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Sample records for colloidal actinide transport

  1. The effect of corrosion product colloids on actinide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The near field of the proposed UK repository for ILW/LLW will contain containers of conditioned waste in contact with a cementious backfill. It will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Colloids deriving from their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. If the colloids are mobile in the groundwater flow, they could act as a significant vector for activity transport into the far field. The desorption of plutonium and americium from colloidal corrosion products of iron and zirconium has been studied under chemical conditions representing the transition from the near field to the far field. Desorption R d values of ≥ 5 x 10 6 ml g -1 were measured for both actinides on these oxides and hydroxides when actinide sorption took place under the near-field conditions and desorption took place under the far-field conditions. Desorption of the actinides occurred slowly from the colloids under far-field conditions when the colloids had low loadings of actinide and more quickly at high loadings of actinide. Desorbed actinide was lost to the walls of the experimental vessel. (author)

  2. The effects of corrosion product colloids on actinide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report assesses the possible effects of colloidal corrosion products on the transport of actinides from the near field of radioactive waste repositories. The desorption of plutonium and americium from colloidal corrosion products of iron and zirconium was studied under conditions simulating a transition from near-field to far-field environmental conditions. Desorption of actinides occurred slowly from the colloids under far-field conditions. Measurements of particle stability showed all the colloids to be unstable in the near field. Stability increased under far-field conditions or as a result of the evolution of the near field. Migration of colloids from the near field is unlikely except in the presence of organic materials. (Author)

  3. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  4. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwater is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudo colloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC Mirage II project, in particular the complexation and colloids research area

  5. Investigation of the transport of actinide-bearing soil colloids in the soil-aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Campbell, M.J.; Kittrick, J.; Cheng, T.

    1980-04-01

    Uranium-233 particle size dependent distribution ratios for the 10 to 60 range were determined for muscatine silt loam, Burbank loamy sand, Ritzville silt loam, Fuquay sand, and Idaho sandy clay. A mathematical method for the analysis of centrifuge data was developed to determine particle size dependent distribution ratio for the 10 to 60 nm range. Comparison of the distribution ratio data for the 0 to 60 nm particle size range strongly suggests that particles in the 1 to 10 nm (8000 to 50,000 MW) range play a dominate role. Since these particles are probably humic acid polymers, future research should be focused on humic acid complexing of radionuclides. A mathematical analysis is given to demonstrate the role of humic acid complexing in the transport of radionuclides in the soil-aquatic environment

  6. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-01-01

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R col is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R col that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k att , and detachment rate constants, k det , of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R col uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly

  8. Analysis of colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  10. Literature review of intrinsic actinide colloids related to spent fuel waste package release rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P.; Steward, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Existence of actinide colloids provides an important mechanism in the migration of radionuclides and will be important in performance of a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. Actinide colloids have been formed during long-term unsaturated dissolution of spent fuel by groundwater. This article summarizes a literature search of actinide colloids. This report emphasizes the formation of intrinsic actinide colloids, because they would have the opportunity to form soon after groundwater contact with the spent fuel and before actinide-bearing groundwater reaches the surrounding geologic formations.

  11. Literature review of intrinsic actinide colloids related to spent fuel waste package release rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Steward, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Existence of actinide colloids provides an important mechanism in the migration of radionuclides and will be important in performance of a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. Actinide colloids have been formed during long-term unsaturated dissolution of spent fuel by groundwater. This article summarizes a literature search of actinide colloids. This report emphasizes the formation of intrinsic actinide colloids, because they would have the opportunity to form soon after groundwater contact with the spent fuel and before actinide-bearing groundwater reaches the surrounding geologic formations

  12. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Actinide contaminants were introduced to the subsurface environment as a result of nuclear weapons development and testing, as well as for nuclear power generation and related research activities for defense and civilian applications. Even though most actinide species were believed to be fairly immobile once in the subsurface, recent studies have shown the transport of actinides kilometers away from their disposal sites. For example, the treated liquid wastes released into Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory were predicted to travel less than a few meters; however, plutonium and americium have been detected 3.4 km away from the waste outfall. A colloid-facilitated mechanism has been suggested to account for this unexpected transport of these radioactive wastes. Clays, oxides, organic matters, and actinide hydroxides have all been proposed as the possible mobile phase. Pu ions associated with natural colloids are often referred to as pseudo-Pu colloids, in contrast with the intrinsic Pu colloids that consist of Pu oxides. Significant efforts have been made to investigate the role of pseudo-Pu colloids, while few studies have evaluated the environmental behavior of the intrinsic Pu colloids. Given the fact that Pu (IV) has extremely low solubility product constant, it can be inferred that the transport of Pu in the intrinsic form is highly likely at suitable environmental conditions. This study investigates the transport of intrinsic Pu colloids in a saturated alluvium material packed in a cylindrical column (2.5-cm Dia. x 30-cm high) and compares the results to previous data on the transport of pseudo Pu colloids in the same material. A procedure to prepare a stable intrinsic Pu colloid suspension that produced consistent and reproducible electrokinetic and stability data was developed. Electrokinetic properties and aggregation stability were characterized. The Pu colloids, together with trillium as a conservative tracer, were injected into the

  13. M4FT-16LL080303052-State of Knowledge for Colloid Facilitated Radionuclide Transport and Update on Actinide Diffusion in Bentonite Backfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.. Physical and Life Sciences; Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.. Physical and Life Sciences

    2016-08-16

    This progress report (Level 4 Milestone Number M4FT-16LL080303052) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within the Crystalline Disposal R&D Activity Number FT-16LL080303051 and Crystalline International Collaborations Activity Number FT-16LL080303061. The focus of this research is the interaction of radionuclides with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) and host rock materials at various physico-chemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. They include both chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion. The colloid-facilitated transport effort focused on preparation of a draft manuscript summarizing the state of knowledge and parameterization of colloid-facilitated transport mechanisms in support of reactive transport and performance assessment models for generic crystalline repositories. This draft manuscript is being submitted as a level 3 milestone with LANL as the primary author. LLNL’s contribution to that effort is summarized only briefly in the present report. A manuscript summarizing long-term U(VI) diffusion experiments through bentonite backfill material was recently accepted for publication; the contents of that manuscript are summarized in the present report. The Np(IV) diffusion experiments were started mid-year and are ongoing. The completion of these experiments is planned for early FY17. Our progress in quantifying Np(IV) diffusion in bentonite backfill is summarized in the present report. Our involvement with the NEA TDB project was summarized in a recent Argillite Disposal activity report. It is not included in this report.

  14. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...

  15. Experimental Evaluation of Actinide Transport in a Fractured Granodiorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate and evaluate new experimental methods for quantifying the potential for actinide transport in deep fractured crystalline rock formations. We selected a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model system because field experiments have already been conducted with uranium and additional field experiments using other actinides are planned at the site. Thus, working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiment results with fieldscale observations. Rock cores drilled from the GTS were shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory, characterized by x-ray diffraction and microscopy, and used in batch sorption and column breakthrough experiments. Solutions with pH 6.8 and 8.8 were tested. Solutions were switched to radionuclide-free synthetic Grimsel groundwater after near-steady actinide/colloid breakthrough occurred in column experiments. We are currently evaluating actinide adsorption/desorption rates as a function of water chemistry (initial focus on pH), with future testing planned to evaluate the influence of carbonate concentrations, flow rates, and mineralogy in solutions and suspensions with bentonite colloids. (auth)

  16. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  17. CTCN: Colloid transport code -- nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential-algebraic systems

  18. Colloidal products and actinide species in leachate from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were subjected to unsaturated leach tests with simulated groundwater at 90 degrees C. The actinides present in the leachate were determined at the end of two successive periods of ∼60 days and after an acid strip done at the end of the second period. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. In addition, the actinide release behavior of the two fuels appeared to be different for both the total amount of material released and the relative amount of each isotope released. This paper will focus on the detection and identification of the colloidal species observed in the leachate that was collected after each of the first two successive testing periods of approximately 60 days each. In addition, preliminary values for the total actinide release for these two periods are reported

  19. Sampling and physical and actinide characterization of colloids from the Grimsel test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of groundwater from a granite fracture at the Grimsel test site in Switzerland have been collected as part of a second intercomparison of groundwater colloid sampling and characterization techniques carried out by members of the Coco Club (colloids and complexes) sponsored by the CEC. This report describes the Harwell contribution to this exercise. The bulk of naturally occurring actinides were found to reside in solution with 10 particles/I (detection limit ∼50 nm) for samples determined by three laboratories. The colloids were shown to be negatively charged using microelectrophoresis and to be relatively stable. There was evidence of a reduction in the pH of the water after storage due to air contamination. This work has served to identify the problems associated with colloid sampling and characterization techniques

  20. The role of humic acid on the formation of HAS (hydroxy-aluminosilicate) colloid-borne actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priemyshev, A.; Kim, M.A. [Inst. fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Breban, D.; Panak, P.J.; Yun, J.I.; Kim, J.I.; Fanghanel, Th. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mansel, A. [Inst. fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, Georadiochemie, Leipzig, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: One of the major unknowns in the process of actinide migration is the formation of their colloid-borne species. Previous studies have been directed to the incorporation of actinides into HAS (hydroxy-aluminosilicate) colloids generated by the nucleation of Si and Al. The present work further pursues the behaviour of actinides at HAS colloid formation but in the presence of humic acid that is known to be an ubiquitous groundwater constituent. The formation and degree of stability of the aluminosilicate binding for the generation of HAS colloids are investigated at first in the absence of actinides. Free and complexed Al resulting from ligand competitions reactions for the complexation of Al with mono-silicic acid, poly-silicic acid and EDTA are monitored spectroscopically by colour reaction. The second part of the study concentrates on the formation and stability of humic colloids using {sup 14}C-labeled humic acid. The activity distribution is ascertained in the ionic, colloidal and precipitated fractions under different conditions of colloid formation, e.g. as a function of pH, time, humic acid and Al concentration. The third part follows the appraisal of appropriate conditions under which stable HAS and humic colloids are formed, and their interaction with actinides, either separately or in competition. Trace actinides of different oxidation states {sup 241}Am(III), {sup 234}Th(IV) and {sup 233}U(VI) are taken for the purpose. HAS colloids generated from poly-silicic acid at neutral pH show EDTA-resistance, whereas HAS colloids formed from mono-silicic acid become EDTA-resistant only by aging (> one month). Humic acid appears to stabilize HAS colloids, unless the loading capacity of humic acid for the Al ion is exceeded. The incorporation of actinides into the colloidal phase is generally enhanced in the presence of humic acid. Synergic effects produce chimeric HAS-humic colloids into which tri-, tetra- and hexavalent actinides

  1. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport.

  2. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained “irreversibly” when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained “irreversibly” upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  3. Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, S.; Garcia-Garcia, S.; Jonsson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials Susanna Wold*, Sandra García-García and Mats Jonsson KTH Chemical Science and Engineering Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden *Corresponding author: E-mail: wold@kth.se Phone: +46 8 790 6295 In colloid transport in water-bearing fractures, the retardation depends on interactions with the fracture surface by sorption or filtration. These mechanisms are difficult to separate. A rougher surface will give a larger area available for sorption, and also when a particle is physically hindered, it approaches the surface and enables further sorption. Sorption can be explained by electrostatics were the strongest sorption on minerals always is observed at pH below pHpzc (Filby et al., 2008). The adhesion of colloids to mineral surfaces is related to the surface roughness according to a recent study (Darbha et al., 2010). There is a large variation in the characteristics of water-bearing fractures in bedrock in terms of aperture distribution, flow velocity, surface roughness, mineral distributions, presence of fracture filling material, and biological and organic material, which is hard to implement in modeling. The aim of this work was to study the transport of negatively charged colloids in model fracture filling material in relation to flow, porosity, mineral type, colloid size, and surface charge distribution. In addition, the impact on transport of colloids of mixing model fracture filling materials with different retention and immobilization capacities, determined by batch sorption experiments, was investigated. The transport of Na-montmorillonite colloids and well-defined negatively charged latex microspheres of 50, 100, and 200 nm diameter were studied in either columns containing quartz or quartz mixed with biotite. The ionic strength in the solution was exclusively 0.001 and pH 6 or 8.5. The flow rates used were 0.002, 0.03, and 0.6 mL min-1. Sorption of the colloids on the model fracture

  4. Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, A.; Reimus, P.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR), as outlined in its Work Direction and Planning Document (CRWMS MandO 1999a), is to provide retardation factors for colloids with irreversibly-attached radionuclides, such as plutonium, in the saturated zone (SZ) between their point of entrance from the unsaturated zone (UZ) and downgradient compliance points. Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this AMR especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and perhaps other radionuclides may be irreversibly attached to colloids. This report establishes the requirements and elements of the design of a methodology for calculating colloid transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In previous Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses, radionuclide-bearing colloids were assumed to be unretarded in their migration. Field experiments in fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain and in porous media at other sites indicate that colloids may, in fact, experience retardation relative to the mean pore-water velocity, suggesting that contaminants associated with colloids should also experience some retardation. Therefore, this analysis incorporates field data where available and a theoretical framework when site-specific data are not available for estimating plausible ranges of retardation factors in both saturated fractured tuff and saturated alluvium. The distribution of retardation factors for tuff and alluvium are developed in a form consistent with the Performance Assessment (PA) analysis framework for simulating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone. To improve on the work performed so far for the saturated-zone flow and transport modeling, concerted effort has been made in quantifying colloid retardation factors in both fractured tuff and alluvium. The fractured tuff analysis used recent data

  5. Actinide transport in Topopah Spring Tuff: Pore size, particle size, and diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M.; Phinney, D.L.; Smith, D.K.

    1991-04-01

    Diffusive transport rates for aqueous species in a porous medium are a function of sorption, molecular diffusion, and sample tortuosity. With heterogeneous natural samples, an understanding of the effect of multiple transport paths and sorption mechanisms is particularly important since a small amount of radioisotope traveling via a faster-than-anticipated transport path may invalidate the predictions of transport codes which assume average behavior. Static-diffusion experiments using aqueous 238 U tracer in tuff indicated that U transport was faster in regions of greater porosity and that apparent diffusion coefficients depended on the scale (m or μm) over which concentration gradients were measured in Topopah Spring Tuff. If a significant fraction of actinides in high-level waste are released to the environment in forms that do not sorb to the matrix, they may be similarly transported along fast paths in porous regions of the tuff. To test this, aqueous diffusion rates in tuff were measured for 238 U and 239 Pu leached from doped glass. Measured transport rates and patterns were consistent in both systems with a dual-porosity transported moeld. In addition, filtration or channelling of actinides associated with colloidal particles may significantly affect the radionuclide transport rate in Topopah Spring tuff. 9 refs., 7 figs

  6. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments

  7. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situ mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment

  8. Modeling of the geochemical behaviour and of the radionuclide transport in the presence of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Lee, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Over the past ten years, colloids have been introduced in the already complex subject of waste storage safety analysis. They are indeed often considered as rapid carriers for otherwise insoluble radioactive elements, and therefore potentially decrease the effective barrier function of the geological rock surrounding the waste. The problem is therefore to understand colloid behaviour and quantify their stability and reactivity with respect to the radionuclides. The subject reveals three different levels of phenomena: the geochemical mechanisms, the micro-physical and electrostatic behaviour of colloids and the transport mechanisms. The topics of this thesis therefore cover a wide range of disciplines, such as geochemistry, radiochemistry, physics, hydrogeology, mathematics and computer science. Given the complexity of the subject, only strongly simplified models are used for safety assessment including the impact of colloids. Henceforth, the objective of this study is to provide a comprehensive theoretical basis for modelling the impact of colloids according to a deterministic approach, in the hope to pave the road towards predictive modelling of a waste repository performance. This thesis is the result of work carried out in different European Community projects in the framework of the fourth R and D program on 'Management and Storage of Radioactive Waste'. part A, task 4, 'Disposal of Radioactive Waste'. Grateful use has been made of many chemical and hydrogeological experiments carried out by many different laboratories all over Europe. The main results can be classified according to three principal topics: - geochemistry and the chemical behaviour of actinides, lanthanides and fission products; - retention mechanisms of colloidal particles; - transport mechanism in geological medium. The first topic is fundamental: geochemistry forms the basis of e.g. the retention model for aqueous and colloidal species. The principal result of this topic is

  9. Colloid transport code-nuclear user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems

  10. The role of colloids in the transport of radioelements by groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skytte Jensen, B.; Halken, T.

    1993-01-01

    An unsettled problem in migration studies is to what extent do colloids take part in the transport of elements with flowing groundwater. Numerous experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that colloids are able to adsorb traces of foreign elements including the actinide ions present in solution, and simple models adequate for the specific experimental conditions may be established. There are, however, not enough data available to model the overall behaviour of 'colloid-complexes' under highly variable natural conditions, where competition for adsorption and flocculation phenomena complicate the simple models. It is the intention of the present project to perform experiments directed at obtaining the missing information and secondly to establish a model, if possible, which may be used for predictive purposes. 3 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, L.; Fuger, J.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of the actinides is explained on the basis of their electronic structure. The actinide elements, actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium, fermium, mendelevium, nobelium, and laurencium are included. For all except the last three elements, the points of discussion are oxidation states, Gibbs energies and potentials, and potential diagram for the element in acid solution; and thermodynamic properties of these same elements are tabulated. References are cited following discussion of each element with a total of 97 references being cited. 13 tables

  12. Formation and transport of radioactive colloids in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.Y.; Lee, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the presence of colloids in natural groundwater on radionuclide transport. The system considered here treats groundwater as a dispersing medium and colloid or finely divided solid material resulting from several different repository sources as a dispersed phase. Evaluation of the radionuclides adsorption on colloid, concepts of effective transport velocity and migration distance, and mathematical formulation of the filtration equation were driven, along with the case studies using typical parameter values of a conceptual radioactive waste repository and concentration on the effect of poly dispersed colloid on radionuclide transport. This paper also introduces the three phase analysis to treat the radionuclide transport more practically. When compared with the previously published experimental data, the modified filtration equation gives a satisfactory result. Results of the case studies show that the reduction of colloidal size enhances the corresponding colloid concentration when colloidal transport is only affected by diffusion phenomena. However, the three phase analysis shows that this trend can be reversed if the colloidal filtration becomes a dominant mechanism in the colloidal transport. Consequently, these results show that colloid could play a very important role in radionuclide transport under a repository environment

  13. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media

  14. Evaluation and characterization of the interactions between colloids and actinides in soils by on-line fractionation multi-detection methods: example of uranium in carbonated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claveranne-Lamolere, C.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the fate of actinides in the environment, it is essential to identify the interactions between actinides and soil components. In the case of problems connected to the nuclear industry (deep geologic storage, dismantling and environmental monitoring of nuclear sites), the purpose of this study was to characterize the uranium-colloids interactions by on-line fractionation multi-detection methods. The main advantage here is to supply a lot of information on the uranium distribution within the various colloidal populations. By varying the keys-parameters of a batch leaching protocol, different scenarios potentially implied in the colloidal mobilization of uranium were studied. Each sample collected was also characterized and their size (hydrodynamic and gyration radius), their nature as well as the uranium concentration carried by colloids were determined. The mechanisms of the uranium-colloids interactions were also studied. (author) [fr

  15. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  16. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research

  17. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  18. Improvement of colloid sampling techniques in groundwater and actinide characterisation of the groundwater systems at Gorleben (FRG) and El Berrocal (E)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearlove, J.P.L.; Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-08-01

    Two sites, the Gorleben site (FRG) and the El Berrocal Experimental station (E) have been studied to evaluate different sampling and analytical techniques for the characterisation of particulates (> 1000 nm size), colloids (1-1000 nm size) and the solution phase (<1 nm) in groundwaters in terms of their physical, chemical and actinide composition. The uptake characteristics of the field ultrafiltration system used to separate the colloid fraction from the solution phase in the groundwater have also been studied. (Author)

  19. Field-scale variation in colloid dispersibility and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, T. P. A.

    2014-01-01

    comparison parameters including textural, chemical, and structural (e.g. air permeability) 8 soil properties. The soil dispersibility was determined (i) using a laser diffraction method on 1-2 mm aggregates equilibrated to an initial matric potential of -100 cm H2O, (ii) using an end-over-end shaking on 6......Colloids are potential carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals in macroporous soils, but predicting the amount of colloids readily available for facilitated chemical transport is an unsolved challenge. This study addresses potential key parameters and predictive indicators when assessing colloid....... Predictions of soil dispersibility and the risk of colloid-facilitated chemical transport will therefore need to be highly scale- and area-specific....

  20. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury, Markus

    2003-01-01

    Contaminants have leaked into the vadose zone at the USDOE Hanford reservation. It is important to understand the fate and transport of these contaminants to design remediation strategies and long-term waste management plans at the Hanford reservation. Colloids may play an important role in fate and transport of strongly sorbing contaminants, such as Cs or Pu. This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. The specific objectives addressed are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. (5) Improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for implementation into reactive chemical transport models. This project was in part supported by an NSF-IGERT grant to Washington State University. The IGERT grant provided funding for graduate student research and education, and two graduate students were involved in the EMSP project. The IGERT program also supported undergraduate internships. The project is part of a larger EMSP program to study fate and transport of contaminants under leaking Hanford waste tanks. The project has

  1. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  2. Actinide speciation bound to hydrous ferric oxide colloids in the near-field conditions of the waste pond at 'Mayak' facility (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, St.; Khasanova, A.; Kriventsov, V.; Teterin, Y.; Novikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 'Mayak' facility is a nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant located in Ural Mountains, Russia. The opened pond, Karachay Lake, was used for several decades for the discharge of low- and intermediate level waste solutions containing fission products and traces of actinides. Due to high salt concentration and high density of waste solutions, they are penetrating into the groundwater system that is represented by oxic Eh conditions. The speciation of actinides in groundwater samples collected close to Karachay Lake was studied by successive micro- and ultra-filtrations with subsequent SEM, TEM, nano-SIMS, membrane extraction and other techniques. It was established that U and Np were found in soluble fraction (pass through 10 kD ultra-filter) in the form of their bi- and tri-carbonate complexes that was supported by chemical thermodynamic calculations. In contrast, Pu and Am were bound to nano-colloids 10 kD - 50 nm in size. The SEM and TEM data indicate the presence of variety of different colloidal particles which relative concentration decrease in the row: hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) >> clays ≅ calcite > rutile ≅ hematite ≅ barite ≅ MnO 2 > monazite > other phases. The SIMS with submicron resolution (Cameca nanoSIMS-50) was used to study local concentration of actinides. According to the obtained data among different colloids detected in the sample actinides were preferentially bound to HFO and MnO 2 while other phases did not sorb actinides. In order to determine actinide speciation bound to HFO colloids XPS and An L 3 edge XAFS measurements were done at Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Centre. The storage ring VEPP-3 with electron beam energy of 2 GeV and an average stored current of 80 mA was used as the source of radiation. Since the concentration of actinides in actual samples was too low for XAFS, the samples for measurements were prepared by contacting about 10 -5 M solutions of Np(V) and Pu(V) with

  3. Factors influencing the transport of actinides in the groundwater environment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Kittrick, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations of factors that significantly influence the transport of actinide cations in the groundwater environment. Briefly, measurements of diffusion coefficients for Am(III), Cm(III), and Np(V) in moist US soils indicated that diffusion is negligible compared to mass transport in flowing groundwater. Diffusion coefficients do, however, indicate that, in the absence of flowing water, actinide elements will migrate only a few centimeters in a thousand years. The remaining investigations were devoted to the determination of distribution ratios (K/sub d/s) for representative US soils, factors influencing them, and chemical and physical processes related to transport of actinides in groundwaters. The computer code GARD was modified to include complex formation to test the importance of humic acid complexing on the rate of transport of actinides in groundwaters. Use of the formation constant and a range of humic acid, even at rather low concentrations of 10 -5 to 10 -6 molar, significantly increases the actinide transport rate in a flowing aquifer. These computer calculations show that any strong complexing agent will have a similar effect on actinide transport in the groundwater environment. 32 references, 9 figures

  4. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  5. A study of uranium and thorium migration at the Koongarra uranium deposit with application to actinide transport from nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    One way to gain confidence in modelling possible radionuclide releases is to study natural systems which are similar to components of the multibarrier waste repository. Several such analogues are currently under study and these provide useful data about radionuclide behaviour in the natural environment. One such system is the Koongarra uranium deposit in the Northern Territory. In this dissertation, the migration of actinides, primarily uranium and thorium, has been studied as an analogue for the behaviour of transuranics in the far-field of a waste repository. The major findings of this study are: 1. the main process retarding uranium migration in the dispersion fan at Koongarra is sorption, which suppresses dissolved uranium concentrations well below solubility limits, with ferrihydrite being a major sorbing phase; 2. thorium is extremely immobile, with very low dissolved concentrations and corresponding high distribution ratios for 230 Th. Overall, it is estimated that colloids are relatively unimportant in Koongarra groundwater. Uranium migrates mostly as dissolved species, whereas thorium and actinium are mostly adsorbed to larger, relatively immobile particles and the stationary phase. However, of the small amount of 230 Th that passes through a 1μm filter, a significant proportion is associated with colloidal particles. Actinium appears to be slightly more mobile than thorium and is associated with colloids to a greater extent, although generally present in low concentrations. These results support the possibility of colloidal transport of trivalent and tetravalent actinides in the vicinity of a nuclear waste repository. 112 refs., 23 tabs., 32 figs

  6. Study of groundwater colloids and their ability to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjus, K.; Wikberg, P.

    1987-03-01

    Natural occurring colloids in groundwater can adsorb and transport released radionuclides. In this work groundwater colloids have been investigated with zeta potential measurements and dynamic light scattering. The goal was i) to estimate the detection limits of the Institute's equipment for particle size estimation with dynamic light scattering and zeta potential with dynamic light scattering combined with estimation of Doppler shift in the scattered light frequency; ii) to examine several different groundwaters (Stripa, Kamlunge, Svartboberget). The possibility to apply a theoretical adsorption model for interpreting the results is also discussed. (orig.)

  7. Transport and Deposition of Suspended Soil-Colloids in Saturated Sand Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anu; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2011-01-01

    Understanding colloid mobilization, transport and deposition in the subsurface is a prerequisite for predicting colloid‐facilitated transport of strongly adsorbing contaminants and further developing remedial activities. This study investigated the transport behavior of soil‐colloids extracted from...... caused tailing of colloid BTCs with higher reversible entrapment and release of colloids than high flow velocity. The finer Toyoura sand retained more colloids than the coarser Narita sand at low pH conditions. The deposition profile and particle size distribution of colloids in the Toyoura sand clearly...

  8. Colloid transport code-nuclear user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-04-03

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems.

  9. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  10. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site

  11. A study on the formation and transport of radioactive colloids in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Yop

    1992-02-01

    Colloid particles, which may be supplied naturally by groundwater, are shown to be important potential vehicles for the transport of radionuclides in geologic media. Colloid particles have also large available sites for adsorption because small particles have high surface areas per unit mass. This possibility leads us to investigate the controlling factors of colloids in groundwater to simulate the radionuclide behavior at the repository. Analytical models that can be generalized for the purpose, however, are not available yet. Therefore, in this study the mechanisms that affect the colloid transport were reviewed carefully and, also in order to evaluate the extent of their effects, general and analytical model combined with modified filtration equation was developed. This modified filtration equation including colloidal particle size effect was solved as a function of colloidal particle size, which is a important factor affecting the colloidal transport, grain diameter of porous media, groundwater velocity, distance, and time. Also, as another measure to estimate colloidal particle size effect, analytical method to calculate the adsorption of radionuclides on the colloid, concepts of transport velocity and migration distance were introduced. To evaluate the relative contribution of colloid to the radionuclide transport quatitatively, colloidal transport was compared with the corresponding solute transport under same conditions. Finally, the three phase analysis was proposed to treat the radionuclide transport more practically. A good agreement was obtained between the predicted result by modified filtration equation and the corresponding published experimental data. As the colloidal size is increased, the effect of diffusional velocity on the mobility decreases and that of gravitational settling increases, respectively, whereas the mobility reduction due to filtration increases when interception and gravitational settling dominate. Results of case studies about

  12. Towards an assessment of colloid transport in undisturbed clay stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durce, D.; Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloids are known as a potentially important transport vector for sparingly soluble radionuclides in natural water environments. For assessing the mass transfer resistance of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation for colloid transport, a series of percolation experiments have been performed, using high pressure stainless steel advection cells of different diameters containing clay cores machined to about 50 μm of accuracy to the inner diameter of the cells. Synthetic clay pore water was pushed by a high pressure syringe pump across the clay core. In order to assess the cut-off size for colloid transport, molecules of different molecular weight were injected. C 14 labeled polymaleic acid (PMA) of sizes of 2 and 50 kDa were used. The effect of clay permeability, of water flow rate (injection pressure) and of ionic strength was studied. Low ionic strength experiments (I = 0.001) were realized by replacing the pore water by advective displacement with the required composition. Clay rock permeabilities were between 10 -12 and 10 -14 m/s. Hydrodynamic parameters were determined by HTO and 36 Cl injection. The results show already at 2 kDa and a permeability of 10 -12 m/s strong retention by partial filtration. The experimental results were modeled using simple chromatographic theory. (authors)

  13. Structure and Transport Anomalies in Soft Colloids

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous trends in nanoparticle correlation and motion are reported in soft nanoparticle suspensions using static and dynamic x-ray scattering measurements. Contrary to normal expectations, we find that particle-particle correlations decrease and particle dynamics become faster as volume fraction rises above a critical particle loading associated with overlap. Our observations bear many similarities to the cascade of structural and transport anomalies reported for complex, network forming molecular fluids such as water, and are argued to share similar physical origins. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  14. A GoldSim Model for Colloid Facilitated Nuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2010-01-01

    Recently several total system performance assessment (TSPA) programs, called 'template' programs, ready for the safety assessment of radioactive waste repository systems which are conceptually modeled have been developed by utilizing GoldSim and AMBER at KAERI. It is generally believed that chelating agents (chelators) that could be disposed of together with radioactive wastes in the repository and natural colloids available in the geological media affect on nuclides by enhancing their transport in the geological media. A simple GoldSim module to evaluate such quantitative effects, by which colloid and chelator-facilitated nuclide release cases could be modeled and evaluated is introduced. Effects of the chelators alone are illustrated with the case associated with well pumping scenario in a hypothetical repository system

  15. Selection of exception limits for all actinide nuclides based on revised criteria for safe international transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavarenne, C.; Rouyer, V.; Sert, G.; Mennerdahl, D.; Dean, C.; Barton, N.; Jean, F.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1998, there have been some speculations about future transport of significant quantities and concentrations of other actinide nuclides than the four currently listed in the regulation for the safe transport of the radioactive material. Therefore, it raised a need to specify exception limits for such actinides. Additionally, the total fissile nuclide mass per consignment of excepted packages was limited in the 1996 edition of the regulations (a conveyance limit is preliminary supported in the 2003 revision). The proposed changes of the rules have to take this new control into account. The European Community (DGTREN) decided to fund a project related to this subject. In order to define credible exception limits, it was necessary to have reasonably accurate data for all actinide nuclides. Then the authors of the study decided to perform calculations with different codes (MONK, MCNP, CRISTAL, SCALE) and different cross-section libraries (JEF2.2, ENDFB, JENDL, etc.). This article presents the work achieved and gives propositions of modification for the IAEA requirements for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material related to, firstly, the list of the fissile materials, and secondly, the rule to determine the quantities of actinide nuclides that can be excepted from the requirements for the packages containing fissile materials. The participants acknowledge the DGTREN who made this work possible due to its support. (author)

  16. Colloid formation during waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, C.J.; Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository may require a technical consideration of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides. The neglect of colloidal properties in assessing the near- and far-field migration behavior of actinides may lead to significant underestimates and poor predictions of biosphere exposure from high-level waste (HLW) disposal. Existing data on colloid-facilitated transport suggests that radionuclide migration may be enhanced, but the importance of colloids is not adequately assessed. Indeed, the occurrence of radionuclide transport, attributed to colloidal species, has been reported at Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos and at the Nevada Test Site; both unsaturated regions are similar to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain. Although some developments have been made on understanding the transport characteristics of colloids, the characterization of colloids generated from the corrosion of the waste form has been limited. Colloids are known to incorporate radionuclides either from hydrolysis of dissolved species (real colloids) or from adsorption of dissolved species onto existing groundwater colloids (pseudocolloids); however, these colloids may be considered secondary and solubility limited when compared to the colloids generated during glass alteration

  17. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen, Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au@CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au@BSPP, Au@TDSP, Au@MPA and Au@MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values.

  18. Generation of actinide colloids and their sorption on rocks. A study on colloids in an ISTC (International Science and Technology Center) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Ai

    2005-01-01

    Results of experimental studies on generation of colloids and their sorption on rocks conducted in the ISTC (International Science and Technology Center) project No.1326 are presented, as well as a brief introduction of the project and a planned new project on colloidal migration near the Karachai Lake, Russia. (author)

  19. A model for radionuclide transport by colloids in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, E.

    1993-01-01

    This research project finds its place in the framework of the coordinated RADWAS-program and is found under the contract F12W-CT91-0079 of the Commission of European Communities. Five partners are involved in the project: Ecole des Mines de Paris/ARMINES (E. Ledoux, J. van der Lee); INTAKTA (M.D. de Cayeux); Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene (R. van der Weerd); CNRS-Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique (J. Dodds, M. Sardin, E. Rodier); ENRESA-CIEMAT (J. Astudillo, A. Hernandez). The main objective of the project is the development of a mathematical model for the migration of colloids and associated radionuclides in groundwaters through geological media. Laboratory migration experiments support the model development and will be used to test the validity of the computer codes. Furthermore, the model must be able to interpret field experiments in order to be applicable as a safety assessment tool for radioactive waste disposals. The project work can be divided into three parts: 1. Theoretical work including a literature survey, formulation of conceptual models, screening of phenomena by means of simple calculations and development of preliminary computer codes. Formulation of the general outline of a final mathematical concept. 2. Migration experiments in laboratory aimed at studying the fundamental transport mechanisms for colloidal substances. Model or artificial colloids are preferable in this stage to achieve fully controlled conditions. Modeling results will stimulate experimental design. Finally, natural geological media will be used to investigate the applicability of fundamental transport mechanisms to a more realistic environment. 3. Final model development, resulting in an operational tool for column experiments and long term safety assessment. A field data base will be compiled and applied to the model for validation purposes. 3 figs

  20. A study on the characteristics of colloid-associated radionuclide transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yun Chang

    1997-02-01

    Recently, the radionuclide transport in the form of colloids has been focused intensively in the safety assessment of a radioactive waste repository. As colloids are considered to be able to increase the transport rate of radionuclide through geologic media, the transport of radionuclide should be adjusted by the presence of colloids. The migration of dissolved radionuclide is expected to depend on various process such as advection, dispersion and interactions with soils, and, in addition, the transport of colloid-mediated radionuclide is considered to be more complicated because of the interactions between radionuclides and colloids. In this paper the migration behavior of colloid-associated radionuclides within subsurface are reviewed and studied in detail. The colloid-mediated transport system was modelled and simulated in order to illustrate the effects of colloids on the transport of radionuclide in the aquifer system. The transport rate of radionuclide is mainly controlled by a retardation factor which is controlled by colloidal behaviors, degree of adsorption, and the related geologic parameters. Therefore it is necessary to carefully understand the accelerating tendency of the retardation difference factor, and in this study the trends are analyzed, described and the retardation difference factor is mathematically defined, simplified and applied practically to the safety and performance assessment of a future repository

  1. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as open-quotes worst-caseclose quotes tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations

  2. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms (open-quotes biocolloidsclose quotes) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories

  3. Three-Dimensional Radionuclide Transport Through the Unsaturated Zone of the Yucca Mountain Site 3 Colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. J. Moridis; Y. Seol

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated colloid transport in the unsaturated fractured zone by means of three-dimensional site-scale numerical model under present-day climate infiltration, considering varying colloid diameters, kinetic declogging, and filtration. The radionuclide transport model was used to simulate continuous release of colloids into fractures throughout the proposed repository, in which any components of engineered barrier system such as waste package or drip shield were not considered. the results of the study indicate the importance of subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The simulations indicate that (1) colloid transport is not significantly affected by varying the filtration parameters, (2) travel time to the water table decreases with the colloid size, (3) larger colloids show little retardation whereas very small ones are retarded significantly, and (4) fracture filtration can have an impact on transport. Because of uncertainties in the fundamentals of colloid transport and an extremely conservative approach (based on an improbably adverse worst-case scenario), caution should be exercised in the analysis and interpretation of the 3-D simulation results. The results discussed here should be viewed as an attempt to identify and evaluate the mechanisms, processes, and geological features that control colloidal transport

  4. A binomial modeling approach for upscaling colloid transport under unfavorable conditions: organic prediction of extended tailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Rasmuson, Anna; Johnson, William

    2017-04-01

    Transport of colloids in saturated porous media is significantly influenced by colloidal interactions with grain surfaces. Near-surface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag and relatively strong colloidal forces that slow their down-gradient translation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near surface fluid domain colloids may re-enter into the bulk fluid via diffusion (nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, they may immobilize (attach) via strong primary minimum interactions, or they may move along a grain-to-grain contact to the near surface fluid domain of an adjacent grain. We introduce a simple model that accounts for all possible permutations of mass transfer within a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena thereby represented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between the bulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization onto grain surfaces. Colloid movement is described by a sequence of trials in a series of unit cells, and the binomial distribution is used to calculate the probabilities of each possible sequence. Pore-scale simulations provide mechanistically-determined likelihoods and timescales associated with the above pore-scale colloid mass transfer processes, whereas the network-scale model employs pore and grain topology to determine probabilities of transfer from up-gradient bulk and near-surface fluid domains to down-gradient bulk and near-surface fluid domains. Inter-grain transport of colloids in the near surface fluid domain can cause extended tailing.

  5. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  6. Evaluation of colloid transport issues and recommendations for SKI performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, S. M.; Bennett, D. G.; Higgo, J. J. W.

    2000-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop recommendations to SKI for evaluating the potential significance of colloids in performance assessment (PA) studies by: Updating a previous review of the treatment of colloids in PA studies for radioactive waste repositories and to include information on PAs published in the period 1997-1999. We have reviewed sixteen PAs conducted in nine countries and have made the following observations: All PAs include colloid formation and colloid transport in their FEP list. Although some programmes have deferred consideration of colloidal radionuclide transport until further research has been performed, more recent PAs do account for the effects of colloids. PAs of disposal systems in which the waste canister is surrounded by a bentonite buffer do not consider the effect of colloids on the source term. These PAs assume that all colloids are filtered by the bentonite buffer and cannot escape from the near-field. PAs of disposal systems with no bentonite buffer have to account for mobilisation of radionuclides from the waste by colloids. The concentration of colloids that may form in the repository is a key uncertainty. Many PA programmes have modelled colloidal radionuclide transport in the geosphere using one-dimensional transport equations. No PA has included a comprehensive treatment of colloid transport using mechanistic modelling. Some PAs have not undertaken modelling of colloid transport in the geosphere, but have relied instead on arguments that such transport processes will be of low consequence to the performance of the disposal system. Five PAs have shown the effects of colloid transport through the geosphere to be potentially significant. For the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, SKB has developed the KBS-3 concept. For the disposal of long-lived low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste, SKB has developed the SFL 3-5 concept. In the SFL 3-5 concept, waste is placed in underground disposal caverns and

  7. Studies on the transport of actinides and lanthanides through DHDECMPO based supported liquid membranes (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudwadkar, N.L.; Tripathi, S.C.; Gandhi, P.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Fuel Reprocessing Div.

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes our studies on the partitioning of actinides from high level liquid waste of PUREX origin employing a supported liquid membrane technique. The process uses a solution of DHDECMPO in n-dodecane as a carrier with poly tetra fluoro ethylene support and a mixture of citric acid, formic acid and hydrazine hydrate as a receiving phase. Transport studies are carried out for {sup 241}Am under different experimental conditions to optimize the transport parameters such as feed acidity, carrier concentration and effect of uranium, Nd(III) and salt concentration in the feed. Studies indicated good transport of neptunium, americium and plutonium across the membrane from a nitric acid medium. Under the optimized conditions the transport of {sup 241}Am has been studied for uranium depleted synthetic PHWR-HLW and finally the technique is used for the partitioning of alpha emitters from an actual HLW after reprocessing. A high concentration of uranium in the feed is found to retard the transport of americium, suggesting the need of prior removal of uranium from the waste. Separation of actinides from uranium-lean simulated as well as actual HLW has been found to be feasible using the above described technique. (orig.)

  8. Mathematical Basis and Test Cases for Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport Modeling in GDSA-PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report provides documentation of the mathematical basis for a colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport modeling capability that can be incorporated into GDSA-PFLOTRAN. It also provides numerous test cases against which the modeling capability can be benchmarked once the model is implemented numerically in GDSA-PFLOTRAN. The test cases were run using a 1-D numerical model developed by the author, and the inputs and outputs from the 1-D model are provided in an electronic spreadsheet supplement to this report so that all cases can be reproduced in GDSA-PFLOTRAN, and the outputs can be directly compared with the 1-D model. The cases include examples of all potential scenarios in which colloid-facilitated transport could result in the accelerated transport of a radionuclide relative to its transport in the absence of colloids. Although it cannot be claimed that all the model features that are described in the mathematical basis were rigorously exercised in the test cases, the goal was to test the features that matter the most for colloid-facilitated transport; i.e., slow desorption of radionuclides from colloids, slow filtration of colloids, and equilibrium radionuclide partitioning to colloids that is strongly favored over partitioning to immobile surfaces, resulting in a substantial fraction of radionuclide mass being associated with mobile colloids.

  9. Impact of colloid formation on safety assessment of waste disposal in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.

    2014-01-01

    The transport model, which had been developed at low ionic strength in an ion - colloid - solid ternary system, was applied to the transport of Np(V) (NpO 2 + ) and humic acid through a quartz-packed column at 2 M NaCl. It was found that the model was useful to simulate the transport behaviors of Np(V) and humic acid by the modification of filtration coefficient which depends on the colloid size. Using this model, the impact of colloids on the transport of actinides was evaluated. It was found that the influence of the colloids in brine is limited or negligible. (author)

  10. Impact of colloid formation on safety assessment of waste disposal in brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The transport model, which had been developed at low ionic strength in an ion - colloid - solid ternary system, was applied to the transport of Np(V) (NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ) and humic acid through a quartz-packed column at 2 M NaCl. It was found that the model was useful to simulate the transport behaviors of Np(V) and humic acid by the modification of filtration coefficient which depends on the colloid size. Using this model, the impact of colloids on the transport of actinides was evaluated. It was found that the influence of the colloids in brine is limited or negligible. (author)

  11. How historical copper contamination affects soil structure and mobilization and transport of colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo, Marcos; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    between 0.01 to 0.43 pore volumes, with longer times for the most contaminated point, likely related with its higher soil density and lower air permeability. The copper pollution affected colloid and tracer transport in the soil columns. The release of colloids especially in the most contaminated points...

  12. Charge transport and contact resistance in coplanar devices based on colloidal polyaniline dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masillamani, A. M.; Peřinka, N.; Hajná, Milena; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Tondelier, D.; Bonnassieux, Y.; Vanel, J.-C.; Geffroy, B.; Mencaraglia, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 17 (2016), s. 1710-1716 ISSN 0887-6266 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : charge transport * colloidal dispersion * colloids Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2016

  13. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  14. Development of COLLAGE 3; Role for colloids in the transport of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, Richard (Aleksandria Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom)); Bath, Adrian (Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom))

    2010-03-15

    The issue of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (CFRT) was last addressed by the Swedish nuclear regulators in 2001 - 2002. SKI had commissioned the Collage code with subsequent development as Collage 2. This code was employed to investigate the potential role for colloids to have been involved in the transport of radionuclides at the Nevada Test Site and to examine the implications for CFRT in the Swedish disposal programme. It was concluded that colloids could not be ruled out as a mechanism for rapid transport and early release from the geosphere. Recently the 'bentonite erosion scenario' has become of concern. In it the generation of large quantities of bentonite colloids in fractures as a result of fresh water ingress at repository depth is possible. Potentially, these could carry radiologically significant quantities of radionuclides to an early release to the surface system. The objectives of this work are to update the knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through a fractured geosphere and to provide review capability within the SSM. Recent developments in CFRT (reviewed here) indicate that additional parameters needed to be added to the existing Collage 2 plus code in order to adequately represent colloid transport in fractures. This report looks at modifications to the model and discusses the implications of the implementation of the new processes. Authors conclude that the process of colloid filtration is an important mitigating mechanism. A new code - Collage 3 - is demonstrated and suggestions for further work are given

  15. Influence of Humic Acid on the Transport and Deposition of Colloidal Silica under Different Hydrogeochemical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport and deposition of colloids in aquifers plays an important role in managed aquifer recharge (MAR schemes. Here, the processes of colloidal silica transport and deposition were studied by displacing groundwater with recharge water. The results showed that significant amounts of colloidal silica transport occurred when native groundwater was displaced by HA solution. Solution contains varying conditions of ionic strength and ion valence. The presence of humic acid could affect the zeta potential and size of the colloidal silica, which led to obvious colloidal silica aggregation in the divalent ion solution. Humic acid increased colloidal silica transport by formation of non-adsorbing aqueous phase silica–HA complexes. The experimental and modeling results showed good agreement, indicating that the essential physics were accurately captured by the model. The deposition rates were less than 10−8 s−1 in deionized water and monovalent ion solution. Moreover, the addition of Ca2+ and increase of IS resulted in the deposition rates increasing by five orders of magnitude to 10−4 s−1. In all experiments, the deposition rates decreased in the presence of humic acid. Overall, the promotion of humic acid in colloidal silica was strongly associated with changes in water quality, indicating that they should receive greater attention during MAR.

  16. A binomial modeling approach for upscaling colloid transport under unfavorable conditions: Emergent prediction of extended tailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Rasmuson, Anna; Johnson, William P.

    2017-07-01

    Colloid transport in saturated porous media is significantly influenced by colloidal interactions with grain surfaces. Near-surface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag and relatively strong colloidal forces that slow their downgradient translation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near-surface fluid domain colloids may reenter into the bulk fluid via diffusion (nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, they may immobilize (attach) via primary minimum interactions, or they may move along a grain-to-grain contact to the near-surface fluid domain of an adjacent grain. We introduce a simple model that accounts for all possible permutations of mass transfer within a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena thereby represented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between the bulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization. Colloid movement is described by a Markov chain, i.e., a sequence of trials in a 1-D network of unit cells, which contain a pore and a grain. Using combinatorial analysis, which utilizes the binomial coefficient, we derive the residence time distribution, i.e., an inventory of the discrete colloid travel times through the network and of their probabilities to occur. To parameterize the network model, we performed mechanistic pore-scale simulations in a single unit cell that determined the likelihoods and timescales associated with the above colloid mass transfer processes. We found that intergrain transport of colloids in the near-surface fluid domain can cause extended tailing, which has traditionally been attributed to hydrodynamic dispersion emanating from flow tortuosity of solute trajectories.

  17. Evaluation of colloid transport issues and recommendations for SKI performance assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickham, S. M.; Bennett, D. G.; Higgo, J. J. W. [Galson Sciences Ltd., Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2000-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop recommendations to SKI for evaluating the potential significance of colloids in performance assessment (PA) studies by: Updating a previous review of the treatment of colloids in PA studies for radioactive waste repositories and to include information on PAs published in the period 1997-1999. We have reviewed sixteen PAs conducted in nine countries and have made the following observations: All PAs include colloid formation and colloid transport in their FEP list. Although some programmes have deferred consideration of colloidal radionuclide transport until further research has been performed, more recent PAs do account for the effects of colloids. PAs of disposal systems in which the waste canister is surrounded by a bentonite buffer do not consider the effect of colloids on the source term. These PAs assume that all colloids are filtered by the bentonite buffer and cannot escape from the near-field. PAs of disposal systems with no bentonite buffer have to account for mobilisation of radionuclides from the waste by colloids. The concentration of colloids that may form in the repository is a key uncertainty. Many PA programmes have modelled colloidal radionuclide transport in the geosphere using one-dimensional transport equations. No PA has included a comprehensive treatment of colloid transport using mechanistic modelling. Some PAs have not undertaken modelling of colloid transport in the geosphere, but have relied instead on arguments that such transport processes will be of low consequence to the performance of the disposal system. Five PAs have shown the effects of colloid transport through the geosphere to be potentially significant. For the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, SKB has developed the KBS-3 concept. For the disposal of long-lived low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste, SKB has developed the SFL 3-5 concept. In the SFL 3-5 concept, waste is placed in underground disposal caverns and

  18. Colloid facilitated transport in fractured rocks: parameter estimation and comparison with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanthan, H.S.; Wolfsberg, A.V.; Reimus, P.W.; Ware, D.; Lu, G.

    2003-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated migration of plutonium in fractured rock has been implicated in both field and laboratory studies. Other reactive radionuclides may also experience enhanced mobility due to groundwater colloids. Model prediction of this process is necessary for assessment of contaminant boundaries in systems for which radionuclides are already in the groundwater and for performance assessment of potential repositories for radioactive waste. Therefore, a reactive transport model is developed and parameterized using results from controlled laboratory fracture column experiments. Silica, montmorillonite and clinoptilolite colloids are used in the experiments along with plutonium and Tritium. The goal of the numerical model is to identify and parameterize the physical and chemical processes that affect the colloid-facilitated transport of plutonium in the fractures. The parameters used in this model are similar in form to those that might be used in a field-scale transport model

  19. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Colloid-facilitated Plutonium Reactive Transport in Fractured Tuffaceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z.; Wolfsberg, A. V.; Zhu, L.; Reimus, P. W.

    2017-12-01

    Colloids have the potential to enhance mobility of strongly sorbing radionuclide contaminants in fractured rocks at underground nuclear test sites. This study presents an experimental and numerical investigation of colloid-facilitated plutonium reactive transport in fractured porous media for identifying plutonium sorption/filtration processes. The transport parameters for dispersion, diffusion, sorption, and filtration are estimated with inverse modeling for minimizing the least squares objective function of multicomponent concentration data from multiple transport experiments with the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM). Capitalizing on an unplanned experimental artifact that led to colloid formation and migration, we adopt a stepwise strategy to first interpret the data from each experiment separately and then to incorporate multiple experiments simultaneously to identify a suite of plutonium-colloid transport processes. Nonequilibrium or kinetic attachment and detachment of plutonium-colloid in fractures was clearly demonstrated and captured in the inverted modeling parameters along with estimates of the source plutonium fraction that formed plutonium-colloids. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding the transport mechanisms and environmental impacts of plutonium in fractured formations and groundwater aquifers.

  20. H51E-1535: Biogeochemical factors influencing the transport and fate of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants in the vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vadose zone exhibits large spatial and temporal variability in many physical, chemical, and biological factors that strongly influence the transport and fate of colloids (e.g., microbes, nanoparticles, clays, and dissolved organic matter) and colloid-associated contaminants (e.g., heavy metals, ...

  1. The role of colloids in the transport of radionuclides in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this programme is to understand how colloids could influence the migration behaviour of radionuclides in geological formations. This is being achieved firstly, by identifying the retention mechanisms of colloids and pseudocolloids (association of radionuclides with colloids) on mineral surfaces by static and dynamic experiments, and secondly by investigating the formation of pseudocolloids. Moreover, these studies will be focused on model systems (surfaces, colloids) selected from studies carried out on the El Berrocal site (characterization of the granite, of the colloids). Two types of experiments are planned: for the study of pseudocolloid formation, sorption experiments (batch tests) with radionuclides will be conducted either with model inorganic colloidal suspensions or with mineral monoliths as macroscopic surfaces of colloids. Dynamic experiments will be performed using well-defined packings of both synthetic and natural minerals (major constituents of granite). Moreover, a particular attention will be devoted to the organic coatings (in static and dynamic conditions). These studies will provide data directly usable by migration models to predict colloid transport under conditions relevant to geological disposals. This programme will be carried out in collaboration with the different partners of this contract: CEA (Fontenay-aux-Roses/F), CIEMAT (Madrid/S), CNRS (Orsay/F), GERMETRAD (Nantes/F), GSF (Munich/G), INFM (Padua/I), INTERA (London/UK) with Dr V. Moulin, Dr P. Rivas, Dr J.C. Dran, Pr Pieri, Dr C. Wolfrum, Pr G. Della Mea and Dr P. Grindrod as project leaders respectively. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselet, J.

    1966-06-01

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author) [fr

  3. Impact of colloids on uranium transport in groundwater applied to the Aube radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cointe, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The presence of colloids, known vectors of radionuclides and chemical contaminants in groundwater, has been identified in groundwater at the Aube radioactive waste disposal in 2004. This thesis aims to characterize these colloids, and to determine their potential impact in the transport of Uranium, chosen as the element of interest for this study. The identified 60 nm in diameter clay colloids and the fulvic and humic acids can move in Aptian groundwater, as indirectly evidenced by column experiments. A feasibility study of a in situ test has been done through a transport modeling to confirm the colloid mobility at the field scale. Using the conditions of the study, the clay colloids do not influence Uranium transport. Even with the greatest concentration assumed on site, they have a very limited impact on the mobilization of Uranium, in the pH range measured on site. On the contrary, the organic colloids, despite their low concentration, can facilitate Uranium transport, the uranyl - organic acid chemical bond being exceptionally strong. Therefore their low concentration in groundwater makes their impact on uranium mobility equally insignificant. (author)

  4. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  5. Modeling for Colloid and Chelator Facilitated Nuclide Transport in Radioactive Waste Disposal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2010-08-01

    A modeling study and development of a total system performance assessment (TSPA) program template, by which assessment of safety and performance for a radioactive waste repository with normal and/or abnormal nuclide release cases can be made has been developed. Colloid and chelator facilitated transport that is believed to result for faster nuclide transport in various mediabothinthegeosphereandbiospherehas been evaluated deterministically and probabilistically to demonstrate the capability of the template developed through this study. To this end colloid and chelator facilitated nuclide transport has been modeled rather strainghtforwardly with assumed data through this study by utilizing some powerful function offered by GoldSim. An evaluation in view of apparent influence of colloid and chelator on the nuclide transport in the various media in and around a repository system with data assumed are illustrated

  6. Selection of exception limits for all actinide nuclides based on revised criteria for safe international transport and including storage delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavarenne, C.; Rouyer, V.; Mennerdahl, D.; Dean, C.; Barton, N.; Jean, F.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1998, there have been some speculations about future transport of significant quantities and concentrations of other actinide nuclides than the four currently listed in the regulation for the safe transport of the radioactive material. Therefore, it raised a need to specify exception limits for such actinides. In order to define credible exception limits, it was necessary to have reasonably accurate data for all actinide nuclides. Then the DGTREN/participants decided to perform calculations with different codes (MONK, MCNP, CRISTAL and SCALE) and different cross-section libraries (JEF2.2, ENDFB, etc.). The parameters of interest (such as k-infinite, critical masses) were determined. This article presents the work achieved and the questions raised, e.g. related to the effect of the radioactive decay of the isotopes on the criticality risks. It also points out the need for an evolution of the regulation of the safe transport of radioactive materials and gives a proposition of modification for the IAEA requirements related to, firstly, the list of the fissile materials, secondly, the rule to determine the quantities of actinide nuclides that can be excepted from the requirements for the packages containing fissile materials

  7. Actinides and the environment: what we know and what we need to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsche, H.

    1998-01-01

    In order to design methods for the cleanup of contaminated sites, predict the transport behavior in the environment, perform safety assessment studies to determine the ability of repositories to adequately contain them, and design ways to retard their release and migration rates, it is essential to understand the chemical behavior and forms of actinides under environmental conditions. Excluding gaseous and airborne transport, actinides can migrate in the environment mostly via aqueous media such as groundwater and surface, river, lake and sea water. Models predicting the hydrological transport through the environment require as input an actinide concentration, the true amount that is actually available for transport. It is defined as the actinide source term and not as true solubility, because it may be a combination of dissolved and colloidal material. Three major processes define the actinide source term: (1) solubility, (2) organic interaction, and (3) sorption. They are dependent on each other and each individual process is the result of several sub-processes. Also, colloid formation plays a major role in the actinide source term, and it is common to each of the three main processes. The current state of knowledge of these processes will be discussed and areas will be outlined where additional information is required

  8. Simultaneous transport of synthetic colloids and a nonsorbing solute through single saturated natural fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Nuttall, H.E.; Kale, R.

    1994-01-01

    Tracer transport experiments involving colloids that showed little tendency to attach to rock surfaces and a nonsorbing solute (iodide) -were conducted in three different well-characterized natural fractures in tuff. The colloids always arrived earlier in the effluent than the iodide, which we believe is evidence of (1) hydrodynamic chromatography and/or (2) the fact that the colloids experience a smaller effective volume in the fracture because they diffuse too slowly to enter low-velocity regions (dead zones) along the rough fracture walls. The iodide also approached the inlet concentration in the effluent more slowly than the colloids, with the concentration at a given elution volume being greater at higher flow rates. By contrast, the rate of approach of the colloid concentration to the inlet concentration did not vary with flow rate. We attribute this behavior to matrix diffusion of the iodide, with the colloids being too large/nondiffusive to experience this phenomenon. Dispersion of all tracers was greatest in the fracture of widest average aperture and least in the fracture of narrowest aperture, which is consistent with Taylor dispersion theory. The tracer experiments were modeled/interpreted using a three-step approach that involved (1) estimating the aperture distribution in each fracture using surface profiling techniques, (2) predicting the flow field in the fractures using a localized parallel-plate approximation, and (3) predicting tracer transport in the fractures using particle-tracking techniques. Although considered preliminary at this time, the model results were in qualitative agreement with the experiments

  9. Actinide sorption on granites and minerals as a function of pH and colloids/pseudocolloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torstenfelt, B.; Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption of uranium, neptunium and plutonium was studied on three granites - Finnsjoe granite, Stripa granite and Westerly granite, and on six minerals - albite, anorthite, bentonite, hornblende, illite and microcline. The aqueous phase was a natural groundwater collected at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This water is used as reference water for the U.S. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI). At neutral pH there was only a minor difference in sorption between the different methods of separation. Below a pH resulting in hydrolysis of the nuclide, the sorption was low. Uranium and especially neptunium sorbed significantly more at high pH, as compared to the sorption at neutral pH. High pH had only little influence on the sorption of plutonium on the minerals with a high cation exchange capacity (CEC); hornblende, bentonite and illite, but on the feldspars albite, anorthite and microcline, with low CEC, there was a pronounced difference between neutral and high pH. For uranium at high pH, the sorption increased significantly with increasing centrifugal force, indicating that part of the uranium either exists as a colloid or as a polymer. This effect was only in a few cases observed for neptunium and plutonium. (orig./RB)

  10. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, Susanna

    2010-04-01

    Due to colloids potential to bind radionuclides (RN) and even mobilise sorbed RN, colloid transport of RN should be taken into account when modeling radionuclide transport in the scenario of a leaking canister in a deep bedrock repository of spent nuclear fuel. Colloids are always present in natural waters and the concentrations are controlled by the groundwater chemistry where specifically the ionic strength is of major importance. In many deep bedrock groundwaters, the ionic strength is fairly high (above the Critical Coagulation Concentration) and therefore colloids are not likely to be stable. In these types of groundwaters colloid concentrations up to 100 μg/l could be expected, and clay colloids organic degradation products and bacteria and viruses represent can be found. In a long time perspective cycles of glaciations can be expected in Sweden as in other Nordic countries. It can not be excluded that glacial melt water can intrude to repository depth with high flows. In this scenario the groundwater conditions may drastically change. In contact with dilute groundwater the bentonite barrier can start to propagate a bentonite gel and further release montmorillonite colloids into water bearing fractures. The concentration of colloids in vicinity of the bentonite barrier can then increase drastically. In contact with Grimsel groundwater types with [Na] and [Ca] of 0.001 and 0.0001 M respectively a montmorillonite concentration of a maximum of 20 mg/l is expected. Further, the groundwater chemistry of Grimsel seems to be representative for glacial meltwater when comparing with the water chemistry data on meltwaters from existing glaciers. A key to be able to model colloid transport of radionuclides is the sorption strength and the sorption reversibility. To facilitate this, a compilation of literature K d -values and an inventory of available sorption kinetic data has been composed for the prioritized elements Pu, Th, Am, Pb, Pa, Ra, Np, Cm, Ac, Tc, Cs, Nb, Ni

  11. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wold, Susanna (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry)

    2010-04-15

    Due to colloids potential to bind radionuclides (RN) and even mobilise sorbed RN, colloid transport of RN should be taken into account when modeling radionuclide transport in the scenario of a leaking canister in a deep bedrock repository of spent nuclear fuel. Colloids are always present in natural waters and the concentrations are controlled by the groundwater chemistry where specifically the ionic strength is of major importance. In many deep bedrock groundwaters, the ionic strength is fairly high (above the Critical Coagulation Concentration) and therefore colloids are not likely to be stable. In these types of groundwaters colloid concentrations up to 100 mug/l could be expected, and clay colloids organic degradation products and bacteria and viruses represent can be found. In a long time perspective cycles of glaciations can be expected in Sweden as in other Nordic countries. It can not be excluded that glacial melt water can intrude to repository depth with high flows. In this scenario the groundwater conditions may drastically change. In contact with dilute groundwater the bentonite barrier can start to propagate a bentonite gel and further release montmorillonite colloids into water bearing fractures. The concentration of colloids in vicinity of the bentonite barrier can then increase drastically. In contact with Grimsel groundwater types with [Na] and [Ca] of 0.001 and 0.0001 M respectively a montmorillonite concentration of a maximum of 20 mg/l is expected. Further, the groundwater chemistry of Grimsel seems to be representative for glacial meltwater when comparing with the water chemistry data on meltwaters from existing glaciers. A key to be able to model colloid transport of radionuclides is the sorption strength and the sorption reversibility. To facilitate this, a compilation of literature K{sub d}-values and an inventory of available sorption kinetic data has been composed for the prioritized elements Pu, Th, Am, Pb, Pa, Ra, Np, Cm, Ac, Tc, Cs, Nb

  12. Polymer Inclusion Membrane Containing a Tripodal Diglycolamide Ligand: Actinide Ion Uptake and Transport Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahanty, B.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Raut, D.R.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, M.; Verboom, Willem

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA)-based polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing a C-pivot tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) as the carrier extractant and 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer shows potential for the uptake of actinides from acidic feed solutions. The uptake of actinides

  13. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  14. Transport of uranium in water and soil: colloidal-isotopic combined approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harguindeguy, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of interaction between uranium and colloids were studied by samples taken from a site of interest for the 'French Nuclear Agency' (CEA). The mobilization of uranium from soils was apprehended by static and dynamic leaching experiments. The transfer and transport have been studied by considering pond waters and drain waters. Results confirm that anthropogenic uranium is more mobile than natural uranium. However mechanisms of mobilization and distribution of uranium, does not differ depending on its origin. The colloidal fraction plays an important role on the migration in soil and the transfer into water by representing from 10 to 90 % uranium depending on samples. The colloidal fractions of uranium are in a continuum of size up to about 200 nm hydrodynamic diameter. They are mainly composed of organic material, iron and aluminum. Along the drain, from the upstream to the downstream of the site, rearrangement of colloidal associations between uranium and organic material occurs in disfavor of colloidal associations between uranium and iron, the proportion of colloidal uranium bound to aluminum remains unchanged. (author) [fr

  15. Mechanical environmental transport of actinides and ¹³⁷Cs from an arid radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew S; Clark, Sue B; Morrison, Samuel S; Watrous, Matthew G; Olson, John E; Snyder, Darin C

    2015-10-01

    Aeolian and pluvial processes represent important mechanisms for the movement of actinides and fission products at the Earth's surface. Soil samples taken in the early 1970's near a Department of Energy radioactive waste disposal site (the Subsurface Disposal Area, SDA, located in southeastern Idaho) provide a case study for studying the mechanisms and characteristics of environmental actinide and (137)Cs transport in an arid environment. Multi-component mixing models suggest actinide contamination within 2.5 km of the SDA can be described by mixing between 2 distinct SDA end members and regional nuclear weapons fallout. The absence of chemical fractionation between (241)Am and (239+240)Pu with depth for samples beyond the northeastern corner and lack of (241)Am in-growth over time (due to (241)Pu decay) suggest mechanical transport and mixing of discrete contaminated particles under arid conditions. Occasional samples northeast of the SDA (the direction of the prevailing winds) contain anomalously high concentrations of Pu with (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios statistically identical to those in the northeastern corner. Taken together, these data suggest flooding resulted in mechanical transport of contaminated particles into the area between the SDA and a flood containment dike in the northeastern corner, following which subsequent contamination spreading in the northeastern direction resulted from wind transport of discrete particles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Directional transport of colloids inside a bath of self-propelling walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlitz, Holger; Wu, Chenxu; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2017-05-24

    We present a setup in which passive colloids inside a solvent are moved to the boundaries of the container. The directional transport is facilitated by self-propelling microparticles ("walkers") with an activity gradient, which reduces their propulsion in the vicinity of bounding walls. An attractive interaction leads to the adsorption of walkers onto the colloid-surfaces in regions of low walker activity. It is shown that the activity gradient generates a free energy gradient which in turn acts as a driving force on the passive colloids. We carry out molecular dynamics simulations and present approaches to a theoretical description of the involved processes. Although the simulation data are not reproduced on a fully quantitative level, their qualitative features are covered by the model. The effect described here may be applied to facilitate a directional transport of drugs or to eliminate pollutants.

  17. Colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in the sampling of soil solution from Duckum soil in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seyong; Ko, Il-Won; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2018-03-24

    Colloid mobilization is a significant process governing colloid-associated transport of heavy metals in subsurface environments. It has been studied for the last three decades to understand this process. However, colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in soil solutions have rarely been studied using soils in South Korea. We investigated the colloid mobilization in a variety of flow rates during sampling soil solutions in sand columns. The colloid concentrations were increased at low flow rates and in saturated regimes. Colloid concentrations increased 1000-fold higher at pH 9.2 than at pH 7.3 in the absence of 10 mM NaCl solution. In addition, those were fourfold higher in the absence than in the presence of the NaCl solution at pH 9.2. It was suggested that the mobility of colloids should be enhanced in porous media under the basic conditions and the low ionic strength. In real field soils, the concentrations of As, Cr, and Pb in soil solutions increased with the increase in colloid concentrations at initial momentarily changed soil water pressure, whereas the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Al, and Co lagged behind the colloid release. Therefore, physicochemical changes and heavy metal characteristics have important implications for colloid-facilitated transport during sampling soil solutions.

  18. Role of bacteria as biocolloids in the transport of actinides from a deep underground radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.; Dunn, M.; Mantione, K.; Strietelmeier, B.A.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of dissolved actinides 232 Th, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, and 243 Am, with a pure and a mixed culture of halophilic bacteria isolated from the waste isolation pilot plant repository under anaerobic conditions to evaluate their potential transport as biocolloids from the waste site. The sizes of the bacterial cells studied ranged from 0.54 x 0.48 μm to 7.7 x 0.67 μm (1 x w). Using sequential microfiltration, we determined the association of actinides with free-living (mobile) bacterial cells suspended in a fluid medium containing NaCl or MgCl 2 brine, at various phases of their growth cycles. The number of suspended bacteria ranged from 10 6 to 10 9 cells ml -1 . The amount of actinide associated with the suspended cell fraction (calculated as mol cell -1 ) was very low: Th, 10 -12 ; U, 10 -15 -10 -18 ; Np, 10 -15 -10 -19 ; Pu, 10 -18 -10 -21 ; and Am, 10 -18 -10 -19 ; and it varied with the bacterial culture studied. The differences in the association are attributed to the extent of bioaccumulation and biosorption by the bacteria, pH, the composition of the brine, and the speciation and bioavailability of the actinides. (orig.)

  19. Effect of chemical and physical heterogeneities on colloid-facilitated cesium transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, Kenton; Um, Wooyong; Chun, Jaehun; Wu, Ning; Yin, Xialong; Wang, Guohui; Neeves, Keith

    2018-06-01

    A set of column experiments was conducted to investigate the chemical and physical heterogeneity effect on colloid facilitated transport under slow pore velocity conditions. Pore velocities were kept below 100 cm d-1 for all experiments. Glass beads were packed into columns establishing four different conditions: 1) homogeneous, 2) mixed physical heterogeneity, 3) sequentially layered physical heterogeneity, and 4) chemical heterogeneity. The homogeneous column was packed with glass beads (diameter 500-600 μm), and physical heterogeneities were created by sequential layering or mixing two sizes of glass bead (500-600 μm and 300-400 μm). A chemical heterogeneity was created using 25% of the glass beads coated with hydrophobic molecules (1H-1H-2H-2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane) mixed with 75% pristine glass beads (all 500-600 μm). Input solution with 0.5 mM CsI and 50 mg L-1 colloids (1-μm diameter SiO2) was pulsed into columns under saturated conditions. The physical heterogeneity in the packed glass beads retarded the transport of colloids compared to homogeneous (R = 25.0), but showed only slight differences between sequentially layered (R = 60.7) and mixed heterogeneity(R = 62.4). The column with the chemical, hydrophobic/hydrophilic, heterogeneity removed most of the colloids from the input solution. All column conditions stripped Cs from colloids onto the column matrix of packed glass beads.

  20. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquardt, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present report summarizes the progress and the results obtained within the BMWi financed Joint Research Project Interaction and Transport of Actinides in Natural Clay Rock with Consideration of Humic Substances and Clay Organic Compounds. The basic approach of the work was to obtain a fundamental process understanding on the molecular level of complexation and sorption reactions as well as diffusion processes. The experimental findings are supported by quantum mechanical modeling.

  1. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- or depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for...

  2. Study of colloids transport during two-phase flow using a novel polydimethylsiloxane micro-model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiulan; Karadimitriou, N K; Hassanizadeh, S M; Kleingeld, P J; Imhof, A

    2013-07-01

    As a representation of a porous medium, a closed micro-fluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with uniform wettability and stable hydrophobic properties, was designed and fabricated. A flow network, with a mean pore size of 30 μm, was formed in a PDMS slab, covering an area of 1 mm × 10 mm. The PDMS slab was covered and bonded with a 120-μm-thick glass plate to seal the model. The glass plate was first spin-coated with a thin layer, roughly 10 μm, of PDMS. The micro-model was treated with silane in order to make it uniformly and stably hydrophobic. Fluorescent particles of 300 μm in diameter were used as colloids. It is known that more removal of colloids occurs under unsaturated conditions, compared to saturated flow in soil. At the same time, the change of saturation has been observed to cause remobilization of attached colloids. The mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. This is the first time that a closed micro-model, made of PDMS with uniform and stable wettability, has been used in combination with confocal microscopy to study colloid transport under transient two-phase flow conditions. With confocal microscopy, the movement of fluorescent particles and flow of two liquids within the pores can be studied. One can focus at different depths within the pores and thus determine where the particles exactly are. Thus, remobilization of attached colloids by moving fluid-fluid interfaces was visualized. In order to allow for the deposition and subsequent remobilization of colloids during two-phase flow, three micro-channels for the injection of liquids with and without colloids were constructed. An outlet channel was designed where effluent concentration breakthrough curves can be quantified by measuring the fluorescence intensity. A peak concentration also indicated in the breakthrough curve with the drainage event. The acquired images and breakthrough curve successfully confirmed the utility of the combination of such a PDMS

  3. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  4. Studies Related to the Role of Colloids on the Transport of Some Radio Contaminants in Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhemar, H.S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The safety of a radioactive waste repository is related to its capacity to confine radioactivity and isolate it from biosphere. The most likely process that can lead to the release of radionuclides from a repository to the geosphere is transport by groundwater. The transport and distribution of radionuclides in groundwater or through geologic media depend on the radioactive source, the physicochemical forms of radionuclides and interactions of radionuclides with other components present in the groundwater. Colloids naturally exist in groundwater aquifers and can significantly impact contaminant migration rate. The presence of colloids affects contaminant transport in aquifers either by facilitation or retardation. The effect of the presence of colloid (Al 2 O 3 ) on the sorption characteristics of Co 2+ and Cs + , as two of the most important radionuclides commonly encountered in the Egyptian waste streams, onto yellow sand and clay taken from Inshas site was studied. Based on the obtained results, the maximum sorption capacity of Cs + and Co 2+ in presence of colloid was higher than sorption in absence of colloid but the sorption capacity of clay was found to be greater than that of yellow sand for both ions in absence and presence of colloid. Sorption capacity (q) increased by increasing initial metal ion concentration. The increasing temperature from 25 to 65 degree C leads to slight decrease in the sorption of Cs ions while lead to increase in sorption of Co ions. The kinetic data could be successfully interpreted by simplified second order kinetic expression. The rate constants and the theoretical equilibrium Sorption capacities were calculated for studied cases. It was demonstrated from column experiments that colloid presence influences radionuclides transport through fixed bed yellow sand column. Al 2 O 3 and Fe 2 O 3 colloids reduce the migration of Cs + and Co 2+ ions in all studied cases. From the results of desorption experiments it can be concluded

  5. A review of some geocolloid transport studies in the Farfield relevant to radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-01-01

    The major pathway for the spread of radionuclides within the geosphere surrounding a radioactive waste repository is the groundwater. Since ground waters contain colloidal particles which can sorb radionuclides and may be mobile, it is important to assess whether the presence of colloids will significantly change the radionuclide burden carried by the groundwater. Groundwater colloids from a variety of aquifers have been characterized in terms of their physical, chemical, and actinide compositions. The partition of natural series actinides has been measured using isotope dilution alpha spectrometry, between the particulate, colloid and solution phases. When the colloids are inorganic in character the fraction of total actinide activities on the colloid phase is less than one per cent for uranium and <10% for thorium. In the case of organic colloids/complexes, however, 80-90% of the uranium or thorium load is carried by the colloid phase. In addition, measurements of daughter/parent isotopic activity ratio demonstrate that the uranium associated with the colloid phase is not in chemical equilibrium with that in the groundwater. The transport of colloids is being studied using labelled synthetic colloids in a shallow glacial sand aquifer in which a set of ordered boreholes over a scale of several meters has been established by the British Geological Survey. The stability and transport behavior of these colloids has been established in laboratory column experiments before their use in a field tracer experiment. The implications of this work for modeling radionuclide transport in the geosphere is discussed. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Actinide nanoparticle research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Denecke, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to cover actinide nano research. It is of interest both for fundamental research into the chemistry and physics of f-block elements as well as for applied researchers such as those studying the long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal and developing remediation strategies. The authors cover important issues of the formation of actinide nano-particles, their properties and structure, environmental behavior of colloids and nanoparticles related to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, modeling and advanced methods of characterization at the nano-scale. (orig.)

  7. Colloid and radionuclide retention mechanisms in fractured rock under near-natural flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delos, A.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H.; Guimera, J.; Carrera, J.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experiments in fractured host rock (Grimsel Test Site, GTS, Switzerland) revealed that the colloid relevance for actinide migration is high due to the specific geochemical groundwater conditions [1]. However, even under such conditions it is found that retention of colloids and colloid-borne actinides becomes significant under near-natural groundwater flow rates (1-10 m/a) [2]. Underlying mechanisms of colloid and radionuclide retention are not well understood up to now. The present study co-funded by the NoE ACTINET-6 focuses on (i) the kinetics of actinide-colloid interactions and (ii) the relevance of matrix diffusion as a competition process to other retention mechanisms which affect the actinides behavior in fractured rock systems such as the Grimsel granodiorite. Colloid migration is studied with well defined model colloids as e.g. fluorescence dyed carboxylated polystyrene particles, and natural colloids extracted from bentonite (FEBEX) and from fracture filling material (GTS). In order to study the influence of matrix porosity on actinides migration, those experiments are performed in columns of well defined geometry filled with microporous unmodified silica spheres, porous ceramic material and natural fracture filling material from the GTS. The behaviour of actinides (Pu(IV) and Am(III)) sorbed onto bentonite colloids is investigated in column and batch experiments. All experiments are performed under anoxic conditions. Colloid characterization methods used in this study include the combination of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD), fluorimetry and field flow fractionation (FFF). Experimental results and their application to the parametrisation of reactive colloid transport models are discussed. [1] Geckeis H, Schaefer T, Hauser W, Rabung T, Missana T, Degueldre C, Moeri A, Eikenberg J, Fierz T, Alexander WR (2004) Results of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retention experiment

  8. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the fractured rock: effects of decay chain and limited matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. B.; Park, J. W.; Lee, E. Y.; Kim, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the fractured rock is studies by considering radioactive decay chain and limited matrix diffusion into surrounding porous media. Semi-analytical solution in the Laplace domain is obtained from the mass balance equation of radionuclides and colloid particles. Numerical inversion of the Laplace solution is used to get the concentration profiles both in a fracture and in rock matrix. There issues are analyzed for the radionuclide concentration in a fracture by 1) formation constant of pseudo-colloid, 2) filtration coefficient of radio-colloid and 3) effective diffusion depth into the surrounding porous rock media

  9. Natural colloids in groundwater from granite and their potential impact on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Bachinski, D.B.

    1997-03-01

    AECL has submitted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate the concept of nuclear fuel disposal at depth in crystalline rock of the Canadian Shield. As part of geochemical studies carried out in support of the EIS, the role of natural groundwater colloids (0.001 to 0.45 μm) and suspended particles (>0.45 μm) in radionuclide transport in granite rock has been investigated. This report summarizes the results of investigations carried out in groundwaters from the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) of southern Manitoba and the Atikokan Research Area (ARA) of northwestern Ontario to determine the concentrations, size distributions, and compositions of natural particles in groundwaters from the Canadian Shield. Particles from groundwater were isolated by ultrafiltration under a nitrogen atmosphere and particle concentrations and size distributions were determined by filtration, and by laser-based particle counting and size analysis. Groundwaters from Canadian Shield granites contain particles in a broad range of sizes, with no one particular size being dominant. Particle compositions include aluminosilicates, Fe oxides, carbonate and organics. Suspended particles are most likely generated by the mobilization of fracture-lining minerals by groundwater flow, while colloids are formed by a combination of precipitation and mobilization of colloidal material from fracture surfaces. The average concentration of 0.01 to 0.45 μm colloids in WRA groundwaters was 1.05 ± 0.14 mg/L. Average colloid concentrations were slightly higher in the more highly fractured ARA, although the highest observed colloid concentration in the ARA was below the 7 mg/L maximum observed in a sample from the WRA. The existence of colloids in the 0.001 to 0.01 μm size range was demonstrated using the results of chemical analysis of particle concentrates and data obtained with the laser-based Ultrafine Particle Size Analyzer (UPA). The WRA groundwaters contain on average about 2.7 mg/L of 0

  10. Transport of Silica Colloid through Saturated Porous Media under Different Hydrogeochemical and Hydrodynamic Conditions Considering Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Colloids may have an important role in regulating the structure and function of groundwater ecosystems, and may influence the migration of low solubility contaminants in groundwater. There is, however, a degree of uncertainty about how colloids behave under the variable hydrogeochemical and hydrodynamic conditions that occur during managed aquifer recharge. We used an online monitoring system to monitor the transport of silica colloid in saturated porous media under different hydrogeochemical conditions, including a range of pH values (5, 7, and 9, ionic strengths (<0.0005, 0.02, and 0.05 M, cation valences (Na+, Ca2+, flow rates (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mL/min. The results showed that silica colloid was more likely to deposit on the surface of porous media in acidic conditions (pH = 5 than in alkaline conditions (pH = 9, indicating that the risks of pollution from colloidal interactions would be higher when the pH of the recharge water was higher. Colloid deposition occurred when the ionic strength of the colloidal suspension increased, and bivalent cations had a greater effect than monovalent cations. This suggests that bivalent cation-rich recharge water might affect the porosity of the porous medium because of colloid deposition during the managed aquifer recharge process. As the flow rate increased, the migration ability of silica colloid increased. We simulated the migration of silica colloid in porous media with the COMSOL Multiphysics model.

  11. Colloid formation and metal transport through two mixing zones affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemel, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Bencala, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stream discharges and concentrations of dissolved and colloidal metals (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, and Zn), SO4, and dissolved silica were measured to identify chemical transformations and determine mass transports through two mixing zones in the Animas River that receive the inflows from Cement and Mineral Creeks. The creeks were the dominant sources of Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb, whereas the upstream Animas River supplied about half of the Zn. With the exception of Fe, which was present in dissolved and colloidal forms, the metals were dissolved in the acidic, high-SO4 waters of Cement Creek (pH 3.8). Mixing of Cement Creek with the Animas River increased pH to near-neutral values and transformed Al and some additional Fe into colloids which also contained Cu and Pb. Aluminium and Fe colloids had already formed in the mildly acidic conditions in Mineral Creek (pH 6.6) upstream of the confluence with the Animas River. Colloidal Fe continued to form downstream of both mixing zones. The Fe- and Al-rich colloids were important for transport of Cu, Pb, and Zn, which appeared to have sorbed to them. Partitioning of Zn between dissolved and colloidal phases was dependent on pH and colloid concentration. Mass balances showed conservative transports for Ca, Mg, Mn, SO4, and dissolved silica through the two mixing zones and small losses (water column.

  12. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Bio solids Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.O.; Karathanasis, A.D.; Matocha, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive bio solids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of bio solids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without bio solids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in reclaimed and undisturbed forest soils, where the presence of unweathered spoil material and bio solids amendments contributed to higher metal release in solution fractions. Up to 81% of mobile Cu was associated with the colloid fraction, particularly when gabbiest was present, while only up to 18% of mobile Zn was associated with the colloid fraction. The colloid bound Cu was exchangeable by ammonium acetate, suggesting that it will release into groundwater resources.

  13. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Bio solids Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.O.; Karathanasis, A.D.; Matocha, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive bio solids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of bio solids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without bio solids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in reclaimed and undisturbed forest soils, where the presence of unweathered spoil material and bio solids amendments contributed to higher metal release in solution fractions. Up to 81% of mobile Cu was associated with the colloid fraction, particularly when gibbsite was present, while only up to 18% of mobile Zn was associated with the colloid fraction. The colloid bound Cu was exchangeable by ammonium acetate, suggesting that it will release into groundwater resources.

  14. Marine phages as excellent tracers for reactive colloidal transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2016-04-01

    Question: Here we evaluate marine phages as specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport of colloidal particles in the Earth's critical zone (CZ). Marine phages and their bacterial hosts are naturally absent in the CZ, and can be detected with extremely high sensitivity. In the framework of the DFG Collaborative Research Center AquaDiva, we asked the following questions: (1) Are marine phages useful specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport in porous media? and (2) Which phage properties are relevant drivers for the transport of marine phages in porous media? Methods: Seven marine phages from different families (as well two commonly used terrestrial phages) were selected based on their morphology, size and physico-chemical surface properties (surface charge and hydrophobicity). Phage properties were assessed by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and water contact angle analysis (CA). Sand-filled laboratory percolation columns were used to study transport. The breakthrough curves of the phages were analyzed using the clean bed filtration theory and the XDLVO theory of colloid stability, respectively. Phages were quantified by a modified high- throughput plaque assay and a culture-independent particle counting method approach. Results: Our data show that most marine tested phages exhibited highly variable transport rates and deposition efficiency, yet generally high colloidal stability and viability. We find that size, morphology and hydrophobicity are key factors shaping the transport efficiency of phages. Differing deposition efficiencies of the phages were also supported by calculated XDLVO interaction energy profile. Conclusion: Marine phages have a high potential for the use as sensitive tracers in terrestrial habitats with their surface properties playing a crucial role for their transport. Marine phages however, exhibit differences in their deposition efficiency depending on their morphology, hydrophobicity and

  15. The Effects of Subsurface Bioremediation on Soil Structure, Colloid Formation, and Contaminant Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Liang, X.; Zhuang, J.; Radosevich, M.

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic bioremediation is widely applied to create anaerobic subsurface conditions designed to stimulate microorganisms that degrade organic contaminants and immobilize toxic metals in situ. Anaerobic conditions that accompany such techniques also promotes microbially mediated Fe(III)-oxide mineral reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) could potentially cause soil structure breakdown, formation of clay colloids, and alternation of soil surface chemical properties. These processes could then affect bioremediation and the migration of contaminants. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of anaerobic bioreduction on soil structure, hydraulic properties, colloid formation, and transport of three tracers (bromide, DFBA, and silica shelled silver nanoparticles). Columns packed with inoculated water stable soil aggregates were placed in anaerobic glovebox, and artificial groundwater media was pumped into the columns to simulate anaerobic bioreduction process for four weeks. Decent amount of soluble Fe(II) accompanied by colloids were detected in the effluent from bioreduction columns a week after initiation of bioreduction treatment, which demonstrated bioreduction of Fe(III) and formation of colloids. Transport experiments were performed in the columns before and after bioreduction process to assess the changes of hydraulic and surface chemical properties through bioreduction treatment. Earlier breakthrough of bromide and DFBA after treatment indicated alterations in flow paths (formation of preferential flow paths). Less dispersion of bromide and DFBA, and less tailing of DFBA after treatment implied breakdown of soil aggregates. Dramatically enhanced transport and early breakthrough of silica shelled silver nanoparticles after treatment supported the above conclusion of alterations in flow paths, and indicated changes of soil surface chemical properties.

  16. Surfactant-enhanced flushing enhances colloid transport and alters macroporosity in diesel-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhuo; Tang, Xiang-Yu; Nishimura, Taku; Katou, Hidetaka; Liu, Hui-Yun; Qing, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Soil contamination by diesel has been often reported as a result of accidental spillage, leakage and inappropriate use. Surfactant-enhanced soil flushing is a common remediation technique for soils contaminated by hydrophobic organic chemicals. In this study, soil flushing with linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS, an anionic surfactant) was conducted for intact columns (15cm in diameter and 12cm in length) of diesel-contaminated farmland purple soil aged for one year in the field. Dynamics of colloid concentration in column outflow during flushing, diesel removal rate and resulting soil macroporosity change by flushing were analyzed. Removal rate of n-alkanes (representing the diesel) varied with the depth of the topsoil in the range of 14%-96% while the n-alkanes present at low concentrations in the subsoil were completely removed by LAS-enhanced flushing. Much higher colloid concentrations and larger colloid sizes were observed during LAS flushing in column outflow compared to water flushing. The X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis of flushed and unflushed soil cores showed that the proportion of fine macropores (30-250μm in diameter) was reduced significantly by LAS flushing treatment. This phenomenon can be attributed to enhanced clogging of fine macropores by colloids which exhibited higher concentration due to better dispersion by LAS. It can be inferred from this study that the application of LAS-enhanced flushing technique in the purple soil region should be cautious regarding the possibility of rapid colloid-associated contaminant transport via preferential pathways in the subsurface and the clogging of water-conducting soil pores. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Silica colloids and their effect on radionuclide sorption. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelttae, P.; Hakanen, M.

    2008-05-01

    Silica sol, commercial colloidal silica manufactured by Eka Chemicals in Bohus, Sweden is a promising inorganic grout material for sealing small fractures in low permeable rock. This literature review collects information about the use of silica sol as an injection grout material, the properties of inorganic, especially silica colloids, colloid contents in granitic groundwater conditions, essential characterization methods and colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides. Objective was to evaluate the release and mobility of silica sol colloids, the effect of the groundwater conditions, the amount of colloids compared with natural colloids in Olkiluoto conditions, radionuclide sorption on colloids and their contribution to radionuclide transport. Silica sol seems to be a feasible material to seal fractures with an aperture as small as 10 μm in low permeable rock. The silica sol gel is sufficiently stable to limit to water ingress during the operational phase, the requirement that the pH should be below 11 is fulfilled and the compatibility with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials is expected to be good. No significant influence on the bentonite properties caused by the silica sol is expected when calcium chloride is used as an accelerator but the influence of sodium chloride has not been examined. No significant release of colloids is expected under prevailing groundwater conditions. The long-term (100 y) stability of silica sol gel has not yet been clearly demonstrated and a long-term release of silica colloids cannot be excluded. The question is the amount of colloids, how mobile they are and the influence of possible glacial melt waters. The bentonite buffer used in the EBS system is assumed to be a potential source of colloids. In a study in Olkiluoto, bentonite colloids were found only in low salinity groundwater. In general, low salinity water (total dissolved solids -1 ) favours colloid stability and bentonite colloids can remain stable over long

  18. Transport and Deposition of Variably Charged Soil Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anu; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2011-01-01

    Okinawa (RYS colloids) in Japan. The VAS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with a high pH dependency, whereas the RYS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with less pH dependency. The soil colloids were applied as colloidal suspensions to 10-cm-long saturated sand columns packed...

  19. Nano-colloid electrophoretic transport: Fully explicit modelling via dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Afrouzi, Hamid; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh; Moshfegh, Abouzar

    2018-02-01

    In present study, a novel fully explicit approach using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is introduced for modelling electrophoretic transport of nano-colloids in an electrolyte solution. Slater type charge smearing function included in 3D Ewald summation method is employed to treat electrostatic interaction. Moreover, capability of different thermostats are challenged to control the system temperature and study the dynamic response of colloidal electrophoretic mobility under practical ranges of external electric field in nano scale application (0.072 600 in DPD units regardless of electric field intensity. Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen and Lowe-Andersen thermostats are found to function more effectively under high electric fields (E > 0.145 [ v / nm ]) while thermal equilibrium is maintained. Reasonable agreements are achieved by benchmarking the radial distribution function with available electrolyte structure modellings, as well as comparing reduced mobility against conventional Smoluchowski and Hückel theories, and numerical solution of Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  20. The influence of colloids on the migration of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seher, Holger

    2011-01-01

    For a concept of deep geological disposal of high level nuclear waste, the repository will be designed as a multiple-barrier system including bentonite as the buffer/backfill material and the host rock formation as the geological barrier. The engineered barrier (compacted bentonite) will be in contact with the host rock formation (e.g. granite). Consequently the bentonite will be saturated over time with formation groundwater, which will induce swelling and gel formation of the bentonite. At the gel-groundwater boundary, colloid detachment might be a possible colloid source and therefore might enhance the mobility of strong sorbing actinides. This work will focus on three aspects of colloidal transport: (a) Colloid stability in the mixing zone between granite groundwater and bentonite pore water, including its description with an extended DLVO model. (b) Colloid generation and erosion of the bentonite at the interface between compacted bentonite and granitic groundwater, as well as formation of new colloids in the mixing zone between the bentonite porewater and the granitic groundwater. (c) Colloid transport and the interaction of U, Th, Hf, Tb, Eu and Cm with bentonite colloids and fracture filling material, as well as their mobility in a natural fracture.

  1. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Charlet, L. [Univ Grenoble 1, Lab Geophys Interne and Tectonophys LGIT OSUG, CNRS, UJF, UMR5559, F-38041 Grenoble 9 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podsolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the {<=} 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean pore-water velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source. (authors)

  2. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P., E-mail: pierre.crancon@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Pili, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique (LGIT-OSUG), University of Grenoble-I, UMR5559-CNRS-UJF, BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2010-04-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the < 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean porewater velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  3. Progress report on colloid-facilitated transport at Yucca Mountain: Yucca Mountain site characterization program milestone 3383

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Degueldre, C.; Wistrom, A.O.; Cotter, C.R.; Lemons, W.W.

    1996-06-01

    To assess colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in groundwaters at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, it is very important to understand the generation and stability of colloids, including naturally occurring colloids. To this end, we measured the colloid concentration in waters from Well J-13, which is on the order of 106 particles per milliliter (for particle sizes larger than 100 manometers). At this low particle loading, the sorption of radionuclides to colloids would have to be extremely high before the colloids could carry a significant amount of radionuclides from the repository to the accessible environment. We also performed aggregation experiments to evaluate the stability of silica (particle diameter: 85 nm) and clay colloids (particle diameter: 140 nm) as a function of ionic strength in a carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater. When the concentration of electrolyte is increased to induce aggregation, the aggregation is irreversible and the rate of aggregation increases with increasing electrolyte strength. We used autocorrelation photon spectroscopy to estimate the rate of particle aggregation for both types of colloids. By relating the measured aggregation rate to the Smoluchowski rate expression, we determined the stability ratio, W. Aggregation of silica particles and kaolinite clay particles decreased dramatically for an electrolyte concentration, C NaCl , below 300 mM and 200 mM, respectively

  4. Transport of radionuclides by bentonite and silica colloids in a GR-3 synthetic groundwater-interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, L.L.; McGarrah, J.E.; Walker, B.A.

    1983-08-01

    Radionuclide distributions in groundwater-colloid-basalt systems were measured using GR-3 groundwater and crushed Umtanum basalt at 60 degree C. The objective was to estimate the potential for radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository in basalt by colloids suspended in groundwater. Three colloids were studied -- a bentonite colloid representing a potential component of packing or backfill materials in the repository, and two hydrated silica colloids which might represent those generated from a glass waste form. The radioelements studied included isotopes of neptunium, uranium, selenium, technetium, and radium. Measurements of radionuclide distributions in experiments with the bentonite colloid showed that uranium was sorbed strongly on the colloid (under both oxidizing and reducing conditions) but was readily transferred to basalt when it was added to the system. Sorption of neptunium, technetium, and selenium on the colloid was greatly enhanced by using reducing conditions. Only small amounts of neptunium and technetium were transferred to the basalt under reducing conditions, but most of the selenium was readily transferred under these conditions

  5. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.J.; Longworth, G.; Hasler, S.E.; Gardiner, M.; Fritz, P.; Klotz, D.; Lazik, D.; Wolf, M.; Geyer, S.; Alexander, J.L.; Read, D.; Thomas, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ( 2 H, 3 H, 13 C, 14 C, 18 O, 34 S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  6. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Delakowitz, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Zeh, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Probst, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Lin, X. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ehrlicher, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Schauer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ivanovich, M. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Longworth, G. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Hasler, S.E. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Gardiner, M. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Fritz, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Klotz, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Lazik, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Wolf, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Geyer, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Alexander, J.L. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Read, D. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Thomas, J.B. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ({sup 2}H, {sup 3}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C, {sup 18}O, {sup 34}S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  7. Measuring and predicting the transport of actinides and fission product contaminants in unsaturated prairie soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, D. J.

    Soil samples have been taken in 2001 from the area of a 1951 release from an underground storage tank of 6.7 L of an aqueous solution of irradiated uranium (360 GBq). A simulation of the dispersion of the actinides and fission products was conducted in the laboratory using irradiated natural uranium, non-irradiated natural uranium and metal standards dissolved in acidic aqueous solutions and added to soil columns containing uncontaminated prairie soil. The lab soil columns were allowed 12 to 14 months for contaminant transport. Soil samples were analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis (NAA) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to determine the elemental concentrations of U, Cs and Sr. Diffusion coefficients from the 50 year soil samples and the lab soil samples were determined. The measured diffusion coefficients from the field samples were 3.0 x 10-4 cm2 s-1 (Cs-137), 1.8 x 10-5 cm2 s-1 (U-238) and 2.6 x 10-3 cm2 s-1 (Sr-90) and the values determined from lab simulation were 5 x 10-6 cm 2 s-1 (Cs-137), 3 x 10-5 cm2 s-1 (U-238) and 1.9 x 10-5 cm 2 s-1 (Sr-90). The differences between the sets of diffusion coefficients can be attributed to differences in retardation effects, weather effects and changes in the soil characteristics when transporting, such as porosity. The analytical work showed that Cs-137 content of soil can be determined effectively using gamma-ray spectroscopy; U-238 content can be measured using NAA; and Sr-90 content can be measured using LSC. For non- and low-radioactive species, it was shown that both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) gave comparable results for Sr, Cs and Sm, with the average values ranging from 0.5 to 4.5 ppm of each other. The U-238 content results from NAA and from ICP-MS showed general agreement with an average difference of 81.3 ppm on samples having concentrations up to 988.2 ppm. The difference may have been due to matrix

  8. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  9. Colloidal transport of uranium in soil: Size fractionation and characterization by field-flow fractionation-multi-detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claveranne-Lamolere, C.; Lespes, G.; Dubascoux, St.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Claveranne-Lamolere, C.; Aupiais, J.; Pointurier, F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize colloids associated with uranium by using an on-line fractionation/multi-detection technique based on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-Fl-FFF) hyphenated with UV detector, multi angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and inductively coupling plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Moreover, thanks to the As-Fl-FFF, the different colloidal fractions were collected and characterized by a total organic carbon analyzer (TOC). Thus it is possible to determine the nature (organic or inorganic colloids), molar mass, size (gyration and hydrodynamic radii) and quantitative uranium distribution over the whole colloidal phase. In the case of the site studied, two populations are highlighted. The first population corresponds to humic-like substances with a molar mass of (1500 ± 300) g mol -1 and a hydrodynamic diameter of (2. 0 ± 0. 2) nm. The second one has been identified as a mix of carbonated nano-particles or clays with organic particles (aggregates and/or coating of the inorganic particles) with a size range hydrodynamic diameter between 30 and 450 nm. Each population is implied in the colloidal transport of uranium: maximum 1% of the uranium content in soil leachate is transported by the colloids in the site studied, according to the depth in the soil. Indeed, humic substances are the main responsible of this transport in sub-surface conditions whereas nano-particles drive the phenomenon in depth conditions. (authors)

  10. Transport of 152Eu colloids in a system of fine sand and water containing humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    1995-01-01

    The migration of 152 Eu in a system of fine sand and water containing humic substances was investigated in a flow column system under realistic conditions. In this system, the trivalent Eu forms colloids with the water. These Eu humates are transported without retardation at recovery rates significantly below 100 per cent. Recovery is more or less a measure of the physical process of filtration of Eu bonded to particulates. In the range of natural filtering rates, the recovery rates decrease with decreasing filtering rate. (orig.) [de

  11. Influence of macroporosity on preferential solute and colloid transport in unsaturated field soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cey, Edwin E; Rudolph, David L; Passmore, Joanna

    2009-06-26

    Transport of solutes and colloids in soils, particularly those subject to preferential flow along macropores, is important for assessing the vulnerability of shallow groundwater to contamination. The objective of this study was to investigate flow and transport phenomena for dissolved and colloid tracers during large infiltration events in partially saturated, macroporous soils. Controlled tracer infiltration tests were completed at two field sites in southern Ontario. A tension infiltrometer (TI) was used to infiltrate water with dissolved Brilliant Blue FCF dye simultaneously with 3.7 microm and 0.53 microm diameter fluorescent microspheres. Infiltration was conducted under maximum infiltration pressure heads ranging from -5.2 to -0.4 cm. All infiltration test sites were excavated to examine and photograph dye-stained flow patterns, map soil features, and collect samples for microsphere enumeration. Results indicated that preferential transport of dye and microspheres via macropores occurred when maximum pressure heads were greater than -3.0 cm, and the corresponding infiltration rates exceeded 2.0 cm h(-1). Dye and microspheres were detected at depths greater than 70 cm under the highest infiltration rates from both sites. Microsphere concentrations in the top 5-10 cm of soil decreased by more than two orders of magnitude relative to input concentrations, yet remained relatively constant with depth thereafter. There was some evidence for increased retention of the 3.7 microm microspheres relative to the 0.53 microm microspheres, particularly at lower infiltration pressures where straining and attachment mechanisms are most prevalent. Microspheres were observed within dye stained soil matrix surrounding individual macropores, illustrating the significance of capillary pressures in controlling the vertical migration of both tracers in the vicinity of the macropores. Overall, microsphere distributions closely followed the dye patterns, with microsphere

  12. Active colloids as mobile microelectrodes for unified label-free selective cargo transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boymelgreen, Alicia M; Balli, Tov; Miloh, Touvia; Yossifon, Gilad

    2018-02-22

    Utilization of active colloids to transport both biological and inorganic cargo has been widely examined in the context of applications ranging from targeted drug delivery to sample analysis. In general, carriers are customized to load one specific target via a mechanism distinct from that driving the transport. Here we unify these tasks and extend loading capabilities to include on-demand selection of multiple nano/micro-sized targets without the need for pre-labelling or surface functionalization. An externally applied electric field is singularly used to drive the active cargo carrier and transform it into a mobile floating electrode that can attract (trap) or repel specific targets from its surface by dielectrophoresis, enabling dynamic control of target selection, loading and rate of transport via the electric field parameters. In the future, dynamic selectivity could be combined with directed motion to develop building blocks for bottom-up fabrication in applications such as additive manufacturing and soft robotics.

  13. A Binomial Modeling Approach for Upscaling Colloid Transport Under Unfavorable Attachment Conditions: Emergent Prediction of Nonmonotonic Retention Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Johnson, William P.

    2018-01-01

    We used a recently developed simple mathematical network model to upscale pore-scale colloid transport information determined under unfavorable attachment conditions. Classical log-linear and nonmonotonic retention profiles, both well-reported under favorable and unfavorable attachment conditions, respectively, emerged from our upscaling. The primary attribute of the network is colloid transfer between bulk pore fluid, the near-surface fluid domain (NSFD), and attachment (treated as irreversible). The network model accounts for colloid transfer to the NSFD of downgradient grains and for reentrainment to bulk pore fluid via diffusion or via expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones (RFSZs). The model describes colloid transport by a sequence of random trials in a one-dimensional (1-D) network of Happel cells, which contain a grain and a pore. Using combinatorial analysis that capitalizes on the binomial coefficient, we derived from the pore-scale information the theoretical residence time distribution of colloids in the network. The transition from log-linear to nonmonotonic retention profiles occurs when the conditions underlying classical filtration theory are not fulfilled, i.e., when an NSFD colloid population is maintained. Then, nonmonotonic retention profiles result potentially both for attached and NSFD colloids. The concentration maxima shift downgradient depending on specific parameter choice. The concentration maxima were also shown to shift downgradient temporally (with continued elution) under conditions where attachment is negligible, explaining experimentally observed downgradient transport of retained concentration maxima of adhesion-deficient bacteria. For the case of zero reentrainment, we develop closed-form, analytical expressions for the shape, and the maximum of the colloid retention profile.

  14. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate; Contribution a l'etude pharmacologique du transport des colloides d'or radioactif par le sang et les exsudats sereux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselet, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author) [French] Apres avoir enonce les proprietes physicochimiques essentielles des colloides nous etudions le devenir biologique de ces substances et, en relation avec leur transport par le sang, leur captation par les elements du Systeme Reticulo-Endothelial. Nous resumons les connaissances acquises jusqu'alors sur le role des proteines seriques dans le transport des

  15. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate; Contribution a l'etude pharmacologique du transport des colloides d'or radioactif par le sang et les exsudats sereux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author) [French] Apres avoir enonce les proprietes physicochimiques essentielles des colloides nous etudions le devenir biologique de ces substances et, en relation avec leur transport par le sang, leur captation par les elements du Systeme Reticulo-Endothelial. Nous resumons les connaissances acquises jusqu'alors sur le role des proteines seriques dans le transport des substances et particulierement dans le

  16. Technetium migration in Boom Clay - Assessing the role of colloid-facilitated transport in a deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, C.; Martens, E.; Maes, N.; Jacops, E.; Van Gompel, M.; Van Ravestyn, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The role of colloids - mainly dissolved natural organic matter (NOM, 50-150 mg/l) - in the transport of radionuclides in the Boom Clay formation (Mol, Belgium), has long since been a matter of (heavy) debate. For more than 20 years, batch experiments with Boom Clay suspensions showed a pronounced influence of the dissolved organic carbon concentration on the aqueous concentrations of different radionuclides like Tc, Np, Am and U. Moreover, small fractions of these radionuclides were also observed to elute almost un-retarded out of confined clay cores in percolation experiments. In the past years, a new conceptual model for the speciation of the long-lived fission product Technetium- 99 ( 99 Tc) under Boom Clay conditions has been drafted. In brief, the stable oxidation state of 99 Tc in these conditions is +IV, and, therefore, Tc solution concentrations are limited by the solubility of TcO 2 .nH 2 O(s). However, during reduction of TcVII (in the TcO 4 - form) to TcIV, precursor TcO 2 .nH 2 O colloids are formed, which are stabilised by the dissolved organic matter present in Boom Clay interstitial pore water, and in supernatants of Boom Clay batch suspensions. Moreover, this stabilisation process occurs in such a systematic way, that (conditional) interaction constants could be established, and the behaviour was described as a 'hydrophobic sorption', or, more accurately, a 'colloid-colloid' interaction. This conceptual model was implemented into PHREEQC geochemical and Hydrus transport code to come to a reactive transport model that was used to simulate both the outflow and the tracer profile in several long-term running percolation experiments (both in lab and under in situ conditions). To account for slow dissociation kinetics of Tc from the NOM colloid, a first-order kinetic rate equation was also added to the model. In order to describe the migration of colloidal particles (NOM), an

  17. Actinides-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  18. Actinides-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  19. The impacts of pore-scale physical and chemical heterogeneities on the transport of radionuclide-carrying colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WU, Ning

    2018-04-24

    Independent of the methods of nuclear waste disposal, the degradation of packaging materials could lead to mobilization and transport of radionuclides into the geosphere. This process can be significantly accelerated due to the association of radionuclides with the backfill materials or mobile colloids in groundwater. The transport of these colloids is complicated by the inherent coupling of physical and chemical heterogeneities (e.g., pore space geometry, grain size, charge heterogeneity, and surface hydrophobicity) in natural porous media that can exist on the length scale of a few grains. In addition, natural colloids themselves are often heterogeneous in their surface properties (e.g., clay platelets possess opposite charges on the surface and along the rim). Both physical and chemical heterogeneities influence the transport and retention of radionuclides under various groundwater conditions. However, the precise mechanisms how these coupled heterogeneities influence colloidal transport are largely elusive. This knowledge gap is a major source of uncertainty in developing accurate models to represent the transport process and to predict distribution of radionuclides in the geosphere.

  20. The importance of colloids and mires for the transport of uranium isotopes through the Kalix River watershed and Baltic Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcelli, D.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Andersson, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of colloids and organic deposits for the transport of uranium isotopes from continental source regions and through the estuarine environment was investigated in the mire-rich Kalix River drainage basin in northern Sweden and the Baltic Sea. Ultrafiltration techniques were used to separate uranium and other elements associated with colloids > 10 kD and >3 kD from open-quotes soluteclose quotes uranium and provided consistent results and high recovery rates for uranium as well as for other elements from large volume samples. Uranium concentrations in 0.45 μm-filtered Kalix River water samples increased by a factor of 3 from near the headwaters in the Caledonides to the river mouth while major cation concentrations were relatively constant. 234 U 238 U ratios were high (δ 234 U = 770-1500) throughout the basin, without showing any simple pattern, and required a supply of 234 U-rich water. Throughout the Kalix River, a large fraction (30-90%) of the uranium is carried by >10 kD colloids, which is compatible with uranium complexation with humic acids. No isotopic differences were found between colloid-associated and solute uranium. Within the Baltic Sea, about half of the uranium is removed at low salinities. The proportion that is lost is equivalent to that of river-derived colloid-bound uranium, suggesting that while solute uranium behaves conservatively during estuarine mixing, colloid-bound uranium is lost due to rapid flocculation of colloidal material. The association of uranium with colloids therefore may be an important parameter in determining uranium estuarine behavior. Mire peats in the Kalix River highly concentrate uranium and are potentially a significant source of recoil 234 U to the mirewaters and river waters. However, mirewater data clearly demonstrate that only small 234 U/ 238 U shifts are generated relative to inflowing groundwater. 63 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs. groundwater. 63 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, D; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  2. Long-term Effects of Organic Waste Fertilizers on Soil Structure, Tracer Transport, and Leaching of Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Magid, Jakob

    2017-07-01

    Organic waste fertilizers have previously been observed to significantly affect soil organic carbon (SOC) content and soil structure. However, the effect of organic waste fertilizers on colloid dispersibility and leaching of colloids from topsoil has not yet been studied extensively. We investigated how the repeated application of different types of agricultural (liquid cattle slurry and solid cattle manure) and urban waste fertilizers (sewage sludge and composted organic household waste) affected soil physical properties, colloid dispersion from aggregates, tracer transport, and colloid leaching from intact soil cores. Total porosity was positively correlated with SOC content. Yearly applications of sewage sludge increased absolute microporosity (pores 30 μm) compared with the unfertilized control, whereas organic household waste compost fertilization increased both total porosity and the absolute porosity in all pore size classes (though not significant for 100-600 μm). Treatments receiving large amounts of organic fertilizers exhibited significantly lower levels of dispersible colloids compared with an unfertilized control and a treatment that had received moderate applications of cattle slurry. The content of water-dispersible colloids could not be explained by a single factor, but differences in SOC content, electrical conductivity, and sodium adsorption ratio were important factors. Moreover, we found that the fertilizer treatments did not significantly affect the solute transport properties of the topsoil. Finally, we found that the leaching of soil colloids was significantly decreased in treatments that had received large amounts of organic waste fertilizers, and we ascribe this primarily to treatment-induced differences in effluent electrical conductivity during leaching. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Colloid Genesis/Transport and Flow Pathway Alterations Resulting From Interactions of Reactive Waste Solutions and Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2001-01-01

    Leakage of underground tanks containing high-level nuclear waste solutions has been identified at various DOE facilities. The Hanford Site is one the main facilities of concern, with about 2,300 to 3,400 m3 of leaked waste liquids. Radionuclides and other contaminants have been found in elevated concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater underneath single shell tank farms. We do not currently know the mechanisms responsible for the unexpected deep migration of some contaminants through the vadose zone, and such understanding is urgently needed for planning remediation. Due to the extreme chemical conditions of the tank waste solutions (very high pH, aluminum concentration, and ionic strength), interactions between the highly reactive waste solutions and sediments underneath the tanks can result in dissolution of primary minerals of the sediments and precipitation of secondary phases including colloidal particles. Contaminants can sorb onto and/or co-precipitate with the secondary phases. Therefore transport of strongly associated contaminants on mobile colloids can be substantially greater than without colloids. The overall objective of this research is to improve our understanding on the effects of interactions between the tank waste solution and sediments on deep contaminant migration under Hanford Site conditions. This objective will be achieved through the following four tasks: (1) colloid generation and transport studies, (2) studies on sediment permeability and chemical composition alterations, (3) quantifying associations of contaminants with secondary colloids, and (4) studies on the combined effects of the aforementioned processes on deep contaminant migration

  4. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport: Current State of Knowledge from a Nuclear Waste Repository Risk Assessment Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, Paul William; Zavarin, Mavrik; Wang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository risk assessment perspective. It draws on work that has been conducted over the past 3 decades, although there is considerable emphasis given to work that has been performed over the past 3-5 years as part of the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign. The timing of this report coincides with the completion of a 3-year DOE membership in the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) partnership, an international collaboration of scientists studying colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides at both the laboratory and field-scales in a fractured crystalline granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. This Underground Research Laboratory has hosted the most extensive and carefully-controlled set of colloid-facilitated solute transport experiments that have ever been conducted in an in-situ setting, and a summary of the results to date from these efforts, as they relate to transport over long time and distance scales, is provided in Chapter 3 of this report.

  5. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport: Current State of Knowledge from a Nuclear Waste Repository Risk Assessment Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    This report provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository risk assessment perspective. It draws on work that has been conducted over the past 3 decades, although there is considerable emphasis given to work that has been performed over the past 3-5 years as part of the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign. The timing of this report coincides with the completion of a 3-year DOE membership in the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) partnership, an international collaboration of scientists studying colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides at both the laboratory and field-scales in a fractured crystalline granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. This Underground Research Laboratory has hosted the most extensive and carefully-controlled set of colloid-facilitated solute transport experiments that have ever been conducted in an in-situ setting, and a summary of the results to date from these efforts, as they relate to transport over long time and distance scales, is provided in Chapter 3 of this report.

  6. Mobilization and transport of soil colloids as influenced by texture, organic matter, and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    The thin layer of soil on the Earth’s surface has major environmental and socioeconomic impacts. The soils sustain our life and society, and do not act only as a growth medium for food, feed and fuel. Soil is an invaluable resource and the processes within it are responsible for waste disposal...... was mainly seen as an impact on soil organic carbon. Results from the column leaching experiments from three sites likewise indicate that basic soil properties, such as the clay content, were the main drivers of colloid mobilization and transport. Effects of management and cropping system seemed secondary......, purification and recharge of groundwater aquifers. Many environmental contaminants are broken down through their passage through the soil and slow percolation through the soil cleanses rainwater before it reaches the groundwater. Strongly sorbing environmental contaminants cannot be assumed to be immobile...

  7. Transport coefficients and mechanical response in hard-disk colloidal suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bo-Kai; Ma Yu-Qiang; Li Jian; Chen Kang; Tian Wen-De

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties and mechanical response of glassy hard disks using nonlinear Langevin equation theory. We derive expressions for the elastic shear modulus and viscosity in two dimensions on the basis of thermal-activated barrier-hopping dynamics and mechanically accelerated motion. Dense hard disks exhibit phenomena such as softening elasticity, shear-thinning of viscosity, and yielding upon deformation, which are qualitatively similar to dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in three dimensions. These phenomena can be ascribed to stress-induced “landscape tilting”. Quantitative comparisons of these phenomena between hard disks and hard spheres are presented. Interestingly, we find that the density dependence of yield stress in hard disks is much more significant than in hard spheres. Our work provides a foundation for further generalizing the nonlinear Langevin equation theory to address slow dynamics and rheological behavior in binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard or soft disks. (rapid communication)

  8. Thermal transport in binary colloidal glasses: Composition dependence and percolation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckdeschel, Pia; Philipp, Alexandra; Kopera, Bernd A. F.; Bitterlich, Flora; Dulle, Martin; Pech-May, Nelson W.; Retsch, Markus

    2018-02-01

    The combination of various types of materials is often used to create superior composites that outperform the pure phase components. For any rational design, the thermal conductivity of the composite as a function of the volume fraction of the filler component needs to be known. When approaching the nanoscale, the homogeneous mixture of various components poses an additional challenge. Here, we investigate binary nanocomposite materials based on polymer latex beads and hollow silica nanoparticles. These form randomly mixed colloidal glasses on a sub-μ m scale. We focus on the heat transport properties through such binary assembly structures. The thermal conductivity can be well described by the effective medium theory. However, film formation of the soft polymer component leads to phase segregation and a mismatch between existing mixing models. We confirm our experimental data by finite element modeling. This additionally allowed us to assess the onset of thermal transport percolation in such random particulate structures. Our study contributes to a better understanding of thermal transport through heterostructured particulate assemblies.

  9. Transport of a Two-Member Decay Chain of Radionuclides Through a Discrete Fracture in a Porous Rock Matrix in the Presence of Colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, N.-C.; Li Shihhai

    2002-01-01

    Many physical and chemical processes dominate the transport of radionuclides in groundwater. Among these processes, the decay chain process of radionuclides was frequently disregarded in previous research. However, the daughter products may travel much farther than their parents along the fracture. Therefore, some models neglecting the effect of the decay chain may underestimate the transport radionuclide concentration in geological media. The transport of radionuclides in groundwater is also controlled by colloidal particles. The radionuclides may be enhanced or retarded by the colloids, according to the mobility of these colloidal particles. This work describes a novel model of the transport of a two-member decay chain of radionuclides through a discrete fracture in a porous rock matrix in the presence of colloids. The model addresses the following processes: (a) advective transport in the fracture, (b) mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion along the fracture, (c) molecular diffusion from the fracture to the rock matrix, (d) adsorption onto the fracture wall, (e) adsorption in the rock matrix, and (f) radioactive decay. Furthermore, colloids are assumed to be excluded from the matrix pores because of their size. A fully developed concentration profile system with nonreactive colloids is used to understand the effect of colloidal sizes by using hydrodynamic chromatography. The external forces acting on the colloid surface, such as the inertial, the van der Waals attractive force, the double layer force, and the gravitational force are accounted for. The parameters, the average velocity of the colloid, the dispersion coefficient of the colloid, and the distribution coefficient of radionuclides with colloids are modified according to the colloidal size. The transport equations for the parent radionuclides are solved analytically using the Laplace transformation and inversion method. However, for the transformed solution of the daughter products along the

  10. Influence of colloids on the attenuation and transport of phosphorus in alluvial gravel aquifer and vadose zone media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Lafogler, Mark; Knorr, Bastian; McGill, Erin; Saunders, Darren; Baumann, Thomas; Abraham, Phillip; Close, Murray

    2016-04-15

    Phosphorous (P) leaching (e.g., from effluents, fertilizers) and transport in highly permeable subsurface media can be an important pathway that contributes to eutrophication of receiving surface waters as groundwater recharges the base-flow of surface waters. Here we investigated attenuation and transport of orthophosphate-P in gravel aquifer and vadose zone media in the presence and absence of model colloids (Escherichia coli, kaolinite, goethite). Experiments were conducted using repacked aquifer media in a large column (2m long, 0.19m in diameter) and intact cores (0.4m long, 0.24m in diameter) of vadose zone media under typical field flow rates. In the absence of the model colloids, P was readily traveled through the aquifer media with little attenuation (up to 100% recovery) and retardation, and P adsorption was highly reversible. Conversely, addition of the model colloids generally resulted in reduced P concentration and mass recovery (down to 28% recovery), and increased retardation and adsorption irreversibility in both aquifer and vadose zone media. The degree of colloid-assisted P attenuation was most significant in the presence of fine material and Fe-containing colloids at low flow rate but was least significant in the presence of coarse gravels and E. coli at high flow rate. Based on the experimental results, setback distances of 49-53m were estimated to allow a reduction of P concentrations in groundwater to acceptable levels in the receiving water. These estimates were consistent with field observations in the same aquifer media. Colloid-assisted P attenuation can be utilized to develop mitigation strategies to better manage effluent applications in gravelly soils. To efficiently retain P within soil matrix and reduce P leaching to groundwater, it is recommended to select soils that are rich in iron oxides, to periodically disturb soil preferential flow paths by tillage, and to apply a low irrigation rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Actinide chemistry in the far field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livens, F.R.; Morris, K.; Parkman, R.; Moyes, L.

    1996-01-01

    The environmental chemistry of the actinides is complicated due both to the extensive redox and coordination chemistry of the elements and also to the complexity of the reactive phases encountered in natural environments. In the far field, interactions with reactive surfaces, coatings and colloidal particles will play a crucial role in controlling actinide mobility. By virtue of both their abundance and reactivity; clays and other layer aluminosilicate minerals, hydrous oxides and organic matter (humic substances) are all identified as having the potential to react with actinide ions and some possible modes of interaction are described, together with experimental evidence for their occurrence. (author)

  12. Actinides and environmental interfaces: striving for molecular-level understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heino Nitsche

    2005-01-01

    Actinides can undergo a variety of complex chemical reactions in the environment. In addition to the formation of solid precipitates, colloids and dissolved solution species common to aqueous systems, actinide ions can interact with the surrounding geo and biomedia to change oxidation states or sorb on surfaces and colloids. The rate of migration is determined by aqueous solubility, and interactions with solid surfaces such as minerals, soils, natural organic matter, and soil microorganisms Sorption of aqueous actinide species on biological and geological matrices can be quantitatively described by a surface complexation or site-binding model. The disadvantage of this model is the difficulty in the experimental determination of the model parameters and surface reaction constants. Usually, a set of surface reactions and species are proposed based on knowledge of the solution speciation of the solute, and the reaction constants are usually derived by fitting computer-calculated absorption curves to experimental data. Because this process typically involves a large number of potentially adjustable parameters, it is likely to lead to non-unique parameter fitting and does not always result in a consistent set of parameters for the same systems. A fundamental molecular-level understanding of sorption processes of actinides on environmental surfaces is required to better understand and predict their transport behavior in nature. Several different surface spectroscopic techniques have been applied to the characterization of the adsorbed species and surface reactions and a direct determination of the sorbed species and surface reactions has become possible. The non-linear optical techniques of second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG and SFG) are ideally suited to study surfaces and interfaces of mineral oxides, biosurfactants and biopolymers, organic adlayers adsorbed on solid/mineral surfaces and soil organic matter, including humic and fulvic acids. Resonant

  13. Electron transport within transparent assemblies of tin-doped indium oxide colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisolia, J.; Decorde, N.; Gauvin, M.; Sangeetha, N. M.; Viallet, B.; Ressier, L.

    2015-08-01

    Stripe-like compact assemblies of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are fabricated by stop-and-go convective self-assembly (CSA). Systematic evaluation of the electron transport mechanisms in these systems is carried out by varying the length of carboxylate ligands protecting the NCs: butanoate (C4), octanoate (C8) and oleate (C18). The interparticle edge-to-edge distance L0, along with a number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of the coating ligand, are deduced from small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements and exhibit a linear relationship with a slope of 0.11 nm per carbon pair unit. Temperature-dependent resistance characteristics are analyzed using several electron transport models: Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping (ES-VRH), inelastic cotunneling (IC), regular island array and percolation. The analysis indicated that the first two models (ES-VRH and IC) fail to explain the observed behavior, and that only simple activated transport takes place in these systems under the experimental conditions studied (T = 300 K to 77 K). Related transport parameters were then extracted using the regular island array and percolation models. The effective tunneling decay constant βeff of the ligands and the Coulomb charging energy EC are found to be around 5.5 nm-1 and 25 meV, respectively, irrespective of ligand lengths. The theoretical tunneling decay constant β calculated using the percolation model is in the range 9 nm-1. Electromechanical tests on the ITO nanoparticle assemblies indicate that their sensitivities are as high as ˜30 and remain the same regardless of ligand lengths, which is in agreement with the constant effective βeff extracted from regular island array and percolation models.

  14. Actinide speciation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear test explosions and nuclear reactor wastes and accidents have released large amounts of radioactivity into the environment. Actinide ions in waters often are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium and their solubility and migration behavior is related to the form in which the nuclides are introduced into the aquatic system. Chemical speciation, oxidation state, redox reactions, and sorption characteristics are necessary in predicting solubility of the different actinides, their migration behaviors and their potential effects on marine biota. The most significant of these variables is the oxidation state of the metal ion as the simultaneous presence of more than one oxidation state for some actinides in a solution complicates actinide environmental behavior. Both Np(V)O 2 + and Pu(V)O 2 + , the most significant soluble states in natural oxic waters, are relatively noncomplexing and resistant to hydrolysis and subsequent precipitation. The solubility of NpO 2 + can be as high as 10 -4 M while that of PuO 2 + is much more limited by reduction to the insoluble tetravalent species, Pu(OH) 4 , (pK sp ≥56) but which can be present in the pentavalent form in aqautic phases as colloidal material. The solubility of hexavalent UO 2 2+ in sea water is relatively high due to formation of carbonate complexes. The insoluble trivalent americium hydroxocarbonate, Am(OH)(CO 3 ) is the limiting species for the solubility of Am(III) in sea water. Thorium(IV) is present as Th(OH) 4 , in colloidal form. The chemistry of actinide ions in the environment is reviewed to show the spectrum of reactions that can occur in natural waters which must be considered in assessing the environmental behavior of actinides. Much is understood about sorption of actinides on surfaces, the mode of migration of actinides in such waters and the potential effects of these radioactive species on marine biota, but much more understanding of the behavior of the actinides in the environment is

  15. Colloid-facilitated effects on migration of radionuclides in fractured rock with a kinetic solubility-limited dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen Chunping; Tien Nengchuan

    2010-01-01

    Nuclides can move with groundwater either as solutes or colloids, where the latter mechanism generally results in much shorter traveling time as the nuclides interact strongly with solid phases, such as actinides. In the performance assessment, it is therefore essential to assess the relative importance of these two transport mechanisms for different nuclides. The relative importance of colloids depends on the nature and concentration of the colloids in groundwater. Plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U) and americium (Am) are four nuclides of concern for the long-term emplacement of nuclear wastes at potential repository sites. These four actinides have a high potential for migrating if attached to iron oxide, clay or silica colloids in the groundwater.Strong sorption of the actinides by colloids in the groundwater may facilitate the transport of these nuclides along potential flow paths. The solubility-limited dissolution model can be used to assess the safety of the release of nuclear waste in geological disposal sites. Usually, it has been assumed that the solubility of the waste form is constant. If a nuclide reaches its solubility limit at an inner location near the waste form, it is unlikely that the same nuclide will reach its solubility limit at an outer location unless this nuclide has a parent nuclide. It is unlikely that the daughter nuclides will exceed their solubility limit due to decay of their parent nuclide. The present study investigates the effect of colloids on the transport of solubility-limited nuclides under the kinetic solubility-limited dissolution (KSLD) boundary condition in fractured media. The release rate of the nuclides is proportional to the difference between the saturation concentration and the inlet aqueous concentration of the nuclides. The presence of colloids decreases the aqueous concentration of nuclides and, thus, increases the release flux of nuclides from the waste form. (authors)

  16. The reactor accident at Chernobyl: A possibility to test colloid-controlled transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Gunten, H.R.; Waber, U.; Krahenbuhl, U.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive fall-out from the damaged nuclear power plant at Chernobyl (USSR) has been measured between May 2 and May 20, 1986 in the River Glatt (Zurich, Switzerland) and in a shallow groundwater stream which is hydraulically connected to the river. Water infiltrating from the river into the groundwater was sampled at different distances and depths by means of a system of piezometer tubes which are part of an experimental installation for the investigation of groundwater quality and migration processes. The aquifer is a quarternary glaciofluvial deposit consisting of stones, gravel, sand, silt and clays. It is typical for large parts of alpine and peri-alpine regions and contains in Switzerlamd about 80% of the drinking water supplies. The radionuclides Tc-99m, Ru-103, I-131, Te-132, Cs-134 and Cs-137 were measured several times in the river water and in the groundwater using calibrated Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometers. Based on the present state of data evaluation the authors conclude that anionic species like iodides, ruthenates or tellurates are not or only slightly sorbed, whereas cesium is completely retained during infiltration from the river into the groundwater. Colloid (>0.05 μm) controlled migration of radionuclides in this heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposits is a transport mechanism of minor importance. However, with the present data it cannot be excluded completely

  17. Transport coefficients and mechanical response in hard-disk colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo-Kai; Li, Jian; Chen, Kang; Tian, Wen-De; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the transport properties and mechanical response of glassy hard disks using nonlinear Langevin equation theory. We derive expressions for the elastic shear modulus and viscosity in two dimensions on the basis of thermal-activated barrier-hopping dynamics and mechanically accelerated motion. Dense hard disks exhibit phenomena such as softening elasticity, shear-thinning of viscosity, and yielding upon deformation, which are qualitatively similar to dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in three dimensions. These phenomena can be ascribed to stress-induced “landscape tilting”. Quantitative comparisons of these phenomena between hard disks and hard spheres are presented. Interestingly, we find that the density dependence of yield stress in hard disks is much more significant than in hard spheres. Our work provides a foundation for further generalizing the nonlinear Langevin equation theory to address slow dynamics and rheological behavior in binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard or soft disks. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821500) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21374073 and, 21574096).

  18. Influence of Roughness-Induced Slip on Colloid Transport: Experimental and Modelling Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, J. A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    A limitation of classic colloid filtration theory is that it applies only to smooth surfaces, yet most natural surfaces present some degree of nano- to micro-scale roughness. A large volume of research has been dedicated to understanding the effects of roughness on particle attachment at the nano-scale since these interactions dictate field scale transport behavior. It has been previously demonstrated that roughness imposes a finite slip vector at the surface that causes particles to experience higher near-surface velocities than would be expected over a smooth surface. Slip near a rough surface can affect two primary mechanisms of particle attenuation: 1) interception of the surface (finding a landing spot) and 2) arrest on the surface (sticking the landing). However, a clear designation on how slip affects particle transport near rough surfaces is missing. The goal of this study was to provide a guide for the height of the slip layer and contact surface in reference to the mean-plane for rough surfaces. Direct observation was used to measure near-surface velocities of particles translating near surfaces of varying roughness spanning three orders of magnitude. The influence of roughness on particle transport was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling with rough surfaces measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The CFD and experimental results were used to calibrate a Lagrangian particle transport model that utilizes simple modifications to the flow field for a smooth surface using statistically based roughness parameters. Advantages of the Lagrangian model are significantly decreased computation times and applicability to a wide range of natural surfaces without explicitly simulating individual asperities. The results suggest that the no-slip boundary should be placed at the bottom of the maximum asperity valleys, and that the contact surface should be placed at the root mean square (RMS) roughness above the mean plane. Collector

  19. Colloids: a review of current knowledge with a view to application to phenomena of transportation within PWR; Colloides: point de vue sur les connaissances actuelles en vue d`une application aux phenomenes de transport dans les REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinard, L.

    1996-12-31

    In an attempt to minimise dosimetry within the primary circuit of PWR units, research is being carried out into understanding the phenomena of transportation and deposition of corrosion products. It is therefore desirable to known the form of these corrosion products and the laws governing this form. It is generally considered that they are in soluble or particulate form. A third starts with a general presentation of colloids and goes on to define points which are useful, both on a theoretical and experimental level, in terms of application to phenomena of transportation within PWRs. (author). 69 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs., 3 appends.

  20. Laboratory and in situ determination of the migration processes of actinide complexes and colloids in a fissured granitic environment. El Berrocal project (preliminary activities - phase 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, J.; Del Olmo, C.; Commission of the European Communities, Ispra

    1993-01-01

    The experimental site of El Berrocal has been chosen for a study of the migration of natural radionuclides in a fractured granitic environment. The granite is classified as an alkaline feldspar-rich quartz granite with two micas. The fresh granite is affected by hydrothermal alteration processes related to fractures, which has led to a strong sericitization of albite, and the precipitation of secondary chlorites and carbonates. The most important U-bearing and Th-bearing accessory minerals are uraninite, thorite-auerlite, monazite, anatase, apatite and zircon. Approximately 65% of the total of U in the rock is held as uraninite. In the altered granite, most of the U is held as autunite. Hydrogeochemical data show that Co 2 /H 2 CO 3 is the dominant system, followed by the silica-silicate system. Based on their stability analyses, two zones can be defined: (i) waters north of the dyke and from deep zones where calcite is in equilibrium and albite and gibbsite precipitate, and (ii) surface waters, south of the dyke, subsaturated in relation to calcite, producing the alteration of albite and the precipitation of montmorillonite. The size distribution of the colloids varies, depending on the treatment given to the water samples. The particles are mainly composed of K-feldspars and clay minerals (smectite) and occasionally by quartz, mica, calcite and pollen. The El Berrocal groundwaters have a very low amount of organic matter. Column migration tests have been carried out and were performed with intact granitic cores and with crushed granite. Np proved to be an adequate radionuclide for these experiments. Under oxic conditions and in the absence of organic matter, it was completely retained in both types of columns, whereas in the presence of organic matter a more rapid breakthrough was observed. Under anoxic conditions, and with or without organic matter, Np was found to move faster than under oxic conditions. (author). 13 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs

  1. Actinide recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C; Chang, Y [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1990-07-01

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository.

  2. Actinide recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.; Chang, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository

  3. Carrier-mediated transport of actinides and rare earth elements through liquid and plasticized membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopunec, R.; Ngo Manh, Th.

    1994-01-01

    The first works in this field were realized approximately 25 years ago, when BLOCK et al. reported their studies about carrier-mediated transport (also called pertraction or membrane extraction) of uranium through plasticized membranes with neutral esters derived from phosphoric acid. At this time, the methodical principles of selective pertraction of ionic compounds through so-called bulk liquid membranes containing carriers were known. However, these membranes, similarly as plasticized membranes, have not achieved a broader use. This is probably because bulk liquid membranes are from a technical point of view fairly distant from the idea of a typical membrane system, and plasticized membranes (sometimes also called gel membranes) present great resistance. By the end of the 1960's and at the beginning of the 1970's, LI and CUSSLER worked out the principles for two widely used pertraction techniques, called pertraction through emulsion liquid and supported liquid membranes (ELM and SLM). These two techniques not only have greatest significance in laboratory practice, but they also are interesting for technological aims because of the attainable large phase boundaries, e.g. 10 3 -10 4 m 2 /m 3 . Many ways to arrange membrane systems are described in papers. Recently, the significance of carrier-mediated transport through liquid membranes has grown to have (since 1980) separate section at the International Solvent Extraction Conference. This paper does not deal with mathematical models and the mechanism of pertraction in general, but it gives an overview of results obtained in publications referring to pertraction of two related element groups - actinoids and rare earth elements - using various membrane types. (author) 154 refs

  4. Colloids: a review of current knowledge with a view to application to phenomena of transportation within PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinard, L.

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to minimise dosimetry within the primary circuit of PWR units, research is being carried out into understanding the phenomena of transportation and deposition of corrosion products. It is therefore desirable to known the form of these corrosion products and the laws governing this form. It is generally considered that they are in soluble or particulate form. A third starts with a general presentation of colloids and goes on to define points which are useful, both on a theoretical and experimental level, in terms of application to phenomena of transportation within PWRs. (author). 69 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs., 3 appends

  5. Role of riverine colloids in macronutrient and metal partitioning and transport, along an upland–lowland land-use continuum, under low-flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, H.P.; Neal, C.; Rowland, A.P.; Neal, M.; Morris, P.N.; Lead, J.R.; Lawlor, A.J.; Woods, C.; Vincent, C.; Guyatt, H.; Hockenhull, K.

    2012-01-01

    An assessment is made of the role of riverine colloids in macronutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon), metal and trace element partitioning and transport, for five rivers in the Ribble and Wyre catchments in north-western England, under baseflow/near-baseflow conditions. Cross-flow ultrafiltration was used to separate colloidal ( 1 kDa) and truly dissolved ( 0.45 μm, suspended) fractions. Of these operationally-defined fractions measured, colloids were generally more important for both macronutrient and metal transport in the upland than in the lowland rivers. The results suggest that organic moieties in truly dissolved form from sewage effluent may have a greater capacity to chelate metals. Organic-rich colloids in the upland moorlands and metal oxide colloidal precipitates in the industrial rivers had a higher capacity for binding metals than the colloidal fractions in the urban and agricultural lowland rivers. Aggregation of these colloids may provide an important mechanism for formation of larger suspended particulates, accounting for a higher degree of metal enrichment in the acid-available particulate fractions of the upland moorland and lowland industrial rivers, than in the lowland agricultural and urban rivers. This mechanism of transfer of contaminants to larger aggregates via colloidal intermediates, known as ‘colloidal pumping’ may also provide a mechanism for particulate P formation and the high proportion of P being transported in the particulate fraction in the uplands. The cross-flow ultrafiltration data also allowed refinement of partition coefficients, by accounting for colloids within the solids phase and replacing the filtered (< 0.45 μm) fraction with the truly dissolved (< 1 kDa) concentrations. These provided a clearer description of the controls on metal and P partitioning along the upland-lowland continuum. -- Highlights: ► Using cross-flow ultrafiltration, we assess the role of colloids in macronutrient and metal partitioning

  6. Actinide migration from contaminated soil to surface water at the rocky flats environmental technology site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Surficial soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contain elevated levels of 239,240 Pu and 241 Am due to wind dispersal of soil particles, contaminated in the 1960's by leaking drums stored on the 903 Pad. Over the past 4 years, actinide mobility in the surface environment at RFETS, Golden, Colorado, USA, was examined through field and laboratory experiments. From measurements of total 239,240 Pu and 241 Am concentrations in storm runoff and pond discharge samples, collected during spring and summer times, it was established that most of the actinide transport from contaminated soils to streams occurred in the particulate (0.45μm) and colloidal (3kDa - 0.45μm) phases. Controlled laboratory investigations of soil resuspension, indicated that remobilization of colloid-bound Pu during soil erosion events can be enhanced by humic acids. 2-D Polyacrylamide Gel electrophoresis (PAGE) experiments of radiolabeled colloidal organic and inorganic matter, extracted from RFETS soils, suggested that colloidal Pu, which was focused at pH IEP of 4.5, is mainly associated with organic (humic acids) colloids of 10-15 kDa molecular weight. Pu(IV) oxide and inorganic colloids such as iron and aluminum oxides have pH IEP of 8-10. While some clay minerals also have pH IEP of 3-5, no Al was found coincident with Pu. This finding has important ramifications for possible remediation, erosion controls, and land-management strategies. (author)

  7. The actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter of coordination compound chemistry is devoted to the actinides and starts with a general survey. Most of the chapter relates to thorium and uranium but protactinium, neptunium and plutonium are included. There are sections on nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, selenium, tellurium and halogen ligands of the metals in their +3, +4, +5 and +6 oxidation states and of the transplutonium elements in their +2, +3, +4, and +5 oxidation states. (UK)

  8. The role of colloids and suspended particles in radionuclide transport in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.

    1994-02-01

    AECL Research is developing a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in a deep engineered vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield and is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to document its case for the acceptability of the disposal concept. This report, one in a series of supporting documents for the EIS, addresses the role of particles in radionuclide transport. It summarizes our studies of natural particles in groundwater and presents the arguments used to justify the omission of particle-facilitated transport in the geosphere model that is based on the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) and used in the postclosure assessment study case. Because radiocolloids formed in the vault will not be able to migrate through the clay buffer, radiocolloid formation in the geosphere will be determined by the sorption of radionuclides onto particles in groundwater. These particles consist of typical fracture-lining minerals, such as clays, micas and quartz; precipitated particles, such as colloidal silica and Fe-Si oxyhydroxides; and organic particles. In groundwater from the WRA, the average concentrations of colloids and suspended particles are 0.34 and 1.4 mg/L respectively. Particle-facilitated transport is not included in the geosphere model because the concentrations of particles in groundwater from the WRA are too low to have a significant impact on radionuclide transport. (author). 92 refs., 11 tabs., 13 figs

  9. Diffusion of organic colloids in compacted bentonite. The influence of ionic strength on molecular size and transport capacity of the colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, S.; Eriksen, Trygve E.

    2000-09-01

    Diffusion of radionuclides in compacted bentonite can be affected by inorganic and organic colloids if the radionuclides form complexes with the colloids. Formation and mobility of the colloid-radionuclide complexes will be governed by the properties of the colloids as well as the competition between complexation and sorption of the radionuclides on bentonite. This report presents the results of experiments with organic colloids humic acid (HA) and lignosulfonate (LS). The aim of the experiments has been to describe the HA and LS properties: size distribution, acidity, sorption on bentonite, diffusivity in compacted bentonite, complexation with strontium, and diffusion of strontium in bentonite in the presence of HA. This study indicates that the diffusion of cationic radionuclides like Sr 2+ is not affected by the presence of HA in high ionic strength solution. In 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution, HA is most probably not available for complexation due to coiling and shielding of the negative sites

  10. Uranium and Cesium sorption to bentonite colloids in high salinity and carbonate-rich environments: Implications for radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, E. L.; Teutsch, N.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Weisbrod, N.

    2017-12-01

    When radionuclides are leaked into the subsurface due to engineered waste disposal container failure, the ultimate barrier to migration of radionuclides into local aquifers is sorption to the surrounding rock matrix and sediments, which often includes a bentonite backfill. The extent of this sorption is dependent on pH, ionic strength, surface area availability, radionuclide concentration, surface mineral composition, and solution chemistry. Colloidal-sized bentonite particles eroded from the backfill have been shown to facilitate the transport of radionuclides sorbed to them away from their source. Thus, sorption of radionuclides such as uranium and cesium to bentonite surfaces can be both a mobilization or retardation factor. Though numerous studies have been conducted to-date on sorption of radionuclides under low ionic strength and carbonate-poor conditions, there has been little research conducted on the behavior of radionuclides in high salinities and carbonate rich conditions typical of aquifers in the vicinity of some potential nuclear repositories. This study attempts to characterize the sorption properties of U(VI) and Cs to bentonite colloids under these conditions using controlled batch experiments. Results indicated that U(VI) undergoes little to no sorption to bentonite colloids in a high-salinity (TDS= 9000 mg/L) artificial groundwater. This lack of sorption was attributed to the formation of CaUO2(CO3)22- and Ca2UO2(CO3)3 aqueous ions which stabilize the UO22+ ions in solution. In contrast, Cs exhibited greater sorption, the extent to which was influenced greatly by the matrix water's ionic strength and the colloid concentration used. Surprisingly, when both U and Cs were together, the presence of U(VI) in solution decreased Cs sorption, possibly due to the formation of stabilizing CaUO2(CO3)22- anions. The implications of this research are that rather than undergoing colloid-facilitated transport, U(VI) is expected to migrate similarly to a

  11. EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and solute/colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.S.; Pruess, K.

    1998-04-01

    EOS9nT is a new TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and transport of an arbitrary number n of tracers (solutes and/or colloids) in the subsurface. The module first solves the flow-related equations, which are comprised of (a) the Richards equation and, depending on conditions, may also include (b) the flow equation of a dense brine or aqueous suspension and/or (c) the heat equation. A second set of transport equations, corresponding to the n tracers, are then solved sequentially. The low concentrations of the n tracers are considered to have no effect on the liquid phase, thus making possible the decoupling of their equations. The first set of equations in EOS9nT provides the flow regime and account for fluid density variations due to thermal and/or solute concentration effects. The n tracer transport equations account for sorption, radioactive decay, advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, molecular diffusion, as well as filtration (for colloids only). EOS9nT can handle gridblocks or irregular geometry in three-dimensional domains. Preliminary results from four 1-D verification problems show an excellent agreement between the numerical predictions and the known analytical solutions

  12. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  13. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of 137Cs in Fracture-Fill Material. Experiments and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-29

    In this study, we demonstrate how a combination of batch sorption/desorption experiments and column transport experiments were used to effectively parameterize a model describing the colloid-facilitated transport of Cs in the Grimsel granodiorite/FFM system. Cs partition coefficient estimates onto both the colloids and the stationary media obtained from the batch experiments were used as initial estimates of partition coefficients in the column experiments, and then the column experiment results were used to obtain refined estimates of the number of different sorption sites and the adsorption and desorption rate constants of the sites. The desorption portion of the column breakthrough curves highlighted the importance of accounting for adsorption-desorption hysteresis (or a very nonlinear adsorption isotherm) of the Cs on the FFM in the model, and this portion of the breakthrough curves also dictated that there be at least two different types of sorption sites on the FFM. In the end, the two-site model parameters estimated from the column experiments provided excellent matches to the batch adsorption/desorption data, which provided a measure of assurance in the validity of the model.

  14. Actinide separation by electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, S.P.; Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Grimmett, D.L.; Roy, J.J.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Takahashi, N.

    1995-01-01

    TRUMP-S is a pyrochemical process being developed for the recovery of actinides from PUREX wastes. This paper describes development of the electrochemical partitioning step for recovery of actinides in the TRUMP-S process. The objectives are to remove 99 % of each actinide from PUREX wastes, with a product that is > 90 % actinides. Laboratory tests indicate that > 99 % of actinides can be removed in the electrochemical partitioning step. A dynamic (not equilibrium) process model predicts that 90 wt % product actinide content can be achieved through 99 % actinide removal. Accuracy of model simulation results were confirmed in tests with rare earths. (authors)

  15. On the Failure of Upscaling the Single-Collector Efficiency to the Transport of Colloids in an Array of Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, F.; Tosco, T.; Sethi, R.

    2017-12-01

    Colloidal transport and deposition in saturated porous media are phenomena of considerable importance in a large number of natural processes and engineering applications, such as the contaminant and microorganism propagation in aquifer systems, the development of innovative groundwater remediation technologies, air and water filtration, and many others. Therefore, a thorough understanding of particle filtration is essential for predicting the transport and fate of colloids in the subsurface environment. The removal efficiency of a filter is a key aspect for colloid transport in porous media. Several efforts were devoted to derive accurate correlations for the single collector efficiency, one of the key concept in the filtration theory. However, up scaling this parameter to the entire porous medium is still a challenge. The common up-scaling approach assumes the deposition to be independent of the transport history, which means that the collector efficiency is considered uniform along the porous medium. However, previous works showed that this approach is inadequate under unfavorable deposition conditions. This study demonstrates that it is not adequate even in the simplest case of favorable deposition. Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations were run for a simplify porous media geometry, composed of a vertical array of 50 identical spherical collectors. A combination of Lagrangian and Eulerian simulations were performed to analyze the particle transport under a broad range of parameters (i.e., particle size, particle density, water velocity). The results show the limits of the existing models to interpret the experimental data. In fact, the outcome evidenced that when particle deposition is not controlled by Brownian diffusion, non-exponential concentration profiles are retrieved, in contrast with the assumption of uniform efficiency. Moreover, when the deposition mechanisms of sedimentation and interception dominate, the efficiency of the first sphere of the

  16. Robust membrane systems for actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Bluhm, Elizabeth A.; Abney, Kent D.; Ehler, Deborah S.; Bauer, Eve; Le, Quyen T.; Young, Jennifer S.; Ford, Doris K.; Pesiri, David R.; Dye, Robert C.; Robison, Thomas W.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Redondo, Antonio; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan L.

    2000-01-01

    Our objective in this project is to develop very stable thin membrane structures containing ionic recognition sites that facilitate the selective transport of target metal ions, especially the actinides

  17. Role of riverine colloids in macronutrient and metal partitioning and transport, along an upland-lowland land-use continuum, under low-flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, H.P., E-mail: hpj@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Neal, C. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Rowland, A.P. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Neal, M.; Morris, P.N. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Lead, J.R. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Science, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lawlor, A.J.; Woods, C.; Vincent, C.; Guyatt, H.; Hockenhull, K. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    An assessment is made of the role of riverine colloids in macronutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon), metal and trace element partitioning and transport, for five rivers in the Ribble and Wyre catchments in north-western England, under baseflow/near-baseflow conditions. Cross-flow ultrafiltration was used to separate colloidal (< 0.45 Micro-Sign m > 1 kDa) and truly dissolved (< 1 kDa) fractions from river water. Clear patterns were observed, along the upland-lowland land use continuum, in the partitioning and transport of macronutrients and metals between the colloidal, truly dissolved and acid-available particulate (> 0.45 {mu}m, suspended) fractions. Of these operationally-defined fractions measured, colloids were generally more important for both macronutrient and metal transport in the upland than in the lowland rivers. The results suggest that organic moieties in truly dissolved form from sewage effluent may have a greater capacity to chelate metals. Organic-rich colloids in the upland moorlands and metal oxide colloidal precipitates in the industrial rivers had a higher capacity for binding metals than the colloidal fractions in the urban and agricultural lowland rivers. Aggregation of these colloids may provide an important mechanism for formation of larger suspended particulates, accounting for a higher degree of metal enrichment in the acid-available particulate fractions of the upland moorland and lowland industrial rivers, than in the lowland agricultural and urban rivers. This mechanism of transfer of contaminants to larger aggregates via colloidal intermediates, known as 'colloidal pumping' may also provide a mechanism for particulate P formation and the high proportion of P being transported in the particulate fraction in the uplands. The cross-flow ultrafiltration data also allowed refinement of partition coefficients, by accounting for colloids within the solids phase and replacing the filtered (< 0.45 {mu}m) fraction with the truly

  18. Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1994-01-01

    The disposition of actinide elements released from high-level waste glasses into a tuff groundwater in laboratory tests at 90 degrees C at various glass surface area/leachant volume ratios (S/V) between dissolved, suspended, and sorbed fractions has been measured. While the maximum release of actinides is controlled by the corrosion rate of the glass matrix, their solubility and sorption behavior affects the amounts present in potentially mobile phases. Actinide solubilities are affected by the solution pH and the presence of complexants released from the glass, such as sulfate, phosphate, and chloride, radiolytic products, such as nitrate and nitrite, and carbonate. Sorption onto inorganic colloids formed during lass corrosion may increase the amounts of actinides in solution, although subsequent sedimentation of these colloids under static conditions leads to a significant reduction in the amount of actinides in solution. The solution chemistry and observed actinide behavior depend on the S/V of the test. Tests at high S/V lead to higher pH values, greater complexant concentrations, and generate colloids more quickly than tests at low S/V. The S/V also affects the rate of glass corrosion

  19. Actinide metal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage

  20. Electrohydrodynamic fibrillation governed enhanced thermal transport in dielectric colloids under a field stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Purbarun; Maganti, Lakshmi Sirisha; Harikrishnan, A R

    2018-05-30

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids are known to exhibit enhanced viscous effects under an electric field stimulus. The present article reports the hitherto unreported phenomenon of greatly enhanced thermal conductivity in such electro-active colloidal dispersions in the presence of an externally applied electric field. Typical ER fluids are synthesized employing dielectric fluids and nanoparticles and experiments are performed employing an in-house designed setup. Greatly augmented thermal conductivity under a field's influence was observed. Enhanced thermal conduction along the fibril structures under the field effect is theorized as the crux of the mechanism. The formation of fibril structures has also been experimentally verified employing microscopy. Based on classical models for ER fluids, a mathematical formalism has been developed to predict the propensity of chain formation and statistically feasible chain dynamics at given Mason numbers. Further, a thermal resistance network model is employed to computationally predict the enhanced thermal conduction across the fibrillary colloid microstructure. Good agreement between the mathematical model and the experimental observations is achieved. The domineering role of thermal conductivity over relative permittivity has been shown by proposing a modified Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) formalism. The findings have implications towards better physical understanding and design of ER fluids from both 'smart' viscoelastic as well as thermally active materials points of view.

  1. Actinide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Paul L. [Geochem Australia, Kiama, NSW (Australia); Ekberg, Christian [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Nuclear Chemistry/Industrial Materials Recycling

    2016-07-01

    All isotopes of actinium are radioactive and exist in aqueous solution only in the trivalent state. There have been very few studies on the hydrolytic reactions of actinium(III). The hydrolysis reactions for uranium would only be important in alkaline pH conditions. Thermodynamic parameters for the hydrolysis species of uranium(VI) and its oxide and hydroxide phases can be determined from the stability and solubility constants. The hydrolytic behaviour of neptunium(VI) is quite similar to that of uranium(VI). The solubility constant of NpO{sub 2}OH(am) has been reported a number of times for both zero ionic strength and in fixed ionic strength media. Americium can form four oxidation states in aqueous solution, namely trivalent, tetravalent, pentavalent and hexavalent. Desire, Hussonnois and Guillaumont determined stability constants for the species AmOH{sup 2+} for the actinides, plutonium(III), americium(III), curium(III), berkelium(III) and californium(III) using a solvent extraction technique.

  2. Actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    All isotopes of actinium are radioactive and exist in aqueous solution only in the trivalent state. There have been very few studies on the hydrolytic reactions of actinium(III). The hydrolysis reactions for uranium would only be important in alkaline pH conditions. Thermodynamic parameters for the hydrolysis species of uranium(VI) and its oxide and hydroxide phases can be determined from the stability and solubility constants. The hydrolytic behaviour of neptunium(VI) is quite similar to that of uranium(VI). The solubility constant of NpO 2 OH(am) has been reported a number of times for both zero ionic strength and in fixed ionic strength media. Americium can form four oxidation states in aqueous solution, namely trivalent, tetravalent, pentavalent and hexavalent. Desire, Hussonnois and Guillaumont determined stability constants for the species AmOH 2+ for the actinides, plutonium(III), americium(III), curium(III), berkelium(III) and californium(III) using a solvent extraction technique.

  3. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  4. Colloid migration in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs

  5. Particulate, colloidal, and solution phase associations of plutonium, americium, and uranium in surface and groundwater at the Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnish, R.A.; McKnight, D.M.; Ranville, J.F.; Stephens, V.C.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    With the cessation of plutonium processing at the D.O.E.-administered Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, CO, the focus of activities at the facility has switched to contaminant assessment and potential remediation strategies. In this context the authors began a study in 1991 to determine the potential for colloid-facilitated transport of the actinides Pu, Am, and in surface- and groundwater at this site. Using the technique of tangential flow ultrafiltration, the authors isolated particles from four size fractions at one groundwater well and two surface water seeps to determine the distribution of Pu, Am, and U among particulate, colloidal, and dissolved aqueous phases. Analysis of particle isolates and filtrate fractions showed significant associations of Am and Pu with colloidal and particulate size particles; uranium isotopes were associated mainly with low molecular weight organic species. The results indicate a potential for colloidal-facilitated transport of the actinides Pu and Am and a significant contribution by low molecular weight natural organic matter to uranium transport

  6. Colloid remediation in groundwater by polyelectrolyte capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.; Rao, S.; Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study to characterize groundwater colloids, to understand the geochemical factors affecting colloid transport in groundwater, and to develop an in-situ colloid remediation process. The colloids and suspended particulate matter used in this study were collected from a perched aquifer site that has radiation levels several hundred times the natural background and where previous researchers have measured and reported the presence of radiocolloids containing plutonium and americium. At this site, radionuclides have spread over several kilometers. Inorganic colloids collected from water samples are characterized with respect to concentration, mineralogy, size distribution, electrophoretic mobility (zeta potential), and radioactivity levels. Presented are the methods used to investigate the physiochemical factors affecting colloid transport and the preliminary analytical results. Included below are a description of a colloid transport model and the corresponding computational code, water analyses, characterization of the inorganic colloids, and a conceptual description of a process for in-situ colloid remediation using the phenomenon of polyelectrolyte capture

  7. Filtration of polydispersed colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic microscopic form of the population balance model is applied to the problem of polydispersed particle capture in one spatial diffusion. This mathematical modeling approach can be applied to the difficult and potentially important problem of particulate (radiocolloid) transport in the groundwater surrounding a nuclear waste disposal site. To demonstrate the population balance methodology, the equations were developed and used to investigate transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. Modeling simulations were compared to experimental column data. The multidimensional form of the population balance equation was used to analyze the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids. A numerical model was developed to describe transport of polydispersed colloids through a one-dimensional porous region. The effects of various size distributions were investigated in terms of capture efficiency. For simulating the column data, it was found by trial and error that as part of the population balance model a linear size dependent filtration function gave a good fit to the measured colloid concentration profile. The effects of constant versus size dependent filtration coefficients were compared and the differences illustrated by the calculated colloid profile within the column. Also observed from the model calculations was the dramatically changing liquid-phase colloid-size distribution which was plotted as a function of position down the column. This modeling approach was excellent for describing and understanding microscopic filtration in porous media

  8. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: complexation and transport of actinides. First technical progress report (work period 01.97 - 12.97)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckau, G.

    1998-08-01

    The present report describes progress within the first year of the EC-project 'Effects of Humic Substances on the Migration of Radionuclides: Complexation and Transport of Actinides'. The project is conducted within the EC-Cluster 'Radionuclide Transport/Retardation Processes'. Contrary to formal requirements of the Commission, this report with a great deal of detail is established already after one year of project work. It is scheduled to be followed by a second technical progress report covering the second year of the project. In agreement with the contractual obligations a final report of similar technical detail will also be generated. The report contains an executive summary written by the coordinator (FZK/INE) with strong support from the other three task leaders (BGS, CEA-SGC and RMC-E). More detailed results are given by individual contributions of the project partners in 13 annexes. In the executive summary report the origin of results presented is given, also serving as guidance for finding more detailed results in the annexes. Not all results are discussed or referred to in the executive summary report and thus readers with a deeper interest also need to consult the annexes. (orig.)

  9. Subcritical limits for special fissile actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    Critical masses and subcritical mass limits in oxide-water mixtures were calculated for actinide nuclides other than /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 239/Pu that have an odd number of neutrons in the nucleus; S/sub n/ transport theory was used together with cross sections, drawn from the GLASS multigroup library, developed to provide accurate forecasts of actinide production at Savannah River

  10. Proposal for experiments with actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted in which critical masses for some actinide isotopes were calculated with the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) Transport computer code. Different spherical computer models were used for even- and odd-neutron nuclides. Critical masses obtained are tabulated for Np-237, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, Pu-241, and Am-242m, together with indirect experimental data. Experimental data are needed for actinides with odd number of neutrons

  11. Molecular Doping of the Hole-Transporting Layer for Efficient, Single-Step Deposited Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Kirmani, Ahmad R.

    2017-07-31

    Employment of thin perovskite shells and metal halides as surface-passivants for colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have been important, recent developments in CQD optoelectronics. These have opened the route to single-step deposited high-performing CQD solar cells. These promising architectures employ a QD hole-transporting layer (HTL) whose intrinsically shallow Fermi level (EF) restricts band-bending at maximum power-point during solar cell operation limiting charge collection. Here, we demonstrate a generalized approach to effectively balance band-edge energy levels of the main CQD absorber and charge-transport layer for these high-performance solar cells. Briefly soaking the QD HTL in a solution of the metal-organic p-dopant, molybdenum tris(1-(trifluoroacetyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)ethane-1,2-dithiolene), effectively deepens its Fermi level, resulting in enhanced band bending at the HTL:absorber junction. This blocks the back-flow of photo-generated electrons, leading to enhanced photocurrent and fill factor compared to undoped devices. We demonstrate 9.0% perovskite-shelled and 9.5% metal-halide-passivated CQD solar cells, both achieving ca. 10% relative enhancements over undoped baselines.

  12. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. VI. Short-term risk analysis of reprocessing, refabrication, and transportation: appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, R.R.; Jackson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has prepared a set of documents that evaluate a Partitioning-Transmutation (PT) fuel cycle relative to a Reference cycle employing conventional fuel-material recovery methods. The PT cycle uses enhanced recovery methods so that most of the long-lived actinides are recycled to nuclear power plants and transmuted to shorter-lived materials, thereby reducing the waste toxicity. This report compares the two fuel cycles on the basis of the short-term radiological and nonradiological risks they present to the public and to workers. The accidental radiological risk to the public is analyzed by estimating the probabilities of sets of accidents; the consequences are calculated using the CRAC code appropriately modified for the material composition. Routine radiological risks to the public are estimated from the calculated release amounts; the effects are calculated using the CRAC code. Radiological occupational risks are determined from prior experience, projected standards, and estimates of accident risk. Nonradiological risks are calculated from the number of personnel involved, historical experience, and epidemiological studies. The result of this analysis is that the short-term risk of PT is 2.9 times greater than that of the Reference cycle, primarily due to the larger amount of industry. This conclusion is strongly dominated by the nonradiological risk, which is about 150 times greater than the radiological risk. The absolute risk as estimated for the fuel cycle portions considered in this report is 0.91 fatalities/GWe-year for the PT cycle and 0.34 fatalities/GWe-year for the Reference cycle. This should be compared with Inhaber's estimate of 1.5 for nuclear and 150 for coal. All of the risks assumed here are associated with the production of one billion watts of electricity (GWe) per year

  13. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. VI. Short-term risk analysis of reprocessing, refabrication, and transportation: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, R.; Jackson, R.

    1980-03-01

    A Partitioning-Transmutation (PT) fuel cycle is being compared to a Reference cycle employing conventional fuel-material recovery methods. The PT cycle uses enhanced recovery methods so that most of the long-lived actinides are recycled to nuclear power plants and transmuted thereby reducing the waste toxicity. This report compares the two fuel cycles on the basis of the short-term radiological and nonradiological risks. The accidental radiological risk to the public is analyzed by estimating the probabilities of sets of accidents; the consequences are calculated using the risk, which is RAC code. Routine radiological risks to the public are estimated from the calculated release amounts, also using the CRAC code. Radiological occupational risks are determined from prior experience, projected standards, and estimates of accident risk. Nonradiological risks are calculated from the number of personnel involved, historical experience, and epidemiological studies. Result of this analysis is that the short-term risk of PT is 2.9 times greater than that of the Reference cycle, primarily due to the larger amount of industry. The nonradiological risk which is about 150 times greater than the radiological risk. If the radiological risk is consdered alone, the ratio of PT to Reference risk is 3, composed as follows: radiological operations affecting the public 5, radiological operations affecting the workers 1.7, and radiological accidents affecting the public 1.4, all in the order of decreasing risk. The absolute risk as estimated for the fuel cycle portions considered in this report is 0.91 fatality/GWe-year for the PT cycle and 0.34 fatality/GWe-year for the reference cycle; this compares with 1.5 for nuclear and 150 for coal. All of the risks assumed here are associated with the production of one billion watts of electricity (GWe) per year

  14. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. VI. Short-term risk analysis of reprocessing, refabrication, and transportation: appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.R.; Jackson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has prepared a set of documents that evaluate a Partitioning-Transmutation (PT) fuel cycle relative to a Reference cycle employing conventional fuel-material recovery methods. The PT cycle uses enhanced recovery methods so that most of the long-lived actinides are recycled to nuclear power plants and transmuted to shorter-lived materials, thereby reducing the waste toxicity. This report compares the two fuel cycles on the basis of the short-term radiological and nonradiological risks they present to the public and to workers. The accidental radiological risk to the public is analyzed by estimating the probabilities of sets of accidents; the consequences are calculated using the CRAC code appropriately modified for the material composition. Routine radiological risks to the public are estimated from the calculated release amounts; the effects are calculated using the CRAC code. Radiological occupational risks are determined from prior experience, projected standards, and estimates of accident risk. Nonradiological risks are calculated from the number of personnel involved, historical experience, and epidemiological studies. The result of this analysis is that the short-term risk of PT is 2.9 times greater than that of the Reference cycle, primarily due to the larger amount of industry. This conclusion is strongly dominated by the nonradiological risk, which is about 150 times greater than the radiological risk. The absolute risk as estimated for the fuel cycle portions considered in this report is 0.91 fatalities/GWe-year for the PT cycle and 0.34 fatalities/GWe-year for the Reference cycle. This should be compared with Inhaber's estimate of 1.5 for nuclear and 150 for coal. All of the risks assumed here are associated with the production of one billion watts of electricity (GWe) per year.

  15. The use of synthetic colloids in tracer transport experiments in saturated rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-08-01

    Studies of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in saturated, fractured geologic media are of great interest to researchers studying the potential long-term storage of hazardous wastes in or near such media. A popular technique for conducting such studies is to introduce tracers having different chemical and physical properties into a system and then observe the tracers at one or more downstream locations, inferring flow and transport mechanisms from the breakthrough characteristics of the different tracers. Many tracer studies have been conducted in saturated, fractured media to help develop and/or refine models capable of predicting contaminant transport over large scales in such media

  16. Lanthanide/Actinide Opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Aimee; Fontes, Christopher J.

    2018-06-01

    Gravitational wave observations benefit from accompanying electromagnetic signals in order to accurately determine the sky positions of the sources. The ejecta of neutron star mergers are expected to produce such electromagnetic transients, called macronovae (e.g. the recent and unprecedented observation of GW170817). Characteristics of the ejecta include large velocity gradients and the presence of heavy r-process elements, which pose significant challenges to the accurate calculation of radiative opacities and radiation transport. Opacities include a dense forest of bound-bound features arising from near-neutral lanthanide and actinide elements. Here we present an overview of current theoretical opacity determinations that are used by neutron star merger light curve modelers. We will touch on atomic physics and plasma modeling codes that are used to generate these opacities, as well as the limited body of laboratory experiments that may serve as points of validation for these complex atomic physics calculations.

  17. Factors affecting actinide solubility in a repository for spent fuel, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, Margit

    1986-07-01

    The main tasks in the study were to get information on the chemical conditions in a repository for spent fuel and information on factors affecting releases of actinides from spent fuel and solubility of actinides in a repository for spent fuel. The work in this field started at the Reactor Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1982. This is a report on the effects on the main parameters, Eh, pH, carbonate, organic compounds, colloids, microbes and radiation on the actinide solubility in the nearfield of the repository. Another task has been to identify available models and reported experience from actinide solubility calculations with different codes. 167 refs

  18. Characterization of colloids in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.

    1987-07-01

    Natural colloids in the Gorleben aquifer systems have been investigated as for their chemical composition, quantification and size distribution. Humic substances appear to be the major organic materials in these groundwaters, generating humic colloids which are analysed to be humic acid (and fulvic acid) loaded with a large number of trace heavy metal ions. These metal ions include natural homologues of actinides and some fission products in trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent state. Concentrations of trivalent and tetravalent heavy metal ions are linearly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DDC) concentration in different groundwaters. The DOC is found to be present as humic colloids. The Am 3+ ions introduced in such a groundwater readily undergo the generation of its pseudocolloids through sorption or ion exchange reactions with humic colloids. The chemical behaviour of Am(III), being similar to the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe 3+ , REE etc. found in natural colloids, has been investigated by laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). Groundwaters from Ispra, Markham Clinton and Felslabor Grimsel. Bidistilled water and one of Gorleben groundwaters, Gohy 1011, are taken for the purpose of comparison. This groundwater contains the least amount of natural colloids of all Gorleben groundwaters hitherto investigated. An indirect quantification is made by comparison of the LPAS results with experiment from Latex solution. (orig./IRB)

  19. Synthesis of tetravalent actinide chlorides. Versatile compounds for actinide chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Juliane [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2016-07-01

    Anhydrous actinide tetrachlorides (AnCl{sub 4}) were synthesized under mild conditions to provide versatile compounds for actinide chemistry. They enable a direct access to actinide complexes with organic and inorganic ligands.

  20. A review of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides in the near and far field. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, E.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides in the near and far field is discussed and DOE and Nirex funded work is compared with relevant studies by other workers. Gaps in the DOE and Nirex programmes are identified and suggestions for further research are made. This is Part 3 of a three-part review. Part 1 reviews fundamental theory and DOE and Nirex funded work and Part 2 is a comprehensive bibliography (with abstracts). (Author)

  1. Transport and Retention of Colloids in Porous Media: Does Shape Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were c...

  2. Sepia ink as a surrogate for colloid transport tests in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Gómez, Diego; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; López-Periago, J. Eugenio; Paradelo, Marcos

    2016-08-01

    We examined the suitability of the ink of Sepia officinalis as a surrogate for transport studies of microorganisms and microparticles in porous media. Sepia ink is an organic pigment consisted on a suspension of eumelanin, and that has several advantages for its use as a promising material for introducing the frugal-innovation in the fields of public health and environmental research: very low cost, non-toxic, spherical shape, moderate polydispersivity, size near large viruses, non-anomalous electrokinetic behavior, low retention in the soil, and high stability. Electrokinetic determinations and transport experiments in quartz sand columns and soil columns were done with purified suspensions of sepia ink. Influence of ionic strength on the electrophoretic mobility of ink particles showed the typical behavior of polystyrene latex spheres. Breakthrough curve (BTC) and retention profile (RP) in quartz sand columns showed a depth dependent and blocking adsorption model with an increase in adsorption rates with the ionic strength. Partially saturated transport through undisturbed soil showed less retention than in quartz sand, and matrix exclusion was also observed. Quantification of ink in leachate fractions by light absorbance is direct, but quantification in the soil profile with moderate to high organic matter content was rather cumbersome. We concluded that sepia ink is a suitable cheap surrogate for exploring transport of pathogenic viruses, bacteria and particulate contaminants in groundwater, and could be used for developing frugal-innovation related with the assessment of soil and aquifer filtration function, and monitoring of water filtration systems in low-income regions.

  3. Actinide science. Fundamental and environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, Gregory R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear test explosions and reactor wastes have deposited an estimated 16x10 15 Bq of plutonium into the world's aquatic systems. However, plutonium concentration in open ocean waters is orders of magnitude less, indicating that most of the plutonium is quite insolvable in marine waters and has been incorporated into sediments. Actinide ions in waters often are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium and their solubility and migration behavior is related to the form in which the nuclides were introduced into the aquatic system. Actinide solubility depends on such factors as pH(hydrolysis), E H (oxidation state), reaction with complexants (e.g. carbonate, phosphate, humic acid, etc.) sorption to surfaces of minerals and/or colloids, etc., in the water. The most significant of these variables is the oxidation sate of the metal ion. The simultaneous presence of more than one oxidation state for some actinides (e.g. plutonium) in a solution complicates actinide environmental behavior. Both Np(V)O 2 + and Pu(V)O 2 + , the most significant soluble states in natural oxic waters are relatively noncomplexing and resistant to hydrolysis and subsequent precipitation but can undergo reduction to the Pu(IV) oxidation state with its different elemental behavior. The solubility of NpO 2 + can be as high as 10 -4 M while that of PuO 2 + is more limited by reduction to the insoluble tetravalent species, Pu(OH) 4 , (pK SP - 56). The net solubility of hexavalent UO 2 2+ in sea water is also limited by hydrolysis; however, it has a relatively high concentration due to formation of carbonate complexes. The insoluble trivalent americium hydroxocarbonate, Am(CO) 3 (OH), is the limiting species for the solubility of Am(III) in sea water. Thorium is found exclusively as the tetravalent species and its solubility is limited by the formation of quite insoluble Th(OH) 4 . The chemistry of actinide ions in the environment is reviewed to show the spectrum of reactions that can occur in

  4. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E.; Charlet, L.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the 238 U initially present in the soil column and 233 U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  5. Entropy production and rectification efficiency in colloid transport along a pulsating channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florencia Carusela, M.; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2018-06-01

    We study the current rectification of particles moving in a pulsating channel under the influence of an applied force. We have shown the existence of different rectification scenarios in which entropic and energetic effects compete. The effect can be quantified by means of a rectification coefficient that is analyzed in terms of the force, the frequency and the diffusion coefficient. The energetic cost of the motion of the particles expressed in terms of the entropy production depends on the importance of the entropic contribution to the total force. Rectification is more important at low values of the applied force when entropic effects become dominant. In this regime, the entropy production is not invariant under reversal of the applied force. The phenomenon observed could be used to optimize transport in microfluidic devices or in biological channels.

  6. Active colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranson, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior. (physics of our days)

  7. Modeling of the pollutant transport in fissured-porous media under consideration of colloids using the transport codes FRAME and COFRAME; Modellierung des Schadstofftransports in geklueftet-poroesen Medien unter Beruecksichtigung von Kolloiden mit den Transportprogrammen FRAME und COFRAME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Tatiana; Noseck, Ulrich; Wolf, Jens Wilhelm

    2014-05-15

    For the long-term safety analysis of final nuclear waste repositories the transport of pollutants from the repository into the biosphere three mostly independent subsystems are considered: the near field, the geosphere and the biosphere. Normally rocks include fissures or other disturbances. Porous materials in the rock matrix have usually a high water content and acts as storage for pollutants due to sorption and diffusion processes. The aim of the project is the development of calculation modules for the code RepoTREND that simulate the pollutant transport in saturated fissured-porous media taking into account the effect of colloids. FRAME describes the pollutant dispersion in a fissured-porous medium and COFRAME the colloid influenced transport in a fissured-porous medium.

  8. Interaction between actinides and protein: the calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulfert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Considering the environmental impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident, it is fundamental to study the mechanisms governing the effects of the released radionuclides on the biosphere and thus identify the molecular processes generating the transport and deposition of actinides, such as neptunium and uranium. However, the information about the microscopic aspect of the interaction between actinides and biological molecules (peptides, proteins...) is scarce. The data being mostly reported from a physiological point of view, the structure of the coordination sites remains largely unknown. These microscopic data are indeed essential for the understanding of the interdependency between structural aspect, function and affinity.The Calmodulin (CaM) (abbreviation for Calcium-Modulated protein), also known for its affinity towards actinides, acts as a metabolic regulator of calcium. This protein is a Ca carrier, which is present ubiquitously in the human body, may also bind other metals such as actinides. Thus, in case of a contamination, actinides that bind to CaM could avoid the protein to perform properly and lead to repercussions on a large range of vital functions.The complexation of Np and U was studied by EXAFS spectroscopy which showed that actinides were incorporated in a calcium coordination site. Once the thermodynamical and structural aspects studied, the impact of the coordination site distortion on the biological efficiency was analyzed. In order to evaluate these consequences, a calorimetric method based on enzyme kinetics was developed. This experiment, which was conducted with both uranium (50 - 500 nM) and neptunium (30 - 250 nM) showed a decrease of the heat produced by the enzymatic reaction with an increasing concentration of actinides in the medium. Our findings showed that the Calmodulin actinide complex works as an enzymatic inhibitor. Furthermore, at higher neptunium (250 nM) and uranium (500 nM) concentration the metals seem to have a poison

  9. Thermodynamic Properties of Actinides and Actinide Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Rudy J. M.; Morss, Lester R.; Fuger, Jean

    The necessity of obtaining accurate thermodynamic quantities for the actinide elements and their compounds was recognized at the outset of the Manhattan Project, when a dedicated team of scientists and engineers initiated the program to exploit nuclear energy for military purposes. Since the end of World War II, both fundamental and applied objectives have motivated a great deal of further study of actinide thermodynamics. This chapter brings together many research papers and critical reviews on this subject. It also seeks to assess, to systematize, and to predict important properties of the actinide elements, ions, and compounds, especially for species in which there is significant interest and for which there is an experimental basis for the prediction.

  10. Research in actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH - , CO 3 2- , PO 4 3- , humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements

  11. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  12. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  13. A review of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides in the near and far field. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, E.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The role of colloids in the release/transport of radionuclides covers a range of scientific disciplines and there is a need for a comprehensive review that pulls together all the relevant research. A literature review has, therefore, been carried out and a bibliography prepared. Entries are in alphabetical (first author) order and abstracts are provided. This is part 2 of a three-part review. Part 1 reviews fundamental theory and DOE and NIREX funded work while Part 3 compares DOE and NIREX-funded work with the other published work and identifies gaps in the DOE and NIREX programmes. (Author)

  14. Radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAMSEY, JAMES L.; BLAINE,R.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SMITH,L.N.; WALLACE,M.

    2000-05-22

    The following topics related to radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, and (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty. The presented results indicate that radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite does not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, no radionuclide transport to the boundary with the accessible environment was observed; thus the associated CCDFs for comparison with the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194) are degenerate in the sense of having a probability of zero of exceeding a release of zero.

  15. PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, J.B.

    1963-11-01

    A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

  16. Superconductivity in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Lawson, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The trends in the occurrence of superconductivity in actinide materials are discussed. Most of them seem to show simple transition metal behavior. However, the superconductivity of americium proves that the f electrons are localized in that element and that ''actinides'' is the correct name for this row of elements. Recently the superconductivity of UBe 13 and UPt 3 has been shown to be extremely unusual, and these compounds fall in the new class of compounds now known as heavy fermion materials

  17. Minor actinide transmutation using minor actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Yoshida, H.; Gunji, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of minor actinide burner reactor is proposed as an efficient way to transmute long-lived minor actinides in order to ease the burden of high-level radioactive waste disposal problem. Conceptual design study of minor actinide burner reactors was performed to obtain a reactor model with very hard neutron spectrum and very high neutron flux in which minor actinides can be fissioned efficiently. Two models of burner reactors were obtained, one with metal fuel core and the other with particle fuel core. Minor actinide transmutation by the actinide burner reactors is compared with that by power reactors from both the reactor physics and fuel cycle facilities view point. (author)

  18. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Z.M.; Ruhter, W.D.; Gunnink, R.

    1990-01-01

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  19. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  20. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  1. Colloid migration in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.R.; McDowell-Boyer; Sitar, N.

    1985-01-01

    Retention of radionuclides for long periods near waste repositories depends upon multiple barriers, one of which is adsorption to immobile solid surfaces. Since small particles and colloidal matter have high adsorption capacities per unit mass and can be mobile in subsurface flows, colloidal transport of waste components requires analysis. Theories for predicting colloid migration through porous media have been developed in the filtration literature. The applicability of filtration theories for predicting particle and colloid transport. Emphasis is on suspended matter much smaller than pore sizes, where physical and chemical forces control migration rather than size dependent physical straining. In general, experimentally verifiable theories exist for particle filtration by clean media, and a sensitivity analysis is possible on particle and media properties and fluid flow rate. When particle aggregates accumulate within pores, media permeability decreases, resulting in flow field alteration and possible radionuclide isolation. An analysis of the limited experimental data available indicates that present theories cannot predict long-term colloid transport when permeability reduction occurs. The coupling of colloid attachment processes and the hydrologic flow processes requires more extensive laboratory field research than has currently been carried out. An emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms is necessary to enhance long-term predictability

  2. The radiological impact of actinides discharged to the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Smith, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the radiological effects of releases of actinides to the Irish Sea from Sellafield, the major source. Exposure pathways to man since the commencement of discharges in 1952 are reviewed; the importance of actinides began to increase with increased discharges in the 1970s. With the demise of the porphyra/laverbread pathway due to transport difficulties, the pathway due to fish and shellfish consumption became critical, particularly for actinides through molluscan shellfish. A reassessment on the current basis of effective dose shows that peak exposures to the critical group of about 2 mSv yr -1 were received in the mid-1970s, about 30% of which was due to actinides. Effective doses have since reduced but the relative importance of actinides is greater, due to the interplay of discharges of radionuclides from Sellafield and their behaviour in the environment. Additive doses through sea food due to releases of natural radionuclides from the Marchon phosphate plant at Whitehaven are also considered, although the actinide component from this source has been small. Exposures due to actinides from Sellafield via other pathways are shown to be much lower than those involving sea food. Collective doses are also considered; these peaked at about 300 man-Sv to the European population (including the UK) in 1979, with only a few percent due to actinides. As in the case of critical group doses, the relative importance of actinides has increased in recent years within the decreasing total collective dose. For both critical group and collective doses, therefore, the actinide component needs to be kept under review. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Extraction chromatography of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    1978-01-01

    Extraction chromatography of actinides in the oxidation state from 2 to 6 is reviewed. Data on using neutral (tbp), basic (substituted ammonium salts) and acidic [di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA)] extracting agents ketones, esters, alcohols and β-diketones in this method are given. Using the example of actinide separation using D2EHPA, discussed are factors influencing the efficiency of their chromatography separation (nature and particle size of the carrier materials, extracting agents amount on the carrier, temperature and elution rate)

  4. Radiochemistry and actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.; Peneloux, A.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of trace amounts of actinide elements by means of radiochemistry, is discussed. The similarities between radiochemistry and actinide chemistry, in the case of species amount by cubic cm below 10 12 , are explained. The parameters which allow to define what are the observable chemical reactions, are given. The classification of radionuclides in micro or macrocomponents is considered. The validity of the mass action law and the partition function in the definition of the average number of species for trace amounts, is investigated. Examples illustrating the results are given

  5. A review on colloidal systems in general and in respect of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, Ulla

    1987-04-01

    Recently the possible importance of colloids in connection with nuclear waste disposal, especially in radionuclide migration has been emphasized. Several studies have been or are going to be initiated to investigate the occurrence of natural groundwater colloids and their properties as well as formation and properties of radiocolloids, especially pseudoradiocolloids. If colloids are found to be important, they also have to considered in the safety assessments of nuclear waste disposal. In order to do so, additional theory and equations have to be added to present codes and models. This study is a literature survey consisting first a general approach on colloidal systems and their properties. Then a review on natural groundwater colloids (clays and organs) is given following descriptions of several methods to study colloids. Lastly the role of colloids in nuclear waste disposal is discussed including especially some information about possible actinide colloids and some current research going on in this field. 96 refs

  6. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, J.D.F.; Russell, P.J.; Avery, R.G.

    1991-03-01

    A comprehensive investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low and intermediate level waste immobilised in cement. Several topics have been investigated using a wide range of advanced physico-chemical and analytical techniques. These include: (a) the study of formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates, (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments, (c) colloid sorption behaviour, (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates, and (e) preliminary assessment of colloid migration behaviour. It has been shown that the generation of colloids in cement leachates can arise from a process of nucleation and growth leading to an amorphous phase which is predominantly calcium silicate hydrate. Such colloidal material has a capacity for association with polyvalent rare earths and actinides and these may be significant in the source term and processes involving radionuclide retention in the near field. It has also been shown that the near-field aqueous chemistry (pH, Ca 2+ concentration) has a marked effect on colloid behaviour (deposition and stability). A mechanistic approach to predict colloid sorption affinity has been developed which highlights the importance of colloid characteristics and the nature of the ionic species. (author)

  7. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and

  8. Simulation of bentonite colloid migration through granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosicka, Dana; Hokr, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloidal bentonite particles generate at the interface of buffer and host rock in spent nuclear fuel repository due to an erosion process and migrate through granite by the water flow. Stability of these colloids and their migration possibilities have been studied on account of radionuclide transport possibility as colloid could carry adsorbed radionuclides in groundwater through granite. That is why a simulation of bentonite colloid migration in the surrounding of a repository might be requested. According to chemical condition as ionic strength and pH, the colloidal particles coagulate into clusters and that influence the migration of particles. The coagulation kinetics of natural bentonite colloids were experimentally studied in many articles, for example by light scattering techniques. We created a model of coagulation of bentonite colloids and simulation of a chosen experiment with use of the multicomponent reactive transport equation. The coagulation model describes clustering of particles due to attractive van der Waals forces as result of collision of particles due to heat fluctuation and different velocity of particles during sedimentation and velocity gradient of water flow. Next, the model includes influence of repulsive electrostatic forces among colloidal particles leading to stability of particles provided high surface charge of colloids. In the model, each group of clusters is transported as one solution component and the kinetics of coagulation are implemented as reactions between the components: a shift of particles among groups of particles with similar migration properties, according to size of the clusters of colloids. The simulation of migration of bentonite colloid through granite using the coagulation model was calibrated according to experiment results. On the basis of the simulation, one can estimate the basic processes that occur during bentonite colloid

  9. Actinides, the narrowwest bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Riseborough, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    A table of elements is shown that demonstrates the crossover from superconductivity to magnetism as well as regions of mixed valence. In particular, the actinides must eventually show 4f-electron like mixed valence, after the 5f-electrons become localized. There also seems to be an adiabatic continuation between heavy fermion and mixed valence behavior

  10. Actinide separative chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.

    2004-01-01

    Actinide separative chemistry has focused very heavy work during the last decades. The main was nuclear spent fuel reprocessing: solvent extraction processes appeared quickly a suitable, an efficient way to recover major actinides (uranium and plutonium), and an extensive research, concerning both process chemistry and chemical engineering technologies, allowed the industrial development in this field. We can observe for about half a century a succession of Purex plants which, if based on the same initial discovery (i.e. the outstanding properties of a molecule, the famous TBP), present huge improvements at each step, for a large part due to an increased mastery of the mechanisms involved. And actinide separation should still focus R and D in the near future: there is a real, an important need for this, even if reprocessing may appear as a mature industry. We can present three main reasons for this. First, actinide recycling appear as a key-issue for future nuclear fuel cycles, both for waste management optimization and for conservation of natural resource; and the need concerns not only major actinide but also so-called minor ones, thus enlarging the scope of the investigation. Second, extraction processes are not well mastered at microscopic scale: there is a real, great lack in fundamental knowledge, useful or even necessary for process optimization (for instance, how to design the best extracting molecule, taken into account the several notifications and constraints, from selectivity to radiolytic resistivity?); and such a need for a real optimization is to be more accurate with the search of always cheaper, cleaner processes. And then, there is room too for exploratory research, on new concepts-perhaps for processing quite new fuels- which could appear attractive and justify further developments to be properly assessed: pyro-processes first, but also others, like chemistry in 'extreme' or 'unusual' conditions (supercritical solvents, sono-chemistry, could be

  11. AMS of actinides in ground- and seawater: a new procedure for simultaneous analysis of U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotopes below ppq levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Francesca; Lagos, Markus; Plaschke, Markus; Schaefer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, KIT, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Steier, Peter [VERA Laboratory, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    U-236, Np-237, Pu isotopes and Am-243 were determined in ground- and seawater samples at levels below ppq with a maximum sample size of 0.250 l. Such high sensitivity measurement was possible by using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with an improved gas stripping and an additional high resolving magnet. The use of non-isotopic tracers was investigated in order to allow the determination of those nuclides, namely Np-237 and Am-243, for which isotopic tracers for mass spectrometry are rarely available. The actinides were concentrated from the sample matrix via iron hydroxide co-precipitation and measured sequentially without previous chemical separation from each other. The analytical method was validated with the analysis of IAEA 443 seawater Reference Material and applied to background samples from the Colloid Formation and Migration project at the Grimsel Test Site and to sea- and freshwater samples affected solely by global fallout. The sensitivity of the presented analytical method provides the capability to study the long-term release of actinide tracers in field experiments as well as the transport of actinides in a variety of environmental systems.

  12. Actinide oxide photodiode and nuclear battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Milan; Usov, Igor

    2017-12-05

    Photodiodes and nuclear batteries may utilize actinide oxides, such a uranium oxide. An actinide oxide photodiode may include a first actinide oxide layer and a second actinide oxide layer deposited on the first actinide oxide layer. The first actinide oxide layer may be n-doped or p-doped. The second actinide oxide layer may be p-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is n-doped, and the second actinide oxide layer may be n-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is p-doped. The first actinide oxide layer and the second actinide oxide layer may form a p/n junction therebetween. Photodiodes including actinide oxides are better light absorbers, can be used in thinner films, and are more thermally stable than silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide.

  13. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes

  14. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P.

    1997-04-01

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as `dissolved` Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H{sub 2}S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory ({sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th) continues to increase. The flux of {sup 232}Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m{sup 2}/y. 208 refs.

  15. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.

    1997-04-01

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as 'dissolved' Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H 2 S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory ( 232 Th and 230 Th) continues to increase. The flux of 232 Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m 2 /y. 208 refs

  16. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  17. Actinide recycling in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Wiese, H.W.; Krieg, B.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is an assessment of the transmutation of long-lived actinides and fission products and the incineration of plutonium for reducing the risk potential of radioactive waste from reactors in comparison to direct waste disposal. The contribution gives an interim account on homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling of 'risk nuclides' in thermal and fast reactors. Important results: - A homogeneous 5 percent admixture of minor actinides (MA) from N4-PWRs to EFR fuel would allow a transmutation not only of the EFR MA, but in addition of the MA from 5 or 6 PWRs of equal power. However, the incineration is restricted by safety considerations. - LWR have only a very low MA incineration potential, due to their disadvantageous neutron capture/fission ratio. - In order to keep the Cm inventory at a low level, it is advantageous to concentrate the Am heterogeneously in particular fuel elements or rods. (orig./HP)

  18. Photochemistry of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Bell, J.T.; Friedman, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    It has been found that all three major actinides have a useful variety of photochemical reactions which could be used to achieve a separations process that requires fewer reagents. Several features merit enumerating: (1) Laser photochemistry is not now as uniquely important in fuel reprocessing as it is in isotopic enrichment. The photochemistry can be successfully accomplished with conventional light sources. (2) The easiest place to apply photo-reprocessing is on the three actinides U, Pu, and Np. The solutions are potentially cleaner and more amenable to photoreactions. (3) Organic-phase photoreactions are probably not worth much attention because of the troublesome solvent redox chemistry associated with the photochemical reaction. (4) Upstream process treatment on the raffinate (dissolver solution) may never be too attractive since the radiation intensity precludes the usage of many optical materials and the nature of the solution is such that light transmission into it might be totally impossible

  19. Analytical chemistry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, H.; Marty, P.

    2001-01-01

    Different characterization methods specifically applied to the actinides are presented in this review such as ICP/OES (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry), ICP/MS (inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy-mass spectrometry), TIMS (thermal ionization-mass spectrometry) and GD/OES (flow discharge optical emission). Molecular absorption spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis are also available to complete the excellent range of analytical tools at our disposal. (authors)

  20. Actinides: why are they important biologically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, P.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: actinide elements in energy systems; biological hazards of the actinides; radiation protection standards; and purposes of actinide biological research with regard to toxicity, metabolism, and therapeutic regimens

  1. Significance of actinide chemistry for the long-term safety of waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Il

    2006-01-01

    A geochemical approach to the long-term safety of waste disposal is discussed in connection with the significance of actinides, which shall deliver the major radioactivity inventory subsequent to the relatively short-term decay of fission products. Every power reactor generates transuranic (TRU) elements: plutonium and minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm), which consist chiefly of long-lived nuclides emitting alpha radiation. The amount of TRU actinides generated in a fuel life period is found to be relatively small (about 1 wt% or less in spent fuel) but their radioactivity persists many hundred thousands years. Geological confinement of waste containing TRU actinides demands, as a result, fundamental knowledge on the geochemical behavior of actinides in the repository environment for a long period of time. Appraisal of the scientific progress in this subject area is the main objective of the present paper. Following the introductory discussion on natural radioactivities, the nuclear fuel cycle is briefly brought up with reference to actinide generation and waste disposal. As the long-term disposal safety concerns inevitably with actinides, the significance of the aquatic actinide chemistry is summarized in two parts: the fundamental properties relevant to their aquatic behavior and the geochemical reactions in nanoscopic scale. The constrained space of writing allows discussion on some examples only, for which topics of the primary concern are selected, e.g. apparent solubility and colloid generation, colloid-facilitated migration, notable speciation of such processes, etc. Discussion is summed up to end with how to make a geochemical approach available for the long-term disposal safety of nuclear waste or for the Performance Assessment (PA) as known generally

  2. Solution-Processed In2O3/ZnO Heterojunction Electron Transport Layers for Efficient Organic Bulk Heterojunction and Inorganic Colloidal Quantum-Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eisner, Flurin

    2018-04-25

    We report the development of a solution‐processed In2O3/ZnO heterojunction electron transport layer (ETL) and its application in high efficiency organic bulk‐heterojunction (BHJ) and inorganic colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells. Study of the electrical properties of this low‐dimensional oxide heterostructure via field‐effect measurements reveals that electron transport along the heterointerface is enhanced by more than a tenfold when compared to the individual single‐layer oxides. Use of the heterojunction as the ETL in organic BHJ photovoltaics is found to consistently improve the cell\\'s performance due to the smoothening of the ZnO surface, increased electron mobility and a noticeable reduction in the cathode\\'s work function, leading to a decrease in the cells’ series resistance and a higher fill factor (FF). Specifically, non‐fullerene based organic BHJ solar cells based on In2O3/ZnO ETLs exhibit very high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 12.8%, and high FFs of over 70%. The bilayer ETL concept is further extended to inorganic lead‐sulphide CQD solar cells. Resulting devices exhibit excellent performance with a maximum PCE of 8.2% and a FF of 56.8%. The present results highlight the potential of multilayer oxides as novel ETL systems and lay the foundation for future developments.

  3. Solution-Processed In2O3/ZnO Heterojunction Electron Transport Layers for Efficient Organic Bulk Heterojunction and Inorganic Colloidal Quantum-Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eisner, Flurin; Seitkhan, Akmaral; Han, Yang; Khim, Dongyoon; Yengel, Emre; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Xu, Jixian; Garcí a de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Sargent, Edward H.; Amassian, Aram; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2018-01-01

    We report the development of a solution‐processed In2O3/ZnO heterojunction electron transport layer (ETL) and its application in high efficiency organic bulk‐heterojunction (BHJ) and inorganic colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells. Study of the electrical properties of this low‐dimensional oxide heterostructure via field‐effect measurements reveals that electron transport along the heterointerface is enhanced by more than a tenfold when compared to the individual single‐layer oxides. Use of the heterojunction as the ETL in organic BHJ photovoltaics is found to consistently improve the cell's performance due to the smoothening of the ZnO surface, increased electron mobility and a noticeable reduction in the cathode's work function, leading to a decrease in the cells’ series resistance and a higher fill factor (FF). Specifically, non‐fullerene based organic BHJ solar cells based on In2O3/ZnO ETLs exhibit very high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 12.8%, and high FFs of over 70%. The bilayer ETL concept is further extended to inorganic lead‐sulphide CQD solar cells. Resulting devices exhibit excellent performance with a maximum PCE of 8.2% and a FF of 56.8%. The present results highlight the potential of multilayer oxides as novel ETL systems and lay the foundation for future developments.

  4. Study of Exciton Hopping Transport in PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot Thin Films Using Frequency- and Temperature-Scanned Photocarrier Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lilei; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Lan, Xinzheng; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Solution-processed colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials for realizing low-cost, large-area, and flexible photovoltaic devices. The study of charge carrier transport in quantum dot solids is essential for understanding energy conversion mechanisms. Recently, solution-processed two-layer oleic-acid-capped PbS CQD solar cells with one layer treated with tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBAI) serving as the main light-absorbing layer and the other treated with 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) acting as an electron-blocking/hole-extraction layer were reported. These solar cells demonstrated a significant improvement in power conversion efficiency of 8.55% and long-term air stability. Coupled with photocarrier radiometry measurements, this work used a new trap-state mediated exciton hopping transport model, specifically for CQD thin films, to unveil and quantify exciton transport mechanisms through the extraction of hopping transport parameters including exciton lifetimes, hopping diffusivity, exciton detrapping time, and trap-state density. It is shown that PbS-TBAI has higher trap-state density than PbS-EDT that results in higher PbS-EDT exciton lifetimes. Hopping diffusivities of both CQD thin film types show similar temperature dependence, particularly higher temperatures yield higher hopping diffusivity. The higher diffusivity of PbS-TBAI compared with PbS-EDT indicates that PbS-TBAI is a much better photovoltaic material than PbS-EDT. Furthermore, PCR temperature spectra and deep-level photothermal spectroscopy provided additional insights to CQD surface trap states: PbS-TBAI thin films exhibit a single dominant trap level, while PbS-EDT films with lower trap-state densities show multiple trap levels.

  5. Actinide uptake by transferrin and ferritin metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Auwer, C.; Llorens, I.; Moisy, Ph.; Vidaud, C.; Goudard, F.; Barbot, C.; Solari, P.L.; Funke, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms of actinide uptake by specific biomolecules, it is essential to explore the intramolecular interactions between the cation and the protein binding site. Although this has long been done for widely investigated transition metals, very few studies have been devoted to complexation mechanisms of actinides by active chelation sites of metalloproteins. In this field, X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been extensively used as a structural and electronic metal cation probe. The two examples that are presented here are related to two metalloproteins in charge of iron transport and storage in eukaryote cells: transferrin and ferritin. U(VI)O 2 2+ , Np(IV) and Pu(IV) have been selected because of their possible role as contaminant from the geosphere. (orig.)

  6. Molecular Doping of the Hole-Transporting Layer for Efficient, Single-Step Deposited Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Garcia de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Fan, James Z.; Khan, Jafar Iqbal; Walters, Grant; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wehbe, Nimer; Said, Marcel M.; Barlow, Stephen; Laquai, Fré dé ric; Marder, Seth R.; Sargent, Edward H.; Amassian, Aram

    2017-01-01

    solar cells. These promising architectures employ a QD hole-transporting layer (HTL) whose intrinsically shallow Fermi level (EF) restricts band-bending at maximum power-point during solar cell operation limiting charge collection. Here, we demonstrate a

  7. Hydration numbers of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, F.; Fourest, B.; Duplessis, J.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations on the structure of actinide aquo ions and determination of hydration numbers have to be studied, essentially, through radiochemical methods. They measured the transport numbers, diffusion coefficient D by the open end capillary method and ionic mobility u by electrophoresis. Both methods show a discontinuity in the transport number corresponding to the crystallographic radius of Eu 3+ or Bk 3+ ion. They deduced the volume of the actinide aquo ions, and the coordination number in the primary sphere. From calculations of the electrostriction phenomenon in the vicinity of central ion, they obtained effective volume of the water molecules and the dynamic hydration number corresponding to the second hydration sphere

  8. Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency`s 40 CFR Part 191B.

  9. Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency's 40 CFR Part 191B

  10. Characteristics of colloids generated during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.

    1993-10-01

    Aqueous colloidal suspensions were generated by reacting nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90 degrees C at different ratios of the glass surface area to solution volume (S/V). The colloids have been characterized in terms of size, charge, identity, and stability with respect to salt concentration, pH, and time, by examination using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and transmission electron microscopy. The colloids are predominately produced by precipitation from solution, possibly with contribution from reacted layers that have spallated from the glass. These colloids are silicon-rich minerals. The colloidal suspensions agglomerate when the salinity of the solutions increase. The following implications for modeling the colloidal transport of contaminants have been derived from this study: (1) The sources of the colloids are not only solubility-limited real colloids and the pseudo colloids formed by adsorption of radionuclides onto a groundwater colloid, but also from the spalled surface layers of reacted waste glasses. (2) In a repository, the local environment is likely to be glass-reaction dominated and the salt concentration is likely to be high, leading to rapid colloid agglomeration and settling; thus, colloid transport may be insignificant. (3) If large volumes of groundwater contact the glass reaction site, the precipitated colloids may become resuspended, and colloid transport may become important. (4) Under most conditions, the colloids are negatively charged and will deposit readily on positively charged surfaces. Negatively charged surfaces will, in general, facilitate colloid stability and transport

  11. Thermal neutron actinide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, H.

    1992-01-01

    During the 70's, the physicists involved in the cross section measurements for the low energy neutrons were almost exclusively interested in the resonance energy range. The thermal range was considered as sufficiently known. In the beginning of the 80's, reactor physicists had again to deal with the delicate problem of the power reactor temperature coefficient, essentially for the light water reactors. The measured value of the reactivity temperature coefficient does not agree with the computed one. The later is too negative. For obvious safety reasons, it is an important problem which must be solved. Several causes were suggested to explain this discrepancy. Among all these causes, the spectral shift in the thermal energy range seems to be very important. Sensibility calculations shown that this spectral shift is very sensitive to the shape of the neutron cross sections of the actinides for energies below one electron-volt. Consequently, reactor physicists require new and accurate measurements in the thermal and subthermal energy ranges. A part of these new measurement results were recently released and reviewed. The purpose of this study is to complete the preceding review with the new informations which are now available. In reactor physics the major actinides are the fertile nuclei, uranium 238, thorium 232 and plutonium 240 and the fissile nuclei, uranium 233, uranium 235 and plutonium 239. For the fertile nuclei the main datum is the capture cross section, for the fissile nuclei the data of interest are nu-bar, the fission and capture cross sections or a combination of these data such as η or α. In the following sections, we will review the neutron data of the major actinides for the energy below 1 eV

  12. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kats, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are

  13. Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1989-06-01

    The progress in the research area of the community project MIRAGE: 'Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquatic systems' has been reviewed. This programme belongs to a specific research and technical development programme for the European Atomic Energy Community in the field of management and storage of radioactive waste. The review summarizes research progresses in subject areas: complexation with organics, colloid generation in groundwater and basic retention mechanisms in the framework of the migration of radionuclides in the geosphere. The subject areas are being investigated by 23 laboratories under interlaboratory collaborations or independent studies. (orig.)

  14. Actinide Separation Demonstration Facility, Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwaraj, I.

    2017-01-01

    Partitioning of minor actinide from high level waste could have a substantial impact in lowering the radio toxicity associated with high level waste as well as it will reduce the burden on geological repository. In Indian context, the partitioned minor actinide could be routed into the fast breeder reactor systems scheduled for commissioning in the near period. The technological breakthrough in solvent development has catalyzed the partitioning programme in India, leading to the setting up and hot commissioning of the Actinide Separation Demonstration Facility (ASDF) at BARC, Tarapur. The engineering scale Actinide Separation Demonstration Facility (ASDF) has been retrofitted in an available radiological hot cell situated adjacent to the Advanced Vitrification Facility (AVS). This location advantage ensures an uninterrupted supply of high-level waste and facilitates the vitrification of the high-level waste after separation of minor actinides

  15. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  16. Long-term kinetic effects and colloid formations in dissolution of LWR spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    This report evaluates continuous dissolution and colloid formation during spent-fuel performance under repository conditions in high-level waste disposal. Various observations suggest that reprecipitated layers formed on spent-fuel surfaces may not be protective. This situation may lead to continuous dissolution of highly soluble radionuclides such as C-14, Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. However, the diffusion limits of various species involved may retard dissolution significantly. For low-solubility actinides such as Pu-(239+240) or Am-(241+243), various processes regarding colloid formation have been analyzed. The processes analyzed are condensation, dispersion, and sorption. Colloid formation may lead to significant releases of low-solubility actinides. However, because there are only limited data available on matrix dissolution, colloid formation, and solubility limits, many uncertainties still exist. These uncertainties must be addressed before the significance of radionuclide releases can be determined. 118 refs

  17. Long-term kinetic effects and colloid formations in dissolution of LWR spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    This report evaluates continuous dissolution and colloid formation during spent-fuel performance under repository conditions in high-level waste disposal. Various observations suggest that reprecipitated layers formed on spent-fuel surfaces may not be protective. This situation may lead to continuous dissolution of highly soluble radionuclides such as C-14, Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. However, the diffusion limits of various species involved may retard dissolution significantly. For low-solubility actinides such as Pu-(239+240) or Am-(241+243), various processes regarding colloid formation have been analyzed. The processes analyzed are condensation, dispersion, and sorption. Colloid formation may lead to significant releases of low-solubility actinides. However, because there are only limited data available on matrix dissolution, colloid formation, and solubility limits, many uncertainties still exist. These uncertainties must be addressed before the significance of radionuclide releases can be determined. 118 refs.

  18. Value of burnup credit beyond actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, Chi.

    1997-01-01

    DOE has submitted a topical report to the NRC justifying burnup credit based only on actinide isotopes (U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241). When this topical report is approved, it will allow a great deal of the commercial spent nuclear fuel to be transported in significantly higher capacity casks. A cost savings estimate for shipping fuel in 32 assembly (burnup credit) casks as opposed to 24 assembly (non-burnup credit) casks was previously presented. Since that time, more detailed calculations have been performed using the methodology presented in the Actinide-Only Burnup Credit Topical Report. Loading curves for derated casks have been generated using actinide-only burnup credit and are presented in this paper. The estimates of cost savings due to burnup credit for shipping fuel utilizing 32, 30, 28, and 24 assembly casks where only the 24 assembly cask does not burnup credit have been created and are discussed. 4 refs., 2 figs

  19. Recovery actinide values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Delphin, W.H.; Mason, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for partitioning and recovering actinide values from acidic waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by adding hydroxylammonium nitrate and hydrazine to the waste solution to adjust the valence of the neptunium and plutonium values in the solution to the +4 oxidation state, thus forming a feed solution and contacting the feed solution with an extractant of di-hexoxyethyl phosphoric acid in an organic diluent whereby the actinide values, most of the rare earth values and some fission product values are taken up by the extractant. Separation is achieved by contacting the loaded extractant with two aqueous strip solutions, a nitric acid solution to selectively strip the americium, curium and rare earth values and an oxalate solution of tetramethylammonium hydrogen oxalate and oxalic acid or trimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate to selectively strip the neptunium, plutonium and fission product values. Uranium values remain in the extractant and may be recovered with a phosphoric acid strip. The neptunium and plutonium values are recovered from the oxalate by adding sufficient nitric acid to destroy the complexing ability of the oxalate, forming a second feed, and contacting the second feed with a second extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert diluent whereby the neptunium and plutonium values are selectively extracted. The values are recovered from the extractant with formic acid. (author)

  20. Actinide AMS at DREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khojasteh, Nasrin B.; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Scharf, Andreas; Ziegenruecker, Rene [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Pavetich, Stefan [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); ANU, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclides such as {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu were introduced into the environment by atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, reactor accidents (Chernobyl, Fukushima), releases from nuclear reprocessing facilities (Sellafield, La Hague), radioactive waste disposal, and accidents with nuclear devices (Palomares, Thule) [1]. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method to measure these actinides. The DREsden AMS (DREAMS) facility is located at a 6 MV accelerator, which is shared with ion beam analytics and implantation users, preventing major modifications of the accelerator and magnetic analyzers. DREAMS was originally designed for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, and {sup 129}I. To modify the system for actinide AMS, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) beamline at the high-energy side has been installed and performance tests are on-going. Ion beam and detector simulations are carried out to design a moveable ionization chamber. Especially, the detector window and anode dimensions have to be optimized. This ionization chamber will act as an energy detector of the system and its installation is planned as closely as possible to the stop detector of the TOF beamline for highest detection efficiency.

  1. Rare earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coqblin, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the different properties of rare-earths and actinides, either as pure metals or as in alloys or compounds. Three different cases are considered: (i) First, in the case of 'normal' rare-earths which are characterized by a valence of 3, we discuss essentially the magnetic ordering, the coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism and the properties of amorphous rare-earth systems. (ii) Second, in the case of 'anomalous' rare-earths, we distinguish between either 'intermediate-valence' systems or 'Kondo' systems. Special emphasis is given to the problems of the 'Kondo lattice' (for compounds such as CeAl 2 ,CeAl 3 or CeB 6 ) or the 'Anderson lattice' (for compounds such as TmSe). The problem of neutron diffraction in these systems is also discussed. (iii) Third, in the case of actinides, we can separate between the d-f hybridized and almost magnetic metals at the beginning of the series and the rare-earth like the metals after americium. (orig.)

  2. Transport and release of colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid-coated CdSe–CdS/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontana JM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacopo M Fontana,1 Huijuan Yin,1 Yun Chen,2 Ricardo Florez,1 Hjalmar Brismar,1 Ying Fu1 1Section of Cellular Biophysics, Department of Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, Solna, 2Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Clinical Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy and University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs have been extensively researched and developed for biomedical applications, including drug delivery and biosensing assays. Hence, it is pivotal to understand their behavior in terms of intracellular transport and toxicological effects. In this study, we focused on 3-mercaptopropionic acid-coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots (3MPA-QDs converted from the as-grown octadecylamine-coated quantum dots (ODA-QDs and their direct and dynamic interactions with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Live cell imaging using confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that 3MPA-QDs first attached to and subsequently aggregated on HUVEC plasma membrane ~25 min after QD deposition. The aggregated QDs started being internalized at ~2 h and reached their highest internalization degree at ~24 h. They were released from HUVECs after ~48 h. During the 48 h period, the HUVECs responded normally to external stimulations, grew, proliferated and wound healed without any perceptible apoptosis. Furthermore, 1 3MPA-QDs were internalized in newly formed LysoTracker-stained early endosomes; 2 adenosine 5'-triphosphate-induced [Ca2+]i modulation caused a transient decrease in the fluorescence of 3MPA-QDs that were attached to the plasma membrane but a transient increase in the internalized 3MPA-QDs; and 3 fluorescence signal modulations of co-stained LysoTracker and QDs induced by the lysosomotropic agent Gly-Phe-β-naphthylamide were spatially co-localized and temporally synchronized. Our findings suggest that 3MPA

  3. Equilibrium, kinetic and reactive transport models for Pu: employing numerical methods to uncover the nature of the intrinsic colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Batchelor, Bill

    2000-01-01

    Future missions for the Department of Defense include processing plutonium for vitrification and conversion to mixed oxide fuels for commercial use. Such processing could result in the production of Pu-containing waste and unplanned releases of Pu to the environment. Some releases related to plutonium processing have occurred in the past. However, scientists are currently not able to explain the observed behavior of plutonium in natural systems. For example, classical filtration theory predicts that plutonium transport within groundwater should be limited to a few tens of meters. Experimental observations, however, show that plutonium is present in groundwater at distances orders of magnitude farther away from its source than predicted. Before adequate disposal practices can be designed for plutonium, its behavior in these systems must be better understood. The overall goal of this project is to develop equilibrium, kinetic and reactive transport models that describe the behavior of Pu in aqueous systems and to apply these models to natural and engineered systems

  4. Colloid Release from Soil Aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  5. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications.

  6. Concentration of actinides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.

    1976-06-01

    Considerable concern is now being expressed over the discharge of actinides into the environment. This report presents a brief review of the chemistry of the actinides and examines the evidence for interaction of the actinides with some naturally-occurring chelating agents and other factors which might stimulate actinide concentration in the food chain of man. This report also reviews the evidence for concentration of actinides in plants and for uptake through the gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  7. Analytical Modeling of the Pseudo-Colloid Migration with the Band release Boundary Condition in the Fractured Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Miseon; Kang, Chulhyung; Hwang, Yongsoo

    2011-01-01

    Many papers have already dealt with the problem of the radionuclide transport in various fractured porous systems, but without discussing daughter products. However, natural radionuclides may decay to radioactive daughter muscled, which may travel farther than the the parent nuclides. It is considered the multi-member decay chain of the actinide nuclide with the band release inlet boundary condition in a fractured porous rock. In this paper, it is developed the pseudo-colloid migration with the band release inlet boundary conditions with multi-member decay chains in a fractured porous matrix. It is obtained a semi-analytical solution for the multi-member decay chains as a canonical form. As one can expected, the colloid has significantly important influence to the radionuclide transport in the geologic system and the decay chain also isn't neglecting. The concept of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been widely accepted at many countries. The repositories aim mainly to prevent the radionuclides form migrating to the biosphere through any one of many pathways. Fractures can act as main pathways for radionuclide transport because of their relatively high permeabilities

  8. Relativistic studies in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, P.; Gonis, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this review the theoretical background is given for a relativistic description for actinide systems. A short introduction is given of the density functional theory which forms the basis for a fully relativistic single-particle theory. A section on the Dirac Hamiltonian is followed by a brief summary on group theoretical concepts. Single site scattering is presented such that formal extensions to the case of the presence of an internal (external) magnetic field and/or anisotropic scattering are evident. Multiple scattering is discussed such that it can readily be applied also to the problem of dislocations. In connection with the problem of selfconsistency particular attention is drawn to the use of complex energies. Finally the various theoretical aspects discussed are illustrated through the results of numerical calculations. 101 refs.; 37 figs.; 5 tabs

  9. Identification of new neutron-rich actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oura, Yasuji; Sakama, Minoru; Ohyama, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1999-10-01

    To advance research on new neutron-deficient actinide isotopes using an on-line isotope separator combined with a gas-jet injector installed in the JAERI Tandem accelerator, Tokai, performance test of the equipment was carried out. Efficiency of the product isotopes being transported from the target chamber to the measuring system was greatly improved by employing lead iodides (PbI{sub 2}) as the aerosol carrier. With the help of this technique, the authors succeeded in synthesizing and identifying actinide isotopes, {sup 235}Am and {sup 236}Am, and measured their alpha-decay half-life. (S. Ohno)

  10. Colloid chemistry: available sorption models and the question of colloid adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1990-05-01

    A safety analysis of a radioactive waste repository should consider the possibility of nuclide transport by colloids. This would involve describing the sorption properties of the colloids and their transport in porous and fissured media. This report deals with a few selected aspects of the chemistry of this complex subject. Because the mechanisms of ion adsorption onto surfaces are material-specific, increased attention should be paid to identifying the material constitution of aquatic colloids. Suitable models already exist for describing reversible adsorption; these models describe sorption using mass action equations. The surface coordination model, developed for hydrous oxide surfaces, allows a uniform approach to be adopted for different classes of materials. This model is also predictive and has been applied successfully to natural systems. From the point of view of nuclide transport by colloids, irreversible sorption represents the most unfavourable situation. There is virtually no information available on the extent of reversibility and on the desorption kinetics of important nuclide/colloid combinations. Experimental investigations are therefore necessary in this respect. The only question considered in connection with colloid transport and its modelling is that of colloid sticking. Natural colloids, and the surfaces of the rock on which they may be collected, generally have negative surface charges so that colloid sticking will be difficult. The DLVO theory contains an approach for calculating the sticking factor from the surface potentials of the solid phases and the ionic strength of the water. However, it has been shown that this theory is inapplicable because of inherent shortcomings which lead to completely unrealistic predictions. The sticking probability of colloids should therefore be determined experimentally for systems which correspond as closely as possible to reality. (author) 66 figs., 12 tabs., 204 refs

  11. Projected benefits of actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, C.; Goldstein, M.

    1976-05-01

    Possible benefits that could accrue from actinide separation and transmutations are presented. The time frame for implementing these processes is discussed and the expected benefits are qualitatively described. These benefits are provisionally quantified in a sample computation

  12. Environmental research on actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  13. Histochemical evidence for the differential surface labeling, uptake, and intracellular transport of a colloidal gold-labeled insulin complex by normal human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, G A; Wolken, K W

    1981-10-01

    A colloidal gold-labeled insulin-bovine serum albumin (GIA) reagent has been developed for the ultrastructural visualization of insulin binding sites on the cell surface and for tracing the pathway of intracellular insulin translocation. When applied to normal human blood cells, it was demonstrated by both visual inspection and quantitative analysis that the extent of surface labeling, as well as the rate and degree of internalization of the insulin complex, was directly related to cell type. Further, the pathway of insulin (GIA) transport via round vesicles and by tubulo-vesicles and saccules and its subsequent fate in the hemic cells was also related to cell variety. Monocytes followed by neutrophils bound the greatest amount of labeled insulin. The majority of lymphocytes bound and internalized little GIA, however, between 5-10% of the lymphocytes were found to bind considerable quantities of GIA. Erythrocytes rarely bound the labeled insulin complex, while platelets were noted to sequester large quantities of the GIA within their extracellular canalicular system. GIA uptake by the various types of leukocytic cells appeared to occur primarily by micropinocytosis and by the direct opening of cytoplasmic tubulo-vesicles and saccules onto the cell surface in regions directly underlying surface-bound GIA. Control procedures, viz., competitive inhibition of GIA labeling using an excess of unlabeled insulin in the incubation medium, preincubation of the GIA reagent with an antibody directed toward porcine insulin, and the incorporation of 125I-insulin into the GIA reagent, indicated the specificity and selectivity of the GIA histochemical procedure for the localization of insulin binding sites.

  14. Histochemical evidence for the differential surface labeling, uptake, and intracellular transport of a colloidal gold-labeled insulin complex by normal human blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, G.A.; Wolken, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    A colloidal gold-labeled insulin-bovine serum albumin (GIA) reagent has been developed for the ultrastructural visualization of insulin binding sites on the cell surface and for tracing the pathway of intracellular insulin translocation. When applied to normal human blood cells, it was demonstrated by both visual inspection and quantitative analysis that the extent of surface labeling, as well as the rate and degree of internalization of the insulin complex, was directly related to cell type. Further, the pathway of insulin (GIA) transport via round vesicles and by tubulo-vesicles and saccules and its subsequent fate in the hemic cells was also related to cell variety. Monocytes followed by neutrophils bound the greatest amount of labeled insulin. The majority of lymphocytes bound and internalized little GIA, however, between 5-10% of the lymphocytes were found to bind considerable quantities of GIA. Erythrocytes rarely bound the labeled insulin complex, while platelets were noted to sequester large quantities of the GIA within their extracellular canalicular system. GIA uptake by the various types of leukocytic cells appeared to occur primarily by micropinocytosis and by the direct opening of cytoplasmic tubulo-vesicles and saccules onto the cell surface in regions directly underlying surface-bound GIA. Control procedures, viz., competitive inhibition of GIA labeling using an excess of unlabeled insulin in the incubation medium, preincubation of the GIA reagent with an antibody directed toward porcine insulin, and the incorporation of 125I-insulin into the GIA reagent, indicated the specificity and selectivity of the GIA histochemical procedure for the localization of insulin binding sites

  15. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  16. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus; Wold, Susanna

    2005-12-01

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel

  17. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  18. Mobility of radioactive colloidal particles in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.; Long, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Radiocolloids are a major factor in the rapid migration of radioactive waste in groundwater. For at least two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sites, researchers have shown that groundwater colloidal particles were responsible for the rapid transport of radioactive waste material in groundwater. On an international scale, a review of reported field observations, laboratory column studies, and carefully collected field samples provides compelling evidence that colloidal particles enhance both radioactive and toxic waste migration. The objective of this project is to understand and predict colloid-contaminant migration through fundamental mathematical models, water sampling, and laboratory experiments and use this information to develop an effective and scientifically based colloid immobilization strategy. The article focuses on solving the suspected radiocolloid transport problems at LANL's Mortandad Canyon site. (author) 6 figs., 5 tabs., 18 refs

  19. Interaction of actinides with natural microporous materials: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaelides, P.; Godelitsas, A.

    1998-01-01

    Natural microporous materials include several types of minerals such as zeolites, clay minerals, micas, iron- and manganese-oxides/hydroxides/oxyhydroxides present in various geological environments and soil formations. The transport of the actinide elements in the environment is mainly performed through aquatic pathways (streams, rivers, underground waters) and their mobility is strongly related to the interaction of their dissolved species with geological materials and especially with the highly sorptive microporous minerals. The existing studies mainly concern the sorption of Th, U, Np, Pu and Am from aqueous media by clay minerals and zeolites as well as the determination of the corresponding chemical processes taking place at the mineral-water interface. The investigation techniques also include advanced spectroscopic methods such as Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS), Rutherford Backscattered Spectroscopy (RBS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. These techniques significantly contribute to the characterization of the reacted mineral surfaces and to the explanation of the structural and compositional characteristics of the sorbed actinide species. Theoretical models regarding the aqueous chemistry and speciation of the actinides have also been developed aiming the elucidation of the complex actinide sorption mechanisms. Finally, this contribution also includes some recently obtained data concerning the interaction of actinides with todorokite (a naturally occurring microporous manganese-oxide of technological importance) and granitic micas (biotite) correlated with the nuclear waste disposal in geological formations

  20. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of 238 U, 238 Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and 241 Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (∼1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport

  2. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M and O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types

  3. Actinides and heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    The actinide series of elements begins with f-shell electrons forming energy bands, contributing to the bonding, and possessing no magnetic moments. At americium the series switches over to localized f electrons with magnetic moments. In metallic compounds this crossover of behavior can be modified and studied. In this continuum of behavior a few compounds on the very edge of localized f-electron behavior exhibit enormous electronic heat capacities at low temperatures. This is associated with an enhanced thermal mass of the conduction electrons, which is well over a hundred times the free electron mass, and is what led to the label heavy fermion for such compounds. A few of these become superconducting at even lower temperatures. The excitement in this field comes from attempting to understand how this heaviness arises and from the likelihood that the superconductivity is different from that of previously known superconductors. The effects of thorium impurities in UBe 13 were studied as a representative system for studying the nature of the superconductivity

  4. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  5. Characterization of Complex Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, J. C.; Guerin, M.; Jackson, B. P.; Ranville, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Surface chemical reactions play a major role in controlling contaminant fate and transport in the subsurface environment. Recent field and laboratory evidence suggests that mobile soil and groundwater colloids may facilitate the migration of sparingly soluble groundwater contaminants. Colloidal suspensions collected in the field or generated in laboratory column experiments tend to be fairly dilute in nature and comprised of relatively small particulates (reserved for studying ideal systems to the characterization of mobile colloids. However, many of these analytical techniques, including total/selective dissolution methods, dynamic light scattering, micro-electrophoresis, streaming potential, and even scanning electron microscopy (SEM), can be biased in of larger size fractions, and therefore, extremely sensitive to sampling, storage, and fractionation artifacts. In addition, surface modifiers such as sorbed oxides or organics can alter particulate appearance, composition, and behavior when compared to synthetic analogues or mineral standards. The current presentation will discuss the limitations and inherent biases associated with a number of analytical characterization techniques that are commonly applied to the study of mobile soil and groundwater colloids, including field flow fractionation (FFF) and acoustic based methods that have only recently become available.

  6. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    colloid concentration is expected to be very low (<1ppb, for 10-100nm) which restricts their relevance for radionuclide transport. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

  8. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigford, T H [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  9. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  10. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  11. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, L.M.; Wilk, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  12. Role of actinide behavior in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    For purposes of assessing the safety of repositories of radioactive wastes placed in geologic isolation, actinide behavior in the environment has been interpreted in terms of five steps of prediction: analysis of repository stability; geosphere transport; the geosphere-biosphere interface; biosphere transport; and biosphere consequences. Each step in the analysis requires models of nuclide behavior and data on the physical and chemical properties of the radioactivity. The scope of information required in order to make reliable safety assessments has been outlined. All steps in the assessment process are coupled; reliable models and data are therefore needed for each step. The prediction phase of safety assessment is also coupled to activities concerned with waste treatment, selection of the final form of the waste, and selection of repository sites and designs. Results of the predictions can impact these activities

  13. Thermal-hydraulics of actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Takano, Hideki; Ogawa, Toru; Osakabe, Masahiro.

    1989-07-01

    As a part of conceptual study of actinide burner reactors, core thermal-hydraulic analyses were conducted for two types of reactor concepts, namely (1) sodium-cooled actinide alloy fuel reactor, and (2) helium-cooled particle-bed reactor, to examine the feasibility of high power-density cores for efficient transmutation of actinides within the maximum allowable temperature limits of fuel and cladding. In addition, calculations were made on cooling of actinide fuel assembly. (author)

  14. Fusion barrier characteristics of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Sridhar, K. N.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied fusion barrier characteristics of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations. After the calculation of fusion barrier heights and positions, we have searched for their parameterization. We have achieved the empirical formula for fusion barrier heights (VB), positions (RB), curvature of the inverted parabola (ħω) of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations (6 projectile target combinations. The values produced by the present formula are also compared with experiments. The present pocket formula produces fusion barrier characteristics of actinides with the simple inputs of mass number (A) and atomic number (Z) of projectile-targets.

  15. ALMR potential for actinide consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockey, C.L.; Thompson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. This reactor combines a high degree of passive safety characteristics with a high level of modularity and factory fabrication to achieve attractive economics. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor fueled with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and for makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR core by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behavior throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. Waste disposal impacts are discussed. (author)

  16. Thin layers in actinide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouder, T.

    1998-01-01

    Surface science research at the ITU is focused on the synthesis and surface spectroscopy studies of thin films of actinides and actinide compounds. The surface spectroscopies used are X-ray and ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS, respectively), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Thin films of actinide elements and compounds are prepared by sputter deposition from elemental targets. Alloy films are deposited from corresponding alloy targets and could be used, in principle, as replicates of these targets. However, there are deviations between alloy film and target composition, which depend on the deposition conditions, such as pressure and target voltage. Mastering of these effects may allow us to study stoichiometric film replicates instead of thick bulk compounds. As an example, we discuss the composition of U-Ni films prepared from a UNi 5 target. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear waste forms for actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    The disposition of actinides, most recently 239Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. Because actinides (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms for the immobilization of actinides. Mineralogic and geologic studies provide excellent candidate phases for immobilization and a unique database that cannot be duplicated by a purely materials science approach. The “mineralogic approach” is illustrated by a discussion of zircon as a phase for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. PMID:10097054

  18. Extraction chromatogrpahy of actinides, ch. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.

    1975-01-01

    This review on extraction chromatography of actinides emphasizes the important usage of neutral (Tributylphosphate), basic (substituted ammonium salts), and acidic (HDEHP) extractants, and their application to separations of actinides in the di-to hexavalent oxidation state. Furthermore, the actinide extraction by ketones, ethers, alcohols and β-diketones is discussed

  19. Actinides integral measurements on FCA assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Okajima, Shigeaki

    1984-01-01

    Actinide integral measurements were performed on eight assemblies of FCA where neutron energy spectra were shifted systematically from soft to hard in order to evaluate and modify the nuclear cross section data of major actinides. Experimental values on actinide fission rates and sample reactivity worths are compared with the calculated values using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (or IV) data sets. (author)

  20. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: c.degueldre@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, University of Lancaster, LA1 4YW Lancaster (United Kingdom); ChiAM & Institute of Environment, University of Geneva, 1211 Genève 4, Swizerland (Switzerland); Earlier, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cloet, Veerle [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    colloid concentration is expected to be very low (< 1 ppb, for 10–100 nm) which restricts their relevance for radionuclide transport. - Graphical abstract: Processes describing the colloid live to build up a colloid population. - Highlights: • This study predicts pore water colloid properties from argillaceous sedimentary rocks. • The study combines field, laboratory and model results. • The high mineralization of the pore water limits the clayeous colloid concentration. • The study predicts colloid concentrations below the ppb level for sizes from 10 to 100 nm.

  1. Moessbauer effect studies with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.

    1966-01-01

    Moessbauer resonance studies in the actinide elements offer a new technique for measuring solid-state properties to a region of the periodic chart where such information is relatively sparse. It is well known that the actinides, the elements with atomic numbers from 90 to 103, form a transition series due to filling of the 5f electron shell, analogous to the rare-earth series in which the 4f shell is filled. Like the rare earths, the actinide metals and compounds are expected to exhibit a variety of interesting magnetic properties, but, unlike the rare earths, there have been few studies of the magnetic behaviour of actinides, and these properties are largely unknown. The chemical properties of the actinides have been studied somewhat more extensively, and, in contrast to the rare earths, form a multiplicity of stable valence states, especially in the lighter members of the series. It is just these properties, magnetic and chemical, for which the Moessbauer effect is a valuable probe, sensitive to the magnetic and electric environment of an atom. The rare-earth series has been a particularly fruitful region in terms of the number of elements which have been shown to exhibit the Moessbauer effect, and for this reason the exploitation of the Moessbauer effect to yield new solid-state and chemical information on the rare earths is a highly active field of research today. There is every reason to believe that the actinides can be similarly studied by the Moessbauer effect. 43 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs

  2. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  3. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  4. Orbital effects in actinide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Actinide magnetism presents a number of important challenges; in particular, the proximity of 5f band to the Fermi energy gives rise to strong interaction with both d and s like conduction electrons, and the extended nature of the 5f electrons means that they can interact with electron orbitals from neighboring atoms. Theory has recently addressed these problems. Often neglected, however, is the overwhelming evidence for large orbital contributions to the magnetic properties of actinides. Some experimental evidence for these effects are presented briefly in this paper. They point, clearly incorrectly, to a very localized picture for the 5f electrons. This dichotomy only enhances the nature of the challenge

  5. Recycle of LWR actinides to an IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Large quantities of actinide elements are present in irradiated light water reactor fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission to capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high energy neutrons in metal-fueled integral fast reactors (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel may represent valuable resource for the expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, the removal of TRU elements from spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of high level waste facilities by reducing the heat load and may increase the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirement. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. Two pyrochemical processes, that is, salt transport process and blanket processing study, are discussed in this paper. Also the experimental studies are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Subcritical limits for special fissile actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    Critical masses and subcritical mass limits in oxide-water mixtures were calculated for actinide nuclides other than 233 U, 235 U, and 239 Pu that have an odd number of neutrons in the nucleus: S/sub n/ transport theory was used together with cross sections, drawn from the GLASS multigroup library, developed to provide accurate forecasts of actinide production at Savannah River. The subcritical limits are 201 g for 241 Pu, 13 g for 242 /sup m/Am, 90 g for 243 Cm, 30 g for 245 Cm, 900 g for 247 Cm, 10 g for 249 Cf, and 5 g for 251 Cf. Association of 241 Pu with an equal mass of 240 Pu increases the 241 Pu limit to a value greater than that for pure 239 Pu. Association of 242 /sup m/Am with 241 Am increases the limit for the mixture to that for dry, theoretical density AmO 2 at isotopic concentrations of 242 /sup m/Am less than approx. 6%. Association of 245 Cm with 244 Cm increases the limit according to the formula 30 + 0.3 244 Cm/ 245 Cm up to the limit for dry CmO 2 . A limiting mass of 8.15 kg for plutonium containing at least 67% 238 Pu as oxide was calculated that applies (provided 240 Pu exceeds 241 Pu) with no limit on moderation. 1 figure, 5 tables

  7. Colloids from the aqueous corrosion of uranium nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Mertz, C. J.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids may enhance the subsurface transport of radionuclides and potentially compromise the long-term safe operation of the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Little data is available on colloid formation for the many different waste forms expected to be buried in the repository. This work expands the sparse database on colloids formed during the corrosion of metallic uranium nuclear fuel. We characterized spherical UO 2 and nickel-rich montmorilonite smectite-clay colloids formed during the corrosion of uranium metal fuel under bathtub conditions at 90 °C. Iron and chromium oxides and calcium carbonate colloids were present but were a minor population. The estimated upper concentration of the UO 2 and clays was 4 × 10 11 and 7 × 10 11-3 × 10 12 particles/L, respectively. However, oxygen eventually oxidized the UO 2 colloids, forming long filaments of weeksite K 2(UO 2) 2Si 6O 15 · 4H 2O that settled from solution, reducing the UO 2 colloid population and leaving predominantly clay colloids. The smectite colloids were not affected by oxygen. Plutonium was not directly observed within the UO 2 colloids but partitioned completely to the colloid size fraction. The plutonium concentration in the colloidal fraction was slightly higher than the value used in the viability assessment model, and does not change in concentration with exposure to oxygen. This paper provides conclusive evidence for single-phase radioactive colloids composed of UO 2. However, its impact on repository safety is probably small since oxygen and silica availability will oxidize and effectively precipitate the UO 2 colloids from concentrated solutions.

  8. Numerical simulation of minor actinide recovery behaviour in batch processing of spent metallic fuel by electrorefining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawada, H P; Bhat, N P [Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Balasubramanian, G R [Atomic Energy Commission, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Numerical simulation of electro-transport of fuel actinides (FAs), minor actinides (MAs) and rare earths (REs) in the electro-refiner (ER) for pyrochemical reprocessing of a typical spent IFR metallic fuel has been attempted based on improved thermo-chemical model developed for application to multi-component system in the ER. Optimization of MA recovery and decontamination factors (DFs) for MAs and REs in batch processing is presented. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.

    1997-01-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs

  10. Burning actinides in very hard spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.H.; Shirley, G.W.; Prichard, A.W.; Trapp, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The major unresolved problem in the nuclear industry is the ultimate disposition of the waste products of light water reactors. The study demonstrates the feasibility of designing a very hard spectrum actinide burner reactor (ABR). A 1100 MW/sub t/ ABR design fueled entirely with actinides reprocessed from light water reactor (LWR) wastes is proposed as both an ultimate disposal mechanism for actinides and a means of concurrently producing usable power. Actinides from discharged ABR fuel are recycled to the ABR while fission products are routed to a permanent repository. As an integral part of a large energy park, each such ABR would dispose of the waste actinides from 2 LWRs

  11. Groundwater colloids: Their mobilization from subsurface deposits. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this program has involved developing basic understandings of the mechanisms controlling the presence of colloidal phases in groundwaters. The presence of colloids in groundwater is extremely important in that they may enable the subsurface transport of otherwise immobile pollutants like plutonium or PCBs. The major findings of this work have included: (1) Sampling groundwaters must be performed with great care in order to avoid false positives; (2) Much of the colloidal load moving below ground derives from the aquifer solids themselves; and (3) The detachment of colloids from the aquifer solids occurs in response to changes in the groundwater solution chemistry

  12. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2010-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  13. ENDF/B-V actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the actinides part of the ENDF/B-V nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  14. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  15. Photochemical reactions of actinide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of photochemical studies of actinide ions, which have been performed in our research group for past several years as follows: I) behavior of the excited uranyl(VI) ion; II) photo-reductions of the uranyl ion with organic and inorganic compounds; III) photo-oxidations of uranium(IV) and plutonium(III) in nitric acid solutions. (author)

  16. Angular overlap model in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative foundations of the Angular Overlap Model in actinides based on ab initio calculations of the crystal field effect in the uranium (III) (IV) and (V) ions in various crystals are presented. The calculations justify some common simplifications of the model and fix up the relations between the AOM parameters. Traps and limitations of the AOM phenomenology are discussed

  17. Angular overlap model in actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (PL). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych)

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative foundations of the Angular Overlap Model in actinides based on ab initio calculations of the crystal field effect in the uranium (III) (IV) and (V) ions in various crystals are presented. The calculations justify some common simplifications of the model and fix up the relations between the AOM parameters. Traps and limitations of the AOM phenomenology are discussed.

  18. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  19. LLNL SFA OBER SBR FY17 Program Management and Performance Report: Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-23

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of anthropogenic plutonium (Pu) has accumulated worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al. 1999; Novikov et al. 2006; Santschi et al. 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA) and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program.

  20. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  1. Actinide biocolloid formation in brine by halophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide

  2. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide

  3. Actinide biocolloid formation in brine by halophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.B.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide

  4. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of 238 U, 238 Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and 241 Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. (author)

  5. The complex formation of selected actinides (U, Np, Cm) with microbial ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorius, Maja

    2009-01-01

    One of the urgent tasks in the field of nuclear technology is the final storage of radioactive substances. As a part of the safety requirements the protection of humans and the environment from the danger of radioactive substances in case of the release from the final storage is essential. For performing long-term safety calculations the detailed understanding of the physico-chemical effects and influences which cause the mobilisation and transport of actinides are necessary. The presented work was a discrete part of a project, which was focused on the clarification of the influence of microorganisms on the migration of actinides in case of the release of actinides from a final storage. The influence of microbial produced substances on the mobilisation of selected actinides was studied thereby. The microbial produced substances studied in this project were synthesized by bacteria from the Pseudomonas genus under special conditions. Fluorescent Pseudomonads secrete bacterial pyoverdin-type siderophores with a high potential to complex and transport metals, especially iron(III). The aim of the project was to determine how and under which conditions the bioligands are able to complex also radioactive substances and therefore to transport them. For this work the alpha-emitting actinides uranium, curium and neptunium were chosen because their long-life cycle and their radiotoxicity are a matter of particular interest. This work dealed with the interaction of the actinides U(VI), Np(V) and Cm(III) with model ligands simulating the functionality of the pyoverdins. So, such bioligands can essentially influence the behaviour of actinides in the environment. The results of this work contribute to a better understanding and assessment of the influence of the microbial ligands to the mobilisation and migration of the radionuclides. The outcomes could be used to quantify the actinide-mobilising effect of the bioligands, which are released, for example, in the vicinity of a

  6. Actinides critical masses and the Paxton Woodcock rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, Jacques; Duhamel, Isabelle; Lavarenne, Caroline; Duluc, Matthieu

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents recent actinides (reflected or not, moderated or not) critical masses calculations performed by the French standard route (APOLLO2 Sn 8 P3, 20 energy groups cross-section collapsed from 172 energy groups CEA 93 library). Comparisons are also presented against more accurate routes of the French criticality package CRISTAL, showing the fair conservatism of the standard values. Checks of the Paxton Woodcock rule for transportation exemption limit were also made. (author)

  7. Actinides critical masses and the Paxton Woodcock rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anno, Jacques; Duhamel, Isabelle; Lavarenne, Caroline [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Duluc, Matthieu [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN) (France)

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents recent actinides (reflected or not, moderated or not) critical masses calculations performed by the French standard route (APOLLO2 Sn 8 P3, 20 energy groups cross-section collapsed from 172 energy groups CEA 93 library). Comparisons are also presented against more accurate routes of the French criticality package CRISTAL, showing the fair conservatism of the standard values. Checks of the Paxton Woodcock rule for transportation exemption limit were also made. (author)

  8. Field-scale colloid migration experiments in a granite fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Frost, L.H.; Bachinski, D.B.

    1997-01-01

    An understanding of particle migration in fractured rock, required to assess the potential for colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides, can best be evaluated when the results of laboratory experiments are demonstrated in the field. Field-scale migration experiments with silica colloids were carried out at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), located in southern Manitoba, to develop the methodology for large-scale migration experiments and to determine whether colloid transport is possible over distances up to 17 m. In addition, these experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of flow rate and flow path geometry, and to determine whether colloid tracers could be used to provide additional information on subsurface transport to that provided by conservative tracers alone. The colloid migration studies were carried out as part of AECL's Transport Properties in Highly Fractured Rock Experiment, the objective of which was to develop and demonstrate methods for evaluating the solute transport characteristics of zones of highly fractured rock. The experiments were carried out within fracture zone 2 as two-well recirculating, two-well non-recirculating, and convergent flow tests, using injection rates of 5 and 101 min -1 . Silica colloids with a 20 nm size were used because they are potentially mobile due to their stability, small size and negative surface charge. The shapes of elution profiles for colloids and conservative tracers were similar, demonstrating that colloids can migrate over distances of 17 m. The local region of drawdown towards the URL shaft affected colloid migration and, to a lesser extent, conservative tracer migration within the flow field established by the two-well tracer tests. These results indicate that stable colloids, with sizes as small as 20 nm, have different migration properties from dissolved conservative tracers. (author)

  9. A column experiment for the study of colloidal radionuclide migration in Gorleben aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Delakowitz, B.; Zeh, P.; Klotz, D.; Lazik, D.

    1994-01-01

    A column experiment is performed for the assessment of the migration behaviour of trivalent 152 Eu, 241 Am and tetra- and pentavalent 237 Np, 233 Pa in the presence of humic colloids. Groundwater of an organic rich aquifer from the geological site at Gorleben is chosen for the experiment, as this has been well characterized during the earlier work and contains a substantial amount of humic colloids. The chemical and mineralogical composition of the pleistocene quartz-sand used in the column experiment is characterized by various analytical and mineralogical methods. Prior to the actinide migration experiment, the hydraulic properties (flow velocity, effective porosity, longitudinal dispersion coefficient) are determined in order to ascertain stable conditions for the experiment. In addition, the microstructure parameters (sediment surface, pore size distribution) of the groundwater-sand system in the column are determined. Radiotracers used for the determination of the hydraulic properties are 3 HHO and 82 Br - . Results obtained to date indicate a relatively high mobility of the lanthanide and actinide ions loaded on aquatic humic colloids. The recovery of injected radiotracer ions in eluates is found to depend on the flow velocity of groundwater through the column. The results help to elucidate the actinide migration behaviour in the presence of natural humic colloids. (orig.)

  10. Formation, characterization, and stability of plutonium (IV) colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium is expected to be a major component of the waste element package in any high-level nuclear waste repository. Plutonium(IV) is known to form colloids under chemical conditions similar to those found in typical groundwaters. In the event of a breach of a repository, these colloids represent a source of radionuclide transport to the far-field environment, in parallel with the transport of dissolved waste element species. In addition, the colloids may decompose or disaggregate into soluble ionic species. Thus, colloids represent an additional term in determining waste element solubility limits. A thorough characterization of the physical and chemical properties of these colloids under relevant conditions is essential to assess the concentration limits and transport mechanisms for the waste elements at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository site. This report is concerned primarily with recent results obtained by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Solubility Determination Task pertaining to the characterization of the structural and chemical properties of Pu(IV) colloid. Important results will be presented which provides further evidence that colloidal plutonium(IV) is structurally similar to plutonium dioxide and that colloidal plutonium(IV) is electrochemically reactive. 13 refs., 7 figs

  11. Recent development in computational actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jun

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the Manhattan project in World War II, actinide chemistry has been essential for nuclear science and technology. Yet scientists still seek the ability to interpret and predict chemical and physical properties of actinide compounds and materials using first-principle theory and computational modeling. Actinide compounds are challenging to computational chemistry because of their complicated electron correlation effects and relativistic effects, including spin-orbit coupling effects. There have been significant developments in theoretical studies on actinide compounds in the past several years. The theoretical capabilities coupled with new experimental characterization techniques now offer a powerful combination for unraveling the complexities of actinide chemistry. In this talk, we will provide an overview of our own research in this field, with particular emphasis on applications of relativistic density functional and ab initio quantum chemical methods to the geometries, electronic structures, spectroscopy and excited-state properties of small actinide molecules such as CUO and UO 2 and some large actinide compounds relevant to separation and environment science. The performance of various density functional approaches and wavefunction theory-based electron correlation methods will be compared. The results of computational modeling on the vibrational, electronic, and NMR spectra of actinide compounds will be briefly discussed as well [1-4]. We will show that progress in relativistic quantum chemistry, computer hardware and computational chemistry software has enabled computational actinide chemistry to emerge as a powerful and predictive tool for research in actinide chemistry. (authors)

  12. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  13. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  14. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP [PowerPoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald T.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  15. Mobilization And Characterization Of Colloids Generated From Cement Leachates Moving Through A SRS Sandy Sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  17. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  18. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  19. Analytical evaluation of actinide sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sola, A.

    1977-01-01

    The analytical evaluation of the sensitivities of actinides to various parameters such as cross sections, decay constants, flux and time is presented. The formulae are applied to isotopes of the Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium and Americium series. The agreement between analytically obtained and computer evaluated sensitivities being always good, it is throught that the formulation includes all the important parameters entering in the evaluation of sensitivities. A study of the published data is made

  20. Interaction of Eu, Th and U with bentonite colloids in presence of humic acid: a flow-field flow fractionation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouby, M.; Geckeis, H.; Schaefer, Th.; Mihai, S.; Fanghaenell, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The actinide mobility in the far-field of a repository site can be strongly influenced by the presence of colloidal species. Field migration experiments at the Grimsel Test Site under low ionic strength (I=10 -3 mol/L) and high pH (∼9.6) conditions have demonstrated a considerable clay colloid-mediated actinide(III/IV) migration [1]. However, those studies rendered it necessary to take the kinetics of notably the actinide-colloid interaction and colloid stability into account [2]. In the present study, we examine the stability of bentonite clay colloids in natural Grimsel groundwater and their interaction with Cs(I), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) (conc. ∼ 10 -8 mol/L). Experiments cover 12 months contact times and are performed under anoxic conditions. Humic acid (Gohy-573) is added after different contact times as a competing ligand and the time dependent metal ion desorption is followed. Dedicated experiments and thermodynamic speciation calculations are performed to estimate the metal ion speciation within the colloid system. As the experimental metal ion speciation (i.e. differentiation of clay-colloid bound, humic colloid bound and dissolved metal ion species) at the given low concentration conditions is hardly possible by spectroscopic methods, we use Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation coupled to UV-Vis spectrophotometry and ICP-MS detection. Unexpectedly, it is found that small-sized bentonite colloids ( d -values, Cs and U do not interact significantly with bentonite colloids, while Th and Eu do. Eu desorption from clay colloids by humic acid is delayed significantly upon increasing the clay colloid-Eu contact time up to several months. Nevertheless, estimated equilibrium conditions are attained after 7 months desorption time. However, it appears that significant fractions of clay colloid borne Th(IV) do not desorb in presence of humic acid and equilibrium conditions estimated from calculation and experiments are not

  1. Grimsel colloid exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Longworth, G.; Vilks, P.

    1989-11-01

    The Grimsel Colloid Exercise was an intercomparison exercise which consisted of an in situ sampling phase followed by a colloid characterisation step. The goal of this benchmark exercise, which involved 12 laboratories, was to evaluate both sampling and characterisation techniques with emphasis on the colloid specific size distribution. The sampling phase took place at the Grimsel Test Site between February 1 and 13, 1988 and the participating groups produced colloid samples using the following methods: 1. Cross-flow ultrafiltration with production of membranes loaded with colloids. 2. Tangential diaultrafiltration and production of colloid concentrates. 3. Filtrates produced by each group. 4. Unfiltered water was also collected by PSI in glass bottles, under controlled anaerobic conditions, and by the other sampling groups in various plastic bottles. In addition, on-line monitoring of pH, χ, [O-2] and T of the water and of [O-2] in the atmosphere of the sampling units was carried out routinely. All samples were shipped according to the CoCo Club scheme for characterisation, with emphasis on the size distribution. The exercise differentiates the colloid samples produced on site from those obtained after transfer of the fluid samples to the laboratories. The colloid concentration and size distribution can be determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gravimetry (GRAV), chemical analysis of fluid samples after micro/ultrafiltration (MF/UF) and by transmission single particle counting (PC). The colloid concentration can also be evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), static and dynamic light scattering (SLS,DLS) and by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). The results are discussed on the basis of the detection limit, lateral resolution and counting conditions of the technique (precision) as well as sample preparation, artefact production and measurement optimisation (accuracy). A good agreement between size distribution results was

  2. Mass spectrometric studies of the complexing behaviour of actinide ions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steppert, Michael

    2012-01-01

    As the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel is governed by Plutonium and the Minor Actinides, these elements are focussed on for investigations in the framework of safety assessment for nuclear waste repositories. To shed more light on the selectivity of the partitioning ligands BTP and BTBP towards the extraction of trivalent actinides, the complexes these ligands form with lanthanides in octanolic solution were characterized. The differences in the extraction efficiencies among the different lanthanides were traced back to the varying preferential formation of Ln(BTP)3 complexes, depending on the ionic radius of the lanthanides. Additionally it was shown that depending on the sterical demand of BTBP ligands nitrate anions coordinate in the first coordination shell of Eu(BTBP)2-complexes. As the behavior of Plutonium under geochemical conditions is of particular interest for the safety assessment of potential nuclear waste repositories, the second part of the thesis focuses on the hydrolysis and colloid formation behavior of aqueous Plutonium solutions. The solution species of Zirconium(IV) as analogue for Plutonium(IV) as well as of Uranium(VI) and Plutonium(VI) were characterized and quantified by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Moreover the colloid-induced reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) and the subsequent formation of colloidal species was investigated. [de

  3. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using highly sensitive and advanced laser-based spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been applied for the chemical speciation of actinide in aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. Development of TRLFS technology for the chemical speciation of actinides, Development of laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) system, Application of LIBD technology to investigate dynamic behaviors of actinides dissolution reactions, Development of nanoparticle analysis technology in groundwater using LIBD, Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, Spectroscopic speciation of uranium-ligand complexes in aqueous solution, Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces

  4. Chemistry of actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.J.; Sherrow, S.A.; Toth, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This task is concerned primarily with the fundamental chemistry of the actinide and fission product elements. Special efforts are made to develop research programs in collaboration with researchers at universities and in industry who have need of national laboratory facilities. Specific areas currently under investigation include: (1) spectroscopy and photochemistry of actinides in low-temperature matrices; (2) small-angle scattering studies of hydrous actinide and fission product polymers in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents; (3) kinetic and thermodynamic studies of complexation reactions in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions; and (4) the development of inorganic ion exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide separations. Recent results from work in these areas are summarized here

  5. Separation of plutonium oxide nanoparticles and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Richard E.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Oil and vinegar: Colloidal plutonium is an important component of Pu aqueous speciation. Pu colloids are problematic in nuclear separations and are a potential transport vector in the environment. Using a mixture of n-octanol and trichloroacetic acid a selective and reversible separation of these particles can be achieved by exploiting their surface reactivity (Li{sub 2}[Pu{sub 38}O{sub 56}Cl{sub 42}(H{sub 2}O){sub 20}].15H{sub 2}O). (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Separation of plutonium oxide nanoparticles and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Richard E.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2011-11-18

    Colloidal plutonium is an important component of Pu aqueous speciation. Pu colloids are problematic in nuclear separations and are a potential transport vector in the environment. Using a mixture of n-octanol and trichloroacetic acid a selective and reversible separation of these particles can be achieved by exploiting their surface reactivity. [German] Kolloidales Plutonium ist ein wichtiger Bestandteil in waessrigen Pu-Bereitungen. Pu-Kolloide sind problematisch bei der Wiederaufbereitung von Kernmaterial und bilden einen potenziellen Transportvektor in die Umwelt. Mit einem Loesungsmittelgemisch aus n-Octanol und Trichloressigsaeure gelingt die selektive und reversible Trennung dieser Partikel durch Ausnutzung ihrer Oberflaechenreaktivitaet.

  7. Aqueous electrochemical mechanisms in actinide residue processing. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, D.L. Jr.; Burns, C.J.; Morris, D.E.; Smith, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    'New and/or improved solutions to the stabilization and volume reduction of nuclear materials processing residues are urgently needed. Mediated electrochemical oxidation/reduction (MEO/R) processes are one such approach for incinerator ash, combustibles, and other solid residues. However, questions remain concerning the mechanisms of these processes, and how they might be optimized. In addition, further research is merited to extend their range of applicability. Recent advances in the study of heterogeneous electron transfer in solid substrates have opened the door for the re-examination of electron transfer processes associated with redox mediated actinide dissolution. The authors develop a deeper understanding of the thermodynamic and mechanistic aspects of heterogeneous electron transfer that lie at the heart of these MEO/R processes. They will also develop and test new approaches based on the results of these fundamental studies using actual residue materials. Key aspects of this proposal include: (1) determination of the potential windows for oxidation/reduction of colloidal actinide oxides and actinide-bearing oxide and organic substrates and the e transfer kinetic parameters that govern the current--overpotential characteristics; (2) development of adaptations of mediation schemes and application of co-mediation reagents for oxidative and reductive dissolution based on complexation of the surface-bound or solid-phase actinides and/or the dissolved redox mediator;and (3) execution of bench-scale tests of new MEO/R schemes on actual residue materials.'

  8. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository

  9. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  10. Clusters in attractive colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, A [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Arcangelis, L de [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione and CNISM II Universita di Napoli, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Candia, A de [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Gado, E Del [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Fierro, A [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Sator, N [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR (CNRS) 7600 Case 121, 4 Place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-09-13

    We discuss how the anomalous increase of the viscosity in colloidal systems with short-range attraction can be related to the formation of long-living clusters. Based on molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo numerical simulations of different models, we propose a similar picture for colloidal gelation at low and intermediate volume fractions. On this basis, we analyze the distinct role played by the formation of long-living bonds and the crowding of the particles in the slow dynamics of attractive colloidal systems.

  11. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  12. MIGRATION '03: 9th International Conference on Chemistry and Migration Behavior of Actinides and Fission Products in the Geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Geon Young; Hahn, Pil Soo; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Kim, Seung

    2003-12-01

    The objectives of this report are overview of the chemistry and migration behavior of actinide for the HLW disposal safety assessment and to summarise the present status of actinide science and future developments. Actinides in HLW are very toxic and long-life time radionuclides. Therefore, the understanding of their characteristics and reaction behaviors in the deep subsurface environment is necessary for improving the reliability of HLW disposal safety assessment. This report presents an overview of the recent developments in the fundamental chemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems, their interactions and migration in the geosphere, and the processes involved in modeling their geochemical behavior for the high level radioactive waste management. In addition, the thesis presented in MIGRATION '03 conference were described briefly. Actinide science in relation to the HLW disposal management can be classified into three main subjects; aquatic chemistry of actinides and fission products, migration behavior of radionuclides and geochemical and transport modeling. The radionuclides leached from waste forms are intruded into human environment along the groundwater flowing in the fracture around the waster disposal facility. To analyze and predict such radionuclide migration phenomena, the data that were obtained from well defined condition are required. Data obtained from studies on the chemical behaviors of actinide elements and fission products in the groundwater are essential in the safety assessment of HLW management. This report is intended to suggest the direction of R and D in actinide chemistry for the national program of HLW management in future

  13. MIGRATION '03: 9th International Conference on Chemistry and Migration Behavior of Actinides and Fission Products in the Geosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon Young; Hahn, Pil Soo; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Kim, Seung

    2003-12-15

    The objectives of this report are overview of the chemistry and migration behavior of actinide for the HLW disposal safety assessment and to summarise the present status of actinide science and future developments. Actinides in HLW are very toxic and long-life time radionuclides. Therefore, the understanding of their characteristics and reaction behaviors in the deep subsurface environment is necessary for improving the reliability of HLW disposal safety assessment. This report presents an overview of the recent developments in the fundamental chemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems, their interactions and migration in the geosphere, and the processes involved in modeling their geochemical behavior for the high level radioactive waste management. In addition, the thesis presented in MIGRATION '03 conference were described briefly. Actinide science in relation to the HLW disposal management can be classified into three main subjects; aquatic chemistry of actinides and fission products, migration behavior of radionuclides and geochemical and transport modeling. The radionuclides leached from waste forms are intruded into human environment along the groundwater flowing in the fracture around the waster disposal facility. To analyze and predict such radionuclide migration phenomena, the data that were obtained from well defined condition are required. Data obtained from studies on the chemical behaviors of actinide elements and fission products in the groundwater are essential in the safety assessment of HLW management. This report is intended to suggest the direction of R and D in actinide chemistry for the national program of HLW management in future.

  14. Quantitative Assessment of the Potential Significance of Colloids to the KBS-3 Disposal Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, R.A.; White, M.J.; Wickham, S.M.; Bennett, D.G.; Hicks, T.W.

    2002-06-01

    Colloids are minute particles in the size range 1 nm to 1 μm that can remain suspended in water, and may influence radionuclide transport in radioactive waste disposal systems. Galson Sciences Ltd (GSL) has undertaken a quantitative assessment of the impact that colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport may have on the performance of the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. This assessment has involved the evaluation and application of SKI's colloid transport model, COLLAGE II, modelling of km-scale Pu transport at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA, and identification of circumstances under which colloid-facilitated transport could be important for a KBS-3-type environment. Colloids bearing traces of plutonium from the BENHAM underground nuclear test have been detected in samples obtained from Nevada Test Site (NTS) groundwater wells 1.3 km from the detonation point. Plutonium is generally fairly immobile in groundwater systems, and it has been suggested that colloids may have caused the plutonium from the BENHAM test to be transported 1.3 km in only 30 years. This hypothesis has been tested by modelling plutonium transport in a fracture with similar characteristics to those present in the vicinity of the BENHAM test. SKI's colloid transport code, COLLAGE II, considers radionuclide transport in a one-dimensional planar fracture and represents radionuclide-colloid sorption and desorption assuming first-order, linear kinetics. Recently published data from both the ongoing NTS site investigation and from the associated Yucca Mountain Project have been used to define a COLLAGE II dataset. The kinetics of radionuclide-colloid sorption and desorption have been found to be crucial in explaining the transport of plutonium associated with colloids, as inferred at the NTS. Specifically, it has been found that for plutonium to have been transported by colloids over the full 1.3 km transport path, it is likely that the plutonium

  15. Spectroscopic studies on colloid-borne uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, K.U.; Weiss, S.; Foerstendorf, H.; Brendler, V.; Zaenker, H.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Information on molecular speciation provides a basis for the reliable assessment of actinide migration in the environment. We use several methods for the separation of colloids from liquids (e.g. ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration) in combination with spectroscopic techniques (EXAFS, ATR-FTIR, Moessbauer) and modeling of surface complexation reactions. This enables us to investigate the speciation of colloid-borne uranium in waters occurring in or escaping from abandoned uranium mines during the remediation process. Mine flooding was simulated on a 100 L scale by mixing acid mine water of elevated U concentration with oxic, near-neutral groundwater until pH ∼ 5.5 was reached. The freshly formed colloids adsorbed 95% of the total uranium and consisted mainly of 2-line ferri-hydrite (Fh) besides traces of aluminum, sulfur, silica, and carbon compounds. EXAFS analysis at the U-LIII absorption edge suggested a bidentate surface complex of UO 2 2+ on FeO 6 octahedra, but two minor backscattering contributions in close vicinity to the absorber remained unexplained. Since only Al could be excluded as backscattering atom, we studied U sorption on Fh at pH 5.5 in presence and in absence of sulfate, silicate, and atmospheric CO 2 to clarify the bond structure. EXAFS showed the unknown backscattering contributions in all the sorption samples regardless of the presence or absence of the tested components. Contrary to structural models proposed in the literature, bi-dentately complexed carbonate ligands do not explain our experimental EXAFS data. But ATR-IR spectra showed that U-carbonato complexes must be involved in the sorption of uranyl on Fh. These results are not contradictory if the carbonate ligands were bound mono-dentately. Nevertheless, carbon cannot act as backscattering atom in carbonate-free samples prepared in N 2 atmosphere. We propose a new structural model including exclusively Fe, H, and O atoms in which the bi

  16. Analysis of the minority actinides transmutation in a sodium fast reactor with uniform load pattern by the MCNPX-CINDER code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Valero, R.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Aragones, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the minority actinides transmutation in sodium fast reactors (SFR) assuming a uniform load pattern. It is determined the isotopic evolution of the actinides along burn, and the evolution of the reactivity and the reactivity coefficients. For that, it is used the MCNPX neutron transport code coupled with the inventory code CINDER90.

  17. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  18. Liquid Crystal Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids are abundant in nature, science, and technology, with examples ranging from milk to quantum dots and the colloidal atom paradigm. Similarly, liquid crystal ordering is important in contexts ranging from biological membranes to laboratory models of cosmic strings and liquid crystal displays in consumer devices. Some of the most exciting recent developments in both of these soft matter fields emerge at their interface, in the fast-growing research arena of liquid crystal colloids. Mesoscale self-assembly in such systems may lead to artificial materials and to structures with emergent physical behavior arising from patterning of molecular order and nano- or microparticles into precisely controlled configurations. Liquid crystal colloids show exceptional promise for new discovery that may impinge on composite material fabrication, low-dimensional topology, photonics, and so on. Starting from physical underpinnings, I review the state of the art in this fast-growing field, with a focus on its scientific and technological potential.

  19. Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Role of Colloids on the Radionuclide Migration in a Crystalline Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; Alonso, Ursula; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Mingarro, Manuel; Lopez, Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    In a deep geological repository (DGR) of high level radioactive waste, all the possible phenomena affecting radionuclide migration have to be studied to assess its security over time. Colloids can play an important role for contaminant transport if the following conditions are fulfilled: colloids exist in a non negligible concentration, they are mobile and stable in the environment of interest, and they are able to adsorb radionuclides irreversibly. In this study, different transport experiments where performed to improve the knowledge on the main mechanisms affecting the radionuclide migration in the presence of colloids in a crystalline medium. Firstly, colloid stability was analysed and then transport experiments in an artificial granite longitudinal fracture were carried out. Synthetic colloids of different size and bentonite clay colloids were used to evaluate the effects of colloid size, charge, and water flow rate on their mobility. Results showed that both major importance of the water flow rate on the mobility of colloids and their recovery and a higher interaction of smaller particles with the surface. Finally, the migration behaviour of Sr, and Sr adsorbed onto bentonite colloids was compared. The elution curves of Sr adsorbed onto colloid were significantly different from the ones of Sr alone, pointing out that sorption/desorption mechanisms must be taken into account to understand the radionuclide migration in the fracture in the presence of colloids. (authors)

  20. Long-term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breshears, D.D.; Hakonson, T.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Whicker, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The mobility of actinides in surface soils is a key issue of concern at several DOE facilities in arid and semiarid environments, including Rocky Flats, Hanford, Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Key sources of uncertainty in assessing Pu mobility are the magnitudes of mobility resulting from three modes of transport: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depend on numerous environmental factors and they compete with one another, particularly for actinides in very shallow soils (∼ 1 mm). The overall goal of the study is to quantify the mobility of soil actinides from all three modes. The authors study is using field measurements, laboratory experiments, and ecological modeling to address these three processes at three DOE facilities where actinide kinetics are of concern: WIPP, Rocky Flats, and Hanford. Wind erosion is being measured with suite of monitoring equipment, water erosion is being studied with rainfall simulation experiments, vertical migration is being studied in controlled laboratory experiments, and the three processes are being integrated using ecological modeling. Estimates for clean up of soil actinides for the extensive tracts of DOE land range to hundreds of billion $ in the US. Without studies of these processes, unnecessary clean-up of these areas may waste billions of dollars and cause irreparable ecological damage through the soil removal. Further, the outcomes of litigation against DOE are dependent on quantifying the mobility of actinides in surface soils.'

  1. Electrochemical separation of actinides and fission products in molten salt electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Fusselman, S.P. [Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Molten salt electrochemical separation may be applied to accelerator-based conversion (ABC) and transmutation systems by dissolving the fluoride transport salt in LiCl-KCl eutectic solvent. The resulting fluoride-chloride mixture will contain small concentrations of fission product rare earths (La, Nd, Gd, Pr, Ce, Eu, Sm, and Y) and actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm). The Gibbs free energies of formation of the metal chlorides are grouped advantageously such that the actinides can be deposited on a solid cathode with the majority of the rare earths remaining in the electrolyte. Thus, the actinides are recycled for further transmutation. Rockwell and its partners have measured the thermodynamic properties of the metal chlorides of interest (rare earths and actinides) and demonstrated separation of actinides from rare earths in laboratory studies. A model is being developed to predict the performance of a commercial electrochemical cell for separations starting with PUREX compositions. This model predicts excellent separation of plutonium and other actinides from the rare earths in metal-salt systems.

  2. Development of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Laboratory; Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Laboratory; Benson, Michael Timothy [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory; Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    and 60%. In general, the performance of all of these substantially disparate metallic fuel alloys has been observed to be excellent, and their irradiation behaviors are generally consistent with historic norms for metallic fuels without minor actinide additions and having lower Pu or Zr contents. Future work is being undertaken with a view toward increasing the burnup potential of metallic fuels even more. Design innovations under investigation include: 1) lowering the fuel smear density in order to accommodate more swelling, 2) annular fuel geometry to eliminate the need for a sodium bond, 3) minor alloy additions to stabilize lanthanide fission products inside the fuel and prevent their transport to the cladding where they can participate in fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI), and 4) coatings/liners on the cladding inner surface to mitigate FCCI and enable higher temperature operation. This paper will present the current state of development of metallic fuels for actinide transmutation in the US. Highlights will include recent results from metallic fuel casting experiments, experiments to identify alloy additions to immobilize lanthanide fission products, and postirradiation examinations of annular metallic fuels at low burnup.

  3. Studies of colloids and their importance for repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, M.; Skaarman, C.; Degueldre, C.

    1995-12-01

    The processes, parameters and data used to evaluate the potential of nuclide transport by a colloid facilitated mechanism are reviewed and discussed in this report. Both steady-state (present situation) and possible future non-steady-state hydrogeochemistry in the geosphere are covered. In the steady-state scenario, the colloid (clay, silica, iron(III)hydroxide) concentration is around 20-45 micrograms/l which is considered to be a low value. The low colloid concentration is justified by the large attachment factor to the rock which reduces the stability of the colloids in the aquifer. Both reversible and irreversible sorption processes are reviewed. In the non-steady-state scenario, changes of hydrogeochemical properties may induce larger colloid concentrations. The increase of concentration is however limited and relaxation is always observed after any change. Emphasis is placed on the glaciation-deglaciation scenario. 53 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, J.D.F.; Russell, P.J.; Avery, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive research investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low level and intermediate level waste immobilized in cement. Several topics have been investigated which include: (a) the study of the formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates; (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments; (c) colloid sorption behaviour; (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates; (e) characteristics of near-field materials in EC repository simulation tests; and (f) colloid migration behaviour. These experimental investigations should provide data and a basis for the development of transport models and leaching mechanisms, and thus relate directly to the part of the Task 3 programme concerned with migration and retention of radionuclides in the near field. 114 Figs.; 39 Tabs.; 12 Refs

  5. Sorption of 241Am onto montmorillonite, illite and hematite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Ulrich, H.J.; Silby, H.

    1994-01-01

    Actinide sorption on colloids may be described as a competition between the formation of complexes in solution and the build up of surface complexes. The role of particle and of carbonate concentrations on the sorption/desorption of 241 Am on montmorillonite, illite and hematite colloids is investigated. Since the partition coefficient (K p ) values are virtually independent of the colloid concentrations, within the range 1 to 300 ppm, no significant aggregation takes place in the sorption/desorption experiment. At pH 8, a slight decrease of K p is observed if the concentration of total carbonate exceeds 10 -2 M. The formation of the carbonato- (and hydroxo-carbonato-) complexes in the solution competes with the formation of surface complexes on the colloids. A relationship between the sorption coefficient and the complexation of 241 Am in the solution has been found. This leads to the conclusion that, besides free americium cation, the hydroxo-, and carbonato- as well as the mixed hydroxo-carbonato-complexes are sorbed. Only when the tricarbonatocomplex [Am(CO 3 ) 3 ] 3- prevails (total carbonate concentration > 10 -2 M), a significant decrease of the distribution coefficient is observed. At pH 10 this decrease disappears because under these conditions the strong hydroxo-complexes dominate. A pragmatic and relatively simple application of surface complexation model describes the observed features. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod, L [Aiken, SC

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  7. Burn of actinides in MOX fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2017-09-01

    The spent fuel from nuclear reactors is stored temporarily in dry repositories in many countries of the world. However, the main problem of spent fuel, which is its high radio-toxicity in the long term, is not solved. A new strategy is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle and for the sustain ability of nuclear power generation, this strategy could be the recycling of plutonium to obtain more energy and recycle the actinides generated during the irradiation of the fuel to transmute them in less radioactive radionuclides. In this work we evaluate the quantities of actinides generated in different fuels and the quantities of actinides that are generated after their recycling in a thermal reactor. First, we make a reference calculation with a regular enriched uranium fuel, and then is changed to a MOX fuel, varying the plutonium concentrations and determining the quantities of actinides generated. Finally, different amounts of actinides are introduced into a new fuel and the amount of actinides generated at the end of the fuel burn is calculated, in order to determine the reduction of minor actinides obtained. The results show that if the concentration of plutonium in the fuel is high, then the production of minor actinides is also high. The calculations were made using the cell code CASMO-4 and the results obtained are shown in section 6 of this work. (Author)

  8. Environmental chemistry of the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Linfeng

    1986-01-01

    The environmental chemistry of the actinide elements is a new branch of science developing with the application of nuclear energy on a larger and larger scale. Various aspects of the environmental chemistry of the actinide elements are briefly reviewed in this paper, such as its significance in the nuclear waste disposal, its coverage of research fields and possible directions for future study

  9. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  10. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused

  11. Minor Actinides Recycling in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, M.; Golfier, H.; Vasile, A.; Varaine, F.; Boucher, L.; Greneche, D.

    2006-01-01

    Recycling of minor actinides in current and near future PWR is considered as one of the options of the general waste management strategy. This paper presents the analysis of this option both from the core physics and fuel cycle point of view. A first indicator of the efficiency of different neutron spectra for transmutation purposes is the capture to fission cross sections ratio which is less favourable by a factor between 5 to 10 in PWRs compared to fast reactors. Another indicator presented is the production of high ranking isotopes like Curium, Berkelium or Californium in the thermal or epithermal spectrum conditions of PWR cores by successive neutron captures. The impact of the accumulation of this elements on the fabrication process of such PWR fuels strongly penalizes this option. The main constraint on minor actinides loadings in PWR (or fast reactors) fuels are related to their direct impact (or the impact of their transmutation products) on the reactivity coefficients, the reactivity control means and the core kinetics parameters. The main fuel cycle physical parameters like the neutron source, the alpha decay power, the gamma and neutrons dose rate and the criticality aspects are also affected. Recent neutronic calculations based on a reference core of the Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor (EPR), indicates typical maximum values of 1 % loadings. Different fuel design options for minor actinides transmutation purposes in PWRs are presented: UOX and MOX, homogeneous and heterogeneous assemblies. In this later case, Americium loading is concentrated in specific pins of a standard UOX assembly. Recycling of Neptunium in UOX and MOX fuels was also studied to improve the proliferation resistance of the fuel. The impact on the core physics and penalties on Uranium enrichment were underlined in this case. (authors)

  12. PIE analysis for minor actinide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya

    2005-01-01

    Minor actinide (MA) is generated in nuclear fuel during the operation of power reactor. For fuel design, reactivity decrease due to it should be considered. Out of reactors, MA plays key role to define the property of spent fuel (SF) such as α-radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and criticality of SF. In order to evaluate the calculation codes and libraries for predicting the amount of MA, comparison between calculation results and experimentally obtained data has been conducted. In this report, we will present the status of PIE data of MA taken by post irradiation examinations (PIE) and several calculation results. (author)

  13. Review of actinide decorporation with chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoborlo, E. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/CETAMA), 30 - Marcoule (France); Amekraz, B.; Moulin, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Moulin, V. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares (DEN/DDIN/MR), 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France); Taran, F. [CEA Saclay (DSV/DBJC/SMMCB), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bailly, Th.; Burgada, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS/LCSB/UMR 7033), 93 - Bobigny (France); Henge-Napoli, M.H. [CEA Valrho, Site de Marcoule (INSTN), 30 (France); Jeanson, A.; Den Auwer, Ch.; Bonin, L.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2007-10-15

    In case of accidental release of radionuclides in a nuclear facility or in the environment, internal contamination (inhalation, ingestion or wound) with actinides represents a severe health risk to human beings. It is therefore important to provide effective chelation therapy or decorporation to reduce acute radiation damage, chemical toxicity, and late radiation effects. Speciation governs bioavailability and toxicity of elements and it is a prerequisite tool for the design and success of new ligands or chelating agents. The purpose of this review is to present the state-of-the-art of actinide decorporation within biological media, to recall briefly actinide metabolism, to list the basic constraints of actinide-ligand for development, to describe main tools developed and used for decorporation studies, to review mainly the chelating agents tested for actinides, and finally to conclude on the future trends in this field. (authors)

  14. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  15. Review on influences of colloids on geologic disposal of high level radioactive waste. For better understanding of natural colloidal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Masaya; Kamioka, Hikari; Yoshida, Takahiro; Suko, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Although the influences of colloidal materials on radionuclide transport in geological media are pointed out, their behaviors in natural environment have not yet been well elucidated and therefore their influences on the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) are not fully estimated quantitatively. This paper reviewed the studies on natural colloids, especially focused on inorganic, organic and biological colloids, and discussed the future works to be carried out. Much attention should be paid to the sampling and analysis. Excellent techniques for in-situ observation, concentration without changing the state of colloid, standard procedure for analysis, are necessary to be developed. More research studies on the behaviors of colloids are required in not only far- and near-fields but also items on effects of the environments and its evolution. (author)

  16. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage

  17. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  18. Actinide behavior in the Integral Fast Reactor. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and weapons grade plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for seven day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  19. Actinide behavior in the Integral Fast Reactor. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ( 237 Np, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 243 Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and weapons grade plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for seven day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  20. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ( 237 Np, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 243 Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors' confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  1. Advances in Metallic Fuels for High Burnup and Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S. L.; Harp, J. M.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Fielding, R. S.; Mariani, R. D.; Carmack, W. J.

    2016-10-01

    Research and development activities on metallic fuels in the US are focused on their potential use for actinide transmutation in future sodium fast reactors. As part of this application, there is a desire to demonstrate a multifold increase in burnup potential. A number of metallic fuel design innovations are under investigation with a view toward significantly increasing the burnup potential of metallic fuels, since higher discharge burnups equate to lower potential actinide losses during recycle. Promising innovations under investigation include: 1) lowering the fuel smeared density in order to accommodate the additional swelling expected as burnups increase, 2) utilizing an annular fuel geometry for better geometrical stability at low smeared densities, as well as the potential to eliminate the need for a sodium bond, and 3) minor alloy additions to immobilize lanthanide fission products inside the metallic fuel matrix and prevent their transport to the cladding resulting in fuel-cladding chemical interaction. This paper presents results from these efforts to advance metallic fuel technology in support of high burnup and actinide transmutation objectives. Highlights include examples of fabrication of low smeared density annular metallic fuels, experiments to identify alloy additions effective in immobilizing lanthanide fission products, and early postirradiation examinations of annular metallic fuels having low smeared densities and palladium additions for fission product immobilization.

  2. Technique Development to Support Clean-up and/or Disposal of Actinide Contaminated Soils and Sediments: Coupling Fission Tract Analysis with Synchroton X-ray Microprobe Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sue Clark

    2003-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop quantitative FTA to provide images of the microscale spatial distributions of high fissile actinides sorbed to environmental particles such as sediments and colloids. We developed methods to provide absolute actinide surface concentrations on the particles, regardless of particle size. We are also working to provide particle size information by our approach. We also coupled our newly devised FTA methods with the quantitative determination of stable element distributions in the same particles using synchrotron x-ray microprobe analysis

  3. Extraction and characterisation of colloids in waste repository leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrall, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    Inorganic colloids are ubiquitous in environmental waters and are thought to be potential transporters of radionuclides and other toxic metals. Colloids present large surface areas to pollutants and contaminants present in waters and are therefore capable of sorbing and transporting them via groundwater and surface water movement. Much research has been and is currently being undertaken to understand more fully the stability of colloids in different water chemistries, factors which affect metal sorption onto colloids, and the processes which affect metal-colloid transport. This thesis first investigates groundwater and surface water sampling and characterisation techniques for the investigation of the colloids present in and around a low-level waste repository. Samples were collected anaerobically using micro-purge low-flow methodology (MPLF) and then subjected to sequential ultrafiltration, again anaerobically. After separation into size fractions the solids were analysed for radiochemical content, colloid population and morphology. It was found that colloids were present in large numbers in the groundwaters extracted from the trench waste burial area (anaerobic environment), but in the surface drain waters (aerobic environment) colloid population was comparable to levels found in waters extracted from above the trenches. There was evidence that the non-tritium activity was associated with the colloids and particulates in the trenches, but outside of the trenches the evidence was not conclusive because the activity and colloid concentrations were low. Secondly this thesis investigates the stability of inorganic colloids, mainly haematite, in the presence of humic acid, varying pH and electrolyte concentrations. The applicability of the SchuIze-Hardy rule to haematite and haematite/humic acid mixtures was investigated using photon correlation spectroscopy to measure the rate of fast and slow coagulation after the addition of mono, di and trivalent ions. It was

  4. Clay colloid formation and release from MX-80 buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1999-12-01

    Flowing groundwater can tear off clay colloids from buffer clay that has penetrated into fractures and transport them and bring sorbed radionuclides up to the biosphere. The colloids are 2-50 μm particle aggregates that are liberated from expanded, softened buffer if the water flow rate in the fractures exceeds a few centimeters per second. Except for the first few months or years after application of the buffer in the deposition holes the flow rate will not be as high as that. The aperture of the fractures will not hinder transport of colloids but most of the fractures contain clastic fillings, usually chlorite, that attract and immobilize them. This condition and the flow rate criterion combine to reduce the chance of radionuclide-bearing clay colloids to reach the biosphere to practically zero except for certain cases that need to be considered

  5. Minor actinide transmutation - a waste management option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    1986-01-01

    The incentive to recycle minor actinides results from the reduction of the long-term α-radiological risk rather than from a better utilization of the uranium resources. Nevertheless, the gain in generated electricity by minor actinide transmutation in a fast breeder reactor can compensate for the costs of their recovery and make-up into fuel elements. Different recycling options of minor actinides are discussed: transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) is possible as long as plutonium is not recycled in light water reactors (LWRs). In this case a minor actinide burner with fuel of different composition has to be introduced. The development of appropriate minor actinide fuels and their properties are described. The irradiation experiments underway or planned are summarized. A review of minor actinide partitioning from the PUREX waste stream is given. From the present constraints of LMFBR technology a reduction of the long-term α-radiological risk by a factor of 200 is deduced relative to that from the direct storage of spent LWR fuel. Though the present accumulation of minor actinides is low, nuclear transmutation may be needed when nuclear energy production has grown. (orig.)

  6. Criteria for achieving actinide reduction goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljenzin, J.O.

    1996-01-01

    In order to discuss various criteria for achieving actinide reduction goals, the goals for actinide reduction must be defined themselves. In this context the term actinides is interpreted to mean plutonium and the so called ''minor actinides'' neptunium, americium and curium, but also protactinium. Some possible goals and the reasons behind these will be presented. On the basis of the suggested goals it is possible to analyze various types of devices for production of nuclear energy from uranium or thorium, such as thermal or fast reactors and accelerator driven system, with their associated fuel cycles with regard to their ability to reach the actinide reduction goals. The relation between necessary single cycle burn-up values, fuel cycle processing losses and losses to waste will be defined and discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to arrange the possible systems on order of performance with regard to their potential to reduce the actinide inventory and the actinide losses to wastes. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Actinides burnup in a sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Pineda A, R.; Martinez C, E.; Alonso, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The burnup of actinides in a nuclear reactor is been proposed as part of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, this process would close the fuel cycle recycling some of the radioactive material produced in the open nuclear fuel cycle. These actinides are found in the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power reactors at the end of their burnup in the reactor. Previous studies of actinides recycling in thermal reactors show that would be possible reduce the amounts of actinides at least in 50% of the recycled amounts. in this work, the amounts of actinides that can be burned in a fast reactor is calculated, very interesting results surge from the calculations, first, the amounts of actinides generated by the fuel is higher than for thermal fuel and the composition of the actinides vector is different as in fuel for thermal reactor the main isotope is the {sup 237}Np in the fuel for fast reactor the main isotope is the {sup 241}Am, finally it is concluded that the fast reactor, also generates important amounts of waste. (Author)

  8. Strontium migration in a crystalline medium: effects of the presence of bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula; Mingarro, Manuel

    2011-03-25

    The effects of bentonite colloids on strontium migration in fractured crystalline medium were investigated. We analyzed first the transport behaviour of bentonite colloids alone at different flow rates; then we compared the transport behaviour of strontium as solute and of strontium previously adsorbed onto stable bentonite colloids at a water velocity of approximately 7.1·10(-6)m/s-224m/yr. Experiments with bentonite colloids alone showed that - at the lowest water flow rate used in our experiments (7.1·10(-6)m/s) - approximately 70% of the initially injected colloids were retained in the fracture. Nevertheless, the mobile colloidal fraction, moved through the fracture without retardation, at any flow rate. Bentonite colloids deposited over the fracture surface were identified during post-mortem analyses. The breakthrough curve of strontium as a solute, presented a retardation factor, R(f)~6, in agreement with its sorption onto the granite fracture surface. The breakthrough curve of strontium in the presence of bentonite colloids was much more complex, suggesting additional contributions of colloids to strontium transport. A very small fraction of strontium adsorbed on mobile colloids moved un-retarded (R(f)=1) and this fraction was much lower than the expected, considering the quantity of strontium initially adsorbed onto colloids (90%). This behaviour suggests the hypothesis of strontium sorption reversibility from colloids. On the other hand, bentonite colloids retained within the granite fracture played a major role, contributing to a slower strontium transport in comparison with strontium as a solute. This was shown by a clear peak in the breakthrough curve corresponding to a retardation factor of approximately 20. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Neutron nuclear data evaluation for actinide nucleic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guochang; Yu Baosheng; Duan Junfeng; Ge Zhigang; Cao Wentian; Tang Guoyou; Shi Zhaomin; Zou Yubin

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear data with high accuracy for minor actinides are playing an important role in nuclear technology applications, including reactor design and operation, fuel cycle concepts, estimation of the amount of minor actinides in high burn-up reactors and the minor actinides transmutation. Through describe the class of nuclear data and nuclear date library, and introduce the procedure of neutron nuclear data evaluation. 234 U(n, f) and 237 Np(n, 2n) reaction experimental data evaluation was evaluated. The fission nuclear data are updated and improved. (authors)

  12. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    The extended spatial distribution of both the transition-metal 3d electrons and the actinide 5f electrons results in a strong interaction between these electron states when the relevant elements are alloyed. A particular interesting feature of this hybridization, which is predicted by single...... experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced...

  13. Migration of actinide elements in representative US soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Campbell, M.J.; Kittrick, J.A.; Hardt, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion data indicate the Am, Cm, and Np migrate 1.2, 0.8, and 26 centimeters, respectively, in a thousand years. Thus, excluding mass transport by moving water or wind, actinide elements, such as Cm, Am, and Np that find their way to the soil-squatic environment are relatively immobile. Measured diffusion coefficients, corrected for distribution between the aqueous and soil phases, tortuosity, negative absorption, and relative fluidity are in reasonable agreement with aqueous diffusion coefficients. However, agreement depends strongly on measurement method used to determine distribution ratios

  14. Lanthanides and actinides extraction by calixarenes containing CMPO groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Carrera, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French program SPIN concerning the radioactive waste management, researches are performed to develop processes allowing the separation of long-lived radioisotopes in order to their transmutation or their specific conditioning. These studies deal with the extraction and the separation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in acid solution. Many systems ''calixarene-diluent-aqueous phase'' are examined by extraction liquid-liquid and membrane transport. The extraction efficiency and the selectivity of the synthesized calixarene-CMPO and of the CMPO are compared with these cations, as the nitric acid extraction by these molecules. (A.L.B.)

  15. Chemical aspects of actinides in the geosphere: towards a rational nuclear materials management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P; Sylwester, E

    2001-01-01

    A complete understanding of actinide interactions in the geosphere is paramount for developing a rational Nuclear and Environmental Materials Management Policy. One of the key challenges towards understanding the fate and transport of actinides is determining their speciation (i.e., oxidation state and structure). Since an element's speciation directly dictates physical properties such as toxicity and solubility, this information is critical for evaluating and controlling the evolution of an actinide element through the environment. Specific areas within nuclear and environmental management programs where speciation is important are (1) waste processing and separations; (2) wasteform materials for long-term disposition; and (3) aqueous geochemistry. The goal of this project was to develop Actinide X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy ( U S ) as a core capability at LLNL and integrate it with existing facilities, providing a multi-technique approach to actinide speciation. XAS is an element-specific structural probe which determines the oxidation state and structure for most atoms. XAS can be more incisive than other spectroscopies because it originates from an atomic process and the information is always attainable, regardless of an element's speciation. Despite the utility, XAS is relatively complex due to the need for synchrotron radiation and significant expertise with data acquisition and analysis. The coupling of these technical hurdles with the safe handling of actinides at a general user synchrotron facility such as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRL) make such experiments even more difficult. As a result, XAS has been underutilized by programs that could benefit by its application. We achieved our project goals by implementing key state-of-the-art Actinide XAS instrumentation at SSRL (Ge detector and remote positioning equipment), and by determining the chemical speciation of actinides (Th, U, and Np) in aqueous solutions, wasteform cements, and

  16. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  17. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  18. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms. Implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, the way how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides is assessed. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. The way how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility is described. Why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions is explained. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. Development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions is described. Throughout, the key research needs are identified. (author)

  19. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs

  20. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  1. Simulation of dense colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, H.J.; Harting, J.D.R.; Hecht, M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2008-01-01

    We present in this proceeding recent large scale simulations of dense colloids. On one hand we simulate model clay consisting of nanometric aluminum oxide spheres in water using realistic DLVO potentials and a combination of MD and SRD. We find pronounced cluster formation and retrieve the shear

  2. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  3. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related

  4. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  5. Research for actinides extractants from various wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Cuillerdier, C.; Condamines, N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the actinides solvent extraction research undertaken in Fontenay-aux-Roses. Two kinds of extractants are investigated; those usable for the improvement of the nowadays nuclear fuels reprocessing and those necessary for advanced fuels cycles which include the minor actinides (Np, Am) recovery for a further elimination through nuclear reactions. In the first class the mono and diamides, alternative to the organophosphorus extractants, TBP and polyfunctional phosphonates, showed promising properties. The main results are discussed. For the future efficient extractants for trivalent actinides-lanthanides group separations are suitable. The point about the actinides (III) - lanthanides (III) group separation chemistry and the development of some of these extractants are given

  6. Actinide isotopes in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.; Fukai, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of actinide isotopes in the environment are important not only from the viewpoint of their radiological effects on human life, but also from the fact that they act as excellent biochemical and geochemical tracers especially in the marine environment. For several of the actinide isotopes there is still a lack of basic data on concentration levels and further investigations on their chemical and physical speciation are required to understand their behaviour in the marine environment. The measured and estimated activity concentration levels of artificial actinides are at present in general a few orders of magnitude lower than those of the natural ones and their concentration factors in biota are relatively low, except in a few species of macroalgae and phytoplankton. The contribution from seafood to total ingestion of actinides by the world population is a few per cent and, therefore, the dose to man from these long-lived radionuclides caused by seafood ingestion is usually low. (orig.)

  7. Possible existence of backbending in actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Szymanski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities for the backbending effect to occur in actinide nuclei are studied using the pairing-self-consistent independent quasiparticle method. The Hamiltonian used is that of the deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus monopole pairing term. The results of the calculations explain why there is no backbending in most actinide nuclei and simultaneously suggest that in some light neutron deficient nuclei around Th and 22 Ra a backbending effect may occur

  8. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated

  9. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  10. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  11. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    actinide oxides . The work described here is an attempt to characterize the quality of crystals using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PALS). The...Upadhyaya, R. V. Muraleedharan, B. D. Sharma and K. G. Prasad, " Positron lifetime studies on thorium oxide powders," Philosohical Magazine A, vol. 45... crystals . A strong foundation for actinide PALS studies was laid, but further work is required to build a more effective system. Positron Spectroscopy

  12. Separation of actinides and their transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, M.; Bathelier, M.; Cousin, M.

    1978-08-01

    Neutron irradiation of long-half-life actinides for transmutation into elements with shorter half-life is investigated as a means to reduce the long-term hazards of these actinides. The effectiveness of the method is analysed by applying it to fission product solutions from the first extraction cycle of fuel reprocessing plants. Basic principles, separation techniques and transmutation efficiencies are studied and discussed in detail

  13. The removal of actinide metals from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.D.; Howell, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A process is specified for removing actinide metals (e.g. uranium) from solutions. The solution is contacted with a substrate comprising the product obtained by reacting an inorganic solid containing surface hydroxyl groups (e.g. silica gel) with a compound containing a silane grouping, a nitrogen-containing group (e.g. an amine) and other specified radicals. After treatment, the actinide metal is recovered from the substrate. (U.K.)

  14. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  15. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    After a few centuries of radioactive decay the long-lived actinides, the elements of atomic numbers 89-103, may constitute the main potential radiological health hazard in nuclear wastes. This is because all but a very few fission products (principally technetium-99 and iodine-129) have by then undergone radioactive decay to insignificant levels, leaving the actinides as the principal radionuclides remaining. It was therefore at first sight an attractive concept to recycle the actinides to nuclear reactors, so as to eliminate them by nuclear fission. Thus, investigations of the feasibility and potential benefits and hazards of the concept of 'actinide partitioning and transmutation' were started in numerous countries in the mid-1970s. This final report summarizes the results and conclusions of technical studies performed in connection with a four-year IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, started in 1976, on the ''Environmental Evaluation and Hazard Assessment of the Separation of Actinides from Nuclear Wastes followed by either Transmutation or Separate Disposal''. Although many related studies are still continuing, e.g. on waste disposal, long-term safety assessments, and waste actinide management (particularly for low and intermediate-level wastes), some firm conclusions on the overall concept were drawn by the programme participants, which are reflected in this report

  16. Advances in computational actinide chemistry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongqi; Wu, Jingyi; Chai, Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Multidisciplinary Initiative Center; Su, Jing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Div. of Nuclear Materials Science and Engineering; Li, Jun [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering

    2014-04-01

    The advances in computational actinide chemistry made in China are reviewed. Several areas relevant to chemistry of actinides in gas, liquid, and solid phases have been explored. However, we limit the scope to selected contributions in the chemistry of molecular actinide systems in gas and liquid phases. These studies may be classified into two categories: treatment of relativistic effects, which cover the development of two- and four-component Hamiltonians and the optimization of relativistic pseudopotentials, and the applications of theoretical methods in actinide chemistry. The applications include (1) the electronic structures of actinocene, noble gas complexes, An-C multiple bonding compounds, uranyl and its isoelectronic species, fluorides and oxides, molecular systems with metal-metal bonding in their isolated forms (U{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}) and in fullerene (U{sub 2} rate at C{sub 60}), and the excited states of actinide complexes; (2) chemical reactions, including oxidation, hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}, ligand exchange, reactivities of thorium oxo and sulfido metallocenes, CO{sub 2}/CS{sub 2} functionalization promoted by trivalent uranium complex; and (3) migration of actinides in the environment. A future outlook is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L.; Culligan, B.K.; Hutchison, J.B.; Utsey, R.C.; McAlister, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti +3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used to separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1-2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ∼30-60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4-8 h with tracer yields of ∼85-95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort. (author)

  18. Detection of the actinides and cesium from environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew Spencer

    Detection of the actinides and cesium in the environment is important for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation to safeguards and nuclear forensics. The utilization of multiple different elemental concentrations and isotopic ratios together can significantly improve the ability to attribute contamination to a unique source term and/or generation process; however, the utilization of multiple elemental "signatures" together from environmental samples requires knowledge of the impact of chemical fractionation for various elements under a variety of environmental conditions (including predominantly aqueous versus arid conditions). The research reported in this dissertation focuses on three major areas: 1. Improving the understanding of actinide-mineral interactions at ultra-low concentrations. Chapter 2 reports a batch sorption and modeling study of Np(V) sorption to the mineral goethite from attomolar to micromolar concentrations. 2. Improving the detection capabilities for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) analyses of ultra-trace cesium from environmental samples. Chapter 4 reports a new method which significantly improves the chemical yields, purification, sample processing time, and ultimately, the detection limits for TIMS analyses of femtogram quantities of cesium from a variety of environmental sample matrices. 3. Demonstrating how actinide and cesium concentrations and isotopic ratios from environmental samples can be utilized together to determine a wealth of information including environmental transport mechanisms (e.g. aqueous versus arid transport) and information on the processes which generated the original material. Chapters1, 3 and 5 demonstrate these principles using Pu, Am, Np, and Cs concentrations and isotopic ratios from contaminated soils taken near the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (a low level radioactive waste disposal site in southeastern Idaho).

  19. Conservatism in the actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.B.; Rahimi, M.; Thornton, J.

    1996-01-01

    In May 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a topical report to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to gain actinide-only burnup credit for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage, transportation, or disposal packages. After approval of this topical report, DOE intends further submittals to the NRC to acquire additional burnup credit (e.g., the topical does not use fission products and is limited to only the first 100 yr of disposal). The NRC has responded to the topical with its preliminary questions. To aid in evaluation of the method, a review of the conservatism in the actinide-only burnup credit methodology was performed. An overview of the actinide-only burnup credit methodology is presented followed by a summary of the conservatism

  20. Reversibility of sorption of plutonium-239 onto hematite and goethite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Cotter, C.R.; Kitten, H.D.; Bentley, J.; Triay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate: (1) sorption of plutonium-239 ( 239 Pu) on different iron oxide colloids (hematite and geothite), (2) sorption kinetics of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) onto these two colloids, and (3) desorption of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) from 239 Pu-loaded colloids as a function of time. Natural groundwater and carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater were used in this study. To examine the possible influence of bicarbonate on 239 Pu sorption, an additional set of experiments was conducted in sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) solutions under carbon dioxide free environments. Our results show that colloidal Pu(IV) as well as soluble Pu(V) was rapidly adsorbed by hematite and goethite colloids in both natural and synthetic groundwater. The amount of 239 Pu adsorbed by both iron oxide colloids in synthetic groundwater was higher than in natural groundwater. The presence of carbonate did not influence the sorption of 239 Pu. While sorption of soluble Pu(V) is a slow process, sorption of colloidal Pu(IV) occurs rapidly. Desorption of Pu from iron oxide colloids is much slower than the sorption processes. Our findings suggest that different sorption and desorption behaviors of 239 Pu by iron oxide colloids in groundwater may facilitate the transport of 239 Pu along potential flowpaths from the areas contaminated by radionuclide and release to the accessible environment. (orig.)

  1. Characterization, origin and aggregation behavior of colloids in eutrophic shallow lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huacheng; Xu, Mengwen; Li, Yani; Liu, Xin; Guo, Laodong; Jiang, Helong

    2018-05-31

    Stability of colloidal particles contributes to the turbidity in the water column, which significantly influences water quality and ecological functions in aquatic environments especially shallow lakes. Here we report characterization, origin and aggregation behavior of aquatic colloids, including natural colloidal particles (NCPs) and total inorganic colloidal particles (TICPs), in a highly turbid shallow lake, via field observations, simulation experiments, ultrafiltration, spectral and microscopic, and light scattering techniques. The colloidal particles were characterized with various shapes (spherical, polygonal and elliptical) and aluminum-, silicon-, and ferric-containing mineralogical structures, with a size range of 20-200 nm. The process of sediment re-suspension under environmentally relevant conditions contributed 78-80% of TICPs and 54-55% of NCPs in Lake Taihu, representing an important source of colloids in the water column. Both mono- and divalent electrolytes enhanced colloidal aggregation, while a reverse trend was observed in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). The influence of NOM on colloidal stability was highly related to molecular weight (MW) properties with the high MW fraction exhibiting higher stability efficiency than the low MW counterparts. However, the MW-dependent aggregation behavior for NCPs was less significant than that for TICPs, implying that previous results on colloidal behavior using model inorganic colloids alone should be reevaluated. Further studies are needed to better understand the mobility/stability and transformation of aquatic colloids and their role in governing the fate and transport of pollutants in natural waters. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  3. Calculation of critical concentrations of actinides in an infinite medium of silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Sato, Shohei; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu

    2009-01-01

    The critical concentrations of actinides in metal-silicon-dioxide (SiO 2 ) and in metal-water (H 2 O) mixtures were calculated for 26 actinides including 233,235 U, 239,241 Pu, 242m Am, 243,245,247 Cm, and 249,251 Cf. The calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo neutron transport calculation code MCNP5 combined with the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL3.3. The results showed that the critical concentration of actinide in metal-SiO 2 mixtures was about 1/5 of that in metal-H 2 O mixtures for all the fissile nuclides investigated. The k ∞ 's of metal-SiO 2 and metal-H 2 O at one-half of the respective critical concentration of actinide, which was assumed as the subcritical concentration limit, were found to be less than 0.8 for all the actinides considered. By applying the sum-of-fractions rule to the concentrations of six nuclides in metal-SiO 2 mixtures, the subcriticality of high-level radioactive wastes was confirmed for a reported sample. The effects of different nuclear data libraries on the results of critical concentrations were found to be large for 242 Cm, 247 Cm, and 250 Cf by comparison with the results calculated with another evaluated nuclear data library, ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  4. Gastrointestinal absorption of actinides: a review with special reference to primate data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.

    1984-01-01

    Large scale geological burial of transuranic wastes from fission power production may expose segments of future generations to trace amounts of actinides in water and food, which, via gastrointestinal absorption, could result in internal doses of alpha radiation. Gastrointestinal absorption of actinide elements is a poorly understood process. Experimental studies, primarily using rodents, often produce ambiguous results with order of magnitude fluctuations in estimates of GI absorption. Since experimental conditions like the chemical form of the fed actinides or reducing and complexing capacity of the stomach content, influence the GI transfer factor in seemingly unpredictable ways, only a better understanding of events at the molecular level will enable more reliable predictions to be made of the organ burdens resulting from actinides passing through the digestive tract. From a review of the existing literature it is apparent that in vitro research data in the area of GI uptake mechanisms (i.e. transport mediated by ion carriers in body fluids and across cell membranes) are virtually non-existant. In view of the uncertainties linked to in vivo uptake experiment, models which approximate man, i.e. derived from non-human primate studies, should be the best choice of experimental systems in which to determine reliable estimates for gastrointestinal transfer factors of actinide elements. (Auth.)

  5. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  6. Effect of Electrical Field on Colloidal CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Bing, Wang; Jia-Yu, Zhang; Yi-Ping, Cui; Yong-Hong, Ye

    2008-01-01

    We fabricate the hybrid films of colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) sandwiched between two electrodes. The voltage and temperature dependences of the electroluminescence (EL) are measured. The quantum-confined Stark effect of colloidal QDs is clearly observed. To explore the mechanism in the QD EL, hybrid films are fabricated with different concentrations of colloidal QDs. Electrons and holes are proposed to be separately transported in QDs and PVK, respectively

  7. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. of Radiochemistry; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this project was the study of basic interaction processes in the systems actinide - clay organics - aquifer and actinide - natural clay - clay organics - aquifer. Thus, complexation, redox, sorption and diffusion studies were performed. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur containing functional groups of humic acid (HA) on the complexation of actinides in comparison to carboxylic groups, the Am(III) and U(VI) complexation by model ligands was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TRLFS. The results show that Am(III) is mainly coordinated via carboxylic groups, however, probably stabilized by nitrogen groups. The U(VI) complexation is dominated by carboxylic groups, whereas nitrogen and sulfur containing groups play a minor role. Phosphorus containing groups may contribute to the U(VI) complexation by HA, however, due to their low concentration in HA they play only a subordinate role compared to carboxylic groups. Applying synthetic HA with varying sulfur contents (0 to 6.9 wt.%), the role of sulfur functionalities of HA for the U(VI) complexation and Np(V) reduction was studied. The results have shown that sulfur functionalities can be involved in U(VI) humate complexation and act as redox-active sites in HA for the Np(V) reduction. However, due to the low content of sulfur in natural HA, its influence is less pronounced. In the presence of carbonate, the U(VI) complexation by HA was studied in the alkaline pH range by means of cryo-TRLFS (-120 C) and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of the ternary UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}HA(II){sup 4-} complex was detected. The complex formation constant was determined with log {beta}{sub 0.1} M = 24.57 {+-} 0.17. For aqueous U(VI) citrate and oxalate species, luminescence emission properties were determined by cryo-TRLFS and used to determine stability constants. The existing data base could be validated. The U(VI) complexation by lactate, studied in the temperature range 7 to 65 C

  8. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, Gert; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was the study of basic interaction processes in the systems actinide - clay organics - aquifer and actinide - natural clay - clay organics - aquifer. Thus, complexation, redox, sorption and diffusion studies were performed. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur containing functional groups of humic acid (HA) on the complexation of actinides in comparison to carboxylic groups, the Am(III) and U(VI) complexation by model ligands was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TRLFS. The results show that Am(III) is mainly coordinated via carboxylic groups, however, probably stabilized by nitrogen groups. The U(VI) complexation is dominated by carboxylic groups, whereas nitrogen and sulfur containing groups play a minor role. Phosphorus containing groups may contribute to the U(VI) complexation by HA, however, due to their low concentration in HA they play only a subordinate role compared to carboxylic groups. Applying synthetic HA with varying sulfur contents (0 to 6.9 wt.%), the role of sulfur functionalities of HA for the U(VI) complexation and Np(V) reduction was studied. The results have shown that sulfur functionalities can be involved in U(VI) humate complexation and act as redox-active sites in HA for the Np(V) reduction. However, due to the low content of sulfur in natural HA, its influence is less pronounced. In the presence of carbonate, the U(VI) complexation by HA was studied in the alkaline pH range by means of cryo-TRLFS (-120 C) and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of the ternary UO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 HA(II) 4- complex was detected. The complex formation constant was determined with log β 0.1 M = 24.57 ± 0.17. For aqueous U(VI) citrate and oxalate species, luminescence emission properties were determined by cryo-TRLFS and used to determine stability constants. The existing data base could be validated. The U(VI) complexation by lactate, studied in the temperature range 7 to 65 C, was found to be endothermic

  9. Recovery of Actinides from Actinide-Aluminium Alloys: Chlorination Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Soucek, P.; Jardin, R.; Glatz, J.P.; Cassayre, L.

    2008-01-01

    A method for recovery of actinides (An) from An-Al alloys formed by electrochemical separation of metallic spent nuclear fuel on solid aluminium electrodes in molten chloride salts is described. The proposed route consists of three main steps: -) vacuum distillation of salt adhered on the electrodes, -) chlorination of An-Al alloy by pure chlorine gas and -) sublimation of formed AlCl 3 . A thermochemical study of the route was performed to determine important chemical reactions and to find optimum experimental conditions for all process steps. Vacuum distillation of the electrode is efficient for complete removal of remaining salt and most fission products, full chlorination of the An-Al alloys is possible at any working temperature and evaporation of AlCl 3 is achieved by heating under argon. Experiments have been carried out using U-Al alloy in order to define parameters providing full alloy chlorination without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6 . It was shown that full chlorination of An-Al alloys without An losses should be possible at a temperature approx. 150 deg. C. (authors)

  10. Recovery of Actinides from Actinide-Aluminium Alloys: Chlorination Route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Soucek, P.; Jardin, R.; Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cassayre, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique (LGC), Universite Paul Sabatier, UMR CNRS 5503, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2008-07-01

    A method for recovery of actinides (An) from An-Al alloys formed by electrochemical separation of metallic spent nuclear fuel on solid aluminium electrodes in molten chloride salts is described. The proposed route consists of three main steps: -) vacuum distillation of salt adhered on the electrodes, -) chlorination of An-Al alloy by pure chlorine gas and -) sublimation of formed AlCl{sub 3}. A thermochemical study of the route was performed to determine important chemical reactions and to find optimum experimental conditions for all process steps. Vacuum distillation of the electrode is efficient for complete removal of remaining salt and most fission products, full chlorination of the An-Al alloys is possible at any working temperature and evaporation of AlCl{sub 3} is achieved by heating under argon. Experiments have been carried out using U-Al alloy in order to define parameters providing full alloy chlorination without formation of volatile UCl{sub 5} and UCl{sub 6}. It was shown that full chlorination of An-Al alloys without An losses should be possible at a temperature approx. 150 deg. C. (authors)

  11. Reactor physics aspects of burning actinides in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1978-01-01

    A short review of the different recycling strategies of actinides other than fuel treated in the literature, is given along with nuclear data requirements for actinide build-up and transmutation studies. The effects of recycling actinides in a nuclear reactor on the flux distribution, the infinite neutron multiplication factor, the reactivity control system, the reactivity coefficients and the delayed neutron fraction are discussed considering a notional LWR or LMFBR as an Actinide Trasmutaton Reactor. Some operational problems of Actinide Transmutation reactors are mentioned, which are caused by the α-decay heat and the neutron sources of Actinide Target Elements

  12. Experimental analysis of colloid capture by a cylindrical collector in laminar overland flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Bin; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2011-09-15

    Although colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in water flow is a well-known contamination process, little research has been conducted to investigate the transport of colloidal particles through emergent vegetation in overland flow. In this work, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the single-collector contact efficiency (η(0)) of colloid capture by a simulated plant stem in laminar lateral flow. Fluorescent microspheres of various sizes were used as experimental colloids. The colloid suspensions were applied to a glass cylinder installed in a small size flow chamber at different flow rates. Two cylinder sizes were tested in the experiment and silicone grease was applied to the cylinder surface to make it favorable for colloid deposition. Our results showed that increases in flow rate and collector size reduced the value of η(0) and a minimum value of η(0) might exist for a colloid size. The experimental data were compared to theoretical predictions of different single-collector contact efficiency models. The results indicated that existing single-collector contact efficiency models underestimated the η(0) of colloid capture by the cylinders in laminar overland flow. A regression equation of η(0) as a function of collector Reynolds number (Re(c)) and Peclet number (N(Pe)) was developed and fit the experimental data very well (R(2) > 0.98). This regression equation can be used to help construct and refine mathematical models of colloid transport and filtration in laminar overland flow on vegetated surfaces.

  13. Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfelder, J.

    1992-01-01

    Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes

  14. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  15. Actinide/crown ether chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benning, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    A structural survey of actinide/crown ether compounds was conducted in order to investigate the solid state chemistry of these complexes. Several parameters - the metal size, crown type, counterion, solvent systems and reaction and crystallization conditions - were varied to correlate their importance in complexation. Under atmospheric conditions, two types of complexes were isolated, those containing only hydrogen-bonded crown interactions and instances where the crown interacts directly with the metal center. In both cases, water seems to play a very important role. When coordinated to the metal, water molecules exhibit the necessary donor properties required for the formation of hydrogen-bonded contacts. The water molecules also provide fierce competition with the crown ethers for metal-binding sites and in most cases prohibit the formation of complexes in which direct metal-ligand association exists. The results of this study indicate that direct interaction between the metal atoms and the crown ethers, in the presence of water, can only occur with polyether conformations which limit the steric replusions within the metal coordination sphere

  16. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultman, J H

    1995-01-17

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP).

  17. Lithium actinide recycle process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.K.; Pierce, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Several pyrochemical processes have been developed in the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne Laboratory for recovery of actinide elements from LWR spent fuel. The lithium process was selected as the reference process from among the options. In this process the LWR oxide spent fuel is reduced by lithium at 650{degrees}C in the presence of molten LiCl. The Li{sub 2}O formed during the reduction process is soluble in the salt. The spent salt and lithium are recycled after the Li{sub 2}O is electrochemically reduced. The oxygen is liberated as CO{sub 2} at a carbon anode or oxygen at an inert anode. The reduced metal components of the LWR spent fuel are separated from the LiCL salt phase and introduced into an electrorefiner. The electrorefining step separates the uranium and transuranium (TRU) elements into two product streams. The uranium product, which comprises about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass, may be enriched for recycle into the LWR fuel cycle, stored for future use in breeder reactors, or converted to a suitable form for disposal as waste. The TRU product can be recycled as fast reactor fuel or can be alloyed with constituents of the LWR cladding material to produce a stable waste form.

  18. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2017-02-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks).

  20. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchsta¨dt longterm static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA......), and aggregate tensile strength. Our studies were carried out on soils on identical parent material under controlled management conditions, enabling us to study the long-term effects on soil physical properties with few explanatory variables in play. The content of WDC and the amount of WSA were measured...

  1. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  2. Study of actinide paramagnetism in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autillo, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    The physiochemical properties of actinide (An) solutions are still difficult to explain, particularly the behavioral differences between An(III) and Ln(III). The study of actinide paramagnetic behavior may be a 'simple' method to analyze the electronic properties of actinide elements and to obtain information on the ligand-actinide interaction. The objective of this PhD thesis is to understand the paramagnetic properties of these elements by magnetic susceptibility measurements and chemical shift studies. Studies on actinide electronic properties at various oxidation states in solution were carried out by magnetic susceptibility measurements in solution according to the Evans method. Unlike Ln(III) elements, there is no specific theory describing the magnetic properties of these ions in solution. To obtain accurate data, the influence of experimental measurement technique and radioactivity of these elements was analyzed. Then, to describe the electronic structure of their low energy states, the experimental results were complemented with quantum chemical calculations from which the influence of the ligand field was studied. Finally, these interpretations were applied to better understand the variations in the magnetic properties of actinide cations in chloride and nitrate media. Information about ligand-actinide interactions may be determined from an NMR chemical shift study of actinide complexes. Indeed, modifications induced by a paramagnetic complex can be separated into two components. The first component, a Fermi contact contribution (δ_c) is related to the degree of covalency in coordination bonds with the actinide ions and the second, a dipolar contribution (δ_p_c) is related to the structure of the complex. The paramagnetic induced shift can be used only if we can isolate these two terms. To achieve this study on actinide elements, we chose to work with the complexes of dipicolinic acid (DPA). Firstly, to characterize the geometrical parameters, a

  3. Use of fast reactors for actinide transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's discussions on nuclear energy, especially the long term disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The recycling of plutonium in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) would allow 'burning' of the associated extremely long life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) decided to include the topic of actinide transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors in its programme. The IAEA organized the Specialists Meeting on Use of Fast Breeder Reactors for Actinide Transmutation in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 22 to 24 September 1992. The specialists agree that future progress in solving transmutation problems could be achieved by improvements in: Radiochemical partitioning and extraction of the actinides from the spent fuel (at least 98% for Np and Cm and 99.9% for Pu and Am isotopes); technological research and development on the design, fabrication and irradiation of the minor actinides (MAs) containing fuels; nuclear constants measurement and evaluation (selective cross-sections, fission fragments yields, delayed neutron parameters) especially for MA burners; demonstration of the feasibility of the safe and economic MA burner cores; knowledge of the impact of maximum tolerable amount of rare earths in americium containing fuels. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  5. Band structure studies of actinide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelling, D.D.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the f-orbitals in an actinide system plays a crucial role in determining the electronic properties. It has long been realized that when the actinide separation is small enough for the f-orbitals to interact directly, the system will exhibit itinerant electron properties: an absence of local moment due to the f-orbitals and sometimes even superconductivity. However, a number of systems with the larger actinide separation that should imply local moment behavior also exhibit intinerant properties. Such systems (URh 3 , UIr 3 , UGe 3 , UC) were examined to learn something about the other f-interactions. A preliminary observation made is that there is apparently a very large and ansiotropic mass enhancement in these systems. There is very good reason to believe that this is not solely due to large electron--electron correlations but to a large electron--phonon interaction as well. These features of the ''non-magnetic'', large actinide separation systems are discussed in light of our results to date. Finally, the results of some recent molecular calculations on actinide hexafluorides are used to illustrate the shielding effects on the intra-atomic Coulomb term U/sub f-f/ which would appear in any attempt to study the formation of local moments. As one becomes interested in materials for which a band structure is no longer an adequate model, this screened U/sub ff/ is the significant parameter and efforts must be made to evaluate it in solid state systems

  6. Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol

  7. Strategies for minority actinides transmutation in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Martin, S.; Martin-Fuertes, F.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation of the strategies that can be followed in fast reactors designed for the fourth generation to reduce the inventory of minority actinides generated in current light water reactors, as the actinides generation in fast reactor.

  8. 1981 Annual Status Report. Plutonium fuels and actinide programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this 1981 report the work carried out by the European Institute for Transuranium elements is reviewed. Main topics are: operation limits of plutonium fuels: swelling of advanced fuels, oxide fuel transients, equation of state of nuclear materials; actinide cycle safety: formation of actinides (FACT), safe handling of plutonium fuel (SHAPE), aspects of the head-end processing of carbide fuel (RECARB); actinide research: crystal chemistry, solid state studies, applied actinide research

  9. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  10. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    correlated to the accumulated outflow and was described as a diffusion controlled process, using ¾(accumulated outflow). The mass of leached particles was positively correlated to the clay content as well as to water-dispersible colloids. Particulate phosphorus (P) was linearly correlated to concentration......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  11. Open channels in fractures maintained by deposition and erosion of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, J.H.; Hunt, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Material in the colloidal size range is present in many natural groundwater systems at existing or proposed radioactive waste storage locations. Colloids initially suspended in the water in fractures can deposit onto the fracture surfaces, and will partially or fully clog the fracture. The amount of clogging will depend on whether the deposited colloidal material can erode from the fracture surfaces. If the fracture remains only partially clogged the unclogged regions take the form of open channels. The purpose of this paper is to assess under what conditions these open channels form. An analytical model of a steady state, average open channel width is presented which is a function of the fluid flow rate and viscosity, fracture aperture, and the permeability and shear strength of the deposited colloidal material. The implications of the presence of open channels for colloidal transport is also discussed. However, for most repository conditions the fractures are expected to fully clog with colloids

  12. Sampling silica and ferrihydrite colloids with fiberglass wicks under unsaturated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shira, Jason M; Williams, Barbara C; Flury, Markus; Czigány, Szabolcs; Tuller, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of passive capillary samplers (PCAPS) for collection of representative colloid samples under partially saturated conditions was evaluated by investigating the transport of negatively and positively charged colloids in fiberglass wicks. A synthetic pore water solution was used to suspend silica microspheres (330 nm in diameter) and ferrihydrite (172 nm in diameter) for transport experiments on fiberglass wicks. Breakthrough curves were collected for three unsaturated flow rates with silica microspheres and one unsaturated flow rate with ferrihydrite colloids. A moisture characteristic curve, relating tensiometer measurements of matric potential to moisture content, was developed for the fiberglass wick. Results indicate that retention of the silica and the ferrihydrite on the wick occurred; that is, the wicks did not facilitate quantitative sampling of the colloids. For silica microspheres, 90% of the colloids were transmitted through the wicks. For ferrihydrite, 80 to 90% of the colloids were transmitted. The mechanisms responsible for the retention of the colloids on the fiberglass wicks appeared to be physicochemical attachment and not thin-film, triple-phase entrapment, or mechanical straining. Visualization of pathways by iron staining indicates that flow is preferential at the center of twisted bundles of filaments. Although axial preferential flow in PCAPS may enhance their hydraulic suitability for sampling mobile colloids, we conclude that without specific preparation to reduce attachment or retention, fiberglass wicks should only be used for qualitative sampling of pore water colloids.

  13. Sorption of colloids, organics, and metals onto gas-water interfaces: Transport mechanisms and potential remediation technology. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.

    1998-01-01

    'Although contaminant sorption at mineral surfaces has received much recognition as a major mechanism controlling contaminant behavior in subsurface environments, virtually no attention has been given to the possibility of contaminant sorption at gas-water interfaces. Moreover, no effort has yet been advanced to optimize such interactions for the purpose of facilitating in-situ remediation. Gas-water interfaces, unlike water-solid interfaces, are mobile. Therefore, associations of contaminants with gas-water interfaces can be very important not only in subsurface contaminant distributions, but also in contaminant transport, and potentially in remediation. The first objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of interactions between contaminants and gas-water interfaces. The anticipated results will provide insights into the poorly understood phenomenon of contaminant interactions with the gas-water interface, and improve the current conceptual models of contaminant behavior in subsurface environments. The second purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of using surfactant stabilized microbubbles for in-situ remediation. Both pump-and-treat, and air sparging remediation methods are ineffective at displacing contaminants in zones which are advectively inaccessible. Stable microbubbles can migrate beyond preferential flow pathways and enter lower permeability zones by buoyant rise. The microbubbles can deliver oxygen and nutrients for promoting aerobic degradation of organic contaminants, and also deliver surfactants for emulsifying NAPLs.'

  14. Transport coefficients and orientational distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions composed of hematite particles (for an external magnetic field parallel to the angular velocity vector of simple shear flow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Akira; Hayasaka, Ryo; Majima, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    We have treated a dilute dispersion composed of ferromagnetic rodlike particles with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis, such as hematites, to investigate the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution of rodlike particles and also on transport coefficients, such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. In the present analysis, these rodlike particles are assumed to conduct the rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow as well as an external magnetic field. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. In the case of a strong magnetic field and a smaller shear rate, the rodlike particle can freely rotate in the xy-plane with the magnetic moment continuing to point the magnetic field direction. On the other hand, for a strong shear flow, the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. In the case of the magnetic field applied normal to the direction of the sedimentation, the diffusion coefficient gives rise to smaller values than expected, since the rodlike particle sediments with the particle axis inclining toward directions normal to the movement direction and, of course, toward the direction along that direction

  15. Special actinide nuclides: Fuel or waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Rao, K.S.; Dingankar, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    The special actinide nuclides such as Np, Cm, etc. which are produced as byproducts during the operation of fission reactors are presently looked upon as 'nuclear waste' and are proposed to be disposed of as part of high level waste in deep geological repositories. The potential hazard posed to future generations over periods of thousands of years by these long lived nuclides has been a persistent source of concern to critics of nuclear power. However, the authors have recently shown that each and every one of the special actinide nuclides is a better nuclear fuel than the isotopes of plutonium. This finding suggests that one does not have to resort to exotic neutron sources for transmuting/incinerating them as proposed by some researchers. Recovery of the special actinide elements from the waste stream and recycling them back into conventional fission reactors would eliminate one of the stigmas attached to nuclear energy

  16. Interaction of actinides with natural microporous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaelides, P.; Godelirsas, A.

    1998-01-01

    The existing studies mainly concern the sorption of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium from aqueous media by clay minerals and zeolites as well as the determination of the corresponding chemical processes taking place at the mineral-water interface. The investigation techniques applied for this purpose include, except the conventional wet-chemical and radiochemical methods, advanced spectroscopic methods such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), Rutherford Backscattered Spectroscopy (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. These techniques significantly contribute to the characterization of the reacted mineral waters and to the explanation of the structural and compositional characteristics of the sorbed actinide species. Theoretical models regarding the aqueous chemistry and speciation of the actinides have also been developed aiming the elucidation of the complex actinide sorption mechanisms. This contribution will critically review of the existing literature, present recently obtained unpublished results and discuss the necessity of future work in the field. (authors)

  17. Actinide distribution in the human skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; McInroy, J.F.; Swint, M.J.

    1985-05-01

    Radiochemical analysis of two half skeletons donated to the United States Transuranium Registry, one from an individual with an occupationally incurred deposition of 241 Am and the other with a deposition of 239 Pu, revealed an inverse linear relationship between the concentration of actinide in the bone ash and the fraction of ash. Two distinct relationships were noted, one for the cranium and the other for the remainder of the skeleton. The results suggest that the actinide content of the skeleton as a whole, Q, can be obtained with an uncertainty of +-50% from analysis of a single sample of any bone (except the cranium) by Q = [(830 C/sub sample/)/(0.61 - f/sub sample/)], in which C/sub sample/ refers to the actinide content per g of ash and f/sub sample/ the fraction of ash (i.e., ratio of dry to wet weight) in the sample. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Neutron scattering studies of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic structure of actinide materials presents a unique example of the interplay between localized and band electrons. Together with a variety of other techniques, especially magnetization and the Mossbauer effect, neutron studies have helped us to understand the systematics of many actinide compounds that order magnetically. A direct consequence of the localization of 5f electrons is the spin-orbit coupling and subsequent spin-lattice interaction that often leads to strongly anisotropic behavior. The unusual phase transition in UO 2 , for example, arises from interactions between quadrupole moments. On the other hand, in the monopnictides and monochalcogenides, the anisotropy is more difficult to understand, but probably involves an interaction between actinide and anion wave functions. A variety of neutron experiments, including form-factor studies, critical scattering and measurements of the elementary excitations have now been performed, and the conceptual picture emerging from these studies will be discussed

  19. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  20. Actinide separations by supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.; Chiarizia, R.

    1984-01-01

    The work has demonstrated that actinide removal from synthetic waste solutions using both flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLM's is a feasible chemical process at the laboratory scale level. The process is characterized by the typical features of SLM's processes: very small quantities of extractant required; the potential for operations with high feed/strip volume ratios, resulting in a corresponding concentration factor of the actinides; and simplicity of operation. Major obstacles to the implementation of the SLM technology to the decontamination of liquid nuclear wastes are the probable low resistance of polypropylene supports to high radiation fields, which may prevent the application to high-level nuclear wastes; the unknown lifetime of the SLM; and the high Na content of the separated actinide solution

  1. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Park, Yong Joon; Cho, Young Hwan

    2010-04-01

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  2. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Park, Yong Joon; Cho, Young Hwan

    2010-04-15

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  3. Ground-state electronic structure of actinide monocarbides and mononitrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increa...

  4. Retention of actinides and rare earth in the alteration gels of R7T7 nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, Th.; Menard, O.; Chouchan, J.L.; Jollivet, P.

    1997-01-01

    Under oxic conditions, over 98.5% of the lanthanides and thorium released from the glass were retained in the alteration products on the glass surface, probably by coprecipitation with a siliceous gel. Uranium and Neptunium retention varied from 40% in carbonated medium to more than 95% in phosphate medium. With carbonate ions, Np and U formed stable complexes, which tend to limit actinide incorporation in the gel layer. Plutonium retention is larger than 90%. This element exhibited atypical behaviour to the extend that it was strongly bonded to colloidal particles in solution. (authors)

  5. Humic colloid-borne migration of uranium in sand columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artinger, R.; Rabung, T.; Kim, J.I.; Sachs, S.; Schmeide, K.; Heise, K.H.; Bernhard, G.; Nitsche, H.

    2002-09-01

    Column experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of humic colloids on subsurface uranium migration. The columns were packed with well-characterized aeolian quartz sand and equilibrated with groundwater rich in humic colloids (dissolved organic carbon (DOC): 30 mg dm -3 ). U migration was studied under an Ar/1% CO 2 gas atmosphere as a function of the migration time, which was controlled by the flow velocity or the column length. In addition, the contact time of U with groundwater prior to introduction into a column was varied. U(VI) was found to be the dominant oxidation state in the spiked groundwater. The breakthrough curves indicate that U was transported as a humic colloid-borne species with a velocity up to 5% faster than the mean groundwater flow. The fraction of humic colloid-borne species increases with increasing prior contact time and also with decreasing migration time. The migration behavior was attributed to a kinetically controlled association/dissociation of U onto and from humic colloids and also a subsequent sorption of U onto the sediment surface. The column experiments provide an insight into humic colloid-mediated U migration in subsurface aquifers

  6. Colloidal sol-gel synthesis of oxides: application to the precursors of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossard, Alban

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives for the future nuclear fuel cycle is the recycling of the minor actinides. Different options are considered: their integration into a new fuel for a prospect of a closed fuel cycle or their transmutation in order to significantly decrease the long-term radiotoxicity of ultimate wastes. In both cases, the synthesis of new advanced materials integrating the actinides jointly is required. Sol-gel processes allow the organization of the material at the colloidal scale or the insertion of controlled porosity using 'templates'. Furthermore, the possibility to work in a 'wet environment' prevents the formation of pulverulent powders which are contaminant in the case of materials incorporating radioactive elements. The main purpose of this work is to demonstrate the adaptability of this route to the nuclear field. Firstly, a methodology of synthesis from a colloidal sol-gel route was set up on a non-radioactive zirconium-based system in order to characterize and understand of the different mechanisms of this synthesis. Then, studies on shaping, including insertion of porosity, were performed. Zirconia monoliths have been obtained thanks to a coupling between a colloidal sol-gel process and the formation of an emulsion stabilized by clusters of solid particles. Finally, a transposition of this work to an uranium-based system was introduced, pointing out different promising perspectives specially concerning the possibilities of shaping of the final material. (author) [fr

  7. Determination of microscopic interactions between actinides and humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Large amount of plutonium has been introduced into the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear power-plant accidents. Contaminated areas, which need a particular survey, have become a very interesting place to study and understand the plutonium behaviour in the environment. Until few years ago, it was admitted that plutonium introduced into subsurface environment is relatively immobile, owing to its low solubility in ground water and strong sorption onto rocks. However, studies of contaminated areas show that humic substances, which are ubiquitous in environment, can alter the speciation of metal ion, e.g. plutonium, and thus their migration. These humic substances are major components of the natural organic matter in soil and water as well as in geological organic deposits such as lake sediments, peats and brown coals. They are complex heterogeneous mixtures of polydisperse supra-molecules formed by biochemical and chemical reactions during the decay and transformation of plant and microbial remains. The knowledge of the impact of humic substances on the plutonium migration is required to assess their transport in natural systems. However, due to the complex and heterogeneous nature of humic substances, there are a lot of difficulties in the description of microscopic interactions. The aim of this PhD thesis is to evaluate as precisely as possible interactions between actinides and humic substances. This work is divided in two parts: on the one hand humic substances will be separated to identify each component, on the other hand the speciation of actinides with characterized humic substances will be studied. In the first part of this study, new methods are developed to study the speciation of actinides with humic substances using two kinds of mass spectrometers: an ICP-MS and a high resolution mass spectrometer using various ionization devices (ESI, APCI, DART, APPI) in order to determine all active molecules for the complexation. In the

  8. Sequential analysis of selected actinides in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.H.

    1980-07-01

    The monitoring of personnel by urinalysis for suspected contamination by actinides necessitated the development and implementation of an analytical scheme that will separate and identify alpha emitting radionuclides of these elements. The present work deals with Pu, Am, and Th. These elements are separated from an ashed urine sample by means of coprecipitation and ion exchange techniques. The final analysis is carried out by electroplating the actinides and counting in a α-spectrometer. Mean recoveries of these elements from urine are: Pu 64%, Am 74% and Th 69%. (auth)

  9. Aqueous actinide complexes: A thermochemical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuger, J.; Khodakovsky, I.L.; Medvedev, V.A.; Navratil, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    The scope and purpose of an assessment of the thermodynamic properties of the aqueous actinide complexes are presented. This work which, at present, is limited to inorganic ligands and three selected organic ligands (formate, acetate and oxalate), is part of an effort established by the International Atomic Energy Agency to assess the thermodynamic properties of the actinides and their compounds. The problems involved in this work are illustrated by discussing the present status of the assessment as related to a few complex species, (hydroxyl-, fluoride-, carbonate complexes). (orig.) [de

  10. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondietti, E.A.; Bogle, M.A.; Brantley, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239 Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  11. Hydrothermal processing of actinide contaminated organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worl, A.; Buelow, S.J.; Le, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrothermal oxidation is an innovative process for the destruction of organic wastes, that occurs above the critical temperature and pressure of water. The process provides high destruction and removal efficiencies for a wide variety of organic and hazardous substances. For aqueous/organic mixtures, organic materials, and pure organic liquids hydrothermal processing removes most of the organic and nitrate components (>99.999%) and facilitates the collection and separation of the actinides. We have designed, built and tested a hydrothermal processing unit for the removal of the organic and hazardous substances from actinide contaminated liquids and solids. Here we present results for the organic generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

  12. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO 3 H 2 ) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described

  13. A worldwide perspective on actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Worldwide interest has been evident over the past few years in reexamining the merits of recovering the actinides from spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel and transmuting them in fast reactors to reduce hazards in geologic repositories. This paper will summarize some of the recent activities in this field. Several countries are embarked on programs of reprocessing and vitrification of present wastes, from which removal of the actinides is largely precluded. The United States is assessing the ideas related to the fast reactor program and the potential application to defense wastes. 18 refs., 2 figs

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) calculation was performed for actinide nitrides (UN, NpN, and PuN) in the temperature range from 300 to 2800 K to evaluate the physical properties viz., the lattice parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and heat capacity. The Morse-type potential function added to the Busing-Ida type potential was employed for the ionic interactions. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting to the experimental data of the lattice parameter. The usefulness and applicability of the MD method to evaluate the physical properties of actinide nitrides were studied. (author)

  15. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  16. Static and dynamic deformations of actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, P.

    1985-09-01

    The zero-point quadrupole-hexadecapole vibrations have been taken into account to calculate dynamical deformations for even-even actinide nuclei. The collective and intrinsic motions are separated according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The collective Hamiltonian is constructed using the macroscopic-microscopic method in the potential energy part and the cranking model in the kinetic energy part. The BCS theory with a modified oscillator potential is applied to describe the intrinsic motion of nucleons. A new set of Nilsson potential parameters, which produces a much better description of the properties of light actinide nuclei, has also been found. (orig.)

  17. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  18. Physical chemistry and modelling of the sintering of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechelle, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This report gives a synthesis of the work I have carried out or to which I have numerically contributed to from 1996 up to 2012 in the Department of Plutonium Uranium and minor Actinides in Cadarache CEA Center. Their main goal is the study and the modeling of the sintering process of nuclear fuels which is the unifying thread of this document. Both in order to take into account the physical and chemical features of the actinide bearing oxide material and in order to combine the different transport phenomena leading to sintering, a sub-granular scale model is under development. Extension to a varying chemical composition as well as exchanges with the gaseous phase are foreseen. A simulation on a larger scale (pellet scale) is ongoing in the framework of a PhD thesis. Validation means have been tested with (U,Pu)O 2 material on the scale of the pellet (Small Angle Neutron Diffusion), on the scale of powder granules (X-Ray High Resolution Micro-Tomography) and with CeO 2 at the 'Institut de Chimie Separative' in Marcoule on a single crystal scale (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The required microstructure homogeneity for nuclear fuels has led to a campaign of experimental studies about the role of Cr 2 O 3 as a sintering aid. Whole of these studies improve our understanding of fuel sintering and hence leads to an improved mastering of this process. (author) [fr

  19. Quantities of actinides in nuclear reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000 MW reactors of the following types: water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breeder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium, and recycled uranium. The radioactivity levels of plutonium, americium, and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the United States nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium processed in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (U.S.)

  20. Polymers and colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurtenberger, P.

    1996-01-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs

  1. Polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurtenberger, P [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  2. The colloid hematite particle migration through the unsaturated porous bed at the presence of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Agnieszka; Sznajder, Izabela; Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2017-07-01

    Colloidal particles have an ability to sorb heavy metals, metalloids, and organic compounds (e.g. biosurfactants) present in soil and groundwater. The pH and ionic strength changes may promote release of such particles causing potential contaminant transport. Therefore, it is very important to know how a colloid particle-mineral particle and colloid-mineral-biosurfactant system behaves in the natural environment. They can have negative impact on the environment and human health. This study highlighted the influence of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the transport of colloidal hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) through porous bed (materials collected from the Szklary and Zloty Stok solid waste heaps from Lower Silesia, Poland). Experiments were conducted using column set in two variants: colloid solution with porous bed and porous bed with adsorbed biosurfactants, in the ionic strengths of 5 × 10 -4 and 5 × 10 -3  M KCl. The zeta potential of mineral materials and colloidal hematite, before and after adsorption of biosurfactant, was determined. Obtained results showed that reduction in ionic strength facilitates colloidal hematite transport through the porous bed. The mobility of colloidal hematite was higher when the rhamnolipid adsorbed on the surface of mineral grain.

  3. Impact of manure-related DOM on sulfonamide transport in arable soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Arenz-Leufen, Martina Gesine; Jacques, Diederik; Lichtner, Peter; Engelhardt, Irina

    2016-09-01

    Field application of livestock manure introduces colloids and veterinary antibiotics, e.g. sulfonamides (SAs), into farmland. The presence of manure colloids may potentially intensify the SAs-pollution to soils and groundwater by colloid-facilitated transport. Transport of three SAs, sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMPD), and sulfamoxole (SMOX), was investigated in saturated soil columns with and without manure colloids from sows and farrows, weaners, and fattening pigs. Experimental results showed that colloid-facilitated transport of SMOX was significant in the presence of manure colloids from fattening pigs with low C/N ratio, high SUVA280 nm and protein C, while manure colloids from sows and farrows and weaners had little effect on SMOX transport. In contrast, only retardation was observed for SDZ and SMPD when manure colloids were present. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of colloids and SAs were replicated well by a newly developed numerical model that considers colloid-filtration theory, competitive kinetic sorption, and co-transport processes. Model results demonstrate that mobile colloids act as carriers for SMOX, while immobile colloids block SMOX from sorbing onto the soil. The low affinity of SMOX to sorb on immobile colloids prevents aggregation and also promotes SMOX's colloid-facilitated transport. Conversely, the high affinity of SDZ and SMPD to sorb on all types of immobile colloids retarded their transport. Thus, manure properties play a fundamental role in increasing the leaching risk of hydrophobic sulfonamides.

  4. Transmutation of waste actinides in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-04-01

    Actinide recycle and transmutation calculations were made for three irradiation options of a light water reactor (LWR). The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies; transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with 235 U enrichment of uranium; and transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with plutonium enrichment of natural uranium. When all actinides were recycled in a uniform lattice, the transuranic inventory after ten recycles was 38% of the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from two regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after five recycles

  5. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, C.T.; Scheffler, K.; Riege, U.

    1978-11-01

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 23 0 C and 115 0 C. (orig.) [de

  6. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  7. Transmutation of LWR waste actinides in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle of actinides to a reactor for transmutation to fission products is being considered as a possible means of waste disposal. Actinide transmutation calculations were made for two irradiation options in a thermal (LWR) reactor. The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies, and transuranic actinides recycled in separate mixed oxide (MOX) assemblies. When all actinides were recycled in a uranium lattice, a reduction of 62% in the transuranic inventory was achieved after 10 recycles, compared to the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from 2 regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after 5 recycles

  8. Heterogeneous all actinide recycling in LWR all actinide cycle closure concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondinelli, Luciano

    1980-01-01

    A project for the elimination of transuranium elements (Waste Actinides, WA) by neutron transmutation is developed in a commercial BWR with U-Pu (Fuel Actinides, FA) recycle. The project is based on the All Actinide Cycle Closure concept: 1) closure of the 'back end' of the fuel cycle, U-Pu coprocessing, 2) waste actinide disposal by neutron transmutation. The reactor core consists of Pu-island fuel assemblies containing WAs in target pins. Two parallel reprocessing lines for FAs and WAs are provided. Mass balance, hazard measure, spontaneous activity during 10 recycles are calculated. Conclusions are: the reduction in All Actinide inventory achieved by Heterogeneous All Actinide Recycling is on the order of 83% after 10 recycles. The U235 enrichment needed for a constant end of cycle reactivity decreases for increasing number of recycles after the 4th recycle. A diffusion-burnup calculation of the pin power peak factors in the fuel assembly shows that design limits can be satisfied. A strong effort should be devoted to the solution of the problems related to high values of spontaneous emission by the target pins

  9. Calculated investigation of actinide transmutation in the BOR-60 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhemkov, I.Yu.; Ishunina, O.V.; Yakovleva, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    One of the prospective actinide burner reactor type is the fast reactor with a 'hard' spectrum and small breeding factor, which is the BOR-60. The calculated investigations demonstrate that Loading up to 40% of minor-actinides to the BOR-60 reactor did not lead to the considerable change of neutron-physical characteristics. The performed calculations show that the BOR- 60 reactor possesses a high efficiency of the minor-actinide and plutonium bum-up (up to 37 kg/(TW · h)) hat is comparable with properties of the actinide burner-reactors under design. The BOR-60 reactor can provide a homogeneous minor-actinide Loading (minor-actinide addition to the standard fuel) to the core and heterogeneous Loading (as separate assemblies-targets with a high minor-actinide fraction) to the first rows of a radial blanket that allows the optimum usage of the reactor and its characteristics. (authors)

  10. ENDF/B-5 Actinides (Rev. 86)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the Actinides part of the ENDF/B-5 nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available costfree from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section upon request. The present version of the library is the Revision of 1986. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Trends in actinide processing at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1993-09-01

    In 1989, the mission at the Hanford Site began a dramatic and sometimes painful transition. The days of production--as we used to know it--are over. Our mission officially has become waste management and environmental cleanup. This mission change didn't eliminate many jobs--in fact, budgets have grown dramatically to support the new mission. Most all of the same skilled crafts, engineers, and scientists are still required for the new mission. This change has not eliminated the need for actinide processing, but it has certainly changed the focus that our actinide chemists and process engineers have. The focus used to be on such things as increasing capacity, improving separations efficiency, and product purity. Minimizing waste had become a more important theme in recent years and it is still a very important concept in the waste management and environmental cleanup arena. However, at Hanford, a new set of words dominates the actinide process scene as we work to deal with actinides that still reside in a variety of forms at the Hanford Site. These words are repackage, stabilize, remove, store and dispose. Some key activities in each of these areas are described in this report

  12. Report of the panel on inhaled actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: assessment of risks to man of inhaling actinides; use of estimates for developing protection standards; epidemiology of lung cancer in exposed human populations; development of respiratory tract models; and effects in animals: dose- and effect-modifying factors