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Sample records for colony formation assay

  1. ColonyArea: an ImageJ plugin to automatically quantify colony formation in clonogenic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Camilo; Bagga, Manish; Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka; Abankwa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The clonogenic or colony formation assay is a widely used method to study the number and size of cancer cell colonies that remain after irradiation or cytotoxic agent administration and serves as a measure for the anti-proliferative effect of these treatments. Alternatively, this assay is used to quantitate the transforming potential of cancer associated genes and chemical agents. Therefore, there is a need for a simplified and standardized analysis of colony formation assays for both routine laboratory use and for parallelized automated analysis. Here we describe the freely available ImageJ-plugin "ColonyArea", which is optimized for rapid and quantitative analysis of focus formation assays conducted in 6- to 24-well dishes. ColonyArea processes image data of multi-well dishes, by separating, concentrically cropping and background correcting well images individually, before colony formation is quantitated. Instead of counting the number of colonies, ColonyArea determines the percentage of area covered by crystal violet stained cell colonies, also taking the intensity of the staining and therefore cell density into account. We demonstrate that these parameters alone or in combination allow for robust quantification of IC50 values of the cytotoxic effect of two staurosporines, UCN-01 and staurosporine (STS) on human glioblastoma cells (T98G). The relation between the potencies of the two compounds compared very well with that obtained from an absorbance based method to quantify colony growth and to published data. The ColonyArea ImageJ plugin provides a simple and efficient analysis routine to quantitate assay data of one of the most commonly used cellular assays. The bundle is freely available for download as supporting information. We expect that ColonyArea will be of broad utility for cancer biologists, as well as clinical radiation scientists.

  2. A new preclinical 3-dimensional agarose colony formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Panchabhai, Sonali; Levin, Victor A

    2008-08-01

    The evaluation of new drug treatments and combination treatments for gliomas and other cancers requires a robust means to interrogate wide dose ranges and varying times of drug exposure without stain-inactivation of the cells (colonies). To this end, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) colony formation assay that makes use of GelCount technology, a new cell colony counter for gels and soft agars. We used U251MG, SNB19, and LNZ308 glioma cell lines and MiaPaCa pancreas adenocarcinoma and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Colonies were grown in a two-tiered agarose that had 0.7% agarose on the bottom and 0.3% agarose on top. We then studied the effects of DFMO, carboplatin, and SAHA over a 3-log dose range and over multiple days of drug exposure. Using GelCount we approximated the area under the curve (AUC) of colony volumes as the sum of colony volumes (microm2xOD) in each plate to calculate IC50 values. Adenocarcinoma colonies were recognized by GelCount scanning at 3-4 days, while it took 6-7 days to detect glioma colonies. The growth rate of MiaPaCa and SW480 cells was rapid, with 100 colonies counted in 5-6 days; glioma cells grew more slowly, with 100 colonies counted in 9-10 days. Reliable log dose versus AUC curves were observed for all drugs studied. In conclusion, the GelCount method that we describe is more quantitative than traditional colony assays and allows precise study of drug effects with respect to both dose and time of exposure using fewer culture plates.

  3. Colony formation in agar: in vitro assay for haemopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, K.A.; Platenburg, M.G.C.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1971-01-01

    Using a method in which embryo fibroblasts were used as feeder layers, the colony forming capacity in agar of a variety of mouse haemopoietic suspensions was compared with their CFUs content. A striking parallelism between the results of the two assays was found. In addition, under certain condition

  4. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities viability.

  5. Colonial state formation without integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexopoulou Giannakitsa, Kleoniki; Juif, Dácil

    2017-01-01

    Samir Amin (1972) divided the African continent into three "macro-regions of colonial influence" with distinct socio-economic systems and labour practices: Africa of the colonial trade or peasant economy, Africa of the concession-owning companies, and Africa of the labour reserves. We argue that

  6. Microfabricated Arrays for Splitting and Assay of Clonal Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C.; Xu, Wei; King, Samantha J.; Sims, Christopher E.; Bear, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    A microfabricated platform was developed for highly parallel and efficient colony picking, splitting and clone identification. A pallet array provided patterned cell colonies which mated to a second printing array composed of bridging microstructures formed by a supporting base and attached post. The posts enabled mammalian cells from colonies initially cultured on the pallet array to migrate to corresponding sites on the printing array. Separation of the arrays simultaneously split the colonies creating a patterned replica. Optimization of array elements provided transfer efficiencies greater than 90% using bridging posts of 30 μm diameter and 100 μm length and total colony numbers of 3000. Studies using five mammalian cell lines demonstrated that a variety of adherent cell types could be cultured and effectively split with printing efficiencies of 78–92%. To demonstrate the technique’s utility, clonal cell lines with siRNA knockdown of Coronin 1B were generated using the arrays and compared to a traditional FACS/Western Blotting-based approach. Identification of target clones required a destructive assay to identify cells with an absence of Coronin 1B brought about by the successful infection of interfering shRNA construct. By virtue of miniaturization and its parallel format, the platform enabled the identification and generation of 12 target clones from a starting sample of only 3900 cells and required only 5-man hours over 11 days. In contrast, the traditional method required 500,000 cells and generated only 5 target clones with 34-man hours expended over 47 days. These data support the considerable reduction in time, manpower and reagents using the miniaturized platform for clonal selection by destructive assay versus conventional approaches. PMID:23153031

  7. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  8. Effect of fluid motion on colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa, generally occurring in large colonies under natural conditions, mainly exists as single cells in laboratory cultures. The mechanisms involved in colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa and their roles in algal blooms remain unknown. In this study, based on previous research findings that fluid motion may stimulate the colony formation in green algae, culture experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a circular water chamber where the flow rate, temperature, light, and nutrients were controlled. The number of cells of Microcystis aeruginosa, the number of cells per colony, and the colonial characteristics in various growth phases were observed and measured. The results indicated that the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa, which was not observed under stagnant conditions, was evident when there was fluid motion, with the number of cells per largest colony reaching 120 and the proportion of the number of cells in colonial form to the total number of cells and the mean number of cells per colony reaching their peak values at a flow rate of 35 cm/s. Based on the analysis of colony formation process, fluid motion stimulates the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa in the lag growth phase, while flushes and disaggregates the colonies in the exponential growth phase. The stimulation effect in the lag growth phase may be attributable to the involvement of fluid motion in a series of physiological processes, including the uptake of trace elements and the synthesis and secretion of polysaccharides. In addition, the experimental groups exhibiting typical colonial characteristics in the lag growth phase were found to have higher cell biomass in the later phase.

  9. Diffusion-limited growth in bacterial colony formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1990-09-01

    Colonies of bacterial species called Bacillus subtilis have been found to grow two-dimensionally and self-similarly on agar plates through diffusion-limited processes in a nutrient concentration field. We obtained a fractal dimension of the colony patterns of D=1.73±0.02, very close to that of the two-dimensional DLA model, and confirmed the existence of the screening effect of protruding main branches against inner ones in a colony, the repulsion between two neighboring colonies and the tendency to grow toward nutrient. These effects are all characteristic of the pattern formation in a Laplacian field. This finding implies the importance of physical properties of the environment for the morphology of bacterial colonies in general.

  10. Rat granulocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-G) assay for the assessment of drug-induced hematotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura-Takeda, K; Kotosai, K; Ozaki, A; Hara, H; Yamashita, S

    2002-06-01

    To assess the drug-induced hematotoxicity to granulocyte progenitors, we established a modified colony-forming assay using rat bone marrow cells (BMCs). In the presence of various colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), rat BMCs were disseminated on methylcellulose at a concentration of 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) (5 x 10(4) cells/0.5 ml/well in a 12-well plate). Mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) stimulated the formation of almost all macrophage colonies. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) alone or in combination with mouse interleukin-3 (mIL-3) did not significantly effect on the number of rat colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C). When BMCs were seeded at 5.2 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) (5 x 10(5) cells/1 ml/dish in a 35-mm dish), hG-CSF increased the number of the colonies in a dose-dependent manner, and resulted in about 50 colonies at 50 ng/ml. The constituent cells of the colonies were identified as neutrophils. Under these conditions, the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) were examined in rats and mice. The inhibitory effect of 5-FU on rat CFU-G was similar to the effect on mouse CFU-G. These results indicate that the rat CFU-G induced by hG-CSF is capable of being used for the evaluation of drug-induced hematotoxicity.

  11. A semi-quantitative approach to assess biofilm formation using wrinkled colony development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Valerie A; Morris, Andrew R; Visick, Karen L

    2012-06-07

    biofilm formation using V. fischeri as a model system. This method involves the careful spotting of bacterial cultures at defined concentrations and volumes onto solid agar media; a spotted culture is synonymous to a single bacterial colony. This 'spotted culture' technique can be utilized to compare gross biofilm phenotypes at single, specified time-points (end-point assays), or to identify and characterize subtle biofilm phenotypes through time-course assays of biofilm development and measurements of the colony diameter, which is influenced by biofilm formation. Thus, this technique provides a semi-quantitative analysis of biofilm formation, permitting evaluation of the timing and patterning of wrinkled colony development and the relative size of the developing structure, characteristics that extend beyond the simple overall morphology.

  12. Colony immunoblot assay for the detection of hemolysin BL enterotoxin producing Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravek, Maximilian; Wegscheider, Monika; Schulz, Anja; Dietrich, Richard; Bürk, Christine; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2004-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strains involved in food poisoning cases of the diarrheal type may produce two different enterotoxin complexes. To facilitate the identification of hemolysin BL-enterotoxin complex (HBL) and/or the nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE) producing colonies a colony immunoblot procedure was developed, which allows a fast and easy identification of the respective colonies from blood agar plates. The enterotoxins were transferred from the blood agar medium to a nitrocellulose membrane and the immobilized toxins were probed with monoclonal antibodies. The antibodies 2A3 and 1A8 allowed the specific detection of the B component of HBL and the nheA component of NHE. The assay enabled the reliable identification of HBL expressing colonies and differentiation from NHE producing but HBL negative colonies.

  13. A rapid procedure for the in situ assay of periplasmic, PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase in intact single bacterial colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuluri, Venkata Ramana; Shaw, Shreya; Autenrieth, Caroline; Ghosh, Robin

    2017-03-23

    Mechanistic details of methanol oxidation catalyzed by the periplasmically-located pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenase of methylotrophs can be elucidated using site-directed mutants. Here, we present an in situ colony assay of methanol dehydrogenase, which allows robotic screening of large populations of intact small colonies, and regrowth of colonies for subsequent analysis.

  14. Observations on colony formation by the cosmopolitan phytoplankton genus Phaeocystis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verity, Peter G.; Medlin, Linda K.

    2003-12-01

    Few marine phytoplankton have heteromorphic life cycles and also often dominate the ecosystems in which they occur. The class Prymnesiophyceae contains a notable exception: the genus Phaeocystis includes three species that form gelatinous colonies but also occur within their ranges as solitary cells. Phaeocystis antarctica and P. pouchetii are exclusively high latitude taxa, and are notable for regionally tremendous blooms of the colony stage. P. globosa occurs circumglobally, yet its colony blooms primarily are confined to colder waters within its range. Three additional species are warm water forms that have been reported only as solitary cells or loose aggregations that bear little resemblance to the organized colonies of the other taxa. Interpretation of existing data indicates that resource availability (light, temperature and nutrients) by itself is not sufficient to explain this distinction between cold-water colony-forming taxa and warm water solitary cell taxa, nor why colony development in P. globosa is essentially a spatially restricted phenomenon within a much broader geographic range. Colony development by P. globosa in situ has been observed at temperatures ≥20 °C, but only rarely and generally under conditions of seasonally or anthropogenically elevated nutrient supply. Data presented here demonstrate colony development at 20-22 °C in natural plankton communities from oligotrophic waters that were pre-screened through 63 μm mesh (i.e. lacking mesozooplankton and large microzooplankton), but not in unscreened communities containing microzooplankton and >63 μm zooplankton. Reduction of colony proliferation at higher temperatures by mesozooplankton grazing remains as an intriguing possibility that is consistent with available evidence to help explain differences in latitudinal extent of in situ colony development. These data are interpreted within a theoretical framework regarding the potential advantages and disadvantages of the two life cycle

  15. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  16. Erythroid colony formation and effect of hemin in vitro in hereditary sideroblastic anemias.

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    Partanen, S; Pasanen, A; Juvonen, E; Tenhunen, R; Ruutu, T

    1988-05-01

    Colony formation by erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) and erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E) and the effect of hemin on colony growth was studied in vitro in three Finnish families with hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA). Defective activity of heme synthase has been demonstrated in family A and that of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase in family B. No biochemical defect has been recognized so far in family C. CFU-E colony growth was defective in seven of the eight persons studied. The formation of BFU-E colonies was normal in family A and increased in family C, whereas of the two members of family B one showed normal and one decreased BFU-E colony growth. Hemin in 30-120 microM concentration increased significantly both BFU-E (p less than 0.01) and CFU-E (p less than 0.005) colony formation in family C. No effect was seen in family A, and in family B the only effect was normalization of the decreased BFU-E colony growth by the highest hemin concentration in one person. This study indicates that differences exist between families with HSA in erythroid colony formation and in response to hemin in vitro, but the low number of investigated members in each family does not permit a conclusive evaluation of the impact of the carrier versus patient status or of sex on the results.

  17. Cell colony formation induced by Xenopus egg extract as a marker for improvement of cloned blastocyst formation in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Østrup, Olga; Li, Juan

    2011-01-01

    method based on the colony formation of cells after extract treatment, and subsequent in vitro cloning efficiency using treated cells as chromatin donors. Porcine fetal fibroblasts were treated with each batch of extract, and cultured in embryonic stem cell (ES) medium for 12 days. The number of forming...... colonies in treated cells was counted on Day 7 after extract treatment and significant variability was detected between different batches of extract. Similarly, when using cells from colonies at Days 7 to 8 after treatment for handmade cloning, increased blastocyst formation rates were observed after...... the cells were treated with a batch showing higher colony formation. In conclusion, assessment of cell colony formation may be used as selection marker for Xenopus egg extract used for pretreatment of donor cells prior to cloning....

  18. Colonial Army Formats in Africa and Post-Colonial Military Coups:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSOS USER

    colonial urban centres evolved and flourished in the coastal south. However .... By 1966, there were no more British officers in the army and the size of the corps had .... The statistics indicating the North's dominance of both the rank and file of.

  19. In vitro effects of fluor-hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite on colony formation, DNA damage and mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantová, S; Theiszová, M; Letasiová, S; Birosová, L; Palou, T M

    2008-04-30

    The number of biomaterials used in biomedical applications has rapidly increased in the past two decades. Fluorapatite (FA) is one of the inorganic constituents of bone or teeth used for hard-tissue repairs and replacements. Fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) is a new synthetically prepared composite that in its structure contains the same molecular concentration of OH(-) groups and F(-) ions. The aim of this experimental investigation was to evaluate cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of FHA and FA eluates on Chinese hamster V79 cells and to compare them with the effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) eluate. Cytotoxicity of the biomaterials tested was evaluated by use of the cell colony-formation assay and by direct counting of the cells in each colony. Genotoxicity was assessed by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) and mutagenicity was evaluated by the Hprt gene-mutation assay and in bacterial mutagenicity tests using Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The results show that the highest test concentrations of the biomaterials (100% and 75% eluates) induced very weak inhibition of colony growth (about 10%). On the other hand, the reduction of cell number per colony induced by these concentrations was in the range from 43% to 31%. The comet assay showed that biomaterials induced DNA breaks, which increased with increasing test concentrations in the order HAcolonies.

  20. Periodic Colony Formation by Bacterial Species Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Itoh, Hiroto; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the periodic colony growth of bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. A colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance (migration phase) and a rest (consolidation phase) alternately on a surface of semi-solid agar plate under appropriate environmental conditions, resulting in a concentric ring-like colony. It was found from macroscopic observations that the characteristic quantities for the periodic growth such as the migration time, the consolidation time and the terrace spacing do not depend so much on nutrient concentration Cn, but do on agar concentration Ca. The consolidation time was a weakly increasing function of Ca, while the migration time and the terrace spacing were, respectively, weakly and strongly decreasing function of Ca. Overall, the cycle (migration-plus-consolidation) time seems to be constant, and does not depend so much on both Cn and Ca. Microscopically, bacterial cells inside the growing front of a colony keep increasing their population during both migration and consolidation phases. It was also confirmed that their secreting surfactant called surfactin does not affect their periodic growth qualitatively, i.e., mutant cells which cannot secrete surfactin produce a concentric ring-like colony. All these results suggest that the diffusion of the nutrient and the surfactin are irrelevant to their periodic growth.

  1. Inducible colony formation within the Scenedesmaceae: adaptive responses to infochemicals from two different herbivore taxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoor, A.M.; Van der Stap, I.; Helmsing, N.R.; Lürling, M.; Van Donk, E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the occurrence of colony formation within 40 different strains of Scenedesmaceae (Chlorococcales, Chlorophyta) in response to grazing-released infochemicals from the herbivorous zooplankters Brachionus calyciflorus Pallas (Rotifera) and Daphnia magna Strauss (Cladocera). With the exceptio

  2. Inducible colony formation within the Scenedesmaceae: Adaptive responses to infochemicals from two different herbivore taxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoor, A.M.; Stap, I.; Helmsing, N.R.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Donk, van E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the occurrence of colony formation within 40 different strains of Scenedesmaceae (Chlorococcales, Chlorophyta) in response to grazing-released infochemicals from the herbivorous zooplankters Brachionus calyciflorus Pallas (Rotifera) and Daphnia magna Strauss (Cladocera). With the exceptio

  3. Colony color assay coupled with 5FOA negative selection greatly improves yeast threehybrid library screening efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed yeast three-hybrid system is a powerful tool for analyzing RNA-protein interactions in vivo. However, large numbers of false positives are frequently met due to bait RNA-independent activation of the reporter gene in the library screening using this system. In this report, we coupled the colony color assay with the 5FOA (5-fluoroorotic acid) negative selection in the library screening, and found that this coupled method effectively eliminated bait RNA-independent false positives and hence greatly improved library screening efficiency. We used this method successfully in isolation of cDNA of an RNA-binding protein that might play important roles in certain cellular process. This improvement will facilitate the use of the yeast three-hybrid system in analyzing RNA-protein interaction.

  4. G(i-coupled GPCR signaling controls the formation and organization of human pluripotent colonies.

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    Kenta Nakamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reprogramming adult human somatic cells to create human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS cell colonies involves a dramatic morphological and organizational transition. These colonies are morphologically indistinguishable from those of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES cells. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are required in diverse developmental processes, but their role in pluripotent colony morphology and organization is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that G(i-coupled GPCR signaling contributes to the characteristic morphology and organization of human pluripotent colonies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Specific and irreversible inhibition of G(i-coupled GPCR signaling by pertussis toxin markedly altered pluripotent colony morphology. Wild-type hES and hiPS cells formed monolayer colonies, but colonies treated with pertussis toxin retracted inward, adopting a dense, multi-layered conformation. The treated colonies were unable to reform after a scratch wound insult, whereas control colonies healed completely within 48 h. In contrast, activation of an alternative GPCR pathway, G(s-coupled signaling, with cholera toxin did not affect colony morphology or the healing response. Pertussis toxin did not alter the proliferation, apoptosis or pluripotency of pluripotent stem cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Experiments with pertussis toxin suggest that G(i signaling plays a critical role in the morphology and organization of pluripotent colonies. These results may be explained by a G(i-mediated density-sensing mechanism that propels the cells radially outward. GPCRs are a promising target for modulating the formation and organization of hiPS and hES cell colonies and may be important for understanding somatic cell reprogramming and for engineering pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  5. Studies on T-cell colony formation in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Y; Sugimoto, M; Ishiyama, T; Horie, S; Abe, S; Hirose, S; Okuda, T

    1989-12-01

    In order to study the possibility of abnormal differentiation and proliferation of T-cell precursors in chronic renal failure (CRF), we studied T-cell colony formation in CRF patients. The two-step monolayer method, with phytohemagglutinin-P as the inducer, was used for T-cell colony formation. In our results, colony formation was markedly reduced in CRF patients in comparison with normal controls, with about half of the former showing no colony growth. All cases showed a significant increase in colony numbers with in vitro plasmapheresis (the replacement of autologous plasma in the culture system with normal AB plasma). A significant increase in colony numbers was also seen with the addition of exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2). The addition of IL-2 in the presence of normal plasma, in particular, induced an increase in colony numbers to near the levels in normal subjects. These results suggest that T-cell precursors exist in near normal numbers in CRF patients and that there are uremic inhibitors in the plasma. A reduced production of IL-2 is also indicated. These factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency in CRF patients.

  6. Effect of aspirin on tumour cell colony formation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Goel, Ajay; Boland, C Richard; Komarova, Natalia L

    2017-09-01

    Aspirin is known to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In a previous study, we quantified the in vitro growth kinetics of different CRC tumour cell lines treated with varying doses of aspirin, measuring the rate of cell division and cell death. Here, we use these measured parameters to calculate the chances of successful clonal expansion and to determine the evolutionary potential of the tumour cell lines in the presence and absence of aspirin. The calculations indicate that aspirin increases the probability that a single tumour cell fails to clonally expand. Further, calculations suggest that aspirin increases the evolutionary potential of an expanding tumour cell colony. An aspirin-treated tumour cell population is predicted to result in the accumulation of more mutations (and is thus more virulent and more difficult to treat) than a cell population of the same size that grew without aspirin. This indicates a potential trade-off between delaying the onset of cancer and increasing its evolutionary potential through chemoprevention. Further work needs to investigate to what extent these findings apply to in vivo settings, and to what degree they contribute to the epidemiologically documented aspirin-mediated protection. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Endogenous erythroid colony assay in patients with polycythemia vera and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁; 邵宗鸿; 刘鸿; 施均; 何广胜; 曹燕然; 崔振珠; 吴玉红; 孙娟; 田征; 贾海蓉; 钱林生; 杨天楹; 杨崇礼

    2004-01-01

    Background Polycythemia vera (PV) is a malignant disorder of hemaopoietic stem cells which is characterized by clonal hyperproliferation and a low rate of apoptosis. This study was to assess endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) formation in the bone marrow of PV patients and determine its clinical significance.Methods The bone marrow mononuclear cells of 26 patients with PV, 2 patients with secondary erythrocytosis (SE), and 19 normal controls were cultured by Marsh's method for EEC evaluation, and the clinical significance was evaluated.Results EECs appeared in 25 patients with PV but not in 2 patients with SE and 19 normal controls. The number of EECs and the EEC ratio [EEC/erythropoietin (EPO)-dependent colony forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E)] in PV patients positively correlated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Their EEC number did not correlate with white blood cell (WBC) counts, platelet (PLT) counts, or leukocyte alkaline phosphatase (LAP) scores. Their EEC did not correlate with serum EPO levels. Fifteen patients with PV were treated with hydroxyurea (Hu) and/or interferon-alpha (IFN-α). Their EEC ratio before treatment positively correlated with the treatment time required for complete remission (CR) and negatively correlated with the time before relapse. The EEC numbers of 7 PV patients treated with Hu/IFN-α decreased after the blood cell counts dropped to normal levels. There was a positive correlation between the EEC ratio and the incidence of attacks of vascular thrombosis in PV patients. The numbers of apoptosised bone marrow mononuclear cells in PV patients were lower than those in normal controls. The EEC numbers of PV patients negatively correlated with the rate of apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells.Conclusions EEC formation is characteristic in PV patients. EEC number in PV patients positively correlates with Hb levels, the time required for CR, and the incidence of attacks of vascular thrombosis. EEC number negatively correlates with the time

  8. Neotenic formation in laboratory colonies of the termite Coptotermes gestroi after orphaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Costa-Leonardo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The termite Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann, 1896 (Rhinotermitidae: Coptotermitinae is an exotic species in Brazil and information concerning its reproductive developmental biology is scarce. We induced the formation of neotenics in laboratory colonies through orphaning experiments. Orphaning experiments were conducted in three-year old colonies of C. gestroi kept under laboratory conditions. After three months, eight nymphoid neotenics were observed in one colony after queen removal. Histological analysis showed that these neotenics were non-functional. The results suggest that these individuals may have arisen from the first nymphal instar (N1 or from an early N1 instar after one or two larval moults. Neotenics also were recorded on two incipient colonies of C. gestroi that lost the queen naturally.

  9. A local PDE model of aggregation formation in bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavy-Waddy, Paul-Christopher; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2016-10-01

    We study pattern formation in a model of cyanobacteria motion recently proposed by Galante, Wisen, Bhaya and Levy. By taking a continuum limit of their model, we derive a novel fourth-order nonlinear parabolic PDE equation that governs the behaviour of the model. This PDE is {{u}t}=-{{u}xx}-{{u}xxxx}+α {{≤ft(\\frac{{{u}x}{{u}xx}}{u}\\right)}x} . We then derive the instability thresholds for the onset of pattern formation. We also compute analytically the spatial profiles of the steady state aggregation density. These profiles are shown to be of the form \\text{sec}{{\\text{h}}p} where the exponent p is related to the parameters of the model. Full numerical simulations give a favorable comparison between the continuum and the underlying discrete system, and show that the aggregation profiles are stable above the critical threshold.

  10. The Spheroplast Lysis Assay for Yeast in Microtiter Plate Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Rafael; Spencer, Moyah; Thiwanont, Monthiwa; Lipke, Peter N.

    1999-01-01

    A yeast lysis assay in the microtiter plate format improved precision and throughput and led to an improved algorithm for estimating lag time. The assay reproducibly revealed differences of 10% or greater in the maximal lysis rate and 50% or greater in the lag time. Clonal differences were determined to be the major source of variation. Microtiter-based assays should be useful for screening for drug susceptibility and for analyzing mutant phenotypes. PMID:10427014

  11. Piceance Basin Oil Shale Data: Assays, Boreholes and Formation Tops

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This database contains Oil Shale Assays, Borehole Locations and Formation Tops that were used in support of the 2009 Oil Shale Assessment (Survey Fact Sheet...

  12. Direct Enzymatic Assay for Alcohol Oxidase, Alcohol Dehydrogenase, and Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase in Colonies of Hansenula polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    Eggeling, L; Sahm, H

    1980-01-01

    A procedure is described for the qualitative direct identification of alcohol oxidase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and formaldehyde dehydrogenase in yeast colonies. The method has been applied successfully to isolate mutants of Hansenula polymorpha with altered glucose repression of alcohol oxidase.

  13. [CFU-HPP colony formation of bone marrow hematopoietic proginitor cells in psoriatic patients and methylation of p16 gene promotor in CFU-HPP colony cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Niu, Xu-Ping; Li, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Ming; Yin, Guo-Hua

    2007-08-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the colony formation of high-proliferative potential colony-forming units (CFU-HPP) from bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells of psoriatic patients and p16 gene promotor methylation in CFU-HPP cells, and to explore the relationship between the colony formation and the methylation status of p16 gene promoter. Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells from psoriatic patients and normal controls were separated by density gradient centrifugation, and were cultured in methycellulose semi-solid culture medium with SCF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-6 for 14 days to measure the colonies of CFU-HPP. The CFU-HPP colony cells were collected and methylation status of p16 gene promoter of CFU-HPP cell DNA modified with sodium bisulfite was detected by the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The results showed that in methycellulose semi-solid culture system, the number and the size of CFU-HPP colonies of bone marrow of psoriatic patients were all significantly less than that of normal controls, the positive frequency of p16 gene promoter methylation in CFU-HPP cells was lower than that in CFU-HPP colony cells of normal controls. It is concluded that the colony formation capability of CFU-HPP from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells in psoriatic patients is lower than that in normal controls, and the lower positive frequency of P16 gene promoter methylation in CFU-HPP cells perhaps closely correlated with lower CFU-HPP colony-forming capability.

  14. Expression of an accessory cell phenotype by hairy cells during lymphocyte colony formation in agar culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Testa, U; Andre, C; Jouault, H; Reyes, F

    1983-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes require the cooperation of accessory cells to generate lymphocyte colonies in agar culture under PHA stimulation. Various hairy cell enriched fractions, as well as normal monocytes, have been found to be able to initiate colony formation by normal lymphocytes. Leukemic monocytes from CMML patients were also effective, but not the leukemic lymphocytes from CLL patients. The phenotype expressed by HC in agar colonies was further studied using cell surface and enzymatic markers. We have concluded that HC in agar culture in the presence of both normal T lymphocytes and PHA lose the B phenotype that they express in vivo and function like an accessory cell in contrast to normal or leukemic B lymphocytes.

  15. Evaluation of the in vitro activities of ceftobiprole and comparators in staphylococcal colony or microtitre plate biofilm assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbanat, Darren; Shang, Wenchi; Amsler, Karen; Santoro, Colleen; Baum, Ellen; Crespo-Carbone, Steven; Lynch, A Simon

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of ceftobiprole and comparator antibiotics, either alone or in combination, in staphylococcal MBEC™ (minimum biofilm eradication concentration) and colony biofilm assays at dilutions of the maximum free-drug plasma concentration attained during clinical use (fCmax). Staphylococci tested included meticillin-susceptible and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=6) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=2). Relative to no-drug controls, after 7 days of exposure ceftobiprole concentrations from 1/4 fCmax to fCmax generally decreased CFUs in MBEC or colony biofilms of S. aureus isolates by ca. 1.5log10 to ≥2.5log10. Gentamicin reduced colony biofilm CFUs by ≥1.4log10 at these concentrations with gentamicin-susceptible isolates. Following 7 days of exposure, vancomycin and rifampicin were ineffective as single agents or in combination in the colony model, but yielded CFU decreases from 0 to 5log10 in the MBEC model. Treatment of biofilms with rifampicin for 7 days yielded rifampicin-resistant mutants, and the selection of rifampicin resistance was inhibited by co-treatment with ceftobiprole. Thus, ceftobiprole alone or in combination demonstrated promising activity against biofilms of meticillin-susceptible and -resistant staphylococci at clinically relevant concentrations. In contrast, vancomycin and rifampicin, two agents used clinically for the treatment of biofilm infections, tested separately or together gave inconsistent results and generally had little impact on cell viability.

  16. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes do Nascimento; Margareth Maria Gomes de Souza; Angela Rita Pontes Azevedo; Lucianne Cople Maia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. METHODS: Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The...

  17. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search for relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted data using the following keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans.

  18. Satellite cell heterogeneity revealed by G-Tool, an open algorithm to quantify myogenesis through colony-forming assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolito Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle growth and repair is accomplished by the satellite cell pool, a self-renewing population of myogenic progenitors. Functional heterogeneity within the satellite cell compartment and changes in potential with experimental intervention can be revealed by in vitro colony-forming cell (CFC assays, however large numbers of colonies need to be assayed to give meaningful data, and manually quantifying nuclei and scoring markers of differentiation is experimentally limiting. Methods We present G-Tool, a multiplatform (Java open-source algorithm that analyzes an ensemble of fluorescent micrographs of satellite cell-derived colonies to provide quantitative and statistically meaningful metrics of myogenic potential, including proliferation capacity and propensity to differentiate. Results We demonstrate the utility of G-Tool in two applications: first, we quantify the response of satellite cells to oxygen concentration. Compared to 3% oxygen which approximates tissue levels, we find that 21% oxygen, the ambient level, markedly limits the proliferative potential of transit amplifying progeny but at the same time inhibits the rate of terminal myogenic differentiation. We also test whether satellite cells from different muscles have intrinsic differences that can be read out in vitro. Compared to masseter, dorsi, forelimb and hindlimb muscles, we find that the diaphragm satellite cells have significantly increased proliferative potential and a reduced propensity to spontaneously differentiate. These features may be related to the unique always-active status of the diaphragm. Conclusions G-Tool facilitates consistent and reproducible CFC analysis between experiments and individuals. It is released under an open-source license that enables further development by interested members of the community.

  19. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns.

  20. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for direct identification of thermostable direct hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Sakata, Junko; Yonekita, Taro; Kumeda, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of an immunochromatographic assay (NH IC TDH) in identifying thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates. The sensitivity of the NH IC TDH assay was 100% (189 samples) and its specificity was 100% (41 samples) compared with the presence of tdh.

  1. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa. Low concentrations of Cd(II significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies (P93% of Cd(II was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II. More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies.

  2. Defective T-cell colony formation and IL-2 receptor expression at all stages of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelstein, A; Kingsley, L A; Klein, R S; Lyter, D W; Evans, T L; Rinaldo, C R; Weaver, L D; Machen, L L; Schadle, R C

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell colony assay is a highly sensitive measure of immunological dysfunction. The present study evaluated this in vitro response in asymptomatic HIV-infected homosexuals, those with chronic adenopathy as their only clinical manifestation and patients with either ARC or AIDS. The mean colony count in antibody-positive asymptomatic individuals was significantly reduced when compared to either heterosexual controls or antibody-negative homosexuals. Furthermore, there were no differences in the responses of these antibody-positive individuals and those with chronic lymphadenopathy as their only clinical manifestation. By contrast, patients with AIDS or ARC showed a profound defect; this suggests that the colony assay can detect a functional gradient across the spectrum of HIV infections. Colony growth was correlated with the absolute number of T-helper cells and the ability of PHA-stimulated lymphocytes to express IL-2 receptors; no correlation was found with the number of suppressor/cytotoxic cells or in vitro production of IL-2. Recent HIV seroconverters had normal colony counts but impaired ability to express IL-2 receptors. These data suggest a sequential loss of T-cell function as a result of HIV infection; the earliest manifestations are impaired expression of IL-2 receptors and reduced proliferative responses, as measured in the colony assay. PMID:2968201

  3. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. METHODS: Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. RESULTS: The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans.

  4. Mouse B- and T-cell colony formation in vitro. I. Separation of colony-promoting and -inhibiting activities in concanavalin A rat spleen conditioned medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Röpke, C

    1984-01-01

    Rat spleen cell cultures exposed for 24 h to concanavalin A (Con A-CM) contain, in addition to interleukin 2 (IL-2), factors that promote colony formation in vitro by mouse T cells (TCPA) and B cells (BCPA). TCPA and BCPA are separable on a Sephadex G-75 column. TCPA has a molecular weight of 15......,000 daltons and shows the same elution profile as IL-2. Absorption studies with Con A-activated T cells suggested that TCPA and IL-2 are the same entity. BCPA has an apparent molecular weight of 45,000 daltons and stimulates colony formation by B lymphocytes seeded at very low cell density (10(4) - 5 X 10......(4) cells/ml). In contrast to TCPA, BCPA can only be demonstrated in gel-filtered material owing to the presence of B colony suppressor activities in crude Con A-CM. Two B colony inhibitory activities were demonstrated by AcA 34 chromatography of crude Con A-CM with molecular weights of 80...

  5. Serum bactericidal assay for the evaluation of typhoid vaccine using a semi-automated colony-counting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi Seon; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun; Yang, Jae Seung

    2016-08-01

    Typhoid fever, mainly caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), is a life-threatening disease, mostly in developing countries. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is widely used to quantify antibodies against S. Typhi in serum but does not provide information about functional antibody titers. Although the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) using an agar plate is often used to measure functional antibody titers against various bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens, it has rarely been used for typhoid vaccines because it is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In the present study, we established an improved SBA against S. Typhi using a semi-automated colony-counting system with a square agar plate harboring 24 samples. The semi-automated SBA efficiently measured bactericidal titers of sera from individuals immunized with S. Typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccines. The assay specifically responded to S. Typhi Ty2 but not to other irrelevant enteric bacteria including Vibrio cholerae and Shigella flexneri. Baby rabbit complement was more appropriate source for the SBA against S. Typhi than complements from adult rabbit, guinea pig, and human. We also examined the correlation between SBA and ELISA for measuring antibody responses against S. Typhi using pre- and post-vaccination sera from 18 human volunteers. The SBA titer showed a good correlation with anti-Vi IgG quantity in the serum as determined by Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.737 (P typhoid vaccines.

  6. Combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes the highest number of primitive haemopoietic progenitors as shown by pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, M J; Hui, C H; To, L B; Begley, C G; Basser, R L; Simmons, P J

    2000-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with poor prognosis carcinoma of the breast underwent peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization using five different regimens. The yields of primitive haemopoietic progenitors were quantified by a recently described pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay using limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Results of days 14 and 35 pre-CFU were also correlated with conventional CD34+ cell enumeration, CFU-GM (granulocyte-macrophage) and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTCIC) assays. The yield of pre-CFUs with the combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) was significantly higher than with G-CSF alone, cyclophosphamide (Cyclo) and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and GM-CSF, or Cyclo alone. No significant correlation between neutrophil engraftment and pre-CFU could be demonstrated. Furthermore, CFU-GM was shown to bear a stronger correlation with pre-CFU and LTCIC than CD34+ cell measurement; thus, CFU-GM remains a useful biological tool for haemopoietic stem cell assay. We conclude that the combination of G-CSF and SCF mobilizes the highest number of pre-CFUs as measured by functional pre-CFU assay, which provides an alternative measurement of primitive haemopoietic progenitors to the LTCIC assay.

  7. A novel type of colony formation in marine planktonic diatoms revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunčica Bosak

    Full Text Available Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM, we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8-100 nm are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6-1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0-2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the

  8. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  9. Determination of colony numbers in pig epidermis as an estimate for radiosensitivity. A rapid assay based on in vitro BrdU-labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.M.J. van den Aardweg (Gerard J. M.); W.J. Mooi (Wolter)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractA rapid assay has been developed for the quantitation of colonies arising from surviving clonogenic cells in pig epidermis after irradiation. The number of surviving clonogenic cells per unit area was related to the epidermal in vivo response of moist desqua

  10. Collective motion and nonequilibrium cluster formation in colonies of gliding bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bar, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.098102

    2013-01-01

    We characterize cell motion in experiments and show that the transition to collective motion in colonies of gliding bacterial cells confined to a monolayer appears through the organization of cells into larger moving clusters. Collective motion by non-equilibrium cluster formation is detected for a critical cell packing fraction around 17%. This transition is characterized by a scale-free power-law cluster size distribution, with an exponent $0.88\\pm0.07$, and the appearance of giant number fluctuations. Our findings are in quantitative agreement with simulations of self-propelled rods. This suggests that the interplay of self-propulsion of bacteria and the rod-shape of bacteria is sufficient to induce collective motion.

  11. Allelopathy is involved in the formation of pure colonies of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2013-04-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica is one of the most widely distributed fern and occurs throughout East to South Asia. The species often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination has not yet been described. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that allelochemicals are involved in the formation of G. japonica colonies. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica inhibited the growth of seedlings of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and timothy (Phleum pratense). Increasing extract concentration increased the inhibition. These results suggest that G. japonica contain allelopathic substances. The extract was then purified by several chromatographies with monitoring the inhibitory activity and two growth inhibitory substances causing the allelopathic effect were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to be a novel compound 3-O-β-allopyranosyl-13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool (1) and 18-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-13-epitorreferol (2). These compounds inhibited the shoot and root growth of garden cress, lettuce, alfalfa (Medicago sativa), timothy, ryegrass and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) at concentrations greater than 0.1-1.0mM. The concentrations required for 50% growth inhibition of root and shoot growth of these test plants ranged from 0.72 to 3.49mM and 0.79 to 3.51mM for compounds 1 and 2, respectively. Concentration of compounds 1 and 2 in soil under the pure colony of G. japonica was 4.9 and 5.7mM, respectively, indicating concentrations over those required for 50% growth inhibition are potentially available under monocultural stands of these ferns. Therefore, these compounds may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by presence of G. japonica and may thus contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this

  12. Agent based modelling helps in understanding the rules by which fibroblasts support keratinocyte colony formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autologous keratincoytes are routinely expanded using irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine serum for clinical use. With growing concerns about the safety of these xenobiotic materials, it is desirable to culture keratinocytes in media without animal derived products. An improved understanding of epithelial/mesenchymal interactions could assist in this. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A keratincyte/fibroblast o-culture model was developed by extending an agent-based keratinocyte colony formation model to include the response of keratinocytes to both fibroblasts and serum. The model was validated by comparison of the in virtuo and in vitro multicellular behaviour of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in single and co-culture in Greens medium. To test the robustness of the model, several properties of the fibroblasts were changed to investigate their influence on the multicellular morphogenesis of keratinocyes and fibroblasts. The model was then used to generate hypotheses to explore the interactions of both proliferative and growth arrested fibroblasts with keratinocytes. The key predictions arising from the model which were confirmed by in vitro experiments were that 1 the ratio of fibroblasts to keratinocytes would critically influence keratinocyte colony expansion, 2 this ratio needed to be optimum at the beginning of the co-culture, 3 proliferative fibroblasts would be more effective than irradiated cells in expanding keratinocytes and 4 in the presence of an adequate number of fibroblasts, keratinocyte expansion would be independent of serum. CONCLUSIONS: A closely associated computational and biological approach is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological systems such as the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The key outcome of this study is the finding that the early addition of a critical ratio of proliferative fibroblasts can give rapid keratinocyte expansion without the use of irradiated mouse

  13. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangdong; Yan, Ran; Li, Fenxiang; Dai, Wei; Jiao, Kewei; Zhou, Qixing; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II) concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II) exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa. Low concentrations of Cd(II) significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies (P bEPS) contents of M. aeruginosa significantly (P 93% of Cd(II) was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II). More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II) was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II) could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II) bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II) and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies.

  14. The Legacy of Literacy Practices in Colonial Taiwan. Japanese-Taiwanese-Chinese: Language Interaction and Identity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylen, Ann

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a historical and sociolinguistic interrogation of Taiwanese to demonstrate the significance of language continuum in relation to identity formation. To this end, Taiwanese is discussed as a particular variety of language. Literacy practices in the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945) are contrasted with the precolonial and…

  15. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  16. Evaluation of the ANSR for Salmonella assay for identification of Salmonella spp. from colony picks from selective/differential agar media: first action 2013.14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozola, Mark; Botimer, Maximilian; Jagadics, Carolyn; Norton, Paul; Caballero, Oscar; Enslin, Nicole; Biswas, Preetha; Rice, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate performance of the ANSR for Salmonella assay for identification of Salmonella spp. from colony picks taken from selective/differential agar media. The ANSR Salmonella assay is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification test based on the nicking enzyme amplification reaction chemistry. The test can be completed in less than 40 min including sample preparation. A total of 18 laboratories representing industry, government, academic, and commercial testing laboratories participated in the study. Each collaborator tested up to 84 samples, comprised of colony picks of six Salmonella spp. and six non-salmonellae taken from six selective/differential agar media as well as tryptic soy agar. A total of 1441 analyses were performed, 1416 of which gave the correct identification, for overall accuracy of 98.3%. For identification of Salmonella spp., 755 of 756 tests (99.9%) produced the correct result. For identification of non-salmonellae as such, 661 of 685 assays (96.5%) produced the correct result. Of the 18 laboratories, 15 produced data sets with 99-100% accuracy. The majority of false-positive results were clustered in three laboratories; analysis of raw data suggests procedural difficulties in at least two cases, which may explain the atypical data from these collaborators. The ANSR Salmonella assay can be used as a rapid, accurate adjunct or alternative to biochemical testing for identification of presumptive Salmonella spp. isolates.

  17. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhen; KONG Fanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes.The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear.Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton.Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions,including different nutrient,light,and temperature conditions,to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change.The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS production in M.aeruginosa.There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M.aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L,1.98 mg N/L,0.65 mg P/L,light intensity:100 μmol/(m2·s)).These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  18. The role of gravity in the nutrition and formation of Bacillus colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzyr, A.; Tirranen, L.; Krylova, T.

    The soil-like substrate is used to cultivate higher plants in man-made closed ecosystems. It allows increasing the closeness of the systems and decreasing the plant solid residues and human wastes. Unusual funnel-shaped bacterial colonies of Bacillus species have been observed during analysis of microflora of plant nutritional solution. The colonies have the following characteristics: a) the diameter of "funnel socket" (the biomass contacting with nutritional agar) is 10.0-15.0 mm; b) the thickness of "funnel socket" is 0.5-2.5 mm; c) the diameter of the middle part of the "funnel spout" (the biomass contacting with the gas phase) is 1,0-1,5 mm; d) the length of the "funnel spout" is 10.0-15.0 mm. In the socket and the middle part of the "funnel spout" there is a gas cavity which is most probably formed by bacterial gas metabolites. It has been shown that: i) the surface of these funnel-shaped colonies of Bacillus species is hydrophobic, as is the surface of other Bacillus species ( . brevis, B. cellulomonos, B. flavus, B.B formosus, B. subtilis); ii) the forms of colonies can be changed by varying the position of the growing biomass in relation to the gravitation forces. The experiment proved that the form of the "funnel sockets" and the length of the "funnel spouts" of the colonies are determined by hydrophobic air-contacting surface layer, which does not leak and stretches under the weight of accumulated water. A hypothesis has been suggested that the gravity force plays the role of a "pump" supplying and holding water within the colony. Thus, the water that comes under the gravity force contains dissolved nutrients and bacterial cells in the hydrophobic layer. These cells that are situated far away from the nutrient agar have no nutrient deficiency. The water accumulated by the colonies might be free water of agar media or it can be produced by metabolic disruption of medium fat. Hence, when growing a colony in agar media the water-soluble nutrient substances

  19. Distinguishing aggregate formation and aggregate clearance using cell based assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Eenjes, E.; J.M. Dragich; H. Kampinga (Harm); A. Yamamoto, A.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe accumulation of ubiquitinated proteinaceous inclusions represents a complex process, reflecting the disequilibrium between aggregate formation and aggregate clearance. Although decreasing aggregate formation or augmenting aggregate clearance will ultimately lead to diminished aggrega

  20. Comparison of colony formation in adult mouse spermatogonial stem cells developed in Sertoli and STO coculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, S M; Movahedin, M; Koruji, S M; Jafarabadi, M Asghari; Makoolati, Z

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the in vitro effects of coculture with Sertoli and SIM mouse embryo-derived thioguanine- and ouabain-resistant (STO) feeder layer cells on the efficiency of adult mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) colony formation. Sertoli and SSCs were isolated from testes, and their identity was confirmed using immunocytochemistry against Oct4, CDH1, PLZF and C-kit for SSCs and vimentin for Sertoli cells. SSCs were cultured in a simple culture system (control group) and on top of the Sertoli and STO feeder layers for 2 weeks. The number and diameter of colonies were evaluated during third, 7th, 10th and 14th day of culture, and the expression of the Oct-4, α6 and β1 integrins was assessed using quantitative RT-PCR. Significant differences were observed between the three groups, separately for each time (P < 0.05), with higher mean in number and diameter for Sertoli cells (P < 0.05). The results of RT-PCR showed higher gene expression of β1 integrin in Sertoli group, but no significant differences were observed in Oct-4 and α6 integrin gene expression among the three groups. Based the on the optimal effect of Seroli cells on the colony formation of SSCs, it is suggested to use these cells for better colonisation of SSCs. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Radiosensitivity of mice and its modifiers based on the endogeneous spleen colony formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Jindo; Wagatuma, Kaoru

    1987-02-01

    In irradiated mouse hematopoietic tissue, there is a group of cells which can proliferate and form macroscopic colonies. In the spleen, the colonies formed in this manner are discrete and easy to count. In order to look into a difference of radiosensitivity between male and female and the mechanisms of the modification, such as protective agent and hormones on radiosensitivity, the spleen colony forming (SCF) is used as an indicator of reactions in the x-rays irradiated mice. A linear decrease was found in SCF depended on x-rays dose. From the colony forming after irradiation the male was more radiosensitive than female. AET protected from the injury depended on the radiation dose in male mice, but in female mice, protection effects were not observed. Gonatropin showed protective effects for radiation injury on high dose irradiation both in male and female mice. Adrenaline showed similar effects as Gonatropin. Insuline showed a negative effects of protection on 400 R irradiation, while on 600 R irradiation, protective effects were observed.

  2. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation on colony formation capability in different human tumor cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, R.; Dasdia, T.; Melloni, E.; Rocca, E.

    1989-01-01

    Fibroblasts and lymphocytes are the most widely used cells for studying the so-called biostimulative effect of low-power laser in vitro. In contrast, stimulation of cancer cells by laser light has not been investigated extensively. The present study attempted to evaluate whether or not human tumor cells could exhibit an increase in colony-forming capability following low-watt laser irradiation. LoVo and HT29 (colon carcinoma), MCF7 (breast carcinoma), M14 and JR1 (malignant melanoma) cell lines were irradiated at different doses of light delivered from an argon or an argon-dye laser. Radiant exposures between 4.2 and 150 kJ/m2 at irradiances ranging from 35 to 500 W/m2 were delivered. Results were mixed. Of the 41 experiments performed, five showed a significant statistical increase in the number of colonies (P less than 0.05), whereas three showed a decrease (P less than 0.05). Nevertheless, the trend of most data was toward an increase in colony formation, and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test suggested that light increases tumor cell culture growth (P less than 0.03).

  3. Assessment of biological and colony hybridization assays for detection of the aerobactin system in Escherichia coli from urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orskov, I; Williams, P H; Svanborg Edén, C; Orskov, F

    1989-01-01

    A total of 466 E. coli strains from urinary tract infections (UTI) were screened for the presence and expression of the aerobactin system by a colony hybridization test and a bioassay. A probe carrying part of the genes for aerobactin synthesis was used. A total of 43.1% (201) of the strains were positive in the probe test and undoubtedly positive in the bioassay. When doubtfully positive bioassays were included, this figure rose to 49.8% (232). An additional 4.9% (23) of the strains were positive in the colony hybridization test only while 44% (205) of the strains were negative in both tests. Doubtfully positive bioassays were probably due either to a false positive reaction or to a weak expression of the aerobactin system. 01:K1:H- strains were characteristically probe positive and doubtfully positive in the bioassay. The incidence of isolates positive by both methods or by only one of them was significantly higher among isolates from cases of pyelonephritis (Py) than among those from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) and normal feces (FN) (P less than 0.01).

  4. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  5. A rapid and quantitative coat protein complex II vesicle formation assay using luciferase reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, J Chris; Kim, Jinoh

    2012-02-15

    The majority of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is facilitated by coat protein complex II (COPII). The COPII proteins deform the ER membrane into vesicles at the ER exit sites. During the vesicle formation step, the COPII proteins load cargo molecules into the vesicles. Formation of COPII vesicles has been reconstituted in vitro in yeast and in mammalian systems. These in vitro COPII vesicle formation assays involve incubation of microsomal membranes and purified COPII proteins with nucleotides. COPII vesicles are separated from the microsomes by differential centrifugation. Interestingly, the efficiency of the COPII vesicle formation with purified recombinant mammalian COPII proteins is lower than that with cytosol, suggesting that an additional cytosolic factor(s) is involved in this process. Indeed, other studies have also implicated additional factors. To facilitate biochemical identification of such regulators, a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay is necessary because the current assay is lengthy. To expedite this assay, we generated luciferase reporter constructs. The reporter proteins were packaged into COPII vesicles and yielded quantifiable luminescent signals, resulting in a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay.

  6. Review; Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies (2012 Buchbesprechung: Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhart Kößler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the monograph:Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, 2012, ISBN 9780857452979, 343 pagesBesprechung der Monographie:Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, 2012, ISBN 9780857452979, 343 Seiten

  7. EFFECTS OF INTERLEUKIN-4 ON GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE-COLONY FORMATION FROM MURINE BONE MARROW CELLS AND HEMATOPOIETIC RECONSTITUTION FOLLOWING MURINE ALLOGENEIC BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱康儿; KerryAtkinson

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mouse recombinant IL-4 on hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo.IL-4 alone was found to be incapable of stimulating colony formation,but it inhibited both IL-3-and GM-CSF-induced colony for-mation by murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.In contrast,colony formation induced by G-CSF was enhanced in the presence of IL-4.We also studied the influence of IL-4 on hematopoietie reconstiution after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a murine model,and found that IL-4 and G-CSF was significantly suppressed by IL-4.The combination of IL-4 and GM-CSF caused a significant decrease in the absolute mumber of meutrophils.

  8. Lamella formation and emigration from the water by a laboratory colony of Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY in flow-through system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. A. Dannemann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamella formation and emigration from the water were investigated in juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata reared at two temperatures in aquaria with a constant water flow. Most snails (97.4% reared at the lower temperature (21- C formed lamella at the shell aperture and emigrated from the water, whereas only 10.1% did so at 25- C. Eighty percent of emigrations at 21- C occurred within a period of 15 days, 70-85 days after hatching. A comparison of the studies done so far indicates that the phenomenon may be affected by the ageing of snail colonies kept in the laboratory and their geographic origin, rather than the rearing conditions. This hypothesis, however, requires experimental confirmation.

  9. Risk assessment of human myelotoxicity of anticancer drugs: a predictive model and the in vitro colony forming unit granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, N

    2006-02-01

    Myelotoxicity is one of the major limitations to the use of anticancer drugs. It is desirable to evaluate human myelotoxicity before a Phase I study, however, this is difficult because of the differences in susceptibility between humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable method to predict the human maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of five camptothecin derivatives: SN-38, DX-8951f, topotecan (TPT), 9-aminocamptothecin (9-AC), and camptothecin (CAM). The myelotoxicity of camptothecin derivatives was evaluated on bone marrow from mice, dogs, and humans using a 14-day colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) assay to determine the 50%, 75%, and 90% inhibitory concentration values (IC50, IC75, and IC90, respectively). Then, using human and murine IC90 values for myelotoxicity of these compounds, in vivo toxicological data, and pharmacokinetic parameters (data referred to the literature), human MTDs were predicted retrospectively. The mechanism-based prediction model which is proposed uses the in vitro CFU-GM assay and in vivo parameters on the basis of free fraction of area under the concentration-curve (AUC) at the MTD (r2 = 0.887) and suggests that the human MTDs were well predicted for the five camptothecin derivatives by this model rather than by other models. The application of this model for in vitro hematotoxicology could be very useful in the development of new anticancer agents.

  10. Quantitative comparison between microfluidic and microtiter plate formats for cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huabing; Pattrick, Nicola; Zhang, Xunli; Klauke, Norbert; Cordingley, Hayley C; Haswell, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we compare a quantitative cell-based assay measuring the intracellular Ca2+ response to the agonist uridine 5'-triphosphate in Chinese hamster ovary cells, in both microfluidic and microtiter formats. The study demonstrates that, under appropriate hydrodynamic conditions, there is an excellent agreement between traditional well-plate assays and those obtained on-chip for both suspended immobilized cells and cultured adherent cells. We also demonstrate that the on-chip assay, using adherent cells, provides the possibility of faster screening protocols with the potential for resolving subcellular information about local Ca2+ flux.

  11. A new computational approach to simulate pattern formation in Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura Jane

    Under the harsh conditions of limited nutrient and hard growth surface, Paenibacillus dendritiformis in agar plates form two classes of patterns (morphotypes). The first class, called the dendritic morphotype, has radially directed branches. The second class, called the chiral morphotype, exhibits uniform handedness. The dendritic morphotype has been modeled successfully using a continuum model on a regular lattice; however, a suitable computational approach was not known to solve a continuum chiral model. This work details a new computational approach to solving the chiral continuum model of pattern formation in P. dendritiformis. The approach utilizes a random computational lattice and new methods for calculating certain derivative terms found in the model.

  12. Evaluation of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for routine screening of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus antibodies in mice colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, Juan M; Carbone, Cecilia; Corva, Santiago G; Galosi, Cecilia M

    2008-11-01

    The current study demonstrates the ability of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) to detect antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus in mice colonies. The antigen was produced from infected baby hamster kidney (BHK)-21 cells and treated with 1% Nonidet P40 in saline buffer. Control antigen was prepared following the same procedure using uninfected BHK-21 cells. The optimal antigen and serum dilutions were established. The reaction was revealed using an anti-mouse-horseradish peroxidase conjugate and 2,2'-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). Optimized iELISA was validated by detection of antibodies in known positive and negative serum samples before testing the samples of unknown status. Performance of the iELISA was compared with the indirect fluorescent antibody test, and the cutoff value was determined by receiver operating curve. Indirect ELISA showed 100% sensitivity, 99.38% specificity, and 97.78% predictive positive value. The antigen used is easy to produce, and no special equipment is required. The iELISA developed is simple and provides a rapid and less costly tool for diagnosis and research.

  13. Osteopontin and the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4 compete for CD44 binding and have opposite effects on CD133+ cell colony formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobocan Monica C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C21, the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4, has growth promoting activity and was discovered as one of several erythropoietin-dependent endothelial proteins. C21 stimulates red cell formation in anemic mice and is a growth factor for CD34+ and CD36+ hematopoietic cells, skin fibroblasts and kidney epithelial cells. ROD1 has been identified as an intracellular mediator. Nothing is known about the existence of putative C21 receptors on plasma membranes of target cells. Findings We analyzed the nature of C21-binding proteins in cell lysates of skin fibroblasts using C21 affinity columns. The membrane receptor CD44 was identified as C21-binding protein by mass spectrometry. We were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD44 on cell growth or the effect of C21 on cell proliferation. A soluble form of CD44 was synthesized in insect cells and purified from culture supernatants with a combination of PVDF filtration in the presence of ammonium sulphate and HPLC. Both osteopontin and hyaluronic acid competitively displaced Biotin-C21 binding to CD44. In a colony-forming assay using primitive CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood, osteopontin and C21 had opposite effects and C21 reduced the inhibitory action of osteopontin. Conclusion CD44 is a C21-binding membrane protein. We could not demonstrate an involvement of CD44 in the proliferative action of C21. Nevertheless, based on the antagonism of C21 and osteopontin in hematopoietic precursors, we speculate that C21 could indirectly have a major impact on hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, by hindering osteopontin membrane binding at the level of the bone marrow niche.

  14. High-throughput colorimetric assays for nucleotide sugar formation and glycosyl transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Thorson, Jon S

    2012-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases are ubiquitous in nature, catalyzing glycosidic bond formation in the context of an enormous range of substrates, which include all major classes of biological molecules. Because this wide range of substrates lacks a shared, distinguishable feature that can be altered by glycosyl transfer, general assays for detection of glycosyltransferase activity have long been largely limited to low-throughput methods. Of those high-throughput assays reported in the literature, many are confined to specific glycosyl transfer reactions with modified aglycon acceptors selected for their unique analytical properties. Herein are described a series of protocols centered on the use of 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl glycoside donors and the reversibility of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions to enable a colorimetric assay for the formation of sugar nucleotides, coupled reaction systems for the glycodiversification of small molecules, and a general colorimetric assay for glycosyltransfer, applicable to drug discovery, protein engineering, and other fundamental sugar nucleotide-dependent investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing and suppressing effects of recombinant murine macrophage inflammatory proteins on colony formation in vitro by bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, H E; Sherry, B; Lu, L; Cooper, S; Oh, K O; Tekamp-Olson, P; Kwon, B S; Cerami, A

    1990-09-15

    Purified recombinant (r) macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIPs) 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 2 were assessed for effects on murine (mu) and human (hu) marrow colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) colonies. Recombinant MIP-1 alpha, -1 beta, and -2 enhanced muCFU-GM colonies above that stimulated with 10 to 100 U natural mu macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) or rmuGM-CSF, with enhancement seen on huCFU-GM colony formation stimulated with suboptimal rhuM-CSF or rhuGM-CSF; effects were neutralized by respective MIP-specific antibodies. Macrophage inflammatory proteins had no effects on mu or huBFU-E colonies stimulated with erythropoietin (Epo). However, natural MIP-1 and rMIP-1 alpha, but not rMIP-1 beta or -2, suppressed muCFU-GM stimulated with pokeweed mitogen spleen-conditioned medium (PWMSCM), huCFU-GM stimulated with optimal rhuGM-CSF plus rhu interleukin-3 (IL-3), muBFU-E and multipotential progenitors (CFU-GEMM) stimulated with Epo plus PWMSCM, and huBFU-E and CFU-GEMM stimulated with Epo plus rhuIL-3 or rhuGM-CSF. The suppressive effects of natural MIP-1 and rMIP-1 alpha were also apparent on a population of BFU-E, CFU-GEMM, and CFU-GM present in cell-sorted fractions of human bone marrow (CD34 HLA-DR+) highly enriched for progenitors with cloning efficiencies of 42% to 75%. These results, along with our previous studies, suggest that MIP-1 alpha, -1 beta, and -2 may have direct myelopoietic enhancing activity for mature progenitors, while MIP-1 alpha may have direct suppressing activity for more immature progenitors.

  16. Prolonged Proteasome Inhibition Cyclically Upregulates Oct3/4 and Nanog Gene Expression, but Reduces Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Elizabeth Z.; Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A.; Kilroy, Gail; Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Barnes, Christian W.; Strickler, Karen L.; Rim, Jong S.; Harkins, Lettie L.; Gao, Ru; Kim, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is ample evidence that the ubiquitin–proteasome system is an important regulator of transcription and its activity is necessary for maintaining pluripotency and promoting cellular reprogramming. Moreover, proteasome activity contributes to maintaining the open chromatin structure found in pluripotent stem cells, acting as a transcriptional inhibitor at specific gene loci generally associated with differentiation. The current study was designed to understand further the role of proteasome inhibition in reprogramming and its ability to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-related genes and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) colony formation. Herein, we demonstrate that acute combinatorial treatment with the proteasome inhibitors MG101 or MG132 and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) increases gene expression of the pluripotency marker Oct3/4, and that MG101 alone is as effective as VPA in the induction of Oct3/4 mRNA expression in fibroblasts. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates gene expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog, but reduces colony formation in the presence of the iPSC induction cocktail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the 26S proteasome is an essential modulator in the reprogramming process. Its inhibition enhances expression of pluripotency-related genes; however, efficient colony formation requires proteasome activity. Therefore, discovery of small molecules that increase proteasome activity might lead to more efficient cell reprogramming and generation of pluripotent cells. PMID:25826722

  17. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  18. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Choudhry

    Full Text Available Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays.

  19. Highly miniaturized formats for in vitro drug metabolism assays using vivid fluorescent substrates and recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Olga V; Gibson, Jasmin R; Marks, Bryan D

    2005-02-01

    Highly miniaturized P450 screening assays designed to enable facile analysis of P450 drug interactions in a 1536-well plate format with the principal human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2) and Vivid fluorogenic substrates were developed. The detailed characterization of the assays included stability, homogeneity, and reproducibility of the recombinant P450 enzymes and the kinetic parameters of their reactions with Vivid fluorogenic substrates, with a focus on the specific characteristics of each component that enable screening in a low-volume 1536-well plate assay format. The screening assays were applied for the assessment of individual cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles with a panel of selected assay modifiers, including isozyme-specific substrates and inhibitors. IC(50) values obtained for the modifiers in 96- and 1536-well plate formats were similar and comparable with values obtained in assays with conventional substrates. An overall examination of the 1536-well assay statistics, such as signal-to-background ratio and Z' factor, demonstrated that these assays are a robust, successful, and reliable tool to screen for cytochrome P450 metabolism and inhibition in an ultra-high-throughput screening format.

  20. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  1. REVENUE FARMING AND IMPERIAL TRANSITION: AN ECONOMIC DIMENSION OF EARLY COLONIAL STATE FORMATION IN JAVA, C. 1800S-1820S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Wahid

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Revenue farming (pacht or verpachtingen in Dutch is a fiscal institution that existed in Java since the pre-colonial period. During the VOC period, the Dutch modified, institutionalized and &extended it as one of their fiscal institutions to solve human resource shortage and administrative barriers in collecting taxes from local population. For political and economic reasons the Dutch favored the Chinese as main partners in operating the system. The system was proven efficient to an extent that it collected substantial revenue contribution to the state exchequer. During the period of 'imperial' transition from 1800s until 1820s, changing regimes in Java retained the system to finance their political agenda. This paper argues that revenue-farming system was the financial source for the Dutch in establishing a real colonial state in Java.

  2. Cartilage formation measured by a novel PIINP assay suggests that IGF-I does not stimulate but maintains cartilage formation ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, S H; Sondergaard, B C; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay;

    2009-01-01

    . Proteoglycan levels retained in the explants after 22 days of culture were extracted and measured by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay. RESULTS: In the absence of stimulation, PIINP markedly decreased as a function of time (99.4%, p collagen formation...... explants were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM):F12 in the presence of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 ng/mL of IGF-I. The viability of the chondrocytes was measured by the colorimetric Alamar blue assay. Collagen formation was assessed from the conditioned medium by the PIINP assay...

  3. A Comparison between the Colony Formation of Adult Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells in Co cultures with Sertoli and STO (Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Morteza Koruji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the colony formation of spermatogonialstem cells (SSCs on sertoli and STO (Mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line feeder celllayers during a two-week period.Materials and Methods: Initially, sertoli cells and SSCs were isolated from adultmouse testes using a two-step enzymatic digestion and lectin immobilization. Characteristicsof the isolated cells were immunocytochemically confirmed by examiningfor the presence of Oct-4, CDH1, promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger factor (PLZF,SSC C-kit, and the distribution of Sertoli cell vimentin. SSCs were then cultured abovethe Sertoli, STO and the control (without co-culture separately for two weeks. In allthree groups, the number and diameter of colonies were evaluated using an invert microscopeon the 3rd, 7th, 10th and 14th day. β1 and α6-integrin m-RNA expressions wereassessed using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and realtimePCR. Furthermore, Oct-4 m RNA expression was assessed using real time PCR.Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA; and the paired two-sample t test andTukey’s test were used as post-hoc tests for the data analysis of the three sertoli, STOand control cocultures.Results: At the four specified time points, our results showed significant differences (p<0.05in colony numbers and diameters among the sertoli, STO and control groups. The numberand diameter of colonies increased more rapidly in the sertoli coculture than in the othertwo Our results at all four time points also showed significant differences (p<0.05 in themean colony numbers and diameters between the three groups, with the Sertoli coculturehaving the highest mean values for colony numbers and diameters. The RT-PCR results,after two-weeks of culturing, showed that β1-integrin was expressed in all three groups cocultures,but α6-integrin was not expressed. Additionally, based on real time PCR results,the three genes (β1-integrin, α6-integrin

  4. A new experimental protocol as an alternative to the colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) clonogenic assay to assess the haematotoxic potential of new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Gianni; Vandin, Luca; Bonato, Monica; Repeto, Paolo; Sciuscio, Davide

    2006-08-01

    In this work, a first attempt to set-up a new in vitro experimental protocol with culture in liquid medium and flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow progenitors is described. This protocol is proposed as an alternative to the colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) clonogenic in vitro assay currently used to assess the toxic potential of new drugs in the bone marrow. This new experimental approach should enable to speed up the procedure of the in vitro haematotoxic potential assessment, to reduce inter-experimental variability and to enhance result accuracy. Preliminary results obtained demonstrated that the progenitor cell count by flow cytometry replacing the light microscopy granulocyte/macrophage colony count represents a tremendous improvement in terms of accuracy and standardisation. Moreover, differential counts of cell sub-populations can be performed by using specific monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, this method demonstrated to be time-saving, since 4 day cell incubation period is required instead of 7-14 day incubation in the CFU-GM clonogenic assay. On the basis of results obtained so far, the new experimental protocol proposed looks a promising alternative to the CFU-GM clonogenic assay currently used.

  5. Phage anti-immunocomplex assay for clomazone: two-site recognition increasing assay specificity and facilitating adaptation into an on-site format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossotti, M A; Carlomagno, M; González-Techera, A; Hammock, B D; Last, J; González-Sapienza, G

    2010-11-01

    The impact of the use of herbicides in agriculture can be minimized by compliance with good management practices that reduce the amount used and their release into the environment. Simple tests that provide real time on-site information about these chemicals are a major aid for these programs. In this work, we show that phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA), a method that uses phage-borne peptides to detect the formation of antibody-analyte immunocomplexes, is an advantageous technology to produce such field tests. A monoclonal antibody to the herbicide clomazone was raised and used in the development of conventional competitive and noncompetitive PHAIA immunoassays. The sensitivity attained with the PHAIA format was over 10 times higher than that of the competitive format. The cross-reactivity of the two methods was also compared using structurally related compounds, and we observed that the two-site binding of PHAIA "double-checks" the recognition of the analyte, thereby increasing the assay specificity. The positive readout of the noncompetitive PHAIA method allowed adaptation of the assay into a rapid and simple format where as little as 0.4 ng/mL clomazone (more than 10-fold lower than the proposed standard) in water samples from a rice field could be easily detected by simple visual inspection.

  6. Information use in colonial living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Julian C; Votier, Stephen C; Dall, Sasha R X

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that many animals live in groups, there is still no clear consensus about the ecological or evolutionary mechanisms underlying colonial living. Recently, research has suggested that colonies may be important as sources of social information. The ready availability of information from conspecifics allows animals to make better decisions about avoiding predators, reducing brood parasitism, migratory phenology, mate choice, habitat choice and foraging. These choices can play a large part in the development and maintenance of colonies. Here we review the types of information provided by colonial animals and examine the different ways in which decision-making in colonies can be enhanced by social information. We discuss what roles information might take in the evolution, formation and maintenance of colonies. In the process, we illustrate that information use permeates all aspects of colonial living.

  7. Evaluation of a liquid dispenser for assay development and enzymology in 1536-well format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butendeich, Heike; Pierret, Noëlle M; Numao, Shin

    2013-06-01

    Although developments in liquid dispensers have made the use of 1536-well plates for high-throughput screening (HTS) standard, there is still a gap in dispenser technology for performing matrix experiments with several components. Experiments such as those performed during assay development and enzymological studies are therefore still performed by manual pipetting in lower-density plates. We have evaluated a new dispenser, the Certus liquid dispenser (Gyger Fluidics GmbH, Switzerland), that is capable of flexible dispensing in 1536-well format, with a dead volume of less than 200 µL. Taking advantage of the precision of the dispenser for volumes down to 50 nL, we have created concentration gradients on plates by dispensing different volumes of reagent and then backfilling with buffer. Using this method and the flexibility of the dispenser software, we have performed several multidimensional experiments varying two to three components, including an assay development for an HTS, a mode of inhibition study, and a cofactor optimization, in which we determined 32 KM values. Overall, the flexibility of the plate layout for multiple components, the accuracy to dispense volumes ranging 2 log orders, and minimal reagent usage enable this dispenser for complex biochemical experiments.

  8. Inhibition of MEK and GSK3 supports ES cell-like domed colony formation from avian and reptile embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanoh, Shota; Okazaki, Kenji; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-07-01

    As amniotes diversified, mammals may have modified mechanisms of cellular pluripotency along with the acquisition of a placenta. What then defined pluripotent states in the ancestral amniotes? To study the evolutionary background of pluripotency in amniotes, we tested the effects of extracellular effectors on primary culture cells from avian and reptile embryos in serum-free medium. When treated with a combination of a MEK inhibitor and a GSK3 inhibitor (2i condition), chicken early embryos formed domed colonies (DCs), which were morphologically indistinguishable from the colonies formed by mouse and rat naïve embryonic stem cells. However, no DCs formed when cells from further-developed embryos were cultured in the 2i condition, indicating that there is a clear boundary of DC-forming ability at around the stage of primitive streak elongation. Quail embryos at the blastoderm and cleavage stages also formed DCs in the 2i condition, which is consistent with the notion that the appearance of DCs corresponds with the presence of pluripotent cells in embryos. Gecko blastoderms also formed DCs in the 2i condition, but gastrulas did not. ERK activation by bFGF caused an effect opposite to that of the 2i condition, namely, it dispersed colonies of cells even from early embryos in all species examined. These results suggest that the regulation of pluripotency by FGF/ERK signaling may date back at least to the common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. However, gene expression analysis indicated the possibility that mammalian pluripotency transcription factors function differently in non-mammalian amniotes.

  9. Simultaneous detection of virulence factors from a colony in diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by a multiplex PCR assay with Alexa Fluor-labeled primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Shigemoto, Naoki; Oohara, Sachiko; Tanizawa, Yukie; Yamada, Hiroko; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Shinji

    2011-07-01

    We have developed simultaneous detection of eight genes associated with the five categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by the multiplex PCR assay with Alexa Fluor-labeled primers. This assay can easily distinguish eight genes based on the size and color of amplified products without gel staining.

  10. Phage Anti-Immunocomplex Assay (PHAIA) for clomazone: Two-site recognition increases assay specificity and facilitates adaptation into a rapid on-site format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossotti, M.A.; Carlomagno, M.; González-Techera, A.; Hammock, B.D.; Last, J.; González-Sapienza, G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of the use of herbicides in agriculture can be minimized by compliance with good management practices that reduce the amount used and their release into the environment. Simple tests that provide real time on-site information about these chemicals are a major aid for these programs. In this work we show that PHAIA, a method that uses phage-borne peptides to detect the formation of antibody-analyte immunocomplexes, is an advantageous technology to produce such field tests. A monoclonal antibody to the herbicide clomazone was raised and used in the development of conventional competitive and noncompetitive PHAIA immunoassays. The sensitivity attained with the PHAIA format was over ten times higher than that of the competitive format. The cross-reactivity of the two methods was also compared by using structurally related compounds, and we observed that the two-site binding of PHAIA “double-checks” the recognition of the analyte, thereby increasing the assay specificity. The positive readout of the noncompetitive PHAIA method allowed adaptation of the assay into a rapid and simple format where as little as 0.4 ng/ml of clomazone (more than 10-fold lower than the proposed standard) in water samples from a rice field could be easily detected by simple visual inspection. PMID:20886819

  11. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  12. Sensitive detection of p53 antibodies in a homogeneous fluorescence assay format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuweiler, Hannes; Schulz, Andreas; Wolfrum, Juergen M.; Sauer, Markus

    2002-06-01

    Circulating p53 autoantibodies are found to be a universal and highly specific tumor marker for malignant diseases. Hence, sereological screening for p53 autoantibodies at low concentration levels has become increasingly relevant for early-stage and follow-up of tumor diagnostics. We developed a new method for the highly sensitive detection of p53 antibodies in a homogeneous fluorescence assay format. Short, linear peptide derived form antibody recognition sequences so human p53 were labeled with an oxazine dye. Hydrophobic interactions constrain a conformation, where the dye interacts selectively with a tryptophan residue in the peptide sequence. Subsequently, the fluorescence of the dye is quenched efficiently due to electron transfer from the indole derivative to the dye in the excited state. Specific antibody recognition induces a conformational change in the peptide structure, repealing the dye-tryptophan interaction. Consequently, a fluorescence increase upon antibody binding signals the binding event. The long-wavelength absorption and emission characteristics of the probe and the use of a red pulsed diode laser as excitation source in a confocal fluorescence microscopic set-up allows ultra sensitive antibody detection at the single-molecule level. The effectiveness of the probes are highlighted by the detection of individual p53 autoantibodies directly in serum dilutions of cancer patients.

  13. A multicellular spheroid array to realize spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisawa, Yu-suke; Takagi, Airi; Nashimoto, Yuji; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel multicellular spheroid culture system that facilitates the easy preparation and culture of a spheroid microarray for the long-term monitoring of cellular activity. A spheroid culture device with an array of pyramid-like microholes was constructed in a silicon chip that was equipped with elastomeric microchannels. A cell suspension was introduced via the microfluidic channel into the microstructure that comprised silicon microholes and elastomeric microwells. A single spheroid can be formed and localized precisely within each microstructure. Since the culture medium could be replaced via the microchannels, a long-term culture (of approximately 2 weeks) is available on the chip. Measurement of albumin production in the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) showed that the liver-specific functions were maintained for 2 weeks. Based on the cellular respiratory activity, the cellular viability of the spheroid array on the chip was evaluated using scanning electrochemical microscopy. Responses to four different chemical stimulations were simultaneously detected on the same chip, thus demonstrating that each channel could be evaluated independently under various stimulation conditions. Our spheroid culture system facilitated the understanding of spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a single chip, thus functioning as a useful drug-screening device for cancer and liver cells.

  14. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G Malone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs, auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes Yfi

  15. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G Malone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs, auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes Yfi

  16. Identification and Characterization of Novel Rat Polyomavirus 2 in a Colony of X-SCID Rats by P-PIT assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatti, Lora H.; Toptan, Tuna; Newsome, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyomaviruses (PyVs) are known to infect a wide range of vertebrates and invertebrates and are associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, including cancers, particularly in immune-suppressed hosts. A novel polyomavirus, designated rat polyomavirus 2 (RatPyV2), was identified from a breeding colony of rats having X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. Using a human panpolyomavirus immunohistochemistry test (P-PIT), RatPyV2 was initially detected in the parotid salivary gland of a colony member. Rolling circle amplification using DNA from harderian and parotid glands identified a novel 5.1-kb polyomavirus genome closely related to human Washington University (WU) and Karolinska Institute (KI) and vole polyomaviruses but notably divergent from Rattus norvegicus PyV1 (RnorPyV1; also designated RatPyV1). Further screening showed RatPyV2 inclusion body infection in the lung epithelium and variably in other respiratory, reproductive, and glandular tissues of 12/12 (100%) rats. IMPORTANCE Although P-PIT was developed to detect diseases associated with known human polyomaviruses, the identification of a new polyomavirus in rats suggests that it may have utility as a broad-based screen for new, as well as known polyomaviruses. Our findings suggest that RatPyV2 may be a commensal infection of laboratory rats that can lead to disseminated disease in T cell immune-deficient rats. Infection of the X-SCID rats with RatPyV2 and Pneumocystis carinii is a potential model for coinfection pathogenesis and treatment options during transplant preclinical studies. PMID:28028546

  17. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  18. A generalized discrete model linking rippling pattern formation and individual cell reversal statistics in colonies of myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Uwe; Deutsch, Andreas; Bär, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Self-organization processes in multicellular aggregates of bacteria and amoebae offer fascinating insights into the evolution of cooperation and differentiation of cells. During myxobacterial development a variety of spatio-temporal patterns emerges such as counterpropagating waves of cell density that are known as rippling. Recently, several models have been introduced that qualitatively reproduce these patterns. All models include active motion and a collision-triggered reversal of individual bacteria. Here, we present a systematic study of a generalized discrete model that is based on similar assumptions as the continuous model by Igoshin et al (2001 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 98 14913). We find counterpropagating as well as unidirectional rippling waves in extended regions of the parameter space. If the interaction strength and the degree of cooperativity are large enough, rippling patterns appear even in the absence of a refractory period. We show for the first time that the experimentally observed double peak in the reversal statistics of bacteria in rippling colonies (Welch and Kaiser 2001 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 98 14907) can be reproduced in simulations of counterpropagating rippling waves which are dominant in experiments. In addition, the reversal statistics in the pre-rippling phase is correctly reproduced.

  19. Colonial Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura; Palmer, Russell

    2016-01-01

    and the USA which reveal that the study of colonial institutions should not be limited to the functional life of these institutions—or solely those that take the form of monumental architecture—but should include the long shadow of “imperial debris” (Stoler 2008) and immaterial institutions....

  20. The mycotoxin zearalenone enhances cell proliferation, colony formation and promotes cell migration in the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi, Haila; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Shirley, Sarah; Abid, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen; Micheau, Olivier

    2016-07-08

    Zearalenone (ZEN) and Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) are fungal secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium and Aspergillus genera, respectively. These mycotoxins are found world-wide as corn and wheat contaminants. AFB1 is probably the most toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin. It has been demonstrated to be mutagenic, genotoxic, and hepatocarcinogenic. ZEN is a non-steroidal estrogenic mycotoxin that displays hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties have so far remained controversial and questionable. Using the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, we will show here that ZEN, at low concentrations, enhances cell proliferation, increases colony formation and fastens cell migration after wound healing. The highest effect of ZEN was observed at a concentration 10 times lower as compared to AFB1. Our findings suggest thus that this mycotoxin exhibits carcinogenesis-like properties in HCT116 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel high-throughput format assay for HIV-1 integrase strand transfer reaction using magnetic beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-qiu HE; Xiao-hui MA; Bin LIU; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG; Shao-hui CHENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To develop a novel high-throughput format assay to monitor the integrase (IN) strand transfer (ST) reaction in vitro and apply it to a reaction character study and the identification of antiviral drugs.Methods:The donor DNA duplex,with a sequence identical to the U5 end of HIV-1 long terminal repeats,is labeled at its 5' end with biotin (BIO).The target DNA duplex is labeled at its 3' end with digoxin (DIG).IN mediates the integration of donor DNA into target DNA and results in a 5' BIO and 3' DIG-labeled duplex DNA product.Streptavidin-coated magnetic beads were used to capture the product,and the amount of DIG was measured as the ST reaction product.The assay was optimized in 96-well microplate format for high-throughput screening purpose.Moreover,the assay was applied in a ST reaction character study,and the efficiency of the assay in the identification of antiviral compounds was tested.Results:The end-point values,measured as absorbance at 405 nm was approximately 1.5 for the IN-mediated ST reaction as compared with no more than 0.05 of background readings.The ST reaction char-acter and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2 known IN inhibitors obtained in our assay were similar to previously reported results using other assays.The evaluation parameter Z' factor for this assay ranged from 0.6 to 0.9.Conclusion:The assay presented here has been proven to be rapid,sensitive,and specific for the detection of IN ST activity,the reaction character study,as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN.

  2. Colony Dimorphism in Bradyrhizobium Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester-Bradley, Rosemary; Thornton, Philip; Jones, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Ten isolates of Bradyrhizobium spp. which form two colony types were studied; the isolates originated from a range of legume species. The two colony types differed in the amount of gum formed or size or both, depending on the strain. Whole 7-day-old colonies of each type were subcultured to determine the proportion of cells which had changed to the other type. An iterative computerized procedure was used to determine the rate of switching per generation between the two types and to predict proportions reached at equilibrium for each strain. The predicted proportions of the wetter (more gummy) or larger colony type at equilibrium differed significantly between strains, ranging from 0.9999 (strain CIAT 2383) to 0.0216 (strain CIAT 2469), because some strains switched faster from dry to wet (or small to large) and others switched faster from wet to dry (or large to small). Predicted equilibrium was reached after about 140 generations in strain USDA 76. In all but one strain (CIAT 3030) the growth rate of the wetter colony type was greater than or similar to that of the drier type. The mean difference in generation time between the two colony types was 0.37 h. Doubling times calculated for either colony type after 7 days of growth on the agar surface ranged from 6.0 to 7.3 h. The formation of two persistent colony types by one strain (clonal or colony dimorphism) may be a common phenomenon among Bradyrhizobium strains. Images PMID:16347599

  3. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  4. Inhibitory effect of parvovirus H—1 on the formation of colonies of human hepatoma cell line in vitro and its tumors in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANSHANGJUN; CHENGWUMA; 等

    1994-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of parvovirus H-1 on the colonyforming ability.in vitro of QGY-7703,a cultured human hepatoma cell line,and on the formation and growth of its tumors in nude mice was studied.With higher multiplicity of infection(MOI) of H-1 given,survival of the QGY-7703 cells was found to be decreased.H-1 DNA amplification level at 30h postinfection(p.i.) was detected to be 7.4 times higher than that at 2h by dispersed cells assay,while the cells were delayed to enter into S phase.Plaques were formed in the indicator cells(new-born human kidney cell line,NBK) by progeny H-1 virus particles released from the infected QGY-7703 cells by infectious cell center assay.The formation of tumors in nude mice by QGY-7703 cells which were injected s c at 2h postinfection was observed to by prevented in 2 proups with given MOI 25 and 50.The tumor growth of MOI 10 group occurred at a lower exponential rate than that of control,after a 20d latent period.It was evident that parvovirus H-1 exhibited a direct inhibitory effect on the formation and growth of human hepatoma cells in vivo as well as in vitro.

  5. Biofilm formation by multidrug resistant Escherichia coli ST131 is dependent on type 1 fimbriae and assay conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sohinee; Vagenas, Dimitrios; Schembri, Mark A; Totsika, Makrina

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) has emerged as a pandemic lineage of important multidrug resistant pathogens worldwide. Despite many studies examining the epidemiology of ST131, only a few studies to date have investigated the capacity of ST131 strains to form biofilms. Some of these studies have reported contrasting findings, with no specific ST131 biofilm-promoting factors identified. Here, we examined a diverse collection of ST131 isolates for in vitro biofilm formation in different media and assay conditions, including urine from healthy adult women. We found significant differences among strains and assay conditions, which offers an explanation for the contrasting findings reported by previous studies using a single condition. Importantly, we showed that expression of type 1 fimbriae is a critical determinant for biofilm formation by ST131 strains and that inhibition of the FimH adhesin significantly reduces biofilm formation. We also offer direct genetic evidence for the contribution of type 1 fimbriae in biofilm formation by the reference ST131 strain EC958, a representative of the clinically dominant H30-Rx ST131 subgroup. This is the first study of ST131 biofilm formation in biologically relevant conditions and paves the way for the application of FimH inhibitors in treating drug resistant ST131 biofilm infections.

  6. Standard Guide for Investigation/Study/Assay Tab-Delimited Format for Nanotechnologies (ISA-TAB-Nano): Standard File Format for the Submission and Exchange of Data on Nanomaterials and Characterizations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2013-01-01

    Standard Guide for Investigation/Study/Assay Tab-Delimited Format for Nanotechnologies (ISA-TAB-Nano): Standard File Format for the Submission and Exchange of Data on Nanomaterials and Characterizations

  7. Seq4SNPs: new software for retrieval of multiple, accurately annotated DNA sequences, ready formatted for SNP assay design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunning Alison M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In moderate-throughput SNP genotyping there was a gap in the workflow, between choosing a set of SNPs and submitting their sequences to proprietary assay design software, which was not met by existing software. Retrieval and formatting of sequences flanking each SNP, prior to assay design, becomes rate-limiting for more than about ten SNPs, especially if annotated for repetitive regions and adjacent variations. We routinely process up to 50 SNPs at once. Implementation We created Seq4SNPs, a web-based, walk-away software that can process one to several hundred SNPs given rs numbers as input. It outputs a file of fully annotated sequences formatted for one of three proprietary design softwares: TaqMan's Primer-By-Design FileBuilder, Sequenom's iPLEX or SNPstream's Autoprimer, as well as unannotated fasta sequences. We found genotyping assays to be inhibited by repetitive sequences or the presence of additional variations flanking the SNP under test, and in multiplexes, repetitive sequence flanking one SNP adversely affects multiple assays. Assay design software programs avoid such regions if the input sequences are appropriately annotated, so we used Seq4SNPs to provide suitably annotated input sequences, and improved our genotyping success rate. Adjacent SNPs can also be avoided, by annotating sequences used as input for primer design. Conclusion The accuracy of annotation by Seq4SNPs is significantly better than manual annotation (P Using Seq4SNPs to incorporate all annotation for additional SNPs and repetitive elements into sequences, for genotyping assay designer software, minimizes assay failure at the design stage, reducing the cost of genotyping. Seq4SNPs provides a rapid route for replacement of poor test SNP sequences. We routinely use this software for assay sequence preparation. Seq4SNPs is available as a service at http://moya.srl.cam.ac.uk/oncology/bio/s4shome.html and http://moya.srl

  8. Assessment of bone formation capacity using in vivo transplantation assays: procedure and tissue analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Ditzel, Nicholas; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    ) in immunodeficient mice is the standard method for in vivo assessment of bone formation capacity of a particular cell type. The method is easy to perform and provides reproducible results. Assessment of the donor origin of tissue formation is possible, especially in the case of human-to-mouse transplanta tion...... transplantation methods in testing bone formationpotential of human mesenchymal stem cells....

  9. Development of fully automated determination of marker-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) avidity based on the avidity competition assay format: application for Abbott Architect cytomegalovirus and Toxo IgG Avidity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curdt, Ingo; Praast, Gerald; Sickinger, Eva; Schultess, Jan; Herold, Iris; Braun, Hans Bertram; Bernhardt, Stephanie; Maine, Gregory T; Smith, Darwin D; Hsu, Stephen; Christ, Heike M; Pucci, Dominick; Hausmann, Michael; Herzogenrath, Jörg

    2009-03-01

    Determination of the avidity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) directed against a specific marker has become an established diagnostic tool for identifying or excluding acute infections with pathogens. A novel assay format termed AVIcomp (avidity competition based on mass action) circumventing the conventional chaotropic format has been developed for determination of the avidity of marker-specific IgG in patient specimens. Its applications for cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Toxoplasma gondii are presented. Specific high-avidity IgG from the patient specimen is selectively blocked using a soluble antigen in a sample pretreatment reagent, and the amount of remaining specific low-avidity IgG is determined relative to that in an untreated control. The comparison of the conventional chaotropic format, represented by the Radim CMV IgG Avidity assay, and the newly developed AVIcomp method, as exemplified by the Architect CMV IgG Avidity assay, on blood drawn within 4 months after seroconversion revealed a sensitivity of 100% (97.3% by an alternative calculation) for the AVIcomp format versus 87.5% (75.7% by an alternative calculation) for the chaotropic avidity assay. The specificity on 312 CMV IgG reactive and CMV IgM nonreactive specimens from pregnant women was 100% for the AVIcomp assay and 99.7% for the conventional avidity assay. The Architect Toxo IgG Avidity assay showed an agreement of 97.2% with the bioMérieux Vidas Toxo IgG Avidity Assay employing chaotropic reagents. These performance data suggest that the AVIcomp format shows superior sensitivity and equivalent specificity for the determination of IgG avidity to assays based on the chaotropic method and that the AVIcomp format may also be applicable to other disease states.

  10. Evaluation of a High-Throughput Peptide Reactivity Format Assay for Assessment of the Skin Sensitization Potential of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin Lin; Lam, Ai-Leen; Smith, Maree T.; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-01-01

    The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) is a validated method for in vitro assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. In the present work, we describe a peptide reactivity assay using 96-well plate format and systematically identified the optimal assay conditions for accurate and reproducible classification of chemicals with known sensitizing capacity. The aim of the research is to ensure that the analytical component of the peptide reactivity assay is robust, accurate, and reproducible in accordance with criteria that are used for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Analytical performance was evaluated using quality control samples (QCs; heptapeptides at low, medium, and high concentrations) and incubation of control chemicals (chemicals with known sensitization capacity, weak, moderate, strong, extreme, and non-sensitizers) with each of three synthetic heptapeptides, viz Cor1-C420 (Ac-NKKCDLF), cysteine- (Ac-RFAACAA), and lysine- (Ac-RFAAKAA) containing heptapeptides. The optimal incubation temperature for all three heptapeptides was 25°C. Apparent heptapeptide depletion was affected by vial material composition. Incubation of test chemicals with Cor1-C420, showed that peptide depletion was unchanged in polypropylene vials over 3-days storage in an autosampler but this was not the case for borosilicate glass vials. For cysteine-containing heptapeptide, the concentration was not stable by day 3 post-incubation in borosilicate glass vials. Although the lysine-containing heptapeptide concentration was unchanged in both polypropylene and borosilicate glass vials, the apparent extent of lysine-containing heptapeptide depletion by ethyl acrylate, differed between polypropylene (24.7%) and glass (47.3%) vials. Additionally, the peptide-chemical complexes for Cor1-C420-cinnamaldehyde and cysteine-containing heptapeptide-2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene were partially reversible during 3-days of autosampler storage. These observations further highlight

  11. Differences in quantification of DNA double-strand breaks assessed by 53BP1/γH2AX focus formation assays and the comet assay in mammalian cells treated with irradiation and N-acetyl-L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Tomomi; Shimamura, Mika; Nagayama, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    The biological effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on genomic DNA is thought to be either direct or indirect; the latter is mediated by IR induction of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was designed to evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a well-known ROS-scavenging antioxidant, on IR induction of genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and ROS production in mammalian cells, and aimed to clarify the conflicting data in previous publications. Although we clearly demonstrate the beneficial effect of NAC on IR-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity (determined using the micronucleus assay and cell viability/clonogenic assays), the data on NAC's effect on DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation were inconsistent in different assays. Specifically, mitigation of IR-induced DSBs by NAC was readily detected by the neutral comet assay, but not by the γH2AX or 53BP1 focus assays. NAC is a glutathione precursor and exerts its effect after conversion to glutathione, and presumably it has its own biological activity. Assuming that the focus assay reflects the biological responses to DSBs (detection and repair), while the comet assay reflects the physical status of genomic DNA, our results indicate that the comet assay could readily detect the antioxidant effect of NAC on DSB formation. However, NAC's biological effect might affect the detection of DSB repair by the focus assays. Our data illustrate that multiple parameters should be carefully used to analyze DNA damage when studying potential candidates for radioprotective compounds.

  12. NS-018, a selective JAK2 inhibitor, preferentially inhibits CFU-GM colony formation by bone marrow mononuclear cells from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junya; Kodama, Ayumi; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nakaya, Yohei; Tamura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Naito, Haruna; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    JAK2/STAT signaling promotes survival and expansion of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) clones, but little is known about the potential of JAK2/STAT as a therapeutic target in MDS. We investigated the effect of NS-018, a novel antagonist for JAK2, on the colony-forming ability of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) from high-risk MDS patients. NS-018 decreased colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colony numbers from MDS-derived BMMNCs in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was significantly more potent than against normal BMMNCs. In addition, NS-018 suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT3 in colony-forming cells from MDS patients. Collectively, NS-018 could be a new therapeutic option for high-risk MDS.

  13. A novel high throughput biochemical assay to evaluate the HuR protein-RNA complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito G D'Agostino

    Full Text Available The RNA binding protein HuR/ELAVL1 binds to AU-rich elements (AREs promoting the stabilization and translation of a number of mRNAs into the cytoplasm, dictating their fate. We applied the AlphaScreen technology using purified human HuR protein, expressed in a mammalian cell-based system, to characterize in vitro its binding performance towards a ssRNA probe whose sequence corresponds to the are present in TNFα 3' untranslated region. We optimized the method to titrate ligands and analyzed the kinetic in saturation binding and time course experiments, including competition assays. The method revealed to be a successful tool for determination of HuR binding kinetic parameters in the nanomolar range, with calculated Kd of 2.5±0.60 nM, k on of 2.76±0.56*10(6 M(-1 min(-1, and k off of 0.007±0.005 min(-1. We also tested the HuR-RNA complex formation by fluorescent probe-based RNA-EMSA. Moreover, in a 384-well plate format we obtained a Z-factor of 0.84 and an averaged coefficient of variation between controls of 8%, indicating that this biochemical assay fulfills criteria of robustness for a targeted screening approach. After a screening with 2000 small molecules and secondary verification with RNA-EMSA we identified mitoxantrone as an interfering compound with rHuR and TNFα probe complex formation. Notably, this tool has a large versatility and could be applied to other RNA Binding Proteins recognizing different RNA, DNA, or protein species. In addition, it opens new perspectives in the identification of small-molecule modulators of RNA binding proteins activity.

  14. Evaluation of a high-throughput peptide reactivity format assay for assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Lin eWong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA is a validated method for in vitro assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. In the present work, we describe a peptide reactivity assay using 96-well plate format and systematically identified the optimal assay conditions for accurate and reproducible classification of chemicals with known sensitizing capacity. The aim of the research is to ensure that the analytical component of the peptide reactivity assay is robust, accurate and reproducible in accordance with criteria that are used for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Analytical performance was evaluated using quality control samples (QCs; heptapeptides at low, medium and high concentrations and incubation of control chemicals (chemicals with known sensitization capacity, weak, moderate, strong, extreme and non-sensitizers with each of three synthetic heptapeptides, viz Cor1-C420 (Ac-NKKCDLF, cysteine- (Ac-RFAACAA and lysine- (Ac-RFAAKAA containing heptapeptides. The optimal incubation temperature for all three heptapeptides was 25°C. Apparent heptapeptide depletion was affected by vial material composition. Incubation of test chemicals with Cor1-C420, showed that peptide depletion was unchanged in polypropylene vials over 3-days storage in an autosampler but this was not the case for borosilicate glass vials. For cysteine-containing heptapeptide, the concentration was not stable by day 3 post-incubation in borosilicate glass vials. Although the lysine-containing heptapeptide concentration was unchanged in both polypropylene and borosilicate glass vials, the apparent extent of lysine-containing heptapeptide depletion by ethyl acrylate, differed between polypropylene (24.7% and glass (47.3% vials. Additionally, the peptide-chemical complexes for Cor1-C420-cinnamaldehyde and cysteine-containing heptapeptide-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene were partially reversible during 3-days of autosampler storage. These observations further

  15. Single cell time-lapse analysis reveals that podoplanin enhances cell survival and colony formation capacity of squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Youichi; Kojima, Motohiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) are characterized by high clonal expansion capacity. We previously reported that podoplanin is a TIC-specific marker for the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. The aim of this study is to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the high clonal expansion potential of podoplanin-positive A431cells using Fucci imaging. Single podoplanin-positive cells created large colonies at a significantly higher frequency than single podoplanin-negative cells, whereas no difference was observed between the two types of cells with respect to cell cycle status. Conversely, the cell death ratio of progenies derived from podoplanin-positive single cell was significantly lower than that of cells derived from podoplanin-negative cells. Single A431 cells, whose podoplanin expression was suppressed by RNA interference, exhibited increased cell death ratios and decreased frequency of large colony forming. Moreover, the frequency of large colony forming decreased significantly when podoplanin-positive single cells was treated with a ROCK (Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase) inhibitor, whereas no difference was observed in single podoplanin-negative cells. Our current study cleared that high clonal expansion capacity of podoplanin-positive TICs populations was the result of reduced cell death by podoplanin-mediated signaling. Therefore, podoplanin activity may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:28059107

  16. Diversity of cultivable bacteria involved in the formation of macroscopic microbial colonies (Cave silver on the walls of a cave in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagajana Herzog Velikonja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Karstic caves often support white, yellow, grey or pink microbial colonies that are termed ‘cave silver’ by speleologists. Using various sample pre-treatments and culture media, a wide variety of bacteria associated with these colonies were recovered from a cave in Slovenia, Pajsarjeva jama. Decreasing the inoculum size resulted in significant increases in viable counts, while pre-treatments had the opposite effect with the exception of microwave irradiation. While all growth media yielded viable counts, the maximal counts were observed on a low-nutrient TWA medium. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of OTU representatives, the majority of the 80 isolates examined belonged to Streptomyces (25%, Micrococcus (16% and Rhodococcus (10% Other abundant groups were Pseudomonas (9%, Agrobacterium (8%, Lysobacter (6% and Paenibacillus (5%, while members of genera Microbacterium, Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Kocuria, Oerskovia, Sphingomonas, Aerococcus, and Bosea represented a minor portion of cultivable diversity encountered. Members of Streptomyces and Agrobacterium were common to all samples. Although these microorganisms readily form colonies under laboratory conditions, they were unrelated to abundant environmental phylotypes recovered from same samples in a previous study. However, the comparative 16S rRNA analysis showed that microorganisms highly related to the ones obtained in this study were cultivated from other subterranean environments indicating that they might represent true microbial cave dwellers.

  17. [Effect of mouse genotype on the hematopoietic stem cell count. II. The number of hematopietic stem cells in BALB/c and CC57BR strain mice differing by the level of endogenous colony formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V A

    1979-01-01

    The number of stem hematopoietic cells in the hematopoietic organs of mice of BALB/c and CC57BR strains and (CC57BRXBALB/c)F1 hybrids was studied by the method of exogenous colony-forming units. The assay of migration of stem cells from the bone marrow to the spleen was carried out. It was found that the spleen and the bone marrow of mice of the studied genotypes contain approximately the same relative number of hematopoietic stem cells. The number of stem cells which migrate from the bone marrow to the spleen is greater in the mice of BALB/c strain than in the CC57BR mice.

  18. A new assay format for NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altevogt, Dominik; Hrenn, Andrea; Kern, Claudia; Clima, Lilia; Bannwarth, Willi; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-07

    Herein we report a feasibility study for a new concept to detect DNA binding protein NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix formation in combination with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The new principle avoids expensive antibodies and radioactivity and might have implications for assays of other DNA binding proteins.

  19. Formation of droplets of alternating composition in microfluidic channels and applications to indexing of concentrations in droplet-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo; Tice, Joshua D; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2004-09-01

    For screening the conditions for a reaction by using droplets (or plugs) as microreactors, the composition of the droplets must be indexed. Indexing here refers to measuring the concentration of a solute by addition of a marker, either internal or external. Indexing may be performed by forming droplet pairs, where in each pair the first droplet is used to conduct the reaction, and the second droplet is used to index the composition of the first droplet. This paper characterizes a method for creating droplet pairs by generating alternating droplets, of two sets of aqueous solutions in a flow of immiscible carrier fluid within PDMS and glass microfluidic channels. The paper also demonstrates that the technique can be used to index the composition of the droplets, and this application is illustrated by screening conditions of protein crystallization. The fluid properties required to form the steady flow of the alternating droplets in a microchannel were characterized as a function of the capillary number Ca and water fraction. Four regimes were observed. At the lowest values of Ca, the droplets of the two streams coalesced; at intermediate values of Ca the alternating droplets formed reliably. At even higher values of Ca, shear forces dominated and caused formation of droplets that were smaller than the cross-sectional dimension of the channel; at the highest values of Ca, coflowing laminar streams of the two immiscible fluids formed. In addition to screening of protein crystallization conditions, understanding of the fluid flow in this system may extend this indexing approach to other chemical and biological assays performed on a microfluidic chip.

  20. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene transduction into human lung cancer cells differentially regulates metastasis formations in various organ microenvironments of natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Nokihara, H; Sone, S

    1997-02-15

    We investigated whether local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), responsible for migration and activation of monocytes/macrophages at a tumor growth site, affected the metastatic pattern of lung cancer. For this, highly metastatic human squamous (RERF-LC-AI) or small (H69/VP) cell lung carcinoma cells were transduced with the human M-CSF gene inserted into pRc/CMV-MCSF to establish M-CSF-producing clones (MCSF-AI-9-18, MCSF-AI-9-24, and MCSF-VP-5). M-CSF gene transduction had no effect on the expression of surface antigen or on in vitro proliferation. After s.c. injection into SCID mice, the growth rates of M-CSF-producing cells were slower than those of parent or mock-transduced cells. In the metastatic model in SCID mice depleted of natural killer cells, RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, whereas H69/VP cells metastasized mainly to the liver and systemic lymph nodes. The numbers of metastatic colonies of MCSF-AI-9-18 and MCSF-AI-9-24 cells in the liver but not the kidneys were significantly reduced. The development of lymph node metastases of MCSF-VP-5 cells was also less than that of parent or mock-transduced cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-human M-CSF antibody resulted in a significant increase in liver metastases of their M-CSF gene transfectants. No significant differences were observed in the distributions in mice or in the in vitro invasive potentials of MCSF-AI-9-18 cells and Neo-AI-3 cells. These findings indicate that the antimetastatic effect of M-CSF may be specific to particular organs, suggesting the influence of heterogeneity of organ microenvironments on the metastasis of lung cancer.

  1. A luciferase based viability assay for ATP detection in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream form strain 427

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery Vicky M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT is caused by two trypanosome species, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Current drugs available for the treatment of HAT have significant issues related to toxicity, administration regimes with limited effectiveness across species and disease stages, thus there is a considerable need to find alternative drugs. A well recognised approach to identify new drug candidates is high throughput screening (HTS of large compound library collections. Results We describe here the development of a luciferase based viability assay in 384-well plate format suitable for HTS of T.b.brucei. The parameters that were explored to determine the final HTS assay conditions are described in detail and include DMSO tolerability, Z', diluents and cell inoculum density. Reference compound activities were determined for diminazene, staurosporine and pentamidine and compared to previously published IC50 data obtained. The assay has a comparable sensitivity to reference drugs and is more cost effective than the 96-well format currently reported for T.b.brucei. Conclusion Due to the reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay it is recommended for potential HTS application. As it is commercially available this assay can also be utilised in many laboratories for both large and small scale screening.

  2. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu, E-mail: yuli_scu@163.com

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  3. Specific detection of DNA and RNA targets using a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay based on the formation of a three-way junction structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, S D; Marsh, P; Lloyd, J S; Ray, T D; Mock, G A; Assenberg, R; McPhee, J E; Brown, P; Weston, A; Cardy, D L

    2001-06-01

    The formation of DNA three-way junction (3WJ) structures has been utilised to develop a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay (SMART) for the detection of specific DNA or RNA targets. The assay consists of two oligonucleotide probes that hybridise to a specific target sequence and, only then, to each other forming a 3WJ structure. One probe (template for the RNA signal) contains a non-functional single-stranded T7 RNA polymerase promoter sequence. This promoter sequence is made double-stranded (hence functional) by DNA polymerase, allowing T7 RNA polymerase to generate a target-dependent RNA signal which is measured by an enzyme-linked oligosorbent assay (ELOSA). The sequence of the RNA signal is always the same, regardless of the original target sequence. The SMART assay was successfully tested in model systems with several single-stranded synthetic targets, both DNA and RNA. The assay could also detect specific target sequences in both genomic DNA and total RNA from Escherichia coli. It was also possible to generate signal from E.coli samples without prior extraction of nucleic acid, showing that for some targets, sample purification may not be required. The assay is simple to perform and easily adaptable to different targets.

  4. Specters of Colonialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhr, Sara Louise; Azad, Salam

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how an organization in Sweden, a country normally not considered among the former colonial powers, is still haunted by the specters of a western colonial history. Based on in-depth interviews as well as participant observation in the headquarters of a Swedish multinational...

  5. Detection of the enzymatically-active polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase subunit gene, phaC, in cyanobacteria via colony PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Courtney E; Benton, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    A colony PCR-based assay was developed to rapidly determine if a cyanobacterium of interest contains the requisite genetic material, the PHA synthase PhaC subunit, to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The test is both high throughput and robust, owing to an extensive sequence analysis of cyanobacteria PHA synthases. The assay uses a single detection primer set and a single reaction condition across multiple cyanobacteria strains to produce an easily detectable positive result - amplification via PCR as evidenced by a band in electrophoresis. In order to demonstrate the potential of the presence of phaC as an indicator of a cyanobacteria's PHA accumulation capabilities, the ability to produce PHA was assessed for five cyanobacteria with a traditional in vivo PHA granule staining using an oxazine dye. The confirmed in vivo staining results were then compared to the PCR-based assay results and found to be in agreement. The colony PCR assay was capable of successfully detecting the phaC gene in all six of the diverse cyanobacteria tested which possessed the gene, while exhibiting no undesired product formation across the nine total cyanobacteria strains tested. The colony PCR quick prep provides sufficient usable DNA template such that this assay could be readily expanded to assess multiple genes of interest simultaneously.

  6. The Maintenance Job Scheduling of the Ship Formation Based on the Wasp Colony Algorithm%基于蜂群算法的舰艇编队维修作业调度方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锐; 金家善; 张小枫; 刘隆波

    2011-01-01

    针对编队维修保障系统需要对编队内所有舰艇装备提供快速有效的保障,使之具有持续作战能力,将维修保障过程中涉及的机构及资源,分割为功能相对独立的多个智能体Agent,并提出基于多Agent的具有良好扩展性和智能性的舰艇编队保障体系架构.基于该架构中Agent单元的特点,提出基于蜂群算法的任务调度优化方法,该方法可缩短舰艇编队维修时间.%The persistent combat capabilities of a ship formation are based on efficiently maintaining all the ship equipment which is the requirement of the whole maintenance supportability of the formation. In this paper, the organization and materials which were involved in the maintenance processing were splited into independent intelligent multi-agents, and then the maintenance support architecture of naval ship formation based on multi-agents was introduced. This architecture had good extensibility and intelligence. Based on the agent of this architecture, a method, which adopted wasp colony algorithm, was put forward to optimize the maintenance job scheduling for shortening the maintenance time cost.

  7. Identification of a Colonial Chordate Histocompatibility Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Newman, Aaron M.; Corey, Daniel M.; Sahoo, Debashis; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F.; Passarelli, Benedetto; Koh, Winston; Ishizuka, Katherine J.; Palmeri, Karla J.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Keasar, Chen; Fan, H. Christina; Mantalas, Gary L.; Sinha, Rahul; Penland, Lolita; Quake, Stephen R.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Histocompatibility is the basis by which multicellular organisms of the same species distinguish self from non-self. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying histocompatibility reactions in lower organisms. Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate, a sister group of vertebrates, that exhibits a genetically determined natural transplantation reaction, whereby self-recognition between colonies leads to formation of parabionts with a common vasculature, whereas rejection occurs between incompatible colonies. Using genetically defined lines, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and genomics, we identified a single gene that encodes self/non-self and determines “graft” outcomes in this organism. This gene is significantly upregulated in colonies poised to undergo fusion or rejection, is highly expressed in the vasculature, and is functionally linked to histocompatibility outcomes. These findings establish a platform for advancing the science of allorecognition. PMID:23888037

  8. Ultrasensitive biotin assay of a noncompetitive format in a homogeneous solution based on resonance energy transfer induced by a protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Tomohiro; Miyao, Hiroki; Sueda, Shinji

    2014-06-17

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin serving as a cofactor for several metabolic enzymes and plays crucial roles in every living cell. In the present study, we describe a noncompetitive assay for determination of biotin in a homogeneous solution. Our assay is based on a biotinylation reaction from archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. S. tokodaii biotinylation has a unique property that biotin protein ligase (BPL) forms a stable complex with its biotinylated substrate protein (BCCP). Determination of biotin was performed by monitoring the complexation reaction between BPL and BCCP through biotinylation, based on luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) from a Tb(3+) complex to fluorescein, where BPL and BCCP were labeled with a Tb(3+) complex and fluorescein, respectively. Our assay allows for ultrasensitive detection of biotin with a detection limit of approximately 1 pM (or 0.2 fmol in a 0.2 mL sample volume) by a simple procedure without use of radioactive materials or enzymatic signal amplification. In addition, owing to its noncompetitive format, our assay has a very wide measurement range of at least 3 orders of magnitude. Our assay is also beneficial as a model system for interaction analysis based on LRET.

  9. Comparison of competitive ligand-binding assay and bioassay formats for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies to protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Deborah; Baltrukonis, Daniel; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Delaria, Kathy; Gunn, George R; Lowe, John; Maia, Mauricio; Wong, Teresa

    2011-01-25

    Administration of biological therapeutic proteins can lead to unwanted immunogenicity in recipients of these products. The assessment and characterization of such immune reactions can be helpful to better understand their clinical relevance and how they relate to patient safety and therefore, have become an integral part of a product development program for biological therapeutics. Testing for anti-drug antibodies (ADA) to biological/biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins generally follows a tiered approach. Samples are initially screened for binding antibodies; presumptive positives are then confirmed in a confirmatory assay; subsequently, confirmed-positive samples may be further characterized by titration and with a neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay. Regulatory guidances on immunogenicity state that assessing the neutralizing capacity of antibodies should preferably be done using functional bioassays, while recognizing that competitive ligand-binding (CLB) assays may be substituted when neutralizing bioassays are inadequate or not feasible. This manuscript describes case studies from four companies in which CLB assays and functional bioassays were compared for their ability to detect neutralizing ADA against a variety of biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins. Our findings indicate that CLB assays are comparable to bioassays for the detection of NAbs, in some cases offering better detection sensitivity, lower variability, and less matrix interference.

  10. Colony fusion in Argentine ants is guided by worker and queen cuticular hydrocarbon profile similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Gissella M; Schal, Coby; Silverman, Jules

    2009-08-01

    Introduced populations of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, have experienced moderate to severe losses of genetic diversity, which may have affected nestmate recognition to various degrees. We hypothesized that cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC) serve as nestmate recognition cues, and facilitate colony fusion of unrelated L. humile colonies that share similar CHC profiles. In this study, we paired six southeastern U.S. L. humile colonies in a 6-month laboratory fusion assay, and determined if worker and queen CHC profile similarity between colonies was associated with colony fusion and intercolony genetic similarity. We also compared worker and queen CHC profiles between fused colony pairs and unpaired controls to determine if worker and queen chemical profiles changed after fusion. We found that colony fusion correlated with the CHC similarity of workers and queens, with the frequency of fusion increasing with greater CHC profile similarity between colonies. Worker and queen CHC profile similarity between colonies also was associated with genetic similarity between colonies. Queen CHC profiles in fused colonies appeared to be a mix of the two colony phenotypes. In contrast, when only one of the paired colonies survived, the CHC profile of the surviving queens did not diverge from that of the colony of origin. Similarly, workers in non-fused colonies maintained their colony-specific CHC, whereas in fused colonies the worker CHC profiles were intermediate between those of the two colonies. These results suggest a role for CHC in regulating interactions among mutually aggressive L. humile colonies, and demonstrate that colony fusion correlates with both genetic and CHC similarities. Further, changes in worker and queen chemical profiles in fused colonies suggest that CHC plasticity may sustain the cohesion of unrelated L. humile colonies that had fused.

  11. Effects of the protein kinase C stimulant bryostatin 1 on the proliferation and colony formation of irradiated human T-lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, S.J.; Lin, P.-S.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.; Hall, C.E.; Walters, J.A.; McCrady, C.; Grant, S. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The protein kinase C stimulant bryostatin 1 (Bryo) was used in examining human peripheral blood T-lymphocyte radiosensitivities in proliferation assays. Bryo was similar to PMA in inducing T-cell proliferation by the CD3, CD28 and CD69 pathways. No difference in radiosensitivities was observed in T-cells stimulated by the three independent surface antigen-mediated activation pathways. CD3 was chosen as the second signal for comparing the potencies of the three different first signals Bryo, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in stimulating T-cell proliferation and in maintaining this response after radiation. Though there were radioresponse differences among various individuals, the irradiated lymphocytes consistently showed significantly greater proliferation when treated with Bryo or PMA than with IL-2. These results support the important tole of protein kinase C in T-cell radiation responses, and suggest a potential role for Bryo in enhancing T-lymphocyte survival during radiation therapy. (author).

  12. A Paper-Based Sandwich Format Hybridization Assay for Unlabeled Nucleic Acid Detection Using Upconversion Nanoparticles as Energy Donors in Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioassays based on cellulose paper substrates are gaining increasing popularity for the development of field portable and low-cost diagnostic applications. Herein, we report a paper-based nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs as donors in luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET. UCNPs with intense green emission served as donors with Cy3 dye as the acceptor. The avidin functionalized UCNPs were immobilized on cellulose paper and subsequently bioconjugated to biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. Introduction of unlabeled oligonucleotide targets resulted in a formation of probe-target duplexes. A subsequent hybridization of Cy3 labeled reporter with the remaining single stranded portion of target brought the Cy3 dye in close proximity to the UCNPs to trigger a LRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye. The hybridization assays provided a limit of detection (LOD of 146.0 fmol and exhibited selectivity for one base pair mismatch discrimination. The assay was functional even in undiluted serum samples. This work embodies important progress in developing DNA hybridization assays on paper. Detection of unlabeled targets is achieved using UCNPs as LRET donors, with minimization of background signal from paper substrates owing to the implementation of low energy near-infrared (NIR excitation.

  13. Development and validation of a real-time two-step RT-qPCR TaqMan(®) assay for quantitation of Sacbrood virus (SBV) and its application to a field survey of symptomatic honey bee colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchard, Philippe; Guillot, Sylvain; Antùnez, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Sacbrood virus (SBV) is the causal agent of a disease of honey bee larvae, resulting in failure to pupate and causing death. The typical clinical symptom of SBV is an accumulation of SBV-rich fluid in swollen sub-cuticular pouches, forming the characteristic fluid-filled sac that gives its name...... bees. A two-step real-time RT-PCR assay, based on TaqMan(®) technology using a fluorescent probe (FAM-TAMRA) was therefore developed to quantify Sacbrood virus in larvae, pupae and adult bees from symptomatic apiaries. This assay was first validated according to the recent XP-U47-600 standard issued...... with individuals without clinical signs. The SBV quantitation revealed that, in symptomatic larvae, the virus load was significantly higher than in samples without clinical signs. Combining quantitation with clinical data, a threshold of SBV viral load related to an overt disease was proposed (10(10) SBV genome...

  14. Colonial American Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald K.

    2007-12-01

    While a foundation of German scientific methods enabled the rapid growth of North American Astronomy in the nineteenth century, during the seventeenth and most of the eighteenth centuries, the colonial men of science looked only to the English mother country for scientific patronage and guidance. An essay on fundamental astronomy appeared in one of the annual colonial almanacs as early as 1656, telescopic observations were made about 1660 and the first original colonial astronomical work was published by Thomas Danforth on the comet of 1664. By 1671 the Copernican ideas were so espoused at Harvard College that a physics class refused to read a Ptolemaic textbook when it was assigned to them by a senior instructor. At least in the Cambridge-Boston area, contemporary colonialist had access to the most recent scientific publications from the mother country. Observations of the great comet of 1680 by the Almanac maker, John Foster, reached Isaac Newton and were used and gratefully acknowledged in his Principia. During the seventeenth century the colonial interest in astronomy was more intense than it was for other sciences but colonists still occupied a position in the scientific backwater when compared with contemporary European scientists. Nevertheless, the science of astronomy was successfully transplanted from England to North America in the seventeenth century.

  15. [Visiting the Amana Colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "The Goldfinch: Iowa History for Young People" focuses upon the Amana Colonies, which were home to many German immigrants in the 19th century, and which retain much of their ethnic heritage today. The articles and activities included in this issue are "Amana Today"; "No Black Buggies in Amana";…

  16. A branching process model for the analysis of abortive colony size distributions in carbon ion-irradiated normal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kawaguchi, Isao; Hara, Takamitsu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2014-05-01

    A single cell can form a colony, and ionizing irradiation has long been known to reduce such a cellular clonogenic potential. Analysis of abortive colonies unable to continue to grow should provide important information on the reproductive cell death (RCD) following irradiation. Our previous analysis with a branching process model showed that the RCD in normal human fibroblasts can persist over 16 generations following irradiation with low linear energy transfer (LET) γ-rays. Here we further set out to evaluate the RCD persistency in abortive colonies arising from normal human fibroblasts exposed to high-LET carbon ions (18.3 MeV/u, 108 keV/µm). We found that the abortive colony size distribution determined by biological experiments follows a linear relationship on the log-log plot, and that the Monte Carlo simulation using the RCD probability estimated from such a linear relationship well simulates the experimentally determined surviving fraction and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). We identified the short-term phase and long-term phase for the persistent RCD following carbon-ion irradiation, which were similar to those previously identified following γ-irradiation. Taken together, our results suggest that subsequent secondary or tertiary colony formation would be invaluable for understanding the long-lasting RCD. All together, our framework for analysis with a branching process model and a colony formation assay is applicable to determination of cellular responses to low- and high-LET radiation, and suggests that the long-lasting RCD is a pivotal determinant of the surviving fraction and the RBE.

  17. Dynamic Network Formation Using Ant Colony Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    VRP ) Cost Equation ................................................ 38 Table 2. ACSE Heuristics...these solutions work, a discussion of the vehicle routing problem is presented followed by an example. The Vehicle Routing Problem ( VRP ) which forms...the Bin Packing Problem (BPP) (Machado, 37 Tavares, Pereira, & Costa, 2002). The Vehicle Routing Problem is NP-hard. The domain of VRPs has a

  18. Laser-induced speckle scatter patterns in Bacillus colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huisung eKim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Label-free bacterial colony phenotyping technology called BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical scattering Technology provided successful classification of several different bacteria at the genus, species, and serovar level. Recent experiments with colonies of Bacillus species provided strikingly different characteristics of elastic light scatter (ELS patterns, which were comprised of random speckles compared to other bacteria, which are dominated by concentric rings and spokes. Since this laser-based optical sensor interrogates the whole volume of the colony, 3-D information of micro- and macro-structures are all encoded in the far-field scatter patterns. Here, we present a theoretical model explaining the underlying mechanism of the speckle formation by the colonies from Bacillus species. Except for Bacillus polymyxa, all Bacillus spp. produced random bright spots on the imaging plane, which presumably dependent on the cellular and molecular organization and content within the colony. Our scatter model-based analysis revealed that colony spread resulting in variable surface roughness can modify the wavefront of the scatter field. As the center diameter of the Bacillus spp. colony grew from 500 μm to 900 μm, average speckles area decreased 2-fold and the number of small speckles increased 7-fold. In conclusion, as Bacillus colony grows, the average speckle size in the scatter pattern decreases and the number of smaller speckle increases due to the swarming growth characteristics of bacteria within the colony.

  19. Cord formation and colony morphology for the presumptive identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex Presença de corda e morfologia da colônia para a identificação presuntiva do complexo Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Tasso Monteiro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MT, using non-molecular methods, is time-consuming. The objective of this study was to evaluate a screening test for the presumptive identification of MT, which could potentially decrease laboratory turn-around time for reporting preliminary results. From January 1998 to December 1999, 3056 cultures were analysed at the Mycobacterial Laboratory, Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, Brasil. The screening test consisted of observation of colony morphology on Löwenstein Jensen medium and evaluation of cord formation on smear microscopy from those positive cultures. After the screening test, the cultures identified as non-tuberculous mycobacteria were identified to species by conventional methods (growth on culture and biochemical tests. Those identified as MT were submitted to drug susceptibility tests. The presumptive identification of MT using the proposed screening test, when compared with conventional tests, presented 98.9, 86.9, 97.8 and 93.0% of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, respectively. The conclusion is that it is possible to make a presumptive identification of MT using visual analysis of colony morphology and cord formation on microscopy examination. This method could be used to report the presumptive identification of MT and to guide laboratory decisions regarding susceptibility and identification tests with little cost and in a very practical way.O resultado da identificação convencional do complexo Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT é demorado. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar um teste de triagem para identificação presuntiva de MT e agilização da informação preliminar do resultado, baseado na análise da morfologia da colônia e da visualização de corda no exame microscópico do esfregaço feito da cultura. De janeiro de 1998 a dezembro de 1999 foram analisadas 3056 culturas no Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, Brasil. As culturas

  20. Physics in Penguin Colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Zitterbart, Daniel P.; Richter, Sebastian; Le Bohec, Celine; Schneider, Werner; Metzner, Claus; Gerum, Richard; Wienecke, Barbara; Fabry, Ben

    2012-01-01

    In polar regions, highly adapted social behavior is crucial for the survival of several species. One prominent example is the huddling behavior of Emperor penguins. To understand how Emperor penguins solve the physical problem of movement in densely packed huddles, we observed an Emperor penguin colony (Atka Bay) with time-lapse imaging and tracked the positions of more than 1400 huddling penguins. The trajectories revealed that Emperor penguins move collectively in a hig...

  1. Method for Assaying the Lipid Kinase Phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Bioluminescent Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mindy I.; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Simeonov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Summary ipid kinases are important regulators of a variety of cellular processes and their dysregulation causes diseases such as cancer and metabolic diseases. Distinct lipid kinases regulate the seven different phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). Some lipid kinases utilize long-chain lipid substrates that have limited solubility in aqueous solutions, which can lead to difficulties in developing a robust and miniaturizable biochemical assay. The ability to prepare the lipid substrate and develop assays to identify modulators of lipid kinases is important and is the focus of this methods chapter. Herein, we describe a method to prepare a DMSO-based lipid mixture that enables the 1536-well screening of the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α (PI5P4Kα) utilizing the D-myo-di16-PtIns(5)P substrate in quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format using the ADP-Glo™ technology to couple the production of ADP to a bioluminescent readout. PMID:26552670

  2. Development of resazurin-based assay in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strain STIB 900 for the identification of potential anti-trypanosomal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kah Tee; Zahari, Zuriati; Amanah, Azimah; Zainuddin, Zafarina; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2016-03-01

    To accelerate the discovery of novel leads for the treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), it is necessary to have a simple, robust and cost-effective assay to identify positive hits by high throughput whole cell screening. Most of the fluorescence assay was made in black plate however in this study the HTS assay developed in 384-well format using clear plate and black plate, for comparison. The HTS assay developed is simple, sensitive, reliable and reproducible in both types of plates. Assay robustness and reproducibility were determined under the optimized conditions in 384-well plate was well tolerated in the HTS assay, including percentage of coefficient of variation (% CV) of 4.68% and 4.74% in clear and black 384-well plate, signal-to-background ratio (S/B) of 12.75 in clear 384-well plate and 12.07 in black 384-well plate, Z' factor of 0.79 and 0.82 in clear 384-well plate and black 384-well plate, respectively and final concentration of 0.30% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in both types of plate. Drug sensitivity was found to be comparable to the reported anti-trypanosomal assay in 96-well format. The reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay make it compliant to automated liquid handler use in HTS applications.

  3. Cannibalism in Colonial Congo

    OpenAIRE

    Lindholm, Anders; Gehin, Laurent; Bliddal, Marie; Christensen, Josefine; Mauritzen, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the project is to view the different concepts of cannibalism seen in colonial Congo. By analyzing the meaning of cannibalism in Congo in the time span between 1890-1905, we have tried to find a coherence between cannibalism in its definitive and metaphorical form. Additionally we have attempted to determine whether cannibalism was more a myth than fact, and what impact it had on the natives. We have furthermore tried to put cannibalism in relation to contemporary fiction of the tim...

  4. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  5. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  6. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  7. Fluorescent intercalator displacement replacement (FIDR) assay: determination of relative thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in triplex formation--a case study using triplex-forming LNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Sujay P; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2012-11-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are the most commonly used approach for site-specific targeting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA). Important parameters describing triplex formation include equilibrium binding constants (K(eq)) and association/dissociation rate constants (k(on) and k(off)). The 'fluorescent intercalator displacement replacement' (FIDR) assay is introduced herein as an operationally simple approach toward determination of these parameters for triplexes involving TC-motif TFOs. Briefly described, relative rate constants are determined from fluorescence intensity changes upon: (i) TFO-mediated displacement of pre-intercalated and fluorescent ethidium from dsDNA targets (triplex association) and (ii) Watson-Crick complement-mediated displacement of the TFO and replacement with ethidium (triplex dissociation). The assay is used to characterize triplexes between purine-rich dsDNA targets and TC-motif TFOs modified with six different locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomers, i.e. conventional and C5-alkynyl-functionalized LNA and α-L-LNA pyrimidine monomers. All of the studied monomers increase triplex stability by decreasing the triplex dissociation rate. LNA-modified TFOs form more stable triplexes than α-L-LNA-modified counterparts owing to slower triplex dissociation. Triplexes modified with C5-(3-aminopropyn-1-yl)-LNA-U monomer Z are particularly stable. The study demonstrates that three affinity-enhancing features can be combined into one high-affinity TFO monomer: conformational restriction of the sugar ring, expansion of the pyrimidine π-stacking surface and introduction of an exocyclic amine.

  8. Development of serum-free quality and quantity control culture of colony-forming endothelial progenitor cell for vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Haruchika; Iwasaki, Hiroto; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Ii, Masaaki; Shizuno, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuko; Ito, Rie; Horii, Miki; Ishida, Hideyuki; Kato, Shunichi; Asahara, Takayuki

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative and qualitative impairment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) limits the efficacy of autologous cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Here, we developed a serum-free quality and quantity control culture system for colony-forming EPCs to enhance their regenerative potential. A culture with serum-free medium containing stem cell factor, thrombopoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-6, and Flt-3 ligand was determined as optimal quality and quantity culture (QQc) in terms of the most vasculogenic colony-forming EPC expansion, evaluated by the newly established EPC colony formation assay. The QQc of umbilical cord blood-CD133(+) cells for 7 days produced a 52.9-fold increase in total cell number and 3.28-fold frequency in definitive EPC colony development, resulting in a 203.9-fold increase in estimated total definitive EPC colony number in vitro. Pre- or post-QQc cells were intramyocardially transplanted into nude rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Echocardiographic and micromanometer-tipped conductance catheter examinations 28 days post-MI revealed significant preservation of left ventricular (LV) function in rats receiving pre- or post-QQc cells compared with those receiving phosphate-buffered saline. Assessments of global LV contractility indicated a dose-dependent effect of pre- or post-QQc cells and the superior potency of post-QQc cells over pre-QQc cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed more abundant formation of both human and rat endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes in the infarcted myocardium following transplantation of post-QQc cells compared with pre-QQc cells. Our optimal serum-free quality and quantity culture may enhance the therapeutic potential of EPCs in both quantitative and qualitative aspects for cardiovascular regeneration.

  9. Colonialism in Heart of Darkness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    回志明

    2015-01-01

    Heart of Darkness, written by the renowned novelist Joseph Conrad, is regarded as“one of the half-dozen greatest novel as”. It has triggered a hot discussion from the perspective of colonialism, feminism and innovative narrative style. This paper aims to explore the colonialism revealed in the novel by showing the greedy nature of the colonizers and the subversion the writer has made against the majority of imperial opinions. The study of the colonialism in Heart of Darkness helps to better understand the heart of western colonialism and the revelations to build a harmonious world among different nations.

  10. Tamale 1907-1957 : between colonial trade and colonial chieftainship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Sebastiaan Robbert

    2012-01-01

    Tamale, the regional capital of Northern Ghana, has been strangely neglected by historians and anthropologists, despite being Ghana’s third largest city. Tamale’s neglect, like the city itself, has colonial origins. The book unpacks the implications for Tamale’s urban character of both its colonial

  11. Spatial and stratigraphic distribution of water in oil shale of the Green River Formation using Fischer assay, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial and stratigraphic distribution of water in oil shale of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado was studied in detail using some 321,000 Fischer assay analyses in the U.S. Geological Survey oil-shale database. The oil-shale section was subdivided into 17 roughly time-stratigraphic intervals, and the distribution of water in each interval was assessed separately. This study was conducted in part to determine whether water produced during retorting of oil shale could provide a significant amount of the water needed for an oil-shale industry. Recent estimates of water requirements vary from 1 to 10 barrels of water per barrel of oil produced, depending on the type of retort process used. Sources of water in Green River oil shale include (1) free water within clay minerals; (2) water from the hydrated minerals nahcolite (NaHCO3), dawsonite (NaAl(OH)2CO3), and analcime (NaAlSi2O6.H20); and (3) minor water produced from the breakdown of organic matter in oil shale during retorting. The amounts represented by each of these sources vary both stratigraphically and areally within the basin. Clay is the most important source of water in the lower part of the oil-shale interval and in many basin-margin areas. Nahcolite and dawsonite are the dominant sources of water in the oil-shale and saline-mineral depocenter, and analcime is important in the upper part of the formation. Organic matter does not appear to be a major source of water. The ratio of water to oil generated with retorting is significantly less than 1:1 for most areas of the basin and for most stratigraphic intervals; thus water within oil shale can provide only a fraction of the water needed for an oil-shale industry.

  12. Bacterial Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli (E. coli lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO. BCO is based on a lifecycle model that simulates some typical behaviors of E. coli bacteria during their whole lifecycle, including chemotaxis, communication, elimination, reproduction, and migration. A newly created chemotaxis strategy combined with communication mechanism is developed to simplify the bacterial optimization, which is spread over the whole optimization process. However, the other behaviors such as elimination, reproduction, and migration are implemented only when the given conditions are satisfied. Two types of interactive communication schemas: individuals exchange schema and group exchange schema are designed to improve the optimization efficiency. In the simulation studies, a set of 12 benchmark functions belonging to three classes (unimodal, multimodal, and rotated problems are performed, and the performances of the proposed algorithms are compared with five recent evolutionary algorithms to demonstrate the superiority of BCO.

  13. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  14. La autobiografia conventual colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Navallo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo propone una aproximación al relato autobiográfico conventual de fines del siglo XVII y principios del XVIII en Hispanoamérica. La lectura crítica del texto escrito por la monja clarisa Úrsula Suárez, en Santiago de Chile, nos permite repensar el lugar de la escritura religiosa femenina durante el período colonial en respuesta a un orden hegemónico que autoriza este tipo de narración, dentro del marco discursivo de los relatos de vida edificante. En este sentido, Relación Autobiográfica se considera el resultado de una práctica de escritura emergente del orden colonial. Mandada a escribir por su director espiritual, la narración autobiográfica implica tanto la delegación de la palabra a la religiosa como el resultado de un mecanismo institucionalizado de selección dentro de la comunidad conventual. Desde el momento en que toma posesión de la escritura, Úrsula se decide a presentar momentos de su historia personal elegidos para configurar la historia de su santidad. La concreción de la labor se expresa mediante una serie de recursos que sirven como un modo de autofiguración en el texto, constituyendo una forma de autoinvención. De allí que la selección de anécdotas, las reiteraciones y omisiones sirvan, por un lado, para ubicar la responsabilidad de la escritura tanto fuera de ella misma como en Dios; por otro, como la expresión de narrar la experiencia mística hispanoamericana de una manera diferente a la tradición peninsular.

  15. Increasing the spectral shifts in LSPR biosensing using DNA-functionalized gold nanorods in a competitive assay format for the detection of interferon-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ding-Zheng; Chuang, Po-Chun; Liao, Pei-Chen; Chen, Jung-Po; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate an approach that utilizes DNA-functionalized gold nanorods (AuNRs) in an indirect competitive assay format to increase the spectra shift in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensing. We use interferon gamma (IFN-γ) as a model analyte to demonstrate the feasibility of our detection method. The LSPR chips with periodic gold nanodot arrays are fabricated using a thermal lithography process and are functionalized with IFN-γ aptamers for detection. The DNA-functionalized AuNRs and IFN-γ compete with each other to bind to the aptamers during detection, and the spectra shifts are mainly caused by the AuNRs rather than IFN-γ. When using our approach, the target molecules do not need to be captured by two capture ligands simultaneously during detection and thus do not require multiple binding sites. Both experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations show that making the AuNRs as close to the chip surface as possible is very critical for increasing LSPR shifts, and the simulated results also show that the orientation of the AuNR affects the plasmon coupling between the gold nanodots on the chip surface and the nearby AuNRs. Although only the detection of IFN-γ is demonstrated in this study, we expect that the LSPR biosensing method can be applied to label-free detection of a variety of molecules as long as suitable aptamers are available.

  16. Evaluation of anti-malarial activity of Artemisia turcomanica and A. kopetdaghensis by cell-free β-hematin formation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mojarrab

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives:The plants of genus Artemisia (Asteraceae have been conventionally used for prevention and medication of a number of ailments. In the present research, ten extracts with different polarities from aerial parts of two Artemisia species, A. kopetdaghensis and A. turcomanica were evaluated for their potential anti-malarial properties. Methods: The plant materials were extracted successively with petroleum ether (PE, dichloromethane (DCM, ethyl acetate (EtOAC, ethanol, and ethanol-water (1:1 v/v  by cold maceration method. Cell free β-hematin formation assay were used for assessing anti-malarial activity of obtained extracts. Results: DCM extract of A. kopetdaghensis and PE extract of A. turcomanica showed remarkable anti-malarial activity with IC50 values of 1.04±0.02 mg/mL and 0.90±0.27 mg/mL, respectively, compared to positive control (chloroquine, IC50 0.04±0.01 mg/mL. Conclusion:  It seems that the anti-malarial activity of these extracts might be bound up with the presence of compounds with low or medium polarity; hence, this preliminary test indicated that these potent extracts could be considered for further investigations to find new sources of anti-malarial phytochemicals.

  17. Student Discipline in Colonial America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, John R.

    The basis for the severe discipline imposed on school children in colonial America, especially in the Puritan colonies, was the belief in original sin. The child was regarded as being born in sin and thus depraved and prone to sin. The purpose of education was to enable children to read the Bible and thus change the behavior which otherwise would…

  18. Ammonia emissions from seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, Trevor D.; Wilson, Linda J.; Theobald, Mark R.; Milford, Celia; Nemitz, Eiko; Bull, Jennifer; Bacon, Philip J.; Hamer, Keith C.; Wanless, Sarah; Sutton, Mark A.

    2007-05-01

    Ammonia emissions were measured from two entire seabird colonies with contrasting species assemblages, to ascertain the ammonia volatilisation potentials among seabird species in relation to their nesting behaviour. Emissions were calculated from downwind plume measurements of ammonia concentration using both inverse dispersion and tracer ratio methods. Measured colony emissions ranged 1-90 kg NH3 hour-1, and equated to 16 and 36% volatilization of excreted nitrogen for colonies dominated by ground/burrow nesting and bare rock nesting birds, respectively. The results were applied in a bioenergetics model with a global seabird database. Seabird colonies are found to represent the largest point sources of ammonia globally (up to ~6 Gg NH3 colony-1 year-1). Moreover the largest emissions occur mainly in remote environments with otherwise low NH3 emissions. These ammonia ``hot spots'' explain significant perturbations of the nitrogen cycle in these regions and add ~20% to oceanic ammonia emissions south of latitude 45°S.

  19. A critical number of workers in a honeybee colony triggers investment in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael L; Ostwald, Madeleine M; Loftus, J Carter; Seeley, Thomas D

    2014-10-01

    Social insect colonies, like individual organisms, must decide as they develop how to allocate optimally their resources among survival, growth, and reproduction. Only when colonies reach a certain state do they switch from investing purely in survival and growth to investing also in reproduction. But how do worker bees within a colony detect that their colony has reached the state where it is adaptive to begin investing in reproduction? Previous work has shown that larger honeybee colonies invest more in reproduction (i.e., the production of drones and queens), however, the term 'larger' encompasses multiple colony parameters including number of adult workers, size of the nest, amount of brood, and size of the honey stores. These colony parameters were independently increased in this study to test which one(s) would increase a colony's investment in reproduction via males. This was assayed by measuring the construction of drone comb, the special type of comb in which drones are reared. Only an increase in the number of workers stimulated construction of drone comb. Colonies with over 4,000 workers began building drone comb, independent of the other colony parameters. These results show that attaining a critical number of workers is the key parameter for honeybee colonies to start to shift resources towards reproduction. These findings are relevant to other social systems in which a group's members must adjust their behavior as a function of the group's size.

  20. A critical number of workers in a honeybee colony triggers investment in reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael L.; Ostwald, Madeleine M.; Loftus, J. Carter; Seeley, Thomas D.

    2014-10-01

    Social insect colonies, like individual organisms, must decide as they develop how to allocate optimally their resources among survival, growth, and reproduction. Only when colonies reach a certain state do they switch from investing purely in survival and growth to investing also in reproduction. But how do worker bees within a colony detect that their colony has reached the state where it is adaptive to begin investing in reproduction? Previous work has shown that larger honeybee colonies invest more in reproduction (i.e., the production of drones and queens), however, the term `larger' encompasses multiple colony parameters including number of adult workers, size of the nest, amount of brood, and size of the honey stores. These colony parameters were independently increased in this study to test which one(s) would increase a colony's investment in reproduction via males. This was assayed by measuring the construction of drone comb, the special type of comb in which drones are reared. Only an increase in the number of workers stimulated construction of drone comb. Colonies with over 4,000 workers began building drone comb, independent of the other colony parameters. These results show that attaining a critical number of workers is the key parameter for honeybee colonies to start to shift resources towards reproduction. These findings are relevant to other social systems in which a group's members must adjust their behavior as a function of the group's size.

  1. Novel mixed-format real-time PCR assay to detect mutations conferring resistance to triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus and prevalence of multi-triazole resistance among clinical isolates in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, C.H.; Valk, H.A. de; Curfs-Breuker, I.M.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was: (i) to study the prevalence of triazole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in the Netherlands; and (ii) to design rapid real-time PCR methods to identify such isolates. METHODS: A novel mixed-format real-time PCR assay is described for the detection of mu

  2. So far away from home : engaging the silenced colonial : the Netherlands-Indies diaspora in North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu-Boon, Hendrika H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of the making of colonial identities, the bond to natal land fundamental to the formation of ‘self,’ its impact on immigration/repatriation, and the hegemonic application of the paradigm of Colonialism to highly diverse colonial encounters, this research engages

  3. So far away from home : engaging the silenced colonial : the Netherlands-Indies diaspora in North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu-Boon, Hendrika H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of the making of colonial identities, the bond to natal land fundamental to the formation of ‘self,’ its impact on immigration/repatriation, and the hegemonic application of the paradigm of Colonialism to highly diverse colonial encounters, this research engages

  4. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  5. Colony collapse disorder in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainat, Benjamin; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a condition of honey bees, which has contributed in part to the recent major losses of honey bee colonies in the USA. Here we report the first CCD case from outside of the USA. We suggest that more standardization is needed for the case definition to diagnose CCD and to compare data on a global scale. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Ensayo a campo sobre la eficacia del Colmesan® contra el ácaro Varroa destructor (Varroidae en colmenas de Apis mellifera (Apidae Field assay of Colmesan® efficacy against the mite Varroa destructor (Varroidae in honey bee colonies of Apis mellifera (Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcangeli

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia del producto Colmesan® para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor (Anderson &Trueman en colmenas de abejas durante el otoño de 2003. El trabajo se llevó a cabo en el apiario experimental ubicado en la ciudad de La Plata, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se trabajó sobre un total de 10 colmenas tipo "Langstroth" que se dividieron en dos grupos iguales. El primer grupo recibió dos dosis de Colmesan® (amitraz, 2,05 g, aplicadas a intervalos de 10 días. El segundo grupo, no recibió ningún tipo de tratamiento. Semanalmente, se recolectaron los ácaros muertos caídos en pisos especiales que evitaban que las abejas los eliminen. Posteriormente, los dos grupos recibieron tres dosis semanales de 5 ml del producto Oxavar® (64,6g/l ácido oxálico en agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas para eliminar los ácaros remanentes en las colonias y poder así calcular la eficacia del tratamiento. El producto Colmesan® presentó una eficacia promedio de 70,92% ± 11,93 (rango = 57,92 - 85,42, registrándose diferencias significativas frente al grupo control (pThe aim of this work was to evaluate the acaricide efficacy of Colmesan® to control Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman in Apis mellifera (L. colonies during the autumn 2003. Work was done at an experimental apiary located in La Plata city, province of Buenos Aires. Ten Langstroth hives were used divided in two equal groups. The first group received Colmesan® (amitraz, 2,05 g in 2 doses at 10 days period. The second one represented the control group. Dead mites were collected weekly from special floors designed to avoid mite removal by adult honeybees. Then, 3 weekly doses of 5 ml of Oxavar® (64.6 g/l oxalic acid in destilled water were placed in each colony to kill remanent mites and the acaricide efficacy was calculated. Colmesan® showed an average acaricide efficacy of 70.92% ± 11.93 (range = 57.92 -85.42, showing significant

  7. Agarose overlay selectively improves macrocolony formation and radiosensitivity assessment in primary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandna, Sudhir; Dagur, Raghubendra Singh; Mathur, Ankit; Natarajan, Adayapalam Tyagarajan; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2014-05-01

    Primary fibroblasts are not suitable for in vitro macrocolony assay due to their inability to form distinct colonies. Here we present a modification of agarose overlay that yielded extensive improvement in their colony formation and assessment of radiosensitivity. Macrocolony formation was assessed in primary human fibroblasts VH10 and HDFn with or without overlay using 0.5% agarose in growth medium at 24 h post-seeding. Malignant human cell lines (A549, U87) and transformed non-malignant fibroblasts (AA8 hamster, MRC5 human) were used for comparison. Agarose overlay caused significant improvement marked by early appearance (one week) of distinct colonies with high cell density and multifold higher plating efficiency than conventional macrocolony assay in VH10 and HDFn human fibroblasts. Compared to conventional assay or feeder cell supplementation, agarose overlay resulted in broader cell morphology due to improved adherence, and yielded more compact colonies. Gamma-radiation dose-response survival curves could be successfully generated for both fibroblast cell lines using this method, which yielded no such effects in the transformed/malignant cell lines tested. This easy and inexpensive 'agarose overlay technique' significantly and selectively improves the fibroblast plating efficiency, thus considerably reducing time and effort to greatly benefit the survival studies on primary fibroblasts.

  8. A simple plate-assay for the screening of L-malic acid producing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Y; Rokem, J S; Goldberg, I

    1990-02-01

    A simple plate-assay has been developed to screen microorganisms for L-malic acid production. Acid producing organisms were identified, after microbial colony growth on media containing glucose or fumaric acid as sole carbons sources, by formation of a dark halo of formazan. The halo was observed when the plate was covered with a soft agar overlay containing NAD(+)-malate dehydrogenase, NAD+, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The assay developed is simple, specific for L-malic acid and therefore can be used to identify L-malic acid producing filamentous fungi using glucose as carbon source (e.g. Aspergillus strains). The assay is also applicable for screening bacteria with high fumarase activity, able to convert fumaric acid to L-malic acid.

  9. Mesoscale variability in intact and ghost colonies of Phaeocystis antarctica in the Ross Sea: Distribution and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Walker O.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Olson, Elise B.; Kosnyrev, Valery; Peacock, Emily E.; Sosik, Heidi M.

    2017-02-01

    Phaeocystis, a genus with a cosmopolitan distribution and a polymorphic life cycle, was observed during summer in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, where large blooms of this haptophyte regularly occur. The mesoscale vertical and horizontal distributions of colonies of Phaeocystis antarctica were assessed using a towed Video Plankton Recorder (VPR). The mean size of colonies was 1.20 mm, and mean abundances within the three VPR surveys were 4.86, 1.96, and 11.5 mL- 1. In addition to the typical spherical, transparent colonies, the VPR quantified an optically dissimilar form of colony that had a distinctive translucent appearance. It also measured the abundance of collapsed colonies, similar to those observed previously from cultures and mesocosms, which we called "ghost colonies". The translucent colonial form had a different distribution than the more common colonial form, and at times was more abundant. Relative to intact colonies, the ghost colonies occurred less frequently, with mean abundances in the three surveys being 0.01, 0.08, and 0.0004 mL- 1. Ghost colonies generally were found below the euphotic zone, where they often were in greater abundance than intact colonies. However, the relationship of ghost colonies to intact P. antarctica colonies was not direct or consistent, suggesting that the formation of ghost colonies from living colonies and their appearance within the water column were not tightly coupled. Given their relative scarcity and low carbon content, it is unlikely that ghost colonies contribute substantially to vertical flux; however, it is possible that we did not sample periods of major flux events, and as a result minimized the importance of ghost colonies to vertical flux. They do, however, represent a poorly documented feature of polar haptophyte life cycles.

  10. Microgradients in bacterial colonies : use of fluorescence ratio imaging : a non-invasive technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakar, P.K.; Brocklehurst, T.F.; Mackie, A.R.; Wilson, P.D.G.; Zwietering, M.H.; Riet, K. van 't

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescence ratio imaging is a non-invasive technique for studying the formation of microgradients in immobilised bacterial colonies. These gradients can be quantified easily when combined with the gel cassette system designed at the Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK. Colonies of

  11. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  12. Language teaching and graphic colonial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Yaneth Chaparro Cardozo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a reflection of the colonial baroque ornamentation from education and graphic blocks; analyzing aspects such as creating maps of the Basilica Church Cathedral Santiago de Tunja. This research tests the interpretation of the drawing and construction of ornamental figures of the native nature of the region in the colonies of the city of Tunja, Boyacá churches. This study of the visual reconstruction of the routes that make a group of children on the reinterpretation of the design in the construction of maps of colonial baroque in the creation and graphic composition. Given the importance of aesthetics in the visual language manuals maples ornaments of the cathedral with a look from the pedagogy and education in studies of iconography Erwin Panofsky in understanding the phenomenon of space. 

  13. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  14. Seabird Colonies in Western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boertmann, D.; Mosbech, A.; Falk, K.;

    surveys of seabird colonies are needed, due to a lack of information or because the present information probably is outdated. The most immediate threats to the colonial seabirds in western Greenland during the breeding time is hunting and egging. Oil pollution is a minor threat to-day, but will increase...... if offshore areas with oil potential are explored and developed. Tab. 6 gives an overview of each species sensitivity to oil spills and the capacity to recover, as well as a comparison of the western Greenland population numbers to the North Atlantic population numbers. The most significant western Greenland...

  15. Responses of Microcystis Colonies of Different Sizes to Hydrogen Peroxide Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mixue; Shi, Xiaoli; Chen, Chao; Yu, Li; Sun, Chuang

    2017-09-27

    Microcystis blooms have become a ubiquitous phenomenon in freshwater ecosystems, and the size of Microcystis colonies varies widely throughout the year. In the present study, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) was applied to test the effect of this algaecide on Microcystis colonies of different sizes and to evaluate the colonies' antioxidant strategy. The results showed that Microcystis populations collapsed under treatment with 5 mg/L H₂O₂ at colony sizes smaller than 25 μm. A dosage of 20 mg/L H₂O₂ was necessary to efficiently control Microcystis colonies larger than 25 μm. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems of different colonies exhibited various strategies to mitigate oxidative stress. In small colonies, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was readily stimulated and operated with catalase (CAT) activity to eliminate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In colonies larger than 25 μm, the antioxidant enzyme CAT and antioxidant substance glutathione (GSH) played major roles in mitigating oxidative stress at H₂O₂ concentrations below 20 mg/L. In addition, application of the algaecide led to the release of intracellular-microcystins (MCs), and oxidatively-driven MCs reached high concentrations when colony size was larger than 100 μm. Algaecide control measures should be implemented before the formation of large colonies to limit the algaecide dosage and MC release.

  16. Globalization in the post - colonial world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikova Larisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new interpretation of globalization within the boundaries of the author’s concept of soft globalization, which exploits a normatively attractive alternative to the concept of the Empire. It is argued here that the conditions of development of contemporary post - colonial world communities do not require any unification in the form of the Empire, but instead the creation of a non repressive mechanism of social regulation - the implementation of a form of soft globalization, a globalization with a mental form are expedient here. Historically, globalization occurred in a strict material(i.e. economical and military form that prompted the conditions for the evolution of civilization as the Empire: a case in which the development of the world occurs under the power of a single dominating state. Imperialistic politics leads to colonial politics formation. The history of the phenomena of civilization shows many instances of Empire globalization. Globalization in the Empire form was already observed at the time of the Roman Empire. At this time processes of development inside the Empire were manifestations of globalization in its highest cultural shape. But ancient Rome was also a social and political experiment that acquired the attributes of a purely material globalization in the end, and historically brought about the irreversible crash of the Roman Empire itself. Contemporary fluctuations referring to the process of globalization can be registered in the US’s attempts of material domination inside this or that existing case of civilization, which causes colonialism appearance. The main idea stressed in the paper is that only a mental globalization could succeed in the end.

  17. Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence-Based Assay to Monitor Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signalling in a High-Throughput Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are key components of multiple important cell signalling pathways regulating diverse biological responses. This signalling is characterized by phosphorylation cascades leading to ERK1/2 activation and promoted by various cell surface receptors including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. We report the development of a new cell-based phospho-ERK1/2 assay (designated Phospho-ERK, which is a sandwich proximity-based assay using the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology. We have validated the assay on endogenously expressed ERK1/2 activated by the epidermal growth factor (EGFR as a prototypical RTK, as well as various GPCRs belonging to different classes and coupling to different heterotrimeric G proteins. The assay was successfully miniaturized in 384-well plates using various cell lines endogenously, transiently or stably expressing the different receptors. The validation was performed for agonists, antagonists and inhibitors in dose-response as well as kinetic analysis, and the signalling and pharmacological properties of the different receptors were reproduced. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.7 indicates the potential of the Phospho-ERK assay for high-throughput screening of compounds that may modulate ERK1/2 signalling. Finally, our study is of great interest in the current context of investigating ERK1/2 signalling with respect to the emerging concepts of biased ligands, G protein-dependent/independent ERK1/2 activation, and functional transactivation between GPCRs and RTKs, illustrating the importance of considering the ERK1/2 pathway in cell signalling.

  18. A three-step method for analysing bacterial biofilm formation under continuous medium flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzler, Karolin; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2015-07-01

    For the investigation and comparison of microbial biofilms, a variety of analytical methods have been established, all focusing on different growth stages and application areas of biofilms. In this study, a novel quantitative assay for analysing biofilm maturation under the influence of continuous flow conditions was developed using the interesting biocatalyst Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120. In contrast to other tubular-based assay systems, this novel assay format delivers three readouts using a single setup in a total assay time of 40 h. It combines morphotype analysis of biofilm colonies with the direct quantification of biofilm biomass and pellicle formation on an air/liquid interphase. Applying the Tube-Assay, the impact of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate on biofilm formation of P. taiwanensis VLB120 was investigated. To this end, 41 deletions of genes encoding for protein homologues to diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase were generated in the genome of P. taiwanensis VLB120. Subsequently, the biofilm formation of the resulting mutants was analysed using the Tube-Assay. In more than 60 % of the mutants, a significantly altered biofilm formation as compared to the parent strain was detected. Furthermore, the potential of the proposed Tube-Assay was validated by investigating the biofilms of several other bacterial species.

  19. Characterization of stroma-dependent blast colony-forming cells in human marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, M.Y.; Dowding, C.R.; Riley, G.P.; Greaves, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a population of haemopoietic progenitor cells that can be distinguished by their ability to adhere to preformed stromal layers (cultured in the presence of methylprednisolone (MP/sup +/) and form blast cell colonies. The stromal layers function in the colony assay after they have been heavily irradiated but not after they have been passaged. The binding of the progenitor cells to the stromal cells is complete after 2 hours of coincubation, and stromal layers of 9.6 cm/sup 2/ can provide adhesion sites for at least 2000 blast colony-forming cells. The blast colony-forming cells were shown by micromanipulation to self-renew as well as the give rise to multipotential and lineage-committed colony-forming progenitor cells.

  20. Ant Colony Optimization for Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ast, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The very basis of this thesis is the collective behavior of ants in colonies. Ants are an excellent example of how rather simple behavior on a local level can lead to complex behavior on a global level that is beneficial for the individuals. The key in the self-organization of ants is communication

  1. Colonial adventures in tropical agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buelens, Frans; Frankema, Ewout

    2015-01-01

    How profitable were foreign investments in plantation agriculture in the Netherlands Indies during the late colonial era? We use a new dataset of monthly quoted stock prices and dividends of international companies at the Brussels stock exchange to estimate the returns to investment in tropical a

  2. Colonial adventures in tropical agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buelens, Frans; Frankema, Ewout

    2016-01-01

    How profitable were foreign investments in plantation agriculture in the Netherlands Indies during the late colonial era? We use a new dataset of monthly quoted stock prices and dividends of international companies at the Brussels stock exchange to estimate the returns to investment in tropical a

  3. Ant Colony Optimization for Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ast, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The very basis of this thesis is the collective behavior of ants in colonies. Ants are an excellent example of how rather simple behavior on a local level can lead to complex behavior on a global level that is beneficial for the individuals. The key in the self-organization of ants is communication

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Cadmium on the Inducible Anti-grazer Colony Formation inScenedesmus obliquus%镉对斜生栅藻诱导型反牧食防御群体形成的抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄园; 南海红; 张星星; 汤恒星

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium contamination in aquatic ecosystems has raised concerns due to its high cytotoxicity to organisms. The inducible anti-grazer defenses in phytoplankton are known to stabilize the population dynamics and the community structures in aquatic environment. However, how the inducible defenses of phytoplankton respond to Cd contamination remains unclear.In the present study,we inoculated the algaScenedesmus obliquusinto media with or withoutDaphnia filtrate, and cultured them at different concentrations of Cd2+(0~0.32 mg·L-1). The results showed that addition ofDaphnia filtrate had no significant effect on the algal growth rate, the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and the efficiency of photosystem II (φPSI). In the presence ofDaphnia filtrate, Cd2+-free populations ofS. obliquus were comprised of 42.7% four-celled colonies on day 2 and 46.4% eight-celled colonies on day 3, with the maximum number of cells per particle of (3.3±0.20). At Cd2+ concentrations of 0.10~0.32 mg·L-1, the algal growth and photosynthesis were decreased with the result of reduced proportions of colonial populations. Exposure to≤0.08 mg·L-1 Cd2+ had no significant effect on algal growth and photosynthesis; however, the ability ofS. obliquusto form large colonies in response to Daphnia filtrate was impaired. These results suggested the high sensitivity of grazer-induced morphological defense of phytoplankton to Cd2+ toxicity. Cd contamination may result in inducible defended algae being easily grazed by small herbivorous zooplankton, potentially changing the energy flow along food chain in Cd-contaminated waters.%水域生态系统的镉污染因对生物具有强毒性而引起人们广泛关注。浮游藻类的反牧食防御在维持种群动态和群落结构方面具有重要作用,但目前关于镉污染对藻类反牧食防御的影响并不清楚。采用在斜生栅藻(Scenedesmus obliquus)培养液中添加浮游动物——大型溞(Daphnia magna)信息素的方法

  5. Caste ratios affect the reproductive output of social trematode colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, T; Poulin, R

    2013-03-01

    Intraspecific phenotypic diversification in social organisms often leads to formation of physical castes which are morphologically specialized for particular tasks within the colony. The optimal caste allocation theory argues that specialized morphological castes are efficient at specific tasks, and hence different caste ratios should affect the ergonomic efficiency, hence reproductive output of the colony. However, the reproductive output of different caste ratios has been documented in few species of insects with equivocal support for the theory. This study investigated whether the ratios of nonreproductive and reproductive morphs affect the reproductive output of a recently discovered social trematode, Philophthalmus sp., in which the nonreproductive members are hypothesized to be defensive specialists. A census of natural infections and a manipulative in vitro experiment demonstrated a positive association between the reproductive output of trematode colonies and the ratio of nonreproductive to reproductive morphs in the presence of an intra-host trematode competitor, Maritrema novaezealandensis. On the contrary, without the competitor, reproductive output was negatively associated with the proportion of nonreproductive castes in colonies. Our findings demonstrate for the first time a clear fitness benefit associated with the nonreproductive castes in the presence of a competitor while illustrating the cost of maintaining such morphs in noncompetitive situations. Although the proximate mechanisms controlling caste ratio remain unclear in this trematode system, this study supports the prediction that the fitness of colonies is influenced by the composition of specialized functional morphs in social organisms, suggesting a potential for adaptive shifts of caste ratios over evolutionary time.

  6. Activity of MKT 077, a rhodacyanine dye, against human tumor colony-forming units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, T; Izbicka, E; Lawrence, R A; Nalin, C; Weitman, S D; Von Hoff, D D

    1999-03-01

    MKT 077 is related to rhodamine 123 dye and demonstrates preferential accumulation in the mitochondria of cancer cells compared to normal cells. This difference in retention between cancer and normal cells led to the finding that MKT 077 selectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells in vitro. To define the preclinical activity profile of MKT 077, the compound was tested in vivo against a large variety of human tumors utilizing the human tumor-cloning assay. MKT 077 was studied using a sequential 2 h exposure separated by 24 h (2-24-2 h) and a 24 h exposure at final concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 1.0, 2.0, 10.0 and 20.0 microg/ml. MKT 077 was also studied using continuous exposure at final concentrations of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 microg/ml. A decrease in tumor colony formation was considered significant if survival of colonies treated with MKT 077 was 50% or less compared to untreated controls. A total of 149 specimens was treated with MKT 077 with 51, 58 and 34 evaluable specimens with the 2-24-2 h, the 24 h and the continuous exposure, respectively. The results of the present study suggest a positive relationship between concentration and response. No relationship between exposure schedule and activity was observed. Inhibitory effects were obtained against multiple tumor types. High cytotoxic activity was obtained against breast, ovary, endometrial, colon and non-small cell lung cancer with concentrations of 2 microg/ml or above. In conclusion, the broad spectrum of cytotoxicity of MKT 077 in the human tumor-cloning assay and the unique mechanism of action of MKT 077 encourage additional preclinical and clinical studies with this compound and other rhodacyanine dyes.

  7. Metabolism and resources of spherical colonies of Nostoc zetterstedtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Borum, Jens

    2009-01-01

    by active transport that could extract most external DIC, accumulate DIC in the colony 150-fold above external concentrations, and retain respiratory CO2. The energy cost of solute transport and gel formation in Nostoc colonies and extensive self shading restrict their potential growth, whereas colony...... formation should prevent grazing and increase longevity and nutrient recirculation. Nostoc zetterstedtii has become one of rarest freshwater macroalgae because of widespread lake eutrophication reducing water transparency and increasing competition from taller and faster-growing stands of filamentous algae...

  8. Bioluminescence Methods for Assaying Kinases in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Format Applied to Yes1 Tyrosine Kinase, Glucokinase, and PI5P4Kα Lipid Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mindy I; Auld, Douglas S; Inglese, James

    2016-01-01

    Assays in which the detection of a biological phenomenon is coupled to the production of bioluminescence by luciferase have gained widespread use. As firefly luciferases (FLuc) and kinases share a common substrate (ATP), coupling of a kinase to FLuc allows for the amount of ATP remaining following a kinase reaction to be assessed by quantitating the amount of luminescence produced. Alternatively, the amount of ADP produced by the kinase reaction can be coupled to FLuc through a two-step process. This chapter describes the bioluminescent assays that were developed for three classes of kinases (lipid, protein, and metabolic kinases) and miniaturized to 1536-well format, enabling their use for quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) of small-molecule libraries.

  9. Settler colonialism and the nuclear family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    PHILLIPS, RICHARD

    2009-01-01

    Colonial societies revolved around nuclear families. Though they often seemed natural, universal and inevitable, colonial nuclear families were in fact produced through a series of laws and customs that regulated sex and marriage...

  10. Asia and Africa in the Colonial Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav Iakovlevich Belokrenitskii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The section examines the colonial history of Asia and Africa, as well as key periods and directions of colonization. The authors analyze the features of the colonial political systems, processes of power distribution, the relationships between colonies and metropolis. Particular attention is paid to the strengthening of Asia and Africa in the final period of colonialism, as well as the impact of the Second World War and a new system of international relations on the process of decolonization.

  11. Cooperative organization of bacterial colonies: from genotype to morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Gutnick, D L

    1998-01-01

    In nature, bacteria must often cope with difficult environmental conditions. To do so they have developed sophisticated cooperative behavior and intricate communication pathways. Utilizing these elements, motile microbial colonies frequently develop complex patterns in response to adverse growth conditions on hard surfaces under conditions of energy limitation. We employ the term morphotype to refer to specific properties of colonial development. The morphologies we discuss include a tip-splitting (T) morphotype, chiral (C) morphotype, and vortex (V) morphotype. A generic modeling approach was developed by combining a detailed study of the cellular behavior and dynamics during colonial development and invoking concepts derived from the study of pattern formation in nonliving systems. Analysis of patterning behavior of the models suggests bacterial processes whereby communication leads to self-organization by using cooperative cellular interactions. New features emerging from the model include various models of cell-cell signaling, such as long-range chemorepulsion, short-range chemoattraction, and, in the case of the V morphotype, rotational chemotaxis. In this regard, pattern formation in microorganisms can be viewed as the result of the exchange of information between the micro-level (the individual cells) and the macro-level (the colony).

  12. Ant colony optimization in continuous problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ling; LIU Kang; LI Kaishi

    2007-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the basic ant colony optimization and optimum problem in a continuous space,an ant colony optimization (ACO) for continuous problem is constructed and discussed. The algorithm is efficient and beneficial to the study of the ant colony optimization in a continuous space.

  13. Polygynous supercolonies of the acacia-ant Pseudomyrmex peperi, an inferior colony founder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, S; Pauls, S U; Ballhorn, D J; Lumbsch, H T; Heil, M

    2009-12-01

    In ant-plant protection mutualisms, plants provide nesting space and nutrition to defending ants. Several plant-ants are polygynous. Possessing more than one queen per colony can reduce nestmate relatedness and consequently the inclusive fitness of workers. Here, we investigated the colony structure of the obligate acacia-ant Pseudomyrmex peperi, which competes for nesting space with several congeneric and sympatric species. Pseudomyrmex peperi had a lower colony founding success than its congeners and thus, appears to be competitively inferior during the early stages of colony development. Aggression assays showed that P. peperi establishes distinct, but highly polygynous supercolonies, which can inhabit large clusters of host trees. Analysing queens, workers, males and virgin queens from two supercolonies with eight polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed a maximum of three alleles per locus within a colony and, thus, high relatedness among nestmates. Colonies had probably been founded by one singly mated queen and supercolonies resulted from intranidal mating among colony-derived males and daughter queens. This strategy allows colonies to grow by budding and to occupy individual plant clusters for time spans that are longer than an individual queen's life. Ancestral states reconstruction indicated that polygyny represents the derived state within obligate acacia-ants. We suggest that the extreme polygyny of Pseudomyrmex peperi, which is achieved by intranidal mating and thereby maintains high nestmate relatedness, might play an important role for species coexistence in a dynamic and competitive habitat.

  14. Viral prevalence increases with regional colony abundance in honey bee drones (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forfert, Nadège; Natsopoulou, Myrsini E; Paxton, Robert J; Moritz, Robin F A

    2016-10-01

    Transmission among colonies is a central feature for the epidemiology of honey bee pathogens. High colony abundance may promote transmission among colonies independently of apiary layout, making colony abundance a potentially important parameter determining pathogen prevalence in populations of honey bees. To test this idea, we sampled male honey bees (drones) from seven distinct drone congregation areas (DCA), and used their genotypes to estimate colony abundance at each site. A multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA) was used to assess the prevalence of ten viruses, using five common viral targets, in individual drones. There was a significant positive association between colony abundance and number of viral infections. This result highlights the potential importance of high colony abundance for pathogen prevalence, possibly because high population density facilitates pathogen transmission. Pathogen prevalence in drones collected from DCAs may be a useful means of estimating the disease status of a population of honey bees during the mating season, especially for localities with a large number of wild or feral colonies.

  15. One Kilogram Interstellar Colony Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, A.

    Small interstellar colony probes based on nanotechnology will become possible long before giant multi-generation ships become affordable. A beam generator and magnetic sail can accelerate a one kg probe to .1 c, braking via the interstellar field can decelerate it, and the field in a distant solar system can allow it to maneuver to an extrasolar planet. A heat shield is used for landing and nanobots emerge to build ever-larger robots and construct colony infrastructure. Humans can then be generated from genomes stored as data in computer memory. Technology is evolving towards these capabilities and should reach the required level in fifty years. The plan appears to be affordable, with the principal cost being the beam generator, estimated at $17 billion.

  16. Prescreening bacterial colonies for bioactive molecules with Janus plates, a SBS standard double-faced microbial culturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Pascual, Javier; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Kath, Gary S; Sigmund, Janet M; Masurekar, Prakash; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the availability of many culture-based antibiotic screening methods, the lack of sensitive automated methods to identify functional molecules directly from microbial cells still limits the search for new biologically active compounds. The effectiveness of antibiotic detection is influenced by the solubility of the assayed compounds, indicator strain sensitivity, culture media and assay configuration. We describe a qualitative high throughput screening system for detecting cell-perturbing molecules from bacterial colonies employing two opposed agar layers sequentially formed in prototype Society for Biomolecular Screening (SBS) plates, named Janus plates. Direct assay of microbial colonies against target organisms in opposed agar layers overcomes some of the limitations of agar overlay methods. The system enables the rapid detection of extracellular cell-perturbing molecules, e.g., antibiotics, excreted directly from environmental isolates. The source bacterial colonies remain separate from the target organism. The growth layer is prepared and grown independently, so environmental strains can be grown for longer intervals, at temperatures and in media that favor their growth and metabolite expression, while the assay layer with pathogens, usually requiring nutrient-rich medium and elevated temperatures, are added later. Colonies to be tested can be precisely arrayed on the first agar surface, thus avoiding dispersion and disturbance of potential antibiotic-producing colonies by overlaying agar with the target strain. The rectangular SBS configuration facilitates factorial replication of dense microbial colony arrays for testing with multiple assays and assay conditions employing robotic colony pickers and pin tools. Opposed agar layers only slightly reduced the effectiveness for detecting growth inhibition from pure antibiotics compared to single-layer agar diffusion assays. The Janus plate enabled an automation-assisted workflow where a lone operator can

  17. Examining cooperative binding of Sox2 on DC5 regulatory element upon complex formation with Pax6 through excess electron transfer assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Kizaki, Seiichiro; De, Debojyoti; Endo, Masayuki; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-08-19

    Functional cooperativity among transcription factors on regulatory genetic elements is pivotal for milestone decision-making in various cellular processes including mammalian development. However, their molecular interaction during the cooperative binding cannot be precisely understood due to lack of efficient tools for the analyses of protein-DNA interaction in the transcription complex. Here, we demonstrate that photoinduced excess electron transfer assay can be used for analysing cooperativity of proteins in transcription complex using cooperative binding of Pax6 to Sox2 on the regulatory DNA element (DC5 enhancer) as an example. In this assay, (Br)U-labelled DC5 was introduced for the efficient detection of transferred electrons from Sox2 and Pax6 to the DNA, and guanine base in the complementary strand was replaced with hypoxanthine (I) to block intra-strand electron transfer at the Sox2-binding site. By examining DNA cleavage occurred as a result of the electron transfer process, from tryptophan residues of Sox2 and Pax6 to DNA after irradiation at 280 nm, we not only confirmed their binding to DNA but also observed their increased occupancy on DC5 with respect to that of Sox2 and Pax6 alone as a result of their cooperative interaction. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Honeybee immunity and colony losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nazzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline of honeybee colonies and their eventual collapse is a widespread phenomenon in the Northern hemisphere of the globe, which severely limits the beekeeping industry. This dramatic event is associated with an enhanced impact of parasites and pathogens on honeybees, which is indicative of reduced immunocompetence. The parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the vectored viral pathogens appear to play a key-role in the induction of this complex syndrome. In particular, the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV is widespread and is now considered, along with Varroa, one of the major causes of bee colony losses. Several lines of evidence indicate that this mite/DWV association severely affects the immune system of honeybees and makes them more sensitive to the action of other stress factors. The molecular mechanisms underpinning these complex interactions are currently being investigated and the emerging information has allowed the development of a new functional model, describing how different stress factors may synergistically concur in the induction of bee immune alteration and health decline. This provides a new logical framework in which to interpret the proposed multifactorial origin of bee colony losses and sets the stage for a more comprehensive and integrated analysis of the effect that multiple stress agents may have on honeybees.

  19. Diffusive boundary layers of the colony-forming plankton alga Phaeocystis sp - implications for nutrient uptake and cellular growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Stolte, W.; Jørgensen, BB

    1999-01-01

    . At diffusion limitation, this concentration gradient was reflected by an apparently higher half-saturation constants for nutrient uptake, K-M, for colonial cells compared with that for single cells. The diffusion limited supply of inorganic nitrogen and orthophosphate from the bulk water phase......The impact of colony formation on cellular nutrient supply was calculated for Phaeocystis in a turbulent environment using a diffusion-reaction model. The model included diffusive boundary layer as predicted by Sherwood numbers in mass transfer to a sphere. Literature values for nutrient uptake (V......-max, K-m) of single cells and colonies and the size dependence of cell numbers in colonies were used in the model. Colony formation was shown to decrease nutrient uptake by Phaeocystis cells because of the presence of diffusive boundary layers with concentration gradients surrounding the colonies...

  20. Development of a real-time PCR assay for the rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii from whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Roscetto, Emanuela; Iula, Vita Dora; Martinucci, Marianna; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug-resistant pathogen associated with severe infections in hospitalized patients, including pneumonia, urinary and bloodstream infections. Rapid detection of A. baumannii infection is crucial for timely treatment of septicemic patients. The aim of the present study was to develop a specific marker for a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. baumannii. The target gene chosen is the biofilm-associated protein (bap) gene, encoding a cell surface protein involved in biofilm formation. The assay is specific for A. baumannii, allowing its discrimination from different species of Acinetobacter and other clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. The assay is able to detect one genomic copy of A. baumannii, corresponding to 4 fg of purified DNA, and 20 colony-forming units/ml using DNA extracted from spiked whole blood samples.

  1. The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Balaji; Dektar, Katherine N; Gordon, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical networks, such as the ones that produce the collective behavior of social insects, operate without any central control, instead arising from local interactions among individuals. A well-studied example is the formation of recruitment trails in ant colonies, but many ant species do not use pheromone trails. We present a model of the regulation of foraging by harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) colonies. This species forages for scattered seeds that one ant can retrieve on its own, so there is no need for spatial information such as pheromone trails that lead ants to specific locations. Previous work shows that colony foraging activity, the rate at which ants go out to search individually for seeds, is regulated in response to current food availability throughout the colony's foraging area. Ants use the rate of brief antennal contacts inside the nest between foragers returning with food and outgoing foragers available to leave the nest on the next foraging trip. Here we present a feedback-based algorithm that captures the main features of data from field experiments in which the rate of returning foragers was manipulated. The algorithm draws on our finding that the distribution of intervals between successive ants returning to the nest is a Poisson process. We fitted the parameter that estimates the effect of each returning forager on the rate at which outgoing foragers leave the nest. We found that correlations between observed rates of returning foragers and simulated rates of outgoing foragers, using our model, were similar to those in the data. Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony.

  2. "Deprovincializing" sociology: the post colonial contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Costa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay discusses the contributions of post-colonial studies for renewing the contemporary social theory. At first it considers the character of the critique addressed by post-colonial studies to social sciences. After that, it analyses the post-colonial epistemological alternatives, considering three interrelated concepts: entangled modernity, "hybrid" site of enunciation, and decentralized subject. The conclusion is that, in spite of its severity and suspicion among some authors that post-colonial theory can destroy epistemological foundations of social sciences, an important part of post-colonial critique is rather addressed to the theory of modernization. Here, post-colonial positions present affinities with objections, which have already been presented by "conventional" social scientists. Other aspects raised by post-colonial authors do not destabilize, necessarily, social sciences; they can even enrich them.

  3. Biocompatibility of various ferrite nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomitaka, Asahi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: d07gd158@ynu.ac.jp; Hirukawa, Atsuo; Yamada, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Morishita, Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Takemura, Yasushi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles for thermotherapy must be biocompatible and possess high thermal efficiency as heating elements. The biocompatibility of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm), ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (15-30 nm) and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (20-30 nm) nanoparticles was studied using a cytotoxicity colony formation assay and a cell viability assay. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} sample was found to be biocompatible on HeLa cells. While ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were non-toxic at low concentrations, HeLa cells exhibited cytotoxic effects when exposed to concentrations of 100 {mu}g/ml nanoparticles.

  4. Rural health under colonialism and neocolonialism: a survey of the Ghanaian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoo, T A

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the implications of colonialism and neocolonialism for rural health in Ghana. The starting point for discussion is a critical review of the dominant ahistorical, atheoretical, and technocratic conception of the underdevelopment of rural health. It is argued that the problems of rural health cannot be fully explained without a consideration of Ghana's colonial and neocolonial experiences. It is necessary to examine the impact of the colonial capitalist mode of production on rural health and health care, as well as the mechanisms underlying the post-colonial entrenchment of the colonial legacy. The implications of the reformist approach to the problems of health are examined, and the possibility of a structural transformationist solution, which must start from the elimination of imperialist control, is assessed. It is concluded that the Ghanaian social formation, given its current constitution and crises, makes structural transformation the only viable alternative to solving the problems of rural health.

  5. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis.

  6. The logic of hypersocial colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jes Søe

    2012-01-01

    It is no wonder that we are transfixed with fascination when we stand in the midst of an ocean of flowing ants within a single extensive society of one of the invasive species. Normal terms do not fit anymore: this is not just a colony, but a “supercolony.” The iconic supercolonial species...... is the Argentine ant, infamous as a pest and now very well studied, all the way from having its genome sequenced to its global distribution mapped. As the Argentine ant can be the key to understanding other supercolonial and/or invasive ants, it is very timely that Moffett's review (2012) focuses on how we...

  7. El pesebre del Museo Colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Jaramillo de Zuleta

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Lo primero que se observa al recorrer nuestro patrimonio artístico del período colonial, es la abrumadora mayoría del temario religioso; al punto de que muchos -desde luego, los no profesionales- identifican confusamente la colonia con una época entregada a las prácticas piadosas y al culto de las imágenes y productora, por lo tanto, de un arte basado exclusivamente en la representación de estos personajes celestiales.

  8. A new assay method for late CFU-S formation and long-term reconstituting activity using a small number of pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guoxiang; Hisha, Hiroko; Cui, Yunze; Fan, Tianxue; Jin, Tienan; Li, Qing; Lian, Zhexiong; Hosaka, Naoki; Li, Yulin; Ikehara, Susumu

    2002-01-01

    We have previously reported that Lin-/CD71-/MHC class Ihigh/c-kitCFU-S) on days 8 to 14 but form late CFU-S (after 16 days). In the present study, to confirm that c-kitCFU-S and reconstitute lethally irradiated recipients. We have established a new method to rescue lethally irradiated mice by transplantation of a few cells so that they survive for more than 16 days: 0.2 ml of 20 Gy-irradiated peripheral blood (PB) was injected into the recipients every 3 days. All the mice that had been transplanted with 25 or 50 c-kitCFU-S were detected in their spleens. However, when 25 or 50 c-kitCFU-S were detected after 16 days. About 40% of the recipients injected with 50 c-kitassay method using a small number of cells would be of great advantage for clarifying which cells are truly P-HSCs.

  9. Exploration versus exploitation in polydomous ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Zoe; Franks, Daniel W; Robinson, Elva J H

    2013-04-21

    In socially foraging species resource information can be shared between individuals, increasing foraging success. In ant colonies, nestmate recruitment allows high exploitation rates at known resources however, to maximise foraging efficiency this must be balanced with searching for new resources. Many ant species form colonies inhabiting two or more spatially separated but socially connected nests: this type of organisation is known as polydomy. Polydomous colonies may benefit from increased foraging efficiency by carrying out dispersed-central place foraging. However, decentralisation of the colony may affect recruitment success by limiting interaction between ants based in separate nests. We use an agent-based model which compares the foraging success of monodomous and polydomous colonies in different food environments, incorporating recruitment through pheromone trails and group foraging. In contrast to previous results we show that polydomy is beneficial in some but not all cases. Polydomous colonies discover resources at a higher rate, making them more successful when food is highly dispersed, but their relative success can be lowered by limitations on recruitment success. Monodomous colonies can have higher foraging efficiency than polydomous colonies by exploiting food more rapidly. The results show the importance of interactions between recruitment strategy, colony size, and colony organisation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential gene expression of two extreme honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies showing varroa tolerance and susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Robertson, T; Mostajeran, M; Robertson, A J; Qiu, X

    2016-06-01

    Varroa destructor, an ectoparasitic mite of honey bees (Apis mellifera), is the most serious pest threatening the apiculture industry. In our honey bee breeding programme, two honey bee colonies showing extreme phenotypes for varroa tolerance/resistance (S88) and susceptibility (G4) were identified by natural selection from a large gene pool over a 6-year period. To investigate potential defence mechanisms for honey bee tolerance to varroa infestation, we employed DNA microarray and real time quantitative (PCR) analyses to identify differentially expressed genes in the tolerant and susceptible colonies at pupa and adult stages. Our results showed that more differentially expressed genes were identified in the tolerant bees than in bees from the susceptible colony, indicating that the tolerant colony showed an increased genetic capacity to respond to varroa mite infestation. In both colonies, there were more differentially expressed genes identified at the pupa stage than at the adult stage, indicating that pupa bees are more responsive to varroa infestation than adult bees. Genes showing differential expression in the colony phenotypes were categorized into several groups based on their molecular functions, such as olfactory signalling, detoxification processes, exoskeleton formation, protein degradation and long-chain fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that these biological processes play roles in conferring varroa tolerance to naturally selected colonies. Identification of differentially expressed genes between the two colony phenotypes provides potential molecular markers for selecting and breeding varroa-tolerant honey bees. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. Effect of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor on Endothelial Cells and Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ling Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Some animal studies showed that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF provides beneficial environment for bone healing. It has been well documented that endothelial cells and osteoblasts play critical roles in multiple phases of bone healing. However, the biological effects of G-CSF on these cells remain controversial. This study aimed to investigate the influence of G-CSF at various concentrations on endothelial cells and osteoblasts. Materials and Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and human osteoblasts (hOBs were treated with G-CSF at 1000, 100, 10, and 0 ng/mL, respectively. The capacity of cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation of HUVECs was evaluated at 72, 8, and 6 hours after treatment, respectively. The capacity of proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of hOBs was evaluated at 24 hours, 72 hours, and 21 days after treatment, respectively. Results. HUVECs treated with 100 and 1000 ng/mL G-CSF showed a significantly higher value comparing with controls in migration assay (p<0.001, p<0.01, resp.; the group treated with 1000 ng/mL G-CSF showed a significantly lower value on tube formation. No significant difference was detected in groups of hOBs. Conclusions. G-CSF showed favorable effects only on the migration of HUVECs, and no direct influence was found on hOBs.

  12. Viral prevalence increases with regional colony abundance in honey bee drones (Apis mellifera L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forfert, Nadège; Natsopoulou, Myrsini E.; Paxton, Robert J.;

    2016-01-01

    of honey bees. To test this idea, we sampled male honey bees (drones) from seven distinct drone congregation areas (DCA), and used their genotypes to estimate colony abundance at each site. A multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA) was used to assess the prevalence of ten viruses......, using five common viral targets, in individual drones. There was a significant positive association between colony abundance and number of viral infections. This result highlights the potential importance of high colony abundance for pathogen prevalence, possibly because high population density...... facilitates pathogen transmission. Pathogen prevalence in drones collected from DCAs may be a useful means of estimating the disease status of a population of honey bees during the mating season, especially for localities with a large number of wild or feral colonies....

  13. Alternative Modernities for Colonial Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sunyoung Park. The Proletarian Wave: Literature and Leftist Culture in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2015. 348 pp. $50 (cloth. Vladimir Tikhonov. Modern Korea and Its Others: Perceptions of the Neighbouring Countries and Korean Modernity. London: Routledge, 2016. 218 pp. $160 (cloth. It has become a global scholarly undertaking: how to rethink modernity so as to decouple it from Westernization (Chakrabarty 2000. Strategies have included foregrounding the plurality of history to disrupt linear progress; positing non-Western centers of modernity in, say, Moscow or Shanghai; and tracing anticolonial circuits connecting Asia to Africa to Latin America. The two recent books under review here add colonial-era Korea to such far-reaching discussions by situating the country across national boundaries. Interestingly, one connecting thread here is the alternative world system provided by the interwar, Soviet-oriented Left. The result is an unsettling of binaries that subsequently became entrenched during the Cold War: for example, north-south, socialist-nationalist, and, for literature, realist-modernist. But more broadly, pervading both books is the sense that history could have turned out differently—that revisiting northeast Asia’s porous borders in the early twentieth century reveals the Korean peninsula’s lost, internationalist potential...

  14. Phenotypic and genetic analyses of the varroa sensitive hygienic trait in Russian honey bee (hymenoptera: apidae colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Kirrane

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor continues to threaten colonies of European honey bees. General hygiene, and more specific Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH, provide resistance towards the Varroa mite in a number of stocks. In this study, 32 Russian (RHB and 14 Italian honey bee colonies were assessed for the VSH trait using two different assays. Firstly, colonies were assessed using the standard VSH behavioural assay of the change in infestation of a highly infested donor comb after a one-week exposure. Secondly, the same colonies were assessed using an "actual brood removal assay" that measured the removal of brood in a section created within the donor combs as a potential alternative measure of hygiene towards Varroa-infested brood. All colonies were then analysed for the recently discovered VSH quantitative trait locus (QTL to determine whether the genetic mechanisms were similar across different stocks. Based on the two assays, RHB colonies were consistently more hygienic toward Varroa-infested brood than Italian honey bee colonies. The actual number of brood cells removed in the defined section was negatively correlated with the Varroa infestations of the colonies (r2 = 0.25. Only two (percentages of brood removed and reproductive foundress Varroa out of nine phenotypic parameters showed significant associations with genotype distributions. However, the allele associated with each parameter was the opposite of that determined by VSH mapping. In this study, RHB colonies showed high levels of hygienic behaviour towards Varroa -infested brood. The genetic mechanisms are similar to those of the VSH stock, though the opposite allele associates in RHB, indicating a stable recombination event before the selection of the VSH stock. The measurement of brood removal is a simple, reliable alternative method of measuring hygienic behaviour towards Varroa mites, at least in RHB stock.

  15. A colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libreros-Minotta, C A; Tipton, P A

    1995-11-01

    A simple and rapid colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase is described. The assay is based on the formation of a Schiff base between the enzymatic reaction product 3-methyl-2-butenal and p-aminophenol. The assay is effective in the submicromolar concentration range and can be used in crude plant extracts as well as in more highly purified preparations.

  16. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  17. Evaluation of an improved bioluminescence assay for the detection of bacteria in soy milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Sato, Jun; Igarashi, Toshinori; Suzuki, Shigeya; Nishimoto, Kazunori; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Because soy milk is nutrient rich and nearly neutral in pH, it favors the growth of microbial contaminants. To ensure that soy milk meets food-safety standards, it must be pasteurized and have its sterility confirmed. ATP bioluminescence assay has become a widely accepted means of detecting food microorganisms. However, the high background bioluminescence intensity of soy milk has rendered it unsuitable for ATP analysis. Here, we tested the efficacy of an improved pre-treated bioluminescence assay on soy milk. By comparing background bioluminescence intensities obtained by the conventional and improved methods, we demonstrated that our method significantly reduces soy milk background bioluminescence. The dose-response curve of the assay was tested with serial dilutions of Bacillus sp. culture. An extremely strong log-linear relation between the bioluminescence intensity relative light units and colony formation units CFU/ml emerged for the tested strain. The detection limit of the assay was estimated as 5.2×10(3) CFU/ml from the dose-response curve and an imposed signal limit was three times the background level. The results showed that contaminated samples could be easily detected within 24 h using our improved bioluminescence assay.

  18. Introduction: Collective Memories of Colonial Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Volpato

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Colonialism, that Loomba calls "the most complex and traumatic relationship in human history" (2005, 8, has left its mark on international relations, social relationships within nations, and the ideologies and imaginaries of virtually all the peoples of the world. Understanding colonialism and its consequences is therefore essential to comprehending the dynamics and conflicts of the contemporary world. This special focus was born out of a desire to bring social psychological studies on colonialism to broader attention.

  19. Hydrodynamics of bacterial colonies: Phase diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, J.; Passot, T.

    2004-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of a recent hydrodynamic model describing the growth of bacterial colonies on agar plates. We show that this model is able to qualitatively reproduce experimentally observed phase diagrams, which relate a colony shape to the initial quantity of nutrients on the plate and the initial wetness of the agar. We also discuss the principal features resulting from the interplay between hydrodynamic motions and colony growth, as described by our model.

  20. Colony life history and lifetime reproductive success of red harvester ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Krista K; Pilko, Anna; Heer, Jeffrey; Gordon, Deborah M

    2013-05-01

    1. We estimate colony reproductive success, in numbers of offspring colonies arising from a colony's daughter queens, of colonies of the red harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus. 2. A measure of lifetime reproductive success is essential to understand the relation of ecological factors, phenotype and fitness in a natural population. This was possible for the first time in a natural population of ant colonies using data from long-term study of a population of colonies in south-eastern Arizona, for which ages of all colonies are known from census data collected since 1985. 3. Parentage analyses of microsatellite data from 5 highly polymorphic loci were used to assign offspring colonies to maternal parent colonies in a population of about 265 colonies, ages 1-28 years, sampled in 2010. 4. The estimated population growth rate Ro was 1.69 and generation time was 7.8 years. There was considerable variation among colonies in reproductive success: of 199 possible parent colonies, only 49 (˜ 25%) had offspring colonies on the site. The mean number of offspring colonies per maternal parent colony was 2.94 and ranged from 1 to 8. A parent was identified for the queen of 146 of 247 offspring colonies. There was no evidence for reproductive senescence; fecundity was about the same throughout the 25-30 year lifespan of a colony. 5. There were no trends in the distance or direction of the dispersal of an offspring relative to its maternal parent colony. There was no relationship between the number of gynes produced by a colony in 1 year and the number of offspring colonies subsequently founded by its daughter reproductive females. The results provide the first estimate of a life table for a population of ant colonies and the first estimate of the female component of colony lifetime reproductive success. 6. The results suggest that commonly used measures of reproductive output may not be correlated with realized reproductive success. This is the starting point for future

  1. GRID SCHEDULING USING ENHANCED ANT COLONY ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mathiyalagan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Grid computing is a high performance computing used to solve larger scale computational demands. Task scheduling is a major issue in grid computing systems. Scheduling of tasks is the NP hard problem. The heuristic approach provides optimal solution for NP hard problems .The ant colony algorithm provides optimal solution. The existing ant colony algorithm takes more time to schedule the tasks. In this paper ant colony algorithm improved by enhancing pheromone updating rule such that it schedules the tasks efficiently and better resource utilization. The simulation results prove that proposed method reduces the execution time of tasks compared to existing ant colony algorithm.

  2. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-15

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400×10(3), 1.218×10(3) and 1.02×10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48h. Beer's law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL(-1) for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL(-1) for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job's method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  3. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400 × 103, 1.218 × 103 and 1.02 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48 h. Beer’s law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL-1 for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL-1 for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job’s method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  4. SU-E-T-253: Open-Source Automatic Software for Quantifying Biological Assays of Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detappe, A [University of Lyon (France); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Berbeco, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Clonogenic cell survival is a common assay for quantifying the effect of drugs and radiation. Manual counting of surviving colonies can take 30–90seconds per plate, a major limitation for large studies. Currently available automatic counting tools are not easily modified for radiation oncology research. Our goal is to provide an open-source toolkit for precise, accurate and fast analysis of biological assays in radiation oncology. Methods: As an example analysis, we used HeLa cells incubated with gadolinium nanoparticles prior to irradiation. After treatment, the cells are grown for 14days to allow for colony formation. To analyze the colony growth, we capture images of each dish for archiving and automatic computer-based analysis. A FujifilmX20 camera is placed at the top of a box setup, 20cm above the sample, which is backlit by a LED lamp placed at the bottom of the box. We use a Gaussian filter (width=1.3mm) and color threshold (19–255). The minimum size for a colony to be counted is 1mm. For this example, 20 dishes with a large range of colonies were analyzed. Each dish was counted 3 times manually by 3 different users and then compared to our counter. Results: Automatic counting of cell colonies takes an average of 7seconds, enabling the analysis process to be accelerated 4–12 times. The average precision of the automatic counter was 1.7%. The Student t-test demonstrated the non-significant differences between the two counting methods (p=0.64). The ICC demonstrated the reliability of each method with ICC>0.999 (automatic) and ICC=0.95 (manual). Conclusion: We developed an open-source automatic toolkit for the analysis of biological assays in radiation oncology and demonstrated the accuracy, precision and effort savings for clonogenic cell survival quantification. This toolkit is currently being used in two laboratories for routine experimental analysis and will be made freely available on our departmental website.

  5. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  6. Blasting the Language of Colonialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbye, Mette

    2016-01-01

    exceptions, such as the documentary photographs and films of Jette Bang, the visual image transmitted through photography was highly stereotypical: ice and wild nature, peopled by tough sealers and hunters. Documen tary photography and art in general, from Greenland as well as Denmark, usually confirmed......Throughout the nineteenth and most of the twentieth centuries, photography was among the main tools for communicating knowledge about Greenland to the rest of the world, not least to the Danish public. Photography was originally used by Arctic explorers as well as by the colonial system. With few...... this image. Recently, however, new narratives have begun emerging among contemporary artists, many of whom use photography in radically new ways to construct an alter native ‘ethno - aesthetics’, to use Pia Arke’s term. This article discusses three photography books, published almost simultaneously: Pia Arke...

  7. Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for Continuous Domains Based on Position Distribution Model of Ant Colony Foraging

    OpenAIRE

    Liqiang Liu; Yuntao Dai; Jinyu Gao

    2014-01-01

    Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules...

  8. All you can eat: is food supply unlimited in a colonially breeding bird?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Herbert; Krištofík, Ján; Darolová, Alžbeta

    2015-01-01

    Food availability is generally considered to determine breeding site selection and therefore plays an important role in hypotheses explaining the evolution of colony formation. Hypotheses trying to explain why birds join a colony usually assume that food is not limited, whereas those explaining variation in colony size suggest that food is under constraint. In this study, we investigate the composition and amount of food items not eaten by the nestlings and found in nest burrows of colonially nesting European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster). We aimed to determine whether this unconsumed food is an indicator of unlimited food supply, the result of mistakes during food transfer between parents and chicks or foraging selectivity of chicks. Therefore, we investigated the amount of dropped food for each nest in relation to reproductive performance and parameters reflecting parental quality. Our data suggest that parents carry more food to the nest than chicks can eat and, hence, food is not limited. This assumption is supported by the facts that there is a positive relationship between dropped food found in a nest and the number of fledglings, nestling age, and chick health condition and that the amount of dropped food is independent of colony size. There is variation in the amount of dropped food within colonies, suggesting that parent foraging efficiency may also be an important determinant. Pairs nesting in the center of a colony performed better than those nesting on the edge, which supports the assumption that quality differences between parents are important as well. However, dropped food cannot be used as an indicator of local food availability as (1) within-colony variation in dropped food is larger than between colony variation and, (2) the average amount of dropped food is not related to colony size.

  9. Understanding Long-Run African Growth : Colonial Institutions or Colonial Education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, J.; Bezemer, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term growth in developing countries has been explained in four frameworks: 'extractive colonial institutions' (Acemoglu et al., 2001), 'colonial legal origin' (La Porta et al., 2004), 'geography' (Gallup et al., 1998) and 'colonial human capital' (Glaeser et al., 2004). In this paper we test th

  10. Ant colony search algorithm for optimal reactive power optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin K.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an (ACSA Ant colony search Algorithm for Optimal Reactive Power Optimization and voltage control of power systems. ACSA is a new co-operative agents’ approach, which is inspired by the observation of the behavior of real ant colonies on the topic of ant trial formation and foraging methods. Hence, in the ACSA a set of co-operative agents called "Ants" co-operates to find good solution for Reactive Power Optimization problem. The ACSA is applied for optimal reactive power optimization is evaluated on standard IEEE, 30, 57, 191 (practical test bus system. The proposed approach is tested and compared to genetic algorithm (GA, Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA.

  11. [Opportunistic fungi as producers of gray colonies and mycetomata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, D

    1979-01-01

    Madurella grisea Mackinnon, Ferrada and Montemayor, 1949, is not the unique species that produces gray colonies and black-grained mycetomata. Perhaps, it is not one species, because its grains and colonies may be confounded with those of several species that can be distinguished through their fertile structures. I take this opportunity to compare some characters of Pyrenochaeta romeroi, Phoma-Phillosticta sp., Chaetosphaeronema larense, Pyrenochaeta mackinnonii, Plendomus avramii and of another aleurisopores Dematiacea with those assigned to Madurella grisea. The need is stressed for the search, the introduction and the divulgation of new methods fostering the formation of disseminating structures (pycnidospores in this case), in order to ensure the proper specification of the agent in every case of mycetoma.

  12. Fire Evacuation using Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kanika Singhal; Shashank Sahu

    2016-01-01

    ... planning.The objective of the algorithm is to minimizes the entire rescue time of all evacuees.The ant colony optimization algorithm is used to solve the complications of shortest route planning. Presented paper gives a comparative overview of various emergency scenarios using ant colony optimization algorithm.

  13. Post-Colonialism Perspectives on Educational Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chuan-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Educational competition has always been the puzzle issue of educational researches. In this article, I analyze several aspects of educational competition within the perspective of post-colonialism discourse. In the political aspect, Taiwanese education is linked with political power, to present the post-colonial spirit by continuing dynastic…

  14. Improving Emergency Management by Modeling Ant Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    brood. The brood stages include the egg, the larval, and the pupa.27 The brood is dependent on the colony for nourishment and warmth until fully...night for rest and to relocate the colony. The bivouac is what is created when army ants huddle together in a ball instead of building a physical nest

  15. Black Frontier Settlements in Spanish Colonial Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Jane

    1988-01-01

    Addresses the much neglected area of Black frontier experience in the Spanish colonies. Concentrates on the role played by Black settlers and one Black township in defending the Spanish frontier in colonial Florida against the threat of growing English settlements to the north. Provides an introduction to the 18th century Southeastern Spanish…

  16. Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive studey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We ...

  17. Education in Colonial Africa: The German Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderPloeg, Arie J.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the introduction and growth of state-supported schools in two German colonies in Africa, Kamerun and Deutsch Ostafrika, describes African reaction to and utilization of them, assesses, from the colonial perspective, why such schools were introduced and what they were intended to accomplish, and examines the reasons for their differential…

  18. Phenotypic and Genetic Analyses of the Varroa Sensitive Hygienic Trait in Russian Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Maria J.; de Guzman, Lilia I.; Holloway, Beth; Frake, Amanda M.; Rinderer, Thomas E.; Whelan, Pádraig M.

    2015-01-01

    Varroa destructor continues to threaten colonies of European honey bees. General hygiene, and more specific Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH), provide resistance towards the Varroa mite in a number of stocks. In this study, 32 Russian (RHB) and 14 Italian honey bee colonies were assessed for the VSH trait using two different assays. Firstly, colonies were assessed using the standard VSH behavioural assay of the change in infestation of a highly infested donor comb after a one-week exposure. Secondly, the same colonies were assessed using an “actual brood removal assay” that measured the removal of brood in a section created within the donor combs as a potential alternative measure of hygiene towards Varroa-infested brood. All colonies were then analysed for the recently discovered VSH quantitative trait locus (QTL) to determine whether the genetic mechanisms were similar across different stocks. Based on the two assays, RHB colonies were consistently more hygienic toward Varroa-infested brood than Italian honey bee colonies. The actual number of brood cells removed in the defined section was negatively correlated with the Varroa infestations of the colonies (r2 = 0.25). Only two (percentages of brood removed and reproductive foundress Varroa) out of nine phenotypic parameters showed significant associations with genotype distributions. However, the allele associated with each parameter was the opposite of that determined by VSH mapping. In this study, RHB colonies showed high levels of hygienic behaviour towards Varroa -infested brood. The genetic mechanisms are similar to those of the VSH stock, though the opposite allele associates in RHB, indicating a stable recombination event before the selection of the VSH stock. The measurement of brood removal is a simple, reliable alternative method of measuring hygienic behaviour towards Varroa mites, at least in RHB stock. PMID:25909856

  19. 'Mill's Liberal Project and Defence of Colonialism from a Post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Mill's Liberal Project and Defence of Colonialism from a Post-Colonial Perspective. ... on the colonialism of John Stuart Mill read from a post-colonial perspective. ... Mill's views on colonial rule were largely informed by his principle of liberty ...

  20. Hydrodynamics of bacterial colonies: A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, J.; Passot, T.

    2003-03-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic model for the evolution of bacterial colonies growing on soft agar plates. This model consists of reaction-diffusion equations for the concentrations of nutrients, water, and bacteria, coupled to a single hydrodynamic equation for the velocity field of the bacteria-water mixture. It captures the dynamics inside the colony as well as on its boundary and allows us to identify a mechanism for collective motion towards fresh nutrients, which, in its modeling aspects, is similar to classical chemotaxis. As shown in numerical simulations, our model reproduces both usual colony shapes and typical hydrodynamic motions, such as the whirls and jets recently observed in wet colonies of Bacillus subtilis. The approach presented here could be extended to different experimental situations and provides a general framework for the use of advection-reaction-diffusion equations in modeling bacterial colonies.

  1. Predictive markers of honey bee colony collapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Dainat

    Full Text Available Across the Northern hemisphere, managed honey bee colonies, Apis mellifera, are currently affected by abrupt depopulation during winter and many factors are suspected to be involved, either alone or in combination. Parasites and pathogens are considered as principal actors, in particular the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, associated viruses and the microsporidian Nosema ceranae. Here we used long term monitoring of colonies and screening for eleven disease agents and genes involved in bee immunity and physiology to identify predictive markers of honeybee colony losses during winter. The data show that DWV, Nosema ceranae, Varroa destructor and Vitellogenin can be predictive markers for winter colony losses, but their predictive power strongly depends on the season. In particular, the data support that V. destructor is a key player for losses, arguably in line with its specific impact on the health of individual bees and colonies.

  2. Public health developments in colonial Malaya: colonialism and the politics of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderson, L

    1999-01-01

    In both African and Asian colonies until the late 19th century, colonial medicine operated pragmatically to meet the medical needs first of colonial officers and troops, immigrant settlers, and laborers responsible for economic development, then of indigenous populations when their ill health threatened the well-being of the expatriate population. Since the turn of the century, however, the consequences of colonial expansion and development for indigenous people's health had become increasingly apparent, and disease control and public health programs were expanded in this light. These programs increased government surveillance of populations at both community and household levels. As a consequence, colonial states extended institutional oversight and induced dependency through public health measures. Drawing on my own work on colonial Malaya, I illustrate developments in public health and their links to the moral logic of colonialism and its complementarity to the political economy.

  3. Learning and memory in workers reared by nutritionally stressed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Heather R; Smith, Brian H

    2008-12-15

    Chronic nutritional stress can have a negative impact on an individual's learning ability and memory. However, in social animals that share food among group members, such as the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.), it is unknown whether group-level nutritional stress is manifested in the learning performance of individuals. Accordingly, we examined learning and memory in honey bee workers reared by colonies exposed to varying degrees of long-term pollen stress. Pollen provides honey bee workers with almost all of the proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals that they require as larvae and adults. Colonies were created that were either chronically pollen poor or pollen rich, or were intermediate in pollen supply; treatments altered colonies' pollen stores and brood-rearing capacity. Workers from these colonies were put through a series of olfactory-conditioning assays using proboscis-extension response (PER). PER thresholds were determined, then workers learned in olfactory-conditioning trials to associate two floral odors (one novel and the other presented previously without reward) with stimulation with sucrose and a sucrose reward. The strength of the memory that was formed for the odor/sucrose association was tested after olfactory-conditioning assays ended. Colony-level nutritional status had no effect on worker learning or memory (response threshold of workers to sucrose, acquisition of the odor/sucrose association, occurrence of latent inhibition, or memory retention over 72 h). We conclude that potential effects of chronic, colony-wide nutrient deprivation on learning and memory are not found in workers, probably because colonies use brood-rearing capacity to buffer nutrient stress at the level of the individual.

  4. subyacentes en la sociedad colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Díaz Pardo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Las epidemias y los aspectos vinculados a la salud de ciudades y comunidades históricas habían sido objeto de análisis por parte de disciplinas como la historia de la medicina y la epidemiología hasta épocas recientes. Pero en la actualidad ha ocurrido un amalgamiento y una confluencia de intereses académicos con estudios históricos y arqueológicos dado el gran potencial para develar respuestas similares transculturales y los orígenes de reacciones mas idiosincrásicas ante la presencia de fenómenos parecidos en el mundo contemporáneo. La ciudad de Cartagena de Indias se constituye en un lugar privilegiado ya que es un microcosmos donde se integraron o se encontraron los elementos humanos que materializaban la sociedad caribeña colonial y donde las epidemias, la salud pública y las respuestas culturales a estos eventos pueden ser analizados bajo nuevas perspectivas que tomen en cuenta las raíces culturales de los diferentes grupos afectados.

  5. COLONIALISM, HAN & ECO-THEOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Ji-Sun Kim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, nations exhibit imperial behaviour but not like the ancient agriculture driven landed empires or the 18-19th century mercantile empires. The land and trade divisions are not as clearly segregated as in the earlier ones, but Imperial nations do exist and do control other nations. Imperialism and colonialism has devastating effects on our world. It has nurtured self-worth through the accumulation of worldly goods for the purposes of serving their own interests and exploiting others for the sole purpose of self-gain. This is devastating not only to human beings but to the whole ecology of the planet. Consumerism drives trade, but consumer buying is now like an unchained beast with tooth and claw causing han for the exploited as well as the resources of the planet. Eco-theologians and feminist theologians examine the devastating effects to help ensure that we are seriously determined to preserve the planet. We will examine ways of rethinking and reimagining our errors and how we can work towards the right direction for a safer, sustainable planet. doi: 10.7833/111-1-15

  6. 骨髓细胞不同组份形成成纤维细胞集落形成单位的效率及1,25(OH)2D3和PGE2在其中的调节作用%Efficiency of colony forming unit-fibroblastic formed by the different fraction of bone marrow cells and regulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2 in colony formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王嵘; 苗登顺; 季吉

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are presented in the different fractions of bone marrow cells and whether the efficiency of colony forming unit-fibroblastic (CFU-f) formed by BM-MSCs is regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and prostaglandin E2(PGE2). Methods:Total bone marrow cells or non-adherent bone marrow cells derived from total bone marrow cell cultures for 1 day were separated into the mononuclear cell fraction and the granulocyte/erythrocyte fraction or the mononuclear cell fraction, the granulocyte fraction and the erythrecyte fraction by density-gradient centrifugation and were cultured in the absence or presence of 10-8mol/L 1,25 (OH)2D3 or 10-7 mol/L PGE2 for 10 days. The resulting cells were stained with methylene blue and the number of CFU-f was counted. Results: ①The CFU-f formed by mononuclear cell fraction accounted for about 10% of the total CFU-f, and CFU-f formed by granulocyte/erythrocyte fraction, granulocyte fraction and erythrocyte fraction accounted for about 90% ,47% and 35% of the total CFU-f, respectively; ②The fractions derived from the non-adherent bone marrow cells accounted for about 71% of the total CFU-f, which was more than those formed by the fractions derived from total bone marrow cells;③ Treatment of 1 ,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2 enhanced the CFU-f formation of the mononuclear fraction and the granulocyte fraction derived from total bone marrow cells and the mononuclear cell fraction, the granulocyte fraction and the erythrocyte fraction derived from non-adherent bone marrow cells. Conclusion: Our results indicate that BM-MSCs are presented in the different fractions of bone marrow cells,and 1 ,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2 play a rele in stimulating proliferation of BM-MSCs.%目的:研究骨髓间充质干细胞(BM-MSCs)是否存在于骨髓不同组份中,以及其成纤维细胞集落形成单位(CFU-f)形成效率是否受1,25二羟基维生素D3[1,25(OH)2D3]和前列腺素E2(PGE2)的

  7. Colony Foundation in an Oceanic Seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Munilla

    Full Text Available Seabirds are colonial vertebrates that despite their great potential for long-range dispersal and colonization are reluctant to establish in novel locations, often recruiting close to their natal colony. The foundation of colonies is therefore a rare event in most seabird species and little is known about the colonization process in this group. The Cory's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea is a pelagic seabird that has recently established three new colonies in Galicia (NE Atlantic thus expanding its distribution range 500 km northwards. This study aimed to describe the establishment and early progress of the new Galician populations and to determine the genetic and morphometric characteristics of the individuals participating in these foundation events. Using 10 microsatellite loci, we tested the predictions supported by different seabird colonization models. Possibly three groups of non-breeders, adding up to around 200 birds, started visiting the Galician colonies in the mid 2000's and some of them eventually laid eggs and reproduced, thus establishing new breeding colonies. The Galician populations showed a high genetic diversity and a frequency of private alleles similar to or even higher than some of the large historical populations. Most individuals were assigned to several Atlantic populations and a few (if any to Mediterranean colonies. Our study suggests that a large and admixed population is settling in Galicia, in agreement with predictions from island metapopulation models of colonization. Multiple source colonies imply that some birds colonizing Galicia were dispersing from very distant colonies (> 1500 km. Long-distance colonizations undertaken by relatively large and admixed groups of colonizers can help to explain the low levels of genetic structure over vast areas that are characteristic of most oceanic seabird species.

  8. Evolutional Ant Colony Method Using PSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morii, Nobuto; Aiyoshi, Eitarou

    The ant colony method is one of heuristic methods capable of solving the traveling salesman problem (TSP), in which a good tour is generated by the artificial ant's probabilistic behavior. However, the generated tour length depends on the parameter describing the ant's behavior, and the best parameters corresponding to the problem to be solved is unknown. In this technical note, the evolutional strategy is presented to find the best parameter of the ant colony by using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in the parameter space. Numerical simulations for benchmarks demonstrate effectiveness of the evolutional ant colony method.

  9. Ant colonies for the travelling salesman problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigo, M; Gambardella, L M

    1997-01-01

    We describe an artificial ant colony capable of solving the travelling salesman problem (TSP). Ants of the artificial colony are able to generate successively shorter feasible tours by using information accumulated in the form of a pheromone trail deposited on the edges of the TSP graph. Computer simulations demonstrate that the artificial ant colony is capable of generating good solutions to both symmetric and asymmetric instances of the TSP. The method is an example, like simulated annealing, neural networks and evolutionary computation, of the successful use of a natural metaphor to design an optimization algorithm.

  10. The Sign of Four as Colonial Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡静芳

    2010-01-01

    The Sign of Four is a detective novel which tells a story about questing the lost treasure and murderer.But now,the colonial ideas which scatter in the text are arousing readers' attention.Reading and analyzing the text closely,the author of this paper draws a conclusion that the novel is a colonial discourse,which implies 'England's colonial govern in India,especially the plunder of wealth and the Englishmen's prejudice towards the India,its people,and the uprising in 1857.

  11. Negotiating Colonial Korean Cinema in the Japanese Empire: From the Silent Era to the Talkies, 1923-1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonghwa Chung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines what I call a “system of cooperation” (K. hyŏp’ŏp, J. kyōgyō, 協業 in the colonial Korean film industry from 1923, when silent films appeared, to the late 1930s, when colonial cinema was restructured within an imperial wartime system. In other words, this article examines the interworking of colonial Korean and imperial Japanese cinema from Yun Hae-dong’s “colonial modern” perspective in order to go beyond the long established lens on colonial Korean film and film historiography that merely focused on the contributions of colonial Korean filmmakers. Here the author rather focuses on the cooperation or collaboration between Japan and Korea: Japanese directors and cinematographers working in Korea, Korean filmmakers with experience in the Japanese apprenticeship system, and filmmakers working together and independently during the silent film era. During the transition from the silent to the early talkie eras, second-generation filmmakers, especially those who trained in film studios in Japan, were significant. They dreamed of the corporatization of the colonial Korean film industry and took the lead in coproductions between Japanese film companies and their colonial Korean counterparts. Korean filmmakers were not unilaterally suppressed by imperial Japan, nor did they independently operate within the Korean film industry during the colonial period. The Japanese in colonial Korea did not take the lead in forming the colonial Korean film scene, either. The core formation of colonial Korean / Korean film was a process of Korean and Japanese filmmakers in competition and negotiation with one another within a complex film sphere launched with Japanese capital and technology.

  12. 21 CFR 866.2170 - Automated colony counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2170 Automated colony counter. (a) Identification. An automated colony counter is a mechanical device intended for...

  13. The Antiproliferative and Colony-suppressive Activities of STAT3 Inhibitors in Human Cancer Cells Is Compromised Under Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jilai; Xiao, Hui; Wu, Ruohan; Cao, Yang; Li, Chenglong; Xu, Ronald; Pierson, Christopher R; Finlay, Jonathan L; Yang, Fang; Gu, Ning; Lin, Jiayuh

    2017-02-01

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been indicated as a novel cancer drug target, since it plays an important role in diverse oncogenic processes including survival, cell proliferation and migration. Emerging STAT3 inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy in cancer cells and animal tumor models. It is well known that most solid tumors are characterized by hypoxia, but it is not clear if hypoxic conditions affect activity of STAT3 inhibitors. To examine this, two STAT3 inhibitors were tested to investigate their inhibitory efficacy in cancer cells grown under hypoxic conditions compared with those without hypoxia. Cell proliferation, colony formation and western blot assays were performed to examine the differences in the cell viability, proliferation and proteins in the STAT3 pathway. Under hypoxic conditions, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration values for both STAT3 inhibitors were increased compared to normoxic conditions in human pancreatic cancer, medulloblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. In addition, the ability of both STAT3 inhibitors to inhibit colony formation in pancreatic cancer, medulloblastoma and sarcoma cell lines was reduced under hypoxic conditions when compared to cells under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, there was an increase in phosphorylated STAT3 levels in cancer cells under hypoxic conditions, suggesting this may be one of the mechanisms of resistance. In summary, the results presented here provide a novel finding of STAT3 inhibitor activity under hypoxic conditions and indicate that under such low oxygen conditions, the anticancer efficacy of STAT3 inhibitors was indeed hampered. These results highlight the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to STAT3 inhibitors under hypoxic conditions.

  14. Nomadic Research Practices in Early Childhood: Interrupting Racisms and Colonialisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers how research practices on racialization in early childhood education might be reconceptualized when racialization is placed within relational intricacies and affects in multiple encounters. By foregrounding race and its emergence in multifarious, unpredictable ways in everyday encounters between human and non-human bodies, space, and discourse, the paper investigates how a movement toward research analyses that engage with both the materiality of race and its systemic and discursive formations might be used to constantly seek new ethical ways of responding to and acting against racisms and colonialism in early childhood.

  15. Post-colonial identity in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2009-01-01

    could be furthered by bringing politics back in. Based on a discourse analysis of the Greenlandic debate on language, this paper makes three claims: First, the identity projects promoted in Greenland are based on an essentialist conception of identity. Secondly, Greenlandic identity discourse combines......In the gradual unravelling of Greenland’s colonial relationship to Denmark, an essentialist conceptualization of Greenlandic identity has played a significant role. However, both our scholarly understanding of post-colonial Greenlandic identity and the process towards independence for Greenland...... elements of traditional Inuit culture and elements of colonial modernity. Thirdly, monolingual Greenlanders are those with the most to gain from abandoning the dichotomy of essentialist identities. Strategically, the paper suggests a post-post-colonial Greenlandic identity as a means of avoiding...

  16. Feeding, Swimming and Navigation of Colonial Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Julius; Bouillant, Ambre; Marron, Alan; Leptos, Kyriacos; Goldstein, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Animals are multicellular in nature, but evolved from unicellular organisms. In the closest relatives of animals, the choanoflagellates, the unicellular species Salpincgoeca rosetta has the ability to form colonies, resembling true multicellularity. In this work we use a combination of experiments, theory, and simulations to understand the physical differences that arise from feeding, swimming and navigating as colonies instead of as single cells. We show that the feeding efficiency decreases with colony size for distinct reasons in the small and large Péclet number limits, and we find that swimming as a colony changes the conventional active random walks of microorganism to stochastic helices, but that this does not hinder effective navigation towards chemoattractants.

  17. Post-colonial identity in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2009-01-01

    In the gradual unravelling of Greenland’s colonial relationship to Denmark, an essentialist conceptualization of Greenlandic identity has played a significant role. However, both our scholarly understanding of post-colonial Greenlandic identity and the process towards independence for Greenland...... could be furthered by bringing politics back in. Based on a discourse analysis of the Greenlandic debate on language, this paper makes three claims: First, the identity projects promoted in Greenland are based on an essentialist conception of identity. Secondly, Greenlandic identity discourse combines...... elements of traditional Inuit culture and elements of colonial modernity. Thirdly, monolingual Greenlanders are those with the most to gain from abandoning the dichotomy of essentialist identities. Strategically, the paper suggests a post-post-colonial Greenlandic identity as a means of avoiding...

  18. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  19. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  20. Post-Colonial Theory and Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim B. Parsons

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores connections between post-colonial theory and action research. Post-colonial theory is committed to addressing the plague of colonialism. Action research, at its core, promises to problematize uncontested ‘colonial’ hegemonies of any form. Both post-colonial theory and action research engage dialogic, critically reflective and collaborative values to offer a fuller range of human wisdom. The authors contend that post-colonialism theory calls for justice and seeks to speak to social and psychological suffering, exploitation, violence and enslavement done to the powerless victims of colonization around the world by challenging the superiority of dominant perspectives and seeking to re-position and empower the marginalized and subordinated. In similar ways, action research works to eradicate oppression, powerlessness and worthlessness by affirming solidarity with the oppressed, helping humans move from passive to active and by fundamentally reshaping power. Because both post-colonial theory and action research position the insider or oppressed in an ethic of efficacy, it values community, relationships, communication and equality, and is committed to reciprocity, reflexivity and reflection. Thus, both hold the potential to help reconstruct conditions for a more democratic and just society.

  1. Polydomy enhances foraging performance in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeymeyt, N; Joye, P; Keller, L

    2017-04-26

    Collective foraging confers benefits in terms of reduced predation risk and access to social information, but it heightens local competition when resources are limited. In social insects, resource limitation has been suggested as a possible cause for the typical decrease in per capita productivity observed with increasing colony size, a phenomenon known as Michener's paradox. Polydomy (distribution of a colony's brood and workers across multiple nests) is believed to help circumvent this paradox through its positive effect on foraging efficiency, but there is still little supporting evidence for this hypothesis. Here, we show experimentally that polydomy enhances the foraging performance of food-deprived Temnothorax nylanderi ant colonies via several mechanisms. First, polydomy influences task allocation within colonies, resulting in faster retrieval of protein resources. Second, communication between sister nests reduces search times for far away resources. Third, colonies move queens, brood and workers across available nest sites in response to spatial heterogeneities in protein and carbohydrate resources. This suggests that polydomy represents a flexible mechanism for space occupancy, helping ant colonies adjust to the environment. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  3. Foraging arena size and structural complexity affect the dynamics of food distribution in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; VanWeelden, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Food acquisition by ant colonies is a complex process that starts with acquiring food at the source (i.e., foraging) and culminates with food exchange in or around the nest (i.e., feeding). While ant foraging behavior is relatively well understood, the process of food distribution has received little attention, largely because of the lack of methodology that allows for accurate monitoring of food flow. In this study, we used the odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) to investigate the effect of foraging arena size and structural complexity on the rate and the extent of spread of liquid carbohydrate food (sucrose solution) throughout a colony. To track the movement of food, we used protein marking and double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DAS-ELISA. Variation in arena size, in conjunction with different colony sizes, allowed us to test the effect of different worker densities on food distribution. Results demonstrate that both arena size and colony size have a significant effect on the spread of the food and the number of workers receiving food decreased as arena size and colony size increased. When colony size was kept constant and arena size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive for the marker decreased, most likely because of fewer trophallactic interactions resulting from lower worker density. When arena size was kept constant and colony size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive decreased. Nonrandom (clustered) worker dispersion and a limited supply of food may have contributed to this result. Overall, results suggest that food distribution is more complete is smaller colonies regardless of the size of the foraging arena and that colony size, rather than worker density, is the primary factor affecting food distribution. The structural complexity of foraging arenas ranged from simple, two-dimensional space (empty arenas) to complex, three-dimensional space (arenas filled with mulch). The structural

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) depresses angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro: implications for sourcing cells for vascular regeneration therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tura, O; Crawford, J; Barclay, G R; Samuel, K; Hadoke, P W F; Roddie, H; Davies, J; Turner, M L

    2010-07-01

    The most common source of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) for hematopoietic reconstitution comprises granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). It has been proposed that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) share precursors with HPCs, and that EPC release may accompany HPC mobilization to the circulation following G-CSF administration. To investigate EPC activity following HPC mobilization, and the direct effects of exogenous G-CSF administration on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), using in vitro and in vivo correlates of angiogenesis. Heparinized venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and from cord blood at parturition. G-CSF-mobilized samples were collected before administration, at apheresis harvest, and at follow-up. PBSCs were phenotyped by flow cytometry, and cultured in standard colony-forming unit (CFU)-EPC and EOC assays. The effect of exogenous G-CSF was investigated by addition of it to HUVECs and EOCs in standard tubule formation and aortic ring assays, and in an in vivo sponge implantation model. Our data show that G-CSF mobilization of PBSCs produces a profound, reversible depression of circulating CFU-EPCs. Furthermore, G-CSF administration did not mobilize CD34+CD133- cells, which include precursors of EOCs. No EOCs were cultured from any mobilized PBSCs studied. Exogenous G-CSF inhibited CFU-EPC generation, HUVEC and EOC tubule formation, microvessel outgrowth, and implanted sponge vascularization in mice. G-CSF administration depresses both endothelial cell angiogenesis and monocyte proangiogenic activity, and we suggest that any angiogenic benefit observed following implantation of cells mobilized by G-CSF may come only from a paracrine effect from HPCs.

  5. In vitro CFU-E and BFU-E responses to androgen in bone marrow from children with primary hypoproliferative anaemia: a possible therapeutic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustres, M; Margueritte, G; Sultan, C

    1986-02-01

    The effects of natural and synthetic androgens on erythroid colony formation in children's bone marrow cultures were studied using a methylcellulose microculture assay. In an attempt to predict the clinical response to androgens in two children with Fanconi anaemia (FA) and two children with Diamond-Blackfan syndrome (DB), we tested the hormonal stimulation of testosterone, nortestosterone and etiocholanolone on CFU-E, BFU-E and uroporphyrinogen I synthase activity (UROS). We observed that colony formation and UROS activity were reduced when compared to values obtained with normal children's bone marrow cultures. The addition of steroids to the cultures significantly enhanced the numbers of CFU-E and BFU-E derived colonies and their UROS activity in marrow from patients with FA and one patient with DB. The strong depletion of marrow progenitor cells in the unresponsive marrow from child 4 with DB could explain the absence of hormonal response. Whereas the responsiveness to steroids varied according to the individual, the in vitro testing of erythroid differentiation in the presence of androgens theoretically may lead to an effective prediction of response to therapy in children with hypoplastic anaemia.

  6. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  7. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  8. BIOLUMINESCENT BEHAVIOR IN RENILLA. I. COLONIAL RESPONSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, John

    1973-02-01

    1. Some details are given of the external morphology of the autozooids and siphonozooids and of their distribution in the colony. It is estimated that a minimum of over 6 meters of nerve net would be required to conduct excitation across an average-size colony during the passage of a wave of luminescence. 2. An account is given of the localization of luminescence in the two types of polyp and of their apparently differing behaviors in colonies collected in summer and winter. 3. In summer colonies the sharp luminous waves induced by electrical stimulation are entirely due to siphonozooids. Under strong stimulation the autozooid calices produce a long lasting glow. 4. Neuroeffector facilitation takes place uniformly throughout the colonial conduction system. Decay of facilitation requires 10-36 seconds, by different tests. There are indications that sensory adaptation in the (hypothetical) net can be local. 5. Local recording shows that the response cycle in small areas of the colony is much shorter, and its frequency response much higher, than indicated by integrative recordings of the wave response as a whole. 6. Individual siphonozooid clusters can flash repetitively in successive waves, fail to participate in every wave and vary in intensity from wave to wave. The increase in light intensity during successive facilitating waves seems due to increase in the activity of individual clusters, not to recruitment of additional clusters. There were indications of individual differences in threshold, adaptation and autoexcitation between clusters. 7. During strong repetitive electrical stimulation there may arise extra siphonozooid waves of augmented brightness, running in the same direction as the "normal" waves ( i.e., centrifugally from the electrode) or in the reverse direction. The colony may then enter an autoexcitatory state ("frenzy"), independent of external stimulation and often involving development of several excitation centers, in which waves of irregular

  9. Emerging morphologies in round bacterial colonies: comparing volumetric versus chemotactic expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2016-06-01

    Biological experiments performed on living bacterial colonies have demonstrated the microbial capability to develop finger-like shapes and highly irregular contours, even starting from an homogeneous inoculum. In this work, we study from the continuum mechanics viewpoint the emergence of such branched morphologies in an initially circular colony expanding on the top of a Petri dish coated with agar. The bacterial colony expansion, based on either a source term, representing volumetric mitotic processes, or a nonconvective mass flux, describing chemotactic expansion, is modeled at the continuum scale. We demonstrate that the front of the colony is always linearly unstable, having similar dispersion curves to the ones characterizing branching instabilities. We also perform finite element simulations, which not only prove the emergence of branching, but also highlight dramatic differences between the two mechanisms of colony expansion in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, the proposed combination of analytical and numerical analysis allowed studying the influence of different model parameters on the selection of specific patterns. A very good agreement has been found between the resulting simulations and the typical structures observed in biological assays. Finally, this work provides a new interpretation of the emergence of branched patterns in living aggregates, depicted as the results of a complex interplay among chemical, mechanical and size effects.

  10. Women's Empowerment in Uganda: Colonial Roots and Contemporary Efforts, 1894-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier zu Selhausen, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis offers new empirical insights on women’s empowerment in colonial and present-day in Uganda. This thesis is organised into two parts. The first part,offers a noval perspective on the long-term development of African male and female human capital formation, skills, labour market participat

  11. Women's Empowerment in Uganda: Colonial Roots and Contemporary Efforts, 1894-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier zu Selhausen, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis offers new empirical insights on women’s empowerment in colonial and present-day in Uganda. This thesis is organised into two parts. The first part,offers a noval perspective on the long-term development of African male and female human capital formation, skills, labour market

  12. Sociological means : colonial reactions to the radicalization of Rastafari in Jamaica, 1956-1959

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Jan van Dijk

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the formative stage in the development of the Rastafarian movement. It was a time of rapid radicalization and heightened expectations of an imminent return to Africa. It ended, after a series of violent incidents, with an abortive repatriation effort in 1959. Focuses on the ways the colonial government reacted to Rastafari and the social unrest it created.

  13. Women's Empowerment in Uganda: Colonial Roots and Contemporary Efforts, 1894-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier zu Selhausen, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis offers new empirical insights on women’s empowerment in colonial and present-day in Uganda. This thesis is organised into two parts. The first part,offers a noval perspective on the long-term development of African male and female human capital formation, skills, labour market participat

  14. Absence of evidence for viral infection in colony-embedded cyanobacterial isolates from the Curonian Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigitas Sulcius

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency of viral infections in colony-embedded cells of the cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Microcystis aeruginosa collected from the brackish Curonian Lagoon. Natural and mitomycin C-treated A. flos-aquae and M. aeruginosa samples were examined for the presence of viruses and lysis by a combination of light-, epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here we report a lack of evidence for virus infection, progeny formation and cell lysis in colony-embedded cells of A. flos-aquae and M. aeruginosa. These results indicated that viruses contribute little to the mortality of these cyanobacteria when the latter occur in colonies. Consequently, the results supported the hypothesis that colony formation can, at least temporarily, provide an efficient strategy for protection against virus-induced mortality. Finally, assuming that grazing has a negligible effect on colony-embedded cells in the Curonian Lagoon, we propose that most of the cyanobacterial biomass produced is lost from the pelagic food web by sedimentation.

  15. Colony collapse disorder: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2009-08-03

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted.

  16. Synthetic quorum sensing in model microcapsule colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna C

    2017-08-08

    Biological quorum sensing refers to the ability of cells to gauge their population density and collectively initiate a new behavior once a critical density is reached. Designing synthetic materials systems that exhibit quorum sensing-like behavior could enable the fabrication of devices with both self-recognition and self-regulating functionality. Herein, we develop models for a colony of synthetic microcapsules that communicate by producing and releasing signaling molecules. Production of the chemicals is regulated by a biomimetic negative feedback loop, the "repressilator" network. Through theory and simulation, we show that the chemical behavior of such capsules is sensitive to both the density and number of capsules in the colony. For example, decreasing the spacing between a fixed number of capsules can trigger a transition in chemical activity from the steady, repressed state to large-amplitude oscillations in chemical production. Alternatively, for a fixed density, an increase in the number of capsules in the colony can also promote a transition into the oscillatory state. This configuration-dependent behavior of the capsule colony exemplifies quorum-sensing behavior. Using our theoretical model, we predict the transitions from the steady state to oscillatory behavior as a function of the colony size and capsule density.

  17. Colony collapse disorder: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Vanengelsdorp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels, no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted.

  18. DYNAMICS OF NUMBER OF GREY HERONS (ARDEA CINEREA L. COLONY IN THE UPPER COURSE OF ZAPOROZHYE (DNEPROVSKOYE RESERVOIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vovk M.V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The research was performed in the area of natural reserve "Dneprovsko-Orelsky" and its adjacent territory – the island Pogorely. We discovered the changes of number of grey heron in colonial settlements, determined the principal factors influencing the formation of spatial structure of island bird communities. The analysis of nest distribution towards tree breeding biotopes was performed and stability of spatial structure of bird colonies was proved. We were tracking the number dynamics of pioneer colony and revealed the principal ecological and anthropogenic factors influencing the fluctuation of its abundance.

  19. Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains based on position distribution model of ant colony foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqiang; Dai, Yuntao; Gao, Jinyu

    2014-01-01

    Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules of ant colony position, and the processing method of constraint condition. Algorithm performance against a set of test trials was unconstrained optimization test functions and a set of optimization test functions, and test results of other algorithms are compared and analyzed to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  20. Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for Continuous Domains Based on Position Distribution Model of Ant Colony Foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules of ant colony position, and the processing method of constraint condition. Algorithm performance against a set of test trials was unconstrained optimization test functions and a set of optimization test functions, and test results of other algorithms are compared and analyzed to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Metallographic study of pearlite colonies and nodules in the eutectoid steel; Estudo metalografico das colonias e de nodulos de perlita em acos eutetoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Sergio Norifumi [Companhia Siderurgica Paulista (COSIPA), SP (Brazil); Kestenbach, Hans-Juergen [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    1987-12-31

    A new metallographic technique was developed which is able to reveal nodule boundaries and to some extent also colonies in a fully transformed pearlite microstructure.The paper describes distinctly different aspects of nodule and colony formation with particular reference to the fact that almost invariably more than one colony grows within each pearlite nodule. A comparison with respect to their relative size between pearlite nodule or colony and the original austenite grain suggests that it is the pearlite nodule size which controls cleavage fracture and therefore the toughness of fully pearlite steels.The new metallographic technique permits quantitative evaluation of this final pearlite module size. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs.

  2. [Epidemics and colonial medicine in West Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C; Collignon, R

    1998-01-01

    We studied colonial medical practices and health policies in West Africa, which has faced endemics and epidemics that have affected entire societies. We found that attempts to centralize the organization of colonial medicine, which began in the late 19th Century, were limited until the end of World War I. Research and control programs expanded after 1920, concentrating on epidemics, but largely ignoring many major health problems, such as measles, whooping cough and malnutrition, the importance of which were not recognized until after World War II. This appraisal of colonial medicine highlights the difficulties of introducing modern medicine and its ideas into African societies. There have been various social reactions, resulting in the current duality in which traditional and modern medicine coexist.

  3. Impacts of Colonialism: A Research Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Ziltener

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of colonialism in Africa and Asia have never been compared in a systematic manner for a large sample of countries. This research survey presents the results of a new and thorough assessment of the highly diverse phenomenon - including length ofdomination , violence, partition, proselytization, instrumentalization of ethno-linguistic and religious cleavages, trade, direct investment, settlements, plantations, and migration -organized through a dimensional analysis (political, social, and economic impacts. It is shown that while in some areas, colonial domination has triggered profound changes in economy and social structure, others have remained almost untouched.

  4. Colony location algorithm for assignment problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingwei WANG

    2004-01-01

    A novel algorithm called Colony Location Algorithm (CLA) is proposed. It mimics the phenomena in biotic conmunity that colonies of species could be located in the places most suitable to their growth. The factors working on the species location such as the nutrient of soil, resource competition between species, growth and decline process, and effect on environment were considered in CLA via the nutrient function, growth and decline rates, environment evaluation and fertilization strategy.CLA was applied to solve the classical assignment problems. The computation results show that CLA can achieve the optimal solution with higher possibility and shorter running time.

  5. Abyssal fiction: common shares, colonial cleavages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Montaury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to develop a reflection on the interaction between the legacies of colonialism and traditional symbolic and cultural practices in African Portuguese-speaking spaces. From a preliminary analysis of fictional texts of wide circulation in Brazil, aims to examine the cleavages, or “abyssal lines” that constitute experiences printed in the daily life of the former Portuguese colony of Cape Verde, Mozambique and Angola.---DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21881/abriluff.2016n17a378

  6. Phenotypic plasticity stimulated by cooperation fosters pattern diversity of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanico, Dranreb Earl

    2012-07-01

    Colonies of flagellated bacteria on agar plates are known to take on diverse morphologies. A diffusion-reaction model is proposed for bacterial-colony pattern formation on a surface due to time scale separation between the slow mass migration of bacteria from the point of inoculation, and the fast, but localized, dynamics of bacterial phenotypic plasticity stimulated by public-goods cooperation and phenotypic switching. By considering two switchable phenotypes in the population, the model generates pattern diversity typifying those reported by experimental studies.

  7. Comment on "Swarming Ring Patterns in Bacterial Colonies Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation"

    CERN Document Server

    Ordemann, A; Ordemann, Anke; Moss, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Commenting on the paper "Swarming Ring Patterns in Bacterial Colonies Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation" of A.M. Delprato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 87, 158102 (2001) we point out that their observed ring pattern formation by colonies of soil bacteria Bacillus subtilis exposed to ultra violet (UV) radiation might be caused by the artificial confinement of motile bacteria evolved to live in a 3-dimensional environment to a 2-dimensional geometry. We propose that to investigate the reaction of Bacillus subtilis to UV radiation coming from above, a seminal experiment should have a 3-dimensional setup.

  8. Effects of Autolog Saliva on Biofilm Formation of Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Caries and Caries-free Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Paramita

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Saliva and Streptococcus mutans play role in biofilm formation. Saliva and S.mutans virulence are different between subjects with and without caries. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of autolog saliva on biofilm formation of S. mutans isolated from caries and caries-free subjects. Materials and Methods: Saliva and plaque samples are obtained from caries and caries-free subjects. Plaque samples were cultured on TYS20B for 3 days. Selected colonies were picked and cultured on TSB for 3 days. After colony counting, biofilm assay was conducted and inoculated for one day. The biofilm was tested using crystal violet binding assay and quantified by measuring the optical density at 655 nm wavelength. Result: The optical density of S. muttans biofilm isolated from subjects with caries were different from taste with no caries. Biofilm formation of S. muttans isolated from caries and caries-free subjects with and without the presence of autolog saliva were different. Conclusion: Autolog saliva influences S. mutans biofilm formation and there is a tendency that is higher than those from subjects with no caries.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i2.48

  9. Behavioral Modulation of Infestation by Varroa destructor in Bee Colonies. Implications for Colony Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiró Santos, Joyce; Coelho, Flávio Codeço; Bliman, Pierre-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has become a global problem for beekeepers and for the crops that depend on bee pollination. While many factors are known to increase the risk of colony collapse, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered to be the most serious one. Although this mite is unlikely to cause the collapse of hives itself, it is the vector for many viral diseases which are among the likely causes for Colony Collapse Disorder. The effects of V. destructor infestation differ from one part of the world to another, with greater morbidity and higher colony losses in European honey bees (EHB) in Europe, Asia and North America. Although this mite has been present in Brazil for many years, there have been no reports of colony losses amongst Africanized Honey Bees (AHB). Studies carried out in Mexico have highlighted different behavioral responses by the AHB to the presence of the mite, notably as far as grooming and hygienic behavior are concerned. Could these explain why the AHB are less susceptible to Colony Collapse Disorder? In order to answer this question, we have developed a mathematical model of the infestation dynamics to analyze the role of resistance behavior by bees in the overall health of the colony, and as a consequence, its ability to face epidemiological challenges.

  10. Behavioral Modulation of Infestation by Varroa destructor in Bee Colonies. Implications for Colony Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has become a global problem for beekeepers and for the crops that depend on bee pollination. While many factors are known to increase the risk of colony collapse, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered to be the most serious one. Although this mite is unlikely to cause the collapse of hives itself, it is the vector for many viral diseases which are among the likely causes for Colony Collapse Disorder. The effects of V. destructor infestation differ from one part of the world to another, with greater morbidity and higher colony losses in European honey bees (EHB) in Europe, Asia and North America. Although this mite has been present in Brazil for many years, there have been no reports of colony losses amongst Africanized Honey Bees (AHB). Studies carried out in Mexico have highlighted different behavioral responses by the AHB to the presence of the mite, notably as far as grooming and hygienic behavior are concerned. Could these explain why the AHB are less susceptible to Colony Collapse Disorder? In order to answer this question, we have developed a mathematical model of the infestation dynamics to analyze the role of resistance behavior by bees in the overall health of the colony, and as a consequence, its ability to face epidemiological challenges. PMID:27583438

  11. DETERMINATION OF SERUM SOLUBLE MACROPHAGE COLONY- STIMULATING FACTOR RECEPTOR LEVELS IN PATIENTS with hematological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO; Qing

    2001-01-01

    [1]Heaney MK, Golde DW. Soluble receptors in human disease [J]. J Leukoc Biol 1998; 61:135.[2]Fix P, Praloram V. M-CSF: Haematopoietic growth factor or inflammatory cytokine [J]? Cytokine 1998; 10:32.[3]Sherr C. Colony-stimulating factor ? 1 receptor [J]. Blood 1990; 75:1.[4]Downing JR, Roussel MF, Sherr CJ. Ligand and protein kinase C down modulate the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor by independent mechanisms [J]. Mol Cell Biol 1989; 9:2890.[5]Baker AH, Cachia PG, Tennant GB, et al. A novel CSF-1 binding factor in a patient in complete remission following cytotoxic therapy for lymphoma [J]. Br J Haematol 1995; 89:219.[6]Wu KF, Zheng GG, Rao Q, et al. Cellular macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its role [J]. Hematologica 1999; 84:951.[7]Rao Q, Han JS, Geng YQ, et al. Antigen association of J6-1 cell membrane associated factor receptor with macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor [J]. Chin J Cancer Res 1999; 11:235.[8]Rao Q, Han JS, Geng YQ, et al. Quantitation of human soluble macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor in human serum by ELISA assay [J]. Exp Hematol 1999; 27:105.[9]Luo SQ, Zheng DX, Liu YX, et al. Analysis of the ligand-binding domain of macrophage colony- stimulating factor receptor [J]. Chin Sci Bull 2000; 45:1191.[10]Wypych J, Bennett LG, Schwartz MG, et al. Soluble Kit receptor in human serum [J]. Blood 1995; 85:66.[11]Tiesman J, Hart CE. Identification of a soluble receptor for platelet-derived growth factor in cell-conditioned medium and human plasma [J]. J Biol Chem 1993; 269:9621.[12]Zhang Q, Xue YP, Song YH, et al. Expression of cellular M-CSF and M-CSFR in hematopoietic cells [J]. Chin J Hematol 1999; 20:249.[13]Tang SS, Liu HZ, Chen GB, et al. Internalization mediated by membrane-bound macrophage colony- stimulating factor and half-life of cell associated macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor [J]. Chin Sci Bull 2000; 45:627.[14]Zeigler ZR

  12. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the detection of Streptococcus agalactiae in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosward, Katrina L; House, John K; Deveridge, Amber; Mathews, Karen; Sheehy, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a well-characterized bovine mastitis pathogen that is known to be highly contagious and capable of spreading rapidly in affected dairy herds. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel molecular diagnostic method that has the capability to provide rapid, cost-effective screening for pathogens to support on-farm disease control and eradication programs. In the current study, a LAMP test was developed to detect S. agalactiae in milk. The assay was validated on a bank of existing clinical mastitis milk samples that had previously been identified as S. agalactiae positive via traditional microbiological culture techniques and PCR. The LAMP assay was conducted on bacterial colonies and DNA extracted from milk in tube- and plate-based formats using multiple detection platforms. The 1-h assay conducted at 64 °C exhibited repeatability (coefficient of variation) of 2.07% (tube) and 8.3% (plate), sensitivity to ~20 pg of extracted DNA/reaction, and specificity against a panel of known bacterial mastitis pathogens. Of the 109 known S. agalactiae isolates assessed by LAMP directly from bacterial cells in culture, 108 were identified as positive, in accordance with PCR analysis. The LAMP analysis from the corresponding milk samples indicated that 104 of these milks exhibited a positive amplification curve. Although exhibiting some limitations, this assay provides an opportunity for rapid screening of milk samples to facilitate on-farm management of this pathogen.

  13. Colonial Continuities and Educational Inequalities in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Harold F., Jr.

    This paper explores the effect of 350 years of Dutch colonial rule upon Indonesian educational policies and the resulting regional inequalities in education. It was Dutch policy not to educate most of the children from the poorer social classes, but to use education to maintain and strengthen the existing social structure. Education was also used…

  14. Colonial Newspaper Reaction to the Somerset Decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Patricia

    To examine colonial American press coverage of the British court decision to free American slave James Somerset, a study was conducted to clarify why the decision worked as a victory for British abolitionists but was usually cited even in post-Revolution America in the passage of increasingly oppressive slave legislation. Twenty-three of the…

  15. Differentiation in colonies of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levin Chucrel, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this Thesis was to study genome-wide gene expression in colonies of A. niger and to relate this to nutrient availability, growth, and secretion. Maltose and xylose were chosen as carbon sources for this study. These compounds result in different sets of extracellular enzymes. In Chapter 2

  16. Project Final Report: HPC-Colony II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Terry R [ORNL; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Moreira, Jose [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

    2013-11-01

    This report recounts the HPC Colony II Project which was a computer science effort funded by DOE's Advanced Scientific Computing Research office. The project included researchers from ORNL, IBM, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The topic of the effort was adaptive system software for extreme scale parallel machines. A description of findings is included.

  17. Latin America: Essays Interpretating Colonial Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pia López

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the Latin–American literature of the 19th and 20th century tried to deal with the national question intertwining different dimensions: the weight of colonial legacy, the cultural peculiarity of the nation and the inner relations between social classes and ethnic groups. Thinking the nation implied, in any case, to think the difference and the conflict with others, as well as the inner conflict and the logic of local colonialism. Analyzing some of these essays that played a central role in such process of recasting the origin of the nation, the author moves around three main axes: the formulation of dualist writings (colonial/national; white /indigenous; civilization/wilderness, the issue of language (the language inherited from the colonial experience versus the multilingual nature of indigenous Latin American societies, and the hypothesis about the birth of the nation – appointed to different groups – and its normal functioning as legitimization of the order sprung from independences.

  18. A catalog of Louisiana's nesting seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, William R.; Cardiff, Steve W.; DeMay, Richard A.; Dittmann, Donna L.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Jeske, Clinton W.; Lorenz, Nicole; Michot, Thomas C.; Purrington, Robert Dan; Seymour, Michael; Vermillion, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing his colonial nesting waterbird survey experiences along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico in a paper presented to the Colonial Waterbird Group of the Waterbird Society (Portnoy 1978), bird biologist John W. Portnoy stated, “This huge concentration of nesting waterbirds, restricted almost entirely to the wetlands and estuaries of southern Louisiana, is unmatched in all of North America; for example, a 1975 inventory of wading birds along the Atlantic Coast from Maine to Florida [Custer and Osborn, in press], tallied 250,000 breeding [waterbirds] of 14 species, in contrast with the 650,000 birds of 15 species just from Sabine Pass to Mobile Bay.” The “650,000 birds” to which Portnoy referred, were tallied by him in a 1976 survey of coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama (see below, under “Major Surveys” section). According to the National Atlas of Coastal Waterbird Colonies in the Contiguous United States: 1976-82 (Spendelow and Patton 1988), the percentages of the total U.S. populations of Laughing Gull (11%), Forster's Tern (52%), Royal Tern (16%), Sandwich Tern (77%), and Black Skimmer (44%) which annually nest in Louisiana are significant – perhaps crucially so in the cases of Forster's Tern, Sandwich Tern, and Black Skimmer. Nearly three decades after Spendelow and Patton's determinations above, coastal Louisiana still stands out as the major center of colonial wading bird and seabird nesting in all of the United States. Within those three intervening decades, however, the

  19. Representing Distant Victims: The Emergence of an Ethical Movement in Dutch Colonial Politics, 1840-1880

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Janse

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to add to our understanding of the relations between the Netherlands and its colonies in the little researched period of 1840-1880 when this relation became politicised. This was a direct result of a new notion of citizenship that developed after the 1848 constitution was implemented: many believed that citizens had now become accountable for government policies, that is, as far as they were acquainted with the effects these had abroad. Colonial issues were among the first for which citizens developed new protest forms and demanded that public opinion should be taken more seriously by the government. This means that not only what happened in the colonies influenced the shape and structure of Dutch politics in an important formative stage, but also that sentiments usually connected to the introduction of the Ethical Policy can be traced back much earlier than isoften assumed.

  20. Representing Distant Victims: The Emergence of an Ethical Movement in Dutch Colonial Politics, 1840-1880

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Janse

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to add to our understanding of the relations between the Netherlands and its colonies in the little researched period of 1840-1880 when this relation became politicised. This was a direct result of a new notion of citizenship that developed after the 1848 constitution was implemented: many believed that citizens had now become accountable for government policies, that is, as far as they were acquainted with the effects these had abroad. Colonial issues were among the first for which citizens developed new protest forms and demanded that public opinion should be taken more seriously by the government. This means that not only what happened in the colonies influenced the shape and structure of Dutch politics in an important formative stage, but also that sentiments usually connected to the introduction of the Ethical Policy can be traced back much earlier than isoften assumed.

  1. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  2. Performance of Bee Colonies Headed by Queens Instrumentally Inseminated with Semen of Drones Who Come from a Single Colony or Many Colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerula Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of honey bee worker diversity within the colony on: development, honey productivity, and wintering. Two different levels of diversity within the colony were tested. The appropriate levels of diversity within the colony were obtained by selecting drones for inseminating the queens. Lower genetic diversity was obtained in the colonies headed by a queen inseminated with semen collected from drones originating from a single colony. Higher genetic diversity was obtained in the colonies with queens inseminated with semen from drones of 30 different colonies. Colonies with a higher genetic variation of workers in the colonies had greater levels of functional characteristics. However, apart from the number of dead bees in winter, the genetic diversity level of the workers on the colony development and honey production, did not have a significant influence. There was an averaging effect observed concerning that male component in the colonies with a higher genetic variation of workers - on honey yield, when compared to the non-additive effect of the best drones.

  3. An American termite in Paris: temporal colony dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Guillaume; Dedeine, Franck; Bech, Nicolas; Bankhead-Dronnet, Stéphanie; Dupont, Simon; Bagnères, Anne-Geneviève

    2017-09-22

    Termites of the genus Reticulitermes are widespread invaders, particularly in urban habitats. Their cryptic and subterranean lifestyle makes them difficult to detect, and we know little about their colony dynamics over time. In this study we examined the persistence of Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) colonies in the city of Paris over a period of 15 years. The aim was (1) to define the boundaries of colonies sampled within the same four areas over two sampling periods, (2) to determine whether the colonies identified during the first sampling period persisted to the second sampling period, and (3) to compare the results obtained when colonies were delineated using a standard population genetic approach versus a Bayesian clustering method that combined both spatial and genetic information. Herein, colony delineations were inferred from genetic differences at nine microsatellite loci and one mitochondrial locus. Four of the 18 identified colonies did not show significant differences in their genotype distributions between the two sampling periods. While allelic richness was low, making it hard to reliably distinguish colony family type, most colonies appeared to retain the same breeding structure over time. These large and expansive colonies showed an important ability to fuse (39% were mixed-family colonies), contained hundreds of reproductives and displayed evidence of isolation-by-distance, suggesting budding dispersal. These traits, which favor colony persistence over time, present a challenge for pest control efforts, which apply treatment locally. The other colonies showed significant differences, but we cannot exclude the possibility that their genotype distributions simply changed over time.

  4. Preliminary catalog of seabird colonies and photographic mapping of seabird colonies: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This preliminary catalog identifies 339 seabird colonies lying along the North Pacific coast of Alaska between Cape Fairweather and Unimak Pass. Information is given...

  5. Bodies for empire: biopolitics, reproduction, and sexual knowledge in late colonial Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-kyung

    2014-08-01

    This paper explores the history of the biomedical construction of women's bodies as social bodies in the formation of colonial modernity in Korea. To do so, I engage with Michel Foucault's concepts of governmentality and biopolitics and the postcolonial history of medicine that has critically revisited these Foucauldian notions. These offer critical insights into the modern calculation of population and the biomedical gaze on female bodies on the Korean Peninsula under Japan's colonial rule (1910-1945). Foucauldian reflections on governmentality and colonial medicine can also shed light on the role of biomedical physicians in the advancement of colonial biopolitics. Biomedical physicians-state and non-state employees This paper explores the history of the biomedical construction of women's bodies as social bodies in the formation of colonial modernity in Korea. To do so, I engage with Michel Foucault's concepts of governmentality and biopolitics and the postcolonial history of medicine that has critically revisited these Foucauldian notions. These offer critical insights into the modern calculation of population and the biomedical gaze on female bodies on the Korean Peninsula under Japan's colonial rule (1910-1945). Foucauldian reflections on governmentality and colonial medicine can also shed light on the role of biomedical physicians in the advancement of colonial biopolitics. Biomedical physicians-state and non-state employees and colonizers and colonized alike - served as key agents investigating, knowing, and managing, as well as proliferating a discourse about, women's bodies and reproduction during Japan's empire-building. In particular, this paper sheds light on the processes by which Korean women's bodies became the objects of intense scrutiny as part of an attempt to quantify, as well as maximize, the total population in late colonial Korea. In the aftermath of the establishment of the Manchurian puppet state in 1932, Japanese imperial and colonial states

  6. Immune gene expression in Bombus terrestris: signatures of infection despite strong variation among populations, colonies, and sister workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska S Brunner

    Full Text Available Ecological immunology relies on variation in resistance to parasites. Colonies of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris vary in their susceptibility to the trypanosome gut parasite Crithidia bombi, which reduces colony fitness. To understand the possible origin of this variation in resistance we assayed the expression of 28 immunologically important genes in foraging workers. We deliberately included natural variation of the host "environment" by using bees from colonies collected in two locations and sampling active foraging workers that were not age controlled. Immune gene expression patterns in response to C. bombi showed remarkable variability even among genetically similar sisters. Nevertheless, expression varied with parasite exposure, among colonies and, perhaps surprisingly, strongly among populations (collection sites. While only the antimicrobial peptide abaecin is universally up regulated upon exposure, linear discriminant analysis suggests that the overall exposure effect is driven by a combination of several immune pathways and further immune functions such as ROS regulation. Also, the differences among colonies in their immune gene expression profiles provide clues to the mechanistic basis of well-known inter-colony variation in susceptibility to this parasite. Our results show that transcriptional responses to parasite exposure can be detected in ecologically heterogeneous groups despite strong background noise.

  7. Honeybee colony marketing and its implications for queen rearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Honeybee colony marketing and its implications for queen rearing and beekeeping ... This increased promotion is creating increasing demand for bee colonies in the ... which can cause genetic mix-up, disease transmissions and failure to

  8. An outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci in an outdoor colony of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jencek, Jacqueline E; Beaufrère, Hugues; Tully, Thomas N; Garner, Michael M; Dunker, Freeland H; Baszler, Timothy V

    2012-12-01

    An outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci occurred in an outdoor colony of 63 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at the San Francisco Zoo. Affected penguins presented with inappetence, lethargy, and light green urates. Hematologic and serum biochemical findings were consistent with chronic inflammation. Penguins did not respond to initial supportive and antimicrobial therapy, and 3 died. Necropsy results of the 3 birds revealed hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, and histologic lesions included necrotizing hepatitis, splenitis, and vasculitis. Chlamydophila psittaci infection was confirmed by results of Gimenez staining, immunohistochemistry, and tissue polymerase chain reaction assay. As additional birds continued to present with similar clinical signs, the entire colony of penguins was prophylactically treated with a 30-day minimum course of doxycycline, administered orally or intramuscularly or as a combination of both. Despite treatment, 9 additional penguins died during a 3-month period. Pathologic results from these birds revealed renal and visceral gout (n = 4), cardiac insufficiency (n = 2), sepsis from a suspected esophageal perforation (n = 2), and no gross lesions (n = 1). During the outbreak, 4 birds presented with seizures, 5 developed dermatitis, and nearly 90% of birds in the colony showed severe keratoconjunctivitis, believed to be related to drug therapy with doxycycline. We report the clinical and pathologic features of Chlamydophila psittaci infection in an outdoor colony of penguins and the associated challenges of treatment.

  9. Kif Tebbi, the colonial archive, between sedimentation and connective memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Proglio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes Kif Tebbi, a colonial novel by Luciano Zuccoli, in theoretical and interpretative perspective of the colonial archive. The aim is to problematize and deconstruct the colonial discourse of this writing from the cultural memories' point of view. In particular, the article will discuss two different forms of memory: the sedimentation and connective memory.

  10. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony counter. (a) Identification. A manual colony counter is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  11. Deconstructive Pedagogy and Ideological Demystification in Post-Colonial Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Asma; Malik, Samina

    2016-01-01

    With post-colonial Pakistan inheriting the British colonial ideological and governmental apparatus, the English literature curriculum implemented at the university level in Pakistan carried the interpellatory baggage of its colonial past. Our interdisciplinary exploration focuses on using deconstructive pedagogy to demystify and subvert the…

  12. Imperialism, Social Control and the Colonial Curriculum in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephan J.

    1983-01-01

    The history of colonial education in Africa is examined. The political functions of educating indigenous peoples, conflict between the educational demands of the indigenous population and the colonial governments, and conflict between differing groups within the colonial system (i.e., missionaries and international aid societies) are discussed.…

  13. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses.

  14. French colonial medicine in Cambodia: reflections of governmentality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trankell, Ing-Britt; Ovesen, Jan

    2004-04-01

    Studies of colonial medicine, mostly from former British colonies, have shown that colonial medical interventions mostly benefited the European colonisers and often had very little positive effects on the health of the native populations at large. A common assumption is that this was also the case for French colonial medicine in general, and for colonial medicine in Cambodia in particular, and that the unsatisfactory contemporary state of the medical services in the country may be partly explained by its colonial past. As a way to test this assumption, this paper presents an ethnography of colonial medicine in Cambodia in the first decades of the twentieth century. Documents in the Cambodian National Archives provided the primary sources, and their significance was assessed against the background of the authors' experience of medical anthropological research in contemporary Cambodia. Michel Foucault's concept of governmentality is used as the interpretative frame. Elements of colonial governmentality in the medical field included the promotion of modern medicine through the free dispensing of medicines and medical treatment and rudimentary medical training of members of the local population, as well as compulsory vaccinations and surveillance of the colonial subjects. It is concluded that both the idea of medicine as a 'tool of empire' and that of the colonial physician as a humanitarian hero are equally incomplete as general descriptions, and that specific ethnographies of medical policies and practices should be undertaken for particular colonial settings. This paper provides the first anthropological account of colonial medicine in Cambodia.

  15. Colonial connections and consulting engineers 1850-1914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Casper

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses colonial connections and networks of British consulting engineers. It unravels how consulting engineers operated within different imperial contexts, including settler colonies, Egypt and Crown colonies in West Africa in particular. The paper also examines the close and at times...

  16. Studying Colonialism in Spanish History Textbooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brescó, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    in classrooms in the 19th Century has aimed at transmitting a shared past in order to encourage subjects to identify with their nation. In psychology different studies have focused on history textbooks as cultural tools for memory and identity, drawing attention to their role in conveying a social......The interwoven dynamics underpinning national identity and collective memory have received growing interest from different disciplines in light of an increasingly globalized and multicultural world. In this context, history textbooks play an important role inasmuch as the introduction of history...... representation of the nation’s historical past. Along these lines, this paper aims to examine the representation of an especially controversial past, such as colonialism, in Spanish secondary history textbooks in two different periods, in late 70’-early 80’ (just after the loss of the last Spanish colonies...

  17. Regulaciones de la vida urbana colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Núñez Sánchez

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo analiza ciertas normas dictadas por la Corona con el propósito de regular la vida urbana a lo largo del período colonial. El artículo centra su estudio en algunas disposiciones que buscaban refrenar el desorden público y mantener el orden y las normas del "buen vivir". Bajo esta perspectiva, se analizan algunas prácticas culturales que se apartaban de estas regulaciones, entre las que se incluyeron los albazos y carnavales. Muchas de estas manifestaciones fueron percibidas por el poder colonial como muestras de primitivismo latente. No obstante, el juego de carnaval, entre otras prácticas, se mantuvo reacio a acatar estas regulaciones.

  18. Print, Newspapers and Audiences in Colonial Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Bodil Folke

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses African and Indian newspaper networks in Kenya in the late 1940s in an Indian Ocean perspective. Newspapers were important parts of a printing culture that was sustained by Indian and African nationalist politics and economic enterprise. In this period new intermediary groups...... of African and Indian entrepreneurs, activists and publicists, collaborating around newspaper production, captured fairly large and significant non-European audiences (some papers had print runs of around ten thousand) and engaged them in new ways, incorporating their aspirations, writings and points of view...... in newspapers. They depended on voluntary and political associations and anti-colonial struggles in Kenya and on links to nationalists in India and the passive resistance movement in South Africa. They sidestepped the European-dominated print culture and created an anti-colonial counter-voice. Editors insisted...

  19. Medicine, Empires, and Ethics in Colonial Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Helen

    2016-07-01

    This essay examines the history of European empire building and health work in sub-Saharan Africa, focusing on four patterns that shed light on the ethics of outside interventions: (1) the epidemiological and bodily harms caused by conquest and economic development; (2) the uneven and inadequate health infrastructures established during the colonial era, including certain iatrogenic consequences; (3) the ethical ambiguities and transgressions of colonial research and treatment campaigns; and (4) the concerted and inadvertent efforts to undermine African healing practices, which were not always commensurable with introduced medical techniques. This kind of historical analysis helps us home in on different kinds of ethical problems that have grown out of past asymmetries of power-between people, professions, states, and institutions-that shape the nature of international health systems to this day.

  20. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  1. Polyethism in a colony of artificial ants

    CERN Document Server

    Marriott, Chris

    2011-01-01

    We explore self-organizing strategies for role assignment in a foraging task carried out by a colony of artificial agents. Our strategies are inspired by various mechanisms of division of labor (polyethism) observed in eusocial insects like ants, termites, or bees. Specifically we instantiate models of caste polyethism and age or temporal polyethism to evaluated the benefits to foraging in a dynamic environment. Our experiment is directly related to the exploration/exploitation trade of in machine learning.

  2. Small colony variants and their clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataramana Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the many factors that contribute to bacterial colonization, persistence and development of infection, the ability of microorganisms to form small colony variants (SCVs assumes great significance. Although bacteria require intrinsic virulence factors to cause pathogenesis, some of them regularly evolve mechanisms to evade immune mechanisms, become resistant to antibiotics, and sustain in the human/animal cells to cause chronic infections. This mini review highlights the recent advances in the study of SCVs.

  3. Colonial Subjectification: Foucault, Christianity and Governmentality

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Petterson

    2012-01-01

    Foucault’s concept of pastoral power is envisioned as a technique of power developed from the medieval period and carried through into modern political rationalities. As such, it is an old power technique – which originated in Christian institutions – in a new political shape, which he coined governmentality. This article uses Foucault’s genealogy of pastoral power and governmentality to discuss the intersection of domination and technology of self in the Greenlandic colonial context and to b...

  4. Ant colony optimization and constraint programming

    CERN Document Server

    Solnon, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Ant colony optimization is a metaheuristic which has been successfully applied to a wide range of combinatorial optimization problems. The author describes this metaheuristic and studies its efficiency for solving some hard combinatorial problems, with a specific focus on constraint programming. The text is organized into three parts. The first part introduces constraint programming, which provides high level features to declaratively model problems by means of constraints. It describes the main existing approaches for solving constraint satisfaction problems, including complete tree search

  5. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  6. Colorimetric protein assay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapan, C V; Lundblad, R L; Price, N C

    1999-04-01

    There has been an increase in the number of colorimetric assay techniques for the determination of protein concentration over the past 20 years. This has resulted in a perceived increase in sensitivity and accuracy with the advent of new techniques. The present review considers these advances with emphasis on the potential use of such technologies in the assay of biopharmaceuticals. The techniques reviewed include Coomassie Blue G-250 dye binding (the Bradford assay), the Lowry assay, the bicinchoninic acid assay and the biuret assay. It is shown that each assay has advantages and disadvantages relative to sensitivity, ease of performance, acceptance in the literature, accuracy and reproducibility/coefficient of variation/laboratory-to-laboratory variation. A comparison of the use of several assays with the same sample population is presented. It is suggested that the most critical issue in the use of a chromogenic protein assay for the characterization of a biopharmaceutical is the selection of a standard for the calibration of the assay; it is crucial that the standard be representative of the sample. If it is not possible to match the standard with the sample from the perspective of protein composition, then it is preferable to use an assay that is not sensitive to the composition of the protein such as a micro-Kjeldahl technique, quantitative amino acid analysis or the biuret assay. In a complex mixture it might be inappropriate to focus on a general method of protein determination and much more informative to use specific methods relating to the protein(s) of particular interest, using either specific assays or antibody-based methods. The key point is that whatever method is adopted as the 'gold standard' for a given protein, this method needs to be used routinely for calibration.

  7. Influence of feeding bee colonies on colony strenght and honey authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja KANDOLF BOROVŠAK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For the natural development of bee colonies, there is the need for appropriate nutrition. Lack of natural honey flow must be supplemented by feeding bee colonies with sugar syrups or candy paste. This supplementary feeding encourages brood breeding and forage activity, whereby stronger colonies collect more honey. Sugar syrups can cause honey adulteration, which is more frequent with the reversing of the brood combs with the bee food, with the combs moved from the brood chamber to the upper chamber. Authentication of honey from the standpoint of the presence of sugar syrup is very complex, because there is no single method by which honey adulteration can be reliably confirmed. Feeding the colonies in spring should result in stronger colonies and hence the collection of more honey in the brood chambers. The objective of the present study was to determine whether this has effects also on honey authenticity, and to discover a simple method for detection of honey adulteration. The colonies were fed with candy paste that had added yeast and blue dye, to provide markers for detection of honey adulteration. The strength of the colonies and quantity of honey in the brood chambers were monitored. The results of the analysis of stable isotope and activity of foreign enzymes were compared with the results of yeast quantity and colour of the honey (absorbance, L*, a*, b* parameters. Detection of yeast in the honey samples and presence of colour as a consequence of added dye appear to be appropriate methods to follow honey adulteration, and further studies are ongoing.

  8. Dynamics of the Presence of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in Honey Bee Colonies with Colony Collapse Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Chunsheng Hou; Hadassah Rivkin; Yossi Slabezki; Nor Chejanovsky

    2014-01-01

    The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and ...

  9. Contemporaneity of colonialism: Capitalist modernity, imperial racism and necropolitics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefik Tatlić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This text articulates global capitalism as an imperial formation, it deems that modernity is a particular project and/or discursive rhetoric, as well as it articulates necropolitics as the dominant form of politics in capitalism in the post 9/11 era. Hence, global capitalism is being treated here as the imperial formation and a relation of dominance which fundamentally resides on colonial epistemologies and governing logic. Modernity is, therefore, being articulated as a particular discursive rhetoric of the First World which universalizes modernity in order to conceal and/or repress other formats of organizing modernity and, in order to apply and normalize various premodern logics and ideologies, such as racism, as foundations on the basis of which social differentiation and capitalist hierarchies of exploitation are being organized. Finally, this text articulates the concept of necropolitics which is an obscene form of politics that has, in the post 9/11 era, been reduced to a form of management of death and to a machinistic form of governing that treats the world as if it is just a commodifiable category.

  10. The Development of Politics in Extraterrestrial Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivier, D. J.

    The existence of feudal or totalitarian interplanetary empires has been a favourite theme in Science Fiction. Although the vast distances between the stars make the emergence of an interstellar empire impossible without the creation of a faster than light drive, this is not necessarily true for the other worlds within our solar system. Environmental constraints on the off-world colonies themselves, and repressive, hierarchical and feudalistic social and commercial institutions and customs inherited from the parent cultures on Earth and a tradition of military rule descending from the foundation of these colonies may all work to bring about a new feudal or totalitarian social order on humanity's extraterrestrial colonies. There are encouraging signs that this may not be the case, however. Already the debate over the projected colonisation of Mars is a factor influencing present controversies over repressive institutions and customs. Nevertheless, those wishing for a free, democratic, and politically, socially and technologically innovative and vigorous human society spreading throughout the solar system should not become complacent.

  11. Review Essay: Governmentality in Late Colonial Korea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Em

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Fujitani, Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Americans during World War II. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011. 520 pp. $65 (cloth.Jun Uchida, Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876-1945. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011. 500 pp. $50 (cloth.In South Korea, more so than in most other postcolonial countries, the issue of sovereignty and the colonial past remains a central feature of politics. Most recently, during a televised presidential debate on December 4, 2012, Lee Jung-hee of the Unified Progressive Party said something that likely had never been said on South Korean television: “Takaki Masao signed an oath of loyalty [to the Emperor of Japan], in his own blood, to become an officer in the Japanese [Imperial] Army. You know who he is. His Korean name is Park Chung Hee.” Lee Jung-hee then made the connection between that colonial past and the willingness to sell out the nation’s sovereignty in the present. The conservative candidate Park Geun-hye, the daughter of the late President Park Chung Hee who ruled South Korea from 1961 through 1979, and members of Park’s Saenuri Party, remain true to their “roots”: these “descendants of pro-Japanese collaborators and dictators” (again sold out South Korea’s sovereignty (on November 22, 2011 when they rammed the US-ROK Free Trade Agreement through the National Assembly.

  12. Ginger extract inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger's ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39-56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor.

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Human primary osteoclasts: in vitro generation and applications as pharmacological and clinical assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamurovic Natasa

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteoclasts are cells of hematopoietic origin with a unique property of dissolving bone; their inhibition is a principle for treatment of diseases of bone loss. Protocols for generation of human osteoclasts in vitro have been described, but they often result in cells of low activity, raising questions on cell phenotype and suitability of such assays for screening of bone resorption inhibitors. Here we describe an optimized protocol for the production of stable amounts of highly active human osteoclasts. Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by density centrifugation, seeded at 600,000 cells per 96-well and cultured for 17 days in α-MEM medium, supplemented with 10% of selected fetal calf serum, 1 μM dexamethasone and a mix of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, 25 ng/ml, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL, 50 ng/ml, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, 5 ng/ml. Thus, in addition to widely recognized osteoclast-generating factors M-CSF and RANKL, other medium supplements and lengthy culture times were necessary. This assay reliably detected inhibition of osteoclast formation (multinucleated cells positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and activity (resorbed area and collagen fragments released from bone slices in dose response curves with several classes of bone resorption inhibitors. Therefore, this assay can be applied for monitoring bone-resorbing activity of novel drugs and as an clinical test for determining the capacity of blood cells to generate bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Isolation of large quantities of active human osteoclast mRNA and protein is also made possible by this assay.

  15. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clint J; Søvik, Eirik; Myerscough, Mary R; Barron, Andrew B

    2015-03-17

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience.

  16. Varroa-Virus Interaction in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Nielsen, Steen L.; Kryger, Per

    2013-01-01

    Varroa mites and viruses are the currently the high-profile suspects in collapsing bee colonies. Therefore, seasonal variation in varroa load and viruses (Acute-Kashmir-Israeli complex (AKI) and Deformed Wing Virus (DWV)) were monitored in a year-long study. We investigated the viral titres...... in honey bees and varroa mites from 23 colonies (15 apiaries) under three treatment conditions: Organic acids (11 colonies), pyrethroid (9 colonies) and untreated (3 colonies). Approximately 200 bees were sampled every month from April 2011 to October 2011, and April 2012. The 200 bees were split to 10...... subsamples of 20 bees and analysed separately, which allows us to determine the prevalence of virus-infected bees. The treatment efficacy was often low for both treatments. In colonies where varroa treatment reduced the mite load, colonies overwintered successfully, allowing the mites and viruses...

  17. Engaging With Colonial Archives: Reflections Of An End-User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Olukoju

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Official and/or public archives were a byproduct of colonial rule in Africa. (Archives are a byproduct of administrative governance everywhere. Given the density and diversity of colonial archival records, historians have tended to rely on them for the study of the colonial period. Publications on the use of archives have not captured the perspective of end-users, who often face peculiar challenges in the use of colonial and metropolitan archives. This paper provides an end-user perspective on colonial archives in Nigeria and the United Kingdom. It highlights the challenges of data collection and prospects of optimal use of archival source material. The discussion is of general application to users of colonial archives especially in the former British colonies in Africa.

  18. A PCR-high-resolution melt assay for rapid differentiation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Janessa; Binks, Michael J; Beissbarth, Jemima; Hare, Kim M; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a PCR-high-resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay to discriminate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonies from Haemophilus haemolyticus. This method is rapid and robust, with 96% sensitivity and 92% specificity compared to the hpd#3 assay. PCR-HRM is ideal for high-throughput screening for NTHi surveillance and clinical trials.

  19. Analysis of Candida albicans mutants defective in the Cdk8 module of mediator reveal links between metabolism and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allia K Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO, a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module-Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development.

  20. The scent of supercolonies: the discovery, synthesis and behavioural verification of ant colony recognition cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulc Robert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ants form highly social and cooperative colonies that compete, and often fight, against other such colonies, both intra- and interspecifically. Some invasive ants take sociality to an extreme, forming geographically massive 'supercolonies' across thousands of kilometres. The success of social insects generally, as well as invasive ants in particular, stems from the sophisticated mechanisms used to accurately and precisely distinguish colonymates from non-colonymates. Surprisingly, however, the specific chemicals used for this recognition are virtually undescribed. Results Here, we report the discovery, chemical synthesis and behavioural testing of the colonymate recognition cues used by the widespread and invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile. By synthesizing pure versions of these chemicals in the laboratory and testing them in behavioural assays, we show that these compounds trigger aggression among normally amicable nestmates, but control hydrocarbons do not. Furthermore, behavioural testing across multiple different supercolonies reveals that the reaction to individual compounds varies from colony to colony -- the expected reaction to true colony recognition labels. Our results also show that both quantitative and qualitative changes to cuticular hydrocarbon profiles can trigger aggression among nestmates. These data point the way for the development of new environmentally-friendly control strategies based on the species-specific manipulation of aggressive behaviour. Conclusion Overall, our findings reveal the identity of specific chemicals used for colonymate recognition by the invasive Argentine ants. Although the particular chemicals used by other ants may differ, the patterns reported here are likely to be true for ants generally. As almost all invasive ants display widespread unicoloniality in their introduced ranges, our findings are particularly relevant for our understanding of the biology of these damaging

  1. One Film, or Many?: The Multiple Texts of the Colonial Korean Film "Volunteer"

    OpenAIRE

    Jaekil Seo

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, studies on films from colonial Korea in the Japanese empire had to rely primarily on secondary texts, such as memoirs, journal and newspaper articles, and film reviews. The recent discovery of original film texts from archives in Japan, China, Russia, and elsewhere and their availability on DVD format, prompted an important turning point in the scholarship. However, juxtaposing these newly released DVD versions with other archival sources exposes significant differences among ...

  2. Intraspecific Variation among Social Insect Colonies: Persistent Regional and Colony-Level Differences in Fire Ant Foraging Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A Bockoven

    Full Text Available Individuals vary within a species in many ecologically important ways, but the causes and consequences of such variation are often poorly understood. Foraging behavior is among the most profitable and risky activities in which organisms engage and is expected to be under strong selection. Among social insects there is evidence that within-colony variation in traits such as foraging behavior can increase colony fitness, but variation between colonies and the potential consequences of such variation are poorly documented. In this study, we tested natural populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, for the existence of colony and regional variation in foraging behavior and tested the persistence of this variation over time and across foraging habitats. We also reared single-lineage colonies in standardized environments to explore the contribution of colony lineage. Fire ants from natural populations exhibited significant and persistent colony and regional-level variation in foraging behaviors such as extra-nest activity, exploration, and discovery of and recruitment to resources. Moreover, colony-level variation in extra-nest activity was significantly correlated with colony growth, suggesting that this variation has fitness consequences. Lineage of the colony had a significant effect on extra-nest activity and exploratory activity and explained approximately half of the variation observed in foraging behaviors, suggesting a heritable component to colony-level variation in behavior.

  3. Intraspecific Variation among Social Insect Colonies: Persistent Regional and Colony-Level Differences in Fire Ant Foraging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockoven, Alison A; Wilder, Shawn M; Eubanks, Micky D

    2015-01-01

    Individuals vary within a species in many ecologically important ways, but the causes and consequences of such variation are often poorly understood. Foraging behavior is among the most profitable and risky activities in which organisms engage and is expected to be under strong selection. Among social insects there is evidence that within-colony variation in traits such as foraging behavior can increase colony fitness, but variation between colonies and the potential consequences of such variation are poorly documented. In this study, we tested natural populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, for the existence of colony and regional variation in foraging behavior and tested the persistence of this variation over time and across foraging habitats. We also reared single-lineage colonies in standardized environments to explore the contribution of colony lineage. Fire ants from natural populations exhibited significant and persistent colony and regional-level variation in foraging behaviors such as extra-nest activity, exploration, and discovery of and recruitment to resources. Moreover, colony-level variation in extra-nest activity was significantly correlated with colony growth, suggesting that this variation has fitness consequences. Lineage of the colony had a significant effect on extra-nest activity and exploratory activity and explained approximately half of the variation observed in foraging behaviors, suggesting a heritable component to colony-level variation in behavior.

  4. FORMAS E LUGARES FANTASMAS DA MEMÓRIA COLONIAL E PÓS-COLONIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Ana Mafalda

    2010-01-01

    O ARTIGO DISCUTE, SEGUINDO SEMPRE NAS ENTRELINHAS AS REFLEXÕES DE HOMI BHABHA EM O LOCAL DA CULTURA, OS DIVERSOS MODOS DE DESVELAMENTO DA MEMÓRIA (COLONIAL E PÓS-COLONIAL) NAS NARRATIVAS DE MANUEL RUI (O MANEQUIM E O PIANO) E DE JOÃO PAULO BORGES COELHO (SETENTRIÃO), MOSTRANDO COMO OS ROTEIROS E O DESLOCAMENTO POR NOVOS LUGARES E ESPAÇOS IMPLICAM UM RE-MAPEAMENTO DA NAÇÃO E SIMULTANEAMENTE UM REPENSAR DE VÁRIOS MOMENTOS DA HISTÓRIA. DISCUTE-SE AINDA DE QUE MODO A ESCRITA NARRATIVA DOS AUTORES...

  5. Incomplete homogenization of chemical recognition labels between Formica sanguinea and Formica rufa ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) living in a mixed colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Tomasz; Szczepaniak, Lech

    2014-01-01

    Formica sanguinea Latreille (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a slave-making species, i.e., it raids colonies of host species and pillages pupae, which are taken to develop into adult workers in a parasite colony. However, it has been unclear if the coexistence of F. sanguinea with slave workers requires uniformity of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), among which those other than n-alkanes are believed to be the principal nestmate recognition cues utilized by ants. In this study, a mixed colony (MC) of F. sanguinea and Formica rufa L. as a slave species was used to test the hypothesis that CHCs are exchanged between the species. Chemical analysis of hexane extracts from ants' body surfaces provided evidence for interspecific exchange of alkenes and methyl-branched alkanes. This result was confirmed by behavioral tests during which ants exhibited hostility toward conspecific individuals from the MC but not toward ones from homospecific colonies of their own species. However, it seems that species-specific differences in chemical recognition labels were not eliminated completely because ants from the MC were treated differently depending on whether they were con- or allospecific to the individuals whose behavioral reactions were tested. These findings are discussed in the context of mechanisms of colony's odor formation and effective integration of slaves into parasite colony. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  6. Primary hypertension in a colony of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, F E; Padgett, G A; Eyster, G; Blanchard, G; Bell, T

    1987-01-01

    A 5-year-old female Siberian husky that was diagnosed as an essential hypertensive was bred several times over a 5-year period, producing a colony of 39 offspring. Thirty of the 39 animals were subjected to biweekly systemic arterial blood pressure determinations with femoral arterial puncture and were placed into two hypertensive and two normotensive groups based on mean blood pressure: Group 1 (mean blood pressure, 128 +/- 12 mm Hg), Group 2 (mean blood pressure, 121 +/- 3 mm Hg), Group 3 (mean blood pressure, 114 +/- 8 mm Hg), and Group 4 (mean blood pressure, 101 +/- 9 mm Hg). Groups 1, 2, and 3 had mean blood pressures significantly higher than that of Group 4 (p less than 0.05). Ten dogs (representatives from Groups 1, 2, and 3) were subjected to more detailed clinical testing including angiography, echocardiography, ophthalmic examination, plasma catecholamine and renin activity measurements, plasma lead and cadmium determinations, cerebrospinal fluid examination, renal profile, and serum chemistry and hematological analysis. Five unrelated normotensive Siberian huskies were compared with colony dogs by using echocardiography. Groups 1 and 2 showed a clear but statistically insignificant upward trend in left ventricular wall thickness indexed against body weights when compared with that in Group 3 and in the unrelated five normal Siberian dogs. Thus, the only specific difference from group to group in the colony at the termination of this study was the difference in mean blood pressure. Based on these data, it is possible and likely that aging will reveal changes secondary to chronic primary hypertension. The pathogenesis of this hereditary disorder remains unknown.

  7. Expression of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF in Hansenula polymorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganeh Talebkhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: During past decades Hansenula polymorpha has attracted global attention for the expression of recombinant proteins due to its high growth rate, minimal nutritional porequirements and use of methanol as a low cost inducer.Materials and Methods: The corresponding nucleotide sequences for the expression of heterologous genes in Hansenula poylmorpha were extracted and assembled in an E. coli vector. The constructed expression cassette included formate dehy- drogenase promoter (pFMD, a secretory signal sequence, a multiple cloning site (MCS and methanol oxidase (MOX ter- minator. Zeocin resistance gene fragment and complete cDNA encoding granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF were cloned downstream of the expression cassette in-frame with signal sequence. Restriction mapping and sequence analysis confirmed the correct cloning procedures. Final vector was transformed into Hansenula and recombinant host was induced for the expression of GCSF protein by adding methanol. SDS-PAGE and immuno-blotting were performed to confirm the identity of r-GCSF.Results: The expression cassette containing gcsf gene (615bp and zeocin resistance marker (sh-ble, 1200bp was prepared and successfully transformed into competent Hansenula polymorpha cells via electroporation. Zeocin resistant colonies were selected and GCSF expression was induced in recombinant Hansenula transformants using 0.5% methanol and an approx- imately 19kDa protein was observed on SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis using serum isolated from GCSF-treated rabbit confirmed the identity of the protein.Conclusions: Molecular studies confirmed the designed expression cassette containing gcsf gene along with pFMD and sig- nal sequence. The expressed 19kDa protein also confirmed the ability of designed vector in expressing heterologous genes in Hansenula cells. Keywords: Hansenula polymorpha, expression cassette, GCSF

  8. Fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using an electrostatic rod-type sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Woon; Park, Chul Woo; Lee, Sung Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall) was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations.

  9. Fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using an electrostatic rod-type sampler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Woon Park

    Full Text Available A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: < 1 min of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations.

  10. Combined Final Report for Colony II Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Laxmikant [University of Illinois; Jones, Terry [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moreira, Jose [IBM Corp.

    2013-10-23

    (This report was originally submmited by the lead PI (Terry Jones, ORNL) on October 22, 2013 to the program manager, Lucy Nowell. It is being submitted from University of Illinois in accordance with instructions). HPC Colony II seeks to provide portable performance for leadership class machines. Our strategy is based on adaptive system software that aims to make the intelligent decisions necessary to allow domain scientists to safely focus on their task at hand and allow the system software stack to adapt their application to the underlying architecture. This report describes the research undertaken towards these objectives and the results obtained over the performance period of the project.

  11. Colonial Subjectification: Foucault, Christianity and Governmentality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Petterson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Foucault’s concept of pastoral power is envisioned as a technique of power developed from the medieval period and carried through into modern political rationalities. As such, it is an old power technique – which originated in Christian institutions – in a new political shape, which he coined governmentality. This article uses Foucault’s genealogy of pastoral power and governmentality to discuss the intersection of domination and technology of self in the Greenlandic colonial context and to bring out the central role of religion in Foucault’s conceptualisation of governmentality.

  12. In the post-colonial waiting room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca; Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2017-01-01

    This chapter investigates this puzzle of choosing non-sovereignty in a postcolonial setting. Historically, the question of freedom from imperial hegemony has been linked to how Western colonialism involved keeping the colonized in ‘the waiting room of history’ by insisting that they were not yet...... the colonizers leave so that the colonized people could decide for themselves. Many anti-imperial struggles settled for nation-states each acquiring a separate, formal sovereignty-based international status. More recent versions of postcolonialism, inspired by poststructuralism and critical constructivism, have...

  13. Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

    2007-02-14

    This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems – the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOE’s high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow

  14. The Struggles of an Eternal American Colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    Fundamentales (Rio Piedras, PR: Editorial Edil, 1996), 93, quoted in Pedro A. Malavet, America’s Colony: the Political and Cultural Conflict between the...Puerto Rico: Culture, Politics, and Identity, 25. 28 Ibid., 25-26. 29 Editorial Group, Puerto Rico Online Encyclopedia (PROE), “Osuna, Juan José...29. 47 Bolívar Pagán, Historia de los partidos políticos puertorriequeños (1898-1956) vol I (San Juan: Libreria Campos , 1959), 160, http

  15. Apuntes sobre el urbanismo en Brasil colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Durán Rocca

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El texto que el lector tiene en sus manos pretende hacer una síntesis del proceso de formación del espacio urbano colonial brasilero, ilustrando el trayecto de una práctica espacial de más de tres siglos, derivada de la milenaria tradición urbana portuguesa. A partir del reconocimiento de la dimensión histórico-artística de la arquitectura y los hechos urbanos2, se asume la indisolubilidad entre la sociedad y el espacio que ésta produce y se conceptúa la urbanización como un proceso social.

  16. Political instability and discontinuity in Nigeria: The pre-colonial past and public goods provision under colonial and post-colonial political orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, K.I.; Dalrymple-Smith, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relative importance of pre-colonial institutional capacity and the effects of periods of peace and stability on long-term development outcomes in Nigeria. We use data on education, health, and public works at a provincial level from a variety of colonial and Nigerian state

  17. Hong Kong architecture 1945-2015 from colonial to global

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Charlie Q L

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the transformation from colonial to global – the formation, mechanism, events, works and people related to urban architecture. The book reveals hardships the city encountered in the 1950s and the glamour enjoyed in the 1980s. It depicts the public and private developments, and especially the public housing which has sheltered millions of residents. The author identifies the architects practising in the formative years and the representatives of a rising generation after the 1980s. Suffering from land shortage and a dense environment, the urban development of Hong Kong has in the past 70 years met the changing demands of fluctuating economic activities and a rising population. Architecture on the island has been shaped by social demands, the economy and technology. The buildings have been forged by the government, clients, planners, architects, many contractors and end-users. The built environment nurtures our life and is visual evidence of the way the city has developed. Hong Kong is a ...

  18. Methods and devices for protein assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Swapnil; Cintron, Jose M.; Shediac, Renee

    2009-11-03

    Methods and devices for protein assays based on Edman degradation in microfluidic channels are disclosed herein. As disclosed, the cleaved amino acid residues may be immobilized in an array format and identified by detectable labels, such as antibodies, which specifically bind given amino acid residues. Alternatively, the antibodies are immobilized in an array format and the cleaved amino acids are labeled identified by being bound by the antibodies in the array.

  19. Colony fingerprint for discrimination of microbial species based on lensless imaging of microcolonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Dobashi, Hironori; Sugiyama, Yui; Saeki, Tatsuya; Lim, Tae-kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Detection and identification of microbial species are crucial in a wide range of industries, including production of beverages, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Traditionally, colony formation and its morphological analysis (e.g., size, shape, and color) with a naked eye have been employed for this purpose. However, such a conventional method is time consuming, labor intensive, and not very reproducible. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel method that detects microcolonies (diameter 10–500 μm) using a lensless imaging system. When comparing colony images of five microorganisms from different genera (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans), the images showed obvious different features. Being closely related species, St. aureus and St. epidermidis resembled each other, but the imaging analysis could extract substantial information (colony fingerprints) including the morphological and physiological features, and linear discriminant analysis of the colony fingerprints distinguished these two species with 100% of accuracy. Because this system may offer many advantages such as high-throughput testing, lower costs, more compact equipment, and ease of automation, it holds promise for microbial detection and identification in various academic and industrial areas. PMID:28369067

  20. Colony fingerprint for discrimination of microbial species based on lensless imaging of microcolonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Dobashi, Hironori; Sugiyama, Yui; Saeki, Tatsuya; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Detection and identification of microbial species are crucial in a wide range of industries, including production of beverages, foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Traditionally, colony formation and its morphological analysis (e.g., size, shape, and color) with a naked eye have been employed for this purpose. However, such a conventional method is time consuming, labor intensive, and not very reproducible. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel method that detects microcolonies (diameter 10-500 μm) using a lensless imaging system. When comparing colony images of five microorganisms from different genera (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans), the images showed obvious different features. Being closely related species, St. aureus and St. epidermidis resembled each other, but the imaging analysis could extract substantial information (colony fingerprints) including the morphological and physiological features, and linear discriminant analysis of the colony fingerprints distinguished these two species with 100% of accuracy. Because this system may offer many advantages such as high-throughput testing, lower costs, more compact equipment, and ease of automation, it holds promise for microbial detection and identification in various academic and industrial areas.

  1. Occupied Cape Judges and Colonial Knowledge of Crime, Criminals, and Punishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pavlich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article returns to a colonial discourse on crime, criminals, and punishment that the court of justice enunciated and followed during an 8-year British occupation of the Cape of Good Hope in the latter part of 1795. Tapping unusually frank juridical discussions on criminality and punishment in the context of sovereignty politics, it examines three key matters. Commencing with a description of the Cape colony’s inquisitorial criminal procedures, the analysis—following Foucault (2000—conceives of these as powers (political techniques through which the British claimed an exclusive capacity to enunciate legal “truths” about specific criminal events. Second, it analyzes a unique correspondence between the British military commander and the court of justice members together with two illustrative criminal cases of the day. These provide a sense of the judge’s knowledge of crime and criminal punishment in a social context that imagined itself through social differentiation and hierarchy. Third, it reads these colonial power-knowledge formations as generating three congruent political logics that in hybrid combinations have nurtured segmented, racially orientated, and group-based criminal justice arenas. This discussion alludes to the pivotal role colonial discourses of criminal law have played in generating a politics that shaped the criminal justice arenas of subsequent social forms. New, and differently combined, political logics of sovereignty, discipline, and biopolitics have left a decided legacy to which post-colonial arenas continue to respond.

  2. Honey bee colonies act as reservoirs for two Spiroplasma facultative symbionts and incur complex, multiyear infection dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ryan S; Teixeira, Érica Weinstein; Tauber, James P; Birke, Juliane M; Martins, Marta Fonseca; Fonseca, Isabela; Evans, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    Two species of Spiroplasma (Mollicutes) bacteria were isolated from and described as pathogens of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, ∼30 years ago but recent information on them is lacking despite global concern to understand bee population declines. Here we provide a comprehensive survey for the prevalence of these two Spiroplasma species in current populations of honey bees using improved molecular diagnostic techniques to assay multiyear colony samples from North America (U.S.A.) and South America (Brazil). Significant annual and seasonal fluctuations of Spiroplasma apis and Spiroplasma melliferum prevalence in colonies from the U.S.A. (n = 616) and Brazil (n = 139) occurred during surveys from 2011 through 2013. Overall, 33% of U.S.A. colonies and 54% of Brazil colonies were infected by Spiroplasma spp., where S. melliferum predominated over S. apis in both countries (25% vs. 14% and 44% vs. 38% frequency, respectively). Colonies were co-infected by both species more frequently than expected in both countries and at a much higher rate in Brazil (52%) compared to the U.S.A. (16.5%). U.S.A. samples showed that both species were prevalent not only during spring, as expected from prior research, but also during other seasons. These findings demonstrate that the model of honey bee spiroplasmas as springtime-restricted pathogens needs to be broadened and their role as occasional pathogens considered in current contexts. PMID:24771723

  3. Modernity/Coloniality and Eurocentric Education: Towards a Post-Occidental Self-Understanding of the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article sketches a post-Occidental interpretation of the historical/conceptual relationships between modern western education and European civilizational identity formation. Modern western education will be interpreted as a modern/colonial institution that emerged along with the sixteenth-century responses to the questions provoked by the…

  4. Spatio-temporal permanence and plasticity of foraging trails in young and mature leaf-cutting ant colonies (Atta spp.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Kost (Christian); E.G. de Oliveira (Evandro); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); R. Wirth (Rainer)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe distribution and formation of foraging trails have largely been neglected as factors explaining harvesting patterns of leaf-cutting ants.We applied fractal analysis, circular, and conventional statistics to published and newly recorded trailmaps of seven Atta colonies focusing on

  5. Adult Learning in Political (Un-Civil) Society: Anti-Colonial Subaltern Social Movement (SSM) Pedagogies of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Dip

    2011-01-01

    Through a selective deployment of conceptualisations from subaltern studies, in particular the concepts of political (un-civil) society and an autonomous domain (or a people's politics that suggests the plausibility of dominance without hegemony), this article distinguishes a subaltern social movement (SSM) formation and related anti-colonial SSM…

  6. The Transcription Factor Nrf2 Protects Angiogenic Capacity of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells in High-Oxygen Radical Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Gremmels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs have shown a promise in tissue engineering of vascular constructs, where they act as endothelial progenitor cells. After implantation, ECFCs are likely to be subjected to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes in response to ROS. Methods. Stable knockdown of Nrf2 and Keap1 was achieved by transduction with lentiviral shRNAs; activation of Nrf2 was induced by incubation with sulforaphane (SFN. Expression of Nrf2 target genes was assessed by qPCR, oxidative stress was assessed using CM-DCFDA, and angiogenesis was quantified by scratch-wound and tubule-formation assays. Results. Nrf2 knockdown led to a reduction of antioxidant gene expression and increased ROS. Angiogenesis was disturbed after Nrf2 knockdown even in the absence of ROS. Conversely, angiogenesis was preserved in high ROS conditions after knockdown of Keap1. Preincubation of ECFCs with SFN reduced intracellular ROS in the presence of H2O2 and preserved scratch-wound closure and tubule-formation. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that Nrf2 plays an important role in the angiogenic capacity of ECFCs, particularly under conditions of increased oxidative stress. Pretreatment of ECFCs with SFN prior to implantation may be a protective strategy for tissue-engineered constructs or cell therapies.

  7. Disrupting the Coloniality of Being: Toward De-Colonial Ontologies in Philosophy of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Troy A.

    2012-01-01

    This essay works to bridge conversations in philosophy of education with decolonial theory. The author considers Margonis' (1999, 2011a, b) use of Rousseau (1979) and Heidegger (1962) in developing an ontological attitude that counters social hierarchies and promotes anti-colonial relations. While affirming this effort, the essay outlines a…

  8. Robert Garrett, Tasmanian penal colony surgeon: alcoholism, medical misadventure and the penal colony of Sarah Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stride, P

    2011-09-01

    Robert Garrett emigrated from Scotland to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania) in 1822. Within a few months of arrival he was posted to the barbaric penal colony in Macquarie Harbour, known as Sarah Island. His descent into alcoholism, medical misadventure and premature death were related to his largely unsupported professional environment and were, in many respects, typical of those subjected to this experience.

  9. Economic mobility in a colonial and post-colonial economy: the case of Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Bas; Földvári, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite a consensus about the main factors influencing economic mobility in Indonesia, such as labor-market opportunities and childhood circumstances, virtually nothing is known about how these factors increased economic standing in the colonial and postcolonial periods. The use of height data as a

  10. Economic mobility in a colonial and post-colonial economy: the case of Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Bas; Földvári, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite a consensus about the main factors influencing economic mobility in Indonesia, such as labor-market opportunities and childhood circumstances, virtually nothing is known about how these factors increased economic standing in the colonial and postcolonial periods. The use of height data as a

  11. Interpretations of colonial representations : reflections on alterity, colonial history, and intercultural contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huigen, S.; Kommers, J.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    This book offers a collection of essays about the interpretations of colonial representations, most of them in relation to the Dutch East India Company (VOC). The history of a world wide operating trading company like the VOC offers a great variety of contact histories, ranging from situations of

  12. The Contemporary Reality of Canadian Imperialism: Settler Colonialism and the Hybrid Colonial State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Adam J.

    2009-01-01

    The author's fundamental contention is this: Canadian society remains driven by the logic of imperialism and engages in concerted colonial action against Indigenous peoples whose claims to land and self-determination continue to undermine the legitimacy of Canadian authority and hegemony. The imperial ambitions of the Canadian state and its…

  13. First recorded loss of an emperor penguin colony in the recent period of Antarctic regional warming: implications for other colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trathan, Philip N; Fretwell, Peter T; Stonehouse, Bernard

    2011-02-28

    In 1948, a small colony of emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri was discovered breeding on Emperor Island (67° 51' 52″ S, 68° 42' 20″ W), in the Dion Islands, close to the West Antarctic Peninsula (Stonehouse 1952). When discovered, the colony comprised approximately 150 breeding pairs; these numbers were maintained until 1970, after which time the colony showed a continuous decline. By 1999 there were fewer than 20 pairs, and in 2009 high-resolution aerial photography revealed no remaining trace of the colony. Here we relate the decline and loss of the Emperor Island colony to a well-documented rise in local mean annual air temperature and coincident decline in seasonal sea ice duration. The loss of this colony provides empirical support for recent studies (Barbraud & Weimerskirch 2001; Jenouvrier et al 2005, 2009; Ainley et al 2010; Barber-Meyer et al 2005) that have highlighted the vulnerability of emperor penguins to changes in sea ice duration and distribution. These studies suggest that continued climate change is likely to impact upon future breeding success and colony viability for this species. Furthermore, a recent circumpolar study by Fretwell & Trathan (2009) highlighted those Antarctic coastal regions where colonies appear most vulnerable to such changes. Here we examine which other colonies might be at risk, discussing various ecological factors, some previously unexplored, that may also contribute to future declines. The implications of this are important for future modelling work and for understanding which colonies actually are most vulnerable.

  14. First recorded loss of an emperor penguin colony in the recent period of Antarctic regional warming: implications for other colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip N Trathan

    Full Text Available In 1948, a small colony of emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri was discovered breeding on Emperor Island (67° 51' 52″ S, 68° 42' 20″ W, in the Dion Islands, close to the West Antarctic Peninsula (Stonehouse 1952. When discovered, the colony comprised approximately 150 breeding pairs; these numbers were maintained until 1970, after which time the colony showed a continuous decline. By 1999 there were fewer than 20 pairs, and in 2009 high-resolution aerial photography revealed no remaining trace of the colony. Here we relate the decline and loss of the Emperor Island colony to a well-documented rise in local mean annual air temperature and coincident decline in seasonal sea ice duration. The loss of this colony provides empirical support for recent studies (Barbraud & Weimerskirch 2001; Jenouvrier et al 2005, 2009; Ainley et al 2010; Barber-Meyer et al 2005 that have highlighted the vulnerability of emperor penguins to changes in sea ice duration and distribution. These studies suggest that continued climate change is likely to impact upon future breeding success and colony viability for this species. Furthermore, a recent circumpolar study by Fretwell & Trathan (2009 highlighted those Antarctic coastal regions where colonies appear most vulnerable to such changes. Here we examine which other colonies might be at risk, discussing various ecological factors, some previously unexplored, that may also contribute to future declines. The implications of this are important for future modelling work and for understanding which colonies actually are most vulnerable.

  15. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based colony blot immunoassay for detection of thermotolerant Campylobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongsheng; Phipps-Todd, Beverley; McMahon, Tanis; Elmgren, Catherine L; Lutze-Wallace, Cheryl; Todd, Zoe A; Garcia, Manuel M

    2016-11-01

    Campylobacter species, particularly thermotolerant Campylobacter spp., such as C. jejuni, are major human foodborne pathogens. Culture methods have been routinely used for the detection of this organism in various types of samples. An alternative, simple and rapid confirmation test(s) without further tedious biochemical tests would be useful. Meanwhile, Campylobacter-like colonies can be difficult to identify on agar plates overgrown with competitive bacteria, which can lead to false-negative results. This study was to develop a simple colony blot immunoassay using a new monoclonal antibody (Mab) produced in the present study for rapid screening, confirmation and quantification of campylobacters on culture agar plates. The procedure developed in this study was able to specifically detect thermotolerant Campylobacter spp., but not other non-thermotolerant Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter reference strains tested. This assay could detect 10(5) cells in a single dot. This assay showed 100% correlation with the culture method for the blotted membranes from 21 either chicken meat or vegetable samples experimentally inoculated with thermotolerant campylobacters. Among 101 natural samples of chicken meat (n=44), chicken feces (n=20) and vegetables (n=37), this assay also showed positive for 23 chicken meat and 14 fecal samples that were positive for thermotolerant campylobacters by culture method, and identified four additional suspects that were culture negative. Membranes stored at 4°C for at least 4years could also be used for this assay. The assay developed in this study can be used in quantitative study for immediate or archival usage, and for diagnostic test to preliminarily confirm the presence of thermotolerant Campylobacter on agar plates. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced Bee Colony Algorithm for Complex Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Suriya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization problems are considered to be one kind of NP hard problems. Usually heuristic approaches are found to provide solutions for NP hard problems. There are a plenty of heuristic algorithmsavailable to solve optimization problems namely: Ant Colony Optimization, Particle Swarm Optimization, Bee Colony Optimization, etc. The basic Bee Colony algorithm, a population based search algorithm, is analyzed to be a novel tool for complex optimization problems. The algorithm mimics the food foraging behavior of swarmsof honey bees. This paper deals with a modified fitness function of Bee Colony algorithm. The effect of problem dimensionality on the performance of the algorithms will be investigated. This enhanced Bee Colony Optimization will be evaluated based on the well-known benchmark problems. The testing functions like Rastrigin, Rosenbrock, Ackley, Griewank and Sphere are used to evaluavate the performance of the enhanced Bee Colony algorithm. The simulation will be developed on MATLAB.

  17. Periodic growth of Bacillus subtilis colonies on agar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1992-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis colonies show periodic growth on agar plates. The organism has been observed to show several colony morphologies including diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) type, dense branching morphology (DBM), Eden type, and spreading without producing openings. The agar concentration for the periodic growth is higher than that of DBM and lower than that of DLA or Eden type. The nutrient (peptone) concentration for the periodic growth is higher than that of DLA and DBM and lower than that of Eden type. The colony grows towards a place with higher peptone concentration. These findings suggest that the diffusion of nutrient particles, i.e. the concentration gradient of peptone particles at the growing perimeter of a colony, would be essentially involved in the periodic growth. The distance between concentric rings of a colony is constant and intervention between two colonies is not observed, unlike the Liesegang ring.

  18. Colonial connections and consulting engineers 1850-1914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Casper

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses colonial connections and networks of British consulting engineers. It unravels how consulting engineers operated within different imperial contexts, including settler colonies, Egypt and Crown colonies in West Africa in particular. The paper also examines the close and at times...... strained connections that existed between London's consulting engineers and British engineers stationed overseas in colonial public works departments. By examining the colonial connections of metropolitan engineers, the paper sheds light on a hitherto ignored factor that tied Britain and the colonies...... together during the diaspora of British engineering. It argues that personal connections and relations remained of paramount importance during this period, which has traditionally been described as characterised by growing professionalisation and a subsequent loss of the personal element in British...

  19. The Assessment of Parameters Affecting the Quality of Cord Blood by the Appliance of the Annexin V Staining Method and Correlation with CFU Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Teja Falk; Barbosa, David; Duggleby, Richard Charles; Saccardi, Riccardo; Querol, Sergio; Kögler, Gesine

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of nonviable haematopoietic cells by Annexin V staining method in flow cytometry has recently been published by Duggleby et al. Resulting in a better correlation with the observed colony formation in methylcellulose assays than the standard ISHAGE protocol, it presents a promising method to predict cord blood potency. Herein, we applied this method for examining the parameters during processing which potentially could affect cord blood viability. We could verify that the current standards regarding time and temperature are sufficient, since no significant difference was observed within 48 hours or in storage at 4°C up to 26°C. However, the addition of DMSO for cryopreservation alone leads to an inevitable increase in nonviable haematopoietic stem cells from initially 14.8% ± 4.3% to at least 30.6% ± 5.5%. Furthermore, CFU-assays with varied seeding density were performed in order to evaluate the applicability as a quantitative method. The results revealed that only in a narrow range reproducible clonogenic efficiency (ClonE) could be assessed, giving at least a semiquantitative estimation. We conclude that both Annexin V staining method and CFU-assays with defined seeding density are reliable means leading to a better prediction of the final potency. Especially Annexin V, due to its fast readout, is a practical tool for examining and optimising specific steps in processing, while CFU-assays add a functional confirmation.

  20. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  1. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  2. Assays for thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    In summary, thrombopoietin levels have been determined indirectly by measuring thrombocytopoiesis in assay animals (platelet counting, measurement of isotope incorporation into newly formed platelets, changes in platelet sizes, or alterations in number and size of megakaryocytes) and by use of an immunoassay. Although much work remains, it seems clear at the present time that isotopic uptake into platelets of specially prepared assay mice (rebound-thrombocytosis) is superior to the other techniques now available for the measurement of thrombopoietin. However, the ideal assay for TSF which is specific, rapid, and inexpensive is yet to be developed. An immunoassay is in the development stage, but will require additional work before it can be utilized for the routine assay of TSF.

  3. Alternative methods in toxicology: CFU assays application, limitation and future prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Shukla, Pooja; Omer, Ankur; Singh, Poonam; Singh, R K

    2016-01-01

    Blood is a fluid connective tissue which plays a vital role for normal body function. It consist different type of blood cells which is continuously reproduce inside the bone marrow from hematopoietic system. Xenobiotics could be specifically toxic to the hematopoietic system and they can cause hematological disorders by disturbing the normal functions. In vitro hematopoietic colony-forming cell assays play a crucial role to evaluate potential toxic effects of new xenobiotics and also helpful in bridging the gap between preclinical toxicology studies in animal models and clinical investigations. Use of these assays in conjunction with, high-throughput screening reduces the cost and time associated with these assays. This article provides a critical view over in vitro hematopoietic colony-forming cell assays in assessment of hematotoxicity.

  4. The LuxS based quorum sensing governs lactose induced biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eDuanis-Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2. However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilms. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway.

  5. Colony patterning and collective hyphal growth of filamentous fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shu

    2002-11-01

    Colony morphology of wild and mutant strains of Aspergillus nidulans at various nutrient and agar levels was investigated. Two types of colony patterning were found for these strains. One type produced uniform colonies at all nutrient and agar levels tested, and the other exhibited morphological change into disordered ramified colonies at low nutrient levels. Both types showed highly condensed compact colonies at high nutrient levels on low agar media that was highly diffusive. Disordered colonies were found to develop with low hyphal extension rates at low nutrient levels. To understand basic pattern selection rules, a colony model with three parameters, i.e., the initial nutrient level and the step length of nutrient random walk as the external parameters, and the frequency of nutrient uptake as an internal parameter, was constructed. At low nutrient levels, with decreasing nutrient uptake frequency under diffusive conditions, the model colony exhibited onsets of disordered ramification. Further, in the growth process of A. nidulans, reduction of hyphal extension rate due to a population effect of hyphae was found when hyphae form three-dimensional dense colonies, as compared to the case in which hyphal growth was restricted into two-dimensional space. A hyphal population effect was introduced in the colony model. Thickening of colony periphery due to the population effect became distinctive as the nutrient diffusion effect was raised at high nutrient levels with low hyphal growth rate. It was considered that colony patterning and onset of disorder were strongly governed by the combination of nutrient diffusion and hyphal growth rate.

  6. Gender Metaphor for Colonialism in John Bull's Other Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹笑丽

    2015-01-01

    John Bull's Other Island is the only play of George Bernard Shaw dealing with the Irish problem.He manages to define and ridicule colonialism in it and satires English colonialist’s intention and nature.This paper studies colonialism in this play through sexual metaphor,to decipher how it works simultaneously as an intimation of the British colonial attitudes and a satire of economicexploitation.

  7. New Rapid Spore Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the Rapid Spore Assay for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited cleanroom studies to assess the feasibility of this assay during spacecraft assembly.

  8. Rethinking the Colonial State: Configurations of Power, Violence, and Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, Søren; Ivarsson, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The main theme of this special volume is the colonial state and its governmental practices. This chapter introduces and contextualizes the contributions by providing a brief induction to recent developments within the study of the colonial state. It then presents the contributions under three per...... perspectives which represent separate yet interrelated themes relevant for the understanding of the colonial state: practices, violence, and agency. Hereby, we also accentuate the value of a non-state-centric approach to the analysis of the colonial state....

  9. [German colonial plans for Africa in the Nazi era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linne, Karsten

    2003-12-01

    The German colonial plans concerning Africa in the era of National Socialism ascribed a central role the sciences. Scientists of all possible fields launched into activities. Especially subjects which were directly related to the practice of colonial policies, e.g. African languages, ethnology, law, economic sciences, and medicine, were developed. There were colonial ambitions at nearly every German university, but there was one which designated to become the centre of colonial sciences: the university of Hamburg. It has to be realized that working in this field of studies protected scientists from being drafted by the army for a long time.

  10. Independent component analysis based on adaptive artificial bee colony

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi Zhang; Chao-Wei Bao; Hai-Bin Shen

    2016-01-01

    .... An independent component analysis method based on adaptive artificial bee colony algorithm is proposed in this paper, aiming at the problems of slow convergence and low computational precision...

  11. REVISITING COLONIAL BEHAVIOUR IN FRENCH ALGERIA AND BRITISH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELKACEM BELMEKKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The British and the French differed in both the approach and method adopted in governing their overseas subjects during their colonial enterprise in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This had a tremendous impact on the psyche of the colonized and was a determinant factor in shaping the nature of the relationship between the colonizers and colonized before and after independence. Therefore, this paper seeks to juxtapose the colonial behaviour of two colonial powers, French and British, in two major colonies, Algeria and India.

  12. Tumor stem cell assay for detecting metastases of human lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai,Shunkichi

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available We applied a tumor stem cell assay using an enriched double-layered soft agar system for the detection of metastatic sites of lung cancer. Lung cancer colonies grew from 7 of 10 effusions cytologically positive for tumor cells and 7 of 10 bone marrow aspirates cytologically and histologically positive for tumor cells. Twenty-six of 29 bone marrow aspirates cytologically and histologically negative for tumor cells showed no colony growth. However, the remaining three bone marrow aspirates, which were obtained from patients with small cell lung cancer, formed colonies in soft agar. These results indicate that the tumor stem cell assay is useful for detecting metastatic sites of lung cancer.

  13. Interleukin-10 inhibits burst-forming unit-erythroid growth by suppression of endogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production from T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, L; Kollars, M; Bohle, B; Berer, A; Reiter, E; Lechner, K; Geissler, K

    1999-02-01

    Numerous cytokines released from accessory cells have been shown to exert either stimulatory or inhibitory growth signals on burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) growth. Because of its cytokine synthesis-inhibiting effects on T cells and monocytes, interleukin-10 (IL-10) may be a potential candidate for indirectly affecting erythropoiesis. We investigated the effects of IL-10 on BFU-E growth from normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a clonogenic progenitor cell assay. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to cultures containing recombinant human erythropoietin suppressed BFU-E growth in a dose-dependent manner (by 55.2%, range 47.3-63.3%, p cultivating highly enriched CD34+ cells. BFU-E growth from PBMC also was markedly suppressed in the presence of a neutralizing anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody (by 48.7%, range 32.9-61.2% inhibition,p < 0.01), but not by neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3. This suggests a stimulatory role of endogenously released GM-CSF on BFU-E formation. Also, the addition of exogenous GM-CSF completely restored IL-10-induced suppression of BFU-E growth. To determine the cellular source of GM-CSF production, we analyzed GM-CSF levels in suspension cultures containing PBMC that were either depleted of monocytes or T cells. Monocyte-depleted PBMC showed spontaneous production of increasing amounts of GM-CSF on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively, which could be suppressed by IL-10, whereas GM-CSF levels did not increase in cultures containing T-cell-depleted PBMC. Our data indicate that IL-10 inhibits the growth of erythroid progenitor cells in vitro, most likely by suppression of endogenous GM-CSF production from T cells.

  14. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  15. In vitro assay for HCV serine proteinase expressed in insect cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hua Hou; Gui-Xin Du; Rong-Bin Guan; Yi-Gang Tong; Hai-Tao Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To produce the recombinant NS3 protease of hepatitis C virus with enzymatic activity in insect cells.METHODS: The gene of HCV serine proteinase domain which encodes 181 amino acids was inserted into pFastBacHTc and the recombinant plasmid pFBCNS3N was transformed into DH10Bac competent cells for transposition.After the recombinant bacmids had been determined to be correct by both blue-white colonies and PCR analysis, the isolated bacmid DNAs were transfected into Sf9 insect cells.The bacmids DNA was verified to replicate in insect cells and packaged into baculovirus particles via PCR and electronic microscopic analysis. The insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus were determined by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot assays. The recombinant protein was soluted in N-lauryl sarcosine sodium (NLS) and purifed by metalchelated-affinity chromatography, then the antigenicity of recombinant protease was determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay and its enzymatic activity was detected.RESULTS: The HCV NS3 protease domain was expressed in insect cells at high level and it was partially solved in NLS.Totally 0.2 mg recombinant serine proteinase domain with high purity was obtained by metal-chelated-affinity chromatography from 5×107 cells, and both antigenicity and specificity of the protein were evaluated to be high when used as antigen to detect hepatitis C patients′ sera in indirect ELISA format. In vitro cleavage assay corroborated its enzymatic activity.CONCLUSION: The recombinant HCV NS3 proteinase expressed by insect cells is a membrane-binding protein with good antigenicity and enzymatic activity.

  16. Virtual Archaeology in an argentina colonial estancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Vázquez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a first approach to the application of virtual reconstruction techniques of a colonial house. In Argentina it is still uncommon to perform 3D modeling of archaeological sites and especially in historical archeology. As a first step, we used the Google SketchUp to model the country house located on the banks of the Río de la Plata (Buenos Aires. It has historical significance because it belonged to a Spanish councilman, housed hundreds of slaves and was the place where stayed the troops that carried out the Second British Invasion of Buenos Aires. In this case, the 3D modeling was useful for evaluating the future excavationa and activities of preservation of cultural heritage.

  17. Concepts for an export oriented lunar colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kent L.

    1990-12-01

    A model of a lunar domestic economy is presented which consists of 12 sectors, trading 21 goods and services. Material flow for operations and investments are balanced to minimize shortages and surpluses. Prices are formed by targeting a 15-35% return on assets for industry and a 15% after expenses income for labour. From this data, accounting statements, a 14 × 14 cash flow input/output matrix (consisting of 11 industrial sectors, labour, foreign trade and finance), and macroeconomic analyses are prepared which illuminate the most important links in the lunar economy. From this model conclusions are drawn regarding the matter of how best to lay the basis for sustainable colony growth and prosperity.

  18. Ant Colony Optimization and Hypergraph Covering Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Pat, Ankit

    2011-01-01

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a very popular metaheuristic for solving computationally hard combinatorial optimization problems. Runtime analysis of ACO with respect to various pseudo-boolean functions and different graph based combinatorial optimization problems has been taken up in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the runtime behavior of an MMAS*(Max-Min Ant System) ACO algorithm on some well known hypergraph covering problems that are NP-Hard. In particular, we have addressed the Minimum Edge Cover problem, the Minimum Vertex Cover problem and the Maximum Weak- Independent Set problem. The influence of pheromone values and heuristic information on the running time is analysed. The results indicate that the heuristic information has greater impact towards improving the expected optimization time as compared to pheromone values. For certain instances of hypergraphs, we show that the MMAS* algorithm gives a constant order expected optimization time when the dominance of heuristic information is ...

  19. Chiral patterning in Paenibacillus colonies under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Herbert

    2012-02-01

    One of the most striking examples of bacterial colony patterning occurs in the C-morphotype of Paenibacillus strains. Here, macroscopic chirality results from the interaction of local liquid-crystal ordering of the long bacterial cells with the self-propelled motility driven by the non-reflection-symmetric flagella. This talk will review some of the original experimental data from the Ben-Jacob lab as well as recent insight obtained via genomics. I will then discuss attempts to model and simulate the chiral patterns via solving reaction-diffusion equations on random lattices. At the end, I will introduce the challenges still to be faced in understanding transitions between these patterns and more common branching structures

  20. Optic disc detection using ant colony optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marcy A.; Monteiro, Fernando C.

    2012-09-01

    The retinal fundus images are used in the treatment and diagnosis of several eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper proposes a new method to detect the optic disc (OD) automatically, due to the fact that the knowledge of the OD location is essential to the automatic analysis of retinal images. Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the foraging behaviour of some ant species that has been applied in image processing for edge detection. Recently, the ACO was used in fundus images to detect edges, and therefore, to segment the OD and other anatomical retinal structures. We present an algorithm for the detection of OD in the retina which takes advantage of the Gabor wavelet transform, entropy and ACO algorithm. Forty images of the retina from DRIVE database were used to evaluate the performance of our method.

  1. Dynamics of the Presence of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in Honey Bee Colonies with Colony Collapse Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunsheng Hou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and it replicated actively in the colonies: viral titers decreased from April to September and increased from September to December. IAPV extracted from infected bees was highly infectious to healthy pupae: they showed several-fold amplification of the viral genome and synthesis of the virion protein VP3. The health of recovered colonies was seriously compromised. Interestingly, a rise of IAPV genomic copies in two colonies coincided with their subsequent collapse. Our results do not imply IAPV as the cause of CCD but indicate that once acquired and induced to replication it acts as an infectious factor that affects the health of the colonies and may determine their survival. This is the first follow up outside the US of CCD-colonies bearing IAPV under natural conditions.

  2. Dynamics of the presence of israeli acute paralysis virus in honey bee colonies with colony collapse disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chunsheng; Rivkin, Hadassah; Slabezki, Yossi; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2014-05-05

    The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and it replicated actively in the colonies: viral titers decreased from April to September and increased from September to December. IAPV extracted from infected bees was highly infectious to healthy pupae: they showed several-fold amplification of the viral genome and synthesis of the virion protein VP3. The health of recovered colonies was seriously compromised. Interestingly, a rise of IAPV genomic copies in two colonies coincided with their subsequent collapse. Our results do not imply IAPV as the cause of CCD but indicate that once acquired and induced to replication it acts as an infectious factor that affects the health of the colonies and may determine their survival. This is the first follow up outside the US of CCD-colonies bearing IAPV under natural conditions.

  3. TEMBLORES DE ARTERIAS Y CÁRCELES DE FUEGO: LITERATURA EN EL BRASIL COLONIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clicie Nunes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available El relato Cultura e Opulencia do Brasil por sus Drogas e Minas de André João Antonil describe los procesos de la producción colonial portuguesa en América. El texto publicado en Lisboa en 1711 contiene informaciones objetivas y prácticas, que se exponen metamorfo-seadas por la influencia del barroco literario. El narrador transita entre la descripción realista y la subjetividad barroca; se puede percibir el carácter lúdico de sus prédicas moralizadoras a través de metáforas a veces exacerbadas del universo del ingenio de azúcar. En la colonia portuguesa, la identidad negra ha sido transfigurada y la formación de una conciencia colonial surge en discursos que se instalan en la memoria social. En su texto, el padre Antonil elabora determinados valores que transforman su obra en un discurso "barroco-apologético" en torno al universo colonial: "Brasil es infierno de negros, purgatorio de blancos y paraíso de mulatos y mulatas".The narrative Cultura e Opulencia do Brasil por sus Drogas e Minas by Father André João Antonil, describes the processes ofthe colonial Portuguese production in América. The text, published in Lisbon in 1711, contains both objective andpractical information, transformed and influenced by 'literary baroque'. The narrator wanders from realistic transcription to baroque subjectivity, and we may perceive a playful character in his morality sermons, as he sometimes uses extreme metaphors belonging to the sugar mili scene. In the Portuguese colony, the black identity has been transfigured and the formation of a colonial conscience arises in speeches that have taken roots in a collective memory. Father Antonil elaborates those valúes which help to transform his work into a 'baroque-apologetic' speech about the colonial world: "Brazil is the hell of blacks, the purgatory of whites and the paradise of mulatto men and w ornen ".

  4. Traveling waves, two-phase fingers, and eutectic colonies in thin-sample directional solidification of a ternary eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu; Faivre

    2000-04-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the morphological transition of lamellar eutectic growth fronts called "formation of eutectic colonies" by the method of thin-sample directional solidification of a transparent model alloy, CBr4-C2Cl6. This morphological transition is due to the presence in the melt of traces of chemical components other than those of the base binary alloy (impurities). In this study, we use naphthalene as an impurity. The formation of eutectic colonies has generally been viewed as an impurity-driven Mullins-Sekerka instability of the envelope of the lamellar front. This traditional view neglects the strong interaction existing between the Mullins-Sekerka process and the dynamics of the lamellar pattern. This investigation brings to light several original features of the formation of eutectic colonies, in particular, the emission of long-wavelength traveling waves, and the appearance of dendritelike structures called two-phase fingers, which are connected with this interaction. We study the part played by these phenomena in the transition to eutectic colonies as a function of the impurity concentration. Recent theoretical results on the linear stability of ternary lamellar eutectic fronts [Plapp and Karma, Phys. Rev. E 60, 6865 (1999)] shed light on some aspects of the observed phenomena.

  5. (PostColonial State and Constitutionalism in India. Differences and Crossings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Grappi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article argues that the end of the formal division of the world between a colonizing metropolis and a colonized periphery requires a different reading of the State’s history. The essay deals with the relation between the formation of British India and the development of Indian nationalist movement through the events related to the ‘tiger of Mysore’, Tipu Sultan, and the swadeshi movement as portrayed in Tagore’s The Home and the World. The essay shows how colonial constitutionalism developed through the contemporary affirmation of the rule of law and the colonial difference. The postcolonial State emerged via concrete crossing of this difference, which today allows a different reading of the political discourses beyond the affirmation of the State as the barycenter of political organization at a global scale.

  6. Kynetic resazurin assay (KRA) for bacterial quantification of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Yaxal; Mandel, Arkady; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Fast detection of bacterial concentrations is important for the food industry and for healthcare. Early detection of infections and appropriate treatment is essential since, the delay of treatments for bacterial infections tends to be associated with higher mortality rates. In the food industry and in healthcare, standard procedures require the count of colony-forming units in order to quantify bacterial concentrations, however, this method is time consuming and reports require three days to be completed. An alternative is metabolic-colorimetric assays which provide time efficient in vitro bacterial concentrations. A colorimetric assay based on Resazurin was developed as a time kinetic assay (KRA) suitable for bacterial concentration measurements. An optimization was performed by finding excitation and emission wavelengths for fluorescent acquisition. A comparison of two non-related bacteria, foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, was performed in 96 well plates. A metabolic and clonogenic dependence was established for fluorescent kinetic signals.

  7. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  8. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  9. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Cthrc1 is a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone mass is maintained by continuous remodeling through repeated cycles of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. This remodeling process is regulated by many systemic and local factors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (Cthrc1 as a downstream target of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 in osteochondroprogenitor-like cells by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization followed by differential hybridization, and found that Cthrc1 was expressed in bone tissues in vivo. To investigate the role of Cthrc1 in bone, we generated Cthrc1-null mice and transgenic mice which overexpress Cthrc1 in osteoblasts (Cthrc1 transgenic mice. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT and bone histomorphometry analyses showed that Cthrc1-null mice displayed low bone mass as a result of decreased osteoblastic bone formation, whereas Cthrc1 transgenic mice displayed high bone mass by increase in osteoblastic bone formation. Osteoblast number was decreased in Cthrc1-null mice, and increased in Cthrc1 transgenic mice, respectively, while osteoclast number had no change in both mutant mice. In vitro, colony-forming unit (CFU assays in bone marrow cells harvested from Cthrc1-null mice or Cthrc1 transgenic mice revealed that Cthrc1 stimulated differentiation and mineralization of osteoprogenitor cells. Expression levels of osteoblast specific genes, ALP, Col1a1, and Osteocalcin, in primary osteoblasts were decreased in Cthrc1-null mice and increased in Cthrc1 transgenic mice, respectively. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation assays showed that Cthrc1 accelerated osteoblast proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, overexpression of Cthrc1 in the transgenic mice attenuated ovariectomy-induced bone loss. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Cthrc1 increases bone mass as a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation and offers an anabolic approach for the

  11. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Rageh Al-Maleki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV] to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk, ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis.

  12. Embodying colonial photography: remembering violence in Tabee Toean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about bodily interactions with photographs. Taking an interview with a veteran from the Dutch colonial army filmed for the documentary Tabee Toean (1995) as its case study, it focuses on the ways in which this man frames these images of colonial warfare through three types of bodily

  13. The colonial 'civilizing process' in Dutch Formosa 1624-1662

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiu, Hsin-hui

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of the colonial ‘civilizing process’ in Dutch Formosa (Present-day Taiwan) between 1624 and 1662. Drawing inspiration from Norbert Elias, this study stresses on ‘the colonial “civilizing process” ’ which is applied to the inexorable process of retreat from the era of ‘Aboriginal

  14. Memory contested, locality transformed : representing Japanese colonial 'heritage' in Taiwan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiang, Min-Chin

    2012-01-01

    In the search for a Taiwanese identity rooted in the land of Taiwan the Japanese colonial past plays an ambiguous role. The Japanese colonial sites became a constituent part of the new identity and cultural narrative of Taiwan in the 1990s and 2000s, when a memory boom was experienced in Taiwan repr

  15. 'Goodwill Ambassador': the Legacy of Dutch Colonial Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen Hendriks, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    abstractThe article looks back at the films commissioned and produced by the Dutch governments about their colony in teh East-Indies between 1912 and 1962. The main focus is on the newsreels and documentaries about the colonial war between the Netherlands and Indonesia  from 1945 to 1949. The articl

  16. Colonial memory and forgetting in the Netherlands and Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.

    2012-01-01

    The article addresses cultural memory in the Netherlands and Indonesia about mass violence committed during Dutch colonialism in the nineteenth and twentieth century. In both cases it questions the conception, expressed by various observers of both countries, that colonial violence has been forgotte

  17. Discover for Yourself: An Optimal Control Model in Insect Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the enlightening path of self-discovery afforded to the teacher of undergraduate mathematics. This is demonstrated as we find and develop background material on an application of optimal control theory to model the evolutionary strategy of an insect colony to produce the maximum number of queen or reproducer insects in the colony at…

  18. Toxoplasmosis in a colony of New World monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, H.H.; Henriksen, P.; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1997-01-01

    In a colony of New World monkeys five tamarins (Saguinus oedipus, Saguinus labiatus and Leontopithecus rosal. rosal.), three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix pygmaea) and one saki (Pithecia pithecia) died suddenly. The colony comprised 16 marmosets, 10 tamarins and three sakis. The ma...

  19. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  20. Slave Advertising in the Colonial Newspaper: Mirror to the Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Patricia

    To explore racial attitudes from the colonial period of the United States, a study examined advertising practices regarding announcements dealing with black slaves in colonial newspapers in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina. Careful scrutiny revealed no relationship between the editorial stance of a…

  1. Modeling cell-matrix traction forces in Keratinocyte colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2013-03-01

    Crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions plays an essential role in the mechanical function of tissues. The traction forces exerted by cohesive keratinocyte colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions are mostly concentrated at the colony periphery. In contrast, for weak cadherin-based intercellular adhesions, individual cells in a colony interact with their matrix independently, with a disorganized distribution of traction forces extending throughout the colony. In this talk I will present a minimal physical model of the colony as contractile elastic media linked by springs and coupled to an elastic substrate. The model captures the spatial distribution of traction forces seen in experiments. For cell colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions, the total traction force of the colony measured in experiments is found to scale with the colony's geometrical size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension of magnitude comparable to that measured for non-adherent, three-dimensional cell aggregates. The physical model supports the scaling and indicates that the surface tension may be controlled by acto-myosin contractility. Supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1004789. This work was done in collaboration with Aaron F. Mertz, Eric R. Dufresne and Valerie Horsley (Yale University) and M. Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse University).

  2. (É. Geoffroy, 1803) colonies within the Tolagnaro region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyde Roberts, S., Jacobs, M. D., Clark, R. M., Daly, C. M., Tsimijaly, L. H., Rossizela, R. J. and Prettyman, S. T. ..... health and status of each colony individually as each colony is ... the forest patch, as it is the sacred site of an ancestral tomb.

  3. Allee effects and colony collapse disorder in honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a mathematical model to quantify the hypothesis that a major ultimate cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honey bees is the presence of an Allee effect in the growth dynamics of honey bee colonies. In the model, both recruitment of adult bees as well as mortality of adult bees have...

  4. Discover for Yourself: An Optimal Control Model in Insect Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the enlightening path of self-discovery afforded to the teacher of undergraduate mathematics. This is demonstrated as we find and develop background material on an application of optimal control theory to model the evolutionary strategy of an insect colony to produce the maximum number of queen or reproducer insects in the colony at…

  5. The colonial 'civilizing process' in Dutch Formosa 1624-1662

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiu, Hsin-hui

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of the colonial ‘civilizing process’ in Dutch Formosa (Present-day Taiwan) between 1624 and 1662. Drawing inspiration from Norbert Elias, this study stresses on ‘the colonial “civilizing process” ’ which is applied to the inexorable process of retreat from the era of ‘Aboriginal Taiw

  6. Resisting the Coloniality of English: A Research Review of Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Funie

    2017-01-01

    The colonial legacy of English instruction has become especially relevant within the field of TESOL. While it is promising that increasing attention is being paid to the issue of colonialism and its historical and contemporary impact on the teaching of English, educators might be left without a clear sense of how to traverse the precarious path of…

  7. Countering Coloniality in Educational Research: From Ownership to Answerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    In this theoretical article, I argue for a relational stance on learning as a way of reckoning with educational research as part of the settler colonial structure of the United States. Because of my geopolitical location to the United States as a settler colony, I begin by contrasting the stances of anticolonial and decolonial. I then analyze the…

  8. Heralding the Other: Sousa, Simulacra, and Settler Colonialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of music and music education in the perpetuation of settler colonialism (a particular colonial configuration predicated on the expulsion of indigenous people and occupation of indigenous land) within the United States. Using Baudrillard's notion of simulacra, or "false truths," to look at racialized…

  9. The Political Economy of Colonial Education: Mozambique, 1930-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Under colonial fascism and during the revolutionary period leading to independence, the schooling of the African majority in Mozambique had no direct link with the economy, was more a mechanism of social control than of labor reproduction, and (in contrast to other African colonies) did not produce an African middle class supportive of the…

  10. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  11. CTL ELISPOT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Elena; Popescu, Iulia; Gigante, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (Elispot) is a quantitative method for measuring relevant parameters of T cell activation. The sensitivity of Elispot allows the detection of low-frequency antigen-specific T cells that secrete cytokines and effector molecules, such as granzyme B and perforin. Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) studies have taken advantage with this high-throughput technology by providing insights into quantity and immune kinetics. Accuracy, sensitivity, reproducibility, and robustness of Elispot resulted in a wide range of applications in research as well as in diagnostic field. Actually, CTL monitoring by Elispot is a gold standard for the evaluation of antigen-specific T cell immunity in clinical trials and vaccine candidates where the ability to detect rare antigen-specific T cells is of relevance for immune diagnostic. The most utilized Elispot assay is the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) test, a marker for CD8(+) CTL activation, but Elispot can also be used to distinguish different subsets of activated T cells by using other cytokines such as T-helper (Th) 1-type cells (characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-21, and TNF-α), Th2 (producing cytokines like IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13), and Th17 (IL-17) cells. The reliability of Elispot-generated data, by the evaluation of T cell frequency recognizing individual antigen/peptide, is the core of this method currently applied widely to investigate specific immune responses in cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. The Elispot assay is competing with other methods measuring single-cell cytokine production, e.g., intracellular cytokine by FACS or Miltenyi cytokine secretion assay. Other types of lymphocyte frequency and function assays include limiting dilution assay (LDA), cytotoxic T cell assay (CTL), and tetramer staining. Compared with respect to sensitivity the Elispot assay is outranking other methods to define frequency of antigen-specific lymphocytes. The method

  12. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is /sup 125/I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed.

  13. Collective motion and density fluctuations in bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Be'Er, Avraham; Florin, E.-L.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2010-03-01

    The emergence of collective motion such as in fish schools and swarming bacteria is a ubiquitous self-organization phenomenon. Such collective behavior plays an important role in a range of phenomenon, such as formation and migration of animal or fish groups. To understand the collective motion, tracking of large numbers of individuals is needed, but such measurements have been lacking. Here we examine a microscopic system, where we are able to measure simultaneously the positions, velocities, and orientations of up to a thousand bacteria in a colony. The motile bacteria form closely-packed dynamic clusters within which they move cooperatively. The number of bacteria in a cluster exhibits a power-law distribution truncated by an exponential tail, and the probability of finding large clusters grows markedly as bacterial density increases. Mobile clusters exhibit anomalous fluctuations in bacterial density: the standard deviation (δN) grows with the mean (N) of the number of bacteria as δN˜N^3/4 rather than δN˜N^1/2, as in thermal equilibrium systems.

  14. VERSES AND SCREAMS: POETIC MEMORY OF THE COLONIAL WAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Calafate Ribeiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the poetic memory of the experience of Colonial Wars identifying disparate expressions of poetic: a sort of poems of documentary value; poetry of the era that integrates Colonial War and also exposes the theme on the protest song; and poetry from poets of the Colonial War. The poetic archive made by the Anthology of Poetic Memory Poetics of Colonial Wars, organized by the authors of this article, shows that only the adverb Ainda/ Still –, one with which Manuel Alegre closes a voyage without return – shows how the war of continues inside the words, inside of the verses. It shows the depth inscription of the Colonial Wars in the Portuguese present time.

  15. Leisure, economy and colonial urbanism: Darjeeling, 1835-1930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2013-08-01

    This article posits that the hill station of Darjeeling was a unique form of colonial urbanism. It shifts historiographical interest from major urban centres in colonial India (such as Bombay or Calcutta) and instead attempts a greater understanding of smaller urban centres. In the process, it also interrogates the category of hill stations, which have been understood as exotic and scenic sites rather than as towns that were integral to the colonial economy. In arguing that hill stations, particularly Darjeeling, were not merely the scenic and healthy 'other' of the clamorous, dirty and diseased plains of India, it refutes suggestions that the 'despoiling' or overcrowding of Darjeeling was incremental to the purposes of its establishment. Instead, it suggests that Darjeeling was part of the colonial mainstream; its urbanization and inclusion into the greater colonial economy was effected from the time of its establishment. Therefore, a constant tension between its exotic and its functional elements persisted throughout.

  16. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays.

  17. Diversity within a colony morphotype: Implications for ecological research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldeman, D.L.; Amy, P.S. (Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas (United States))

    1993-03-01

    In microbial ecology, accurate identification based on morphotype is often impossible, so the assumption is often made that colonies of the same morphotype represent the same species or biotype. This study examines the validity of using colony morphology as the selection criterion for calculating ecological indices of the diversity and equitability of recoverable microbial communities. Isolates within sets of microbial colonies were very similar in terms of colony morphology, microscopic appearance, resistance to metals, and response to API-rapid-NFT tests. Resistance to antibiotics was variable within sets. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis distinguished between isolates of the same species or biotype. However, isolates belonging to the same biotype can be selected by morhotype. The researchers conclude colony morphology can provide an accurate basis on which to define recoverable diversity.

  18. An ant colony algorithm on continuous searching space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Cai, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Ant colony algorithm is heuristic, bionic and parallel. Because of it is property of positive feedback, parallelism and simplicity to cooperate with other method, it is widely adopted in planning on discrete space. But it is still not good at planning on continuous space. After a basic introduction to the basic ant colony algorithm, we will propose an ant colony algorithm on continuous space. Our method makes use of the following three tricks. We search for the next nodes of the route according to fixed-step to guarantee the continuity of solution. When storing pheromone, it discretizes field of pheromone, clusters states and sums up the values of pheromone of these states. When updating pheromone, it makes good resolutions measured in relative score functions leave more pheromone, so that ant colony algorithm can find a sub-optimal solution in shorter time. The simulated experiment shows that our ant colony algorithm can find sub-optimal solution in relatively shorter time.

  19. Remote Sensing Image Feature Extracting Based Multiple Ant Colonies Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhi-long

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel feature extraction method for remote sensing imagery based on the cooperation of multiple ant colonies. First, multiresolution expression of the input remote sensing imagery is created, and two different ant colonies are spread on different resolution images. The ant colony in the low-resolution image uses phase congruency as the inspiration information, whereas that in the high-resolution image uses gradient magnitude. The two ant colonies cooperate to detect features in the image by sharing the same pheromone matrix. Finally, the image features are extracted on the basis of the pheromone matrix threshold. Because a substantial amount of information in the input image is used as inspiration information of the ant colonies, the proposed method shows higher intelligence and acquires more complete and meaningful image features than those of other simple edge detectors.

  20. The Colonial Situation: Complicities and Distinctions from the Surrealist Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pablo Gómez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, taking as baseline the thought of Aimé Césaire and Franz Fanon —keeping in mind the closeness of the Negritude movement with surrealism—, we propose to approach the modernity/coloniality problem, appealing to the denominated surrealist image of beauty. In the first part the colonial situation is approached, in the second the colonial situation from the logic of surrealist image, and in the third the possibility of a decolonial universal or pluriversal is raised. In general terms, exploring the existent link between the “surrealist image” and the colonial structure of modernity —that generates the denominated colonial situation—, we aspire to approach what could be a decolonial aesthetic that, as general problem, will be tackled in later works.

  1. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory ...

  2. Iridovirus and microsporidian linked to honey bee colony decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry J Bromenshenk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, again devastated honey bee colonies in the USA, indicating that the problem is neither diminishing nor has it been resolved. Many CCD investigations, using sensitive genome-based methods, have found small RNA bee viruses and the microsporidia, Nosema apis and N. ceranae in healthy and collapsing colonies alike with no single pathogen firmly linked to honey bee losses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Mass spectrometry-based proteomics (MSP to identify and quantify thousands of proteins from healthy and collapsing bee colonies. MSP revealed two unreported RNA viruses in North American honey bees, Varroa destructor-1 virus and Kakugo virus, and identified an invertebrate iridescent virus (IIV (Iridoviridae associated with CCD colonies. Prevalence of IIV significantly discriminated among strong, failing, and collapsed colonies. In addition, bees in failing colonies contained not only IIV, but also Nosema. Co-occurrence of these microbes consistently marked CCD in (1 bees from commercial apiaries sampled across the U.S. in 2006-2007, (2 bees sequentially sampled as the disorder progressed in an observation hive colony in 2008, and (3 bees from a recurrence of CCD in Florida in 2009. The pathogen pairing was not observed in samples from colonies with no history of CCD, namely bees from Australia and a large, non-migratory beekeeping business in Montana. Laboratory cage trials with a strain of IIV type 6 and Nosema ceranae confirmed that co-infection with these two pathogens was more lethal to bees than either pathogen alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings implicate co-infection by IIV and Nosema with honey bee colony decline, giving credence to older research pointing to IIV, interacting with Nosema and mites, as probable cause of bee losses in the USA, Europe, and Asia. We next need to characterize the IIV and Nosema that we detected and develop management practices to reduce honey

  3. Iridovirus and microsporidian linked to honey bee colony decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Henderson, Colin B; Wick, Charles H; Stanford, Michael F; Zulich, Alan W; Jabbour, Rabih E; Deshpande, Samir V; McCubbin, Patrick E; Seccomb, Robert A; Welch, Phillip M; Williams, Trevor; Firth, David R; Skowronski, Evan; Lehmann, Margaret M; Bilimoria, Shan L; Gress, Joanna; Wanner, Kevin W; Cramer, Robert A

    2010-10-06

    In 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), again devastated honey bee colonies in the USA, indicating that the problem is neither diminishing nor has it been resolved. Many CCD investigations, using sensitive genome-based methods, have found small RNA bee viruses and the microsporidia, Nosema apis and N. ceranae in healthy and collapsing colonies alike with no single pathogen firmly linked to honey bee losses. We used Mass spectrometry-based proteomics (MSP) to identify and quantify thousands of proteins from healthy and collapsing bee colonies. MSP revealed two unreported RNA viruses in North American honey bees, Varroa destructor-1 virus and Kakugo virus, and identified an invertebrate iridescent virus (IIV) (Iridoviridae) associated with CCD colonies. Prevalence of IIV significantly discriminated among strong, failing, and collapsed colonies. In addition, bees in failing colonies contained not only IIV, but also Nosema. Co-occurrence of these microbes consistently marked CCD in (1) bees from commercial apiaries sampled across the U.S. in 2006-2007, (2) bees sequentially sampled as the disorder progressed in an observation hive colony in 2008, and (3) bees from a recurrence of CCD in Florida in 2009. The pathogen pairing was not observed in samples from colonies with no history of CCD, namely bees from Australia and a large, non-migratory beekeeping business in Montana. Laboratory cage trials with a strain of IIV type 6 and Nosema ceranae confirmed that co-infection with these two pathogens was more lethal to bees than either pathogen alone. These findings implicate co-infection by IIV and Nosema with honey bee colony decline, giving credence to older research pointing to IIV, interacting with Nosema and mites, as probable cause of bee losses in the USA, Europe, and Asia. We next need to characterize the IIV and Nosema that we detected and develop management practices to reduce honey bee losses.

  4. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  5. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  6. Collective Memories of Portuguese Colonial Action in Africa: Representations of the Colonial Past among Mozambicans and Portuguese Youths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Feijó

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Social representations of the colonization and decolonization processes among young people from a former European colonial power (Portugal and from an African ex-colony (Mozambique were investigated through surveys using open- and closed-ended questions about national history, focusing on the identity functions of collective memories. Hegemonic and contested representations were found of the most prominent events related to Portuguese colonization of Mozambique, arousing a range of collective emotions. A central place is occupied by memories of the Colonial War, which ended with the Carnation Revolution in Portugal and the subsequent independence of the Portuguese African colonies. Overall, the depiction of colonialism was more negative for Mozambican than for Portuguese participants. The violent effects of colonial action were very salient in Mozambican memories, which stressed the most oppressive aspects of the colonial period, associated with slave trade and brutal repression. On the Portuguese side, the idealization of the voyages of discovery persisted, obscuring the most violent effects of colonial expansion. However, collective memories of colonization of former colonizer and former colonized do not simply stand opposed. Both Mozambican and Portuguese participants reported ambivalent feelings towards the colonization process.

  7. The Importance of Microbes in Nutrition and Health of Honey Bee Colonies Part-2: Factors Affecting the Microbial Community in Honey Bee Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bee colonies have innumerable symbiotic bacteria and fungi that are essential to the health of the colony. In the first part of this series, we discussed the importance of microbes in maintaining the health of honey bee colonies. The bacteria, yeasts and molds that live in a healthy colony a...

  8. The hematopoietic chemokine CXCL12 promotes integration of human endothelial colony forming cell-derived cells into immature vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Sarah E; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Khoo, Cheen P; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Camicia, Rosalba; Zhang, Youyi; Grabowska, Rita; Harris, Adrian L; Roubelakis, Maria G; Watt, Suzanne M

    2014-11-15

    Proangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prime endothelial cells to respond to "hematopoietic" chemokines and cytokines by inducing/upregulating expression of the respective chemokine/cytokine receptors. Coculture of human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-derived cells with human stromal cells in the presence of VEGF and FGF-2 for 14 days resulted in upregulation of the "hematopoietic" chemokine CXCL12 and its CXCR4 receptor by day 3 of coculture. Chronic exposure to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in this vasculo/angiogenesis assay significantly reduced vascular tubule formation, an observation recapitulated by delayed AMD3100 addition. While AMD3100 did not affect ECFC-derived cell proliferation, it did demonstrate a dual action. First, over the later stages of the 14-day cocultures, AMD3100 delayed tubule organization into maturing vessel networks, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell retraction and loss of complexity as defined by live cell imaging. Second, at earlier stages of cocultures, we observed that AMD3100 significantly inhibited the integration of exogenous ECFC-derived cells into established, but immature, vascular networks. Comparative proteome profiler array analyses of ECFC-derived cells treated with AMD3100 identified changes in expression of potential candidate molecules involved in adhesion and/or migration. Blocking antibodies to CD31, but not CD146 or CD166, reduced the ECFC-derived cell integration into these extant vascular networks. Thus, CXCL12 plays a key role not only in endothelial cell sensing and guidance, but also in promoting the integration of ECFC-derived cells into developing vascular networks.

  9. Was Fundamental Education Another Form Of Colonialism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watras, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    A description of the work of Pedro Tamesis Orata provides an opportunity to investigate the conflicts that can occur when educators seek to reduce poverty while trying to respect indigenous cultures. A native of the Philippines, Orata completed his doctoral studies at the Ohio State University in 1927. During US President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, he accepted the position of school principal for the US Bureau of Indian Affairs. After World War II, he directed the spread of fundamental education through the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In his final years, he returned to the Philippines where he began a movement to spread what were called self-help high schools. In these activities, Orata taught people to follow John Dewey's five steps of thinking while working to improve their standards of living. In the 1970s, educators, such as Paulo Freire, complained that problem-solving methods, similar to those Orata favored, reinforced the oppressive aspects of formerly colonial societies. While Freire may have been overly critical, conflicts among cultural orientations appear to be unavoidable. The hope behind this investigation is that the difficulties can be reduced when people understand the different forces that persist.

  10. Kanehsatà:ke: Canadian Colonial Aporias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Koptie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reflective topical narrative following the research of Irihapeti Ramsden (2003, an Ngai Tahupotiki (Maori nursing instructor of Aotearoa (New Zealand. It is a reflection on the nature of Indigenous inquiry, or what Irihapeti Ramsden recognized as an often melancholic journey of self-discovery. It has been a continuous struggle for Indigenous scholars to understand how, where, and why the injustices of colonization reduced Indigenous peoples to dependent remnants of the self-reliant and independent nations our stories remember. By connecting ideas like Jacques Derrida’s work on Aporias to the intentionality of the Kahswenhtha (Two Row Wampum, my hope is to contextualize one unresolved injustice, the Kanehsatà:ke (Oka conflict. The symbolism of the Two Row Wampum addresses the possible but also the impossible of a new brotherhood between colonial Canada and its Indigenous peoples. Reconciliation will only be possible when Canada honours Indigenous resistance, resentment and rebellion against European myths of prerogative power. Our ancestors sacrificed a great deal, and we must wipe our tears and open our eyes, listen deeply, clear our throats and raise our voices to bear witness to our ancestors’ prayers for enduring hope, liberty and peace.

  11. Historicism, Coloniality, and Culture in Wartime Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Koyama

    Full Text Available Abstract Abstract: Historicism has shaped global politics by projecting multiple images of development. Specifically, it has served to legitimise Western forms of hegemony by naturalising the schema of ‘First in the West, then in the Rest,’ thereby damning non-Western Others to the ‘waiting room’ of history (Chakrabarty 2000. In this light, decolonising international relations must likewise complement efforts to decolonise the stagist views of historicism implicit in civilisational history. However, this focus on stagism neglects the ways in which historicism has also been employed to assert non-Western agencies in the name of culture, and to legitimise colonialism, as it was in the case of Japan. The case of Japan thus raises the question of whether limiting the critique of historicism to that of being a stagist civilisational discourse is sufficient or not. This article argues that there are not just one but two problems with historicism in international relations: first, that the stagist view of history legitimises the civilising mission; and second, that the romantic turn to culture as a means of resisting Eurocentric history may actually underwrite a colonialist discourse as well. If this is correct, the debate on historicism must not only engage with the concept of civilisation, but also with the concept of culture as a site through which sovereignty is projected.

  12. Ant Colony Optimisation for Backward Production Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pereira dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of a production scheduling system is to assign tasks (orders or jobs to resources and sequence them as efficiently and economically (optimised as possible. Achieving this goal is a difficult task in complex environment where capacity is usually limited. In these scenarios, finding an optimal solution—if possible—demands a large amount of computer time. For this reason, in many cases, a good solution that is quickly found is preferred. In such situations, the use of metaheuristics is an appropriate strategy. In these last two decades, some out-of-the-shelf systems have been developed using such techniques. This paper presents and analyses the development of a shop-floor scheduling system that uses ant colony optimisation (ACO in a backward scheduling problem in a manufacturing scenario with single-stage processing, parallel resources, and flexible routings. This scenario was found in a large food industry where the corresponding author worked as consultant for more than a year. This work demonstrates the applicability of this artificial intelligence technique. In fact, ACO proved to be as efficient as branch-and-bound, however, executing much faster.

  13. Artificial bee colony in neuro - Symbolic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasihmuddin, Mohd Shareduwan Mohd; Sathasivam, Saratha; Mansor, Mohd. Asyraf

    2017-08-01

    Swarm intelligence is a research area that models the population of the swarm based on natural computation. Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is a swarm based metaheuristic algorithm introduced by Karaboga to optimize numerical problem. Pattern-SAT is a pattern reconstruction paradigm that utilized 2SAT logical rule in representing the behavior of the desired pattern. The information of the desired pattern in terms of 2SAT logic is embedded to Hopfield neural network (HNN-P2SAT) and the desired pattern is reconstructed during the retrieval phase. Since the performance of HNN-P2SAT in Pattern-SAT deteriorates when the number of 2SAT clause increased, newly improved ABC is used to reduce the computation burden during the learning phase of HNN-P2SAT (HNN-P2SATABC). The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of Pattern-SAT produced by ABC incorporated with HNN-P2SAT and compare it with conventional standalone HNN. The comparison is examined by using Microsoft Visual Basic C++ 2013 software. The detailed comparison in doing Pattern-SAT is discussed based on global Pattern-SAT, ratio of activated clauses and computation time. The result obtained from computer simulation indicates the beneficial features of HNN-P2SATABC in doing Pattern-SAT. This finding is expected to result in a significant implication on the choice of searching method used to do Pattern-SAT.

  14. Analysis of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and Dipicryethane (DPE) for Mutagenicity by the Ames/Salmonella Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Felton, J

    2007-10-12

    The Ames/Salmonella assay, developed by Professor Bruce Ames at the University of California, Berkeley, is a rapid and sensitive assay for detecting mutagenicity of various chemical compounds (Maron and Ames, 1983). It is a widely accepted short-term assay for detecting chemicals that induce mutations in the histidine (his) gene of Salmonella typhimurium. This is a reverse mutation assay that detects the mutational reversion of his-dependent Salmonella to the his-independent counterpart. Thereby, mutagenic compounds will increase the frequency of occurrence of his-independent bacterial colonies. The assay utilizes the specific genetically constructed strains of bacteria either with or without mammalian metabolic activation enzymes (S9), Aroclor induced rat liver homogenate to assess the mutagenicity of different compounds. In this study, we will use the Ames/Salmonella assay to investigate the mutagenicity of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) from both Bofors and Pantex, and Dipicryethane (DPE).

  15. The hyper-cube framework for ant colony optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Christian; Dorigo, Marco

    2004-04-01

    Ant colony optimization is a metaheuristic approach belonging to the class of model-based search algorithms. In this paper, we propose a new framework for implementing ant colony optimization algorithms called the hyper-cube framework for ant colony optimization. In contrast to the usual way of implementing ant colony optimization algorithms, this framework limits the pheromone values to the interval [0,1]. This is obtained by introducing changes in the pheromone value update rule. These changes can in general be applied to any pheromone value update rule used in ant colony optimization. We discuss the benefits coming with this new framework. The benefits are twofold. On the theoretical side, the new framework allows us to prove that in Ant System, the ancestor of all ant colony optimization algorithms, the average quality of the solutions produced increases in expectation over time when applied to unconstrained problems. On the practical side, the new framework automatically handles the scaling of the objective function values. We experimentally show that this leads on average to a more robust behavior of ant colony optimization algorithms.

  16. Ecological conditions favoring budding in colonial organisms under environmental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Nakamaru

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a topic of great interest in ecology. Many organisms adopt one of two distinct dispersal tactics at reproduction: the production of small offspring that can disperse over long distances (such as seeds and spawned eggs, or budding. The latter is observed in some colonial organisms, such as clonal plants, corals and ants, in which (superorganisms split their body into components of relatively large size that disperse to a short distance. Contrary to the common dispersal viewpoint, short-dispersal colonial organisms often flourish even in environments with frequent disturbances. In this paper, we investigate the conditions that favor budding over long-distance dispersal of small offspring, focusing on the life history of the colony growth and the colony division ratio. These conditions are the relatively high mortality of very small colonies, logistic growth, the ability of dispersers to peacefully seek and settle unoccupied spaces, and small spatial scale of environmental disturbance. If these conditions hold, budding is advantageous even when environmental disturbance is frequent. These results suggest that the demography or life history of the colony underlies the behaviors of the colonial organisms.

  17. Between stigmatisation and regulation: prostitution in colonial Northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracol-Huynh, Isabelle

    2010-08-01

    Colonisation was a masculine adventure which took place in a distorted world full of 'welcoming' native women. The colonial encounter therefore was both racial and gendered: boundaries between European men and Vietnamese women were obvious. On the other hand the intimacy that resulted from this encounter blurred the racial boundaries that were the foundation of the colonial order. These boundaries had to be redrawn or sharpened. Focusing on French colonial northern Vietnam (Tonkin) this paper examines how the whole colonial encounter was embodied in the sexual encounter between European men and native women and how prostitution was an integral part of the colonial order. This analysis of the regulation of prostitution and its ambivalence reveals that the definition of prostitution and its treatment by the French colonial authorities was political, racial and therefore connected to a specific period. The political definition of prostitution in today's Vietnam is different from the colonial one. This shift reveals that prostitution is a pertinent vantage point from which one can study how a society apprehends itself and its own future.

  18. Colony induction and growth inhibition in Desmodesmus quadrispina (Chlorococcales) by allelochemicals released from the filamentous alga Uronema confervicolum (Ulotrichales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflaive, Joséphine; Lacroix, Gérard; Nicaise, Yvan; Ten-Hage, Loïc

    2008-06-01

    In biofilms, the competition between microorganisms for light, nutrients and space is extreme. Moreover, planktonic algae can be considered as competitors insofar as they decrease the available light for the benthic algae. One of the strategies employed by microorganisms to eliminate competitors is the release of inhibiting compounds, a process known as allelopathy. Here we demonstrate that a benthic/epiphytic alga, Uronema confervicolum, produces allelopathic compounds that induce oxidative stress and growth inhibition in the planktonic Desmodesmus quadrispina. Some of these compounds can also trigger the formation of colony in D. quadrispina. As colonies have higher sedimentation rates than unicells, their induction by U. confervicolum might decrease shading. This study is the first report of colony induction in the context of alga-alga interaction. Our results also suggest the implication of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the transduction of the signal leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species in the cells. A comparison with allelochemicals from another planktonic green alga, Monoraphidium aff. dybowski, emphasizes the specificity of colony induction by U. confervicolum, in contrast with oxidative stress which is induced by several compounds. The reciprocal production of inhibiting compounds by D. quadrispina makes this interaction an interesting example of co-evolution between two microorganisms belonging to different compartments of the ecosystem.

  19. The Role of the Navy of the German Empire in the Colonial Plans of the Emperor Wilhelm II (1896–1900

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesya L. Goncharenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of ideological background for the formation of the German Navy and its role in the colonial plans of the German Emperor Wilhelm II in the late XIX – early XX century. It is reported the main directions and peculiarities of the implementation of the naval program, in particular, the characteristics of the coverage of this issue in society and its scientific justification. Much attention is given to the problems of the Kaiser's participation in the formation and development of the fleet, as well as the Emperor's plans for the engagement of the naval forces to participate in the colonial policy of the Empire.

  20. RICE IN COLONIAL AND POST COLONIAL SOUTHEAST ASIA: A FOOD REGIME ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Pradadimara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the ways in which rice, as a global commodity, has been produced and sold in various regions in Southeast Asia from the colonial era to the present days. This paper employs a food regime analysis first introduced by Harriet Friedmann (1982 and later developed together with Philip McMichael (1989 to look at the global political economy of rice. In this paper, it will be shown how various colonial and post colonial states in Southeast Asia (including Thailand who was never formally colonized through their policies have practically divided the region where Burma (now Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam in the mainland have become major rice producer and exporter, while Indonesia, Malaya (now Malaysia, and the Philippines in the archipelagic Southeast Asia have become major rice importers although at the same time producers and exporters of other agro-commodities (coffee, sugar, rubber.Keywords: rice history, food regime, Southeast Asia Artikel ini menelusuri cara di mana padi sebagai komoditas dunia diproduksi dan dijual di beberapa daerah di Asia Tenggara mulai zaman kolonial sampai sekarang. Artikel ini menggunakan analisis “food regime” yang pertama kali diperkenalkan oleh Harrier Friedman (1982 dan kemudian dikembangkan bersama oleh Philip (1989 untuk mengetahui politik ekonomi global dari padi. Dalam artikel ini, akan dilihat mengenai bagaimana negara kolonial dan pasca-kolonial yanb berbeda di Asia Tenggara (termasuk Thailand yang tidak pernah dijajah sebelumnya melalui kebiakannya, yang hampir membagi wilayahnya, di mana Burma (Myanmar, Thailand, dan Vietnam telah menjadi produsen dan eksportir utama terbesar, sedangkan Indonesia dan Malaya (Malaysia dan Filipina di Asia Tenggara telah menjadi produsen dan eksportir komoditas pertanian lain (kopi, gula, karet dalam waktu yang bersamaan.Kata kunci: sejarah beras, food regime, Asia Tenggara. 

  1. The corneal pocket assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  2. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  3. Bacterial assay of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D E; Hosmer, M; Georgescu, M; Farris, R L

    1996-03-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the quantity of bacteria on the contact lens and adjacent areas of the eye. This paper is a quantitative study of the contact lens and ocular aerobic microbiota in a mixed group of daily and extended wear disposable contact lens users. The contact lens, the lower fornix, tears collecting at the lower fornix, and edge of the lower lid at the Meibomian gland margin were assayed for the quantity of bacterial colony forming units (CFU). Eighteen patients wearing 49 disposable high water content hydrogel contact lenses were assayed and the mean lens age was 8.8 +/- 4.6 days. Three patients wore their lenses on a daily wear basis and 15 on an extended wear schedule. Tear samples were obtained with sterile microbial loops and the lens was macerated into small particles with a tissue grinder. The samples were poured onto the surface of chocolate agar plates and incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h in 5% Co2. The lid margin revealed the greatest bacterial presence (mean = 9.7 CFU; median = 2 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The lens showed the next greatest presence of CFU (mean = 4.5 CFU; median = 1 CFU; mode = 0). The fornix and tears revealed the least bacterial presence (fornix: mean = 2.6 CFU; median = 0 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci. The bacterial assay of disposable lens wearing contact lens subjects indicates that the lid margins are the greatest source of bacteria with the tears being the lowest. These studies support the concept that in the eye, the lens typically does not possess a large number of bacteria under normal conditions.

  4. Ants regulate colony spatial organization using multiple chemical road-signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Yael; Shental, Noam; Brandis, Alexander; Hefetz, Abraham; Feinerman, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    Communication provides the basis for social life. In ant colonies, the prevalence of local, often chemically mediated, interactions introduces strong links between communication networks and the spatial distribution of ants. It is, however, unknown how ants identify and maintain nest chambers with distinct functions. Here, we combine individual tracking, chemical analysis and machine learning to decipher the chemical signatures present on multiple nest surfaces. We present evidence for several distinct chemical ‘road-signs' that guide the ants' movements within the dark nest. These chemical signatures can be used to classify nest chambers with different functional roles. Using behavioural manipulations, we demonstrate that at least three of these chemical signatures are functionally meaningful and allow ants from different task groups to identify their specific nest destinations, thus facilitating colony coordination and stabilization. The use of multiple chemicals that assist spatiotemporal guidance, segregation and pattern formation is abundant in multi-cellular organisms. Here, we provide a rare example for the use of these principles in the ant colony. PMID:28569746

  5. The colonial identity of wine: the "Leakey Affair" and the Franco-Algerian order of things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, John

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the 1905 crisis of French and Algerian viticulture that came to be known as the "Leakey Affair." It explains why metropolitan French observers reacted so strongly to Leakey's contract and subsequent advertising of Algerian wine on the British market, first from a socio-economic perspective, and second by reference to the importance of wine in French culture and identity. The final section of the article explains the response of Algeria's colonists to their metropolitan critics. Throughout, wine is used as a prism through which to explore the nature of identity in modern France and the complex colonial relationship in which the wine industry played such a major role. The Leakey Affair revealed the fragility of colonial cultural formations and the importance of wine as a conduit of ideas, and a symbol for fierce wrangling over identity, belonging, and the nature of empire. What was at stake was no less than the intellectual ownership of a mainstay of France's cultural mythology -- wine -- and the relationship between an imperial power and its colonial world.

  6. One Film, or Many?: The Multiple Texts of the Colonial Korean Film "Volunteer"

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    Jaekil Seo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, studies on films from colonial Korea in the Japanese empire had to rely primarily on secondary texts, such as memoirs, journal and newspaper articles, and film reviews. The recent discovery of original film texts from archives in Japan, China, Russia, and elsewhere and their availability on DVD format, prompted an important turning point in the scholarship. However, juxtaposing these newly released DVD versions with other archival sources exposes significant differences among the existing versions of texts. For instance, a newly discovered script reveals that important segments are missing in the recently released DVD version of the propaganda film "Volunteer." There also exist important discrepancies in the dialogue among the original film script, the actual film version, the synopsis, and the Japanese subtitles. Some of the Korean-language dialogue, which might be interpreted as exhibiting some ambivalence toward Japanese imperial policies, was completely silenced through strategic omissions in the Japanese-language subtitles targeting Japanese audiences. Some Japanese-language translations of the script also exhibit drastic changes from the original Korean-language dialogue. Piecing together such fragmented and fraught linguistic dissonance found in the colonial archives, we can conjecture that viewers from the colony and the metropole of "Volunteer" may have consumed very different versions of the film. This article aims to examine the significance of such dissonance, which has only recently become audible in so-called films of transcolonial coproduction.

  7. An Improved Ant Colony Routing Algorithm for WSNs

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    Tan Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ant colony algorithm is a classical routing algorithm. And it are used in a variety of application because it is economic and self-organized. However, the routing algorithm will expend huge amounts of energy at the beginning. In the paper, based on the idea of Dijkstra algorithm, the improved ant colony algorithm was proposed to balance the energy consumption of networks. Through simulation and comparison with basic ant colony algorithms, it is obvious that improved algorithm can effectively balance energy consumption and extend the lifetime of WSNs.

  8. Improvement and Implementation of Best-worst Ant Colony Algorithm

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    Xianmin Wei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduced the ant colony algorithm of best-worst ant system based on the pheromone update. By update improvements of local pheromone and global pheromone, as well as the optimal solution enhancement to a greater extent and the weakening of the worst solution, the algorithm further increased the difference of pheromone amount between the edge of the optimal path and the edge of the worst path and allowed the ant colony search behavior more focused near the optimal solution. Finally, through simulation experiments to prove that the algorithm can get the optimal solution and the convergence rate is faster than the average ant colony algorithm.

  9. 'Goodwill Ambassador': the Legacy of Dutch Colonial Films

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    Gerda Jansen Hendriks

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article looks back at the films commissioned and produced by the Dutch governments about their colony in teh East-Indies between 1912 and 1962. The main focus is on the newsreels and documentaries about the colonial war between the Netherlands and Indonesia  from 1945 to 1949. The article reviews these films and the re-use of their footage in later television programs. The programs often look back at the colonial war in ways that go beyond the purpose of the original films and the article aims to show the methods that are used to do this.

  10. Evolution of medical education in India: The impact of colonialism

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    Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross-cultural exchanges between the people of India and their colonial rulers provides a fascinating insight into how these encounters shaped medicine and medical education in India. This article traces the history of how Indian medicine was transformed in the backdrop of colonialism and hegemony. It goes on to show how six decades after independence, we have have still been unable to convincingly shrug off the colonial yoke. India needs to work out a national medical curriculum which caters to our country's needs. A symbiotic relationship needs to be developed between the indigenous and allopathic systems of medicine.

  11. Evolution of medical education in India: The impact of colonialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supe, A

    2016-01-01

    The cross-cultural exchanges between the people of India and their colonial rulers provides a fascinating insight into how these encounters shaped medicine and medical education in India. This article traces the history of how Indian medicine was transformed in the backdrop of colonialism and hegemony. It goes on to show how six decades after independence, we have have still been unable to convincingly shrug off the colonial yoke. India needs to work out a national medical curriculum which caters to our country's needs. A symbiotic relationship needs to be developed between the indigenous and allopathic systems of medicine.

  12. Critical evaluation of branch polarity and apical dominance as dictators of colony astogeny in a branching coral.

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    Lee Shaish

    Full Text Available The high morphological resemblance between branching corals and trees, can lead to comparative studies on pattern formation traits, best exemplified in plants and in some cnidarians. Here, 81 branches of similar size of the hermatypic coral Stylophora pistillata were lopped of three different genets, their skeletons marked with alizarin red-S, and divided haphazardly into three morphometric treatment groups: (I upright position; (II horizontal position, intact tip; and (III horizontal position, cut tip. After 1 y of in-situ growth, the 45 surviving ramets were brought to the laboratory, their tissues removed and their architectures analyzed by 22 morphological parameters (MPs. We found that within 1 y, isolated branches developed into small coral colonies by growing new branches from all branch termini, in all directions. No architectural dissimilarity was assigned among the three studied genets of treatment I colonies. However, a major architectural disparity between treatment I colonies and colonies of treatments II and III was documented as the development of mirror structures from both sides of treatments II and III settings as compared to tip-borne architectures in treatment I colonies. We did not observe apical dominance since fragments grew equally from all branch sides without documented dominant polarity along branch axis. In treatment II colonies, no MP for new branches originating either from tips or from branch bases differed significantly. In treatment III colonies, growth from the cut tip areas was significantly lower compared to the base, again, suggesting lack of apical dominance in this species. Changes in branch polarity revealed genet associated plasticity, which in one of the studied genets, led to enhanced growth. Different genets exhibited canalization flexibility of growth patterns towards either lateral growth, or branch axis extension (skeletal weight and not porosity was measured. This study revealed that colony

  13. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  14. Multiscale modeling of bacterial colonies: how pili mediate the dynamics of single cells and cellular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pönisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph A.; Juckeland, Guido; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, gonorrhea. Over the past two decades there has been an alarming increase of reported gonorrhea cases where the bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics thus prompting for alternative antimicrobial treatment strategies. The crucial step in this and many other bacterial infections is the formation of microcolonies, agglomerates consisting of up to several thousands of cells. The attachment and motility of cells on solid substrates as well as the cell-cell interactions are primarily mediated by type IV pili, long polymeric filaments protruding from the surface of cells. While the crucial role of pili in the assembly of microcolonies has been well recognized, the exact mechanisms of how they govern the formation and dynamics of microcolonies are still poorly understood. Here, we present a computational model of individual cells with explicit pili dynamics, force generation and pili-pili interactions. We employ the model to study a wide range of biological processes, such as the motility of individual cells on a surface, the heterogeneous cell motility within the large cell aggregates, and the merging dynamics and the self-assembly of microcolonies. The results of numerical simulations highlight the central role of pili generated forces in the formation of bacterial colonies and are in agreement with the available experimental observations. The model can quantify the behavior of multicellular bacterial colonies on biologically relevant temporal and spatial scales and can be easily adjusted to include the geometry and pili characteristics of various bacterial species. Ultimately, the combination of the microbiological experimental approach with the in silico model of bacterial colonies might provide new qualitative and quantitative insights on the development of bacterial infections and thus pave the way to new antimicrobial treatments.

  15. Anticancer drug sensitivity by human tumor clonogenic assay.

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    Hiraki,Shunkichi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers was tested by the human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA. Of 152 human cancer specimens tested, 63 (41% formed more than 30 tumor cell colonies in control plates and could be used to evaluate the drug sensitivity of tumor cells. In 42 (93% of 45 clinical trials in 24 patients, a parallel correlation was observed between the in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity measured by the HTCA and the clinical response of tumors to anticancer drugs. These results suggest that the HTCA is a good technique for the in vitro test of the anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers.

  16. Multiple MTS Assay as the Alternative Method to Determine Survival Fraction of the Irradiated HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab-Bafrani, Zahra; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abbasian, Mahdi; Fesharaki, Mehrafarin

    2016-01-01

    A multiple colorimetric assay has been introduced to evaluate the proliferation and determination of survival fraction (SF) of irradiated cells. The estimation of SF based on the cell-growth curve information is the major advantage of this assay. In this study, the utility of multiple-MTS assay for the SF estimation of irradiated HT-29 colon cancer cells, which were plated before irradiation, was evaluated. The SF of HT-29 colon cancer cells under irradiation with 9 MV photon was estimated using multiple-MTS assay and colony assay. Finally, the correlation between two assays was evaluated. Results showed that there are no significant differences between the SF obtained by two assays at different radiation doses (P > 0.05), and the survival curves have quite similar trends. In conclusion, multiple MTS-assay can be a reliable method to determine the SF of irradiated colon cancer cells that plated before irradiation.

  17. Validation of a NAT-based Mycoplasma assay according European Pharmacopoiea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Sven M; Kavermann, Holger; Knack, Yvonne

    2010-03-01

    Eucaryotic expression systems are widely used to produce biologicals for human use, e.g. vaccines, recombinant proteins and monoclonal antibodies. As part of the safety testing the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory guidelines as well as several European Pharmacopoiea monographs requests the demonstration of the absence of Mycoplasma in the cell culture in the bioreactors prior to harvest and further downstream processing. In recent years progress has been made in the development of a sensitive NAT-based method for the detection of Mycoplasma species in CHO cells, e.g. Eldering et al. This method is based on a nucleic acid amplification technique using a very sensitive touch-down PCR-profile. The presence of mollicutes DNA in the test specimens is determined by an approx. 450 bp target sequence which is amplified and this amplicon is finally detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Based on this method a ready-to-use test kit was developed. In this report the validation of both method variants according the European Pharmacopoiea monograph 2.6.7 "Mycoplasmas" is described. The validation demonstrated the robustness and precision as well as a sufficient specificity of both assay formats. The validated sensitivity fulfills the requirements of the European Pharmacopoiea for a PCR-based method proposed as an alternative to the time consuming indicator cell culture and the culture method for the detection of Mollicutes (requested sensitivity of at least 10 colony-forming-units/mL). (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Public Heath in Colonial and Post-Colonial Ghana: Lesson-Drawing for The Twenty-First Century

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    Adu-Gyamfi, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Public health in twenty-first century Ghana is mired with several issues ranging from the inadequacy of public health facilities, improper settlement planning, insanitary conditions, and the inadequacy of laws and their implementation. This situation compared to the colonial era is a direct contradiction. Development in the pre-colonial era to the colonial era sought to make the prevention of diseases a priority in the colonial administration. This was begun with the establishment of the health branch in 1909 as a response to the bubonic plague that was fast spreading in the colony. From here public health policies and strategies were enacted to help the diseases prevention cause. Various public health boards, the medical research institute or the laboratory branch, the waste management department, the use of preventive medicine and maintenance of good settlement planning and sanitation were public health measures in the colonial era. This research seeks to analyse the public health system in the colonial era so as to draw basic lessons for twenty-first century Ghana. Archival data and other secondary sources are reviewed and analysed to help draw these lessons. Richard Rose’s lesson-drawing approach was used to draw the lessons.

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and leukemogenesis

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    Lorena Lobo de Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF plays an important role in normal granulopoiesis. Its functions are mediated by specific receptors on the surface of responsive cells and, upon ligand binding, several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases are activated. The cytoplasmic region proximal to the membrane of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R transduces proliferative and survival signals, whereas the distal carboxy-terminal region transduces maturation signals and suppresses the receptor's proliferative signals. Mutations in the G-CSF-R gene resulting in truncation of the carboxy-terminal region have been detected in a subset of patients with severe congenital neutropenia who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In addition, the AML1-ETO fusion protein, expressed in leukemic cells harboring the t(8;21, disrupt the physiological function of transcription factors such as C/EBPα and C/EBPε, which in turn deregulate G-CSF-R expression. The resulting high levels of G-CSF-R and G-CSF-dependent cell proliferation may be associated with pathogenesis of AML with t(8;21. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that G-CSF may act as a co-stimulus augmenting the response of PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia cells to all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. Finally, in the PLZF-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia transgenic model, G-CSF deficiency suppressed leukemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that the G-CSF signaling pathway may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  20. Metatranscriptomic analyses of honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozkar, Cansu Ö; Kence, Meral; Kence, Aykut; Huang, Qiang; Evans, Jay D

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees face numerous biotic threats from viruses to bacteria, fungi, protists, and mites. Here we describe a thorough analysis of microbes harbored by worker honey bees collected from field colonies in geographically distinct regions of Turkey. Turkey is one of the World's most important centers of apiculture, harboring five subspecies of Apis mellifera L., approximately 20% of the honey bee subspecies in the world. We use deep ILLUMINA-based RNA sequencing to capture RNA species for the honey bee and a sampling of all non-endogenous species carried by bees. After trimming and mapping these reads to the honey bee genome, approximately 10% of the sequences (9-10 million reads per library) remained. These were then mapped to a curated set of public sequences containing ca. Sixty megabase-pairs of sequence representing known microbial species associated with honey bees. Levels of key honey bee pathogens were confirmed using quantitative PCR screens. We contrast microbial matches across different sites in Turkey, showing new country recordings of Lake Sinai virus, two Spiroplasma bacterium species, symbionts Candidatus Schmidhempelia bombi, Frischella perrara, Snodgrassella alvi, Gilliamella apicola, Lactobacillus spp.), neogregarines, and a trypanosome species. By using metagenomic analysis, this study also reveals deep molecular evidence for the presence of bacterial pathogens (Melissococcus plutonius, Paenibacillus larvae), Varroa destructor-1 virus, Sacbrood virus, and fungi. Despite this effort we did not detect KBV, SBPV, Tobacco ringspot virus, VdMLV (Varroa Macula like virus), Acarapis spp., Tropilaeleps spp. and Apocephalus (phorid fly). We discuss possible impacts of management practices and honey bee subspecies on microbial retinues. The described workflow and curated microbial database will be generally useful for microbial surveys of healthy and declining honey bees.

  1. Transits of Venus and Colonial India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Rajesh

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical expeditions during the colonial period had a political and national significance also. Measuring the earth and mapping the sky were activities worthy of powerful and power- seeking nations. Such was the sanctity of global astronomical activity that many other agendas could be hidden under it. An early astronomy-related expedition turned out to be extremely beneficial, to botany. The expedition sent by the French Government in 1735 to South America under the leadership of Charles Marie de la Condamine (1701--1774) ostensibly for the measurement of an arc of the meridian at Quito in Ecuador surreptitiously collected data that enabled Linnaeus to describe the genus cinchona in 1742. When the pair of transits of Venus occurred in 1761 and 1769, France and England were engaged in a bitter rivalry for control of India. The observation of the transits became a part of the rivalry. A telescope presented by the British to a South Indian King as a decorative toy was borrowed back for actual use. Scientifically the transit observations were a wash out, but the exercise introduced Europe to details of living Indian tradition of eclipse calculations. More significantly, it led to the institutionalization of modern astronomy in India under the auspices of the English East India Company (1787). The transits of Venus of 1874 and 1882 were important not so much for the study of the events as for initiating systematic photography of the Sun. By this, Britain owned most of the world's sunshine, and was expected to help European solar physicists get data from its vast Empire on a regular basis. This and the then genuinely held belief that a study of the sun would help predict failure of monsoons led to the institutionalization of solar physics studies in India (1899). Of course, when the solar physicists learnt that solar activity did not quite determine rainfall in India, they forgot to inform the Government.

  2. Metatranscriptomic analyses of honey bee colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Ozge Tozkar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees face numerous biotic threats from viruses to bacteria, fungi, protists, and mites. Here we describe a thorough analysis of microbes harbored by worker honey bees collected from field colonies in geographically distinct regions of Turkey. Turkey is one of the World’s most important centers of apiculture, harboring 5 subspecies of Apis mellifera L., approximately 20% of the honey bee subspecies in the world. We use deep ILLUMINA-based RNA sequencing to capture RNA species for the honey bee and a sampling of all non-endogenous species carried by bees. After trimming and mapping these reads to the honey bee genome, approximately 10% of the sequences (9-10 million reads per library remained. These were then mapped to a curated set of public sequences containing ca. 60 megabase-pairs of sequence representing known microbial species associated with honey bees. Levels of key honey bee pathogens were confirmed using quantitative PCR screens. We contrast microbial matches across different sites in Turkey, showing new country recordings of Lake Sinai virus, two Spiroplasma bacterium species, symbionts Candidatus Schmidhempelia bombi, Frischella perrara, Snodgrassella alvi, Gilliamella apicola, Lactobacillus spp., neogregarines, and a trypanosome species. By using metagenomic analysis, this study also reveals deep molecular evidence for the presence of bacterial pathogens (Melissococcus plutonius, Paenibacillus larvae, Varroa destructor-1 virus, Sacbrood virus, Apis filamentous virus and fungi. Despite this effort we did not detect KBV, SBPV, Tobacco ringspot virus, VdMLV (Varroa Macula like virus, Acarapis spp., Tropilaeleps spp. and Apocephalus (phorid fly. We discuss possible impacts of management practices and honey bee subspecies on microbial retinues. The described workflow and curated microbial database will be generally useful for microbial surveys of healthy and declining honey bees.

  3. Honey Bee Colonies Remote Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lebrero, Sergio; Quiles-Latorre, Francisco Javier; Ortiz-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Ruiz, Víctor; Gámiz-López, Victoria; Luna-Rodríguez, Juan Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Bees are very important for terrestrial ecosystems and, above all, for the subsistence of many crops, due to their ability to pollinate flowers. Currently, the honey bee populations are decreasing due to colony collapse disorder (CCD). The reasons for CCD are not fully known, and as a result, it is essential to obtain all possible information on the environmental conditions surrounding the beehives. On the other hand, it is important to carry out such information gathering as non-intrusively as possible to avoid modifying the bees’ work conditions and to obtain more reliable data. We designed a wireless-sensor networks meet these requirements. We designed a remote monitoring system (called WBee) based on a hierarchical three-level model formed by the wireless node, a local data server, and a cloud data server. WBee is a low-cost, fully scalable, easily deployable system with regard to the number and types of sensors and the number of hives and their geographical distribution. WBee saves the data in each of the levels if there are failures in communication. In addition, the nodes include a backup battery, which allows for further data acquisition and storage in the event of a power outage. Unlike other systems that monitor a single point of a hive, the system we present monitors and stores the temperature and relative humidity of the beehive in three different spots. Additionally, the hive is continuously weighed on a weighing scale. Real-time weight measurement is an innovation in wireless beehive—monitoring systems. We designed an adaptation board to facilitate the connection of the sensors to the node. Through the Internet, researchers and beekeepers can access the cloud data server to find out the condition of their hives in real time. PMID:28036061

  4. Honey Bee Colonies Remote Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Gil-Lebrero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bees are very important for terrestrial ecosystems and, above all, for the subsistence of many crops, due to their ability to pollinate flowers. Currently, the honey bee populations are decreasing due to colony collapse disorder (CCD. The reasons for CCD are not fully known, and as a result, it is essential to obtain all possible information on the environmental conditions surrounding the beehives. On the other hand, it is important to carry out such information gathering as non-intrusively as possible to avoid modifying the bees’ work conditions and to obtain more reliable data. We designed a wireless-sensor networks meet these requirements. We designed a remote monitoring system (called WBee based on a hierarchical three-level model formed by the wireless node, a local data server, and a cloud data server. WBee is a low-cost, fully scalable, easily deployable system with regard to the number and types of sensors and the number of hives and their geographical distribution. WBee saves the data in each of the levels if there are failures in communication. In addition, the nodes include a backup battery, which allows for further data acquisition and storage in the event of a power outage. Unlike other systems that monitor a single point of a hive, the system we present monitors and stores the temperature and relative humidity of the beehive in three different spots. Additionally, the hive is continuously weighed on a weighing scale. Real-time weight measurement is an innovation in wireless beehive—monitoring systems. We designed an adaptation board to facilitate the connection of the sensors to the node. Through the Internet, researchers and beekeepers can access the cloud data server to find out the condition of their hives in real time.

  5. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

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    Satomi Kawaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test. WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU, ethyl nitrosourea (ENU, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, bleomycin (BLM, or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC and without (Comet assay DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea. Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD, which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1 for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2 except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3 except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1 LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2 for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  6. On the Dynamic of Population Spreading of Self-Organized Colonies of Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Ezequiel V.

    A simple model for the self-organized displacements of self-driving individuals, aimed to describe the dynamic of flocking behavior among living things, is presented and studied. Processes such as growth, death, survival, self-propagation, competition and communication are considered. The model has two simple rules: The first one governs the displacements and states that all individuals have some tendency to assume the average age direction of motion of the neighboring individuals with some random perturbation (noise) added. The ability of the individuals to damp the external noise is introduced by means of the parameter α, such as for α→0 individuals cannot suppress the noise while for larger α-values e.g. α≥4 the noise is effectively suppressed. The second rule allow the individuals to self-regulate the population. The dynamic of the spreading of small colonies on an otherwise empty sample is firstly studied. The survivability of the colonies depends on the starting configuration. In finite samples and after some transient period, surviving colonies succeed to establish a stationary state. It is found that the spreading behavior of the colonies is independent on the parameter α. Spreading studies performed in finite space shows that after some transient period the systems reaches a stationary state with a constant (average) density of individuals. Such state can also be achieved starting from a randomly distributed population. In the stationary state the population density is conserved, however the local density of individuals becomes enhaced, in comparison to the global density. This behavior reflects a clustering tendency, i.e. "flocking behavior". Different patterns of displacement, ranging from random migration (resembling clouds of mosquitoes) to well ordered formations following a defined direction of migration (resembling herds of quadrupeds) are obtained varing the parameter α.

  7. Candida albicans Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Formation is Closely Related to Surface Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Zhigang; Chu, Haoyue; Guo, Jing; Jiang, Guangshui; Qi, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans persisters have so far been observed only in biofilm environment; the biofilm element(s) that trigger(s) persister formation are still unknown. In this study, we tried to further elucidate the possible relationship between C. albicans persisters and the early phases of biofilm formation, especially the surface adhesion phase. Three C. albicans strains were surveyed for the formation of persisters. We tested C. albicans persister formation dynamically at different time points during the process of adhesion and biofilm formation. The number of persister cells was determined based on an assessment of cell viability after amphotericin B treatment and colony-forming unit assay. None of the planktonic cultures contained persisters. Immediately following adhesion of C. albicans cells to the surface, persister cells emerged and the proportion of persisters reached a peak of 0.2-0.69 % in approximately 2-h biofilm. As the biofilm matured, the proportion of persisters decreased and was only 0.01-0.02 % by 24 h, while the number of persisters remained stable with no significant change. Persisters were not detected in the absence of an attachment surface which was pre-coated. Persisters were also absent in biofilms that were scraped to disrupt surface adhesion prior to amphotericin B treatment. These results indicate that C. albicans antifungal-tolerant persisters are produced mainly in surface adhesion phase and surface adhesion is required for the emergence and maintenance of C. albicans persisters.

  8. Hindu Responses to Darwinism: Assimilation and Rejection in a Colonial and Post-Colonial Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie Brown, C.

    2010-06-01

    Hindu responses to Darwinism, like Christian, have run the gamut from outright rejection to fairly robust but limited accommodations of the Darwinian perspective. Despite certain features of Hindu thought such as the enormous time-scales of traditional cosmogonies that may suggest considerable affinity with modern notions of organic evolution, more often than not traditional assumptions have worked against deep engagement with Darwinism, allowing only for superficial assimilation at best. Three fundamental factors have affected Hindu responses to Darwinism: the great diversity within the tradition spanning evolutionist and creationist perspectives, the encounter with Darwinism in the late nineteenth century as part of an alien culture, and the fact that this encounter occurred within a colonial context. This essay explores the complex interactions of these three factors, beginning with the diversity within the ancient and classical cosmological traditions, followed by consideration of colonial developments and the emergence of four representative Hindu approaches to Darwinism: Modern Vedic Evolutionism, Anthropic Vedic Evolutionism, Reactionary Vedic Evolutionism, and Modern Vedic Creationism. The essay concludes by discussing various epistemological issues in the attempts of modern Hindu apologists to legitimize Vedic world views. These issues include the appeal to modern science to confirm traditional ideals and values, while simultaneously subordinating scientific method to spiritual means of knowledge, or rejecting scientific methodology with its inbuilt skepticism entirely.

  9. Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge : Notes on Colonial Nesters : 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains notes on the colonial nesters on Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge from calendar years 1949 to 1988. Each year is documented by a summary...

  10. Colonial Education and Women of the Cross River Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colonial Education and Women of the Cross River Region of Nigeria, 1900 – 1960: An Appraisal. ... foundation on which subsequent generations of educated women such as medical doctors, ... The paper concludes that more attention should

  11. EAARL Bare Earth Topography-Colonial National Historical Park

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Elevation maps (also known as Digital Elevation Models or DEMs) of Colonial National Historical Park were produced from remotely-sensed, geographically-referenced...

  12. Incremental Web Usage Mining Based on Active Ant Colony Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jie; LIN Ying; CHEN Zhimin

    2006-01-01

    To alleviate the scalability problem caused by the increasing Web using and changing users' interests, this paper presents a novel Web Usage Mining algorithm-Incremental Web Usage Mining algorithm based on Active Ant Colony Clustering. Firstly, an active movement strategy about direction selection and speed, different with the positive strategy employed by other Ant Colony Clustering algorithms, is proposed to construct an Active Ant Colony Clustering algorithm, which avoid the idle and "flying over the plane" moving phenomenon, effectively improve the quality and speed of clustering on large dataset. Then a mechanism of decomposing clusters based on above methods is introduced to form new clusters when users' interests change. Empirical studies on a real Web dataset show the active ant colony clustering algorithm has better performance than the previous algorithms, and the incremental approach based on the proposed mechanism can efficiently implement incremental Web usage mining.

  13. Social life: the paradox of multiple-queen colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L

    1995-09-01

    The evolution of animal societies in which some individuals forego their own reproductive opportunities to help others to reproduce poses an evolutionary paradox that can be traced to Darwin. Altruism may evolve through kin selection when the donor and recipient of altruistic acts are related to each other, as generally is the case in social birds and mammals. Similarly, social insect workers are highly related to the brood they rear when colonies are headed by a single queen. However, recent studies have shown that insect colonies frequently contain several queens, with the effect of decreasing relatedness among colony members. How can one account for the origin and maintenance of such colonies? This evolutionary enigma presents many of the same theoretical challenges as does the evolution of cooperative breeding and eusociality.

  14. EAARL Bare Earth Topography-Colonial National Historical Park

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Elevation maps (also known as Digital Elevation Models or DEMs) of Colonial National Historical Park were produced from remotely-sensed, geographically-referenced...

  15. Intra-colonial Population of Macrotermes bellicosus (Smeathman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Macrotermes bellicosus, Mounds- building termites, intra-colonial Population, Mounds,. Castes. .... The difference may be due to the efficiency of the sampling method .... SERC (Sokoto Energy Research Centre, Usmanu. Danfodiyo ...

  16. Artificial bee colony algorithm variants on constrained optimization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bahriye Akay; Dervis Karaboga

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, the performance analysis of artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC), one of the intelligent optimization techniques, is examined on constrained problems and the effect of some modifications on the performance of the algorithm is examined...

  17. A Reading of Kwame Nkrumah's Towards Colonial Freedom Atta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaders of the nationalist movements, in search of radical colouring, borrowed ... intellectual companion, Karl Marx, affirmed: 'mankind must first of all eat, drink, ..... last quote from Towards colonial freedom: 'Hence political independence is an ...

  18. A non-policing honey bee colony (Apis mellifera capensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Madeleine; Good, Gregory; Allsopp, Mike; Radloff, Sarah; Pirk, Chris; Ratnieks, Francis

    2002-09-01

    In the Cape honey bee Apis mellifera capensis, workers lay female eggs without mating by thelytokous parthenogenesis. As a result, workers are as related to worker-laid eggs as they are to queen-laid eggs and therefore worker policing is expected to be lower, or even absent. This was tested by transferring worker- and queen-laid eggs into three queenright A. m. capensis discriminator colonies and monitoring their removal. Our results show that worker policing is variable in A. m. capensis and that in one colony worker-laid eggs were not removed. This is the first report of a non-policing queenright honey bee colony. DNA microsatellite and morphometric analysis suggests that the racial composition of the three discriminator colonies was different. The variation in policing rates could be explained by differences in degrees of hybridisation between A. m. capensis and A. m. scutellata, although a larger survey is needed to confirm this.

  19. Performance : Le grand Bingo colonial du clown Barnabott

    OpenAIRE

    Préaud, Martin

    2017-01-01

    “Barnabott the Clown’s great colonial bingo” is a performance that seeks to show how Australian governments currently practice settler colonialism. This essay accompanies the edited video capture of Barnabott’s performance at a colloquium held in December 2015 at the College de France in Paris focusing on how action is staged in domains where humans experiment new ways of transforming or interpreting the world. Barnabott thus turns to farce the bloody continuation, under polite political mask...

  20. Pre-Colonial political centralization and contemporary development in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The importance of pre-colonial history on contemporary African development has become an important .eld of study within development economics in recent years. In particular Gennaioli and Rainer (2007) suggest that pre-colonial political centralization has had an impact on con- temporary levels of development within Africa at the country level. We test the Gennaioli and Rainer (2007) hypothesis at the sub-national level with evidence from Uganda. Using a variety of datasets we obtain results w...