12. Assessment of OLED displays for vision research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Emily A.; Jiang, Haomiao; Vildavski, Vladimir; Farrell, Joyce E.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Vision researchers rely on visual display technology for the presentation of stimuli to human and nonhuman observers. Verifying that the desired and displayed visual patterns match along dimensions such as luminance, spectrum, and spatial and temporal frequency is an essential part of developing controlled experiments. With cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) becoming virtually unavailable on the commercial market, it is useful to determine the characteristics of newly available displays based on organic light emitting diode (OLED) panels to determine how well they may serve to produce visual stimuli. This report describes a series of measurements summarizing the properties of images displayed on two commercially available OLED displays: the Sony Trimaster EL BVM-F250 and PVM-2541. The results show that the OLED displays have large contrast ratios, wide color gamuts, and precise, well-behaved temporal responses. Correct adjustment of the settings on both models produced luminance nonlinearities that were well predicted by a power function (“gamma correction”). Both displays have adjustable pixel independence and can be set to have little to no spatial pixel interactions. OLED displays appear to be a suitable, or even preferable, option for many vision research applications. PMID:24155345

  13. Industrial robot's vision systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iureva, Radda A.; Raskin, Evgeni O.; Komarov, Igor I.; Maltseva, Nadezhda K.; Fedosovsky, Michael E.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the improved economic situation in the high technology sectors, work on the creation of industrial robots and special mobile robotic systems are resumed. Despite this, the robotic control systems mostly remained unchanged. Hence one can see all advantages and disadvantages of these systems. This is due to lack of funds, which could greatly facilitate the work of the operator, and in some cases, completely replace it. The paper is concerned with the complex machine vision of robotic system for monitoring of underground pipelines, which collects and analyzes up to 90% of the necessary information. Vision Systems are used to identify obstacles to the process of movement on a trajectory to determine their origin, dimensions and character. The object is illuminated in a structured light, TV camera records projected structure. Distortions of the structure uniquely determine the shape of the object in view of the camera. The reference illumination is synchronized with the camera. The main parameters of the system are the basic distance between the generator and the lights and the camera parallax angle (the angle between the optical axes of the projection unit and camera).

  14. Coherent laser vision system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastion, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS) is being developed to provide precision real-time 3D world views to support site characterization and robotic operations and during facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning. Autonomous or semiautonomous robotic operations requires an accurate, up-to-date 3D world view. Existing technologies for real-time 3D imaging, such as AM laser radar, have limited accuracy at significant ranges and have variability in range estimates caused by lighting or surface shading. Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no-moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic to coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system

  15. Energy visions 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Energy Visions 2050 considers measures for addressing the enormous future challenges facing the energy sector, focusing on technological and techno-economic perspectives. The analysis of the development of technologies covers the whole energy chain, highlighting the necessity of efficient energy use in all activities of societies. The contents include a discussion on potential future low-emission and renewable energy conversion technologies, as well as new technology solutions in the industrial, building and transport sectors and in energy supply systems. The move towards zero-emission energy systems has consequenses for energy supply, and makes the analysis of energy resources presented in the book all the more valuable. Scenarios of alternative development paths to 2050 at the global, European and Finnish levels are presented, assuming different technological development options, economic growth rates, degrees of globalisation and information flows. The results show interesting differences between the scenarios with regard to energy production and use, mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, and global warming. Energy Visions 2050 in mainly intended for those who have a fairly good knowledge of the energy sector and energy technologies, e.g. energy policymakers, experts responsible for energy-related issues in industry, and investors in energy technologies. The topics are approached from a global perspective. In some technological details, however, Finnish technology and Finland's technological achievements are highlighted. The topics and viewpoints of the book will certainly be of interest to international readers as well

  16. Luminance contours can gate afterimage colors and "real" colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstis, Stuart; Vergeer, Mark; Van Lier, Rob

    2012-09-06

    It has long been known that colored images may elicit afterimages in complementary colors. We have already shown (Van Lier, Vergeer, & Anstis, 2009) that one and the same adapting image may result in different afterimage colors, depending on the test contours presented after the colored image. The color of the afterimage depends on two adapting colors, those both inside and outside the test. Here, we further explore this phenomenon and show that the color-contour interactions shown for afterimage colors also occur for "real" colors. We argue that similar mechanisms apply for both types of stimulation.

  17. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 16, 2016 More Eye Health News New Laser Treatment Can Help Get Rid of Eye Floaters FEB ... vision may soon have another option: a laser treatment called YAG vitreolysis. Google AI May Reveal Health ...

  18. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people with high myopia? Mar 29, 2017 New Technology Helps the Legally Blind Be More Independent Oct ... Answers Free Newsletter Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ...

  19. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart attack or stroke. Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced Search Ask an Ophthalmologist Browse Answers Free Newsletter Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ...

  20. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Free EyeSmart Resources for Professionals Link your website ... Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology ...

  1. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drive for eight weeks," she said. "I now live with a corneal scar, vision damage and a ... 2018 By Reena Mukamal Millions of Americans who live with annoying spots (floaters) in their field of ...

  2. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Free EyeSmart Resources for Professionals Link your ... the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media ...

  3. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people with high myopia? Mar 29, 2017 New Technology Helps the Legally Blind Be More ... ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ...

  4. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... edging closer, thanks to a wave of new technologies aiming to fix failing eye parts with human-made versions. ... tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ...

  5. Benchmarking Neuromorphic Vision: Lessons Learnt from Computer Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheston eTan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromorphic Vision sensors have improved greatly since the first silicon retina was presented almost three decades ago. They have recently matured to the point where they are commercially available and can be operated by laymen. However, despite improved availability of sensors, there remains a lack of good datasets, and algorithms for processing spike-based visual data are still in their infancy. On the other hand, frame-based computer vision algorithms are far more mature, thanks in part to widely accepted datasets which allow direct comparison between algorithms and encourage competition. We are presented with a unique opportunity to shape the development of Neuromorphic Vision benchmarks and challenges by leveraging what has been learnt from the use of datasets in frame-based computer vision. Taking advantage of this opportunity, in this paper we review the role that benchmarks and challenges have played in the advancement of frame-based computer vision, and suggest guidelines for the creation of Neuromorphic Vision benchmarks and challenges. We also discuss the unique challenges faced when benchmarking Neuromorphic Vision algorithms, particularly when attempting to provide direct comparison with frame-based computer vision.

  6. Near vision spectacle coverage and barriers to near vision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the near vision spectacle coverage and barriers to obtaining near vision correction among adults aged 35 years and older in the Cape Coast Metropolis of Ghana. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study design was adopted and 500 out of 576 participants aged 35 years and older were ...

  7. the evaluation of vision in children using monocular vision acuity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Monocular visual acuity (VA) is a direct method of detecting amblyopia, a leading cause of monocular vision loss in the 2 to 7years age group . Binocular vision is fully established by 6 moths of age, while fusion is consistently strengthened until the age of 6 years when it is fully developed . It was observed ...

  8. Quorum Colorings of Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Heditniemi (Sandra); R.C. Laskar (R.C.); H.M. Mulder (Martyn)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLet $G = (V,E)$ be a graph. A partition $\\pi = \\{V_1, V_2, \\ldots, V_k \\}$ of the vertices $V$ of $G$ into $k$ {\\it color classes} $V_i$, with $1 \\leq i \\leq k$, is called a {\\it quorum coloring} if for every vertex $v \\in V$, at least half of the vertices in the closed neighborhood

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ...

  10. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye ... colored contact lenses , from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Are the colored lenses you are ...

  11. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact ... After One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter ...

  12. On color transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, B.K.; Miller, G.A.

    1989-10-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of high momentum transfer nuclear processes is presented. Color transparency, the suppression of initial and final state interaction effects, is shown to arise from using the closure approximation. New conditions for the appearance of color transparency are derived

  13. Millennial Teachers of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Mary E., Ed.

    2018-01-01

    "Millennial Teachers of Color" explores the opportunities and challenges for creating and sustaining a healthy teaching force in the United States. Millennials are the largest generational cohort in American history, with approximately ninety million members and, of these, roughly 43 percent are people of color. This book, edited by…

  14. On dominator colorings in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A dominator coloring of a graph is a proper coloring of in which every vertex dominates every vertex of at least one color class. The minimum number of colors required for a dominator coloring of is called the dominator chromatic number of and is denoted by d ( G ) . In this paper we present several results on ...

  15. Color quarks and octonions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guersey, F.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical framework based on octonions is developed for the description of the color quark scheme in which quarks are unobservable, the color SU(3) is exact, and only color singlets correspond to observable hadrons. The fictitious Hilbert space in which quarks operate is taken to be a space of vectors with octonion components. This space admits as a gauge group an exact SU(3) identified with the color SU/sub C/(3). Because of the nonassociativity of the underlying algebra, nonsinglet representations of SU/sub C/(3) are unobservable, while the subspace of color singlets satisfies associativity along with conditions for observability. Octonion quark fields satisfy the commutation relations of parafermions of order 3, leading to the correct SU(6) multiplets for hadrons. (U.S.)

  16. Understanding and applying machine vision

    CERN Document Server

    Zeuch, Nello

    2000-01-01

    A discussion of applications of machine vision technology in the semiconductor, electronic, automotive, wood, food, pharmaceutical, printing, and container industries. It describes systems that enable projects to move forward swiftly and efficiently, and focuses on the nuances of the engineering and system integration of machine vision technology.

  17. Vision by Man and Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Tomaso

    1984-01-01

    Studies of stereo vision guide research on how animals see and how computers might accomplish this human activity. Discusses a sequence of algorithms to first extract information from visual images and then to calculate the depths of objects in the three-dimensional world, concentrating on stereopsis (stereo vision). (JN)

  18. An overview of computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of computer vision is provided. Image understanding and scene analysis are emphasized, and pertinent aspects of pattern recognition are treated. The basic approach to computer vision systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the current existing systems and state-of-the-art issues and research requirements, who is doing it and who is funding it, and future trends and expectations are reviewed.

  19. Continuous learning in computer vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pintea, S.L.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on continuous learning, and specifically on continuous learning in the context of computer vision. Computer vision aims at interpreting the world from its visual dimension, in an automatic manner. The world in general is characterized by continuity, and so is the visual world

  20. Color evaluation of computer-generated color rainbow holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yile; Wang, Hui; Wu, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    A color evaluation approach for computer-generated color rainbow holography (CGCRH) is presented. Firstly, the relationship between color quantities of a computer display and a color computer-generated holography (CCGH) colorimetric system is discussed based on color matching theory. An isochromatic transfer relationship of color quantity and amplitude of object light field is proposed. Secondly, the color reproduction mechanism and factors leading to the color difference between the color object and the holographic image that is reconstructed by CGCRH are analyzed in detail. A quantitative color calculation method for the holographic image reconstructed by CGCRH is given. Finally, general color samples are selected as numerical calculation test targets and the color differences between holographic images and test targets are calculated based on our proposed method. (paper)

  1. Functional programming for computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuel, Thomas M.

    1992-04-01

    Functional programming is a style of programming that avoids the use of side effects (like assignment) and uses functions as first class data objects. Compared with imperative programs, functional programs can be parallelized better, and provide better encapsulation, type checking, and abstractions. This is important for building and integrating large vision software systems. In the past, efficiency has been an obstacle to the application of functional programming techniques in computationally intensive areas such as computer vision. We discuss and evaluate several 'functional' data structures for representing efficiently data structures and objects common in computer vision. In particular, we will address: automatic storage allocation and reclamation issues; abstraction of control structures; efficient sequential update of large data structures; representing images as functions; and object-oriented programming. Our experience suggests that functional techniques are feasible for high- performance vision systems, and that a functional approach simplifies the implementation and integration of vision systems greatly. Examples in C++ and SML are given.

  2. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eHagmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies.

  3. 2020 Vision Project Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, K.W.; Scott, K.P.

    2000-11-01

    Since the 2020 Vision project began in 1996, students from participating schools have completed and submitted a variety of scenarios describing potential world and regional conditions in the year 2020 and their possible effect on US national security. This report summarizes the students' views and describes trends observed over the course of the 2020 Vision project's five years. It also highlights the main organizational features of the project. An analysis of thematic trends among the scenarios showed interesting shifts in students' thinking, particularly in their views of computer technology, US relations with China, and globalization. In 1996, most students perceived computer technology as highly beneficial to society, but as the year 2000 approached, this technology was viewed with fear and suspicion, even personified as a malicious, uncontrollable being. Yet, after New Year's passed with little disruption, students generally again perceived computer technology as beneficial. Also in 1996, students tended to see US relations with China as potentially positive, with economic interaction proving favorable to both countries. By 2000, this view had transformed into a perception of China emerging as the US' main rival and ''enemy'' in the global geopolitical realm. Regarding globalization, students in the first two years of the project tended to perceive world events as dependent on US action. However, by the end of the project, they saw the US as having little control over world events and therefore, we Americans would need to cooperate and compromise with other nations in order to maintain our own well-being.

  4. Color Orchestra: Ordering Color Palettes for Interpolation and Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Huy Q.; Fu, Hongbo; Chan, Antoni B.

    2017-01-01

    Color theme or color palette can deeply influence the quality and the feeling of a photograph or a graphical design. Although color palettes may come from different sources such as online crowd-sourcing, photographs and graphical designs, in this paper, we consider color palettes extracted from fine art collections, which we believe to be an abundant source of stylistic and unique color themes. We aim to capture color styles embedded in these collections by means of statistical models and to ...

  5. Computer vision for an autonomous mobile robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Withey, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer vision systems are essential for practical, autonomous, mobile robots – machines that employ artificial intelligence and control their own motion within an environment. As with biological systems, computer vision systems include the vision...

  6. Color image encryption using random transforms, phase retrieval, chaotic maps, and diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaby, M. H.; Rushdi, M. A.; Nehary, E. A.

    2018-04-01

    The recent tremendous proliferation of color imaging applications has been accompanied by growing research in data encryption to secure color images against adversary attacks. While recent color image encryption techniques perform reasonably well, they still exhibit vulnerabilities and deficiencies in terms of statistical security measures due to image data redundancy and inherent weaknesses. This paper proposes two encryption algorithms that largely treat these deficiencies and boost the security strength through novel integration of the random fractional Fourier transforms, phase retrieval algorithms, as well as chaotic scrambling and diffusion. We show through detailed experiments and statistical analysis that the proposed enhancements significantly improve security measures and immunity to attacks.

  7. A Multiple Sensor Machine Vision System for Automatic Hardwood Feature Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Richard W. Conners; Daniel L. Schmoldt; Philip A. Araman; Robert L. Brisbin

    1993-01-01

    A multiple sensor machine vision prototype is being developed to scan full size hardwood lumber at industrial speeds for automatically detecting features such as knots holes, wane, stain, splits, checks, and color. The prototype integrates a multiple sensor imaging system, a materials handling system, a computer system, and application software. The prototype provides...

  8. Adaptive Path Planning for a Vision-Based quadrotor in an Obstacle Field : Beijing, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junell, J.L.; van Kampen, E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a real life approach for quadrotor obstacle avoidance in indoor flight. A color-based vision approach for obstacle detection is used to good effect conjointly with an adaptive path planning algorithm. The presented task is to move about a set indoor space while avoiding

  9. Sex & vision I: Spatio-temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramov Israel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral cortex has a very large number of testosterone receptors, which could be a basis for sex differences in sensory functions. For example, audition has clear sex differences, which are related to serum testosterone levels. Of all major sensory systems only vision has not been examined for sex differences, which is surprising because occipital lobe (primary visual projection area may have the highest density of testosterone receptors in the cortex. We have examined a basic visual function: spatial and temporal pattern resolution and acuity. Methods We tested large groups of young adults with normal vision. They were screened with a battery of standard tests that examined acuity, color vision, and stereopsis. We sampled the visual system’s contrast-sensitivity function (CSF across the entire spatio-temporal space: 6 spatial frequencies at each of 5 temporal rates. Stimuli were gratings with sinusoidal luminance profiles generated on a special-purpose computer screen; their contrast was also sinusoidally modulated in time. We measured threshold contrasts using a criterion-free (forced-choice, adaptive psychophysical method (QUEST algorithm. Also, each individual’s acuity limit was estimated by fitting his or her data with a model and extrapolating to find the spatial frequency corresponding to 100% contrast. Results At a very low temporal rate, the spatial CSF was the canonical inverted-U; but for higher temporal rates, the maxima of the spatial CSFs shifted: Observers lost sensitivity at high spatial frequencies and gained sensitivity at low frequencies; also, all the maxima of the CSFs shifted by about the same amount in spatial frequency. Main effect: there was a significant (ANOVA sex difference. Across the entire spatio-temporal domain, males were more sensitive, especially at higher spatial frequencies; similarly males had significantly better acuity at all temporal rates. Conclusion As with other sensory systems

  10. Stool Color: When to Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stool color: When to worry Yesterday, my stool color was bright green. Should I be concerned? Answers from Michael ... M.D. Stool comes in a range of colors. All shades of brown and even green are ...

  11. LACTASE DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article is the lactase deficiency in children. The most frequent clinical manifestations — diarrhea and flatulence —are not specific to this pathology. Symptoms, typical for the majority of the diseases nosologies of the digestive system, lack of timely laboratory diagnosis, and, often, lack of pediatricians awareness about the specifics of this disease are the cause of lactase deficiency under-diagnostics. The article describes in detail the physiopathological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and dietary correction of lactase deficiency, the data concerning the prevalence of this disease are cited.Key words: lactose, lactase deficiency, children, health food.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  13. Iodine deficiency disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.)

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... are also at high risk of deficiency in populations where dietary intake of B12-containing animal-derived foods is restricted. Deficiency is caused by either inadequate intake, inadequate bioavailability or malabsorption. Disruption of B12 transport in the blood, or impaired cellular uptake or metabolism...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  16. Research of principles for estimating the freshness of meat products by color analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Petukhova, Daria B.; Alekhin, Artem A.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    Color is one of the most important metrics of foodstuffs quality. It gives an indication of freshness, ingredient composition as well as about the presence or absence of falsification. Most often, the color is estimated visually, and thus, the evaluation is subjective. By automating the color analysis a wide application for this method could be found. The aim of this research is to study the principles of color analysis as applied to the task of evaluating the freshness of meat products using modern machine vision systems. From a scientific point of view, the color of meat depends on the proportion of myoglobin and its derivatives. It's the main pigment that characterizes the freshness of meat. Further color of meat can change due to oxidation of myoglobin during storage. Myoglobin exists in three forms. There are oxygenated form, oxidized form and form without oxygen. The meat color changes not only due to the conversion of one form into another. The content of amino acids and ammonia are another characteristics and constant signs of meat products spoilage. The paper presents the results of meat color computer simulation based on data on the content of various forms of myoglobin in different proportions. The spectral characteristic of the light source used to illuminate the meat sample is taken into account. Also the experimental studies were conducted using samples of beef. As a result the correlations between said biochemical indicators of the quality and color of the meat obtained with the help of machine vision system were found.

  17. Lo Squardo di micol: I modi della visione nell'opera narrativa di ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only Micòl manages to retain a strong intent in her gaze, through which she confronts the varied and painful phenomenology of reality, and a pirandellian humour allows her to face life with pitying irony. Initiated into Micòl's gaze, the author can correct the deficient vision of the other characters, and regain the moral and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ... Donor Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non- ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... All News NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information ...

  20. Vision related quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes in the EUROCONDOR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trento, Marina; Durando, Olga; Lavecchia, Sonia; Charrier, Lorena; Cavallo, Franco; Costa, Miguel Angelo; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael; Porta, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate vision related quality of life in the patients enrolled in The European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy, a clinical trial on prevention of diabetic retinopathy. Four-hundred-forty-nine patients, 153 women, with type 2 Diabetes and no or mild diabetic retinopathy were enrolled in a 2-year multicenter randomized controlled trial. The 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire was used to explore 12 subscales of vision related quality of life. The patients were 62.8 ± 6.7 years old and had 11.1 ± 5.6 years known disease duration. Diabetic retinopathy was absent in 193 (43.0 %) and mild in 256 (57.0 %). Patients without diabetic retinopathy were older, had shorter diabetes duration and used less insulin and glucose-lowering agents but did not differ by gender, best corrected visual acuity or any subscale, except vision specific mental health and vision specific role difficulties. Patients with reduced retinal thickness at the ganglion cell layer (n = 36) did not differ for diabetic retinopathy but were older, had lower best corrected visual acuity and worse scores for ocular pain, color vision and peripheral vision. On multivariable analysis, worse scores for general vision remained associated with reduced retinal thickness, diabetes duration and best corrected visual acuity, and scores for visual specific mental health with diabetic retinopathy and lower best corrected visual acuity. Visual specific role difficulties were only associated with reduced best corrected visual acuity. Scores for driving decreased among females, with worsening of Hemoglobin A1c and best corrected visual acuity. Color vision depended only on reduced retinal thickness, and peripheral vision on both reduced thickness and best corrected visual acuity. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire could detect subtle changes in patients' perception of visual function, despite absent/minimal diabetic