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Sample records for colon cancer prognosis

  1. Elevated serum levels of MMP-11 correlate with poor prognosis in colon cancer patients.

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    Pang, Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Da-Hai; Meng, Xiang-Wei

    2016-03-11

    Matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11) has been shown to play a key role in human tumor progression and indicates poor clinical outcome in cancer patients. The current study aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum levels of MMP-11 and prognosis in colon cancer patients. Serum levels of MMP-11 were determined in 92 colon cancer patients and 92 healthy individuals using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Associations between serum MMP-11 levels and clinicopathological characteristics of the patients and their outcomes were investigated. Survival analyses were performed to measure the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Serum MMP-11 levels were substantially higher in colon cancer patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, serum MMP-11 levels were significantly higher in patients with advanced T status, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and a higher TNM stage. Elevated serum levels of MMP-11 were identified as an independent prognostic factor for 5-year mortality and adverse events associated with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified the serum MMP-11 level as an independent predictor of OS and DFS. Our study established that high serum levels of MMP-11 are associated with poor clinical outcome and may serve as a prognostic biomarker in colon cancer patients.

  2. Colon cancer

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    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  3. The prognosis significance and application value of peritoneal elastic lamina invasion in colon cancer.

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    Lu, Jun; Hu, Xiumei; Meng, Yutong; Zhao, Hongying; Cao, Qing; Jin, Mulan

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the associations between peritoneal elastic lamina invasion (ELI) and the clinicopathological prognostic factors of colon cancer, to evaluate the feasibility of ELI with use of an elastic stain to help diagnose serosal invasion of colon cancer in routine practice, so as to help us to provide a more accurate estimate for prognosis and stage of patients and a marker for postoperative treatment. 254 cases with colon cancer were included in the study. According to the presence of elastic lamina (EL) and elastic lamina invasion (ELI), all cases were divided into four groups: pT3 EL negative (pT3 EL (-)), pT3 ELI positive (pT3 ELI (+)), pT3 ELI negative (pT3 ELI (-)) and pT4a. Statistical analysis was used to analyze the relationship between elastic lamina invasion and other established adverse histologic features. The EL and ELI positive rates were 81.5% and 42.1% respectively. There were significant differences in mph node metastasis, venous invasion and tumor buds between pT3 ELI (-) and pT3 ELI (+), pT3 ELI (-) and pT4a. There was no significant difference in same factors between pT3 ELI (+) and pT4a. In pT3 stage, there were significant differences in lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and tumor buds between EL (-) and ELI (+). There were no significant differences in same factors between EL (-) and ELI (-). EL was detected less frequently in right-sided tumors compared with left-sided tumors. ELI might be the prognostic factors of colon cancer with II stage and might be the marker of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with pT3 ELI (+) might have similar prognosis to patients with pT4a. For patients with pT3 colon cancer, EL(-) might have similar prognosis as ELI (-) and might take the same therapy. In addition, the right half colon EL positive rate was lower than the left colon. Elastic staining might be a useful tool to help determine the invasive depth and stage of colon cancer.

  4. The differential impact of microsatellite instability as a marker of prognosis and tumour response between colon cancer and rectal cancer.

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    Hong, Sung Pil; Min, Byung So; Kim, Tae Il; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Won Ho

    2012-05-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a distinct molecular phenotype of colorectal cancer related to prognosis and tumour response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. We investigated the differential impact of MSI between colon and rectal cancers as a marker of prognosis and chemotherapeutic response. PCR-based MSI assay was performed on 1125 patients. Six hundred and sixty patients (58.7%) had colon cancer and 465 patients (41.3%) had rectal cancer. Among 1125 patients, 106 (9.4%) had high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) tumours. MSI-H colon cancers (13%) had distinct phenotypes including young age at diagnosis, family history of colorectal cancer, early Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) stage, proximal location, poor differentiation, and high level of baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), while MSI-H rectal cancers (4.3%) showed similar clinicopathological characteristics to MSS/MSI-L tumours except for family history of colorectal cancer. MSI-H tumours were strongly correlated with longer disease free survival (DFS) (P=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.009) than MSS/MSI-L tumours in colon cancer, while these positive correlations were not observed in rectal cancers. The patients with MSS/MSI-L tumours receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy showed good prognosis (P=0.013), but this positive association was not observed in MSI-H (P=0.104). These results support the use of MSI status as a marker of prognosis and response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with colon cancers. Further study is mandatory to evaluate the precise role of MSI in patients with rectal cancers and the effect of 5-FU-based chemotherapy in MSI-H tumours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Clinical characteristics and prognosis of colon cancer patient with extremely elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level].

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    Chen, Pengju; Yao, Yunfeng; Zhang, Dakui; Gu, Jin

    2015-10-01

    To explore the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of colon cancer patients with extremely elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) level before operation(>50 μg/L). Clinicopathological and follow-up data of 1250 patients with colonic adenocarcinoma undergoing primary tumor resection between January 2001 and December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients were divided into three groups according to the preoperative serum CEA levels as normal group (0-5 μg/L, 721 cases), elevated group(5-50 μg/L, 408 cases) and extremely elevated(>50 μg/L, 121 cases). Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the overall survival and disease-free survival. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival between groups. Cox regression was used to screen the independent prognostic factors of colon cancer. Compared with normal and elevated groups, patients with extremely elevated CEA had more advanced T,N,M stages (Pcolon cancer (all PColon cancer patients with extremely elevated preoperative CEA levels are associated with more unfavorable pathological factors, advanced TNM stage and more distant metastases (especially the liver metastases) during the follow-up. The elevated degree of preoperative CEA level is an independent poor prognostic factor of patients with colon cancer.

  6. [Comparison of clinicopathological features and prognosis between left-sided colon cancer and right-sided colon cancer].

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    Gao, Xianhua; Yu, Guanyu; Liu, Peng; Hao, Liqiang; Liu, Lianjie; Zhang, Wei

    2017-06-25

    To compare the clinicopathological features and prognosis between left-sided colon cancer (LC) and right-sided colon cancer (RC). Clinicopathological and follow-up data of 2 174 colon carcinoma cases undergoing resection at Shanghai Changhai Hospital of The Second Military Medical University from January 2000 to December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with transverse colon cancer, overlapping position, unknown location, recurrent cancer, multiple primary cancer, concomitant malignant tumors, preoperative chemotherapy, local resection, incomplete clinical data and missed follow up were excluded. Finally, a total of 1 036 patients, whose primary tumors were radically removed, were enrolled, with 563 patients in LC group (including carcinoma in cecum, ascending colon and hepatic flexure) and 473 in RC group (including carcinoma in splenic flexure, descending colon and sigmoid colon). The clinicopathological features and survival, including median overall survival, 5-year overall survival rate, tumor specific median overall survival, cancer specific 5-year overall survival rate, were compared between LC and RC groups. Tumor specific overall survival was defined as the period between operation date to the date of death caused by cancer progression. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to analyze the influencing factors of survival. Propensity score matching was carried out to balance the clinicopathological factors between the two groups with the SAS 9.3, taking the following parameters into consideration (age, gender, gross appearance, tumor diameter, invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, TNM stages, differentiation, CEA and CA199-9). Patients in RC group and LC group were matched according to the propensity scores and the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of two groups were compared again. No significant differences were identified between the two groups in age, distant metastasis and serum CEA level

  7. Establishment of a 12-gene expression signature to predict colon cancer prognosis

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    Dalong Sun

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A robust and accurate gene expression signature is essential to assist oncologists to determine which subset of patients at similar Tumor-Lymph Node-Metastasis (TNM stage has high recurrence risk and could benefit from adjuvant therapies. Here we applied a two-step supervised machine-learning method and established a 12-gene expression signature to precisely predict colon adenocarcinoma (COAD prognosis by using COAD RNA-seq transcriptome data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. The predictive performance of the 12-gene signature was validated with two independent gene expression microarray datasets: GSE39582 includes 566 COAD cases for the development of six molecular subtypes with distinct clinical, molecular and survival characteristics; GSE17538 is a dataset containing 232 colon cancer patients for the generation of a metastasis gene expression profile to predict recurrence and death in COAD patients. The signature could effectively separate the poor prognosis patients from good prognosis group (disease specific survival (DSS: Kaplan Meier (KM Log Rank p = 0.0034; overall survival (OS: KM Log Rank p = 0.0336 in GSE17538. For patients with proficient mismatch repair system (pMMR in GSE39582, the signature could also effectively distinguish high risk group from low risk group (OS: KM Log Rank p = 0.005; Relapse free survival (RFS: KM Log Rank p = 0.022. Interestingly, advanced stage patients were significantly enriched in high 12-gene score group (Fisher’s exact test p = 0.0003. After stage stratification, the signature could still distinguish poor prognosis patients in GSE17538 from good prognosis within stage II (Log Rank p = 0.01 and stage II & III (Log Rank p = 0.017 in the outcome of DFS. Within stage III or II/III pMMR patients treated with Adjuvant Chemotherapies (ACT and patients with higher 12-gene score showed poorer prognosis (III, OS: KM Log Rank p = 0.046; III & II, OS: KM Log Rank p = 0.041. Among stage II/III pMMR patients

  8. High expression of WISP1 in colon cancer is associated with apoptosis, invasion and poor prognosis.

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    Wu, Jianghong; Long, Ziwen; Cai, Hong; Du, Chunyan; Liu, Xiaowen; Yu, Shengjia; Wang, Yanong

    2016-08-02

    Colon cancer (CC) likes many epithelial-derived cancers, resulting from a complex tumorigenic process. However, the exactly mechanisms of development and progression of CC are still unknown. In this study, integrated analysis in the GSE33113 and Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center Hospital datasets revealed that WISP1 expression was significantly increased in CC cases, positivity correlated with the advanced pathologic stage and a poor prognosis was more likely in CC patients with higher levels of WISP1. Downregulation of WISP1 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion through increasing apoptosis and blocking cell cycle at G1 phase in CC LOVO and RKO cells. Besides, Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that relative genes involved in the Cell adhesion molecules and Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were enriched in WISP1-higher expression patients. Western blot analysis showed that Cell adhesion molecules pathway associated genes (ICAM- 1, VCAM-1, SDC2 and CDH2) and Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway associated genes (VEGFC, CCL18, CXCR4 and TGFBR1) were also modulated by WISP1 downregulation. Then, we found that the protein β-catenin was identified as a binding partner of WISP1 and mediated the functions of WISP1 through promoting cell proliferation and invasion in LOVO and RKO cells. Further in vivo tumor formation study in nude mice indicated that inhibition of WISP1 delayed the progress of tumor formation and inhibited PCNA expression. These results indicate that WISP1 could act as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  9. Right Sided Colon Cancer as a Distinct Histopathological Subtype with Reduced Prognosis.

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    Nitsche, Ulrich; Stögbauer, Fabian; Späth, Christoph; Haller, Bernhard; Wilhelm, Dirk; Friess, Helmut; Bader, Franz G

    2016-01-01

    Recent data suggest that tumors of the right and left colon should be distinguished as they differ in clinical and molecular characteristics. A total of 1,319 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon cancer (CC) were investigated. Tumors between the ileocecal valve and the hepatic flexure were classified as right CC (RCC), tumors between the splenic flexure and the rectum as left CC (LCC). RCC revealed a higher cause-specific mortality risk (hazard ratio 1.36, 95% CI 1.10-1.68, p = 0.005) and lower 5-year cause-specific (RCC 64.9%, 95% CI 60.4-69.4, LCC 70.7%, 95% CI 67.2-74.2, p = 0.032) and disease-free (RCC 56.0%, 95% CI 51.5-60.5, LCC 59.9%, 95% CI 56.2-63.6, p = 0.025) survival rates. RCCs were more often microsatellite instable (RCC 37.2%, LCC 13.0%, p clinical, histopathological and molecular genetic features and can be considered as distinct entities. The reduced prognosis of RCC may be caused by higher rates of microsatellite instability, KRAS and BRAF mutations. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Overexpression of GRK3, Promoting Tumor Proliferation, Is Predictive of Poor Prognosis in Colon Cancer

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    Tao Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3, which belongs to a subfamily of kinases called GRKs, acts as a promoter mechanism in some cancer types. Our study found that GRK3 was significantly overexpressed in 162 pairs of colon cancer tissues than in the matched noncancerous mucosa (P<0.01. Based on immunohistochemistry staining of TMAs, GRK3 was dramatically stained positive in primary colon cancer (130/180, 72.22%, whereas it was detected minimally or negative in paired normal mucosa specimens (50/180, 27.78%. Overexpression of GRK3 was closely correlated with AJCC stage (P=0.001, depth of tumor invasion (P<0.001, lymph node involvement (P=0.004, distant metastasis (P=0.016, and histologic differentiation (P=0.004. Overexpression of GRK3 is an independent prognostic indicator that correlates with poor survival in colon cancer patients. Consistent with this, downregulation of GRK3 exhibited decreased cell growth index, reduction in colony formation ability, elevated cell apoptosis rate, and impaired colon tumorigenicity in a xenograft model. Hence, a specific overexpression of GRK3 was observed in colon cancer, GRK3 potentially contributing to progression by mediating cancer cell proliferation and functions as a poor prognostic indicator in colon cancer and potentially represent a novel therapeutic target for the disease.

  11. Overexpression of RBBP6, alone or combined with mutant TP53, is predictive of poor prognosis in colon cancer.

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    Jian Chen

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6 plays an important role in chaperone-mediated ubiquitination and interacts with TP53 in carcinogenesis. However, the clinicopathologic significance of RBBP6 expression in colon cancer is unknown; in particular, the prognostic value of RBBP6 combined with TP53 expression has not been explored. Therefore, quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analyses were performed to detect RBBP6 expression in colon cancer tissues. RBBP6 and TP53 expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray format, in which the primary colon cancer tissue was paired with noncancerous tissue. Tissue specimens were obtained from 203 patients. We found that RBBP6 was overexpressed in colon tumorous tissues and was significantly associated with clinical stage, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis (LNM, distant metastasis, and histologic grade. Further studies revealed that a corresponding correlation between RBBP6 overexpression and mutant TP53 was evident in colon cancer (r = 0.450; P<0.001. RBBP6 expression was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Interestingly, patients with tumors that had both RBBP6 overexpression and mutant TP53 protein accumulation relapsed and died within a significantly short period after surgery (P<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with LNM and patients with both RBBP6- and TP53-positive tumors had extremely poor OS (HR 6.75; 95% CI 2.63-17.35; P<0.001 and DFS (HR 8.08; 95% CI 2.80-23.30; P<0.001. These clinical findings indicate that the assessment of both RBBP6 and mutant TP53 expression will be helpful in predicting colon cancer prognosis.

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means ... prognosis include: The type of cancer and where it is in your body The stage of the ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions ...

  18. Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis

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    Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis is the main video in the NCI Prognosis Video Series, which offers the perspectives of three cancer patients and their doctor, an oncologist who is also a national expert in doctor-patient communication.

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... doctor may tell you that you have a good prognosis if statistics suggest that your cancer is ... about how to discuss prognosis with their patients. Good communication, he says, is part of providing good ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what she'd like to know of her prognosis. Credit: National ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... during a certain period of time after diagnosis. Disease-free survival This statistic is the percentage of ... discuss cancer prognosis (the likely course of the disease). Learn key points about prognosis and how to ...

  3. Positive expression of LSD1 and negative expression of E-cadherin correlate with metastasis and poor prognosis of colon cancer.

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    Jie, Ding; Zhongmin, Zhang; Guoqing, Liao; Sheng, Liu; Yi, Zhang; Jing, Wen; Liang, Zeng

    2013-06-01

    The first identified lysine-specific demethylase, LSD1, plays an important role in the metastatic progression of several types of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin expression in colon cancer specimens and their clinical significance. The expression of LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin in colon cancer specimens was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship between the expression of the respective molecules and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. The positive expression rates of LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin in colon cancer specimens were 66.7 % (72/108), 85.2 % (92/108), and 41.7 % (45/108), respectively. LSD1 was significantly more highly expressed in colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis (P colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis (P clinical and pathological characteristics (P > 0.05). Correlation analysis revealed that LSD1 expression was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (r s = -0.318, P = 0.001), but not evidently correlated with N-cadherin expression (r s = 0.182, P = 0.06). Colon cancer specimens with positive LSD1 expression and negative E-cadherin expression were correlated with significantly lower overall survival. LSD1 showed a significantly higher expression, in contrast to the significantly lower expression of E-cadherin, in colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis. Positive expression of LSD1 and negative expression of E-cadherin may be predictors of a worse colon cancer prognosis.

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  5. Understanding your cancer prognosis

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    ... about: Treatment Palliative care Personal matters such as finances Knowing what to expect may make it easier ... treatment. www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/cancer-basics/understanding-statistics-used-guide-prognosis-and-evaluate-treatment . ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using statistics that researchers have collected over many years about ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Resources for ... Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask ... This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... spread. Certain traits of the cancer cells Your age and how healthy you were before cancer How ... how to discuss prognosis with their patients. Good communication, he says, is part of providing good care. ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about ... This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Resources for ... Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about ... This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a ... for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that affect prognosis include: The type of cancer ... that cancer will come back later. For this reason, doctors cannot say for sure that you are ...

  13. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

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    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  14. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA colon cancer-associated transcript 2 is associated with advanced tumor progression and poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

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    Zhang, Junling; Jiang, Yong; Zhu, Jing; Wu, Tao; Ma, Ju; Du, Chuang; Chen, Shanwen; Li, Tengyu; Han, Jinsheng; Wang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) colon cancer-associated transcript 2 (CCAT2) expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Expression levels of lncRNA CCAT2 in CRC, adjacent non-tumor and healthy colon mucosa tissues were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The disease-free survival and overall survival rates were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard analysis. The expression level of lncRNA CCAT2 in CRC tissues was increased significantly compared with adjacent normal tissues or non-cancerous tissues. CCAT2 expression was observed to be progressively increased between tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stages I and IV. A high level of CCAT2 expression was revealed to be associated with poor cell differentiation, deeper tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis, distance metastasis, vascular invasion and advanced TNM stage. Compared with patients with low levels of CCAT2 expression, patients with high levels of CCAT2 expression had shorter disease-free survival and overall survival times. Multivariate analyses indicated that high CCAT2 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor. Therefore, increased lncRNA CCAT2 expression maybe a potential diagnostic biomarker for CRC, and an independent predictor of prognosis in patients with CRC.

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that affect prognosis include: The type of cancer and where ... at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what she'd like to ... how to discuss cancer prognosis (the likely course of the disease). Learn key points about prognosis and how to talk about it, and gain valuable insight from the ...

  17. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

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    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... your cancer and knowing what to expect can help you and your loved ones make decisions. Some ... what the statistics may mean. If you need help coping with your prognosis, you may find our ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to know more, the doctor who knows the most about your situation is in the best position ... statistics may be used to estimate prognosis. The most commonly used statistics include: Cancer-specific survival This ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... that cancer will come back later. For this reason, doctors cannot say for sure that you are ... about how to discuss prognosis with their patients. Good communication, he says, is part of providing good ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to deal with financial and legal matters Many people want to know their prognosis. They find it ... that researchers have collected over many years about people with the same type of cancer. Several types ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... poor prognosis if the cancer is harder to control. Whatever your doctor tells you, keep in mind ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to you. Everyone is different. Treatments and how people respond to treatment can differ greatly. Also, it takes years to see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may not be based ...

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  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  14. Co-expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic HMGB1 is inversely associated with infiltration of CD45RO+ T cells and prognosis in patients with stage IIIB colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Rui-Qing; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Ya; Li, Chun-Yan; Yu, Xing-Juan; Zhang, Xing; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen; Zheng, Li-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The intratumoral infiltration of T cells, especially memory T cells, is associated with a favorable prognosis in early colorectal cancers. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. This study examined whether high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule, is involved in the infiltration of T cells and disease progression in locally advanced colon cancer. Seventy-two cases of pathologically-confirmed specimens were obtained from patients with stage IIIB (T3N1M0) colon cancer who underwent radical resection between January 1999 and May 2002 at the Cancer Center of Sun Yat-Sen University. The density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) within the tumor tissue and the expression of HMGB1 in the cancer cells were examined via immunohistochemical analysis. The phenotype of CD45RO+ cells was confirmed using a flow cytometric assay. The association between HMGB1 expression, the density of TILs, and the 5-year survival rate were analyzed. The density of CD45RO+ T cells within the tumor was independently prognostic, although a higher density of CD3+ T cells was also associated with a favorable prognosis. More importantly, the expression of HMGB1 was observed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm (co-expression pattern) in a subset of colon cancer tissues, whereas nuclear-only expression of HMGB1 (nuclear expression pattern) existed in most of the cancer tissues and normal mucosa. The co-expression pattern of HMGB1 in colon cancer cells was inversely associated with the infiltration of both CD3+ and CD45RO+ T cells and 5-year survival rates. This study revealed that the co-expression of HMGB1 is inversely associated with the infiltration of CD45RO+ T cells and prognosis in patients with stage IIIB colon cancer, indicating that the distribution patterns of HMGB1 might contribute to the progression of colon cancer via modulation of the local immune response

  15. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatments being used today. Still, your doctor may tell you that you have a good prognosis if ... to respond well to treatment. Or, he may tell you that you have a poor prognosis if ...

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    Full Text Available ... your situation is in the best position to discuss your prognosis and explain what the statistics may ... situation best is in the best position to discuss your prognosis. Survival statistics most often come from ...

  8. CT in colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kubo, Kozo; Ogawa, Hajime; Sato, Yukihiko; Tomita, Masayoshi; Hanawa, Makoto; Matsuzawa, Tohru; Nishioka, Ken

    1990-01-01

    CT pictures from 59 lesions of advanced colon cancer including rectal cancer were reviewed to evaluate a role of CT in preoperative staging diagnosis. CT findings were recorded following general rules for clinical and pathological studies on cancer of colon rectum and anus, proposed by Japanese society for cancer of colon and rectum. Tumors were detected in 90% of advanced colon cancers. Sensitivity in local extension (S factor) was 58.0%. Sensitivity in lymphonode involvement (N factor) was 50.0%. Sensitivity in final staging diagnosis, dividing colon cancer into two groups below st II and above st III, was 63.3%. Further study should be necessitated to provide useful information for preoperative staging diagnosis of colon cancer. (author)

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  19. Associations between cigarette smoking status and colon cancer prognosis among participants in North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Shi, Qian; Newcomb, Polly A; Nelson, Garth D; Sargent, Daniel J; Alberts, Steven R; Limburg, Paul J

    2013-06-01

    By using data from North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147, a randomized adjuvant trial of patients with stage III colon cancer, we assessed the relationship between smoking and cancer outcomes, disease-free survival (DFS), and time to recurrence (TTR), accounting for heterogeneity by patient and tumor characteristics. PATIENTS AND METHODS Before random assignment to infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or FOLFOX plus cetuximab, 1,968 participants completed a questionnaire on smoking history and other risk factors. Cox models assessed the association between smoking history and the primary trial outcome of DFS (ie, time to recurrence or death), as well as TTR, adjusting for other clinical and patient factors. The median follow-up was 3.5 years among patients who did not experience events. Compared with never-smokers, ever smokers experienced significantly shorter DFS (3-year DFS proportion: 70% v 74%; hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.42). This association persisted after multivariate adjustment (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.49). There was significant interaction in this association by BRAF mutation status (P = .03): smoking was associated with shorter DFS in patients with BRAF wild-type (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66) but not BRAF mutated (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.29) colon cancer. Smoking was more strongly associated with poorer DFS in those with KRAS mutated versus KRAS wild-type colon cancer (HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.12 to 2.00] v HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 0.85 to 1.39]), although interaction by KRAS mutation status was not statistically significant (P = .07). Associations were comparable in analyses of TTR. Overall, smoking was significantly associated with shorter DFS and TTR in patients with colon cancer. These adverse relationships were most evident in patients with BRAF wild-type or KRAS mutated colon cancer.

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  11. Colon and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldombide, L.; Cordoba, A.

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the diagnosis, therapy and monitoring of colon cancer. The techniques used are the endoscopy with biopsy in the pre and post operative colon surgery, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray studies of hemogram as well as liver and renal function

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  10. Prognosis following cancer surgery during holiday periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagergren, Jesper; Mattsson, Fredrik; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2017-11-15

    Surgery is the mainstay curative treatment in most cancer. We aimed to test the new hypothesis that cancer surgery performed during holiday periods is associated with worse long-term prognosis than for non-holiday periods. This nationwide Swedish population-based cohort study included 228,927 patients during 1997-2014 who underwent elective resectional surgery for a cancer where the annual number of resections was over 100. The 16 eligible cancer sites were grouped into 10 cancer groups. The exposure, holiday periods, was classified as wide (14-weeks) or narrow (7-weeks). Surgery conducted inside versus outside holiday periods was compared regarding overall disease-specific (main outcome) and overall all-cause (secondary outcome) mortality. Cox regression provided hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, hospital volume, calendar period and tumor stage. Surgery conducted during wide and narrow holiday periods were associated with increased HRs of disease-specific mortality for cancer of the breast (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03-1.13 and HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12) and possibly of cancer of the liver-pancreas-bile ducts (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99-1.20 and HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.99-1.26). Sub-groups with cancer of the colon-rectum, head-and-neck, prostate, kidney-urine bladder and thyroid also experienced statistically significantly worse prognosis following surgery conducted during holiday periods. No influence of surgery during holiday was detected for cancer of the esophagus-stomach, lung or ovary-uterus. All-cause HRs were similar to the disease-specific HRs. The prognosis following cancer surgery might not be fully maintained during holiday periods for all cancer sites. © 2017 UICC.

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  3. CT staging of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dighe, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton SM5 2TT (United Kingdom); Swift, I. [Department of Surgery, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon CR7 7YE (United Kingdom); Brown, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton SM5 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gina.brown@rmh.nhs.uk

    2008-12-15

    Computer tomography (CT) has been the principal investigation in the staging of colon cancers. The information obtained with routine CT has been limited to identifying the site of the tumour, size of the tumour, infiltration into surrounding structures and metastatic spread. The Foxtrot trial National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) has been specifically designed to evaluate the efficacy of neoadjuvant treatment in colon cancers by using preoperative chemotherapy with or without an anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody to improve outcome in high-risk operable colon cancer. Patients are selected based on their staging CT examination. The criteria for poor prognosis are T4 and T3 tumours with more than 5 mm extramural depth. Thus the success of the trial would depend upon the confidence of the radiologist to identify the patients that would receive the neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this review is to explain the process of identifying high-risk features seen on the staging CT images. This will help to identify a cohort of patients that could truly benefit from neoadjuvant strategies.

  4. CT staging of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dighe, S.; Swift, I.; Brown, G.

    2008-01-01

    Computer tomography (CT) has been the principal investigation in the staging of colon cancers. The information obtained with routine CT has been limited to identifying the site of the tumour, size of the tumour, infiltration into surrounding structures and metastatic spread. The Foxtrot trial National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) has been specifically designed to evaluate the efficacy of neoadjuvant treatment in colon cancers by using preoperative chemotherapy with or without an anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody to improve outcome in high-risk operable colon cancer. Patients are selected based on their staging CT examination. The criteria for poor prognosis are T4 and T3 tumours with more than 5 mm extramural depth. Thus the success of the trial would depend upon the confidence of the radiologist to identify the patients that would receive the neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this review is to explain the process of identifying high-risk features seen on the staging CT images. This will help to identify a cohort of patients that could truly benefit from neoadjuvant strategies

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  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  20. Right colon cancer: Left behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaz, P; Usel, M; Rapiti, E; Chappuis, P; Neyroud-Kaspar, I; Bouchardy, C

    2016-09-01

    Prognosis of colon cancer (CC) has steadily improved during the past three decades. This trend, however, may vary according to proximal (right) or distal (left) tumor location. We studied if improvement in survival was greater for left than for right CC. We included all CC recorded at the Geneva population-based registry between 1980 and 2006. We compared patients, tumor and treatment characteristics between left and right CC by logistic regression and compared CC specific survival by Cox models taking into account putative confounders. We also compared changes in survival between CC location in early and late years of observation. Among the 3396 CC patients, 1334 (39%) had right-sided and 2062 (61%) left-sided tumors. In the early 1980s, 5-year specific survival was identical for right and left CCs (49% vs. 48%). During the study period, a dramatic improvement in survival was observed for patients with left-sided cancers (Hazard ratio [HR]: 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29-0.62, p colon cancer patients, those with right-sided lesions have by far the worse prognosis. Change of strategic management in this subgroup is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... they cannot be used to predict exactly what will happen to you. Everyone is different. Treatments and how people respond to treatment can differ greatly. Also, it takes years to see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. ...

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  5. Carotenoids and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, M L; Benson, J; Curtin, K; Ma, K N; Schaeffer, D; Potter, J D

    2000-02-01

    Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer. Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version). Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.

  6. Therapeutic considerations in Dukes C colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Willem Aldert

    2001-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the main health issues in the western world. In the Netherlands more than 7000 patients are diagnosed yearly with this disease and half of them will die from it. Prognosis largely depends on tumor stage, which is estimated by radiological, clinical and histological

  7. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer in Chinese Adolescent Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Du

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Colorectal cancer in Chinese adolescents was very rare. The chinese adolecents with colorectal cancer were frequently diagnosed in the right colon, as Stage III/IV disease with signet ring cell carcinoma. The prognosis was relatively poor.

  8. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown. Here we showed that stromal VASH1 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size, advanced clinical stage and distant metastases in colon cancer patients. Overexpression of VASH1 in colon cancer cells induced apoptosis and senescence, inhibiting cancer cell growth and co...

  9. Providing clinicians and patients with actual prognosis: cancer in the context of competing causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, Nadia; Mariotto, Angela B; Woloshin, Steven; Schwartz, Lisa M

    2014-11-01

    To isolate progress against cancer from changes in competing causes of death, population cancer registries have traditionally reported cancer prognosis (net measures). But clinicians and cancer patients generally want to understand actual prognosis (crude measures): the chance of surviving, dying from the specific cancer and from competing causes of death in a given time period. To compare cancer and actual prognosis in the United States for four leading cancers-lung, breast, prostate, and colon-by age, comorbidity, and cancer stage and to provide templates to help patients, clinicians, and researchers understand actual prognosis. Using population-based registry data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, we calculated cancer prognosis (relative survival) and actual prognosis (five-year overall survival and the "crude" probability of dying from cancer and competing causes) for three important prognostic determinants (age, comorbidity [Charlson-score from 2012 SEER-Medicare linkage dataset] and cancer stage at diagnosis). For younger, healthier, and earlier stage cancer patients, cancer and actual prognosis estimates were quite similar. For older and sicker patients, these prognosis estimates differed substantially. For example, the five-year overall survival for an 85-year-old patient with colorectal cancer is 54% (cancer prognosis) versus 22% (actual prognosis)-the difference reflecting the patient's substantial chance of dying from competing causes. The corresponding five-year chances of dying from the patient's cancer are 46% versus 37%. Although age and comorbidity lowered actual prognosis, stage at diagnosis was the most powerful factor: The five-year chance of colon cancer death was 10% for localized stage and 83% for distant stage. Both cancer and actual prognosis measures are important. Cancer registries should routinely report both cancer and actual prognosis to help clinicians and researchers understand the difference between

  10. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown. Here we showed that stromal VASH1 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size, advanced clinical stage and distant metastases in colon cancer patients. Overexpression of VASH1 in colon cancer cells induced apoptosis and senescence, inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In addition, knockdown of VASH1 in cancer cells promoted cell growth, adhesion and migration in vitro, and enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. PMID:25797264

  11. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-04-10

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor.However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown. Here we showed that stromal VASH1 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size, advanced clinical stage and distant metastases in colon cancer patients. Overexpression of VASH1 in colon cancer cells induced apoptosis and senescence, inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In addition, knockdown of VASH1 in cancer cells promoted cell growth, adhesion and migration in vitro, and enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo.

  12. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer

  13. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

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    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  14. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  15. Radiotherapy in breast cancer and its prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitter, Mihir

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of breast cancer are discussed. These include clinical staging, histological grading, site of growth, frequency and lactation, immunological response and prognosis, and survival of untreated cases. Importance of early detection is emphasised and prognosis after radiotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is briefly discussed. (M.G.B.)

  16. [A Case of Endocrine Cell Carcinoma of the Transverse Colon with Very Poor Prognosis, Onset with Bowel Obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Sakiko; Yamamoto, Eisuke; Masuda, Taiki; Sugimoto, Hitoshi; Koshiishi, Haruya; Yoshimura, Tetsunori

    2018-01-01

    We report a case of endocrine cell carcinoma of the colon with very poor prognosis, onset with bowel obstruction and multiple liver metastases. The patient was a 77-year-old man who underwent left hemicolectomy after a colon stent treatment for bowel obstruction due to cancer of the transverse colon with unresectable multiple liver metastases. Chemotherapy was not initiated because of his poor health. He died of primary cancer 52 days after the surgery. Endocrine cell carcinoma of the large intestine has a poor prognosis due to an early onset of liver and lymph node metastases, as well as peritoneal dissemination. A large-scale clinical study is needed to establish an effective adjuvant chemotherapy.

  17. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  18. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Lee, Yen-Lin; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. The study is limited by its retrospective nature. This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  20. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for women and 2 drinks per day for men DO NOT smoke You can also have genetic testing done to assess your risk for colon cancer. If you have a strong family history of the disease, talk with your ...

  1. A Case of Sigmoid Colon Tuberculosis Mimicking Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Seong-Min; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Min-Dae; Lee, Hee-Ryong; Jung, Peel; Ryu, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Seung-Ho; Lee, Il-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the sigmoid colon is a rare disorder. An 80-year-old man visited Bongseng Memorial Hospital for medical examination. A colonoscopy was performed, and a lesion in the sigmoid colon that was suspected to be colon cancer was found. A biopsy was performed, and tuberculous enteritis with chronic granulomatous inflammation was diagnosed. Intestinal tuberculosis is most frequent in the ileocecal area, followed by the ascending colon, transverse colon, duodenum, stomach, and sigmoid c...

  2. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The Economics of Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orangio, Guy R

    2018-04-01

    The economic burden of cancer on the national health expenditure is billions of dollars. The economic cost is measured on direct and indirect medical costs, which vary depending on stage at diagnosis, patient age, type of medical services, and site of service. Costs vary by region, physician behavior, and patient preferences. When analyzing the economic burden of survivors of colon cancer, we cannot forget the societal burden. Post-acute care and readmissions are major economic burdens. People with colon cancer have to be followed for their lifetime. Economic models are being studied to give cost-effective solutions to this problem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  5. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Lash, Timothy L; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges involved...

  6. Prognostic impact of Metadherin-SND1 interaction in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Du, Xilin; Zang, Li; Song, Nuan; Yang, Tao; Dong, Rui; Wu, Tao; He, Xianli; Lu, Jianguo

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between Metadherin (MTDH) and Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1) is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression of several human malignancies. However, its roles in colon cancer are still unclear. To investigate the clinical value of MTDH and SND1 expression in colon cancer. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expression of MTDH and SND1 using human colon cancer and their corresponding non-cancerous colon tissues from 196 patients' biopsies. Positive expression of MTDH and SND1 were both increased in colon cancer tissues compared to paired non-cancerous colon tissues. There was a positive correlation between MTDH and SND1 expression in colon cancer tissues (r = 0.86, p colon cancer patients with positive expression of MTDH and SND1 were significantly shorter than those without their expression (both p = 0.01). Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis suggested that positive expression of MTDH and SND1 was an independent poor prognostic predictor in colon cancer. Our data suggest that the increased expression of MTDH and/or SND1 is closely related to carcinogenesis, progression, and prognosis of colon cancer. The co-expression of MTDH/SND1 may be a novel distinctive marker to benefit us in prediction of the prognosis in colon cancer.

  7. Invasive ductal breast cancer metastatic to the sigmoid colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiao-cong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The most common sites of breast cancer metastasis are the bone, lung, liver and brain. However, colonic metastases from breast cancer are very rare in the clinic. We describe an unusual case of sigmoid colonic metastasis from invasive ductal breast cancer. With this report, we should increase the clinical awareness that any patient with a colorectal lesion and a history of malignancy should be considered to have a metastasis until proven otherwise. Early diagnosis is very important, which enables prompt initiation of systemic treatment, such as chemotherapy, endocrine therapy or both, thus avoiding unnecessary radical surgical resection and improving the prognosis.

  8. CALCIUM AND THE PREVENTION OF COLON CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WELBERG, JWM; KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    1991-01-01

    Diet is a major determinant of colon cancer risk. Calcium may protect against colon cancer, presumably by binding cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. Numerous studies support this proposition. In subjects at risk for colon cancer oral calcium supplementation has been shown to reduce rectal

  9. Prognosis of synchronous bilateral breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Tjønneland, Anne; Balslev, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no consistent evidence-based guidelines for the management of synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) exist and it is uncertain how presenting with SBBC affects patients' prognosis. We conducted a review of studies analyzing the association between SBBC and prognosis. The studies...... that reported adjusted effect measures were included in meta-analyses of effect of bilaterality on breast cancer mortality. From 57 initially identified records 17 studies from 11 different countries including 8,050 SBBC patients were included. The quality of the studies varied but was generally low with small...... sample sizes, and lack of consistent, detailed histo-pathological information. When doing meta-analysis on the subgroup of studies that provided adjusted effect estimates on breast cancer mortality (nine studies including 3,631 SBBC cases), we found that bilaterality in itself had a negative impact...

  10. The prognostic significance of extramural deposits and extracapsular lymph node invasion in colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al Sahaf, Osama

    2011-08-01

    The status of resected lymph nodes in colon cancer determines prognosis and further treatment. The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system has designated extramural nodules as nonnodal disease and classified them as extensions of the T category in the sixth edition and as site-specific tumor deposits in the seventh edition. Extracapsular lymph node extension is an established poor prognostic indicator in many cancers. Its significance in colon cancer has not been extensively investigated.

  11. Diagnosis and prognosis of primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J. F. R.; Evans, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The diagnosis of breast cancer should be made in the context of a multidisciplinary team: preoperative diagnosis can be made in over 90 % of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected cancers. A preoperative diagnosis allows patients the opportunity to come to terms with the diagnosis of breast cancer and to consider their treatment options before progressing to therapeutic surgery. Surgery remains the primary therapeutic treatment for operable breast cancer with radiotherapy and systemic therapies as adjuvant treatments. Surgery in addition provides pathological specimens from which important prognostic information may be obtained. The traditional TNM classification in itself is no longer sufficient although there is still c considerable prognostic information to be gained in staging patients. Markers of tumour biology provide prognostic data independent of TNM staging. Both need to be considered in any overall assessment of patient prognosis

  12. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  13. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chien Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? OBJECTIVES: The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. PATIENTS: A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. RESULTS: Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. LIMITATIONS: The study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSION: This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  14. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Endometrial cancer, types, prognosis, female hormones and antihormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G

    2011-01-01

    . Prognosis is also dependent on tumor differentiation and stage, and treatment should be adjusted accordingly. In this paper, the different types of endometrial cancer, staging, prognosis, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and their relationship to estrogen and other female hormones are reviewed....

  16. Possible better long-term survival in left versus right-sided colon cancer - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Iben Onsberg; Jess, Per

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most frequent types of cancer in Denmark and the western world. Recent studies indicate that there are differences between right- and left-sided colon cancer with regard to epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathology and prognosis. The present systematic literature...

  17. Breast. cancer. Prognosis factors - preliminar study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotstein, S.; Fonseca, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminar study of prognosis factors in 8 cases of breast cancer is made. Are used as parameters the dimension, the localization and the nuclear differentiation degree (gN) of the primary tumor, the vascular invasion and the axillary histologic status (pN) and the sinus histiocytosis phenomenon. Among the studied factors, have special importance the presence of vascular invasion and the negative sinus histiocytosis (minimal or absent sinus histiocytosis). Both phenomena are considered as an expression of potential systemic disease, independent of the clinical stage. Consequently the use of chemotherapy in the surgery complementation is preconized, to a best control of the disease. (author)

  18. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  19. [Breast cancer: histological prognosis from biopsy material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, F; Picco, C

    1977-01-01

    Two histological factors to be taken into consideration for prognosis in pretreatment schedules of breast cancer have been studied on a group of 352 cases treated by non-mutilating therapeutics at the Fondation Curie between 1960 and 1970. The tumour material the slides of which we have reexamined "blindly", i.e. ignoring the evolution of the case had been obtained mostly by drill-biopsy. Histological groups and types have been determined following an analytical classification for computer purpose. The degree of malignancy was calculated with the method of Scarff-Bloom-Richardson. The analyzed data have been memorized on computer and then confronted with the elements of the T.N.M. classification and the survival of the patients involved. It appeared that if drill-biopsie have been performed correctly the histological type may be defined in eighty percent of cases. And it is likewise possible to calculate the histological grade of malignancy for each mammary cancer. With such a material the value for prognosis by means of the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method still remains if applied only to adenocarcinoma of the "common infiltrating type".

  20. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  1. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  2. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  3. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  4. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer in Chinese Adolescent Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Feng; Shi, Su-Sheng; Sun, Yong-Kun; Wang, Jin-Wan; Chi, Yihebali

    2015-12-05

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma rarely occurred in adolescent. Clinical feature and prognosis of this population are not clear until now. In addition, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status may relate to the early disease occurrence. The present study aimed to perform a retrospective analysis of adolescent patients with colorectal cancer, including clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis. The medical records of 11,503 patients diagnosed as colorectal cancer in Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from January 1999 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Finally, 19 patients who were between 10 and 20 years old were selected as the study group. We summarized the clinicopathological characteristics, analyzed the association with prognosis and assessed the expression of MMR protein by immunohistochemical method. The most common primary site was the right colon in 7 patients. Ten patients had Stage III colorectal cancer, 5 patients had Stage IV disease. Signet ring cell carcinoma was the most frequent pathological type (7/19). Deficient MMR was identified in 2 patients. The 5-year survival rate and median survival time were 23.2% and 26 months. Distant metastasis was identified as an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.02). Colorectal cancer in Chinese adolescents was very rare. The chinese adolecents with colorectal cancer were frequently diagnosed in the right colon, as Stage III/IV disease with signet ring cell carcinoma. The prognosis was relatively poor.

  5. Role of neutral ceramidase in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barros, Mónica; Coant, Nicolas; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Wada, Masayuki; Snider, Ashley J; Truman, Jean-Philip; Wu, Bill X; Furuya, Hideki; Clarke, Christopher J; Bialkowska, Agnieszka B; Ghaleb, Amr; Yang, Vincent W; Obeid, Lina M; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in sphingolipid metabolism, especially ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been linked to colon cancer, suggesting that enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism may emerge as novel regulators and targets in colon cancer. Neutral ceramidase (nCDase), a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism that hydrolyzes ceramide into sphingosine, is highly expressed in the intestine; however, its role in colon cancer has not been defined. Here we show that molecular and pharmacological inhibition of nCDase in colon cancer cells increases ceramide, and this is accompanied by decreased cell survival and increased apoptosis and autophagy, with minimal effects on noncancerous cells. Inhibition of nCDase resulted in loss of β-catenin and inhibition of ERK, components of pathways relevant for colon cancer development. Furthermore, inhibition of nCDase in a xenograft model delayed tumor growth and increased ceramide while decreasing proliferation. It is noteworthy that mice lacking nCDase treated with azoxymethane were protected from tumor formation. Taken together, these studies show that nCDase is pivotal for regulating initiation and development of colon cancer, and these data suggest that this enzyme is a suitable and novel target for colon cancer therapy.-García-Barros, M., Coant, N., Kawamori, T., Wada, M., Snider, A. J., Truman, J.-P., Wu, B. X., Furuya, H., Clarke, C. J., Bialkowska, A. B., Ghaleb, A., Yang, V. W., Obeid, L. M., Hannun, Y. A. Role of neutral ceramidase in colon cancer. © FASEB.

  6. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  7. Prognosis of constipation: clinical factors and colonic transit time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorijn, F; van Wijk, M P; Reitsma, J; van Ginkel, R; Taminiau, J; Benninga, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Measurement of colonic transit time (CTT) is sometimes used in the evaluation of patients with chronic constipation. Aim: To investigate the relation between symptoms and CTT, and to assess the importance of symptoms and CTT in predicting outcome. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 169 consecutive patients (median age 8.4 years, 65% boys) fulfilling the criteria for constipation were enrolled. During the intervention and follow up period, all kept a diary to record symptoms. CTT was measured at entry to the study. Results: At entry, defecation frequency was lower in girls than in boys, while the frequency of encopresis episodes was higher in boys. CTT values were significantly higher in those with a low defecation frequency (⩽1/week) and a high frequency of encopresis (⩾2/day). However, 50% had CTT values within the normal range. Successful outcome occurred more often in those with a rectal impaction. CTT results 100 hours were less likely to have had a successful outcome. Conclusion: The presence of a rectal impaction at presentation is associated with a better outcome at one year. A CTT >100 hours is associated with a poor outcome at one year. PMID:15269069

  8. Survival pathological prognosis factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Longoria Boada, Lourdes B.

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive and longitudinal study of 273 women with breast cancer belonging to Granma province was carried out from 2003 to 2004, in order to analyze the survival of this female population, reason why the method of Kaplan Meier was used for the calculation of the mentioned variable and the Log Rank test was used for the comparison of curves. Patients with higher survival at 5 years were those who had tumors of 2 cm or less (87.5%), histological grade I (90.3%), nuclear grade I (88.3%), as well as the absence of vascular, lymphatic or lymph node invasion (with 80.6; 74.9 and 6.1% respectively). Also, tumor size, histological and nuclear grade, nodal status, as well as lymphatic and vascular invasion constituted prognosis factors, which favored the individualization of therapeutic behaviors

  9. Higher percentage of CD133+ cells is associated with poor prognosis in colon carcinoma patients with stage IIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xin

    2009-07-01

    with a poorer prognosis in patients with locally advanced colon cancer implicated that CD133+ cancer cells contribute to the tumor progression, and the overpopulation hypothesis of cancer stem cell seems reasonable.

  10. Analysis on misdiagnosed cases of right colon cancer as appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report is to investigate the causes of misdiagnosing right colon cancer as appendicitis, in order to reduce the misdiagnosis rate. The process of diagnosing and treating 44 misdiagnosed right colon cancer cases was analyzed. It was found that the right colonic lumen in these patients was thick, and their cancer consisted mostly of the ulcerative type or of a cauliflower-like tumor that protruded into the intestinal cavity. Moreover, ring-shaped and structured cancer was rarely observed, which suggested a decreased likelihood of obstruction. The patients showed limited peritoneal irritation signs in their right lower abdomen, which was also a potential cause for misdiagnosis. Right colon cancer associated with appendicitis is easily misdiagnosed as simple appendicitis, chronic appendicitis, or appendiceal abscess. Therefore, it is necessary to raise general awareness on the manifestations of the disease in order to exclude other common complications during diagnosis and to reduce the misdiagnosis rate. An accurate early diagnosis and treatment will improve patient prognosis.

  11. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Mery

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80, 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71 and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84, respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC. An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29 for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10 for distal colon cancer (DCC. An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers.

  12. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jinfu, E-mail: Jinfu.hu@phac-aspc.gc.ca [Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 785 Carling Avenue, AL: 6807B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); La Vecchia, Carlo [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri,” Via La Masa, 19-20156 Milan (Italy); Istituto di Statistica Medica e Biometria, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Venezian, 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Negri, Eva [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri,” Via La Masa, 19-20156 Milan (Italy); Mery, Les [Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 785 Carling Avenue, AL: 6807B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2010-02-10

    Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers.

  13. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Mery, Les

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers

  14. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Andersen, Fahimeh; Fischer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has proven valuable in several tumors, but it has not been elucidated in colon cancer. The present phase II trial addressed the issue in high-risk patients selected by computed tomography (CT) scan. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with resectable colon cancer...... 32% (p = 0.005) translating into a three-year DFS of 94% versus 63% (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer is feasible and the results suggest that a major part of the patients can be spared adjuvant chemotherapy. Validation in a randomized trial is warranted....

  15. Combination of aging and dimethylhydrazine treatment causes an increase in cancer-stem cell population of rat colonic crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Edi; Misra, Sandhya; Du, Jianhua; Patel, Bhaumik B; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2009-07-31

    Aging is associated with increased incidence of colon cancers. It is also becoming evident that cancer stem cells (CSC) play a vital role in the pathogenesis and prognosis of colon cancer. Recently, we reported the presence of colon cancer stem-like cells in macroscopically normal mucosa in patients with adenomatous polyps and that they increase with aging, suggesting that aging may predispose the colon to carcinogenesis. In the current study we have examined the combined effects of aging and carcinogen exposure on the status of colon CSCs in an experimental model. We used young (4-6 months) and aged (22-24 months) rats and exposed them to the carcinogen, dimethylhydroxide (DMH). We investigated the expression of colon cancer stem cell markers, CD44, CD166, EpCam, and ALDH1 as well as EGFR expression in normal colonic crypt epithelium following carcinogen treatment. Our results demonstrate that aging per se or carcinogen treatment alone causes an increase in the number of colon cancer stems cells, as evidenced by increased immunoreactive-CSC-markers positive cells in the colonic mucosa. In aged rats, carcinogen exposure results in a more pronounced increase in colon cancer stem cells. Our study shows that in aging colon the effects of carcinogens are more pronounced, and an increase in colon CSCs is one of the earliest changes preceding tumor development. Moreover, the current investigation of the use of a panel of immunohistochemical markers of colon CSC can potentially serve as a prognostic marker during screening for colon cancer.

  16. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  18. Emergency management of acute colonic cancer obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainant, A

    2012-02-01

    Emergency management of obstructing colonic cancer depends on both tumor location and stage, general condition of the patient and surgeon's experience. Right sided or transverse colon obstructing cancers are usually treated by right hemicolectomy-extended if necessary to the transverse colon-with primary anastomosis. For left-sided obstructing cancer, in patients with low surgical risk, primary resection and anastomosis associated with on-table irrigation or manual decompression can be performed. It prevents the confection of a loop colostomy but presents the risk of anastomotic leakage. Subtotal or total colectomy allows the surgeon to encompass distended and fecal-loaded colon, and to perform one-stage resection and anastomosis. Its disadvantage is an increased daily frequency of stools. It must be performed only in cases of diastatic colon perforation or synchronous right colonic cancer. In patients with high surgical risk, Hartmann procedure must be preferred. It allows the treatment of both obstruction and cancer, and prevents anastomotic leakage but needs a second operation to reverse the colostomy. Colonic stenting is clinically successful in up to 90% in specialized groups. It is used as palliation in patients with disseminated disease or bridge to surgery in the others. If stent insertion is not possible, loop colostomy is still indicated in patients at high surgical risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  20. Colon Cancer After Acute Diverticulitis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Kwang Hoon; Han, Koon Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Je Hoon; Choi, Kyu Un; Han, Myung Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2013-01-01

    Diverticulitis is the most common clinical complication of diverticular disease, affecting 10-25% of the patients with diverticula. The prevalences of diverticulitis and colon cancer tend to increase with age and are higher in industrialized countries. Consequently, diverticulitis and colon cancer have been reported to have similar epidemiological characteristics. However, the relationship between these diseases remains controversial, as is the performance of routine colonoscopy after an epis...

  1. Curative resection of transverse colon cancer via minilaparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishiguro, Tohru; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Okada, Norimichi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Haga, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Minilaparotomy has been reported to be a minimally invasive alternative to laparoscopically assisted surgery. We retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of minilaparotomy for the resection of transverse colon cancer, which has generally been considered difficult to resect laparoscopically. Patients for whom curative resection was attempted for transverse colon cancer (n = 21) or sigmoid colon cancer (n = 81) via minilaparotomy (skin incision, transverse colon cancer as well as those with sigmoid colon cancer.

  2. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-05

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but essential to cure the malignant foci completely. Herein, we review the recent evidence for intestinal stem cells and colon cancer stem cells, methods to detect the tumor-initiating cells, and clinical significance of cancer stem cell markers. We also describe the emerging problems of cancer stem cell theory, including bidirectional conversion and intertumoral heterogeneity of stem cell phenotype.

  3. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer and Its Prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melbye, Mads

    2000-01-01

    This project investigated the influence of reproductive history on risk of breast cancer and its prognosis by taking advantage of very large linkages between population-based health and demographic registries in Denmark...

  4. Melanosis coli in patients with colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Biernacka-Wawrzonek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intoduction: Melanosis coli is a benign lesion affecting the mucosa of the large intestine. There is a relationship between the presence of melanosis and anthraquinone laxative use. Melanosis coli is also observed in patients with colon cancer, but there is doubt whether these two conditions are related. Aim : To analyze the correlation between melanosis and colon cancer. Material and methods: We analyzed retrospectively 436 patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. There were 246 women and 190 men. Patients were divided into three age groups: under 50 years, between 51 and 65 years, and over 66 years. We analyzed sections of the cancer and intestinal mucosa from the tumor’s proximal (2–5 cm and distal (8–10 cm zone. Results : Melanosis coli was present in 52 patients, which represents 11.9% of patients with colon cancer. More often it was present in women. The most common location of melanosis and colon cancer was the terminal part of the large intestine. In patients below 50 years of age in both sexes melanosis coli did not occur. In men, melanosis was more common in the age group over 66 years. Intensity of pigmentation was higher in the tumor’s distal zone. Conclusions : The incidence of melanosis coli increases with age, similar to that of colon cancer. Melanosis was not present inside tumors, in almost half of the cases it was not present in the proximal zone, and the degree of pigmentation increased in distal zone. The cause-effect relationship between melanosis coli and colon cancer remains uncertain.

  5. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Colorectal (Colon) Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Risk Assessment Tool (National Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  6. Emergency presentation of colon cancer is most frequent during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, H; Holm, T; Ekholm, A; Olsson, L I

    2011-06-01

    The frequency of emergency colon cancer (ECC) was determined using a reproducible definition of 'emergency' to analyse the impact of mode of presentation on long-term prognosis and to search for risk factors for an emergency presentation. All patients with colon cancer treated at one Swedish GDH between 1996 and 2005 (N = 604) were eligible. Patients admitted through the emergency room, operated on within three days and with an emergency condition confirmed at surgery were classified as ECC. Survival was analysed by Kaplan-Meier estimates and risk of death by Cox regression. The rate of ECC was 97/585 (17%). Patients with ECC were older (median 77 vs 74, P = 0.02), they had more stage III and IV cancers (65%vs 47%; χ(2) = 9.4, P Emergency presentation of colon cancer is an independent and adverse risk factor for long-term survival. The causes of a seasonal variation need to be clarified. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  8. Combinatorial nanomedicines for colon cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, A; Maya, S; Sivaram, Amal J; Mony, U; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Even after surgical resection and aggressive chemotherapy, 50% of colorectal carcinoma patients develop recurrent disease. Thus, the rationale of developing new therapeutic approaches to improve the current chemotherapeutic regimen would be highly recommended. There are reports on the effectiveness of combination chemotherapy in colon cancer and it has been practiced in clinics for long time. These approaches are associated with toxic side effects. Later, the drug delivery research had shown the potential of nanoencapsulation techniques and active targeting as an effective method to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy with less toxicity. This current focus article provides a brief analysis of the ongoing research in the colon cancer area using the combinatorial nanomedicines and its outcome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Longitudinal changes in lifestyle behaviors and health status in colon cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satia, Jessie A; Campbell, Marci K; Galanko, Joseph A; James, Aimee; Carr, Carol; Sandler, Robert S

    2004-06-01

    Lifestyle changes in persons diagnosed with cancer are important because they may impact prognosis, co-morbidities, and survival. This report describes longitudinal changes in lifestyle behaviors and health status among colon cancer survivors (n = 278) and population-based controls (n = 459) in North Carolina (39% African American), and examines demographic and psychosocial correlates of healthy lifestyle changes following a colon cancer diagnosis. Data are from surveys of a population-based cohort of colon cancer patients on diagnosis (the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study, NCCCS) and approximately 2 years post-diagnosis [the North Carolina Strategies to Improve Diet, Exercise, and Screening Study (NC STRIDES)], and population-based controls. Both studies collected information on demographic/lifestyle characteristics and medical history. The NCCCS reflects pre-diagnosis or pre-interview patterns, whereas NC STRIDES queried on current practices. Between the NCCCS and NC STRIDES, colon cancer survivors reported significant increases in vegetable intake, physical activity, and supplement use (all P dietary supplement post-diagnosis, whereas being retired correlated with increased vegetable intake, all P Colon cancer survivors reported making significant improvements in multiple health-related behaviors. Health care providers should communicate with persons diagnosed with colon cancer to ensure that they are making healthy lifestyle changes.

  10. MicroRNA classifier and nomogram for metastasis prediction in colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens-Beumer, I.J.; Derr, R.S.; Buermans, H.P.; Goeman, J.J.; Bohringer, S.; Morreau, H.; Nitsche, U.; Janssen, K.P.; Velde, C.J. van de; Kuppen, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colon cancer prognosis and treatment are currently based on a classification system still showing large heterogeneity in clinical outcome, especially in TNM stages II and III. Prognostic biomarkers for metastasis risk are warranted as development of distant recurrent disease mainly

  11. Generation of an inducible colon-specific Cre enzyme mouse line for colon cancer research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W.; Kretzschmar, Kai; Begthel, Harry; Van Den Born, Maaike; Korving, Jeroen; Morsink, Folkert; Farin, Henner; Van Es, Johan H.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Current mouse models for colorectal cancer often differ significantly from human colon cancer, being largely restricted to the small intestine. Here, we aim to develop a colon-specific inducible mouse model that can faithfully recapitulate human colon cancer initiation and progression. Carbonic

  12. Prognostic Importance of Bcl-2 Expression in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenal Alikanoðlu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: TNM classification, that had been established according to pathologic and anatomic characteristics of the lesion , is the most important factor in decision of adjuvant therapy in colon cancer. Despite curative resection, recurrence can ocur with a rate of 20-30% in early stage disease. Therefore efficieny of TNM classification is controversial. In recent years ,significance of molecular characteristics of the tumors besides their anatomic and pathologic characteristics in determining the biological behaviour and response to treatment have been discussed. In our study, relation between expression of Bcl-2 and the other known prognostic factors in colon cancer had been searched. Material and Method: Patients who had been followed up in our clinic were enrolled in this study. Expression of Bcl-2 was searched by immunohistochemical method. Results: A total of 52, 19 (%36.5 female and 33 (%63.5 male patients were enrolled in this study. Bcl-2 expression was found positive in 7 (%13.5 and negative in 45 (%86.5 patients. Statistically no significant relationship was found between Bcl-2 expression and sex, stage, regional lymph node involvement, presence of distant metastasis and histologic grade. Discussion: In our study, although not in a statistical significance, we found that Bcl-2 expression is related to early stage disease. Bcl-2 is a low-priced and easily accessible prognostic marker. We think that establishing expression of Bcl-2 by immunohistohemistry may play a role in determining prognosis of patients with colon cancer.

  13. Control of Colon Cancer Progression by the Colon Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Award  Number:    W81XWH-­14-­1-­0235   TITLE:      Control of Colon Cancer Progression by the Colon Microbiome PRINCIPAL  INVESTIGATOR:    Frank  J... Microbiome Table  of  Contents   Page   1. Introduction………………………………………………………….4 2. Keywords…………………………………………………………….5 3. Accomplishments………..…………………………………………5

  14. Right Versus Left Colon Cancer Biology: Integrating the Consensus Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Menter, David G; Kopetz, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Although clinical management of colon cancer generally has not accounted for the primary tumor site, left-sided and right-sided colon cancers harbor different clinical and biologic characteristics. Right-sided colon cancers are more likely to have genome-wide hypermethylation via the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), hypermutated state via microsatellite instability, and BRAF mutation. There are also differential exposures to potential carcinogenic toxins and microbiota in the right and left colon. Gene expression analyses further shed light on distinct biologic subtypes of colorectal cancers (CRCs), with 4 consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) identified. Importantly, these subtypes are differentially distributed between right- and left-sided CRCs, with greater proportions of the "microsatellite unstable/immune" CMS1 and the "metabolic" CMS3 subtypes found in right-sided colon cancers. This review summarizes important biologic distinctions between right- and left-sided CRCs that likely impact prognosis and may predict for differential responses to biologic therapy. Given the inferior prognosis of stage III-IV right-sided CRCs and emerging data suggesting that anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy is associated with worse survival in right-sided stage IV CRCs compared with left-sided cancers, these biologic differences between right- and left-sided CRCs provide critical context and may provide opportunities to personalize therapy. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  15. Accuracy of colonoscopy in localizing colonic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, C; Trifan, Anca; Khder, Saad Alla

    2007-01-01

    It is important to establish the precise localization of colonic cancer preoperatively; while colonoscopy is regarded as the diagnostic gold standard for colorectal cancer, its ability to localize the tumor is less reliable. To define the accuracy of colonoscopy in identifying the location of colonic cancer. All of the patients who had a colorectal cancer diagnosed by colonoscopy at the Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Iaşi and subsequently received a surgical intervention at three teaching hospitals in Iaşi, between January 2001 and December 2005, were included in this study. Endoscopic records and operative notes were carefully reviewed, and tumor localization was recorded. There were 161 patients (89 men, 72 women, aged 61.3 +/- 12.8 years) who underwent conventional surgery for colon cancer detected by colonoscopy during the study period. Twenty-two patients (13.66%) had erroneous colonoscopic localization of the tumors. The overall accuracy of preoperative colonoscopic localization was 87.58%. Colonoscopy is an accurate, reliable method for locating colon cancer, although additional techniques (i.e., endoscopic tattooing) should be performed at least for small lesions.

  16. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong; Tao, Meng-Hua

    2010-01-01

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer

  17. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  18. Long-term prognosis of young breast cancer patients (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.H.E. Dackus (Gwen); N.D. ter Hoeve (Natalie); M. Opdam (Mark); W. Vreuls (Willem); Z. Varga (Zsuzsanna); E. Koop (Esther); S.M. Willems (Stefan Martin); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); E.J. Groen (Emilie); A. Cordoba (Alicia); J. Bart (Jos); A.L. Mooyaart (Antien); J.G. van den Tweel (Jan); V. Zolota (Vicky); J. Wesseling (Jelle); A. Sapino (Anna); E. Chmielik (Ewa); A. Ryska (Ales); F. Amant (Frédéric); A. Broeks (Annegien); R.M. Kerkhoven (Ron); N. Stathonikos (Nikolas); M. Veta (Mitko); A.C. Voogd (Adri); K. Jóźwiak (Katarzyna); M. Hauptmann (Michael); M. Hoogstraat (Marlous); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); G.S. Sonke (Gabe); E. van der Wall (Elsken); S. Siesling (Sabine); P.J. van Diest (Paul); S.C. Linn (Sabine)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction__ Currently used tools for breast cancer prognostication and prediction may not adequately reflect a young patient’s prognosis or likely treatment benefit because they were not adequately validated in young patients. Since breast cancers diagnosed at a young age are

  19. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  20. DPEP1, expressed in the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, affects cancer cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Hiromi; Saigusa, Susumu; Yokoe, Takeshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Tanaka, Koji; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-02-01

    We investigated changes in the gene expression profile in colon cancer in order to identify gene markers that may be useful in the management of this disease. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project was used to detect differences in gene expression between normal and cancer tissue. The overexpression of dipeptidase-1 (DPEP1) in cancer tissue was confirmed in a sample of 76 patients by real-time PCR. To identify the function of DPEP1, RNA interference (RNAi) was used to inactivate this gene in the colon cancer cell line. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to characterize the pattern of DPEP1 expression in colon cancer. DPEP1 expression in cancer was significantly higher than that in normal tissue. However, DPEP1 expression decreased with pathological differentiation, lymph-node and distant metastasis. Patients with tumors with decreased DPEP1 expression showed a poorer prognosis, and this was also true of patients with tumors who are treated with curative intent. RNAi-mediated DPEP1 reduction in the colon cancer cell line did not result in cell proliferation or apoptosis, but was associated with an increased invasive ability. DPEP1 protein was observed on the apical side of the cancer cells, and is expressed in the early stages of carcinogenesis, even in adenomas of both sporadic colorectal cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis patients. DPEP1 expression in normal colonic mucosa is very low, but it is highly expressed in colorectal adenoma and cancer specimens and is negatively correlated with parameters of pathological aggressiveness and poor prognosis. DPEP1 is expressed in the early stages of colon carcinogenesis and affects cancer cell invasiveness.

  1. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Identification of sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colon cancers is increasingly demanded for decisions on adjuvant therapies. We evaluated clinicopathologic factors for the identification of these prognostically favorable tumors. Histopathologic features in 238 consecutive colon cancers...

  2. Enterobacter Strains Might Promote Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakul, Dilşad; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-09-01

    Many studies have been performed to determine the interaction between bacterial species and cancer. However, there has been no attempts to demonstrate a possible relationship between Enterobacter spp. and colon cancer so far. Therefore, in the present study, it is aimed to investigate the effects of Enterobacter strains on colon cancer. Bacterial proteins were isolated from 11 Enterobacter spp., one Morganella morganii, and one Escherichia coli strains, and applied onto NCM460 (Incell) and CRL1790 (ATCC) cell lines. Cell viability and proliferation were determined in MTS assay. Flow Cytometry was used to detect CD24 level and apoptosis. Real-Time PCR studies were performed to determine NFKB and Bcl2 expression. Graphpad Software was used for statistical analysis. The results showed that proteins, isolated from the Enterobacter spp., have significantly increased cell viability and proliferation, while decreasing the apoptosis of the cell lines tested. The data in the present study indicated that Enterobacter strains might promote colon cancer. Moreover, Enterobacter spp. could be a clinically important factor for colon cancer initiation and progression. Studies can be extended on animal models in order to develop new strategies for treatment.

  3. Prognosis Relevance of Serum Cytokines in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandre, Maria José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Prados, Jose; Aránega, Antonia; Delgado, Juan R.; Irigoyen, Antonio; Martínez-Galán, Joaquina; Ortuño, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is extremely low. Although gemcitabine is the standard used chemotherapy for this disease, clinical outcomes do not reflect significant improvements, not even when combined with adjuvant treatments. There is an urgent need for prognosis markers to be found. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential value of serum cytokines to find a profile that can predict the clinical outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer and to establish a practical prognosis index that significantly predicts patients' outcomes. We have conducted an extensive analysis of serum prognosis biomarkers using an antibody array comprising 507 human cytokines. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox's proportional hazard models were used to analyze prognosis factors. To determine the extent that survival could be predicted based on this index, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation model. The multivariate model showed a better performance and it could represent a novel panel of serum cytokines that correlates to poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. B7-1/CD80, EG-VEGF/PK1, IL-29, NRG1-beta1/HRG1-beta1, and PD-ECGF expressions portend a poor prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer and these cytokines could represent novel therapeutic targets for this disease. PMID:26346854

  4. Prognosis Relevance of Serum Cytokines in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is extremely low. Although gemcitabine is the standard used chemotherapy for this disease, clinical outcomes do not reflect significant improvements, not even when combined with adjuvant treatments. There is an urgent need for prognosis markers to be found. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential value of serum cytokines to find a profile that can predict the clinical outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer and to establish a practical prognosis index that significantly predicts patients’ outcomes. We have conducted an extensive analysis of serum prognosis biomarkers using an antibody array comprising 507 human cytokines. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox’s proportional hazard models were used to analyze prognosis factors. To determine the extent that survival could be predicted based on this index, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation model. The multivariate model showed a better performance and it could represent a novel panel of serum cytokines that correlates to poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. B7-1/CD80, EG-VEGF/PK1, IL-29, NRG1-beta1/HRG1-beta1, and PD-ECGF expressions portend a poor prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer and these cytokines could represent novel therapeutic targets for this disease.

  5. Survival and Prognostic Factors for Metachronous Peritoneal Metastasis in Patients with Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Soichiro; Hata, Keisuke; Murono, Koji; Kaneko, Manabu; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-05-01

    The clinical course of metachronous peritoneal metastasis of colorectal origin is poorly understood. In this retrospective study, we aimed to elucidate survival and prognostic factors for metachronous peritoneal metastasis. Patients with metachronous peritoneal metastasis after curative resection for stage I-III colon cancer were retrospectively reviewed, and the incidence and prognosis of metachronous peritoneal metastasis were investigated. Prognostic factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Among 1582 surgically resected stage I-III colon cancer patients, 65 developed metachronous peritoneal metastasis. The 5-year cumulative incidence rate was 4.5%, and the median survival after diagnosis of peritoneal metastasis was 29.6 months. None of the patients underwent peritonectomy or intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Independent prognostic factors included right colon cancer [hazard ratio (HR) 2.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-5.64; p = 0.011], time to metachronous peritoneal metastasis of Cancer Index (PCI) >10 (HR 3.68, 95% CI 1.37-8.99; p = 0.012), concurrent metastases (HR 4.09, 95% CI 2.02-8.23; p colon cancer patients with metachronous peritoneal metastasis may benefit from combined peritoneal nodule resection and systemic chemotherapy. Right colon cancer, early peritoneal metastasis, a high PCI, and concurrent metastases negatively affected prognosis in patients with metachronous peritoneal metastasis.

  6. CEA A BIOCHEMICAL MARKER FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS OF GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathibha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Serum tumor markers (TM are widely used for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment of cancer. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA is one of the most widely investigated tumor markers in gastrointestinal (GI cancers. Estimation of circulating tumor markers is a non- invasive quantitative method. Serum levels of CEA were studied for diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal malignancies. 140 subjects were undertaken out of which 35 normal and remaining 105 were GI cancer patients. Serum levels of CEA were analyzed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Result of serum CEA levels of the GI cancer patients and normal subjects were analyzed statistically. It was observed that there was significant increase in (P <0.01 in CEA levels of oesophagus, stomach and colon cancer patients as compared to normal subjects. The levels of CEA decreased significantly after the surgery but the decrease in levels of CEA was not up to the levels as normal control subjects.

  7. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva B; Erichsen, Rune; Iversen, Lene H; Gandrup, Per; Nørgaard, Mette; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark. Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs). The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76-0.92) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78-0.90) respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68-0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73-0.89) respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998-2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007-2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53-0.87) for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37-0.96) for rectal cancer. The survival after colon and rectal cancer has improved in central and northern Denmark during the 1998-2009 period, as well as the 30-day postoperative mortality.

  8. Prognosis of Lung Cancer: Heredity or Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    and white patients in an equal access health system. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2012;21:1841–1847. 19. Hardy D, Xia R, Liu CC, Cormier JN...Nurgalieva Z, Du XL. Racial dis- parities and survival for nonsmall-cell lung cancer in a large cohort of black and white elderly patients. Cancer 2009;115...P. In lung cancer patients, age, race-ethnicity, gender and smoking predict adverse comor- bidity, which in turn predicts treatment and survival. J

  9. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Identification of sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colon cancers is increasingly demanded for decisions on adjuvant therapies. We evaluated clinicopathologic factors for the identification of these prognostically favorable tumors. Histopathologic features in 238 consecutive colon cancers...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  10. Integrative Analysis of Prognosis Data on Multiple Cancer Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yawei; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Summary In cancer research, profiling studies have been extensively conducted, searching for genes/SNPs associated with prognosis. Cancer is diverse. Examining the similarity and difference in the genetic basis of multiple subtypes of the same cancer can lead to a better understanding of their connections and distinctions. Classic meta-analysis methods analyze each subtype separately and then compare analysis results across subtypes. Integrative analysis methods, in contrast, analyze the raw data on multiple subtypes simultaneously and can outperform meta-analysis methods. In this study, prognosis data on multiple subtypes of the same cancer are analyzed. An AFT (accelerated failure time) model is adopted to describe survival. The genetic basis of multiple subtypes is described using the heterogeneity model, which allows a gene/SNP to be associated with prognosis of some subtypes but not others. A compound penalization method is developed to identify genes that contain important SNPs associated with prognosis. The proposed method has an intuitive formulation and is realized using an iterative algorithm. Asymptotic properties are rigorously established. Simulation shows that the proposed method has satisfactory performance and outperforms a penalization-based meta-analysis method and a regularized thresholding method. An NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma) prognosis study with SNP measurements is analyzed. Genes associated with the three major subtypes, namely DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL, are identified. The proposed method identifies genes that are different from alternatives and have important implications and satisfactory prediction performance. PMID:24766212

  11. Metabolic Syndrome X and Colon Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoulek, M.; Svobodová, S.; Svačina, Š.; Plavcová, Marie; Zvárová, Jana; Visokai, V.; Lipská, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 27, suppl. 1 (2003), s. 86 ISSN 0307-0565. [European Congress on Obesity /12./. 29.05.2003-01.06.2003, Helsinki] R&D Projects: GA MZd NB6635; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : metabolic syndrome X * colon cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  12. [Postoperative intraperitoneal complications in colon cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, E A; Topuzov, É G; Topuzov, É É

    2014-01-01

    The authors studied the clinical characteristics and terms of the development of postoperative intraperitoneal complications in patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. It was stated, that the diversity of clinical data depended on complication characteristics. Results of investigation allowed defining of the most dangerous terms of intraperitoneal complications and risk factors.

  13. Colon cancer: it's CIN or CIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Combined genetic and epigenetic analysis of sporadic colon cancer suggest that it can no longer be viewed as a single disease. There are at least three different subsets with distinct clinico-pathologic features, with important implications for preventions, screening, and therapy.

  14. Lgr5 Methylation in Cancer Stem Cell Differentiation and Prognosis-Prediction in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Su

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich-repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (lgr5 is a candidate marker for colorectal cancer stem cells (CSC. In the current study, we investigated the methylation status within thelgr5 promoter and evaluated its relationship with CSC differentiation, prognosis for colorectal cancer, and its clinicopathological features.The methylation status within Lgr5 promoter was detected with a methylation-specific PCR in six colorectal cancer cell lines as well as 169 primary colorectal tumor tissues. Differentiation of CSC was examined with immunofluorescence and immunocytochemistry. Down-regulation of lgr5 was achieved with gene-specific siRNA. The associations between lgr5 methylation and the clinicopathological features as well as survival of patients were analyzed with statistical methods.The lgr5 promoter was methylated to different degrees for the six colorectal cell lines examined, with complete methylation observed in HCT116 cells in which the lgr5 expression was partially recovered following DAC treatment. The stem-cell sphere formation from HCT116 cells was accompanied by increasing methylation within the lgr5 promoter and decreasing expression of lgr5. Knocking down lgr5 by siRNA also led to stem-cell spheres formation. Among primary colorectal tumors, 40% (67/169 were positive for lgr5 methylation, while none of the normal colon tissues were positive for lgr5 methylation. Furthermore, lgr5 methylation significantly associated with higher tumor grade, and negative distant metastasis (p < 0.05, as well as better prognosis (p = 0.001 in patients with colorectal cancer.Our data suggests that lgr5 methylation, through the regulation of lgr5 expression and colorectal CSC differentiation, may constitute a novel prognostic marker for colorectal cancer patients.

  15. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sze Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The potential of genetic programming (GP on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. Method GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS. The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM and logistic regression (LR are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. Result The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341 when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Discussion Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  16. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mei Sze; Tan, Jing Wei; Chang, Siow-Wee; Yap, Hwa Jen; Abdul Kareem, Sameem; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2016-01-01

    The potential of genetic programming (GP) on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS). The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341) when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  17. Screening for colorectal cancer in defunctioned colons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Fayyaz; Quyn, Aaron; Steele, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Population-based colorectal (bowel) cancer screening using faecal occult blood tests leads to a reduction in cause-specific mortality. However, in people where the colon is defunctioned, the use of standard faecal occult blood test is not appropriate. The aim of this study was to examine the current trends of clinical practice for colorectal cancer screening in people with defunctioned colons. Methods An online survey was performed using SurveyMonkey. All members of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland were invited by email to participate. Reminders were sent to non-responders and partial responders till six weeks. All responses were included in our analysis. Results Of the 206 (34.59%) questionnaires completed, all questions were answered in 110 (55.8%). Among responders, 94 (85.4%) were colorectal consultant surgeons, 72% had worked in their current capacity for more than five years, and 105 (50.9%) had encountered colorectal cancer in defunctioned colons during their career. Some 72.2% of responders stated that a screening test for colorectal cancer in patients with defunctioned colons was currently not offered, or that they did not know whether or not it was offered in their area. Conclusions Bowel screening in the United Kingdom is currently not offered to 72.2% of the age appropriate population with defunctioned colons. Among responding colorectal surgeons, 50% had encountered colorectal cancer in such patients. There is considerable variability in clinical practice regarding the optimal age for onset of screening, time interval, and the optimal modality to offer for screening in such cases.

  18. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. ► Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. ► Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers – this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding

  19. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  20. [Analysis of clinicopathologic and survival characteristics in patients with right-or left-sided colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junjie; Zhou, Zhixiang; Liang, Jianwei; Zhou, Haitao; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xingmao; Zeng, Weigen

    2015-07-28

    This study aimed to clarify the clinical and histological parameters, and survival difference between right- and left-sided colon cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records (2006.1-2009.12) of 1 088 consecutive colon cancer patients who received surgery at our hospital. Right- and left-sided colon cancers were compared regarding the clinical and histological parameters. The survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank test was used to determine the statistical significance of differences. Right-sided colon cancer was associated with older age, a more advanced state, and poorly differentiated and undifferentiated adenocarcinoma (25.2% vs 13.2%), mucinous adenocarcinoma (33.5% vs 17.3%) and vascular invasion (9.9% vs 3.9%) were more commonly seen in right-sided colon cancer compared with right-sided colon cancer, and all these differences were statistically significant. Median overall survival was right, 67 months; and left, 68 months. The five-years overall survival of right- and left-sided colon cancer was I/II stage, 91.4% vs 88.6% (P = 0.819); III stage, 66.1% vs 75.4% (P = 0.010); and IV stage, 27.8% vs 38.5% (P = 0.020) respectively. Right- and left-sided colon cancers are significantly different regarding clinical and histological parameters. Right-sided colon cancers in stage III and IV have a worse prognosis.

  1. Clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of proximal and distal gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu X

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Xuefeng Yu,1,* Fulan Hu,2,* Chunfeng Li,1 Qiang Yao,1 Hongfeng Zhang,1 Yingwei Xue1 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China; 2Department of Epidemiology, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objectives: The dismal prognosis of gastric cancer patients is a global problem. We aim to evaluate the clinicopathologic features and prognostic factors of proximal and distal gastric cancer.Materials and methods: Gastric cancer cases diagnosed and treated at the same surgical unit between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Follow-up data from all patients were collected for at least 5 years until 2015. A total of 964 patients were studied (distal gastric cancer [DG], n=777 and proximal gastric cancer [PG], n=187.Results: DG patients had a relatively higher percentage of females, more thorough therapy (R0 [D0/D1/D2], fewer combined organ resections, younger age, smaller tumors (<5 cm, shorter surgery durations, less blood loss during surgery, and a relatively lower percentage of nodal metastases and a TNM stage of 4 (p<0.05. A significantly higher 5-year survival rate was observed in DG patients compared to PG patients (DG: 51%, PG: 28%; p<0.001. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor size, blood loss during surgery, surgery approach of lymph node dissection, treatment with palliative surgery, histopathologic type, TNM stage, and tumor location were independent predictors of poor outcome.Conclusion: The different characteristics and prognosis of DG and PG cases have implications for the development of guiding strategies for a surgical program and assessment of prognosis of gastric cancer patients based on tumor location. Keywords: gastric cancer, tumor location, clinicopathologic features, prognosis, distal gastric cancer, proximal gastric cancer 

  2. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  3. Role of microsatellite instability in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coloncancer is among leading causes of cancer morbidity and mortality both inRussiaand worldwide. Development of molecular biology lead to decoding of carcinogenesis and tumor progression mechanisms. These processes require accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in a tumor cell.Coloncancer carcinogenesis is characterized by mutations cumulation in genes controlling growth and differentiation of epithelial cells, which leads to their genetic instability. Microsatellite instability is a type of genetic instability characterized by deterioration of mismatch DNA repair. This leads to faster accumulation of mutations in DNA. Loss of mismatch repair mechanism can easily be diagnosed by length of DNA microsatellites. These alterations are termed microsatellite instability. They can be found both in hereditary and sporadic colon cancers. This review covers the questions of microsatellite instability, its prognostic and predictive value in colon cancer.

  4. A Study of Clinicopathological Differences Between Right-sided and Left-sided Colon Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    芳賀, 駿介; 遠藤, 俊吾; 加藤, 博之; 高橋, 直樹; 吉松, 和彦; 橋本, 雅彦; 石橋, 敬一郎; 梅原, 有弘; 横溝, 肇; 梶原, 哲郎; Shunsuke, HAGA; Shungo, ENDO; Hiroyuki, KATO; Naoki, TAKAHASHI; Kazuhiko, YOSHIMATSU

    1996-01-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the clinicopathological features of cancers of the right-sided colon (cecum, ascending colon, transverse colon) and left-sided colon (descending colon, sigmoid colon) in order to help improve the efficacy of their treatment. Excluding multiple cancer cases, 364 patients with primary colon cancer underwent surgey at our department between 1974 and 1994; they comprised 171 individuals with right-sided colon cancer and 193 with left-sided colon cancer. A ...

  5. Colon cancer: a civilization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alastair J M; Collins, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer arises in individuals with acquired or inherited genetic predisposition who are exposed to a range of risk factors. Many of these risk factors are associated with affluent Western societies. More than 95% of colorectal cancers are sporadic, arising in individuals without a significant hereditary risk. Geographic variation in the incidence of colorectal cancer is considerable with a higher incidence observed in the West. Environmental factors contribute substantially to this variation. A number of these risk factors are associated with a Western lifestyle and could be considered a product of 'civilization'. Recently, smoking has been recognized as a risk factor. Energy consumption also influences colorectal cancer risk, with obesity increasing risk and exercise reducing risk. However, the strongest contribution to environmental risk for colorectal cancer is dietary. Consumption of fat, alcohol and red meat is associated with an increased risk. Fresh fruit and vegetables and dietary fibre may be protective. Much has been learnt recently about the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer always arises in the context of genomic instability. There is inactivation of the tumour suppressor genes adenomatous polyposis coli, p53, transforming growth factor-β, activation of oncogene pathways including K-ras, and activation of the cyclooxygenase-2, epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor pathways. The mechanisms by which some environmental factors modify the mutation risk in these pathways have been described. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Rana catesbeiana, pólvora e modulação supramolecular cicatrização intestinal e prognóstico no câncer de cólon: uma mesma origem biológica para o insucesso? Rana catesbeiana, Gunpowder and Supramolecular Modulation Intestinal Healing and Prognosis in Colon Cancer: The Same Biological Origin of the Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Delabio-Ferraz

    2010-06-01

    studying tadpole resorption of the American bullfrog. Metalloproteinases activity in cancer research, has taken a special place. Currently, evidences points to the cancer cell ability to interfere with enzymatic activity modulation - an co-factor which affects local invasiveness and metastatic dissemination. Both MMPs-2 and -7 have been frequently observed in colon cancer. Moreover, MMP-12 seems to counteract MMP-7 effect therefore considered as a protector and associated with better prognosis, in contrast to MMP-3, which may be responsible for a worse outcome. Association between high activity of MMPs, the prognosis of cancer and increased risk of intestinal anastomotic leakage has been highlighted, suggesting a consistent trilogy. Pharmacological therapy using MMPs inhibitors has been extensively studied, especially targeted for cancer control. The article discusses the most relevant information and updated information on the subject.

  7. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaofang; Du, Hong; Zhou, Chunlian; Zhang, Qingyun; Hao, Chunyi; Wen, Xianzi; Ji, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients. Method Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort), 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model. Results LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts). LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045). Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS) in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively), but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.243–0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638–1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663–1.530, respectively). Conclusion These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might

  8. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Cheng

    Full Text Available Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients.Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort, 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model.LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts. LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively, but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.243-0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638-1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663-1.530, respectively.These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might be a useful prognostic indicator for

  9. Pancreatoduodenectomy with colon resection for cancer: A nationwide retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, E. Madelief; de Rooij, Thijs; van Eijck, Casper H.; Boerma, Djamila; Bonsing, Bert A.; van Dam, Ronald M.; van Dieren, Susan; Erdmann, Joris I.; Gerhards, Michael F.; de Hingh, Ignace H.; Kazemier, Geert; Klaase, Joost; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Patijn, Gijs A.; Scheepers, Joris J.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Busch, Olivier R.; Besselink, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically radical (R0) resection of pancreatic, periampullary, or colon cancer may occasionally require a pancreatoduodenectomy with colon resection (PD-colon), but the benefits of this procedure have been disputed, and multicenter studies on morbidity and oncologic outcomes after PD-colon are

  10. Detection and prognosis of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deregowski, Valerie; Van Criekinge, Wim; Dehaspe, Luc; Wisman, G. Bea A.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Schuuring, E. M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and kits for identifying, diagnosing, prognosing, and monitoring cervical cancer. These methods include determining the methylation status or the expression levels of particular genes, or a combination thereof.

  11. MicroRNAs in Testicular Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hui; Krassnig, Lisa; Bullock, Marc D; Pichler, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Testicular cancer processes a unique and clear miRNA expression signature. This differentiates testicular cancer from most other cancer types, which are usually more ambiguous when assigning miRNA patterns. As such, testicular cancer may represent a unique cancer type in which miRNAs find their use as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, with a potential to surpass the current available markers usually with low sensitivity. In this review, we present literature findings on miRNAs associated with testicular cancer, and discuss their potential diagnostic and prognostic values, as well as their potential as indicators of drug response in patients with testicular cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eating patterns and risk of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, M L; Boucher, K M; Caan, B J; Potter, J D; Ma, K N

    1998-07-01

    Colon cancer has been associated with several nutrients and foods. The authors used data from a population-based study conducted in Northern California, Utah, and Minnesota to examine associations between dietary eating patterns and risk of developing colon cancer. Through factor analysis, detailed dietary intake data obtained from 1,993 cases (diagnosed in 1991-1994) and 2,410 controls were grouped into factors that were evaluated for relations with lifestyle characteristics and colon cancer risk. Several dietary patterns emerged. The dietary patterns with the most variation were labeled "Western," "prudent," "high fat/sugar dairy," "substituters," and "drinkers." The "Western" dietary pattern was associated with a higher body mass index and a greater intake of total energy and dietary cholesterol. The "prudent" pattern was associated with higher levels of vigorous leisure time physical activity, smaller body size, and higher intakes of dietary fiber and folate. Persons who had high scores on the "drinker" pattern were also more likely to smoke cigarettes. The "Western" dietary pattern was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in both men and women. The association was strongest among people diagnosed prior to age 67 years (for men, odds ratio (OR)=1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-3.15; for women, OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.21-3.36) and among men with distal tumors (OR=2.25, 95% CI 1.47-3.46). The "prudent" diet was protective, with the strongest associations being observed among people diagnosed prior to age 67 years (men: OR=0.63, 95% CI 0.43-0.92; women: OR=0.58, 95% CI 0.38-0.87); associations with this dietary pattern were also strong among persons with proximal tumors (men: OR=0.55, 95% CI 0.38-0.80; women: OR=0.64, 95% CI 0.45-0.92). Although "substituters" (people who substituted low fat dairy products for high fat dairy products, margarine for butter, poultry for red meat, and whole grains for refined grains) were at reduced risk of colon cancer

  13. Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome Associated with Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Haghighi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal and ectodermal manifestations. In this paper, we describe a 64-year-old Iranian male, presenting with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome with metastatic colon cancer. The patient was suffering from hair loss, which occurred on the scalp at first and then, during 5 months, extended to the whole body. After that, his sense of taste was impaired, and 2 months later, gastrointestinal symptoms gradually started, with weight loss of 20 kg over 2 months with an initial weight of 100 kg. Finally, he was admitted to our center 10 months after the onset of symptoms. On skin examination, generalized hair loss and hyperpigmentation and dysmorphic nail changes were observed. Multiple polyps within the colon and sigmoid were observed on colonoscopy. According to biopsies, a serrated adenoma and an invasive adenocarcinoma were reported in the ascending colon and sigmoid, respectively. Other polyps were pseudopolyps, and their characteristics were not significant. Computed tomography of the lungs and abdomen showed multiple adenopathies. On biopsy, metastatic adenocarcinoma was reported. The patient underwent chemotherapy with FOLFIRI and ERBITUX. Finally, after 5 courses of chemotherapy, his regimen was changed to FOLFOX and Avastin because of evidence of progression on computed tomography. The etiology of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is currently unknown, and the optimal therapy has not been reported so far. This syndrome has many complications; the major of them is malignancy, and the prognosis is poor with a mortality rate of 50%. Therefore, annual monitoring is necessary in these patients.

  14. Colon cancer information as a source of exercise motivation for relatives of patients with colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Erin L; Prapavessis, Harry

    2010-12-01

    Using a Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) framework, this study examined whether factual colon cancer information is a meaningful source of exercise motivation for relatives of patients with colon cancer. One hundred sixty-six inactive relatives were randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: PMT group (intervention); and non-PMT group (attention control). At baseline (T1) participants completed demographic information, a questionnaire designed to assess their beliefs toward exercise and colon cancer as well as their exercise intentions. At T2 (one week following T1) participants watched one of two DVD videos that were created for the study. The intervention DVD contained exercise and colon cancer information that was yoked within the four major components of PMT: perceived vulnerability (PV); perceived severity (PS); response efficacy (RE); and self-efficacy (SE), while the attention control DVD contained general diet and cancer information. Immediately following watching the DVD, participants completed the same measures as in T1. Participants assigned to the PMT intervention group showed significant improvement in PV, RE, SE and exercise intentions, whereas participants assigned to the attention control group showed significant improvement only in RE. RE, SE, and PS made significant and unique contributions to prediction of exercise intention. Overall, the results of the present study demonstrate that a single exposure media intervention grounded in a PMT framework can change individuals' exercise and colon cancer beliefs, as well as change their exercise intentions. Implications of these findings and direction for future research are discussed.

  15. Red meat and colon cancer : a possible role for heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sesink, Aloysius Lambertus Antonia

    2000-01-01

    Sporadic colon cancer is a multifactorial aging disease affected by long-term exposure to environmental risk factors. Epidemiological studies have shown that risk for colon cancer is associated with diets high in red meat and/or animal fat. The mechanisms by which colonic tumors arise are, however,

  16. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    surgery and radiation therapy, result in well documented significant morbidities, including significant lower urinary tract symptoms such as incontinence ...and urinary urgency as well as sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from many sources suggests that most prostate cancers are relatively...pre-operative PSA (pɘ.0001). These analyses provide confidence in the clinical data because they are known factors associated with recurrence

  17. Concurrent new drug prescriptions and prognosis of early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Lash, Timothy L; Ahern, Thomas P

    2018-01-01

    Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) clinical database provides high-quality prospectively collected data on breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and routine follow-up for breast cancer recurrence. Individual-level linkage of DBCG data to other population-based and medical registries in Denmark, including......BACKGROUND: Myriad reports suggest that frequently used prescription drugs alter the viability of breast cancer cells in pre-clinical studies. Routine use of these drugs, therefore, may impact breast cancer prognosis, and could have important implications for public health. METHODS: The Danish...... the Danish National Prescription Registry, has facilitated large population-based pharmacoepidemiology studies. A unique advantage of using DBCG data for such studies is the ability to investigate the association of drugs with breast cancer recurrence rather than breast cancer mortality - which may...

  18. Prognosis and Survival in patients with Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the outcome after colorectal surgery and to try to find possible ways to improve staging and treatment, especially in patients with stage I and II colonic cancer. The first part of this thesis describes the outcome and quality of life in patients with

  19. Managing Potentially Resectable Metastatic Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, John L.

    2008-01-01

    For patients with metastatic colon cancer, management has evolved from resecting a single liver metastasis and having only one chemotherapy medicine, to resecting multiple metastases including those outside the liver as well as using combination chemotherapy (based on recent supportive trials) to improve outcomes. This success has also raised many questions, including the role of adjuvant chemotherapy to downstage borderline resectable tumors, whether patients who receive preoperative chemoth...

  20. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment o...

  1. Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2004-01-01

    The Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams has been produced under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Regional Advisory Committee on Cancer. It contains details of the full membership of the clinical teams providing care for colon and rectal cancer in each of Health and Social Services Board Area. Lead Clinicians For Colon and Rectal Cancer Services (PDF 74 KB) EHSSB (PDF 198 KB) NHSSB (PDF 107 KB) SHSSB (PDF 130 KB) WHSSB (PDF 131 KB)

  2. The role of metallothionein in oncogenesis and cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2009-01-01

    in various human cancers; such as breast, kidney, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, urinary bladder, cervical, endometrial, skin carcinoma, melanoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and pancreatic cancers, where MT-I+II expression is sometimes correlated to higher tumor grade....../stage, chemotherapy/radiation resistance, and poor prognosis. However, MT-I+II are downregulated in other types of tumors (e.g. hepatocellular, gastric, colorectal, central nervous system (CNS), and thyroid cancers) where MT-I+II is either inversely correlated or unrelated to mortality. Large discrepancies exist...

  3. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  4. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaniselvam Kuppusamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  5. Model Comparison for Breast Cancer Prognosis Based on Clinical Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Boughorbel

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of several prediction techniques for breast cancer prognosis, based on AU-ROC performance (Area Under ROC for different prognosis periods. The analyzed dataset contained 1,981 patients and from an initial 25 variables, the 11 most common clinical predictors were retained. We compared eight models from a wide spectrum of predictive models, namely; Generalized Linear Model (GLM, GLM-Net, Partial Least Square (PLS, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Random Forests (RF, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN and Boosted Trees. In order to compare these models, paired t-test was applied on the model performance differences obtained from data resampling. Random Forests, Boosted Trees, Partial Least Square and GLMNet have superior overall performance, however they are only slightly higher than the other models. The comparative analysis also allowed us to define a relative variable importance as the average of variable importance from the different models. Two sets of variables are identified from this analysis. The first includes number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, cancer grade and estrogen receptor, all has an important influence on model predictability. The second set incudes variables related to histological parameters and treatment types. The short term vs long term contribution of the clinical variables are also analyzed from the comparative models. From the various cancer treatment plans, the combination of Chemo/Radio therapy leads to the largest impact on cancer prognosis.

  6. [A case of transverse colon cancer mimicking urachal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Taku; Inoue, Ryo; Kondo, Junya; Nagashima, Yukiko; Okada, Toshimasa; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Sakata, Koichiro; Yamaguchi, Shiro; Setoguchi, Mihoko

    2013-11-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal distension. Computed tomography revealed an abscess in the anterior abdominal wall and invasion of the large intestine. Biopsy of the large intestine revealed adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the antigen expression profile of the tumor was positive for cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 903 (34βE12), and cytokeratin 20. We diagnosed the tumor as urachal cancer and performed surgery. Examination of the resected specimen showed that the tumor was located in the transverse colon. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as having transverse colon cancer with urachal abscess.

  7. Chromatin organisation and cancer prognosis: a pan-cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppe, Andreas; Albregtsen, Fritz; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Pradhan, Manohar; Nielsen, Birgitte; Hveem, Tarjei S; Askautrud, Hanne A; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Nesbakken, Arild; Trovik, Jone; Wæhre, Håkon; Tomlinson, Ian; Shepherd, Neil A; Novelli, Marco; Kerr, David J; Danielsen, Håvard E

    2018-03-01

    Chromatin organisation affects gene expression and regional mutation frequencies and contributes to carcinogenesis. Aberrant organisation of DNA has been correlated with cancer prognosis in analyses of the chromatin component of tumour cell nuclei using image texture analysis. As yet, the methodology has not been sufficiently validated to permit its clinical application. We aimed to define and validate a novel prognostic biomarker for the automatic detection of heterogeneous chromatin organisation. Machine learning algorithms analysed the chromatin organisation in 461 000 images of tumour cell nuclei stained for DNA from 390 patients (discovery cohort) treated for stage I or II colorectal cancer at the Aker University Hospital (Oslo, Norway). The resulting marker of chromatin heterogeneity, termed Nucleotyping, was subsequently independently validated in six patient cohorts: 442 patients with stage I or II colorectal cancer in the Gloucester Colorectal Cancer Study (UK); 391 patients with stage II colorectal cancer in the QUASAR 2 trial; 246 patients with stage I ovarian carcinoma; 354 patients with uterine sarcoma; 307 patients with prostate carcinoma; and 791 patients with endometrial carcinoma. The primary outcome was cancer-specific survival. In all patient cohorts, patients with chromatin heterogeneous tumours had worse cancer-specific survival than patients with chromatin homogeneous tumours (univariable analysis hazard ratio [HR] 1·7, 95% CI 1·2-2·5, in the discovery cohort; 1·8, 1·0-3·0, in the Gloucester validation cohort; 2·2, 1·1-4·5, in the QUASAR 2 validation cohort; 3·1, 1·9-5·0, in the ovarian carcinoma cohort; 2·5, 1·8-3·4, in the uterine sarcoma cohort; 2·3, 1·2-4·6, in the prostate carcinoma cohort; and 4·3, 2·8-6·8, in the endometrial carcinoma cohort). After adjusting for established prognostic patient characteristics in multivariable analyses, Nucleotyping was prognostic in all cohorts except for the prostate carcinoma

  8. Outcome for stage II and III rectal and colon cancer equally good after treatment improvement over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Joern, Fischer; Hellmich, Gunter; Gunter, Hellmich; Jackisch, Thomas; Thomas, Jackisch; Puffer, Erik; Erik, Puffer; Zimmer, Jörg; Jörg, Zimmer; Bleyl, Dorothea; Dorothea, Bleyl; Kittner, Thomas; Thomas, Kittner; Witzigmann, Helmut; Helmut, Witzigmann; Stelzner, Sigmar; Sigmar, Stelzner

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the outcome for stage II and III rectal cancer patients compared to stage II and III colonic cancer patients with regard to 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival, and local and combined recurrence rates over time. This prospective cohort study identified 3,355 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and treated in our colorectal unit between 1981 and 2011, for investigation. The study was restricted to International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stages II and III. Postoperative mortality and histological incomplete resection were excluded, which left 995 patients with colonic cancer and 726 patients with rectal cancer for further analysis. Five-year CSS rates improved for colonic cancer from 65.0% for patients treated between 1981 and 1986 to 88.1% for patients treated between 2007 and 2011. For rectal cancer patients, the respective 5-year CSS rates improved from 53.4% in the first observation period to 89.8% in the second one. The local recurrence rate for rectal cancer dropped from 34.2% in the years 1981-1986 to 2.1% in the years 2007-2011. In the last decade of observation, prognosis for rectal cancer was equal to that for colon cancer (CSS 88.6 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.409). Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer has continued to improve over the last three decades. After major changes in treatment strategy including introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant (radio)chemotherapy, prognosis for stage II and III rectal cancer is at least as good as for stage II and III colonic cancer.

  9. Microchimerism and survival after breast and colon cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported microchimerism to be oppositely associated with maternal breast and colon cancer. In women with a blood test positive for male microchimerism the risk of breast cancer development was reduced to one third, whereas the risk of colon cancer was elevated 4-fold. In this article...

  10. [Liver metastases from colon and rectal cancer in terms of differences in their clinical parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, V; Emingr, M; Skála, M; Pálek, R; Troup, O; Novák, P; Vyčítal, O; Skalický, T; Třeška, V

    2016-02-01

    From the clinical point of view, rectal cancer and colon cancer are clearly different nosological units in their progress and treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse and clarify the differences between the behaviour of liver metastases from colon and rectal cancer. The study of these factors is important for determining an accurate prognosis and indication of the most effective surgical therapy and oncologic treatment of colon and rectal cancer as a systemic disease. 223 patients with metastatic disease of colorectal carcinoma operated at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital in Pilsen between January 1, 2006 and January 31, 2012 were included in our study. The group of patients comprised 145 men (65%) and 117 women (35%). 275 operations were performed. Resection was done in 177 patients and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the total of 98 cases. Our sample was divided into 3 categories according to the location of the primary tumor to C (colon), comprising 58 patients, S (c. sigmoideum) in 61 patients, and R (rectum), comprising 101 patients. Significance analysis of the studied factors (age, gender, staging [TNM classification], grading, presence of mucinous carcinoma, type of operation) was performed using ANOVA test. Overall survival (OS), disease-free interval (DFI) or no evidence of disease (NED) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves, which were compared with the log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. As regards the comparison of primary origin of colorectal metastases in liver regardless of their treatment (resection and RFA), our study indicated that rectal liver metastases showed a significantly earlier recurrence than colon liver metastases (shorter NED/DFI). Among other factors, a locally advanced finding, further R2 resection of liver metastases and positivity of lymph node metastases were statistically significant for the prognosis of an early recurrence of the primary colon and sigmoid tumor. Furthermore, we proved that in patients with

  11. Increased colon cancer risk after severe Salmonella infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Schaapveld, Michael; Kramers, Jolanda; Mooij, Sofie; Neefjes-Borst, E. Andra; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Neefjes, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Background Colon cancer constitutes one of the most frequent malignancies. Previous studies showed that Salmonella manipulates host cell signaling pathways and that Salmonella Typhimurium infection facilitates colon cancer development in genetically predisposed mice. This epidemiological study examined whether severe Salmonella infection, usually acquired from contaminated food, is associated with increased colon cancer risk in humans. Methods and findings We performed a nationwide registry-b...

  12. Transverse colon cancer with Krukenberg tumor : A case report

    OpenAIRE

    東門, 敦子; 松原, 洋孝; 下地, 英明; 伊佐, 勉; 濱安, 俊吾; 仲地, 厚; 宮里, 浩; 白石, 祐之; 武藤, 良弘; Tomon, Atsuko; Matsubara, Hirotaka; Shimoji, Hideaki; Isa, Tsutomu; Nakachi, Atsushi; Miyazato, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    A case of Krukenberg tumor in a 30-year-old woman with transverse colon cancer is reported herein. The patient was found to have bilateral ovarian tumors and abnormal elevation of serum CEA at a community hospital. Subsequently, she was referred to the University Hospital for further work. Diagnostic examinations including US, CT and colonoscopy demonstrated transverse colon cancer and bilateral ovarian tumors. Exploratory laparotomy showed the growth of transverse colon cancer over the perit...

  13. The role of the CpG island methylator phenotype on survival outcome in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ki Joo; Min, Byung Hoon; Ryu, Kyung Ju; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-03-01

    CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP)- high colorectal cancers (CRCs) have distinct clinicopathologi-cal features from their CIMP-low/negative CRC counterparts. However, controversy exists regarding the prognosis of CRC according to the CIMP status. Therefore, this study examined the prognosis of Korean patients with colon cancer according to the CIMP status. Among a previous cohort pop-ulation with CRC, a total of 154 patients with colon cancer who had available tissue for DNA extraction were included in the study. CIMP-high was defined as ≥3/5 methylated mark-ers using the five-marker panel (CACNA1G, IGF2, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1). CIMP-high and CIMP-low/neg-ative cancers were observed in 27 patients (17.5%) and 127 patients (82.5%), respectively. Multivariate analysis adjust-ing for age, gender, tumor location, tumor stage and CIMP and microsatellite instability (MSI) statuses indicated that CIMP-high colon cancers were associated with a significant increase in colon cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 3.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20 to 8.69; p=0.02). In microsatellite stable cancers, CIMP-high cancer had a poor survival outcome compared to CIMP-low/negative cancer (HR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.02 to 8.27; p=0.04). Re-gardless of the MSI status, CIMP-high cancers had poor sur-vival outcomes in Korean patients. (Gut Liver, 2015;9202-207).

  14. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shushang; Feng, Fan; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Zhen; Tian, Yangzi; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Cai, Lei; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer in young patients are both limited and controversial. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define the clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer in young patients after curative resection. From May 2008 to December 2014, 198 young patients (age ≤ 40 years) and 1096 middle-aged patients (55 ≤ age ≤ 64 years) were enrolled in this study. The clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer in these patients were analyzed. Compared with middle-aged patients, the proportion of females, lower third tumors, tumor size less than 5 cm, poorly differentiated tumors and T1 tumors were significantly higher in young patients (all P < 0.05). The proportions of comorbidity, upper third tumors, well and moderately differentiated tumors, T4 tumors, and positive carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19–9 were significantly lower in young patients (all P < 0.05). The distributions of N status and CA125 were comparable between young and middle-aged patients (all P > 0.05). The five-year overall survival rates were comparable between young patients and middle-aged patients (62.8 vs 54.7 %, P = 0.307). The tumor location, T status, N status and CA125 were independent predictors of prognosis in young patients. The overall survival of patients with tumors located in the upper or middle third was significantly lower than for those located in the lower third (60.8 vs 50.6 % vs 68.4 %, P = 0.016). The overall survival of CA125-positive patients was significantly lower than CA125-negative patients (49.0 vs 64.4 %, P = 0.001). The clinicopathological features were significantly different between young and middle-aged patients. The prognosis of gastric cancer in young patients was equivalent to that of middle-aged patients. Tumor location, T status, N status and CA125 were independent risk factors for prognosis in young patients. The online

  15. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  16. Single vaginal metastasis from cancer of the right colon: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Renato Pais Costa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaginal metastases of colonic origin are exceedingly rare. When present, the prognosis is poor, and most individuals do not survive past 40 months. Surgical excision and radiotherapy have been used to treat this type of lesion. Ccase: A 67-year-old woman went to the Oncology Surgery Service with complaints of vaginal discharge and local pain. On physical examination, a 2.5 cm nodular lesion was found in the vagina. She had undergone a right hemicolectomy for a right colon cancer three months earlier. Punch biopsy was performed, and histological examination of the specimen showed metastasis of colonic adenocarcinoma. Subsequently, she underwent both radical wide excision and localized adjuvant radiotherapy. Four years later, the patient is asymptomatic, with no signs of local or systemic recurrence. Despite the rarity of this entity and its usually poor outcome, surgical treatment for isolated vaginal metastases of colonic origin is an appropriate therapeutic option with effective local control associated with low morbidity.

  17. Colon cancer chemoprevention with ginseng and other botanicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Wargovich, M J

    2001-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is becoming increasingly common in Asian countries and still remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Efforts to prevent colon cancer have targeted early detection through screening and chemoprevention. For the last ten years our laboratory has utilized an in vivo screening assay for the testing of potential cancer preventives for colon cancer. We have conducted investigations on over 150 compounds including many with botanical or herbal origin...

  18. Dietary Patterns and Colon Cancer Risk in Whites and African Americans in the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study

    OpenAIRE

    Satia, Jessie A.; Tseng, Marilyn; Galanko, Joseph A.; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    We examined associations of dietary patterns with colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites from a case-control study in North Carolina. Incident colon cancer cases, 40 to 80 yr (n = 636), and matched controls (n = 1,042) were interviewed in person to elicit information on potential colon cancer risk factors. A validated food frequency questionnaire adapted to include regional foods captured diet over the year prior to diagnosis (cases) or interview date (controls). Three meaningful i...

  19. Different effects of ERβ and TROP2 expression in Chinese patients with early-stage colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Jing; Wang, Guo-Qiang; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ji-Bin; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Pei-Rong; Ou, Qing-Jian; Zhang, Mei-Fang; Jiang, Wu; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and TROP2 expressed in colon carcinoma and might play an important role there. We explored the relationship of ERβ and TROP2 expression with the prognosis of early-stage colon cancer. ERβ and TROP2 levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa and tumoral tissues from 220 Chinese patients with T(3)N(0)M(0) (stage IIa) and T(4)N(0)M(0) (stage IIb) colon cancer in the Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, who underwent curative surgical resection between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to analyze the overall survival (OS) data, and the ROC curve, Kaplan-Meier estimate, log rank test, and Jackknife method were used to show the effect of ERβ and TROP2 expression at different stages of cancer. The 5-year survival rates were not significantly different between the patients with stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer (83 vs. 80 %, respectively). The high expression of ERβ was related to decreasing OS in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, while the high expression of TROP2 was related to decreasing OS in stage IIb colon cancer. The expression of ERβ and TROP2 has tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effect in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, respectively.

  20. A nationwide Danish cohort study challenging the categorisation into right-sided and left-sided colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Per; Hansen, Iben Onsberg; Gamborg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The categorisation of colon cancer (CC) into right-sided (RCC) and left-sided (LCC) disease may not capture more subtle variances in aetiology and prognosis. In a nationwide study, we investigated differences in clinical characteristics and survival of RCC versus LCC and of the complete range of CC...

  1. Diet, genes, and microbes: complexities of colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Diane F; Phillips, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and generally, as countries climb the economic ladder, their rates of colon cancer increase. Colon cancer was an early disease where key genetic mutations were identified as important in disease progression, and there is considerable interest in determining whether specific mutations sensitize the colon to cancer prevention strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that fiber- and vegetable-rich diets and physical activity are associated with reduced rates of colon cancer, while consumption of red and processed meat, or alcoholic beverages, and overconsumption as reflected in obesity are associated with increased rates. Animal studies have probed these effects and suggested directions for further refinement of diet in colon cancer prevention. Recently a central role for the microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract in colon cancer development is being probed, and it is hypothesized that the microbes may integrate diet and host genetics in the etiology of the disease. This review provides background on dietary, genetic, and microbial impacts on colon cancer and describes an ongoing project using rodent models to assess the ability of digestion-resistant starch in the integration of these factors with the goal of furthering colon cancer prevention.

  2. Endoscopic Localization of Colon Cancer Is Frequently Inaccurate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayor, Jennifer; Rotman, Stephen R; Chan, Walter W; Goldberg, Joel E; Saltzman, John R

    2017-08-01

    Colonoscopic location of a tumor can influence both the surgical procedure choice and overall treatment strategy. To determine the accuracy of colonoscopy in determining the location of colon cancer compared to surgical localization and to elucidate factors that predict discordant colon cancer localization. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of colon cancers diagnosed on colonoscopy at two academic tertiary-care hospitals and two affiliated community hospitals from 2012 to 2014. Colon cancer location was obtained from the endoscopic and surgical pathology reports and characterized by colon segment. We collected data on patient demographics, tumor characteristics, endoscopic procedure characteristics, surgery planned, and surgery performed. Univariate analyses using Chi-squared test and multivariate analysis using forward stepwise logistic regression were performed to determine factors that predict discordant colon cancer localization. There were 110 colon cancer cases identified during the study period. Inaccurate endoscopic colon cancer localization was found in 29% (32/110) of cases. These included 14 cases (12.7%) that were discordant by more than one colonic segment and three cases where the presurgical planned procedure was significantly changed at the time of surgery. On univariate analyses, right-sided colon lesions were associated with increased inaccuracy (43.8 vs 24.4%, p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, right-sided colon lesions remained independently associated with inaccuracy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.03-2.93, p = 0.04). Colon cancer location as determined by colonoscopy is often inaccurate, which can result in intraoperative changes to surgical management, particularly in the right colon.

  3. Evaluation of clinical, laboratory and morphologic prognostic factors in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Michele; Milito, Giovanni; Attinà, Grazia Maria; Cadeddu, Federica; Muzi, Marco Gallinella; Nigro, Casimiro; Rulli, Francesco; Farinon, Attilio Maria

    2008-01-01

    Background The long-term prognosis of patients with colon cancer is dependent on many factors. To investigate the influence of a series of clinical, laboratory and morphological variables on prognosis of colon carcinoma we conducted a retrospective analysis of our data. Methods Ninety-two patients with colon cancer, who underwent surgical resection between January 1999 and December 2001, were analyzed. On survival analysis, demographics, clinical, laboratory and pathomorphological parameters were tested for their potential prognostic value. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed considering the depth of tumour invasion into the bowel wall as independent variable. Results On survival analysis we found that depth of tumour invasion (P anismus, hematocrit, WBC count, fibrinogen value and CT scanning were significantly related to the degree of mural invasion of the cancer. On the multivariate analysis, fibrinogen value was the most statistically significant variable (P < 0.001) with the highest F-ratio (F-ratio 5.86). Finally, in the present study, the tumour site was significantly related neither to the survival nor to the mural invasion of the tumour. Conclusion The various clinical, laboratory and patho-morphological parameters showed different prognostic value for colon carcinoma. In the future, preoperative prognostic markers will probably gain relevance in order to make a proper choice between surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence for preoperative stratification of high and low risk patients. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted. PMID:18778464

  4. Prognostic analysis and comparison of colon cancer in Han and Hui patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Qu-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Peng; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Hong-Ming; Chhetri, Jagadish K

    2014-05-07

    To investigate the relevant prognostic factors and their differences between colorectal cancer (CRC) patients of Chinese Han and Hui ethnicities in the Beijing region. A retrospective analysis of 880 patients diagnosed with CRC at Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University between September 2001 and September 2011 was performed. Among the 880 patients, 398 and 482 were Hui and Han, respectively. Characteristics including sex, age, diet, tumor size, primary tumor site, Dukes' stage and degree of differentiation were analyzed for their influence on prognosis. Data on dietary structures were recorded through a questionnaire survey conducted during the patient's first visit, return visit or follow-up checkups. Among patients with colon cancer, the 5-year survival rate for patients of Hui ethnicity was lower than that for Han patients (P = 0.025). Six risk factors (age of onset, dietary structure, tumor size, Dukes' stage, location of cancer and degree of differentiation) in both Han and Hui patients were identified as prognostic factors (P dietary structure was a statistically significant factor, and diet varied significantly between the two ethnic groups. Dietary structure has a significant influence on colon cancer prognosis among Han and Hui patients with colon cancer in Beijing, which may cause a difference in their survival rates.

  5. Delayed breast reconstruction with implants after invasive breast cancer does not impair prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmich, L.R.; During, M.; Henriksen, T.F.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women......We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women...

  6. Occlusive stenosis – atypical presentation of right colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrişor Banu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancers are one of the most frequent malignancies worldwide. Significant differences are described in relation to the location of tumors within the colon. Thus, between right and left colon cancer there are epidemiological, clinical, genetic, evolutionary and prognostic differences. Considering these premises, right and left colon cancers can be seen as distinct pathological entities. In right colon cancer the initial phases are often asymptomatic and the presence of symptoms is in relation to advanced phases and complications. We report the case of a 64-year-old man with no significant medical history who was admitted and operated as an emergency for stenotic and perforated tumor of the right colon. Operative exploration revealed distended small bowel loops and caecum up to the ascending colon where a stenosing tumor is found. The tumor extends to a small bowel loop and also exhibit a perforation. Right hemicolectomy was performed, with favorable postoperative evolution and discharge on 7th day.

  7. Generation of an inducible colon-specific Cre enzyme mouse line for colon cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Paul W; Kretzschmar, Kai; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; Korving, Jeroen; Morsink, Folkert; Farin, Henner; van Es, Johan H; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Clevers, Hans

    2016-10-18

    Current mouse models for colorectal cancer often differ significantly from human colon cancer, being largely restricted to the small intestine. Here, we aim to develop a colon-specific inducible mouse model that can faithfully recapitulate human colon cancer initiation and progression. Carbonic anhydrase I (Car1) is a gene expressed uniquely in colonic epithelial cells. We generated a colon-specific inducible Car1 CreER knock-in (KI) mouse with broad Cre activity in epithelial cells of the proximal colon and cecum. Deletion of the tumor suppressor gene Apc using the Car1 CreER KI caused tumor formation in the cecum but did not yield adenomas in the proximal colon. Mutation of both Apc and Kras yielded microadenomas in both the cecum and the proximal colon, which progressed to macroadenomas with significant morbidity. Aggressive carcinomas with some invasion into lymph nodes developed upon combined induction of oncogenic mutations of Apc, Kras, p53, and Smad4 Importantly, no adenomas were observed in the small intestine. Additionally, we observed tumors from differentiated Car1-expressing cells with Apc/Kras mutations, suggesting that a top-down model of intestinal tumorigenesis can occur with multiple mutations. Our results establish the Car1 CreER KI as a valuable mouse model to study colon-specific tumorigenesis and metastasis as well as cancer-cell-of-origin questions.

  8. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  9. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Burt, Randall W.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Delker, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/Ps) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20–30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n=12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n=9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). A smaller seven-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high (CIMP-H) and MLH1 silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. PMID:27026680

  10. Using data mining techniques for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kharya, Shweta

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancers for women in developed countries including India. It is the second most common cause of cancer death in women. The high incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in the last years. In this paper we have discussed various data mining approaches that have been utilized for breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Breast Cancer Diagnosis is distinguishing of benign from malignant breast lumps and Breast Cancer Prognosis predicts whe...

  11. DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Rectal Cancer: Benchmarking Its Impact on Prognosis, Neoadjuvant Response Prediction, and Clinical Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Nicole; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J; Veerapong, Jula; Borras, Ester; Krishnan, Sunil; Bednarski, Brian; Messick, Craig A; Skibber, John M; Feig, Barry W; Lynch, Patrick M; Vilar, Eduardo; You, Y Nancy

    2016-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) hallmarks consensus molecular subtype 1 of colorectal cancer. It is being routinely tested, but little is known about dMMR rectal cancers. The efficacy of novel treatment strategies cannot be established without benchmarking the outcomes of dMMR rectal cancer with current therapy. We aimed to delineate the impact of dMMR on prognosis, the predicted response to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant therapy, and implications of germline alterations in the MMR genes in rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 2012, 62 patients with dMMR rectal cancers underwent multimodality therapy. Oncologic treatment and outcomes as well as clinical genetics work-up were examined. Overall and rectal cancer-specific survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years. MMR deficiency was most commonly due to alterations in MSH2 (53%) or MSH6 (23%). After a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the 5-year rectal cancer-specific survival was 100% for stage I and II, 85.1% for stage III, and 60.0% for stage IV disease. Fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation was associated with a complete pathologic response rate of 27.6%. The extent of surgical resection was influenced by synchronous colonic disease at presentation, tumor height, clinical stage, and pelvic radiation. An informed decision for a limited resection focusing on proctectomy did not compromise overall survival. Five of the 11 (45.5%) deaths during follow-up were due to extracolorectal malignancies. dMMR rectal cancer had excellent prognosis and pathologic response with current multimodality therapy including an individualized surgical treatment plan. Identification of a dMMR rectal cancer should trigger germline testing, followed by lifelong surveillance for both colorectal and extracolorectal malignancies. We herein provide genotype-specific outcome benchmarks for comparison with novel interventions. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostenfeld EB

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Eva B Ostenfeld1, Rune Erichsen1, Lene H Iversen1,2, Per Gandrup3, Mette Nørgaard1, Jacob Jacobsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Department of Surgery A, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkObjective: The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark.Material and methods: Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs.Results: The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76–0.92 and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90 respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68–0.91 and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89 respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998–2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007–2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53–0.87 for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.96 for rectal cancer.Conclusion: The survival after colon and rectal

  13. Clinical issues in the surgical treatment of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amri, R.

    2015-01-01

    More than half of colon cancer patients will eventually die of their disease. Early detection is crucial to maximize chances of cure, as five-year survival can range from 97% to as low as 8% depending on disease stage at diagnosis. Since colon cancer is associated with both old age and obesity,

  14. Reproductive and hormonal factors in male and female colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Bijl, A.J.; Kok, C.; Veer, P. van 't

    1994-01-01

    We analysed data from a case-control study in the Netherlands in order to investigate whether reproductive events and hormonal factors are similarly related to colon cancer risk in men and women after adjustment for dietary factors. In total, 232 colon cancer cases (102 women, 130 men) and 259

  15. Prophylactic effects of triptolide on colon cancer development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of triptolide on colon cancer cell growth and its capacity to prevent tumor development in an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model of colon cancer. Methods: HCT116 cell viability and migration potential were assessed. Control and AOM/DSS-treated mice (with and ...

  16. Combination of capecitabine and ludartin inhibits colon cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of capecitabine and ludartin in the treatment of colon cancer in mice. Methods: Mice model of colon cancer was used in this study. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Qrt-PCR) was used to quantify the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA.

  17. Short-term outcomes following laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2011-03-01

    Laparoscopic resection for colon cancer has been proven to have a similar oncological efficacy compared to open resection. Despite this, it is performed by a minority of colorectal surgeons. The aim of our study was to evaluate the short-term clinical, oncological and survival outcomes in all patients undergoing laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

  18. Combination of capecitabine and ludartin inhibits colon cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Mice model of colon cancer was used in this study. Quantitative ... mRNA. Micro-vessel density was assessed using immunohistochemical analysis. ... increase in white blood cell (WBC) count, and increased median survival time of colon cancer mice from ..... tumor cells is associated with the development of.

  19. Mechanisms of oncogenesis in colon versus rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, E.; Liefers, G.J.; Los, L.C.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Hermans, J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Moriya, Y.; Veld, C.J.H. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Observations support the theory that development of left- and right-sided colorectal cancers may involve different mechanisms. This study investigated different genes involved in oncogenesis of colon and rectal cancers and analysed their prognostic value. The study group comprised 35 colon and 42

  20. Role of phytochemicals in colon cancer prevention. A nutrigenomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Specific food compounds, especially from fruits and vegetables, may protect against development of colon cancer. In this thesis effects and mechanisms of various phytochemicals in relation to colon cancer prevention were studied through application of large-scale gene expression profiling.

  1. Applications of Machine Learning in Cancer Prediction and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Cruz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that employs a variety of statistical, probabilistic and optimization techniques that allows computers to “learn” from past examples and to detect hard-to-discern patterns from large, noisy or complex data sets. This capability is particularly well-suited to medical applications, especially those that depend on complex proteomic and genomic measurements. As a result, machine learning is frequently used in cancer diagnosis and detection. More recently machine learning has been applied to cancer prognosis and prediction. This latter approach is particularly interesting as it is part of a growing trend towards personalized, predictive medicine. In assembling this review we conducted a broad survey of the different types of machine learning methods being used, the types of data being integrated and the performance of these methods in cancer prediction and prognosis. A number of trends are noted, including a growing dependence on protein biomarkers and microarray data, a strong bias towards applications in prostate and breast cancer, and a heavy reliance on “older” technologies such artificial neural networks (ANNs instead of more recently developed or more easily interpretable machine learning methods. A number of published studies also appear to lack an appropriate level of validation or testing. Among the better designed and validated studies it is clear that machine learning methods can be used to substantially (15-25% improve the accuracy of predicting cancer susceptibility, recurrence and mortality. At a more fundamental level, it is also evident that machine learning is also helping to improve our basic understanding of cancer development and progression.

  2. Applications of machine learning in cancer prediction and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Joseph A; Wishart, David S

    2007-02-11

    Machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that employs a variety of statistical, probabilistic and optimization techniques that allows computers to "learn" from past examples and to detect hard-to-discern patterns from large, noisy or complex data sets. This capability is particularly well-suited to medical applications, especially those that depend on complex proteomic and genomic measurements. As a result, machine learning is frequently used in cancer diagnosis and detection. More recently machine learning has been applied to cancer prognosis and prediction. This latter approach is particularly interesting as it is part of a growing trend towards personalized, predictive medicine. In assembling this review we conducted a broad survey of the different types of machine learning methods being used, the types of data being integrated and the performance of these methods in cancer prediction and prognosis. A number of trends are noted, including a growing dependence on protein biomarkers and microarray data, a strong bias towards applications in prostate and breast cancer, and a heavy reliance on "older" technologies such artificial neural networks (ANNs) instead of more recently developed or more easily interpretable machine learning methods. A number of published studies also appear to lack an appropriate level of validation or testing. Among the better designed and validated studies it is clear that machine learning methods can be used to substantially (15-25%) improve the accuracy of predicting cancer susceptibility, recurrence and mortality. At a more fundamental level, it is also evident that machine learning is also helping to improve our basic understanding of cancer development and progression.

  3. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  5. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y.; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y.; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A.; Osarogiagbon, Raymond University; Manne, Upender

    2016-01-01

    African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. We retrieved demographic, clinical, and archived tumor tissues from stage II colon cancer patients at four institutions. The 12-gene assay and mismatch repair (MMR) status were performed by Genomic Health (Redwood City, California). Student’s t-test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare Recurrence Score data and gene expression data from AA and CA patients (SAS Enterprise Guide 5.1). Samples from 122 AA and 122 CA patients were analyzed. There were 118 women (63 AA, 55 CA) and 126 men (59 AA, 67 CA). Median age was 66 years for AA patients and 68 for CA patients. Age, gender, year of surgery, pathologic T-stage, tumor location, the number of lymph nodes examined, lymphovascular invasion, and MMR status were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.93). The mean Recurrence Score result for AA patients (27.9 ± 12.8) and CA patients (28.1 ± 11.8) was not significantly different and the proportions of patients with high Recurrence Score values (≥41) were similar between the groups (17/122 AA; 15/122 CA). None of the gene expression variables, either single genes or gene groups (cell cycle group, stromal group, BGN1, FAP, INHBA1, Ki67, MYBL2, cMYC and GADD45B), was significantly different between the racial groups. After controlling for clinical and pathologic covariates, the means and distributions of Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles showed no statistically significant difference between patient groups. The distribution of Recurrence Score

  6. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Manne, Upender

    2016-06-18

    African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. We retrieved demographic, clinical, and archived tumor tissues from stage II colon cancer patients at four institutions. The 12-gene assay and mismatch repair (MMR) status were performed by Genomic Health (Redwood City, California). Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare Recurrence Score data and gene expression data from AA and CA patients (SAS Enterprise Guide 5.1). Samples from 122 AA and 122 CA patients were analyzed. There were 118 women (63 AA, 55 CA) and 126 men (59 AA, 67 CA). Median age was 66 years for AA patients and 68 for CA patients. Age, gender, year of surgery, pathologic T-stage, tumor location, the number of lymph nodes examined, lymphovascular invasion, and MMR status were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.93). The mean Recurrence Score result for AA patients (27.9 ± 12.8) and CA patients (28.1 ± 11.8) was not significantly different and the proportions of patients with high Recurrence Score values (≥41) were similar between the groups (17/122 AA; 15/122 CA). None of the gene expression variables, either single genes or gene groups (cell cycle group, stromal group, BGN1, FAP, INHBA1, Ki67, MYBL2, cMYC and GADD45B), was significantly different between the racial groups. After controlling for clinical and pathologic covariates, the means and distributions of Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles showed no statistically significant difference between patient groups. The distribution of

  7. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva B; Erichsen, Rune; Iversen, Lene H; Gandrup, Per; Nørgaard, Mette; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Objective The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark. Material and methods Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs). Results The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76–0.92) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90) respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68–0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89) respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998–2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007–2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53–0.87) for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.96) for rectal cancer. Conclusion The survival after colon and rectal cancer has improved in central and northern Denmark during the 1998–2009 period, as well as the 30-day postoperative mortality. PMID:21814467

  8. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian-Yong [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Huang, Yi [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Li, Ji-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Meng, Yan-Ling [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yan, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Bian, Yong-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Wang, Wei-Zhong, E-mail: weichang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  9. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting β-catenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. ► Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. ► β-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. ► miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of β-catenin’s target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and β-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and β-catenin’s downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting β-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  10. Machine learning applications in cancer prognosis and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourou, Konstantina; Exarchos, Themis P; Exarchos, Konstantinos P; Karamouzis, Michalis V; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been characterized as a heterogeneous disease consisting of many different subtypes. The early diagnosis and prognosis of a cancer type have become a necessity in cancer research, as it can facilitate the subsequent clinical management of patients. The importance of classifying cancer patients into high or low risk groups has led many research teams, from the biomedical and the bioinformatics field, to study the application of machine learning (ML) methods. Therefore, these techniques have been utilized as an aim to model the progression and treatment of cancerous conditions. In addition, the ability of ML tools to detect key features from complex datasets reveals their importance. A variety of these techniques, including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Bayesian Networks (BNs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and Decision Trees (DTs) have been widely applied in cancer research for the development of predictive models, resulting in effective and accurate decision making. Even though it is evident that the use of ML methods can improve our understanding of cancer progression, an appropriate level of validation is needed in order for these methods to be considered in the everyday clinical practice. In this work, we present a review of recent ML approaches employed in the modeling of cancer progression. The predictive models discussed here are based on various supervised ML techniques as well as on different input features and data samples. Given the growing trend on the application of ML methods in cancer research, we present here the most recent publications that employ these techniques as an aim to model cancer risk or patient outcomes.

  11. Plasma testosterone in the general population, cancer prognosis and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orsted, D D; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Testosterone is an important anabolic hormone in humans and in vitro testosterone stimulates growth of lung and colon cancer cells. We tested the hypothesis that plasma testosterone associate with increased risk of cancer and with increased risk of early death after cancer. MATERIALS...

  12. Evaluation of clinical, laboratory and morphologic prognostic factors in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigro Casimiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The long-term prognosis of patients with colon cancer is dependent on many factors. To investigate the influence of a series of clinical, laboratory and morphological variables on prognosis of colon carcinoma we conducted a retrospective analysis of our data. Methods Ninety-two patients with colon cancer, who underwent surgical resection between January 1999 and December 2001, were analyzed. On survival analysis, demographics, clinical, laboratory and pathomorphological parameters were tested for their potential prognostic value. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed considering the depth of tumour invasion into the bowel wall as independent variable. Results On survival analysis we found that depth of tumour invasion (P Conclusion The various clinical, laboratory and patho-morphological parameters showed different prognostic value for colon carcinoma. In the future, preoperative prognostic markers will probably gain relevance in order to make a proper choice between surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence for preoperative stratification of high and low risk patients. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted.

  13. Differences in telomerase activity between colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitis, Georgios D; Notas, George; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Georgiadou, Maria; Sfakianaki, Ourania; Kouroumallis, Elias

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and the third leading cause of cancer death in both sexes. The disease progresses as a multistep process and is associated with genetic alterations. One of the characteristic features of cancer is telomerase activation. We sought to evaluate the differences in telomerase activity between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue and to correlate the differences in telomerase activity between different locations with clinicopathological factors and survival. Matched colon tumour samples and adjacent normal mucosa samples 10 cm away from the tumour were collected during colectomy. We assessed telomerase activity using real time polymerase chain reaction. Several pathological characteristics of tumours, including p53, Ki-67, p21, bcl2 and MLH1 expression were also studied. We collected samples from 49 patients. There was a significantly higher telomerase activity in colon cancer tissue than normal tissue. Adenocarcinomas of the right colon express significantly higher telomerase than left-side cancers. Colon cancers and their adjacent normal tissue had significantly more telomerase and were more positive to MLH1 than rectal cancers. The expression of p53 negatively correlated to telomerase activity and was linked to better patient survival. Colon and rectal cancers seem to have different telomerase and MLH1 profiles, and this could be another factor for their different biologic and clinical behaviour and progression. These results support the idea that the large bowel cannot be considered a uniform organ, at least in the biology of cancer.

  14. MicroRNAs as Regulator of Signaling Networks in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Du, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C.; Yang, Yinxue

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression translationally and/or transcriptionally. A large number of evidence have demonstrated that miRNAs have a functional role in both physiological and pathological processes by regulating the expression of their target genes. Recently, the functionalities of miRNAs in the initiation, progression, angiogenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance of tumors have gained increasing attentions. Particularly, the alteration of miRNA profiles has been correlated with the transformation and metastasis of various cancers, including colon cancer. This paper reports the latest findings on miRNAs involved in different signaling networks leading to colon cancer metastasis, mainly focusing on miRNA profiling and their roles in PTEN/PI3K, EGFR, TGFβ, and p53 signaling pathways of metastatic colon cancer. The potential of miRNAs used as biomarkers in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic targets in colon cancer is also discussed. PMID:26064956

  15. MicroRNAs as Regulator of Signaling Networks in Metastatic Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Du, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C; Yang, Yinxue

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression translationally and/or transcriptionally. A large number of evidence have demonstrated that miRNAs have a functional role in both physiological and pathological processes by regulating the expression of their target genes. Recently, the functionalities of miRNAs in the initiation, progression, angiogenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance of tumors have gained increasing attentions. Particularly, the alteration of miRNA profiles has been correlated with the transformation and metastasis of various cancers, including colon cancer. This paper reports the latest findings on miRNAs involved in different signaling networks leading to colon cancer metastasis, mainly focusing on miRNA profiling and their roles in PTEN/PI3K, EGFR, TGFβ, and p53 signaling pathways of metastatic colon cancer. The potential of miRNAs used as biomarkers in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic targets in colon cancer is also discussed.

  16. MicroRNAs as Regulator of Signaling Networks in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, noncoding RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression translationally and/or transcriptionally. A large number of evidence have demonstrated that miRNAs have a functional role in both physiological and pathological processes by regulating the expression of their target genes. Recently, the functionalities of miRNAs in the initiation, progression, angiogenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance of tumors have gained increasing attentions. Particularly, the alteration of miRNA profiles has been correlated with the transformation and metastasis of various cancers, including colon cancer. This paper reports the latest findings on miRNAs involved in different signaling networks leading to colon cancer metastasis, mainly focusing on miRNA profiling and their roles in PTEN/PI3K, EGFR, TGFβ, and p53 signaling pathways of metastatic colon cancer. The potential of miRNAs used as biomarkers in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic targets in colon cancer is also discussed.

  17. Prognostic significance of unintentional body weight loss in colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Hung; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Cheng Yi; Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether unintentional body weight loss (BWL) provides additional clinical information in terms of tumor progression and prognosis in non-metastatic colon cancer. In the present study, a total of 2,406 consecutive colon cancer patients without metastasis were retrospectively enrolled. Unintentional BWL was defined as loss of >5% of body weight within the last 6-12 months, or defined subjectively upon fulfillment of at least two of the following: Evidence of change in clothing size and corroboration of the reported weight loss by family or friend. This category was recorded as present ('with') or absent ('without'). Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation between BWL and the tumor characteristics and post-operative outcomes of patients with colon cancer. The Cox regression model was used to determine the association of BWL with long-term survival of colon cancer patients. A significant association between BWL and tumor location [right vs. left: Odds ratio (OR)=1.62; Pcolon cancer is not just a symptom, but it is also correlated with tumor location, size and depth, and is a prognostic factor for poor outcomes including overall survival and tumor relapse.

  18. Increased colon cancer risk after severe Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapo Mughini-Gras

    Full Text Available Colon cancer constitutes one of the most frequent malignancies. Previous studies showed that Salmonella manipulates host cell signaling pathways and that Salmonella Typhimurium infection facilitates colon cancer development in genetically predisposed mice. This epidemiological study examined whether severe Salmonella infection, usually acquired from contaminated food, is associated with increased colon cancer risk in humans.We performed a nationwide registry-based study to assess colon cancer risk after diagnosed Salmonella infection. National infectious disease surveillance records (1999-2015 for Dutch residents aged ≥20 years when diagnosed with salmonellosis (n = 14,264 were linked to the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Salmonella-infected patients were laboratory-confirmed under medical consultation after 1-2 weeks of illness. These datasets also contained information on Salmonella serovar and type of infection. Colon cancer risk (overall and per colon subsite among patients with a diagnosed Salmonella infection was compared with expected colon cancer risk in the general population. Data from the nationwide registry of histo- and cytopathology (PALGA and Statistics Netherlands (CBS allowed assessing potential effects of age, gender, latency, socioeconomic status, genetic predisposition, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and tumor features. We found that compared to the general population, colon cancer risk was significantly increased (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 1.54; 95%CI 1.09-2.10 among patients with Salmonella infection diagnosed <60 years of age. Such increased risk concerned specifically the ascending/transverse colon (SIR 2.12; 95%CI 1.38-3.09 after S. Enteritidis infection (SIR 2.97; 95%CI 1.73-4.76. Salmonellosis occurred more frequently among colon cancer patients with pre-infectious IBD, a known risk factor for colon cancer. Colon tumors of patients with a history of Salmonella infection were mostly of low grade

  19. Increased colon cancer risk after severe Salmonella infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Sofie; Neefjes-Borst, E. Andra; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Neefjes, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Background Colon cancer constitutes one of the most frequent malignancies. Previous studies showed that Salmonella manipulates host cell signaling pathways and that Salmonella Typhimurium infection facilitates colon cancer development in genetically predisposed mice. This epidemiological study examined whether severe Salmonella infection, usually acquired from contaminated food, is associated with increased colon cancer risk in humans. Methods and findings We performed a nationwide registry-based study to assess colon cancer risk after diagnosed Salmonella infection. National infectious disease surveillance records (1999–2015) for Dutch residents aged ≥20 years when diagnosed with salmonellosis (n = 14,264) were linked to the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Salmonella-infected patients were laboratory-confirmed under medical consultation after 1–2 weeks of illness. These datasets also contained information on Salmonella serovar and type of infection. Colon cancer risk (overall and per colon subsite) among patients with a diagnosed Salmonella infection was compared with expected colon cancer risk in the general population. Data from the nationwide registry of histo- and cytopathology (PALGA) and Statistics Netherlands (CBS) allowed assessing potential effects of age, gender, latency, socioeconomic status, genetic predisposition, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and tumor features. We found that compared to the general population, colon cancer risk was significantly increased (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 1.54; 95%CI 1.09–2.10) among patients with Salmonella infection diagnosed transverse colon (SIR 2.12; 95%CI 1.38–3.09) after S. Enteritidis infection (SIR 2.97; 95%CI 1.73–4.76). Salmonellosis occurred more frequently among colon cancer patients with pre-infectious IBD, a known risk factor for colon cancer. Colon tumors of patients with a history of Salmonella infection were mostly of low grade. Conclusions Patients diagnosed with severe

  20. Association between Perception of Prognosis and Spiritual Well-being among Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alehe Seyedrasooly

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disclosure of cancer prognosis is one of the most difficult challenges in caring of cancer patients. An exact effect of prognosis disclosure on spiritual well-being of cancer patient was not completely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between perception of prognosis and spiritual well-being among cancer patients. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, which conducted in 2013, two hundred cancer patients referred to Shahid Ghazi Hospital and private offices of two oncologists in Tabriz participated with convenience sampling method. Perception of prognosis was investigated by Perception of Prognosis Inventory and spiritual well-being of cancer patients was investigated by Paloutzian and Ellison Inventory. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test. Results: Participants reported positive perception about the prognosis of their disease (score 11 from 15 and rated their spiritual well-being as high (score 99 from 120. There was a positive correlation between the perception of prognosis and spiritual health among cancer patients.Conclusion: Disclosure of cancer prognosis has negative effects on cancer patients. This result highlights the importance of considering cultural factors in disclosure of cancer prognosis. According to limitations of the present study approving these results need more studies.

  1. Effect of BRCA germline mutations on breast cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretta, Zora; Mocellin, Simone; Goldin, Elena; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The contribution of BRCA germline mutational status to breast cancer patients’ prognosis is unclear. We aimed to systematically review and perform meta-analysis of the available evidence of effects of BRCA germline mutations on multiple survival outcomes of breast cancer patients as a whole and in specific subgroups of interest, including those with triple negative breast cancer, those with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and patients with stage I–III disease. Methods: Sixty studies met all inclusion criteria and were considered for this meta-analysis. These studies involved 105,220 breast cancer patients, whose 3588 (3.4%) were BRCA mutations carriers. The associations between BRCA genes mutational status and overall survival (OS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were evaluated using random-effect models. Results: BRCA1 mutation carriers have worse OS than BRCA-negative/sporadic cases (hazard ratio, HR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11–1.52) and worse BCSS than sporadic/BRCA-negative cases among patients with stage I–III breast cancer (HR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.01–2.07). BRCA2 mutation carriers have worse BCSS than sporadic/BRCA-negative cases (HR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.03–1.62), although they have similar OS. Among triple negative breast cancer, BRCA1/2 mutations carriers had better OS than BRCA-negative counterpart (HR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26–0.92). Among Ashkenazi Jewish women, BRCA1/2 mutations carriers presented higher risk of death from breast cancer (HR 1.44, 95% CI: 1.05–1.97) and of distant metastases (HR 1.82, 95% CI: 1.05–3.16) than sporadic/BRCA-negative patients. Conclusion: Our results support the evaluation of BRCA mutational status in patients with high risk of harboring BRCA germline mutations to better define the prognosis of breast cancer in these patients. PMID:27749552

  2. Synchronous colon and renal cancer - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luczynska, E.; Pawlik, T.; Aniol, J.; Chwalibog, A.

    2008-01-01

    Primary cancer may occur synchronously in two different organs. We present an example of pathologically proven, coexistent renal and colony double malignant tumors. A 59 year old man, was admitted to the Institute of Oncology due to left renal lesion, discovered during a routine abdominal ultrasound examination. The CT exam was performed before surgery. The CT scans reveled a second abnormality, presenting irregular shaped and thickened to 20 mm intestinal wall within a patient's large bowel. As a next diagnostic step a CT-colonoscopy was undertaken, which confirmed the presence of an exophytic sigmoid lesion, eccentrically affecting the colonic wall and protruding into the lumen moderately narrowing it, placed about 50 cm from the external rectal sphincter. Patient underwent simultaneous radical left nephrectomy and sigmoidectomy. Both tumors were confirmed in pathologic evaluation, reveling renal clear cell carcinoma (Fuhrman G II) and colonic adenocarcinoma (Astler-Coller B2). Preoperative careful imaging studies reveled neoplastic tumors in two different organs, allowing for radical resection at the same surgical procedure. (author)

  3. Synuclein gamma predicts poor clinical outcome in colon cancer with normal levels of carcinoembryonic antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Xiaofang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synuclein gamma (SNCG, initially identified as a breast cancer specific gene, is aberrantly expressed in many different malignant tumors but rarely expressed in matched nonneoplastic adjacent tissues. In this study, we investigated the prognostic potential of SNCG in colon cancer particularly in the patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels. Methods SNCG levels were assessed immunohistochemically in cancer tissues from 229 colon adenocarcinoma patients with a mean follow-up of 44 months. Correlations between SNCG levels and clinicopathologic features, preoperative serum CEA level, and clinical outcome were analyzed statistically using SPSS. Results SNCG levels in colon adenocarcinoma were closely associated with intravascular embolus and tumor recurrence but independent of preoperative serum CEA levels. SNCG expression was an independent prognostic factor of a shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS (P P = 0.001, P = 0.001, 0.002 for 97 patients with normal preoperative serum CEA level. Conclusions Our results suggest for the first time that SNCG is a new independent predicator for poor prognosis in patients with colon adenocarcinoma, including those with normal CEA levels. Combination of CEA with SNCG improves prognostic evaluation for patients with colon adenocarcinoma.

  4. [Expression and significance of CK7 and CK19 in colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Peng-sheng

    2010-02-01

    To detect the cytokeratin (CK) genes expression in the colon cancer, and investigate the expression variability in different pathological types and clinical stages. The CK gene expression pattern in normal colon, colon cancer tissues and colon cancer cell lines were analyzed by using Immunohistochemical, Immunocytochemical and Western blot ways. CK7 and CK19 didn't express in normal colon tissues. CK7 was low or not expressed in the colon cancer, and CK19 was highly expressed in the colon cancer. There were significant deviation (Pcolon cancer, and CK7-)/CK19+ may be one of the expression characteristics in colon cancer.

  5. Comparison of oncological outcomes of right-sided colon cancer versus left-sided colon cancer after curative resection: Which side is better outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae Ro; Kuk, Jung Kul; Kim, Taehyung; Shin, Eung Jin

    2017-10-01

    There are embryological origins, anatomical, histological, genetic, and immunological differences between right-sided colon cancer (RCC) and left-sided colon cancer (LCC). Many studies have sought to determine the survival and prognosis according to tumor location. This study aimed to analyze outcomes between RCC and LCC. Between January 2000 and December 2012, data on 414 patients who underwent curative resection for RCC and LCC were retrieved from a retrospective database. Propensity score matching (1:1) was performed and RCC was identified in 207 and LCC in 207 patients. On average, RCC exhibited a more advanced N stage, increased tumor size, more frequently poorly differentiated tumors, more harvested lymph nodes, and more positivity of lymphovascular invasion than LCC. With a median follow-up of 66.7 months, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for RCC and LCC were 82.1% and 88.7%, respectively, (P cancers, the DFS rates were 61.1% (RCC) and 81.9% (LCC; P colon cancer is needed.

  6. Complement 5a stimulates macrophage polarization and contributes to tumor metastases of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Chunmei; Zhang, Wen-Mei; Li, Tao-Tao; Zhang, Cong-Cong; Qiu, Shulan; Liu, Yan; Liu, Sa; Jin, Ming; Jia, Li-Xin; Song, Wen-Chao; Du, Jie

    2018-05-15

    Inflammatory cells such as macrophages can play a pro-tumorigenic role in the tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) generally display an M2 phenotype with tumor-promoting activity; however, the mechanisms regulating the TAM phenotype remain unclear. Complement 5a (C5a) is a cytokine-like polypeptide that is generated during complement system activation and is known to promote tumor growth. Herein, we investigated the role of C5a on macrophage polarization in colon cancer metastasis in mice. We found that deficiency of the C5a receptor (C5aR) severely impairs the metastatic ability of implanted colon cancer cells. C5aR was expressed on TAMs, which exhibited an M2-like functional profile in colon cancer liver metastatic lesions. Furthermore, C5a mediated macrophage polarization and this process relied substantially on activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Finally, analysis of human colon carcinoma indicated that C5aR expression is negatively associated with tumor differentiation grade. Our results demonstrate that C5aR has a central role in regulating the M2 phenotype of TAMs, which in turn, contributes to hepatic metastasis of colon cancer through NF-κB signaling. C5a is a potential novel marker for cancer prognosis and drugs targeting complement system activation, specifically the C5aR pathway, may offer new therapeutic opportunities for colon cancer management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for colonic cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic cancer detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (colonic tissues (i.e., normal and caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and cancerous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  8. Robotic adrenalectomy for sigmoid colon cancer oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vishwas D; Bhandare, Manish; Deodhar, Kedar; Yuvaraja, Thyavihally Boregowda; Saklani, Avanish P

    2015-12-01

    Solitary adrenal metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare with reported incidence from 3.1% to 14.4% in the literature. Conventionally, adrenal metastasis is considered as indicative of widespread systemic disease and hence treated with palliative intent. Surgical resection remains controversial although a median survival of 32 months was found in the largest reported case series. It has been postulated that surgical resection should be offered when the adrenal metastasis develops more than 6 months after the treatment of the primary tumor. For the metastatic lesions and potentially malignant lesions, role of minimally invasive surgery is still considered controversial. We are presenting a case of metachronous, solitary adrenal metastasis from sigmoid colon carcinoma treated surgically with curative intent.

  9. Tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic colon cancer after treatment with oxaliplatin and 5-Fu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruo-Han Tseng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome in solid tumors is a rare occurrence, with a poor prognosis. We present the case of a patient of recurrent colon cancer who received chemotherapy with FOLFOX regimen (lencovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin with subsequent tumor lysis. We present a recurrent rectal cancer patient suffered from tumor lysis syndrome after salvage FOLFOX regimen. After treat with CVVH with improved conscious status. In this case report, we had review the tumor lysis in solid tumor.

  10. Sparse Group Penalized Integrative Analysis of Multiple Cancer Prognosis Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Xie, Yang; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In cancer research, high-throughput profiling studies have been extensively conducted, searching for markers associated with prognosis. Because of the “large d, small n” characteristic, results generated from the analysis of a single dataset can be unsatisfactory. Recent studies have shown that integrative analysis, which simultaneously analyzes multiple datasets, can be more effective than single-dataset analysis and classic meta-analysis. In most of existing integrative analysis, the homogeneity model has been assumed, which postulates that different datasets share the same set of markers. Several approaches have been designed to reinforce this assumption. In practice, different datasets may differ in terms of patient selection criteria, profiling techniques, and many other aspects. Such differences may make the homogeneity model too restricted. In this study, we assume the heterogeneity model, under which different datasets are allowed to have different sets of markers. With multiple cancer prognosis datasets, we adopt the AFT (accelerated failure time) model to describe survival. This model may have the lowest computational cost among popular semiparametric survival models. For marker selection, we adopt a sparse group MCP (minimax concave penalty) approach. This approach has an intuitive formulation and can be computed using an effective group coordinate descent algorithm. Simulation study shows that it outperforms the existing approaches under both the homogeneity and heterogeneity models. Data analysis further demonstrates the merit of heterogeneity model and proposed approach. PMID:23938111

  11. The G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptor FPR2 promotes malignant phenotype of human colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Chen, Keqiang; Wang, Xiafei; Zhou, Jiamin; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Huang, Jiaqiang; Wang, Rongquan; Wu, Yuzhang; Shi, Guochao; Bian, Xiuwu; Wang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptor formylpeptide receptor-2 (FPR2 in human, Fpr2 in mice) is expressed by mouse colon epithelial cells and plays a critical role in mediating mucosal homeostasis and inflammatory responses. However, the biological role of FPR2 in human colon is unclear. Our investigation revealed that a considerable number of human colon cancer cell lines expressed FPR2 and its ligands promoted cell migration and proliferation. Human colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of FPR2 also formed more rapidly growing tumors in immunocompromised mice as compared with cell lines expressing lower levels of FPR2. Knocking down of FPR2 from colon cancer cell lines highly expressing FPR2 reduced their tumorigenicity. Clinically, FPR2 is more highly expressed in progressive colon cancer, associated with poorer patient prognosis. These results suggest that FPR2 can be high-jacked by colon cancer cells for their growth advantage, thus becoming a potential target for therapeutic development. PMID:27904774

  12. Dietary patterns and colon cancer risk in Whites and African Americans in the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satia, Jessie A; Tseng, Marilyn; Galanko, Joseph A; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    We examined associations of dietary patterns with colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites from a case-control study in North Carolina. Incident colon cancer cases, 40 to 80 yr (n = 636), and matched controls (n = 1,042) were interviewed in person to elicit information on potential colon cancer risk factors. A validated food frequency questionnaire adapted to include regional foods captured diet over the year prior to diagnosis (cases) or interview date (controls). Three meaningful intake patterns were identified in both Whites and African Americans: "Western-Southern," "fruit-vegetable," and "metropolitan." Compared to the Western-Southern pattern, the fruit-vegetable and metropolitan patterns were associated with more healthful dietary behaviors (e.g., higher vegetable intake and lower red meat consumption), and demographic/lifestyle characteristics typically correlated with low colon cancer risk, for example, lower BMI, higher education, and higher NSAID use. The fruit-vegetable pattern was significantly inversely associated with colon cancer risk in Whites (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.3-0.6) and the metropolitan pattern with a nonsignificant 30% risk reduction in both Whites and African Americans after adjustment for education. The Western-Southern pattern was not associated with colon cancer risk. These findings may explain some of the racial differences in colon cancer incidence and underscore the importance of examining diet-cancer associations in different population subgroups.

  13. Radiation-associated colon cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Ishihara, Soichiro; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Kaneko, Manabu; Murono, Koji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Teppei; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    Radiation-associated colon cancer is a rare clinical entity. We herein describe the case of a patient with radiation-associated colon cancer who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy. Certain characteristics of radiation-associated colon cancer are highlighted. The patient was a 48-year-old man who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy at a total dose of 50 Gy, at the age of 29 years. When the patient presented at the University of Tokyo Hospital, 19 years after the surgery, he complained of severe anal pain and frequent defecation. Colonoscopy revealed two flat tumors in the sigmoid colon, located 10 cm to the oral side of the anastomosis site, which were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In addition, colonoscopy identified five flat polyps near the tumors, which were resected endoscopically. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the sigmoid colon and no evidence of distant metastasis. Laparoscopic-assisted intersphincteric resection of the rectum and sigmoid colon with diverting ileostomy was performed. There were no specific postoperative complications and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the 20th postoperative day. On pathological examination, the resected rectum and sigmoid colon contained two separate tumors and six flat polyps. The two tumors were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with invasion of the subserosa and submucosa, respectively. A total of 17 regional lymph nodes without metastasis were resected. The six flat polyps were diagnosed as tubular adenomas. We herein present a case of a radiation-associated colon cancer in a patient who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy 19 years prior. Colonoscopic surveillance of radiation-associated colon cancer may be indicated for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative

  14. microRNA-365, down-regulated in colon cancer, inhibits cell cycle progression and promotes apoptosis of colon cancer cells by probably targeting Cyclin D1 and Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing; Liu, Lin; Zheng, Wei; Chen, Lin; Wu, Xin; Xu, Yingxin; Du, Xiaohui; Han, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Deregulated microRNAs participate in carcinogenesis and cancer progression, but their roles in cancer development remain unclear. In this study, miR-365 expression was found to be downregulated in human colon cancer tissues as compared with that in matched non-neoplastic mucosa tissues, and its downregulation was correlated with cancer progression and poor survival in colon cancer patients. Functional studies revealed that restoration of miR-365 expression inhibited cell cycle progression, promoted 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and repressed tumorigenicity in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation were used to identify miR-365 target genes and indicated that the antitumor effects of miR-365 were probably mediated by its targeting and repression of Cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expression, thus inhibiting cell cycle progression and promoting apoptosis. These results suggest that downregulation of miR-365 in colon cancer may have potential applications in prognosis prediction and gene therapy in colon cancer patients.

  15. MicroRNA classifier and nomogram for metastasis prediction in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens-Beumer, Inès J; Derr, Remco S; Buermans, Henk P J; Goeman, Jelle J; Böhringer, Stefan; Morreau, Hans; Nitsche, Ulrich; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancer prognosis and treatment are currently based on a classification system still showing large heterogeneity in clinical outcome, especially in TNM stages II and III. Prognostic biomarkers for metastasis risk are warranted as development of distant recurrent disease mainly accounts for the high lethality rates of colon cancer. miRNAs have been proposed as potential biomarkers for cancer. Furthermore, a verified standard for normalization of the amount of input material in PCR-based relative quantification of miRNA expression is lacking. A selection of frozen tumor specimens from two independent patient cohorts with TNM stage II-III microsatellite stable primary adenocarcinomas was used for laser capture microdissection. Next-generation sequencing was performed on small RNAs isolated from colorectal tumors from the Dutch cohort (N = 50). Differential expression analysis, comparing in metastasized and nonmetastasized tumors, identified prognostic miRNAs. Validation was performed on colon tumors from the German cohort (N = 43) using quantitative PCR (qPCR). miR25-3p and miR339-5p were identified and validated as independent prognostic markers and used to construct a multivariate nomogram for metastasis risk prediction. The nomogram showed good probability prediction in validation. In addition, we recommend combination of miR16-5p and miR26a-5p as standard for normalization in qPCR of colon cancer tissue-derived miRNA expression. In this international study, we identified and validated a miRNA classifier in primary cancers, and propose a nomogram capable of predicting metastasis risk in microsatellite stable TNM stage II-III colon cancer. In conjunction with TNM staging, by means of a nomogram, this miRNA classifier may allow for personalized treatment decisions based on individual tumor characteristics. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Complex of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in Colon Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascio, Sandra; Finn, Olivera J.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that CIN85, an 85 KDa protein known to be involved in tumor cell migration and metastasis through its interaction with Cbl, associates with MUC1 in tumor cells. MUC1/CIN85 complex also regulates migration and invasion of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we examined specifically human colon carcinoma tissue microarrays (TMA) by immunohistochemistry for the expression of MUC1 and CIN85 and their potential role in cancer progression and metastasis. We detected a significant increase in expression of both MUC1 and CIN85 associated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. We further investigated if Cbl could also be present in the MUC1/CIN85 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that Cbl co-localized both with CIN85 and with MUC1 in a human colon cancer cell line. To begin to investigate the in vivo relevance of MUC1 overexpression and association with CIN85 and Cbl in cancer development and progression, we used human MUC1 transgenic mice that express MUC1 on the colonic epithelial cells, treated with azoxymethane to initiate and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) to promote colorectal carcinogenesis. MUC1.Tg mice showed higher tumor incidence and decreased survival when compared with wild-type mice. Consistent with the in vitro data, the association of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl was detected in colon tissues of AOM/DSS-treated MUC1 transgenic mice. MUC1/CIN85/Cbl complex appears to contribute to promotion and progression of colon cancer and thus increased expression of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in early stage colon cancer might be predictive of poor prognosis

  17. Complex of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in Colon Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascio, Sandra, E-mail: sac131@pitt.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, E1040 Biomedical Science Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Fondazione Ri.Med, via Bandiera, Palermo 90133 (Italy); Finn, Olivera J., E-mail: sac131@pitt.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, E1040 Biomedical Science Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    We previously reported that CIN85, an 85 KDa protein known to be involved in tumor cell migration and metastasis through its interaction with Cbl, associates with MUC1 in tumor cells. MUC1/CIN85 complex also regulates migration and invasion of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we examined specifically human colon carcinoma tissue microarrays (TMA) by immunohistochemistry for the expression of MUC1 and CIN85 and their potential role in cancer progression and metastasis. We detected a significant increase in expression of both MUC1 and CIN85 associated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. We further investigated if Cbl could also be present in the MUC1/CIN85 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that Cbl co-localized both with CIN85 and with MUC1 in a human colon cancer cell line. To begin to investigate the in vivo relevance of MUC1 overexpression and association with CIN85 and Cbl in cancer development and progression, we used human MUC1 transgenic mice that express MUC1 on the colonic epithelial cells, treated with azoxymethane to initiate and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) to promote colorectal carcinogenesis. MUC1.Tg mice showed higher tumor incidence and decreased survival when compared with wild-type mice. Consistent with the in vitro data, the association of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl was detected in colon tissues of AOM/DSS-treated MUC1 transgenic mice. MUC1/CIN85/Cbl complex appears to contribute to promotion and progression of colon cancer and thus increased expression of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in early stage colon cancer might be predictive of poor prognosis.

  18. Cryptogenic pyogenic liver abscess as the herald of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Soung Won; Jang, Jae Young; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Gun; Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Seung Hoon; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Boo Sung; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong

    2012-02-01

    Colonic mucosal defects might be a route for bacterial invasion into the portal system, with subsequent hematogenous spread to the liver. We retrospectively investigated the results of colonoscopy and the clinical characteristics of patients with pyogenic liver abscess of colonic origin. A total of 230 consecutive patients with pyogenic liver abscess were reviewed between 2003 and 2010. The 230 patients were categorized into three groups (pancreatobiliary [n = 135], cryptogenic [n = 81], and others [n = 14]). Of the 81 cryptogenic patients, 37 (45.7%) underwent colonoscopy. Colonic lesions with mucosal defects were considered colonic causes of abscess. In the 37 colonoscopic investigations, colon cancer was found in six patients (16.2%), laterally-spreading tumor (LST) in two patients (5.4%), multiple colon ulcers in one patient (2.7%), colon polyps in 17 patients (45.9%), and diverticula in four patients (10.8%). Nine (11%) of 81 cryptogenic abscesses were therefore reclassified as being of colonic origin (colon cancer = 6, LST = 2, ulcer = 1). Three cases were stage III colon cancer, and the others were stage I. Two LST were high-grade dysplasia. The percentage of patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) and diabetes mellitus (DM) of colonic origin was 66.7%, which was significantly higher than the 8.6% for other causes (P colonic cause. Colonoscopy should be considered for the detection of hidden colonic malignant lesions in patients with cryptogenic pyogenic liver abscess, especially for patients with K. pneumoniae and DM. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Radiation-induced neuropathies: collateral damage of improved cancer prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Maisonobe, Thierry; Psimaras, Dimitri; Lenglet, Timothee; Porcher, Raphael; Lefaix, J.L.; Delenian, S.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the improvement of cancer prognosis, long-term damages of treatments become a medical and public health problem. Among the iatrogenic complications, neurological impairment is crucial to consider since motor disability and pain have a considerable impact on quality of life of long cancer survivors. However, radiation-induced neuropathies have not been the focus of great attention. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated review about the radiation-induced lesions of the peripheral nerve system. Radiation-induced neuropathies are characterized by their heterogeneity in both symptoms and disease course. Signs and symptoms depend on the affected structures of the peripheral nerve system (nerve roots, nerve plexus or nerve trunks). Early-onset complications are often transient and late complications are usually progressive and associated with a poor prognosis. The most frequent and well known is delayed radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, which may follow breast cancer irradiation. Radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy is characterized by pure or predominant lower motor neuron signs. They can be misdiagnosed, confused with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or with leptomeningeal metastases since nodular MRI enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina and increased cerebrospinal fluid protein content can be observed. In the absence of specific markers of the link with radiotherapy, the diagnosis of post-radiation neuropathy may be difficult. Recently, a posteriori conformal radiotherapy with 3D dosimetric reconstitution has been developed to link a precise anatomical site to unexpected excess irradiation. The importance of early diagnosis of radiation-induced neuropathies is underscored by the emergence of new disease-modifying treatments. Although the pathophysiology is not fully understood, it is already possible to target radiation-induced fibrosis but also associated factors such as ischemia, oxidative stress and

  20. Dietary intervention strategies to modulate prostate cancer risk and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J; Aronson, William J

    2009-05-01

    There is increasing interest in complementary and holistic approaches for cancer prevention and management. We sought to review the latest literature regarding dietary interventions for prostate cancer with a special emphasis on dietary fat and carbohydrate intake for modulating prognosis among men with prostate cancer. Several recent prospective trials have investigated various dietary and lifestyle investigations on malignant prostate tissue biology. These interventions included a very low-fat (12% fat kcals) vegan diet with various supplements and lifestyle changes, a more traditional low-fat diet (25% fat kcals) with flaxseed supplementation, and a low-glycemic index diet. Low-glycemic index and very low-fat vegan diets (with supplements and lifestyle changes) alter tumor biology as assessed by tumor gene expression changes, with a common mechanism perhaps being weight loss whereas no effects were seen with a traditional low-fat diet. In mice, either very low-fat or low-carbohydrate diets significantly slow tumor growth independent of weight loss. Epidemiologic and preclinical data also suggest cholesterol intake and serum cholesterol levels may be linked with the development and progression of prostate cancer. Small clinical trials suggest that tumor biology can be altered by either a vegan low-fat diet or eliminating simple carbohydrates accompanied by weight loss. Larger and longer term studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of these findings.

  1. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  2. A Case of Urethral Metastasis from Sigmoid Colon Cancer Diagnostically and Prognostically Indicated by F 18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Han Seok; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Soyon; Im, Su Jin; Park, Yong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hyoung; Hur, So Chong

    2011-01-01

    Urethral metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare and is known to have a poor prognosis. A 72 year old man with a history of colectomy and colostomy due to sigmoid colon cancer was admitted to the emergency room with bowel distension, rectal bleeding and urinary symptoms. Computed tomography of the abdominopelvis showed sigmoid colon cancer with multiple metastases involving the liver. Positron emission tomography with F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) showed multiple hypermetabolic foci in the liver, penis and pubic bone, which otherwise could not be diagnosed. The lesions revealed no improvement with chemotherapy and urological surgery on follow up F 18 FDG PET/CT. We present a case of urethral metastasis of sigmoid colon cancer diagnostically and prognostically indicated by F 18 FDG PET/CT.

  3. A Case of Urethral Metastasis from Sigmoid Colon Cancer Diagnostically and Prognostically Indicated by F 18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han Seok; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Soyon; Im, Su Jin; Park, Yong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hyoung; Hur, So Chong [National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Urethral metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare and is known to have a poor prognosis. A 72 year old man with a history of colectomy and colostomy due to sigmoid colon cancer was admitted to the emergency room with bowel distension, rectal bleeding and urinary symptoms. Computed tomography of the abdominopelvis showed sigmoid colon cancer with multiple metastases involving the liver. Positron emission tomography with F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) showed multiple hypermetabolic foci in the liver, penis and pubic bone, which otherwise could not be diagnosed. The lesions revealed no improvement with chemotherapy and urological surgery on follow up F 18 FDG PET/CT. We present a case of urethral metastasis of sigmoid colon cancer diagnostically and prognostically indicated by F 18 FDG PET/CT.

  4. Colonic macrophage polarization in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, Caroline B.

    2016-01-01

    Our review focuses on the colonic macrophage, a monocyte-derived, tissue-resident macrophage, and the role it plays in health and disease, specifically in inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and cancer of the colon and rectum. We give special emphasis to macrophage polarization, or phenotype, in these different states. We focus on macrophages because they are one of the most numerous leukocytes in the colon, and because they normally contribute to homeostasis through an anti-inflammatory phenotype. However, in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, proinflammatory macrophages are increased in the colon and have been linked to disease severity and progression. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells may employ anti-inflammatory macrophages to promote tumor growth and dissemination, whereas proinflammatory macrophages may antagonize tumor growth. Given the key roles that this cell type plays in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, the colonic macrophage is an intriguing therapeutic target. As such, potential macrophage-targeting strategies are discussed. PMID:27229123

  5. Prostate and Colon Cancer Screening Messages in Popular Magazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L; Sheridan, Stacey; Pignone, Michael; Lewis, Carmen; Battle, Jamila; Gollop, Claudia; O'Malley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To 1) compare the number of articles published about prostate, colon, and breast cancer in popular magazines during the past 2 decades, and 2) evaluate the content of in-depth prostate and colon cancer screening articles identified from 1996 to 2001. DESIGN We used a searchable database to identify the number of prostate, colon, and breast cancer articles published in three magazines with the highest circulation from six categories. In addition, we performed a systematic review on the in-depth (≥2 pages) articles on prostate and colon cancer screening that appeared from 1996 through 2001. RESULTS Although the number of magazine articles on prostate and colon cancer published in the 1990s increased compared to the 1980s, the number of articles is approximately one third of breast cancer articles. There were 36 in-depth articles from 1996 to 2001 in which prostate or colon cancer screening were mentioned. Over 90% of the articles recommended screening. However, of those articles, only 76% (25/33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 58% to 89%) cited screening guidelines. The benefits of screening were mentioned in 89% (32/36; 95% CI, 74% to 97%) but the harms were only found in 58% (21/36; 95% CI, 41% to 75%). Only 28% (10/36; 95% CI, 14% to 45%) of the articles provided all the necessary information needed for the reader to make an informed decision. CONCLUSIONS In-depth articles about prostate and colon cancer in popular magazines do not appear as frequently as articles about breast cancer. The available articles on prostate and colon cancer screening often do not provide the information necessary for the reader to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:15242469

  6. Differences between right- and left-sided colon cancer in patient characteristics, cancer morphology and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Toru; Kato, Jun; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hisayuki; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2008-03-01

    Recently, the clinical and biological differences between right- and left-sided colon cancers have been widely debated. However, close analyses of these clinical differences, based on large-scale studies, have been scarcely reported. A total of 3552 consecutive Japanese colorectal cancer cases were examined and the clinical differences between right- and left-sided colon cancer cases were investigated. The proportion of right-sided colon cancer was relatively high in patients aged less than 40 years (33%) and more than 80 years (43%). The proportion of right-sided colon cancer in patients aged 40-59 years was relatively low (male 22% and female 29%). In male patients the proportion increased in the 70-79 years age group (30%), while in female patients the proportion increased in the 60-69 years age group (39%). Right-sided colon cancer was more likely to be detected at an advanced stage (T1 stage; left 22%, right 15%) (P cancer was dominant in the left colon (left 59%; right 40%) (P cancer in the right colon was significantly higher than that in the left colon (left 25%; right 44%) (P colon cancer was observed and the difference between male and female patients was highlighted. Other clinical features also differed between right- and left-sided colon cancer, suggesting that different mechanisms may be at work during right and left colon carcinogenesis.

  7. A mutational comparison of adult and adolescent and young adult (AYA) colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricoli, James V; Boardman, Lisa A; Patidar, Rajesh; Sindiri, Sivasish; Jang, Jin S; Walsh, William D; McGregor, Paul M; Camalier, Corinne E; Mehaffey, Michele G; Furman, Wayne L; Bahrami, Armita; Williams, P Mickey; Lih, Chih-Jian; Conley, Barbara A; Khan, Javed

    2018-03-01

    It is possible that the relative lack of progress in treatment outcomes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer is caused by a difference in disease biology compared with the corresponding diseases in younger and older individuals. There is evidence that colon cancer is more aggressive and has a poorer prognosis in AYA patients than in older adult patients. To further understand the molecular basis for this difference, whole-exome sequencing was conducted on a cohort of 30 adult, 30 AYA, and 2 pediatric colon cancers. A statistically significant difference in mutational frequency was observed between AYA and adult samples in 43 genes, including ROBO1, MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2), breast cancer 2 (early onset) (BRCA2), MAP3K3, MCPH1, RASGRP3, PTCH1, RAD9B, CTNND1, ATM, NF1; KIT, PTEN, and FBXW7. Many of these mutations were nonsynonymous, missense, stop-gain, or frameshift mutations that were damaging. Next, RNA sequencing was performed on a subset of the samples to confirm the mutations identified by exome sequencing. This confirmation study verified the presence of a significantly greater frequency of damaging mutations in AYA compared with adult colon cancers for 5 of the 43 genes (MYCBP2, BRCA2, PHLPP1, TOPORS, and ATR). The current results provide the rationale for a more comprehensive study with a larger sample set and experimental validation of the functional impact of the identified variants along with their contribution to the biologic and clinical characteristics of AYA colon cancer. Cancer 2018;124:1070-82. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Late stage and grave prognosis of esophageal cancer in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nun-Anan, Pongjarat; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the major health concerns in Southeast Asian countries, including Thailand. However, only a limited number of studies have been reported from this region. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical characteristics and survival rate of esophageal cancer in Thailand. Clinical information, histological features and endoscopic findings were collected from a tertiary care center in central region of Thailand between September 2011- November 2014 and reviewed. A total of 64 esophageal cancer patients including 58 men and 6 women with mean age of 62.6 years were enrolled. Common presenting symptoms were dysphagia (74%), dyspepsia (10%) and hematemesis (8%). Mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 72 days. Esophageal stenosis with contact bleeding was the most common endoscopic finding (55.6%). The location of cancer was found in proximal (16%), middle (50%) and distal (34%) esophagus. Squamous cell carcinoma was far more common histology than adenocarcinoma (84.2% vs 10.5%). However, esophageal adenocarcinoma was significantly more common than squamous cell carcinoma in distal area of esophagus (100% vs 22.9%; p=0.0001, OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.1-2.2). Esophageal cancer stages 3 and 4 accounted for 35.2% and 59.3% respectively. Overall 2-year survival rate was 20% and only 16% in metastatic patients. Most esophageal cancer patients in Thailand have squamous cell carcinoma and nearly all present at advanced stage with a grave prognosis. Screening of high risk individuals and early detection might be important keys to improve the survival rate and treatment outcome in Thailand.

  9. Explanation of colon cancer pathophysiology through analyzing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: The colon plays a key role in regulating the homeostasis of bile acids. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the influence of colon cancer towards the homeostasis of bile acids. Methods: The free and conjugated bile acids were determined using ultraperformance LC (UPLC) coupled with ABI 4000.

  10. Explanation of colon cancer pathophysiology through analyzing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The colon plays a key role in regulating the homeostasis of bile acids. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the influence of colon cancer towards the homeostasis of bile acids. Methods: The free and conjugated bile acids were determined using ultraperformance LC (UPLC) coupled with ABI 4000 QTRAP ...

  11. Predictors of Lymph Node Metastasis and Prognosis in pT1 Colorectal Cancer Patients with Signet-Ring Cell and Mucinous Adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Rong Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The local excision of early colorectal cancer is limited by the presence of lymph node metastasis (LNM. Signet-ring cell carcinomas (SRC and mucinous adenocarcinomas (MAC are two relatively infrequent histological subtypes. However, little is known about the predictors of LNM and prognosis to support the feasibility of local excision in early-stage SRC and MAC. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Database were used to identify all patients with pT1 adenocarcinomas, including conventional adenocarcinoma (AC, MAC, and SRC. The prevalence of LNM was assessed, and the long-term survival rate in the above three types of colorectal cancer was calculated. Results: SRC accounted for 0.3% and MAC accounted for 4.4% of the entire cohort of colorectal adenocarcinomas. Compared to AC, MRC and SRC were more often located in the proximal colon, and exhibited a higher grade. The incidence of LNM in AC, MAC, and SRC was 10.6%, 17.2%, and 33.3% for colon cancers and 14.8%, 25.9%, and 46.2% for rectal cancers, respectively. In patients with lymph nodes resected no less than 12, incidence of LNM in AC, MRC, and SRC was 12%, 21%, and 44% for colon tumors and 17%, 30%, and 14% for rectal tumors, respectively. Although, colon patients MAC showed an entirely worse survival rate than AC, rectum patients MAC showed a similar prognosis to AC. We found that in patients with rectal tumors, SRC had a worse 3 and 5-year prognosis than AC. However, for colon cancers, the prognosis of SRC was similar to that of AC. Histology was not found to be an independent prognostic factor in multivariate survival analysis. Conclusions: MAC and SRC are two distinct subtypes of colorectal cancer that require special attention despite their relatively rare prevalence. pT1 patients with SRC of the rectum and patients with MAC of the colon have higher incidences of LNM, and with these adverse outcomes, local excision is not recommended. AlthoughMAC of the

  12. Patients with Acromegaly Presenting with Colon Cancer: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray B. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Frequent colonoscopy screenings are critical for early diagnosis of colon cancer in patients with acromegaly. Case Presentations. We performed a retrospective analysis of the incidental diagnoses of colon cancer from the ACCESS trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995734. Colon cancer was identified in 2 patients (4.5%. Case  1 patient was a 36-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma. After surgery, the patient underwent routine colonoscopy screening, which revealed a 40 mm tubular adenoma in the descending colon. A T1N1a carcinoma was surgically removed, and 1 of 22 lymph nodes was positive for metastatic disease, leading to a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. Case  2 patient was a 50-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove a 2 cm pituitary adenoma. The patient reported severe cramping and lower abdominal pain, and an invasive 8.1 cm3 grade 2 adenocarcinoma with signet rings was identified in the ascending colon and removed. Of the 37 lymph nodes, 34 were positive for the presence of tumor cells, and stage 3c colon cancer was confirmed. Conclusion. Current guidelines for colonoscopy screening at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly and at appropriate follow-up intervals should be followed.

  13. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Cheng,1,* Samantha Ho,1,* Jun Hwan Yoo,1,2,* Deanna Hoang-Yen Tran,1,* Kyriaki Bakirtzi,1 Bowei Su,1 Diana Hoang-Ngoc Tran,1 Yuzu Kubota,1 Ryan Ichikawa,1 Hon Wai Koon1 1Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Digestive Disease Center, CHA University Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors share co-first authorship Background: Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods: We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results: Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-ß1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the

  14. Red meat and colon cancer : how dietary heme initiates hyperproliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, N.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. The risk to develop colorectal cancer is associated with the intake of red meat. Red meat contains the porphyrin pigment heme. Heme is an irritant for the colonic wall and it is previously shown that the addition of heme

  15. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HCT-15 cells caused condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in a concentration- ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial ... fluoropyrimidine aimed to selectively transfer 5-.

  16. Potentialities of computed tomography and ultrasonography in colonic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    Data of examination of 59 patients with colonic cancer were used to consider the potentialities of transabdominal, transrectal ultrasonography and X-ay compound tomography and to assess their value in diagnosing colonic cancer, including its minor forms. Ultrasound and computed tomographic semiotics of colonic cancer and determines a place of the above techniques in the algorithm of radiation and instrumental studies are described. Inclusion of these techniques into the diagnostic algorithm may solve a range of differentially diagnostic problems and allows a preliminary analysis to be made in a tumor lesion according to the International TNM classification. Ultrasonography and X-ray computed tomography should be included into a range of basic methods for diagnosis of colonic cancer [ru

  17. Local staging of sigmoid colon cancer using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An accurate radiological staging of colon cancer is crucial to select patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PURPOSE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer, poor...... prognostic factors, and the inter-observer variation of the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using 1.5 T MRI with high resolution T2-weighted (T2W) imaging, DWI, and no contrast enhancement, 35 patients with sigmoid colon cancer were...... the measured mean ADC values were below 1.0 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s with an intra-class correlation coefficient in T3cd-T4 tumors of 0.85. CONCLUSION: Preoperative MRI can identify locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer and has potential as the imaging of choice to select patients for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Initial...

  18. diet, bowel motility, faeces composition and colonic cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1970-07-20

    Jul 20, 1970 ... The commonness of colonic cancer in privileged popula- tions compared with ... salient differences in environmental factors concern diet. physical activity .... how well known are the risk factors for coronary heart disease; yet ...

  19. Staging with computed tomography of patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrom, M. L.; Brisling, S.; Klausen, T. W.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Accurate staging of colonic cancer is important for patient stratification. We aimed to correlate the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT) with final histopathology as reference standard. Methods Data was collected retrospectively on 615 consecutive patients operated...

  20. Outcome of Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection for Transverse Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Gen; Liu, Meng-Jia; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang; Hou, Hui-Rong; Liang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xing-Mao; Hu, Jun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic resection for transverse colon cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate the short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for transverse colon cancer. A total of 278 patients with transverse colon cancer from a single institution were included. All patients underwent curative surgery, 156 patients underwent laparoscopic resection (LR), and 122 patients underwent open resection (OR). The short- and long-term results were compared between two groups. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were comparable between two groups. Conversions were required in eight (5.1 %) patients. LR group was associated with significantly longer median operating time (180 vs. 140 min; P colon cancer is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes.

  1. High Expression of PHGDH Predicts Poor Prognosis in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumors have exceptionally high demands for energy and anabolism because of their rapid growth. The de novo serine synthesis pathway initiated by phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH has been recognized as a hallmark of metabolic adaption in carcinogenesis. The oncogenic role and prognostic value of PHGDH have been investigated in multiple cancer types, including breast cancer, melanoma, cervical cancer, and colon cancer. Due to the importance of PHGDH in cancer, we attempted to determine the clinical significance of PHGDH in 319 patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We evaluated the mRNA and protein expression levels of PHGDH gene, using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and tissue array–based immunohistochemistry, respectively. Significantly increased PHGDH expression in mRNA and protein levels was identified in tumor tissues versus matched adjacent nontumor tissues. More interestingly, immunohistochemical expression of PHGDH was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P = .021 and TNM stage (P = .016. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that NSCLC patients with low levels of PHGDH outperformed patients with high levels of PHGDH regarding 5-year overall survival. Significantly longer survival in the former suggested the prognostic implication of PHGDH in NSCLC. Multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model demonstrated that high PHGDH levels and advanced TNM stage (III + IV were independent predictors of prognosis in NSCLC. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis confirmed the increase in PHGDH transcripts (data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and its prognostic value (Kaplan-Meier plotter in NSCLC. In conclusion, this study suggested the clinical implication of PHGDH in NSCLC. PHGDH may be a promising therapeutic target in NSCLC.

  2. Galectin-3 expression in colorectal cancer and its correlation with clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To explore the expression levels of galectin-3 in colorectal cancer and the association between galectin-3 and its clinical pathological parameters, as well as the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients.

  3. Survival after elective surgery for colonic cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perdawid, S K; Hemmingsen, L; Boesby, S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Total mesorectal excision (TME) has been shown to improve the outcome for patients with rectal cancer. In contrast, there are fewer data on complete mesocolic excision (CME) for colonic cancer. METHOD: Data from the National Colorectal Cancer Database were analysed. This includes about 95......% of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark. Only patients having elective surgery for colonic cancer in the period 2001-2008 were included. Overall and relative survival analyses were carried out. The study period was divided into the periods 2001-2004 and 2005-2008. RESULTS: 9149 patients were...... included for the final analysis. The overall 5-year survival rates were 0.65 in 2001-2004 and 0.66 in 2005-2008. The relative 5-year survival rates were also within 1% of each other. None of these comparisons was statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Survival following elective colon cancer surgery has...

  4. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  5. Early colon cancer : findings on double contrast barium enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Soon Jin; Lim, Hyo Keun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the radiologic findings of early colon cancer on double-contrast barium enema. We retrospectively reviewed the double-contrast barium enemas of eight patients (M:F = 6:2; mean age : 67 yrs; range : 48-77 yrs) who were pathologically proven to be early colon cancer. The location, size and gross morphology of lesions was evaluated using double-contrast barium enema, while depth of invasion, degree of differentiation, precancerous lesions and lymph node metastasis were evaluated histopathologically. Early colon cancer was found in the rectum (n=4), sigmoid colon (n=3) and ascending colon (n=1). The size of mass ranged from 2.3 ∼ 8.3 (mean, 4.6) cm. And the polypoid type was most common (n=7); this was subdivided into sessile (Is, n=5), semipedunculated (Isp, n=1) and pedunculated type (Ip, n=1). Another mass was a sessile polypoid combined with a flat depressed lesion. In eight cases, four cancers were confined to the mucosa, while the remaining four had infiltrated the submucosa. Most cancers arose from villous and villotubular adenoma. All cases were well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and no metastasis to lymph nodes had occurred. In early colon cancer, lesions were mainly polypoid and large. Most arose from villous and villotubular adenoma. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  6. Curcumin synergizes with resveratrol to inhibit colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Adhip P N; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Nautiyal, Jyoti; Patel, Bhaumik B; Patel, Vaishali; Du, Jianhua; Yu, Yingjie; Elliott, Althea A; Levi, Edi; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2009-01-01

    Development and progression of many malignancies, including colorectal cancer, are associated with activation of multiple signaling pathways. Therefore, inhibition of these signaling pathways with noncytotoxic natural products represents a logical preventive and/or therapeutic approach for colon cancer. Curcumin and resveratrol, both of which inhibit the growth of transformed cells and colon carcinogenesis, were selected to examine whether combining them would be an effective preventive and/or therapeutic strategy for colon cancer. Indeed, the combination of curcumin and resveratrol was found to be more effective in inhibiting growth of p53-positive (wt) and p53-negative colon cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID xenografts of colon cancer HCT-116 (wt) cells than either agent alone. Analysis by Calcusyn software showed synergism between curcumin and resveratrol. The inhibition of tumors in response to curcumin and/or resveratrol was associated with the reduction in proliferation and stimulation of apoptosis accompanied by attenuation of NF-kappaB activity. In vitro studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment caused a greater inhibition of constitutive activation of EGFR and its family members as well as IGF-1R. Our current data suggest that the combination of curcumin and resveratrol could be an effective preventive/therapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  7. Cancer of the colon spleen angle. Presentation of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Sanchez, Yariana; De la Rosa Perez, Nereida; Barcelo Casanova, Renato E

    2010-01-01

    The colon cancer is currently an important public health problem in developed countries. It is the fourth most common cancer in the world. We report the case of a 65-years-old, black, female patient, assisting our consultation with dyspeptic disturbances as the unique symptom, without known risk factors. We indicated a colon by enema and a distal narrowing was observed at the colon spleen angle, at the same zone of the physiologic narrowing at that level. A colonoscopy was carried out diagnosing a left colon tumor near the spleen angle. It was operated with segmental resection of the spleen angle and a biopsy was made. Pathologic anatomy informed a well-differentiated colon adenocarcinoma

  8. Evolutionary Origins of Cancer Driver Genes and Implications for Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Yi; Jiang, Ling-Han; Zhou, Xiong-Hui; Cui, Ze-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-07-14

    The cancer atavistic theory suggests that carcinogenesis is a reverse evolution process. It is thus of great interest to explore the evolutionary origins of cancer driver genes and the relevant mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis. Moreover, the evolutionary features of cancer driver genes could be helpful in selecting cancer biomarkers from high-throughput data. In this study, through analyzing the cancer endogenous molecular networks, we revealed that the subnetwork originating from eukaryota could control the unlimited proliferation of cancer cells, and the subnetwork originating from eumetazoa could recapitulate the other hallmarks of cancer. In addition, investigations based on multiple datasets revealed that cancer driver genes were enriched in genes originating from eukaryota, opisthokonta, and eumetazoa. These results have important implications for enhancing the robustness of cancer prognosis models through selecting the gene signatures by the gene age information.

  9. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  10. ITGBL1 promotes migration, invasion and predicts a poor prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao; Feng, Jue-Rong; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Lan; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Yu-Peng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Qiu

    2018-05-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide; its progression and prognosis are associated with oncogenes. The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and explore the role and potential mechanism of integrin subunit β like 1 (ITGBL1) in CRC. The microarray dataset GSE41258 was used to screen DEGs involved in CRC. Survival analysis was performed to predict the prognosis of CRC patients. To validate ITGBL1 expression, immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting were performed in CRC tissues and cells. Subsequently, the effects of ITGBL1 were evaluated through colony formation, cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays. Finally, we took advantage of Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) to explore potential function and mechanism of ITGBL1 in CRC. In our study, 182 primary CRC tissues and 54 normal colon tissues were contained in GSE41258 dataset. A total of 318 DEGs were screened, among which ITGBL1 was found to be significantly up-regulated in CRC, and its high expression was associated with shortened survival of CRC patients. Moreover, knockdown of ITGBL1 promoted CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Finally, GO analysis revealed that ITGBL1 was associated with cell adhesion. GSEA indicated that ITGBL1 was enriched in ECM receptor interaction and focal adhesion. In conclusion, a novel oncogene ITGBL1 was identified and demonstrated to be associated with the progression and prognosis of CRC, which might be a potential therapeutic target and prognostic biomarker for CRC patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Limitations of tissue micro array in Duke's B colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brunner, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular distribu......Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular...

  12. Integral analysis of p53 and its value as prognostic factor in sporadic colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariña Sarasqueta, Arantza; Morreau, Hans; Forte, Giusi; Corver, Wim E; Miranda, Noel F de; Ruano, Dina; Eijk, Ronald van; Oosting, Jan; Tollenaar, Rob AEM; Wezel, Tom van

    2013-01-01

    p53 (encoded by TP53) is involved in DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, aging and cellular senescence. TP53 is mutated in around 50% of human cancers. Nevertheless, the consequences of p53 inactivation in colon cancer outcome remain unclear. Recently, a new role of p53 together with CSNK1A1 in colon cancer invasiveness has been described in mice. By combining data on different levels of p53 inactivation, we aimed to predict p53 functionality and to determine its effects on colon cancer outcome. Moreover, survival effects of CSNK1A1 together with p53 were also studied. Eighty-three formalin fixed paraffin embedded colon tumors were enriched for tumor cells using flow sorting, the extracted DNA was used in a custom SNP array to determine chr17p13-11 allelic state; p53 immunostaining, TP53 exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 mutations were determined in combination with mRNA expression analysis on frozen tissue. Patients with a predicted functional p53 had a better prognosis than patients with non functional p53 (Log Rank p=0.009). Expression of CSNK1A1 modified p53 survival effects. Patients with low CSNK1A1 expression and non-functional p53 had a very poor survival both in the univariate (Log Rank p<0.001) and in the multivariate survival analysis (HR=4.74 95% CI 1.45 – 15.3 p=0.009). The combination of mutational, genomic, protein and downstream transcriptional activity data predicted p53 functionality which is shown to have a prognostic effect on colon cancer patients. This effect was specifically modified by CSKN1A1 expression

  13. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival....... PATIENTS: Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were...... the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. RESULTS: Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon...

  14. p53 and PCNA expression in advanced colorectal cancer: response to chemotherapy and long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, A; Rabinovich, M; Vallejo, C; Machiavelli, M; Romero, A; Perez, J; Lacava, J; Cuevas, M A; Rodriquez, R; Leone, B; Sapia, M G; Simone, G; De Lena, M

    1996-12-20

    In a series of 71 patients with advanced colorectal cancer treated with biochemically modulated 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and methotrexate (MTX), we investigated the relationship between the proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (PC10) and p53 (Pab1801) primary-tumor immunohistochemical expression with respect to clinical response and long-term prognosis. Nuclear p53 expression was demonstrated in 44% of samples (any number of positive tumor cells) while all tumors showed a certain degree of PCNA immunostaining. PCNA immunostaining was correlated with histopathologic grade and p53 expression, while p53 was not correlated with any of the parameters considered. The probability of clinical response to biochemically modulated 5-FU was independent of p53 and PCNA expression. p53 expression (all cut-off values) was not associated with short- or long-term clinical prognosis, whereas patients with higher PCNA primary-tumor expression showed longer survival from treatment and survival from diagnosis, according to univariate and multivariate analysis, particularly in the sub-set of colon-cancer patients. We conclude that the clinical response of advanced-colorectal-cancer patients to biochemically modulated 5-FU and MTX cannot be predicted by PCNA and p53 primary-tumor expression, but high PCNA expression appears to be independently related to long-term prognosis.

  15. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-05-01

    Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival and the decision to administer chemotherapy and/or metastasectomy after elective surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer. This was a nationwide, retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the National Patient Registry. Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered.

  16. [Computer-aided Prognosis for Breast Cancer Based on Hematoxylin & Eosin Histopathology Image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiamei; Qu, Aiping; Liu, Wenlou; Wang, Linwei; Yuan, Jingping; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Quantitatively analyzing hematoxylin &eosin(H&E)histopathology images is an emerging field attracting increasing attentions in recent years.This paper reviews the application of computer-aided image analysis in breast cancer prognosis.The traditional prognosis based on H&E histopathology image for breast cancer is firstly sketched,followed by a detailed description of the workflow of computer-aided prognosis including image acquisition,image preprocessing,regions of interest detection and object segmentation,feature extraction,and computer-aided prognosis.In the end,major technical challenges and future directions in this field are summarized.

  17. Genetic variation in 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase and colon cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L Thompson

    Full Text Available 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH is a metabolic antagonist of COX-2, catalyzing the degradation of inflammation mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and other prostanoids. Recent studies have established the 15-PGDH gene as a colon cancer suppressor.We evaluated 15-PDGH as a colon cancer susceptibility locus in a three-stage design. We first genotyped 102 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 15-PGDH gene, spanning ∼50 kb up and down-stream of the coding region, in 464 colon cancer cases and 393 population controls. We then genotyped the same SNPs, and also assayed the expression levels of 15-PGDH in colon tissues from 69 independent patients for whom colon tissue and paired germline DNA samples were available. In the final stage 3, we genotyped the 9 most promising SNPs from stages 1 and 2 in an independent sample of 525 cases and 816 controls (stage 3.In the first two stages, three SNPs (rs1365611, rs6844282 and rs2332897 were statistically significant (p<0.05 in combined analysis of association with risk of colon cancer and of association with 15-PGDH expression, after adjustment for multiple testing. For one additional SNP, rs2555639, the T allele showed increased cancer risk and decreased 15-PGDH expression, but just missed statistical significance (p-adjusted = 0.063. In stage 3, rs2555639 alone showed evidence of association with an odds ratio (TT compared to CC of 1.50 (95% CI = 1.05-2.15, p = 0.026.Our data suggest that the rs2555639 T allele is associated with increased risk of colon cancer, and that carriers of this risk allele exhibit decreased expression of 15-PGDH in the colon.

  18. [Evaluation of knowledge about colon cancer prevention versus other tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, José María; Henry, Nicolás; Ocaña, Domingo; Polesel, Julio Lotero

    2015-06-01

    In Argentina almost 7% of deaths are due to different cancers with screening strategies. Evaluate knowledge about cancer prevention compared with other tumors. Materials. A descriptive and comparative study. A survey between April and June 2013 in Salta City, province of Salta, Argentina. Correct answers were considered. Statistical analysis: Descriptive (mean and percentage), comparative Chi square Test (significance level Pmama and cervix. 20% (CI 0,13-0,28) knew that colon cancer has a genetic predisposition and 58% (CI 0,48-0,67) about mama. 73% (CI 0,63-0,8) received information about cancer prevention. The main source of information was the physician. 46% (CI 0,36-0,55) received medical care in private institutions. Those who had social security, higher educational levels and medical care in private institutions had better knowledge about cancer prevention except in colon cancer. The global results showed levels below 70% in general but extremely low in colon cancer. Not having social security, receiving medical care in public institutions and having a low educational level are related with poor knowledge about cancer prevention except for colon and prostate cancer.

  19. Improved survival for rectal cancer compared to colon cancer: the four cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Pamela; Hall, Claire; Davidson, Callum; Dixon, Liane; Dobbs, Bruce; Robinson, Bridget; Frizelle, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. This study was undertaken to evaluate survival outcomes and changes of disease outcomes of CRC patients over the last decades. A retrospective analysis of CRC patients in Christchurch was performed in four patient cohorts at 5 yearly intervals; 1993-94, 1998-99, 2004-05 and 2009. Data on cancer location, stage, surgical and oncological treatment and survival were collected. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed. There were 1391 patients (355, 317, 419 and 300 per cohort), 1037 colon and 354 rectal cancers, respectively. For colon cancer, right-sided cancers appeared more common in later cohorts (P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in the number of permanent stomas for colon cancer patients (P = 0.001). There was an analogous trend for rectal cancers (P = 0.075). More CRC patients with stage IV disease were treated surgically (P = 0.001) and colon cancer stages I and II tended to have increased survival if operated by a colorectal surgeon (P = 0.06). Oncology referrals have increased remarkably (P = 0.001). Overall 56% of patients were alive at 5 years however rectal cancer patients had significantly better 5-year survival than those with colon cancer (P rectal cancer patients have a better 5-year survival than colon cancer patients. The improved survival with early stage colon cancers operated on by specialist colorectal surgeons needs further exploration. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    19 NIH Exploiting drivers of androgen receptor signaling negative prostate cancer for precision medicine Goal(s): Identify novel potential drivers...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0466 TITLE: Clonal evaluation of prostate cancer by ERG/SPINK1 status to improve prognosis prediction PRINCIPAL...Sept 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction 5b

  1. Adult Liver Cancer Symptoms, Tests, Prognosis, and Stages (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common type of adult primary liver cancer. The Barcelona Clinical Liver Cancer (BCLC) Staging System is used to stage liver cancer. Learn more about risk factors, signs and symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, and stages of adult primary liver cancer.

  2. PKA RIα/A-kinase anchoring proteins 10 signaling pathway and the prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mojin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Ziqiang; Chen, Keling; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Zongguang; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-03-01

    Previously study showed that the loss of the control of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A RIα (PKA RIα)/ A-kinase anchoring proteins 10 (AKAP10) signaling pathway initiate dysregulation of cellular healthy physiology leading to tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKA RIα/AKAP10 signaling pathway in colorectal cancer (CRC). The AKAP10 expression at the mRNA and protein level have been analyzed in colon cancer cell lines, primary CRCs and matched normal mucosa samples, and compared in accordance with specific clinicopathological features of CRC. The correlation between expression of AKAP10 and PKA RIα were also analyzed. Compared with HCT116 and SW480 cells, the AKAP10 was significantly upregulated in the colon cell line KM12C and its metastatic counterparts, KM12SM and KM12L4A. Moreover, the KM12SM and KM12L4A having high metastatic potentials displayed the elevated levels of AKAP10 compared with KM12C having poor metastatic potential. A notably higher level of AKAP10 expression was found in CRC tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Increased expression of AKAP10 in CRC patients was positively associated with the depth of invasion and the grade of differentiation. Univariate survival analysis showed that the increased expression of AKAP10 was related to poorer survival. Cox multivariate regression analysis confirmed that AKAP10 was an independent predictor of the overall survival of CRC patients. PKA RIα mRNA was also expressed at high levels in CRC. The correlation coefficient between mRNA expression of AKAP10 and PKA RIα in CRC was 0.417. AKAP10 mRNA overexpression was correlated significantly with PKA RIα. Our data indicated that PKA RIα/AKAP10 signaling pathway is associated with the progression and prognosis of CRC. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Incisional hernias after open versus laparoscopic surgery for colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K.; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Scheike, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    patients operated on electively for colonic cancer with primary anastomosis in Denmark from 2001 to 2008. Patient data were obtained from the database of the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group and merged with data from the National Patient Registry. Multivariable Cox regression and competing risks analysis......, fascial dehiscence, anastomotic leak, and body mass index >25 kg/m(2). CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide analysis demonstrated that laparoscopic as compared with open access for curative resection of colonic cancer was associated with a decreased risk of incisional hernia formation....

  4. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels

    2016-01-01

    followed 1995–2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression...

  5. Use of nonsteroidal antiinflamatory drugs for chemoprevention of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is in the third most frequent cancer among malignant tumors of both sexes in developed countries. It is predominantly a disease of older persons and occurs mostly after the age of 60. Although the etiology of colon cancer is unknown, it is assumed to arise as a result of unclear and complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The main element in the etiology of colorectal cancer is the process of genetic changes in epithelial cells of colon mucosa. It is believed that specific epidemiological factors such as stress, hypoxia, reduced intake of glucose and other nutrients, a hereditary predisposition to mutagenic effects, the meat in the diet, bile acids, reduced intake of minerals and vitamins as well as changes in pH of feces lead to initiation of the process of carcinogenesis in mucosa of the colon. Cancer chemoprevention is defined as the use of chemical agents in order to block, prevent or delay the reversal development or progress of cancer. It is believed that chemoprevention is a key component of cancer control, and numerous studies indicate potential role of NSAIDs in chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  6. Mucin expression patterns in histological grades of colonic cancers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathological expression of mucins has been noted in cancer development and progression. This study sought to identify and quantify the types of mucins produced during various histological grades of colon cancer and to assess the diagnostic significance. Methods: Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, ...

  7. Clinical significance of adiponectin expression in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Canhoroz

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Adiponectin, which is secreted by adipose tissue, may have a role in the development and progression of cancer via its pro-apoptotic and/or anti-proliferative effects. Adiponectin expression in tumor tissues is likely to have a negative effect on disease - free survival in patients with stage II/III colon cancer; however, no statistically significant effect was demonstrated.

  8. Prognosis was not deteriorated by multiple primary cancers in esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer patients are often associated with multiple primary cancers (MPC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of MPC on prognosis in esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 2001 and 2008, esophageal cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy at Gunma Cancer Center were retrospectively reviewed. Exclusion criteria were preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy, palliative radiotherapy, follow-up of <6 months, radiation dose of <50 Gy and no information on MPC. We analyzed 167 esophageal cancer patients and 56 (33.5%) were associated with MPC. Gastric cancer was the most frequent tumor (38.2%), followed by head and neck cancer (26.5%). Median follow-up time was 31.5 months (range 6.1-87.3 months). Patients with MPC included more stage I/II esophageal cancer than those without MPC (66.1% vs. 36.9%, P<0.01). The 5-year overall survival rate for esophageal cancer with MPC was relatively better than those without MPC (46.1% vs. 26.7%), although the difference did not reach statistical significance in univariate analysis (P=0.09). Stage I/II esophageal cancer patients had a significantly better overall survival than stage III/IV patients (P<0.01). Among esophageal cancer patients with MPC, there was no difference in overall survival between antecedent and synchronous cancer (P=0.59). Our study indicated that the prognosis of esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy was primarily determined by the clinical stage itself, but not the presence of MPC. (author)

  9. Clinicopathologic and gene expression parameters predict liver cancer prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ke; Zhong, Hua; Greenawalt, Danielle; Ferguson, Mark D; Ng, Irene O; Sham, Pak C; Poon, Ronnie T; Molony, Cliona; Schadt, Eric E; Dai, Hongyue; Luk, John M; Lamb, John; Zhang, Chunsheng; Xie, Tao; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Bin; Chudin, Eugene; Lee, Nikki P; Mao, Mao

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) varies following surgical resection and the large variation remains largely unexplained. Studies have revealed the ability of clinicopathologic parameters and gene expression to predict HCC prognosis. However, there has been little systematic effort to compare the performance of these two types of predictors or combine them in a comprehensive model. Tumor and adjacent non-tumor liver tissues were collected from 272 ethnic Chinese HCC patients who received curative surgery. We combined clinicopathologic parameters and gene expression data (from both tissue types) in predicting HCC prognosis. Cross-validation and independent studies were employed to assess prediction. HCC prognosis was significantly associated with six clinicopathologic parameters, which can partition the patients into good- and poor-prognosis groups. Within each group, gene expression data further divide patients into distinct prognostic subgroups. Our predictive genes significantly overlap with previously published gene sets predictive of prognosis. Moreover, the predictive genes were enriched for genes that underwent normal-to-tumor gene network transformation. Previously documented liver eSNPs underlying the HCC predictive gene signatures were enriched for SNPs that associated with HCC prognosis, providing support that these genes are involved in key processes of tumorigenesis. When applied individually, clinicopathologic parameters and gene expression offered similar predictive power for HCC prognosis. In contrast, a combination of the two types of data dramatically improved the power to predict HCC prognosis. Our results also provided a framework for understanding the impact of gene expression on the processes of tumorigenesis and clinical outcome

  10. Overtreatment of young adults with colon cancer: more intense treatments with unmatched survival gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneuertz, Peter J; Chang, George J; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Eng, Cathy; Vilar, Eduardo; Skibber, John M; Feig, Barry W; Cormier, Janice N; You, Y Nancy

    2015-05-01

    Colon cancer is increasing among adults younger than 50 years. However, the prognosis of young-onset colon cancer remains poorly defined given significant age-related demographic, disease, and treatment differences. To define stage-specific treatments and prognosis of colon cancer diagnosed in young adults (ages 18-49 years) vs older adults (ages 65-75 years) outside of the clinical trial setting while accounting for real-world age-related variations in patient, tumor, and treatment factors. A nationwide cohort study was conducted among US hospitals accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. Participants were 13 102 patients diagnosed as having young-onset colon adenocarcinoma aged 18 to 49 years and 37 007 patients diagnosed as having later-onset colon adenocarcinoma aged 65 to 75 years treated between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2005, and reported to the National Cancer Data Base. Patients who underwent surgical resection and postoperative systemic chemotherapy of curative intent. The primary end point was stage-specific relative survival, an objective measure of survival among patients with cancer, adjusting for baseline mortality rates and independent of the data on cause of death. The secondary end point was stage-specific likelihood of receiving postoperative systemic chemotherapy. Most young-onset colon cancer was initially seen at advanced stages (61.8% had stage III or IV). After adjusting for patient-related and tumor-related factors, young patients were more likely to receive systemic chemotherapy, particularly multiagent regimens, at all stages relative to those with later-onset disease. These odds ratios were 2.88 (95% CI, 2.21-3.77) for stage I, 3.93 (95% CI, 3.58-4.31) for stage II, 2.42 (95% CI, 2.18-2.68) for stage III, and 2.74 (95% CI, 2.44-3.07) for stage IV. The significantly more intense treatments received by younger patients were unmatched by any survival gain, which was nil for stage II (relative risk, 0

  11. Use of a combination of CEA and tumor budding to identify high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Xue, Weicheng; Dou, Fangyuan; Peng, Yifan; Yao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Gu, Jin

    2017-07-24

    High-risk patients with stage II colon cancer may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, but identifying this patient population can be difficult. We assessed the prognosis value for predicting tumor progression in patients with stage II colon cancer, of a panel of 2 biomarkers for colon cancer: tumor budding and preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Consecutive patients (N = 134) with stage II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery from 2000 to 2007 were included. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the association of CEA and tumor budding grade with 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). The prognostic accuracy of CEA, tumor budding grade and the combination of both (CEA-budding panel) was determined. The study found that both CEA and tumor budding grade were associated with 5-year DFS. The prognostic accuracy for disease progression was higher for the CEA-budding panel (82.1%) than either CEA (70.9%) or tumor budding grade (72.4%) alone. The findings indicate that the combination of CEA levels and tumor budding grade has greater prognostic value for identifying patients with stage II colon cancer who are at high-risk for disease progression, than either marker alone.

  12. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  13. Roles of stromal microenvironment in colon cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketo, Makoto Mark

    2012-05-01

    Although our understanding of epithelial cancer cells has advanced significantly, our understanding of the cancer microenvironment is still fragmentary. In contrast to our intuitive impression that our body always suppresses cancer growth, recent pieces of evidence show that cancer often exploits our body reactions to expand, invade local tissues and metastasize to distant organs. Accordingly, investigations of such body reactions in the tumour microenvironment should help us to design novel therapeutic strategies that can be combined with the traditional therapeutics targeted at the cancer cells themselves. In this article, I am going to review our recent efforts in search of novel therapeutic strategies against colon cancer using mouse models.

  14. EMT is the dominant program in human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollenaar Rob AEM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer has been classically described by clinicopathologic features that permit the prediction of outcome only after surgical resection and staging. Methods We performed an unsupervised analysis of microarray data from 326 colon cancers to identify the first principal component (PC1 of the most variable set of genes. PC1 deciphered two primary, intrinsic molecular subtypes of colon cancer that predicted disease progression and recurrence. Results Here we report that the most dominant pattern of intrinsic gene expression in colon cancer (PC1 was tightly correlated (Pearson R = 0.92, P -135 with the EMT signature-- both in gene identity and directionality. In a global micro-RNA screen, we further identified the most anti-correlated microRNA with PC1 as MiR200, known to regulate EMT. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the biology underpinning the native, molecular classification of human colon cancer--previously thought to be highly heterogeneous-- was clarified through the lens of comprehensive transcriptome analysis.

  15. Variation in positron emission tomography use after colon cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christina E; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D; Chang, George J

    2015-05-01

    Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Calcitriol Supplementation Causes Decreases in Tumorigenic Proteins and Different Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures in Right versus Left-Sided Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroll, Monica M; Ludwig, Katelyn R; Bauer, Kerry M; Hummon, Amanda B

    2018-01-11

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem worldwide. In particular, it is an issue in the Northern Hemisphere where UVB radiation does not penetrate the atmosphere as readily. There is a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Furthermore, there is strong evidence that cancer of the ascending (right side) colon is different from cancer of the descending (left side) colon in terms of prognosis, tumor differentiation, and polyp type, as well as at the molecular level. Right-side tumors have elevated Wnt signaling and are more likely to relapse, whereas left-side tumors have reduced expression of tumor suppressor genes. This study seeks to understand both the proteomic and metabolomic changes resulting from treatment of the active metabolite of vitamin D, calcitriol, in right-sided and left-sided colon cancer. Our results show that left-sided colon cancer treated with calcitriol has a substantially greater number of changes in both the proteome and the metabolome than right-sided colon cancer. We found that calcitriol treatment in both right-sided and left-sided colon cancer causes a downregulation of ribosomal protein L37 and protein S100A10. Both of these proteins are heavily involved in tumorigenesis, suggesting a possible mechanism for the correlation between low vitamin D levels and colon cancer.

  17. Calcitriol Supplementation Causes Decreases in Tumorigenic Proteins and Different Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures in Right versus Left-Sided Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica M. Schroll

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem worldwide. In particular, it is an issue in the Northern Hemisphere where UVB radiation does not penetrate the atmosphere as readily. There is a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Furthermore, there is strong evidence that cancer of the ascending (right side colon is different from cancer of the descending (left side colon in terms of prognosis, tumor differentiation, and polyp type, as well as at the molecular level. Right-side tumors have elevated Wnt signaling and are more likely to relapse, whereas left-side tumors have reduced expression of tumor suppressor genes. This study seeks to understand both the proteomic and metabolomic changes resulting from treatment of the active metabolite of vitamin D, calcitriol, in right-sided and left-sided colon cancer. Our results show that left-sided colon cancer treated with calcitriol has a substantially greater number of changes in both the proteome and the metabolome than right-sided colon cancer. We found that calcitriol treatment in both right-sided and left-sided colon cancer causes a downregulation of ribosomal protein L37 and protein S100A10. Both of these proteins are heavily involved in tumorigenesis, suggesting a possible mechanism for the correlation between low vitamin D levels and colon cancer.

  18. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    . Data on patients with stage III colonic cancer operated between January 1, 2005 and August 31, 2012 were retrieved. Perioperative variables, surgical modality, and time to adjuvant therapy (8 weeks) were evaluated and Cox regression was performed to identify factors influencing survival...

  19. Prognostic and predictive potential molecular biomarkers in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, A; Pâslaru, L; Niculescu, A M; Ionescu, M; Dumitraşcu, T; Herlea, V; Dima, S; Gheorghe, C; Lazar, V; Popescu, I

    2011-01-01

    An important objective in nowadays research is the discovery of new biomarkers that can detect colon tumours in early stages and indicate with accuracy the status of the disease. The aim of our study was to identify potential biomarkers for colon cancer onset and progression. We assessed gene expression profiles of a list of 10 candidate genes (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-7, DEFA 1, DEFA-5, DEFA-6, IL-8, CXCL-1, SPP-1, CTHRC-1) by quantitative real time PCR in triplets of colonic mucosa (normal, adenoma, tumoral tissue) collected from the same patient during surgery for a group of 20 patients. Additionally we performed immunohistochemistry for DEFA1-3 and SPP1. We remarked that DEFA5 and DEFA6 are key factors in adenoma formation (p<0.05). MMP7 is important in the transition from a benign to a malignant status (p <0.01) and further in metastasis being a prognostic indicator for tumor transformation and for the metastatic potential of cancer cells. IL8, irrespective of tumor stage, has a high mRNA level in adenocarcinoma (p< 0.05). The level of expression for SPP1 is correlated with tumor level. We suggest that high levels of DEFAS, DEFA6 (key elements in adenoma formation), MMP7 (marker of colon cancer onset and progression to metastasis), SPP1 (marker of progression) and IL8 could be used to diagnose an early stage colon cancer and to evaluate the prognostic of progression for colon tumors. Further, if DEFA5 and DEFA6 level of expression are low but MMP7, SPP1 and IL8 level are high we could point out that the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma had already occurred. Thus, DEFA5, DEFA6, MMP7, IL8 and SPP1 consist in a valuable panel of biomarkers, whose detection can be used in early detection and progressive disease and also in prognostic of colon cancer.

  20. Colon-available raspberry polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer effects on in vitro models of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDougall Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a probable association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and reduced risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the digestive tract. This anti-cancer activity has been attributed in part to anti-oxidants present in these foods. Raspberries in particular are a rich source of the anti-oxidant compounds, such as polyphenols, anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Methods A "colon-available" raspberry extract (CARE was prepared that contained phytochemicals surviving a digestion procedure that mimicked the physiochemical conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The polyphenolic-rich extract was assessed for anti-cancer properties in a series of in vitro systems that model important stages of colon carcinogenesis, initiation, promotion and invasion. Results The phytochemical composition of CARE was monitored using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The colon-available raspberry extract was reduced in anthocyanins and ellagitannins compared to the original raspberry juice but enriched in other polyphenols and polyphenol breakdown products that were more stable to gastrointestinal digestion. Initiation – CARE caused significant protective effects against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in HT29 colon cancer cells measured using single cell microgelelectrophoresis. Promotion – CARE significantly decreased the population of HT29 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, effectively reducing the number of cells entering the cell cycle. However, CARE had no effect on epithelial integrity (barrier function assessed by recording the trans-epithelial resistance (TER of CACO-2 cell monolayers. Invasion – CARE caused significant inhibition of HT115 colon cancer cell invasion using the matrigel invasion assay. Conclusion The results indicate that raspberry phytochemicals likely to reach the colon are capable of inhibiting several important stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro.

  1. Efficient and reproducible identification of mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Halvarsson, Britta

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of mismatch-repair (MMR) defective colon cancer is clinically relevant for diagnostic, prognostic and potentially also for treatment predictive purposes. Preselection of tumors for MMR analysis can be obtained with predictive models, which need to demonstrate ease...... of application and favorable reproducibility. METHODS: We validated the MMR index for the identification of prognostically favorable MMR deficient colon cancers and compared performance to 5 other prediction models. In total, 474 colon cancers diagnosed ≥ age 50 were evaluated with correlation between...... clinicopathologic variables and immunohistochemical MMR protein expression. RESULTS: Female sex, age ≥60 years, proximal tumor location, expanding growth pattern, lack of dirty necrosis, mucinous differentiation and presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes significantly correlated with MMR deficiency. Presence...

  2. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3) in colon cancer serum and tumours: a biomarker study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Bøgebo, Rikke; Gammeltoft, Steen; Olsen, Jesper; Winther, Benny; Raskov, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Molecular markers for localized colon tumours and for prognosis following therapy are needed. Proteomics research is currently producing numerous biomarker studies with clinical potential. We investigate the protein composition of plasma and of tumour extracts with the aim of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation – Time Of Flight / Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS) we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue. By size exclusion chromatography, we investigate the binding of HNP 1-3 to high mass plasma proteins. By microflow we investigate the effect of HNP 1-3 on mammalian cells. Human Neutrophil Peptides -1, -2 and -3 (HNP 1-3), also known as alfa-defensin-1, -2 and -3, are present in elevated concentrations in serum from colon cancer patients and in protein extracts from colon tumours. A fraction of HNP 1-3 in serum is bound to unidentified high mass plasma proteins. HNP 1-3 purified from colon tumours are lethal to mammalian cells. HNP 1-3 may serve as blood markers for colon cancer in combination with other diagnostic tools. We propose that HNP 1-3 are carried into the bloodstream by attaching to high mass plasma proteins in the tumour microenvironment. We discuss the effect of HNP 1-3 on tumour progression

  3. Locally advanced colon cancer with cutaneous invasion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Ferreira, Cátia; Silva, Silvia; Marques, Rita; Ribeiro, Artur; Sousa, Paulo Jorge; Luís, Fernando Próspero

    2017-03-01

    Locally advanced colon cancer with direct abdominal wall and skin invasion is an extremely rare finding with most data being derived from case reports, historical autopsy-based or single-center retrospective studies. We present a unique case of a colon cancer with direct cutaneous invasion and colocutaneous fistulization. Eighty-six year old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, referred to Surgical Consultation due to ulcerated skin lesion in the abdomen. She had a long-standing large umbilical hernia but with no previous episodes of incarceration or occlusive symptoms. She denied any digestive or constitutional symptoms. Physical examination showed a large non-reducible umbilical hernia, with an associated painless firm mass within the hernia sac and cutaneous ulcerated growth. Colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer (endoscopic biopsy of the tumor and skin punch biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma of the colon). Computed tomography showed a tumoral mass within the umbilical hernia, with cutaneous infiltration and enlarged regional lymph nodes. Rapid local progression led to colocutaneous fistula with total fecal diversion. We performed an extended right hemicolectomy with en bloc excision of the hernia sac and infiltrating cutaneous mass. In the current era of widespread use of screening colonoscopies, initial diagnosis of locally advanced colon cancer is decreasing. However, this unique case presented an opportunity to recall the advantages of multivisceral resections.

  4. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  5. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, van B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  6. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erk, Marjan J; Teuling, Eva; Staal, Yvonne C. M.; Huybers, Sylvie; Van Bladeren, Peter J; Aarts, Jac MMJG; Van Ommen, Ben

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  7. MINIMALLY INVASIVE APPROACH FOR RIGHT-SIDED COLON CANCER, COMPLICATED BY LARGE-BOWEL OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Chernookov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case demonstrates an opportunity of safe and successful colonic stenting to treat bowel obstruction with following laparoscopic radical intervention for right-sided colon cancer localization. The colonic stent as a “bridge to the surgery” improves immediate results and surviving rate in elderly patients with complicated right-sided colon cancer and severe concomitant disease.

  8. Optimizing prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions responsible for cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongying; Yuan, Huating; Hu, Jing; Xu, Chaohan; Liao, Gaoming; Yin, Wenkang; Xu, Liwen; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xinxin; Shi, Aiai; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun

    2017-12-12

    Increasing evidence suggests that the abnormality of microRNAs (miRNAs) and their downstream targets is frequently implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancers, however, the clinical benefit of causal miRNA-target interactions has been seldom studied. Here, we proposed a computational method to optimize prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions by combining transcriptome and clinical data from thousands of TCGA tumors across 16 cancer types. We obtained a total of 1,956 prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions between 112 miRNAs and 1,443 their targets. Interestingly, these key target genes are specifically involved in tumor progression-related functions, such as 'cell adhesion' and 'cell migration'. Furthermore, they are most significantly correlated with 'tissue invasion and metastasis', a hallmark of metastasis, in ten distinct types of cancer through the hallmark analysis. These results implicated that the prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions were highly associated with cancer metastasis. Finally, we observed that the combination of these key miRNA-target interactions allowed to distinguish patients with good prognosis from those with poor prognosis both in most TCGA cancer types and independent validation sets, highlighting their roles in cancer metastasis. We provided a user-friendly database named miRNATarget (freely available at http://biocc.hrbmu.edu.cn/miRNATar/), which provides an overview of the prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions across 16 cancer types.

  9. Tumor hypoxia, p53, and prognosis in cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensgen, Gabriele; Krause, Ulf; Becker, Axel; Stadler, Peter; Lautenschlaeger, Christine; Wohlrab, Wolfgang; Rath, Friedrich W.; Molls, Michael; Dunst, Juergen

    2001-01-01

    Background: The p53 protein is involved in the regulation of initiation of apoptosis. In vitro, p53-deficient cells do not respond to hypoxia with apoptosis as do p53-normal cells, and this may lead to a relative growth advantage of cells without a functioning p53 under hypoxia. On the basis of this hypothesis, a selection of cells with a functionally inactive p53 may occur in hypoxic tumors. The development of uterine cervical carcinomas is closely associated with infections of human papilloma viruses, which may cause a degradation of the tumor suppressor gene p53, resulting in a restriction of apoptosis. Thus, cervical cancers have often a functionally inactive p53. The purpose of our clinical study was therefore to investigate the association between p53, hypoxia, and prognosis in cervical cancers in which the oxygenation status can be determined by clinical methods. Material and Methods: Seventy patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer Stages IIB (n=14), IIIB (n=49), and IVA (n=7) were investigated in the period from 1996 through 1999. All were treated with definitive radiotherapy with curative intent by a combination of external radiotherapy plus high-dose-rate afterloading. Before therapy, tumor oxygenation was measured with a needle probe polarographically using the Eppendorf histograph. Hypoxic tumors were defined as those with pO 2 measurements below 5 mm Hg (HF5). Pretreatment biopsies were taken and analyzed immunohistologically for p53 protein expression with the DO-7 antibody. The DNA index was measured by flow cytometry. The statistical data analysis was done with SPSS 9.0 for Windows. Results: The 3-year overall survival was 55% for the whole group of patients. Clinical prognostic factors in a multivariate analysis were pretreatment hemoglobin level (3-year survival 62% for patients with a pretreatment hemoglobin ≥11 g/dl vs. 27% for hemoglobin <11 g/dl, p=0.006) and FIGO stage (Stage IIB: 65%; Stage IIIB: 60%; Stage IVA: 29%, p

  10. Pitfalls in diagnosing colon cancer on abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, E; Eifer, M; Kopylov, U; Belsky, V; Raskin, S; Konen, E; Amitai, M M

    2017-10-01

    To assess the frequency of undetected colon cancer on conventional abdominal CT and to evaluate the imaging features that are characteristic of those cancers. The present study included consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer at colonoscopy (2006-2015) who also underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various reasons within a year prior to the colonoscopy. The frequency of undetected lesions was evaluated for the original CT interpretations ("original readers"). Two radiologists ("study readers"), blinded to the tumour location, independently performed interpretations oriented for colon cancer detection. The study readers analysed the imaging features of detected tumours (tumour shape, length, maximal wall thickness, free fluid, fat stranding, vascular engorgement, stenosis, and lymphadenopathy). Imaging features of the cancers undetected by the original readers were evaluated. The study included 127 patients. The original readers' frequency of undetected cancer was 25/127 (19.7%). Each study reader could not identify the cancer in 8/127 (6.3%) patients. Imaging features associated with undetected cancers by the original readers included the absence of fat stranding (p=0.007, p=0.003), absence of vascular engorgement (pColon cancer is undetected in 20% of abdominal CT examinations in patients subsequently proven to have colon cancer at colonoscopy. The absence of fat stranding, vascular engorgement, or lymphadenopathy, and an average tumour length of 3.3 cm are contributing factors for failure of detection. Radiologists' training should emphasis these findings as it may improve cancer detection, and clinicians should be aware of the limitations of abdominal CT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting opportunities to increase utilization of laparoscopy for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Deborah S; Parikh, Niraj; Senagore, Anthony J

    2017-04-01

    Despite proven safety and efficacy, rates of minimally invasive approaches for colon cancer remain low in the USA. Given the known benefits, investigating the root causes of underutilization and methods to increase laparoscopy is warranted. Our goal was to develop a predictive model of factors impacting use of laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer. The Premier Hospital Database was reviewed for elective colorectal resections for colon cancer (2009-2014). Patients were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis code and then stratified into open or laparoscopic approaches by ICD-9-CM procedure codes. An adjusted multivariate logistic regression model identified variables predictive of use of laparoscopy for colon cancer. A total of 24,245 patients were included-12,523 (52 %) laparoscopic and 11,722 (48 %) open. General surgeons performed the majority of all procedures (77.99 % open, 71.60 % laparoscopic). Overall use of laparoscopy increased from 48.94 to 52.03 % over the study period (p colon cancer laparoscopically. Colorectal surgeons were 32 % more likely to approach a case laparoscopically than general surgeons (OR 1.315, 95 % CI [1.222, 1.415], p characteristics that can be identified preoperatively to predict who will undergo surgery for colon cancer using laparoscopy. However, additional patients may be eligible for laparoscopy based on patient-level characteristics. These results have implications for regionalization and increasing teaching of MIS. Recognizing and addressing these variables with training and recruiting could increase use of minimally invasive approaches, with the associated clinical and financial benefits.

  12. [Expression and clinical significance of kisspeptin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in tissue of colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhui; Qi, Yuanling; Xu, Qian; Ren, Haipeng

    2016-03-01

    To detect the expression of kisspeptin-1 (KISS-1), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tissue of colon cancer, and analyze the relativity between KISS-1, MMP-2, VEGF and pathological characteristics of colon cancer. A total of 60 colon cancer patients and 60 patients with benign colorectal disease who received surgical treatment in our hospital from January 2009 to June 2010 were selected as observation group and control group respectively. The cancer tissue samples and excision samples collected from them were used to detect KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF with immunohistochemistry. The positive rates of KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF were 31.7%, 58.3% and 78.3% in observation group, and 73.3%, 16.7% and 33.3% in control group. The positive rate of KISS-1 in observation group was lower than that in control group (χ(2)=23.489, Pcolon cancer (χ(2)=8.997, P=0.011; χ(2)=6.163, P=0.013; χ(2)=8.519, P=0.014; χ(2)=9.160, P=0.002; χ(2)=16.577, Pclinical stage of colon cancer and provide evidence for clinical diagnosis and prognosis prediction by detecting KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF.

  13. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  14. Risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessler, Bodil; Bock, David; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this was to assess potential risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery in a national cohort. METHODS: All patients, who had undergone a resection of a large bowel segment with an anastomosis between 2008 and 2011, were identified in the Swedish Colon Cancer...... Registry. Patient factors, socioeconomic factors, surgical factors, and medication and hospital data were combined to evaluate risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence. RESULTS: The prevalence of anastomotic dehiscence was 4.3 % (497/11 565). Male sex, ASA classification III-IV, prescribed medications...

  15. Disparities in prognosis communication among parents of children with cancer: The impact of race and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilowite, Maya F; Cronin, Angel M; Kang, Tammy I; Mack, Jennifer W

    2017-10-15

    Most parents of children with cancer say they want detailed information about their child's prognosis. However, prior work has been conducted in populations of limited diversity. The authors sought to evaluate the impact of parental race/ethnicity on prognosis communication experiences among parents of children with cancer. In total, 357 parents of children with cancer and the children's physicians were surveyed at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Boston Children's Hospital and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Outcome measures were parental preferences for prognostic information, physician beliefs about parental preferences, prognosis communication processes, and communication outcomes. Associations were assessed by logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to correct for physician clustering. Two hundred eighty-one parents (79%) were white, 23 (6%) were black, 29 (8%) were Hispanic, and 24 (7%) were Asian/other. Eighty-seven percent of parents wanted as much detail as possible about their child's prognosis, with no significant differences by race/ethnicity (P = .75). However, physician beliefs about parental preferences for prognosis communication varied based on parent race/ethnicity, with physicians considering black and Hispanic parents less interested in details about prognosis than whites (P = .003). Accurate understanding of a less favorable prognosis was greater among white (49%) versus nonwhite parents (range, 20%-29%), although this difference was not statistically significant (P = .14). Most parents, regardless of racial and ethnic background, want detailed prognostic information about their child's cancer. However, physicians underestimate the information needs of black and Hispanic parents. To meet parents' information needs, physicians should ask about parents' information preferences before prognosis discussions. Cancer 2017;123:3995-4003. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Does buccal cancer have worse prognosis than other oral cavity cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilon, P Ryan; Stokes, William A; Fuller, Colin W; Nguyen, Shaun A; Lentsch, Eric J

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether buccal squamous cell carcinoma has worse overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity. Retrospective analysis of a large population database. We began with a Kaplan-Meier analysis of OS and DSS for buccal versus nonbuccal tumors with unmatched data, followed by an analysis of cases matched for race, age at diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, and treatment modality. This was supported by a univariate Cox regression comparing buccal cancer to nonbuccal cancer, followed by a multivariate Cox regression that included all significant variables studied. With unmatched data, buccal cancer had significantly lesser OS and DSS values than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity (P cancer versus nonbuccal oral cancer were no longer significant. Univariate Cox regression models with respect to OS and DSS showed a significant difference between buccal cancer and nonbuccal cancer. However, with multivariate analysis, buccal hazard ratios for OS and DSS were not significant. With the largest series of buccal carcinoma to date, our study concludes that the OS and DSS of buccal cancer are similar to those of cancers in other oral cavity sites once age at diagnosis, tumor stage, treatment, and race are taken into consideration. The previously perceived poor prognosis of buccal carcinoma may be due to variations in tumor presentation, such as later stage and older patient age. 2b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Galectin-3 expression in colorectal cancer and its correlation with clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Liu; Jin Li; Dechun Li; Hongqiang Yang; Changhua Kou; Guijun Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the expression levels of galectin-3 in colorectal cancer and the association between galectin-3 and its clinical pathological parameters, as well as the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods An immunohistochemistry assay was used to test the expression levels of galectin-3 in cancer tissues of 61 colorectal cancer cases and in normal intestinal tissues adjacent to the cancer tissues of 23 cases. The associations between protein expression levels of gal...

  18. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa from cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of colon cancer patients and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 cancer patients and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of 10 of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r=0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy. PMID:24806665

  19. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116 with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat “SAHA,” sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin. Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells.

  20. Spontaneous regression of transverse colon cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Keigo; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Shomura, Hiroki; Homma, Shigenori; Hattori, Atsuo; Kazui, Keizo; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2017-12-01

    Spontaneous regression (SR) of many malignant tumors has been well documented, with an approximate incidence of one per 60,000-100,000 cancer patients. However, SR of colorectal cancer (CRC) is very rare, accounting for less than 2% of such cases. We report a case of SR of transverse colon cancer in an 80-year-old man undergoing outpatient follow-up after surgical treatment of early gastric cancer. Colonoscopy (CS) revealed a Borrmann type II tumor in the transverse colon measuring 30 × 30 mm. Because the patient underwent anticoagulant therapy, we did not perform a biopsy at that time. A second CS was performed 1 week after the initial examination and revealed tumor shrinkage to a diameter of 20 mm and a shift to the Borrmann type III morphology. Biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. One week after the second CS, we performed a partial resection of the transverse colon and D2 lymph node dissection. Histopathology revealed inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis from the submucosal to muscularis propria layers in the absence of cancer cells, leading to pathological staging of pStage 0 (T0N0). The patient had an uneventful recovery, and CS performed at 5 months postoperatively revealed the absence of a tumor in the colon and rectum. The patient continues to be followed up as an outpatient at 12 months postoperatively, and no recurrence has been observed.

  1. Current management of liver metastases of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainieri Breedy, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer has been one of the major tumors in the world, both men and women; and it is constituted the third most commonly diagnosed tumor, with approximately 1.2 million of new cases per year. This cancer type is considered of great importance in Costa Rica and has occupied the fifth place. Age is the main risk factor, followed by environmental, diabetic and genetic factors. An IV colon cancer has been manifested with any T, with any N and metastases. Metastases from colon cancer to liver can be classified according to whether have been synchronous (20 to 25%) or metachronous (15 to 29%). In turn, they can be synchronous, resectable or unresectable or mechanical resectable or unresectable. The liver has been the most common site of metastases, and the status of this organ has been an important determinant of overall survival in patients with advanced disease. Half of the patients developed metastases during the course of the disease. Metastases has represented the leading cause of death from this tumor. With the advent of new surgical techniques, new anesthetic care, new chemotherapeutic and molecular agents, together with new radiofrequency modalities and ablative treatment, the approach of metastases from colon cancer to the liver has been shown to be decisive in the prolongation of survival of the patient, who in the past was considered a terminal patient [es

  2. Elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Yuan, Chenwei; Zhao, Senlin; Fang, Changyi; Yu, Yang; Yan, Dongwang, E-mail: yandw70@163.com

    2015-12-04

    The THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a nuclear matrix protein playing vital roles in transcription elongation and mRNA export. Recently, aberrant expression of Thoc1 has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types. However, the clinical significance of Thoc1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the expression of Thoc1 in human CRC and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Thoc1 in CRC specimens was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosae. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of Thoc1 in 185 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that high levels of Thoc1 expression were associated with the clinical stages and tumor differentiation. CRC patients with high levels of Thoc1 expression had poorer overall-survival and disease-free survival, whereas those with lower levels of Thoc1 expression survived longer. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated that Thoc1 expression remained an independent prognostic factor for increased disease recurrence and decreased survival. Our results suggest for the first time that Thoc1 is involved in the development and progression of CRC, and elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in CRC. These findings may prove to be clinically useful for developing a new therapeutic target of CRC treatment.

  3. [Expression of connective tissue growth factor in colorectal cancer and its association with prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Yang, Ping; Liang, Li-yuan; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Wei-jian; Cao, Jie

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in colorectal cancer(CRC) and its association with clinicopathologic parameters and overall survival rate. Fresh tumor tissues and matched distal normal colon tissues were collected from 92 patients diagnosed as CRC by surgical operation. The expression level of CTGF mRNA was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Thirty out of 92 pairs of tissue specimens were selected randomly to detect CTGF protein by immunohistochemistry. All the cases were followed up to identify prognostic factors for survival. CTGF mRNA expression was up-regulated in CRC. The positive rate of CTGF protein expression tissues (73.3%) was significantly higher than that in the corresponding normal tissues (23.3%, Ptissues was classified into high and low expression groups. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was lower in patients with low CTGF expression (29.3%) as compared to those with high CTGF expressions (68.3%) (P<0.01). Cox regression analysis revealed that the relative expression level of CTGF was independent factor of overall survival (RR=2.960, 95%CI:1.491-1.587, P<0.01). ROC curve analysis showed that sensitivity and specificity of CTGF mRNA expression for prediction of 5-year survival were 64.9% and 74.5%, respectively. The aberrant expression of CTGF is associated with the malignant biological behaviors of CRC. Low expression of CTGF is associated with worse prognosis of CRC.

  4. [Surgical treatment and prognosis of Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruizeng; Zhang, Zewei; Zhou, Yiming; Hua, Yonghong; Guo, Jianmin

    2018-02-25

    To explore the surgical treatment and prognosis of Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach. Clinicopathological characteristics and survival data of 223 patients with Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach (defined as the tumor infiltrating 3 regions of the stomach) receiving surgical treatment at the Department of Abdominal Surgery of Zhejiang Cancer Hospital between January 2002 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The survival time of patients with different clinicopathological features and different treatment methods was compared. Cox regression was used to analyze the independent prognostic factors. Two hundred and twenty-three patients with Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer involving the whole stomach accounted for 24.0% (223/930) of all Borrmann type IIII( gastric cancer cases undergoing surgical resection at the same period. There were 147 males and 76 females with an average age of 57.8 years. All the patients underwent total gastrectomy. Of these patients, radical resection was performed in 149 cases(66.8%) and palliative resection in 74 cases (33.2%). Combined organ resection was performed in 43 patients (19.3%), including 25 splenectomies, 6 pancreatic body and tail plus spleen and transverse colon resections, 2 transverse colon plus spleen resections, 2 right colon resections, 2 transverse colon resections, 2 ovariectomies, 1 partial jejunal resection, 1 pancreatoduodenectomy, 1 pancreatic tail plus transverse colon resection, and 1 partial pancreatectomy. Postoperative complications occurred in 28 patients(12.6%), including 10 patients with combined organ resection. Esophagojejunal fistula was the most frequent complication, accounting for 39.3%(11/28). Perioperative mortality occurred in 3 patients (1.3%). Thirty-nine patients underwent preoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (clinical stage: cT4aN0M0 in 1 patient, cT4bN1-2M0 in 12 patients, cT4aN1-2M0 in 20 patients, and cT4aN3M0 in 6 patients

  5. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Identifying subgroups among poor prognosis patients with nonseminomatous germ cell cancer by tree modelling: a validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. van Dijk (Merel); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); S.P. Stenning; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In order to target intensive treatment strategies for poor prognosis patients with non-seminomatous germ cell cancer, those with the poorest prognosis should be identified. These patients might profit most from more intensive treatment strategies. For

  7. Body Mass Index, Diet-Related Factors, and Bladder Cancer Prognosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, E.; Witjes, J.A.; Fleshner, N.E.; Lerner, S.P.; Shariat, S.F.; Steineck, G.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Vrieling, A.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Urologists are frequently confronted with questions of urinary bladder cancer (UBC) patients about what they can do to improve their prognosis. Unfortunately, it is largely unknown which lifestyle factors can influence prognosis. Objective: To systematically review the available evidence

  8. Biomarker discovery for colon cancer using a 761 gene RT-PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackett James R

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR is widely recognized to be the gold standard method for quantifying gene expression. Studies using RT-PCR technology as a discovery tool have historically been limited to relatively small gene sets compared to other gene expression platforms such as microarrays. We have recently shown that TaqMan® RT-PCR can be scaled up to profile expression for 192 genes in fixed paraffin-embedded (FPE clinical study tumor specimens. This technology has also been used to develop and commercialize a widely used clinical test for breast cancer prognosis and prediction, the Onco typeDX™ assay. A similar need exists in colon cancer for a test that provides information on the likelihood of disease recurrence in colon cancer (prognosis and the likelihood of tumor response to standard chemotherapy regimens (prediction. We have now scaled our RT-PCR assay to efficiently screen 761 biomarkers across hundreds of patient samples and applied this process to biomarker discovery in colon cancer. This screening strategy remains attractive due to the inherent advantages of maintaining platform consistency from discovery through clinical application. Results RNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FPE tissue, as old as 28 years, from 354 patients enrolled in NSABP C-01 and C-02 colon cancer studies. Multiplexed reverse transcription reactions were performed using a gene specific primer pool containing 761 unique primers. PCR was performed as independent TaqMan® reactions for each candidate gene. Hierarchal clustering demonstrates that genes expected to co-express form obvious, distinct and in certain cases very tightly correlated clusters, validating the reliability of this technical approach to biomarker discovery. Conclusion We have developed a high throughput, quantitatively precise multi-analyte gene expression platform for biomarker discovery that approaches low density DNA arrays in numbers of

  9. File list: InP.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Oth.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer hg19 TFs and others Digestive tract Colon cancer SRX1...55772,SRX155773,SRX155775,SRX155776 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Dig.10.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Dig.10.AllAg.Colon_cancer hg19 Input control Digestive tract Colon cancer SRX12...155774,SRX625671,SRX155777 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Dig.10.AllAg.Colon_cancer.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer hg19 Unclassified Digestive tract Colon cancer SRX115...0169,SRX1150170,SRX124703 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer hg19 TFs and others Digestive tract Colon cancer SRX1...55772,SRX155775,SRX155773,SRX155776 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Dig.10.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.10.AllAg.Colon_cancer hg19 Unclassified Digestive tract Colon cancer SRX115...0169,SRX124703,SRX1150170 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Dig.10.AllAg.Colon_cancer.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer hg19 Unclassified Digestive tract Colon cancer SRX115...0169,SRX1150170,SRX124703 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Colon_cancer.bed ...