WorldWideScience

Sample records for collisional plasma application

  1. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Fe XVII Emission from Hot, Collisional Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; von Goeler, S; Hill, K W

    2004-12-03

    The ratios of the Fe XVII 3s {yields} 2p transitions to that of the dominant 3d {yields} 2p transition measured in high-temperature tokamak plasmas are compared to solar and astrophysical observations. Good agreement is found, indicating that the collisional line formation processes active in opacity-free, low-density, high-temperature laboratory plasmas are a good description of those found in astrophysical plasmas.

  3. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  4. Rovibrationally Resolved Time-Dependent Collisional-Radiative Model of Molecular Hydrogen and Its Application to a Fusion Detached Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Sawada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel rovibrationally resolved collisional-radiative model of molecular hydrogen that includes 4,133 rovibrational levels for electronic states whose united atom principal quantum number is below six is developed. The rovibrational X 1 Σ g + population distribution in a SlimCS fusion demo detached divertor plasma is investigated by solving the model time dependently with an initial 300 K Boltzmann distribution. The effective reaction rate coefficients of molecular assisted recombination and of other processes in which atomic hydrogen is produced are calculated using the obtained time-dependent population distribution.

  5. Fine velocity structures collisional dissipation in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    In a weakly collisional plasma, such as the solar wind, collisions are usually considered far too weak to produce any significant effect on the plasma dynamics [1]. However, the estimation of collisionality is often based on the restrictive assumption that the particle velocity distribution function (VDF) shape is close to Maxwellian [2]. On the other hand, in situ spacecraft measurements in the solar wind [3], as well as kinetic numerical experiments [4], indicate that marked non-Maxwellian features develop in the three-dimensional VDFs, (temperature anisotropies, generation of particle beams, ring-like modulations etc.) as a result of the kinetic turbulent cascade of energy towards short spatial scales. Therefore, since collisional effects are proportional to the velocity gradients of the VDF, the collisionless hypothesis may fail locally in velocity space. Here, the existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can increase locally due to the velocity space deformation of the particle velocity distribution. In particular, by means of Eulerian simulations of collisional relaxation of a spatially homogeneous force-free plasma, in which collisions among particles of the same species are modeled through the complete Landau operator, we show that the system entropy growth occurs over several time scales, inversely proportional to the steepness of the velocity gradients in the VDF. We report clear evidences that fine velocity structures are dissipated by collisions in a time much shorter than global non-Maxwellian features, like, for example, temperature anisotropies. Moreover we indicate that, if small-scale structures

  6. Langmuir probe in collisionless and collisional plasma including dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sayak; Kaur, Manjit; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.; Pal, R.

    2017-04-01

    Measurements of local plasma parameters in dusty plasma are crucial for understanding the physics issues related to such systems. The Langmuir probe, a small electrode immersed in the plasma, provides such measurements. However, designing of a Langmuir probe system in a dusty plasma environment demands special consideration. First, the probe has to be miniaturized enough so that its perturbation on the ambient dust structure is minimal. At the same time, the probe dimensions must be such that a well-defined theory exists for interpretation of its characteristics. The associated instrumentation must also support the measurement of current collected by the probe with high signal to noise ratio. The most important consideration, of course, comes from the fact that the probes are prone to dust contamination, as the dust particles tend to stick to the probe surface and alter the current collecting area in unpredictable ways. This article describes the design and operation of a Langmuir probe system that resolves these challenging issues in dusty plasma. In doing so, first, different theories that are used to interpret the probe characteristics in collisionless as well as in collisional regimes are discussed, with special emphasis on application. The critical issues associated with the current-voltage characteristics of Langmuir probe obtained in different operating regimes are discussed. Then, an algorithm for processing these characteristics efficiently in presence of ion-neutral collisions in the probe sheath is presented.

  7. Exact collisional moments for plasma fluid theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Hirvijoki, E.; Lingam, M.

    2017-04-01

    The velocity-space moments of the often troublesome nonlinear Landau collision operator are expressed exactly in terms of multi-index Hermite-polynomial moments of distribution functions. The collisional moments are shown to be generated by derivatives of two well-known functions, namely, the Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd-Trubnikov potentials for a Gaussian distribution. The resulting formula has a nonlinear dependency on the relative mean flow of the colliding species normalised to the root-mean-square of the corresponding thermal velocities and a bilinear dependency on densities and higher-order velocity moments of the distribution functions, with no restriction on temperature, flow, or mass ratio of the species. The result can be applied to both the classic transport theory of plasmas that relies on the Chapman-Enskog method, as well as to derive collisional fluid equations that follow Grad's moment approach. As an illustrative example, we provide the collisional ten-moment equations with exact conservation laws for momentum- and energy-transfer rates.

  8. Collisional Drift Waves in Stellarator Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-10-07

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a stellarator with an helical magnetic axis is presented. Three coupled field equations, describing the collisional drift wave dynamics in the linear approximation, are solved as an initial-value problem along the magnetic field line. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  9. Nonlinear magnetic reconnection in low collisionality plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottaviani, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Porcelli, F. [Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic reconnection in collisionless regimes, where electron inertia is responsible for the decoupling of the plasma motion from that of the field lines, is discussed. Since the linear theory of m=1 modes breaks down for very small magnetic island widths, a non linear analysis is called for. Thus, the behaviour of a collisionless, 2-D fluid slab model in the limit {rho}/d -> 0, is analyzed. The main result is that, when the island size is larger than the linear layer but smaller than the equilibrium scale length, the reconnection rate exhibits a quasi-explosive time behaviour, during which a current density sub-layer narrower than the skin depth is formed. It is believed that the inclusion of the electron initial term in Ohm`s law opens the possibility to understand the rapidity of relaxation process observed in low collisionality plasmas. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Theory of sheath in a collisional multi-component plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Mahanta; K S Goswami

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this brief report is to study the behaviour of sheath structure in a multicomponent plasma with dust-neutral collisions. The plasma consists of electrons, ions, micron size negatively charged dust particles and neutrals. The sheath-edge potential and sheath width are calculated for collisionally dominated sheath. Comparison of collisionless and collisionally dominated sheath are made.

  11. Modern methods in collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a compact yet comprehensive overview of recent developments in collisional-radiative (CR) modeling of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It describes advances across the entire field, from basic considerations of model completeness to validation and verification of CR models to calculation of plasma kinetic characteristics and spectra in diverse plasmas. Various approaches to CR modeling are presented, together with numerous examples of applications. A number of important topics, such as atomic models for CR modeling, atomic data and its availability and quality, radiation transport, non-Maxwellian effects on plasma emission, ionization potential lowering, and verification and validation of CR models, are thoroughly addressed. Strong emphasis is placed on the most recent developments in the field, such as XFEL spectroscopy. Written by leading international research scientists from a number of key laboratories, the book offers a timely summary of the most recent progress in this area. It ...

  12. Weakly nonlinear electron plasma waves in collisional plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Tagare, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a high frequency plasma wave in a weakly magnetized, collisional plasma is considered. In addition to the ponderomotive-force-nonlinearity the nonlinearity due to the heating of the electrons is taken into account. A set of nonlinear equations including the effect...... of a constantly maintained pump wave is derived and a general dispersion relation describing the modulation of the high frequency wave due to different low frequency responses is obtained. Particular attention is devoted to a purely growing modulation. The relative importance of the ponderomotive force...

  13. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzi, Oreste; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attach, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view, and which requires in general to approximate the original collisional Landau integral by simplified differential operators in reduced dimensionality. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear form. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator...

  14. Longitudinal dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasma with constant collision frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The formula for dielectric function of non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasmas is transformed to the form, convenient for research. Graphic comparison of longitudinal dielectric functions of quantum and classical non-degenerate collisional plasmas is made.

  15. Longitudinal dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenegate and maxwellian collisional plasma with constant collision frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The formula for dielectric function of non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasmas is transformed to the form, convenient for research. Graphic comparison of longitudinal dielectric functions of quantum and classical non-degenerate collisional plasmas is made.

  16. Collisional effects in weakly collisional plasmas: nonlinear electrostatic waves and recurrence phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Pezzi, O.; Valentini, F.

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding problem of collisions in plasmas is a very fascinating and huge topic in plasma physics. The 'natural' operator that describes the Coulombian interactions between charged particles is the Landau (LAN) integral operator. The LAN operator is a nonlinear, integro-differential and Fokker-Planck type operator which satisfies the H theorem for the entropy growth. Due to its nonlinear nature and multi-dimensionality, any approach to the solution of the Landau integral is almost prohibitive. Therefore collisions are usually modeled by simplified collisional operators. Here collisional effects are modeled by i) the one-dimensional Lenard-Bernstein (LB) operator and ii) the three-dimensional Dougherty (DG) operator. In the first case i), by focusing on a 1D-1V phase space, we study recurrence effects in a weakly collisional plasma, being collisions modeled by the LB operator. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through a Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. Despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not in general a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations. Moreover, recursive phenomena affect both the linear exponential growth and the nonlinear saturation of a linear instability by producing a fake growth in the electric field, thus showing that, although the filamentation is usually associated with low amplitude fluctuations contexts, it can occur also in nonlinear phenomena. On the other hand ii), the effects of electron-electron collisions on the propagation of nonlinear electrostatic waves are shown by means of Eulerian simulations in a 1D-3V (one dimension in physical space, three dimensions in velocity space) phase space. The nonlinear regime of the symmetric

  17. Surface waves in the magnetized, collisional dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B. P. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Ishihara, O. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The properties of the low frequency surface waves in inhomogeneous, magnetized collisional complex dusty plasma are investigated in this work. The inhomogeneity is modelled by the two distinct regions of the dusty medium with different dust densities. The external magnetic field is assumed to be oriented along the interface dividing the two medium. It is shown that the collisional momentum exchange that is responsible for the relative drift between the plasma particles affects the propagation of the surface waves in the complex plasma via the Hall drift of the magnetic fluctuations. The propagation properties of the sausage and kink waves depend not only on the grain charge and size distribution but also on the ambient plasma thermal conditions.

  18. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    tioned (e.g., for non - Maxwellian kinetics), one must be able to correctly apportion the changes in energy, e.g., to Ee and Eh (for heavy particles) and (b...or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non -equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non -equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we

  19. Collisionality dependent transport in TCV SOL plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Odd Erik; Pitts, R.A.; Horacek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from probe measurements in the low field side scrape-off layer (SOL) region of TCV during plasma current scan experiments. It is shown that with decreasing plasma current the radial particle density profile becomes broader and the fluctuation levels and turbulence driven...... radial particle flux increase. In the far SOL the fluctuations exhibit a high degree of statistical similarity and the particle density and flux at the wall radius scale inversely with the plasma current. Together with previous TCV density scan experiments, this indicates that plasma fluctuations...

  20. Renormalized dissipation in plasmas with finite collisionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, S.E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Carati, D. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Service de Physique Statistique

    1995-05-01

    A nonlinear truncation procedure for Fourier-Hermite expansion of Boltzmann-type plasma equations is presented which eliminates fine velocity scale, taking into account its effect on coarser scales. The truncated system is then transformed back to (x, v) space which results in a renormalized Boltzmann equation. The resulting equation may allow for coarser velocity space resolution in kinetic simulations while reducing to the original Boltzmann equation when fine velocity scales are resolved. To illustrate the procedure, renormalized equations are derived for one dimensional electrostatic plasmas in which collisions are modeled by the Lenard-Bernstein operator.

  1. Longitudinal dielectric permettivity of quantum Maxwell collisional plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic equation of Wigner -- Vlasov -- Boltzmann with collision integral in relaxation BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) form in coordinate space for quantum non--degenerate (Maxwellian) collisional plasma is used. Exact expression (within the limits of considered model) is found. The analysis of longitudinal dielectric permeability is done. It is shown that in the limit when Planck's constant tends to zero of expression for dielectric permettivity transforms into the classical case of di...

  2. Kinetic simulation study of one dimensional collisional bounded plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic simulation study ofone dimensional collisional bounded plasma is presented.The formation of stable sheath potential is investigated.It is found that mass ratio of electron and ion not onlyaffects the level of sheath potential, but also affectsthe ion temperature of system. It is clarified that the effects of secondaryemission electron on both the total potential dropand the temperature are not important.

  3. Construction of Larger Area Density-Uniform Plasma with Collisional Inductively Coupled Plasma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LIU Wandong; BAI Xiaoyan; CHEN Zhipeng; WANG Huihui; LI LUO Chen; JI Liangliang; HU Bei

    2007-01-01

    The plasma density and electron temperature of a multi-source plasma system composed of several collisional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cells were measured by a double-probe. The discharges of the ICP cells were shown to be independent of each other. Furthermore, the total plasma density at simultaneous multi-cell discharge was observed to be approximately equal to the summation of the plasma density when the cells discharge separately. Based on the linear summation phenomenon, it was shown that a larger area plasma with a uniform density and temperature profile could be constructed with multi-collisional ICP cells.

  4. Fully implicit kinetic modelling of collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, V.A.

    1996-05-01

    This dissertation describes a numerical technique, Matrix-Free Newton Krylov, for solving a simplified Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. This method is both deterministic and fully implicit, and may not have been a viable option before current developments in numerical methods. Results are presented that indicate the efficiency of the Matrix-Free Newton Krylov method for these fully-coupled, nonlinear integro-differential equations. The use and requirement for advanced differencing is also shown. To this end, implementations of Chang-Cooper differencing and flux limited Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) are presented. Results are given for a fully kinetic ion-electron problem with a self consistent electric field calculated from the ion and electron distribution functions. This numerical method, including advanced differencing, provides accurate solutions, which quickly converge on workstation class machines. It is demonstrated that efficient steady-state solutions can be achieved to the non-linear integro-differential equation, obtaining quadratic convergence, without incurring the large memory requirements of an integral operator. Model problems are presented which simulate plasma impinging on a plate with both high and low neutral particle recycling typical of a divertor in a Tokamak device. These model problems demonstrate the performance of the new solution method.

  5. Collisional current drive in two interpenetrating plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Kugland, N. L.; Park, H.-S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The magnetic field generation in two interpenetrating, weakly collisional plasma streams produced by intense lasers is considered. The generation mechanism is very similar to the neutral beam injection current drive in toroidal fusion devices, with the differences related to the absence of the initial magnetic field, short interaction time, and different geometry. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the magnetic field produced in two counterstreaming jets are evaluated; it is shown that the magnetic field of order of 1 T can be generated for modest jet parameters. Conditions under which this mechanism dominates that of the ''Biermann battery'' are discussed. Other settings where the mechanism of the collisional current drive can be important for the generation of seed magnetic fields include astrophysics and interiors of hohlraums.

  6. The acoustic instabilities in magnetized collisional dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B. P., E-mail: birendra.pandey@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V., E-mail: s.vladimirov@physics.usyd.edu.au [Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Dwivedi, C. B., E-mail: jagatpurdwivedi@gmail.com [Ved–Vijnanam Pravartanam Samitihi, Pratapgarh (Awadh), Jagatpur, Bharat (India)

    2014-09-15

    The present work investigates the wave propagation in collisional dusty plasmas in the presence of electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the dust ion-acoustic waves may become unstable to the reactive instability whereas dust-acoustic waves may suffer from both reactive and dissipative instabilities. If the wave phase speed is smaller than the plasma drift speed, the instability is of reactive type whereas in the opposite case, the instability becomes dissipative in nature. Plasma in the vicinity of dust may also become unstable to reactive instability with the instability sensitive to the dust material: dielectric dust may considerably quench this instability. This has implications for the dust charging and the use of dust as a probe in the plasma sheath.

  7. Collisional-radiative model: a plasma spectroscopy theory for experimentalists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Sawada, Keiji

    1997-01-01

    The rate equation describing the population n(p) of an excited (and the ground state) level p of ions immersed in plasma is shown. In 1962, the method of quasi-steady state solution (collisional-radiative model) was proposed. Its idea is explained. The coupled differential equations reduce to a set of coupled linear equations for excited levels. The solution of these coupled equations is presented. The equations giving the ionization and recombination of this system of ions under consideration are described in terms of the effective rate coefficients. The collisional-radiative ionization and recombination rate coefficients are expressed in terms of the population coefficients for p > 1. As for ionizing plasma, the excited level populations, the populations, the population distribution among the excited levels, two regimes of the excited levels, the dominant flows of electrons among the levels and so on are shown. As for recombining plasma, the excited level populations, the population distribution among the excited levels, the dominant flows of electrons and so on are shown. Ionization balance plasma may be considered. (K.I.)

  8. Longitudinal dielectric permettivity of quantum Maxwell collisional plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic equation of Wigner -- Vlasov -- Boltzmann with collision integral in relaxation BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) form in coordinate space for quantum non--degenerate (Maxwellian) collisional plasma is used. Exact expression (within the limits of considered model) is found. The analysis of longitudinal dielectric permeability is done. It is shown that in the limit when Planck's constant tends to zero of expression for dielectric permettivity transforms into the classical case of dielectric permettivity. At small values of wave number it has been received the solution of the dispersion equation. Damping of plasma oscillations has been analized. The analytical comparison with the dielectric Mermin' function received with the use of the kinetic equation in momentum space is done. Graphic comparison of the real and imaginary parts of dielectric permettivity of quantum and classical plasma is done also.

  9. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  10. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this end, the focus was in the development of (a) a...Collisional Radiative operator was necessary to accurately account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this...important to note that this is a code-to- code comparison and the validation of these simulations is an area of active research in the non-local

  11. An experimentally constrained MHD model for a collisional, rotating plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. M.; Qu, Z. S.; Caneses, J. F.; Hole, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    A steady-state single fluid MHD model which describes the equilibrium of plasma parameters in a collisional, rotating plasma column with temperature gradients and a non-uniform externally applied magnetic field is developed. Two novel methods of simplifying the governing equations are introduced. Specifically, a ‘radial transport constraint’ and an ordering argument are applied. The reduced system is subsequently solved to yield the equilibrium of macroscopic plasma parameters in the bulk region of the plasma. The model is benchmarked by comparing these solutions to experimental measurements of axial velocity and density for a hydrogen plasma in the converging-field experiment MAGPIE and overall a good agreement is observed. The plasma equilibrium is determined by the interaction of a density gradient, due to a temperature gradient, with an electric field. The magnetic field and temperature gradient are identified as key parameters in determining the flow profile, which may be important considerations in other applications.

  12. Experimental studies of collisional plasma shocks and plasma interpenetration via merging supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 4 years on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL, we have studied obliquely and head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets of an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture. The jets are formed/launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. In successive experimental campaigns, we characterized the (a) evolution of plasma parameters of a single plasma jet as it propagated up to ~ 1 m away from the railgun nozzle, (b) density profiles and 2D morphology of the stagnation layer and oblique shocks that formed between obliquely merging jets, and (c) collisionless interpenetration transitioning to collisional stagnation between head-on-merging jets. Key plasma diagnostics included a fast-framing CCD camera, an 8-chord visible interferometer, a survey spectrometer, and a photodiode array. This talk summarizes the primary results mentioned above, and highlights analyses of inferred post-shock temperatures based on observations of density gradients that we attribute to shock-layer thickness. We also briefly describe more recent PLX experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution with magnetic and viscous effects, and potential future collisionless shock experiments enabled by low-impurity, higher-velocity plasma jets formed by contoured-gap coaxial guns. Supported by DOE Fusion Energy Sciences and LANL LDRD.

  13. Plasma-statistical models of the atom in the theory of some collisional and radiative processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astapenko, VA

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-statistical model was used to describe collisional and radiative processes involving target ionization, namely, collisional ionization of atoms and incoherent polarization bremsstrahlung. The cross sections of these processes were expressed through the Compton profile of X-ray scattering, f

  14. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  15. Collisional-radiative modelling for the spectroscopic diagnostic of turbulent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, J.; Lefevre, T.; Escarguel, A.; Capes, H.; Catoire, F.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R. [PIIM, Universite de Provence, CNRS, Marseille (France); Rosmej, F.B. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)] [LULI, Palaiseau (France); Kadomtsev, M.B.; Levashova, M.G.; Lisitsa, V.S. [NFI, Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bonhomme, G. [IJL, Universite de Nancy, CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2011-07-01

    Spectroscopy is a diagnostic method widely used in plasma physics research, e.g. in laboratory experiments, in fusion devices or in astrophysics. Information on the plasma parameters (electron density, temperature etc.) can be obtained from the analysis of both line shapes and intensities through the use of suitable models. The aim of the present paper is to assess the role of turbulent fluctuations on line intensity ratios in the case of weakly radiating plasmas. This involves the use of collisional-radiative modelling. In the present work we address the radiation due to atomic lines in turbulent helium plasmas at low density/temperature. The statistical formalism previously used in line shape modelling is adapted in this way, and the atomic populations are calculated with a collisional-radiative code. Different regimes, according to the turbulence correlation time, have been considered. In the static case, which corresponds to low-frequency fluctuations, it has been shown that the turbulence can lead to an increase of the line intensities. An application to helium in realistic experimental conditions has revealed that line ratios are sensitive to the fluctuations, which offers a track to a diagnostic. In the dynamic case, the use of a reduced model in the case of an ideal two-level atom has revealed the possibility for a significant dependence of the atomic populations on the turbulence frequency

  16. X-ray and EUV spectroscopy of various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas -- Collisional, photoionization and charge-exchange plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, G Y; Wang, F L; Wu, Y; Zhong, J Y; Zhao, G

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratory facilities were used to benchmark theoretical spectral models those extensively used by astronomical communities. However there are still many differences between astrophysical environments and laboratory miniatures that can be archived. Here we setup a spectral analysis system for astrophysical and laboratory (SASAL) plasmas to make a bridge between them, and investigate the effects from non-thermal electrons, contribution from metastable level-population on level populations and charge stage distribution for coronal-like, photoionized, and geocoronal plasmas. Test applications to laboratory measurement (i.e. EBIT plasma) and astrophysical observation (i.e. Comet, Cygnus X-3) are presented. Time evolution of charge stage and level population are also explored for collisional and photoionized plasmas.

  17. Colloidal Plasmas : Electrostatic sheath at the boundary of a collisional dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Baishya; G C Das; Joyanti Chutia

    2000-11-01

    Considering the Boltzmann response of the ions and electrons in plasma dynamics and inertial dynamics of the dust charged grains in a highly collisional dusty plasma, the nature of the electrostatic potential near a boundary is investigated. Based on the fluid approximation, the formation as well as the characteristic behaviours of the sheath is studied. It is expected that the presence of dust charged grains will lead to a very different behaviour of the sheath as compared to that of electron-ion plasma. Moreover, the collisions of the dust charged grains with the neutrals are expected to exhibit novel features.

  18. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui, E-mail: xuejk@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronics Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  19. Nonlinear Transport Processes in Tokamak Plasmas. Part I: The Collisional Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    An application of the thermodynamic field theory (TFT) to transport processes in L-mode tokamak plasmas is presented. The nonlinear corrections to the linear (Onsager) transport coefficients in the collisional regimes are derived. A quite encouraging result is the appearance of an asymmetry between the Pfirsch-Schlueter (P-S) ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter presents a nonlinear correction, which is absent for the ions, and makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. Explicit calculations and comparisons between the neoclassical results and the TFT predictions for JET plasmas are also reported. We found that the nonlinear electron P-S transport coefficients exceed the values provided by neoclassical theory by a factor, which may be of the order 100. The nonlinear classical coefficients exceed the neoclassical ones by a factor, which may be of order 2. The expressions of the ion transport coefficients, determined by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes, remain...

  20. Magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of a quantum collisional Plasmas with arbitrary degree of degeneration of electronic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic description of magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of quantum collisional plasmas with any degeration of electronic gas is given. The correct expression of electric conductivity of quantum collisional plasmas with any degeration of electronic gas (see A. V. Latyshev and A. A. Yushkanov, Transverse electrical conductivity of a quantum collisional plasma in the Mermin approach. - Theor. and Math. Phys., V. 175(1):559-569 (2013)) is used.

  1. Nonintrusive microwave diagnostics of collisional plasmas in Hall thrusters and dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stults, Joshua

    This research presents a numerical framework for diagnosing electron properties in collisional plasmas. Microwave diagnostics achieved a significant level of development during the middle part of the last century due to work in nuclear weapons and fusion plasma research. With the growing use of plasma-based devices in fields as diverse as space propulsion, materials processing and fluid flow control, there is a need for improved, flexible diagnostic techniques suitable for use under the practical constraints imposed by plasma fields generated in a wide variety of aerospace devices. Much of the current diagnostic methodology in the engineering literature is based on analytical diagnostic, or forward, models. The Appleton-Hartree formula is an oft-used analytical relation for the refractive index of a cold, collisional plasma. Most of the assumptions underlying the model are applicable to diagnostics for plasma fields such as those found in Hall Thrusters and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators. Among the assumptions is uniform material properties, this assumption is relaxed in the present research by introducing a flexible, numerical model of diagnostic wave propagation that can capture the effects of spatial gradients in the plasma state. The numerical approach is chosen for its flexibility in handling future extensions such as multiple spatial dimensions to account for scattering effects when the spatial extent of the plasma is small relative to the probing beam's width, and velocity dependent collision frequency for situations where the constant collision frequency assumption is not justified. The numerical wave propagation model (forward model) is incorporated into a general tomographic reconstruction framework that enables the combination of multiple interferometry measurements. The combined measurements provide a quantitative picture of the spatial variation in the plasma properties. The benefit of combining multiple measurements in a coherent

  2. Collisional effects on the current-filamentation instability in a dense plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Biao; SHENG Zheng-Ming; ZHANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    The collisional current-filamentation instability (CFI) is studied for a nonrelativistic electron beampenetrating an infinite uniform plasma.It is analytically shown that the CFI is driven by the drift-anisotropyrather than the classical anisotropy of the beam and the background plasma.Therefore,collisional effects can either attenuate or enhance the CFI depending on the drift-anisotropy of the beam-plasma system.Numerical results are given for some typical parameters,which show that collisional effects cannot stabilize but enhance the CFI in a dense plasma.Thus,the CFI may play a dominant role in the fast electron transport and deposition relevant to the fast ignition scenario(FIS).

  3. Numerical study of drift-kinetic evolution of collisional plasmas in tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, Jr., C. O.; Meier, H. K.; van Rij, W. I.; McCune, J. E.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary numerical results for the dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas in the drift-kinetic, Fokker--Planck description are discussed. These solutions were obtained by using the techniques inherent to the collisional plasma model (CPM) described in detail elsewhere. An initial value problem is solved in the local approximation in which collisions and particle dynamics compete in a given magnetic field to set up a quasi-equilibrium. Both the plasma (guiding center) distribution function and many macroscopic quantities of interest are monitored. Good agreement with corresponding but more approximate theories is obtained over a wide range of collisionality, particularly with regard to the neoclassical particle flux. Encouraging confirmation of earlier results for the distribution function is achieved when due account is taken of the differing collisionality of particles with differing energies. These initial results indicate the potential importance of certain non-local effects as well as inclusion of self-consistency between fields and plasma currents and densities.

  4. Plasma plume diagnostics of low power stationary plasma thruster (SPT-20M8) with collisional radiative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttamsing Rajput, Rajendrasing; Alona, Khaustova; Loyan, Andriy V.

    2017-03-01

    Electric propulsion offers higher specific impulse compared to the chemical propulsion systems. It reduces the overall propellant mass and enables high operational lifetimes. Scientific Technological Center of Space Power and Energy (STC SPE), KhAI is involved in designing, manufacturing and testing of stationary plasma thrusters (SPT). Efforts are made to perform plasma diagnostics with corona and collisional radiative models (C-R model), as expected corona model falls short below 4 eV because of the heavy particle collisions elimination, whereas the C-R model's applicability is confirmed. Several tests are performed to analyze the electron temperature at various operational parameters of thruster like discharge voltage and mass flow rate. SPT-20M8 far and near-field plumes diagnostics are performed. Feasibility of C-R model by comparing its result to optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to investigate the electron temperature is validated with the probe measurements within the 10% of discrepancy.

  5. Self-Focusing/Defocusing of Chirped Gaussian Laser Beam in Collisional Plasma with Linear Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Manzoor Ahmad; Kant, Niti

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the self-focusing/defocusing of chirped Gaussian laser beam in collisional plasma with linear absorption. We have derived the differential equation for the beam width parameter by using WKB and paraxial approximations and solved it numerically. The effect of chirp and other laser plasma parameters is seen on the behavior of beam width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation. The results are discussed and presented graphically. Our simulation results show that the amplitude of oscillations decreases with the distance of propagation. Due to collisional frequency, the laser beam shows fast divergence which can be minimized by the introduction of chirp parameter. The chirp decreases the effect of defocusing and increases the ability of self-focusing of laser beam in collisional plasma. Supported by a financial grant from CSIR, New Delhi, India, under Project No. 03(1277)/13/EMR-II

  6. Dielectric function of a collisional plasma for arbitrary ionic charge

    CERN Document Server

    Nersisyan, H B; Andreev, N E; Matevosyan, H H

    2013-01-01

    Simple model for the dielectric function of a completely ionized plasma with an arbitrary ionic charge, that is valid for the long-wavelength, high-frequency perturbations is derived using approximate solution of a linearized Fokker-Planck kinetic equation for electrons with a Landau collision integral. The model accounts for both the electron-ion collisions and the collisions of the subthermal (cold) electrons with thermal ones. The relative contribution of the latter collisions into dielectric function is treated phenomenologically introducing some parameter $\\varkappa $ which is chosen in such a way to get well-known expression for stationary electric conductivity in low-frequency region and fulfill requirement of vanishing contribution of electron-electron collisions at high frequency region. This procedure ensures the applicability of our model in the wide ranges of plasma parameters as well as the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation. Unlike interpolation formula proposed earlier by Brantov \\emph{...

  7. Collisional Sheath in the Electronegative Radio-Frequency Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Baoxia; DENG Wenjuan; CHEN Yinhua

    2007-01-01

    A model of collisional RF sheath with negative ions is discussed in this paper.The influences of collision and negative ions on the parameters of the sheath are studied through numerical simulation.It is found that when the collision coefficient increases and the RF power is fixed,the electrode potential and sheath electric field potential increase,the electrode current and thickness of the sheath decrease.When the negative ion content changes,the same phenomenon occurs.

  8. Stability of current-driven electrostatic waves in a magnetized and collisional negative ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu; Varghese, Anu; S, Jyothi [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Issac, Molly [Department of Physics, All Saints' College, Thiruvananthapuram 695 007, Kerala (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)], E-mail: cvgmgphys@yahoo.co.in

    2008-10-15

    The stability of electrostatic waves, propagating nearly parallel to a uniform external magnetic field, is studied in a fully ionized, collisional plasma of positive and negative ions and a field-aligned current of drifting electrons. Expressions have been derived for the dispersion relation and growth rate using fluid theory and retaining the collisional and conductivity terms for the electrons. The plasma can, in general, support two modes, which have frequencies that are a composite of the ion acoustic and ion gyro frequencies. The growth rate of the modes increases with increasing drift velocities of the electrons and decreases with increasing negative ion densities.

  9. The Stability of Weakly Collisional Plasmas with Thermal and Composition Gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Pessah, Martin E; 10.1088/0004-637X/764/1/13

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, substantial efforts have been devoted to understanding the stability properties, transport phenomena, and long-term evolution of weakly-collisional, magnetized plasmas which are stratified in temperature. These studies have improved our understanding of the physics governing the intra-cluster medium (ICM), but assumed that ICM is a homogeneous. This, however, might not be a good approximation if heavy elements sediment in the inner region of the galaxy cluster. In this paper, we analyze the stability of a weakly-collisional, magnetized plane-parallel atmosphere which is stratified in both temperature and composition. This allows us to discuss for the first time the dynamics of weakly-collisional environments where heat conduction, momentum transport, and ion-diffusion are anisotropic with respect to the direction of the magnetic field. We show that, depending on the relative signs and magnitudes of the gradients in the temperature and the mean molecular weight, the plasma can be subject ...

  10. Collisional Energy Loss of a Heavy Quark in an Anisotropic Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Romatschke, P; Romatschke, Paul; Strickland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We compute the leading-order collisional energy loss of a heavy quark propagating through a quark-gluon plasma in which the quark and gluon distributions are anisotropic in momentum space. Following the calculation outlined for QED in an earlier work we indicate the differences encountered in QCD and their effect on the collisional energy loss results. For a 20 GeV bottom quark we show that momentum space anisotropies can result in the collisional heavy quark energy loss varying with the angle of propagation by up to 50%. For low velocity quarks we show that anisotropies result in energy gain instead of energy loss with the energy gain focused in such a way as to accelerate particles along the anisotropy direction thereby reducing the momentum-space anisotropy. The origin of this negative energy loss is explicitly identified as being related to the presence of plasma instabilities in the system.

  11. Nonlinear acoustic waves in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Zhi-Rong; Yang Zeng-Qiang; Yin Bao-Xiang; Sun Mao-Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Using the reductive perturbation method,we investigate the small amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma.The result shows that the small amplitude dust acoustic wave can be expressed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation,and the nonlinear wave is instable because of the collisions between the neutral gas molecules and the charged particles.

  12. Generation of longitudinal electric current by the transversal electromagnetic field in collisional plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01

    From kinetic Vlasov equation for collisional plasmas distribution function is received in square-law approximation on size of electromagnetic field. The formula for calculation electric current is deduced at any temperature (any degree of degeneration electronic gas). This formula contains one-dimension quadrature. It is shown, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence the longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This longitudinal current is perpendicular to the known transversal classical current, received at the linear analysis. When frequency of collisions tends to zero, all received results for collisional plasma pass in known corresponding formulas for collisionless plasma. The case of small values of wave number is considered. It is shown, that the received quantity of longitudinal current at tendency of frequency of collisions to zero also passes in known corresponding expression of current for collisionless plasmas. Graphic comparison of dimensionless size of current is spen...

  13. Conservation laws for collisional and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, H.; Nunami, M.; Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2017-02-01

    A novel gyrokinetic formulation is presented by including collisional effects into the Lagrangian variational principle to yield the governing equations for background and turbulent electromagnetic fields and gyrocenter distribution functions, which can simultaneously describe classical, neoclassical, and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large toroidal flows on the order of the ion thermal velocity. Noether's theorem modified for collisional systems and the collision operator given in terms of Poisson brackets are applied to derivation of the particle, energy, and toroidal momentum balance equations in the conservative forms, which are desirable properties for long-time global transport simulation.

  14. Colloidal Plasmas : Dynamo transformation of the collisional R-T in a weakly ionized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Theoretical prediction of a new kind of normal mode behaviour of electro-mechanical nature was first time reported by Dwivedi and Das in 1992 in the context of mesospheric modeling of observed neutral induced turbulence. Local dynamo action (due to relative neutral flow) governs the basic physical principle for linear excitation of the neutral induced low frequency instability (NILF) in mesospheric plasma, which comprises of weakly ionized inhomogeneous gas confined by the external gravity and ambient magnetic field. The present contribution offers physical explanation in terms of dynamo transformation of neutral drag effect as a source to understand complete suppression of the usual collisional R-T and in turn linear driving of the NILF. It is therefore emphasized, worth calling it as the dynamo instability.

  15. Collisional effects on the oblique instability in relativistic beam-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, B.; Ding, W. J.; Sheng, Z. M.; Ren, C.; Kong, X.; Mu, J.; Zhang, J.

    2012-07-01

    The general oblique instability for a relativistic electron beam propagating through a warm and resistive plasma is investigated fully kinetically by a variable rotation method. Analysis shows that the electrostatic part of the oblique instability is attenuated and eventually stabilized by collisional effects. However, the electromagnetic part of the oblique instability (EMOI) is enhanced. Since the current-filamentation instability as a special case of the EMOI has a larger growth rate, it becomes dominant in the collisional case as shown in our two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. While the beam diverges in the collisionless case, it can become magnetically collimated in the collisional case due to stabilization of the electrostatic instabilities when the initial beam spreading angle is less than certain magnitude such as a dozen degrees.

  16. Collisional Thermalization in Strongly Coupled Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-25

    ultracold neutral plasmas, which are formed by photoionizing laser cooled atoms. These are the coldest neutral plasmas every created, and they allow...and received the “Editors’ Suggestion” distinction. We also completed numerical modeling of laser cooling a neutral plasma and construction of the...We also had to install several laser systems for driving the laser - cooling transitions in the ions and for repumping atoms out of dark states

  17. Limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Howes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas are explored using quantitative comparisons to Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory over a wide range of parameter space. The validity of Hall MHD in the cold ion limit is shown, but spurious undamped wave modes exist in Hall MHD when the ion temperature is finite. It is argued that turbulence in the dissipation range of the solar wind must be one, or a mixture, of three electromagnetic wave modes: the parallel whistler, oblique whistler, or kinetic Alfvén waves. These modes are generally well described by Hall MHD. Determining the applicability of linear kinetic damping rates in turbulent plasmas requires a suite of fluid and kinetic nonlinear numerical simulations. Contrasting fluid and kinetic simulations will also shed light on whether the presence of spurious wave modes alters the nonlinear couplings inherent in turbulence and will illuminate the turbulent dynamics and energy transfer in the regime of the characteristic ion kinetic scales.

  18. Effects of plasma collisionality on power balance and magnetic fluctuations in the T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, G.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Hörling, P.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.; Drake, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of plasma collisionality on power balance and magnetic fluctuations have been studied on the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch. A characteristic minimum in loop voltage is observed as the plasma collisionality decreases. The minimum is caused by an increase in the anomalous input power and coincides with a change of scaling of the magnetic fluctuations and a rapid increase of the electron mean free path. However, the increase of anomalous input power in the low collisional regime appears to have little influence on the total amount of energy stored in the plasma.

  19. Collisional transport in a plasma with steep gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two {delta}f method for neoclassical transport calculation, which can be solve the drift kinetic equation considering effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and an orbit topology near the axis. The new method is applied to the study of ion transport with steep plasma gradients. It is found that the ion thermal diffusivity decreases as the scale length of density gradient decreases, while the ion particle flux due to ion-ion self collisions increases with increasing gradient. (author)

  20. Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri Boroujeni, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum plasma in the presence of the external magnetic field and collisional effects is investigated by using quantum magnetohydrodynamics model. A general analytical expression for the dispersion relation of surface waves is obtained by considering the boundary conditions. It is shown that, in some special cases, the obtained dispersion relation reduces to the results reported in previous works. It is also indicated that the quantum, external magnetic field and collisional effects can facilitate the propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded plasma. In addition, it is found that the growth rate of the surface wave instability is enhanced by increasing the collision frequency and plasmonic parameter.

  1. Particle in cell calculation of plasma force on a small grain in a non-uniform collisional sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2013-01-01

    The plasma force on grains of specified charge and height in a collisional plasma sheath are calculated using the multidimensional particle in cell code COPTIC. The background ion velocity distribution functions for the unperturbed sheath vary substantially with collisionality. The grain force is found to agree quite well with a combination of background electric field force plus ion drag force. However, the drag force must take account of the non-Maxwellian (and spatially varying) ion distribution function, and the collisional drag enhancement. It is shown how to translate the dimensionless results into practical equilibrium including other forces such as gravity.

  2. Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.E.

    1990-05-24

    Research on this grant is devoted to the calculation of heavy particle collision cross sections needed for diagnostic studies of magnetic fusion plasmas. This work requires the development and testing of new theoretical methods, with the implementation of benchmarked techniques to collisions pertinent to fusion reactors. Within the last context, we have provided charge-exchange-recombination cross sections to specific n,1-levels for diagnostic studies on TFTR and for a major compilation for IAEA. We have also completed a cross section study related to the planned neutral beam current drive for ITER. In addition, calculations were completed to assess the use of He neutral atom angular scattering measurements for JT-60. Also, new theoretical methods have been developed to more accurately calculate cross sections involving either He or H{sub 2} targets and partially stripped multiply-charged ions.

  3. A study of the propagation of ulf electromagnetic fields in collisional, inhomogeneous, magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1987-02-01

    The propagation of ultralow-frequency (ulf) electromagnetic signals (Alfven and magnetosonic waves) in collisional, inhomogeneous, magnetized plasmas is analyzed by numerical simulation. The problem is formulated from a Maxwell-equation orbit-theory approach rather than from a magnetohydrodynamic point of view, and the problem is numerically treated in a fully time-dependent manner. Boundary-value-problem behavior is distinguished from initial-value-problem behavior. The propagation of two-dimensional small-amplitude electromagnetic disturbances in plasmas with spatially dependent densities and in plasmas with spatially dependent conductivities is numerically simulated, and when possible, the simulations are compared with theory. Changes in the plasma density lead to changes in the signal speed and to reflections; collisions lead to changes in the signal speed, to reflections, and to attenuations. Theoretical descriptions based upon discontinuities in the media are generally incorrect in predicting the amplitudes of signals reflected from plasma inhomogeneities. 19 refs., 16 figs.

  4. Comment on "Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 122106 (2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    In a recent article [Niknam et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122106 (2013)], Niknam et al. investigated the propagation of TM surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma in the Faraday configuration (in this case, the magnetic field is parallel to the both of the plasma surface and direction of propagation). Here, we present a fresh look at the problem and show that TM surface waves cannot propagate on surface of the present system. We find in the Faraday configuration the surface waves acquire both TM and TE components due to the cyclotron motion of electrons. Therefore, the main result of the work by Niknam et al. is incorrect.

  5. Formation and evolution of vortices in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Sayanee [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, a/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Banerjee, Debabrata, E-mail: debu@ustc.edu.cn [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, a/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2016-07-29

    Formation and evolution of vortices are studied in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma in the framework of a Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). Here we mainly present the nonlinear dynamical response of this strongly coupled system in presence of dust-neutral collisional drag. It is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear elastic stress and the dust-neutral collisional drag results in the generation of non-propagating monopole vortex for some duration before it starts to propagate like transverse shear wave. It is also found that the interaction between two unshielded monopole vortices having both same (co-rotating) and opposite (counter rotating) rotations result in the formation of two propagating dipole vortices of equal and unequal strength respectively. These results will provide some new understanding on the transport properties in such a strongly coupled system. The numerical simulation is carried out using a de-aliased doubly periodic pseudo-spectral code with Runge–Kutta–Gill time integrator. - Highlights: • A numerical study of vortex evolution in strongly coupled dusty plasma is presented. • Dust-neutral drag is first time considered with the Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). • Dust-neutral drag force balances the nonlinear effect of elastic stress. • Localized non-propagating monopole structure is generated for some duration. • Dipole vortices are produced after interaction between two monopole vortices.

  6. Collisional Thermalization of Hydrogen and Helium in Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Maruca, Bennett A; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kasper, Justin C; Stevens, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    In situ observations of the solar wind frequently show the temperature of $\\alpha$-particles (fully ionized helium), $T_\\alpha$, to significantly differ from that of protons (ionized hydrogen), $T_p$. Many heating processes in the plasma act preferentially on $\\alpha$-particles, even as collisions among ions act to gradually establish thermal equilibrium. Measurements from the $\\textit{Wind}$ spacecraft's Faraday cups reveal that, at $r=1.0\\ \\textrm{AU}$ from the Sun, the observed values of the $\\alpha$-proton temperature ratio, $\\theta_{\\alpha p} \\equiv T_\\alpha\\,/\\,T_p$ has a complex, bimodal distribution. This study applied a simple model for the radial evolution of $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$ to these data to compute expected values of $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$ at $r=0.1\\ \\textrm{AU}$. These inferred $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$-values have no trace of the bimodality seen in the $\\theta_{\\alpha p}$-values measured at $r=1.0\\ \\textrm{AU}$ but are instead consistent with the actions of the known mechanisms for $\\alpha$-particle p...

  7. The stability of weakly collisional plasmas with thermal and composition gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, M.E.; Chakraborty, S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, substantial efforts have been devoted to understanding the stability properties, transport phenomena, and long-term evolution of weakly collisional, magnetized plasmas which are stratified in temperature. The insights gained via these studies have led to a significant...... approximation if heavy elements are able to sediment in the inner region of the galaxy cluster. Motivated by the need to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamical properties of the ICM, we analyze the stability of a weakly collisional, magnetized plane-parallel atmosphere which is stratified in both...... in homogeneous media. We also find that there are new modes which are driven by heat conduction and particle diffusion. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our findings for a representative galaxy cluster where helium has sedimented. Our findings suggest that the core insulation that results from...

  8. Second harmonic generation of Cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisional plasma with nonlinear absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navpreet; Gupta, Naveen; Singh, Arvinder

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates second harmonic generation (SHG) of an intense Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) laser beam propagating through a preformed underdense collisional plasma with nonlinear absorption. Nonuniform heating of plasma electrons takes place due to the nonuniform irradiance of intensity along the wavefront of laser beam. This nonuniform heating of plasma leads to the self-focusing of the laser beam and thus produces strong density gradients in the transverse direction. The density gradients so generated excite an electron plasma wave (EPW) at pump frequency that interacts with the pump beam to produce its second harmonics. To envision the propagation dynamics of the ChG laser beam, moment theory in Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (W.K.B) approximation has been invoked. The effects of nonlinear absorption on self-focusing of the laser beam as well as on the conversion efficiency of its second harmonics have been theoretically investigated.

  9. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Moser, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions [A. L. Moser & S. C. Hsu, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2014)]. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex ...

  10. Collisional damping of helicon waves in a high density hydrogen linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan F.; Blackwell, Boyd D.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation and damping of helicon waves along the length (50 cm) of a helicon-produced 20 kW hydrogen plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 1–2 × 1019 m‑3, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 1–6 eV, H2 8 mTorr) operated in a magnetic mirror configuration (antenna region: 50–200 G and mirror region: 800 G). Experimental results show the presence of traveling helicon waves (4–8 G and {λz}∼ 10–15 cm) propagating away from the antenna region which become collisionally absorbed within 40–50 cm. We describe the use of the WKB method to calculate wave damping and provide an expression to assess its validity based on experimental measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with experiment and indicate that for conditions where Coulomb collisions are dominant classical collisionality is sufficient to explain the observed wave damping along the length of the plasma column. Based on these results, we provide an expression for the scaling of helicon wave damping relevant to high density discharges and discuss the location of surfaces for plasma-material interaction studies in helicon based linear plasma devices.

  11. Slowing of Magnetic Reconnection Concurrent with Weakening Plasma Inflows and Increasing Collisionality in Strongly Driven Laser-Plasma Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Fox, W; Zylstra, A B; Stoeckl, C; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D

    2015-05-22

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, β≲20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (V_{jet}∼20V_{A}) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly driven regime.

  12. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D. R., E-mail: dmikkelsen@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Reinke, M. L. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Podpaly, Y. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); AAAS S and T Fellow placed in the Directorate for Engineering, NSF, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States); Ma, Y. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 175 Albany St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Peaked density profiles in low-collisionality AUG and JET H-mode plasmas are probably caused by a turbulently driven particle pinch, and Alcator C-Mod experiments confirmed that collisionality is a critical parameter. Density peaking in reactors could produce a number of important effects, some beneficial, such as enhanced fusion power and transport of fuel ions from the edge to the core, while others are undesirable, such as lower beta limits, reduced radiation from the plasma edge, and consequently higher divertor heat loads. Fundamental understanding of the pinch will enable planning to optimize these impacts. We show that density peaking is predicted by nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations based on measured profile data from low collisionality H-mode plasma in Alcator C-Mod. Multiple ion species are included to determine whether hydrogenic density peaking has an isotope dependence or is influenced by typical levels of low-Z impurities, and whether impurity density peaking depends on the species. We find that the deuterium density profile is slightly more peaked than that of hydrogen, and that experimentally relevant levels of boron have no appreciable effect on hydrogenic density peaking. The ratio of density at r/a = 0.44 to that at r/a = 0.74 is 1.2 for the majority D and minority H ions (and for electrons), and increases with impurity Z: 1.1 for helium, 1.15 for boron, 1.3 for neon, 1.4 for argon, and 1.5 for molybdenum. The ion temperature profile is varied to match better the predicted heat flux with the experimental transport analysis, but the resulting factor of two change in heat transport has only a weak effect on the predicted density peaking.

  13. Tungsten Ions in Plasmas: Statistical Theory of Radiative-Collisional Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The statistical model for calculations of the collisional-radiative processes in plasmas with tungsten impurity was developed. The electron structure of tungsten multielectron ions is considered in terms of both the Thomas-Fermi model and the Brandt-Lundquist model of collective oscillations of atomic electron density. The excitation or ionization of atomic electrons by plasma electron impacts are represented as photo-processes under the action of flux of equivalent photons introduced by E. Fermi. The total electron impact single ionization cross-sections of ions Wk+ with respective rates have been calculated and compared with the available experimental and modeling data (e.g., CADW. Plasma radiative losses on tungsten impurity were also calculated in a wide range of electron temperatures 1 eV–20 keV. The numerical code TFATOM was developed for calculations of radiative-collisional processes involving tungsten ions. The needed computational resources for TFATOM code are orders of magnitudes less than for the other conventional numerical codes. The transition from corona to Boltzmann limit was investigated in detail. The results of statistical approach have been tested by comparison with the vast experimental and conventional code data for a set of ions Wk+. It is shown that the universal statistical model accuracy for the ionization cross-sections and radiation losses is within the data scattering of significantly more complex quantum numerical codes, using different approximations for the calculation of atomic structure and the electronic cross-sections.

  14. Ponderomotive self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari Milani, M. R., E-mail: mrj.milani@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam through warm collisional plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive force nonlinearity and the complex eikonal function. By introducing the dielectric permittivity of warm unmagnetized plasma and using the WKB and paraxial ray approximations, the coupled differential equations defining the variations of laser beam parameters are obtained and solved numerically. Effects of laser and plasma parameters such as the collision frequency, the initial laser intensity and its spot size on the beam width parameter and the axis laser intensity distribution are analyzed. It is shown that, self-focusing of the laser beam takes place faster by increasing the collision frequency and initial laser spot size and then after some distance propagation the laser beam abruptly loses its initial diameter and vastly diverges. Furthermore, the modified electron density distribution is obtained and the collision frequency effect on this distribution is studied.

  15. A Numerical Model for Ion Charge Distribution of Plasmas in Collisional Radiative Steady State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yaoyong; GUO Yonghui; QIU Aici; KUAI Bin

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model for the charge state distribution of plasmas in a collisional ra-diative steady state (CRSS) is established by averaging over the atomic process rate coefficients in universal kinetic equations.It is used to calculate the mean ion charge and ion population for a given temperature and density of the plasmas,ranging from low Z to high Z elements.The comparisons of the calculated results with those of other non-local thermodynamic equilibrium kinetics codes show that this model possesses acceptable precision.Furthermore,the NLTE effects are investigated by virtue of the model,and the differences between CRSS and LTE models for low density plasmas are quite evident.

  16. Laser plasma physics in shock ignition – transition from collisional to collisionless absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimo O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock Ignition is considered as a relatively robust and efficient approach to inertial confinement fusion. A strong converging shock, which is used to ignite the fuel, is launched by a high power laser pulse with intensity in the range of 1015 − 1016 W/cm2 (at the wavelength of 351 nm. In the lower end of this intensity range the interaction is dominated by collisions while the parametric instabilities are playing a secondary role. This is manifested in a relatively weak reflectivity and efficient electron heating. The interaction is dominated by collective effects at the upper edge of the intensity range. The stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering (SBS and SRS respectively take place in a less dense plasma and cavitation provides an efficient collisionless absorption mechanism. The transition from collisional to collisionless absorption in laser plasma interactions at higher intensities is studied here with the help of large scale one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC simulations. The relation between the collisional and collisionless processes is manifested in the energy spectrum of electrons transporting the absorbed laser energy and in the spectrum of the reflected laser light.

  17. Collisional effects in the ion Weibel instability for two counter-propagating plasma streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Fiuza, F.; Huntington, C. M.; Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments directed towards the study of the collisionless interaction between two counter-streaming plasma flows generated by high-power lasers are designed in such a way as to make collisions between the ions of the two flows negligibly rare. This is reached by making flow velocities v as high as possible and thereby exploiting the 1/v{sup 4} dependence of the Rutherford cross-section. At the same time, the plasma temperature of each flow may be relatively low so that collisional mean-free paths for the intra-stream particle collisions may be much smaller than the characteristic spatial scale of the unstable modes required for the shock formation. The corresponding effects are studied in this paper for the case of the ion Weibel (filamentation) instability. Dispersion relations for the case of strong intra-stream collisions are derived. It is shown that the growth-rates become significantly smaller than those stemming from a collisionless model. The underlying physics is mostly related to the increase of the electron stabilizing term. Additional effects are an increased “stiffness” of the collisional ion gas and the ion viscous dissipation. A parameter domain where collisions are important is identified.

  18. X-ray spectra of high temperature tungsten plasma calculated with collisional radiative model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Zhang Hong; Cheng Xin-Lu

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten is regarded as an important candidate of plasma facing material in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER),so the determination and modeling of spectra of tungsten plasma,especially the spectra at high temperature were intensely focused on recently.In this work,using the atomic structure code of Cowan,a collisional radiative model (CRM) based on the spin-orbit-split-arrays is developed.Based on this model,the charge state distribution of tungsten ions is determined and the soft X-ray spectra from high charged ions of tungsten at different temperatures are calculated.The results show that both the average ionization charge and line positions are well agreed with others calculations and measurements with discrepancies of less than 0.63% and 1.26%,respectively.The spectra at higher temperatures are also reported and the relationship between ion abundance and temperature is predicted in this work.

  19. The frequency and damping of ion acoustic waves in collisional and collisionless two-species plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, R L; Valeo, E J

    2004-07-15

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves (IAW) are sensitive to the strength of ion-ion collisions in multi-species plasma in which the different species usually have differing charge-to-mass ratios. The modification of the frequency and damping of the fast and slow acoustic modes in a plasma composed of light (low Z) and heavy (high Z) ions is considered. In the fluid limit where the light ion scattering mean free path, {lambda}{sub th} is smaller than the acoustic wavelength, {lambda} = 2{pi}/k, the interspecies friction and heat flow carried by the light ions scattering from the heavy ions causes the damping. In the collisionless limit, k{lambda}{sub lh} >> 1, Landau damping by the light ions provides the dissipation. In the intermediate regime when k{lambda}{sub lh} {approx} 1, the damping is at least as large as the sum of the collisional and Landau damping.

  20. The Frequency and Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves in Collisional and Collisionless Two-species Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Berger; E.J. Valeo

    2004-08-18

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves (IAW) are sensitive to the strength of ion-ion collisions in multi-species plasma in which the different species usually have differing charge-to-mass ratios. The modification of the frequency and damping of the fast and slow acoustic modes in a plasma composed of light (low Z) and heavy (high Z) ions is considered. In the fluid limit where the light ion scattering mean free path, {lambda}{sub th} is smaller than the acoustic wavelength, {lambda} = 2{pi}/k, the interspecies friction and heat flow carried by the light ions scattering from the heavy ions causes the damping. In the collisionless limit, k{lambda}{sub th} >> 1, Landau damping by the light ions provides the dissipation. In the intermediate regime when k{lambda}{sub th} {approx} 1, the damping is at least as large as the sum of the collisional and Landau damping.

  1. Coupled dust drift acoustic shock and soliton in collisional four component magnetized dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, M.; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Jan, Qasim

    2017-09-01

    Low frequency electrostatic coupled dust drift dust acoustic waves are studied in an inhomogeneous, collisional four component dust magnetoplasma composed of dust components of opposite polarity, along with Boltzmannian ions and electrons. The nonlinear evolution equation in the form of an ordinary differential equation and its limiting cases are derived and solved using the Tanh-method. The numerical analysis of the obtained solutions is studied for both laboratory and cosmic plasma systems. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion and electron temperatures, and charge number, both rarefactive and compressive shock and solitary waves may exist. It is shown that the concepts of a critical ion and electron temperatures/density in the nonlinear equations treatment, and of a changeover from compressive to rarefactive shock and soliton characters, correspond to the formation of rarefactive regimes, at which the electric stresses maximize and density minimizes.

  2. Theory of Collisional Two-Stream Plasma Instabilities in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Chad Allen; Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers; Fontenla, Juan

    2014-06-01

    The solar chromosphere experiences intense heating just above its temperature minimum. The heating increases the electron temperature in this region by over 2000 K. Furthermore, it exhibits little time variation and appears widespread across the solar disk. Although semi-empirical models, UV continuum observations, and line emission measurements confirm the existence of the heating, its source remains unexplained. Potential heating sources such as acoustic shocks, resistive dissipation, and magnetic reconnection via nanoflares fail to account for the intensity, persistence, and ubiquity of the heating. Fontenla (2005) suggested turbulence from a collisional two-stream plasma instability known as the Farley-Buneman instability (FBI) could contribute significantly to the heating. This instability is known to heat the plasma of the E-region ionosphere which bears many similarities to the chromospheric plasma. However, the ionospheric theory of the FBI does not account for the diverse ion species found in the solar chromosphere. This work develops a new collisional, two-stream instability theory appropriate for the chromospheric plasma environment using a linear fluid analysis to derive a new dispersion relationship and critical E x B drift velocity required to trigger the instability. Using a 1D, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, radiative transfer model and careful estimates of collision rates and magnetic field strengths, we calculate the trigger velocities necessary to induce the instability throughout the chromosphere. Trigger velocities as low as 4 km s^-1 are found near the temperature minimum, well below the local neutral acoustic speed in that region. From this, we expect the instability to occur frequently, converting kinetic energy contained in neutral convective flows from the photosphere into thermal energy via turbulence. This could contribute significantly to chromospheric heating and explain its persistent and ubiquitous nature.

  3. First-principle description of collisional gyrokinetic turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dif-Pradalier, G

    2008-10-15

    This dissertation starts in chapter 1 with a comprehensive introduction to nuclear fusion, its basic physics, goals and means. It especially defines the concept of a fusion plasma and some of its essential physical properties. The following chapter 2 discusses some fundamental concepts of statistical physics. It introduces the kinetic and the fluid frameworks, compares them and highlights their respective strengths and limitations. The end of the chapter is dedicated to the fluid theory. It presents two new sets of closure relations for fluid equations which retain important pieces of physics, relevant in the weakly collisional tokamak regimes: collective resonances which lead to Landau damping and entropy production. Nonetheless, since the evolution of the turbulence is intrinsically nonlinear and deeply influenced by velocity space effects, a kinetic collisional description is most relevant. First focusing on the kinetic aspect, chapter 3 introduces the so-called gyrokinetic framework along with the numerical solver - the GYSELA code - which will be used throughout this dissertation. Very generically, code solving is an initial value problem. The impact on turbulent nonlinear evolution of out of equilibrium initial conditions is discussed while studying transient flows, self-organizing dynamics and memory effects due to initial conditions. This dissertation introduces an operational definition, now of routine use in the GYSELA code, for the initial state and concludes on the special importance of the accurate calculation of the radial electric field. The GYSELA framework is further extended in chapter 4 to describe Coulomb collisions. The implementation of a collision operator acting on the full distribution function is presented. Its successful confrontation to collisional theory (neoclassical theory) is also shown. GYSELA is now part of the few gyrokinetic codes which can self-consistently address the interplay between turbulence and collisions. While

  4. Effect of Higher Order Axial Electron Temperature on Self-Focusing of Electromagnetic Pulsed Beam in Collisional Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏雄平; 易林

    2012-01-01

    Effect of higher order axial electron temperature on self-focusing of electromagnetic pulsed beam in collisional plasma is investigated.It is shown that higher order axial electron temperature T p4 is not trivial than T p0 and T p2,which can modify slightly radial redistribution of electron density and increases effective dielectric constant.As a result,on one hand,slightly reduce electromagnetic beam self-focusing in the course of oscillatory convergence,on the other hand,quicken beam divergence in the course of steady divergence,i.e.,higher order axial electron temperature T p4 can decrease the influence of collisional nonlinearity in collisional plasma.

  5. A collisional-radiative model for low-pressure weakly magnetized Ar plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Tsankov, Tsanko; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Marchuk, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative (CR) models are widely investigated in plasma physics for describing the kinetics of reactive species and for optical emission spectroscopy. This work reports a new Ar CR model used in low-pressure (0.01-10 Pa) weakly magnetized (<0.1 Tesla) plasmas, including ECR, helicon, and NLD discharges. In this model 108 realistic levels are individually studied, i.e. 51 lowest levels of the Ar atom and 57 lowest levels of the Ar ion. We abandon the concept of an ``effective level'' usually adopted in previous models for glow discharges. Only in this way the model can correctly predict the non-equilibrium population distribution of close energy levels. In addition to studying atomic metastable and radiative levels, this model describes the kinetic processes of ionic metastable and radiative levels in detail for the first time. This is important for investigation of plasma-surface interaction and for optical diagnostics using atomic and ionic line-ratios. This model could also be used for studying Ar impurities in tokamaks and astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Sheath Criterion for a Collisional Electronegative Plasma Sheath in an Applied Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹秀; 刘惠平; 邱明辉; 孙骁航

    2011-01-01

    The sheath criterion for a collisional electronegative plasma sheath in an applied magnetic field is investigated.It is assumed that the system consists of hot electrons,hot negative ions and cold positive ions.The effect of an applied magnetic field on the sheath criterion is discussed.The results reveal that the magnetic field has effects on both the upper and lower limits,which cause the range of the ion Mach number to increase.In addition,the numerical calculations of the electronegative plasma sheath are carried out to demonstrate the effects of sheath criterion on the characteristics of the sheath.%The sheath criterion for a collisioned electronegative plasma sheath in an applied magnetic Geld is investigated. It is assumed that the system consists of hot electrons, hot negative ions and cold positive ions. The effect of an applied magnetic Reid on the sheath criterion is discussed. The results reveal that the magnetic field has effects on both the upper and lower limits, which cause the range of the ion Mach number to increase. In addition, the numerical calculations of the electronegative plasma sheath are carried out to demonstrate the effects of sheath criterion on the characteristics of the sheath.

  7. Fluid Simulation of the Ion Temperature Effects on a Collisional Magnetized Sheath of a Dusty Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Driouch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of magnetized dusty plasma sheath with finite ion temperature are studied using a fluid model. Hot electrons, fluid ions, neutral particles and cold fluid dust grains are taken into account in this system. Considering the cross section for collisions between the dust and neutrals has a power law dependence on the dust flow velocity, the fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures. A significant change is observed in the quantities characterizing the sheath with respect to the cold ion assumption. In addition, the result reveals that the effect of ion temperature is more obvious on the dust dynamics in collisional sheath with constant cross section.

  8. Experimental evidence for collisional shock formation via two obliquely merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Elizabeth C; Hsu, Scott C; Adams, Colin S; Gilmore, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We report spatially resolved experimental measurements of the oblique merging of two supersonic laboratory plasma jets. The jets are formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns using injected argon, and have electron density $\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$, electron temperature $\\approx 1.4$ eV, ionization fraction near unity, and velocity $\\approx 40$ km/s just prior to merging. The jet merging produces a few-cm-thick stagnation layer, as observed in both fast-framing camera images and multi-chord interferometer data, consistent with collisional shock formation [E. C. Merritt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 085003 (2013)]. The observed stagnation layer emission morphology is consistent with hydrodynamic oblique shock theory at early times, and then undergoes an evolution at later times that is coincident with the theoretically predicted transition to detached shock formation.

  9. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic instabilities in weakly collisional, high beta plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations with Coulomb collisions modeled through the Langevin equation (corresponding to the Fokker-Planck one). The expansion drives a parallel or perpendicular temperature anisotropy (depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field). For the chosen parameters the Coulomb collisions are important with respect to the driver but are not strong enough to keep the system stable with respect to instabilities driven by the proton temperature anisotropy. In the case of the parallel temperature anisotropy the dominant oblique fire hose instability efficiently reduces the anisotropy in a quasilinear manner. In the case of the perpendicular temperature anisotropy the dominant mirror instability generates coherent compressive structures which scatter protons and reduce the temperature anisotropy. For both the cases the instabilities generate temporarily enough wave energy so that the ...

  10. Nonlinear interaction between surface plasmons and ion oscillations in a semi-bounded collisional quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir; Taheri Boroujeni, S. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the nonlinear interaction between high-frequency surface plasmons and low-frequency ion oscillations in a semi-bounded collisional quantum plasma. By coupling the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and quantum hydrodynamic model, and taking into account the ponderomotive force, the dispersion equation is obtained. By solving this equation, it is shown that there is a modulational instability in the system, and collisions and quantum forces play significant roles on this instability. The quantum tunneling increases the phase and group velocities of the modulated waves and collisions increase the growth rate of the modulational instability. It is also shown that the effect of quantum forces and collisions is more significant in high modulated wavenumber regions.

  11. SPEX (Plasma Code Spectral Fitting Tool). Collisional ionization for atoms and ions of H to Zn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdampilleta, I.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    Every observation of astrophysical objects involving a spectrum requires atomic data for the interpretation of line fluxes, ratios and ionization state of the emitting plasma. One of processes which determines it is collisional ionization. In this study an update of the direct ionization (DI) and excitation-autoionization (EA) processes is discussed for the H to Zn-like isoelectronic sequences. The previous assessments were performed by Dere (2007, A&A 466, 771) for H to Zn isoelectronc sequences, Arnaud & Raymond (1992, ApJ. 398, 394) for Fe and Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985, A&AS, 60, 425). However, in the last years new laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations of ionization cross sections have become accessible. We provide a review, extension and update of this previous work and fit the cross sections of all individuals shells of all ions from H to Zn. These data are described using an extension of Younger's formula, suitable for integration over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to derive the subshell ionization rate coefficients. These ionization rate coefficients are included together with the radiative recombination rates data (Mao et al. 2016, A&AS, 27568) and a change-exchange model (Gu et al. 2016, A&A 588, A52, 11) into the high-resolution plasma code and spectral fit tool SPEX V3.0 (Kaastra et al. 1996, UV and X-ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas).

  12. Collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized two-species pure ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O’Neil, Thomas M.; Dubin, Daniel H. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized pure ion plasma that is composed of two species with slightly different masses is discussed. We have in mind two isotopes of the same singly ionized atom. Parameters are assumed to be ordered as Ω{sub 1},Ω{sub 2}≫|Ω{sub 1}−Ω{sub 2}|≫v{sup ¯}{sub ij}/b{sup ¯} and v{sup ¯}{sub ⊥j}/Ω{sub j}≪b{sup ¯}, where Ω{sub 1} and Ω{sub 2} are two cyclotron frequencies, v{sup ¯}{sub ij}=√(T{sub ∥}/μ{sub ij}) is the relative parallel thermal velocity characterizing collisions between particles of species i and j, and b{sup ¯}=2e{sup 2}/T{sub ∥} is the classical distance of closest approach for such collisions, and v{sup ¯}{sub ⊥j}/Ω{sub j}=√(2T{sub ⊥j}/m{sub j})/Ω{sub j} is the characteristic cyclotron radius for particles of species j. Here, μ{sub ij} is the reduced mass for the two particles, and T{sub ∥} and T{sub ⊥j} are temperatures that characterize velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For this ordering, the total cyclotron action for the two species, I{sub 1}=∑{sub i∈1}m{sub 1}v{sub ⊥i}{sup 2}/(2Ω{sub 1}) and I{sub 2}=∑{sub i∈2}m{sub 2}v{sub ⊥i}{sup 2}/(2Ω{sub 2}) are adiabatic invariants that constrain the collisional dynamics. On the timescale of a few collisions, entropy is maximized subject to the constancy of the total Hamiltonian H and the two actions I{sub 1} and I{sub 2}, yielding a modified Gibbs distribution of the form exp[−H/T{sub ∥}−α{sub 1}I{sub 1}−α{sub 2}I{sub 2}]. Here, the α{sub j}’s are related to T{sub ∥} and T{sub ⊥j} through T{sub ⊥j}=(1/T{sub ∥}+α{sub j}/Ω{sub j}){sup −1}. Collisional relaxation to the usual Gibbs distribution, exp[−H/T{sub ∥}], takes place on two timescales. On a timescale longer than the collisional timescale by a factor of (b{sup ¯2}Ω{sub 1}{sup 2}/v{sup ¯}{sub 11}{sup 2})exp(5[3π(b{sup ¯}|Ω{sub 1}−Ω{sub 2}|/v{sup ¯}{sub 12})]{sup 2/5}/6), the two

  13. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas%Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秋艳; 李弘; 陈志鹏; 谢锦林; 刘万东

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnos- tics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron tem- perature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method.

  14. Amplitude limits and nonlinear damping of shear-Alfvén waves in high-beta low-collisionality plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Quataert, E.

    2017-05-01

    This work, which extends Squire et al (Astrophys. J. Lett. 2016 830 L25), explores the effect of self-generated pressure anisotropy on linearly polarized shear-Alfvén fluctuations in low-collisionality plasmas. Such anisotropies lead to stringent limits on the amplitude of magnetic perturbations in high-β plasmas, above which a fluctuation can destabilize itself through the parallel firehose instability. This causes the wave frequency to approach zero, ‘interrupting’ the wave and stopping its oscillation. These effects are explored in detail in the collisionless and weakly collisional ‘Braginskii’ regime, for both standing and traveling waves. The focus is on simplified models in one dimension, on scales much larger than the ion gyroradius. The effect has interesting implications for the physics of magnetized turbulence in the high-β conditions that are prevalent in many astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Stationary distribution functions for ohmic Tokamak-plasmas in the weak-collisional transport regime by MaxEnt principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Peeters, Philippe; Sonnino, Alberto; Nardone, Pasquale; Steinbrecher, György

    2015-01-01

    In previous works, we derived stationary density distribution functions (DDF) where the local equilibrium is determined by imposing the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, under the scale invariance restrictions, and the minimum entropy production theorem. In this paper we demonstrate that it is possible to reobtain these DDF solely from the MaxEnt principle subject to suitable scale invariant restrictions in all the variables. For the sake of concreteness, we analyse the example of ohmic, fully ionized, tokamak-plasmas, in the weak-collisional transport regime. In this case we show that it is possible to reinterpret the stationary distribution function in terms of the Prigogine distribution function where the logarithm of the DDF is directly linked to the entropy production of the plasma. This leads to the suggestive idea that also the stationary neoclassical distribution functions, for magnetically confined plasmas in the collisional transport regimes, may be derived solely by the MaxEnt principle.

  16. Instability-Enhanced Collisional Friction Determines the Bohm Criterion in Multiple-Ion-Species Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, S. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2009-11-01

    Ion-ion streaming instabilities are excited in the presheath region of plasmas with multiple ion species if the ions are much colder than the electrons. Streaming instabilities onset when the relative fluid flow between ion species exceeds a critical speed, δVc, of order the ion thermal speeds. Using a generalized Lenard-Balescu theory that accounts for instability-enhanced collective responses [1], one is able to show the instabilities rapidly enhance the collisional friction between ion species far beyond the contribution from Coulomb collisions alone. This strong frictional force determines the relative fluid speed between species. When this condition is combined with the Bohm criterion generalized for multiple ion species, the fluid speed of each ion species is determined at the sheath edge. For each species, this speed differs from the common ``system'' sound speed by a factor that depends on the species concentrations, masses and δVc.[4pt] [1] S.D. Baalrud, J.D. Callen, and C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 15, 092111 (2008).

  17. The exact form of the Bohm criterion for a collisional plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Tsankov, Tsanko Vaskov

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing debate in the literature about the kinetic form of the Bohm criterion is resolved for plasmas with single positive ion species when transport is dominated by charge exchange collisions. The solution of the Boltzmann equation for the ions gives the exact form free of any divergence and contains an additional term that is not included in the classical result. This term includes collisional and geometric effects and leads to a noticeable correction. Further, the question is addressed whether the space charge argument at the bottom of the Bohm criterion can actually lead to a meaningful definition of the transition point between bulk and sheath. The analysis is supported by a numerical model and experiments, showing excellent agreement throughout. As a novelty in diagnostics, the theoretical results allow from the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF), measured at the wall, a reconstruction of the IVDF and the electric field at any point in the plasma. This property is used to reconstruct non-...

  18. Nonlinear wave structures in collisional plasma of auroral E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volosevich

    Full Text Available Studies of the auroral plasma with small-scale inhomogenieties producing the VHF-radar reflections (radar aurora when observed in conditions of the saturated Farley-Buneman instability within the auroral E region, show strong nonlinear interactions and density fluctuations of 5–15%. Such nonlinearity and high fluctation amplitudes are inconsistent with the limitations of the weak turbulence theory, and thus a theory for arbitrary amplitudes is needed. To this end, a nonlinear theory is described for electrostatic MHD moving plasma structures of arbitrary amplitude for conditions throughout the altitude range of the collisional auroral E region. The equations are derived, from electron and ion motion self-consistent with the electric field, for the general case of the one-dimensional problem. They take into account nonlinearity, electron and ion inertia, diffusion, deviation from quasi-neutrality, and dynamical ion viscosity. The importance of the ion viscosity for dispersion is stressed, while deviation from the quasi-neutrality can be important only at rather low plasma densities, not typical for the auroral E region. In a small amplitude limit these equations have classical nonlinear solutions of the type of "electrostatic shock wave" or of knoidal waves. In a particular case these knoidal waves degrade to a dissipative soliton. A two-dimensional case of a quasi-neutral plasma is considered in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by way of the Poisson brackets, but neglecting the nonlinearity and ion inertia. It is shown that in these conditions an effective saturation can be achieved at the stationary turbulence level of order of 10%.

  19. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  20. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  1. Resonant scattering as a sensitive diagnostic of current collisional plasma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorzalek, Anna; Zhuravleva, Irina; Allen, Steven W.; Pinto, Ciro; Werner, Norbert; Mantz, Adam; Canning, Rebecca; Fabian, Andrew C.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; de Plaa, Jelle

    2017-08-01

    Resonant scattering is a subtle process that suppresses fluxes of some of the brightest optically thick X-ray emission lines produced by collisional plasmas in galaxy clusters and massive early-type galaxies. The amplitude of the effect depends on the turbulent structure of the hot gas, making it a sensitive velocity probe. It is therefore crucial to properly model this effect in order to correctly interpret high resolution X-ray spectra. Our measurements of resonant scattering with XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer in giant elliptical galaxies and with Hitomi in the center of Perseus Cluster show that the potentially rich inference from this effect is limited by the uncertainties in the atomic data underlying plasma codes such as APEC and SPEX. Typically, the effect is of the order of 10-20%, while the discrepancy between the two codes is of similar order or even higher. Precise knowledge of the emissivity and oscillator strengths of lines emitted by Fe XVII and Fe XXV, as well as their respective uncertainties propagated through plasma codes are key to understanding gas dynamics and microphysics in giant galaxies and cluster ICM, respectively. This is especially crucial for massive ellipticals, where sub-eV resolution would be needed to measure line broadening precisely, making resonant scattering an important velocity diagnostic in these systems for the foreseeable future. In this poster, I will summarize current status of resonant scattering measurements and show how they depend on the assumed atomic data. I will also discuss which improvements are essential to maximize scientific inference from future high resolution X-ray spectra.

  2. Anomalous collisional absorption of laser pulses in underdense plasma at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M.

    2015-04-01

    In a previous paper [M. Kundu, Phys. Plasmas 21, 013302 (2014), 10.1063/1.4862038], fractional collisional absorption (α ) of laser light in underdense plasma was studied by using a classical scattering model of electron-ion collision frequency νei, where total velocity v =√{vth2+v02 } (with vth and v0 as the thermal and the ponderomotive velocity of an electron) dependent Coulomb logarithm lnΛ (v ) was shown to be responsible for the anomalous (unconventional) increase of νei and α (∝νei ) with the laser intensity I0 up to a maximum value about an intensity Ic in the low temperature (TeIc . One may object that the anomalous increase in νei and α were partly due to the artifact introduced in lnΛ through the maximum cutoff distance bmax∝v . In this work, we show similar anomalous increase in νei and α versus I0 (in the low temperature and underdense density regime) with more accurate quantum and classical kinetic models of νei without using lnΛ , but with a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cutoff length kmax∝v2 (classical) or kmax∝v (quantum). For a given I0<5 ×1014Wcm -2 , νei versus Te also exhibits so far unnoticed identical anomalous increase as νei versus I0, even if the conventional kmax∝vth2 or kmax∝vth (without v0) is chosen. The total velocity dependent kmax in the kinetic models, as proposed here, is found to explain the anomalous increase of α with I0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments.

  3. Collisional thermalization of hydrogen and helium in solar-wind plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruca, B A; Bale, S D; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Kasper, J C; Stevens, M L

    2013-12-13

    In situ observations of the solar wind frequently show the temperature of α particles (fully ionized helium) Tα to significantly differ from that of protons (ionized hydrogen) Tp. Many heating processes in the plasma act preferentially on α particles, even as collisions among ions act to gradually establish thermal equilibrium. Measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups reveal that, at r=1.0  AU from the Sun, the observed values of the α-proton temperature ratio, θαp≡Tα/Tp, has a complex, bimodal distribution. This study applied a simple model for the radial evolution of θαp to these data to compute expected values of θαp at r=0.1  AU. These inferred θαp values have no trace of the bimodality seen in the θαp values measured at r=1.0  AU but are instead consistent with the actions of the known mechanisms for α-particle preferential heating. This result underscores the importance of collisional processes in the dynamics of the solar wind and suggests that similar mechanisms may lead to preferential α-particle heating in both slow and fast wind.

  4. An advanced time-dependent collisional-radiative model of helium plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustre, J.; Boukandou-Mombo, C.; Margot, J.; Matte, J.-P.; Vidal, F.

    2017-10-01

    A new spatially averaged time-dependent collisional-radiative model for helium plasmas, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation (EBE), has been developed. Its main novelties are: (1) full time dependence for both the multi-species kinetics and the EBE. It is shown that this is necessary to correctly simulate discharges where the parameters vary on nanoseconds-microsecond timescales. (2) All electron processes are accounted for accurately. In particular, for the various ionization and recombination processes, free electrons are added or removed at the appropriate energy, with the appropriate interpolation on the energy grid. (3) The energy dependence of the electron loss by ambipolar diffusion is taken into account approximately. (4) All of the processes which are known to be important in helium discharges for pressure P≤slant 760 Torr are included, and 42 energy levels up to n = 6, where n is the main quantum number, are taken into account. Atomic and molecular ions, as well as excimers, are also included. (5) The gas temperature is calculated self-consistently. The model is validated through comparisons with known numerical steady-state results of Santos et al (2014 J. Phys. D. 47 265201) which they compared to their experimental results, and good agreement is obtained for their measured quantities. It is then applied to post-discharge decay cases with very short power decay times. The time evolution of the population densities and reaction rates are analyzed in detail with emphasis on the observed large increase of the metastable density.

  5. Number-conserving linear response study of low-velocity ion stopping in a collisional magnetized classical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nersisyan Hrachya B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity stopping power of ions in a magnetized collisional plasma is studied through the linear response theory. The collisions are taken into account through a number-conserving relaxation time approximation. One of the major objectives of this study is to compare and contrast our theoretical results with those obtained through a diffusion coefficient formulation based on Dufty-Berkovsky relation.

  6. Stability of the lower hybrid instability excited by longitudinal currents in a collisional, multi-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Kurian, M J [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Antony, S [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Anilkumar, C P [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli-627 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2007-05-15

    We have investigated the stability of the lower hybrid wave in a collisional plasma containing hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions. The collisions of all the species in the plasma have been considered. The electrons, streaming parallel to the magnetic field, can excite the instability if their drift velocity exceeds the parallel phase velocity of the wave. This is true for both the weakly as well as the strongly collisional cases. If the ion collisions are neglected, the growth/damping rate depends on the electron collision frequency and is modified by a factor dependent directly on the number densities and square of the charges on the oxygen ions and inversely on the masses of these ions. Ion collisions, however only damp the wave; this damping being dependent also on the ion collision frequencies, in addition to the above dependencies. We find that the dispersion relation in the low collisional limit can account for lower hybrid waves in the observed frequency range.

  7. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a collisionally confined laser-ablated plasma plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, M E; Mancini, R C; Bailey, J; Filuk, A; Clark, B; Lake, P; Abdallah, J

    2007-11-01

    Plasma plumes produced by laser ablation are an established method for manufacturing the high quality stoichiometrically complex thin films used for a variety of optical, photoelectric, and superconducting applications. The state and reproducibility of the plasma close to the surface of the irradiated target plays a critical role in producing high quality thin films. Unfortunately, this dense plasma has historically eluded quantifiable characterization. The difficulty in modeling the plume formation arises in the accounting for the small amount of energy deposited into the target when physical properties of these exotic target materials are not known. In this work we obtain the high density state of the plasma plume through the use of an experimental spectroscopic technique and a custom spectroscopic model. In addition to obtaining detailed temperature and density profiles, issues regarding line broadening and opacity for spectroscopic characterization will be addressed for this unique environment.

  8. (Quasi-)collisional Magneto-optic Effects in Collisionless Plasmas with sub-Larmor-scale Electromagnetic Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D; Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2015-01-01

    High-amplitude, chaotic/turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations are ubiquitous in high-energy-density laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, where they can be excited by various kinetic-streaming and/or anisotropy-driven instabilities, such as the Weibel instability. These fields typically exist on "sub-Larmor scales" -- scales smaller than the electron Larmor radius. Electrons moving through such magnetic fields undergo small-angle stochastic deflections of their pitch-angles, thus establishing diffusive transport on long time-scales. We show that this behavior, under certain conditions, is equivalent to Coulomb collisions in collisional plasmas. The magnetic pitch-angle diffusion coefficient, which acts as an effective "collision" frequency, may be substantial in these, otherwise, collisionless environments. We show that this effect, colloquially referred to as the plasma "quasicollisionality", may radically alter the expected radiative transport properties of candidate plasmas. We argue that the modified mag...

  9. LIF measurements for validation of collisional-radiative modelling of atomic helium in the edge of a fusion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krychowiak, M; Koenig, R; Wolf, R; Klinger, T [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany); Mertens, Ph; Schweer, B; Brezinsek, S; Schmitz, O; Samm, U [Institut fuer Energieforschung (Plasmaphysik), FZ Juelich, EURATOM Association, TEC, Juelich (Germany); Brix, M, E-mail: maciej.krychowiak@ipp.mpg.d [UKAEA, JET-Experimental Department, EURATOM Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    Local values of the electron density and temperature in the edge of a fusion plasma can be derived with high space and time resolution by the use of line radiation of atomic helium beams. The accuracy of this method is mainly limited by the uncertainties in the collisional-radiative (CR) model which is needed in order to obtain both plasma parameters from the measured relative intensities of atomic helium lines. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy on a thermal helium beam in the edge plasma of the tokamak TEXTOR in Juelich was applied to validate the CR model of helium. By use of a high-power, pulsed laser system (a dye laser pumped by an excimer laser) several laser excitation schemes starting from the n=2 levels have been tried. The fluorescence light was observed at the laser wavelength and elsewhere in the spectrum providing information on population densities of initial levels as well as on collisional population transfer between excited levels. This paper summarises the results of the measurements, showing principal limits and possible improvements of this experimental validation method of the CR model of the diagnostic helium beam.

  10. LIF measurements for validation of collisional-radiative modelling of atomic helium in the edge of a fusion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychowiak, M.; Mertens, Ph; König, R.; Schweer, B.; Brezinsek, S.; Schmitz, O.; Brix, M.; Samm, U.; Wolf, R.; Klinger, T.

    2010-05-01

    Local values of the electron density and temperature in the edge of a fusion plasma can be derived with high space and time resolution by the use of line radiation of atomic helium beams. The accuracy of this method is mainly limited by the uncertainties in the collisional-radiative (CR) model which is needed in order to obtain both plasma parameters from the measured relative intensities of atomic helium lines. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy on a thermal helium beam in the edge plasma of the tokamak TEXTOR in Jülich was applied to validate the CR model of helium. By use of a high-power, pulsed laser system (a dye laser pumped by an excimer laser) several laser excitation schemes starting from the n=2 levels have been tried. The fluorescence light was observed at the laser wavelength and elsewhere in the spectrum providing information on population densities of initial levels as well as on collisional population transfer between excited levels. This paper summarises the results of the measurements, showing principal limits and possible improvements of this experimental validation method of the CR model of the diagnostic helium beam.

  11. Collisional excitation and emission of H-alpha Stark multiplet in fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchuk, O.; Ralchenko, Y.; Janev, R. K.; Biel, W.; Delabie, E.; Urnov, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the excitation of parabolic Stark states in hydrogen atoms by collisions with fast ions. It is shown that excitation cross sections are very sensitive to the angle between the electric field and the projectile velocity. The calculated collisional data are implemented in a newly developed co

  12. Global and pedestal confinement and pedestal structure in dimensionless collisionality scans of low-triangularity H-mode plasmas in JET-ILW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Saarelma, S.; Boom, J. E.; Delabie, E.; Flanagan, J.; Kempenaars, M.; Giroud, C.; Lomas, P.; Meneses, L.; Maggi, C. S.; Menmuir, S.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Stefanikova, E.; Urano, H.; Verdoolaege, G.; Contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    A dimensionless collisionality scan in low-triangularity plasmas in the Joint European Torus with the ITER-like wall (JET-ILW) has been performed. The increase of the normalized energy confinement (defined as the ratio between thermal energy confinement and Bohm confinement time) with decreasing collisionality is observed. Moreover, at low collisionality, a confinement factor H98, comparable to JET-C, is achieved. At high collisionality, the low normalized confinement is related to a degraded pedestal stability and a reduction in the density-profile peaking. The increase of normalized energy confinement is due to both an increase in the pedestal and in the core regions. The improvement in the pedestal is related to the increase of the stability. The improvement in the core is driven by (i) the core temperature increase via the temperature-profile stiffness and by (ii) the density-peaking increase driven by the low collisionality. Pedestal stability analysis performed with the ELITE (edge-localized instabilities in tokamak equilibria) code has a reasonable qualitative agreement with the experimental results. An improvement of the pedestal stability with decreasing collisionality is observed. The improvement is ascribed to the reduction of the pedestal width, the increase of the bootstrap current and the reduction of the relative shift between the positions of the pedestal density and pedestal temperature. The EPED1 model predictions for the pedestal pressure height are qualitatively well correlated with the experimental results. Quantitatively, EPED1 overestimates the experimental pressure by 15-35%. In terms of the pedestal width, a correct agreement (within 10-15%) between the EPED1 and the experimental width is found at low collisionality. The experimental pedestal width increases with collisionality. Nonetheless, an extrapolation to low-collisionality values suggests that the width predictions from the KBM constraint are reasonable for ITER.

  13. Diagnosis of a low pressure capacitively coupled argon plasma by using a simple collisional-radiative model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yi-Qing; Xin Yu; Ning Zhao-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple collisional-radiative model to characterise capacitively coupled argon plasmas driven by conventional radio frequency in combination with optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe measurements.Two major processes are considered in this model, electron-impact excitation and the spontaneous radiative decay.taken into account. Behaviours of representative metastable and radiative states are discussed. Two emission lines (located at 696.5 nm and 750.4 nm) are selected and intensities are measured to obtain populated densities of the corresponding radiative states in the argon plasma. The calculated results agree well with that measured by Langmuir probe, indicating that the current model combined with optical emission spectroscopy is a candidate tool for electron density and temperature measurement in radio frequency capacitively coupled discharges.

  14. The use of ultraviolet Thomson scattering as a versatile diagnostic for detailed measurements of a collisional laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, M.D.

    1993-01-08

    Collective Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic waves at 266nm is used to obtain spatially resolved, two-dimensional electron density, sound speed, and radial drift profiles of a collisional laser plasma. An ultraviolet diagnostic wavelength minimizes the complicating effects of inverse bremsstrahlung and refractive turning in the coronal region of interest, where the electron densities approach n{sub c}/10. Laser plasmas of this type are important because they model some of the aspects of the plasmas found in high-gain laser-fusion pellets irradiated by long pulse widths where the laser light is absorbed mostly in the corona. The experimental results and LASNEX simulations agree within a percent standard deviation of 40% for the electron density and 50% for the sound speed and radial drift velocity. Thus it is shown that the hydrodynamics equations with classical coefficients and the numerical approximations in LASNEX are valid models of laser-heated, highly collisional plasmas. The versatility of Thomson scattering is expanded upon by extending existing theory with a Fokker-Planck based model to include plasmas that are characterized by (0 {le} k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ii} {le} {infinity}) and ZT{sub e}/T{sub i}, where k{sub ia} is the ion- acoustic wave number, {lambda}{sub ii} is the ion-ion mean free path, Z is the ionization state of the plasma, and T{sub e}, T{sub i} are the electron and ion temperatures in electron volts respectively. The model is valid for plasmas in which the electrons are approximately collisionless, (k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ei}, k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ee} {ge} 1), and quasineutrality holds, ({alpha} {much_gt}1), where {alpha} = 1/k{lambda}{sub DE} and {lambda}{sub DE} is the electron Debye length. This newly developed model predicts the lineshape of the ion-acoustic Thomson spectra and when fit to experimental data provides a direct measurement of the relative thermal flow velocity between the electrons and ions.

  15. Second harmonic generation of q-Gaussian laser beam in preformed collisional plasma channel with nonlinear absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Naveen, E-mail: naveens222@rediffmail.com; Singh, Arvinder, E-mail: arvinder6@lycos.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Jalandhar (India); Singh, Navpreet, E-mail: navpreet.nit@gmail.com [Guru Nanak Dev University College, Kapurthala, Punjab (India)

    2015-11-15

    This paper presents a scheme for second harmonic generation of an intense q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed parabolic plasma channel, where collisional nonlinearity is operative with nonlinear absorption. Due to nonuniform irradiance of intensity along the wavefront of the laser beam, nonuniform Ohmic heating of plasma electrons takes place. Due to this nonuniform heating of plasma, the laser beam gets self-focused and produces strong density gradients in the transverse direction. The generated density gradients excite an electron plasma wave at pump frequency that interacts with the pump beam to produce its second harmonics. The formulation is based on a numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrodinger wave equation in WKB approximation followed by moment theory approach. A second order nonlinear differential equation governing the propagation dynamics of the laser beam with distance of propagation has been obtained and is solved numerically by Runge Kutta fourth order technique. The effect of nonlinear absorption on self-focusing of the laser beam and conversion efficiency of its second harmonics has been investigated.

  16. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  17. Refractive index of quark-gluon plasma: Kinetic theory with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisional kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-10-01

    We derive the electric permittivity ɛ and magnetic permeability μM of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with the kinetic theory associated with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collisional kernel. Based on them, we study the effect of collisions on the refractive index of QGP. Compared to the collisionless case, collisions change the ω -behavior of ɛ and μM dramatically, which is responsible for the fact that the real and imaginary parts of n2 and the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL are smooth functions of ω . For a small collision rate ν , the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL is negative in some frequency range. When the collision rate increases, the frequency range for nDLindex nDL is positive for all frequency regions, which indicates a normal refractive index. In contrast to the collisionless case, there exists some frequency range in which nDLnegative refractive index.

  18. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  19. Wakefields generated by collisional neutrinos in neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinakiche, Nouara [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, University of Boumeredes U.M.B.B., Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria)

    2015-12-15

    A classical fluid description is adopted to investigate nonlinear interaction between an electron-type neutrino beam and a relativistic collisionless unmagnetized neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma. In this work, we consider the collisions of the neutrinos with neutrals in the plasma and study their effect on the generation of wakefields in presence of a fraction of ions in a neutral-electron-positron plasma. The results obtained in the present work are interpreted and compared with previous studies.

  20. Long-Lived Vortex Structures in Collisional Pure and Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Kervalishvili, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of experimental investigations of equilibrium, interaction and dynamics of vortex structures in pure electron and gas-discharge electron nonneutral plasmas during the time much more than the electron-neutral collision time has been carried out. The problem of long confinement of the column of pure electron plasma in Penning-Malmberg trap is considered. The mechanism of stability of long-lived vortex structure in gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma is investigated. The collap...

  1. Impact of the Collisional Plasma on the Propagation of Millimeter Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁忠才; 时家明; 汪家春; 许波

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated in the low-altitude atmosphere is of high collision frequencies.In this paper, the transmission coefficients of millimeter(MM) waves normally incident upon the plasma with high collision frequencies are calculated and analyzed. The experimental results of reflection and attenuation are presented for the eight-millimeter waves propagating through the plasma. Both the calculated experimental results indicate that the MM-waves concerned are attenuated significantly and reflected weakly, when propagating through the plasma of high collision frequencies.

  2. Attenuation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in a weak collisional and fully ionized dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Li; Guo, Li-Xin; Li, Jiang-Ting; Chen, Wei; Yan, Xu; Huang, Qing-Qing

    2017-09-01

    The expression of complex dielectric permittivity for non-magnetized fully ionized dusty plasma is obtained based on the kinetic equation in the Fokker-Planck-Landau collision model and the charging equation of the statistical theory. The influences of density, average size of dust grains, and balanced charging of the charge number of dust particles on the attenuation properties of electromagnetic waves in fully ionized dusty plasma are investigated by calculating the attenuation constant. In addition, the attenuation characteristics of weakly ionized and fully ionized dusty plasmas are compared. Results enriched the physical mechanisms of microwave attenuation for fully ionized dusty plasma and provide a theoretical basis for future studies.

  3. Generation of Electrojets in Weakly Ionized Plasmas through a Collisional Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Dimant, Yakov S; Fletcher, Alex C

    2016-01-01

    Intense electric currents called electrojets occur in weakly ionized magnetized plasmas. An example occurs in the Earth's ionosphere near the magnetic equator where neutral winds drive the plasma across the geomagnetic field. Similar processes take place in the Solar chromosphere and MHD generators. This letter argues that not all convective neutral flows generate electrojets and it introduces the corresponding universal criterion for electrojet formation, $\

  4. A nonlinear theory of the parallel firehose and gyrothermal instabilities in a weakly collisional plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rosin, M S; Rincon, F; Cowley, S C

    2010-01-01

    Plasmas have a natural tendency to develop pressure anisotropies with respect to the local direction of the magnetic field. These anisotropies trigger plasma instabilities at scales just above the ion Larmor radius with growth rates of a fraction of the ion cyclotron frequency - much faster than either the global dynamics or local turbulence. The instabilities can dramatically modify the macroscopic dynamics of the plasma. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities is expected to drive pressure anisotropies towards marginal stability values, controlled by the plasma beta. This nonlinear evolution is worked out in an ab initio kinetic calculation for the simplest analytically tractable example - the parallel firehose instability in a high-beta plasma. A closed nonlinear equation for the firehose turbulence is derived and solved. In the nonlinear regime, the instability leads to secular (~t) growth of magnetic fluctuations. The fluctuations develop a k^{-3} spectrum, extending from scales somewhat larger than r...

  5. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Osikdo-Dong, Gunsan-City, Jeollabuk-Do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ=π/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  6. Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas. I. Updated Recombination Rate Coefficients for Bare though Sodium-like Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bryans, P; Gorczyca, T W; Laming, J M; Mitthumsiri, W; Savin, D W

    2006-01-01

    Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and are often highly suspect. This translates directly into the reliability of the collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) calculations. We make use of state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He up to and including Zn. We also make use of state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H through to Zn. Here we present improved CIE calculations for temperatures from $10^4$ to $10^9$ K using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of \\citet{Mazz98a} for elements up to and including Ni and Mazzotta (private communication) for Cu and Zn. DR and RR ...

  7. Three-Dimensional Dust-Acoustic Waves in a Collisional Dusty Plasma with Opposite Polarity Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Mai-Mai; DUAN Wen-Shan

    2005-01-01

    The dispersion relation is derived for three-dimensional dust-acoustic waves in a current-driven dusty plasmas with both positively and negatively charged dust particles. The dependencies of the frequency and the growth rate on the wave number K, the intensity of magnetic field B, and the inclination angle θ have been numerically shown in this paper. The growth rate is negative for the laboratory dusty plasma, but it is positive for the cosmic dusty plasma.It is found that when the inclination angle θ = π/2, there is no instability. The effect of the electrostatic field E0 has also been studied in this paper.

  8. Long-Lived Vortex Structures in Collisional Pure and Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of experimental investigations of equilibrium, interaction and dynamics of vortex structures in pure electron and gas-discharge electron nonneutral plasmas during the time much more than the electron-neutral collision time has been carried out. The problem of long confinement of the column of pure electron plasma in Penning-Malmberg trap is considered. The mechanism of stability of long-lived vortex structure in gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma is investigated. The collapse of electron sheath in gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma in Penning cell at high pressures of neutral gas is described. The interaction between the stable vortex structure and the annular electron sheath, and the action of vortex structures on the transport of electrons along and across the magnetic field are discussed.

  9. Continuum Kinetic Model for Simulating Low-Collisionality Regimes in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    properties for non -linear plasma phenomena require further investigation. VII. CONCLUSIONS A fourth order accurate algorithm in space and time has been...theory, each particle species is treated as a distribution function evolving in position-velocity phase space . For a collisionless plasma , the evolution... Maxwellian distribution in velocity space with a small position-dependent perturbation: f(x, v)|t=0 = 1√ 2π exp ( −v 2 2 ) (1 + a cos(kx)) , (16) with

  10. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: Timofeev-AV@nrcki.ru [Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  11. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  12. X-ray Spectral Measurements and Collisional Radiative Modeling of Hot, High-Z Plasmas at the Omega Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M J; Schneider, M B; Hansen, S B; Chung, H; Hinkel, D E; Baldis, H A; Constantin, C

    2008-02-20

    M-Band and L-Band Gold spectra between 3 to 5 keV and 8 to 13 keV, respectively, have been recorded by a photometrically calibrated crystal spectrometer. The spectra were emitted from the plasma in the laser deposition region of a 'hot hohlraum'. This is a reduced-scale hohlraum heated with {approx} 9 kJ of 351 nm light in a 1 ns square pulse at the Omega laser. The space- and time-integrated spectra included L-Band line emission from Co-like to Ne-like gold. The three L-Band line features were identified to be the 3s {yields} 2p, 3d{sub 5/2} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} {yields} 2p{sub 1/2} transitions at {approx}9 keV, {approx}10 keV and {approx}13 keV, respectively. M-Band 5f {yields} 3d, 4d {yields} 3p, and 4p {yields} 3s transition features from Fe-like to P-like gold were also recorded between 3 to 5 keV. Modeling from the radiation-hydrodynamics code LASNEX, the collisional-radiative codes FLYCHK and SCRAM, and the atomic structure code FAC were used to model the plasma and generate simulated spectra for comparison with the recorded spectra. Through these comparisons, we have determined the average electron temperature of the emitting plasma to be {approx} 6.5 keV. The electron temperatures predicted by LASNEX appear to be too large by a factor of about 1.5.

  13. X-ray Spectral Measurements and Collisional Radiative Modeling of Hot, Gold Plasmas at the Omega Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M J; Schneider, M B; Hansen, S B; Chung, H; Hinkel, D E; Baldis, H A; Constantin, C

    2008-07-02

    M-Band and L-Band Gold spectra between 3 to 5 keV and 8 to 13 keV, respectively, have been recorded by a photometrically calibrated crystal spectrometer. The spectra were emitted from the plasma in the laser deposition region of a 'hot hohlraum'. This is a reduced-scale hohlraum heated with {approx} 9 kJ of 351 nm light in a 1 ns square pulse at the OMEGA laser. The space- and time-integrated spectra included L-Band line emission from Co-like to Ne-like gold. The three L-Band line features were identified to be the 3s {yields} 2p, 3d{sub 5/2} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} {yields} 2p{sub 1/2} transitions at {approx}9 keV, {approx}10 keV and {approx}13 keV, respectively. M-Band 5f {yields} 3d, 4d {yields} 3p, and 4p {yields} 3s transition features from Fe-like to P-like gold were also recorded between 3 to 5 keV. Modeling from the radiation-hydrodynamics code LASNEX, the collisional-radiative codes FLYCHK and SCRAM, and the atomic structure code FAC were used to model the plasma and generate simulated spectra for comparison with the recorded spectra. Through these comparisons, we have determined the average electron temperature of the emitting plasma to be between 6.0 and 6.5 keV. The electron temperatures predicted by LASNEX appear to be too large by a factor of about 1.5.

  14. A new code to study structures in collisionally active, perturbed debris discs. Application to binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Thebault, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Debris discs are traditionally studied using two distinct types of numerical models: statistical particle-in-a-box codes to study their collisional and size distribution evolution, and dynamical N-body models to study their spatial structure. The absence of collisions from N-body codes is in particular a major shortcoming, as collisional processes are expected to significantly alter the results obtained from pure N-body runs. We present a new numerical model, to study the spatial structure of perturbed debris discs at dynamical and collisional steady-state. We focus on the competing effects between gravitational perturbations by a massive body (planet or star), collisional production of small grains, and radiation pressure placing these grains in possibly dynamically unstable regions. We consider a disc of parent bodies at dynamical steady-state, from which small radiation-pressure-affected grains are released in a series of runs, each corresponding to a different orbital position of the perturber, where part...

  15. Advanced Multifluid and Collisional-Radiative Models for Laser-Plasma Interaction (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    direct control of computational cost in particle methods • Future Work: Test merge in non - Maxwellian laser plasma test case Control Merge & Split...shocks Current focus: Develop advanced multiscale  algorithms for plasma M&S  in highly  non ‐equilibrium  condition and with  collisional‐radiative kinetics...Radiative (CR) model • Non -equilibrium modeling of the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) – Detailed state-to-state model of atomic

  16. Spatial mode structures of electrostatic drift waves in a collisional cylindrical helicon plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.;

    2004-01-01

    In a cylindrical helicon plasma, mode structures of coherent drift waves are studied in the poloidal plane, the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The mode structures rotate with a constant angular velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and show significant...

  17. Transverse electric conductivity and dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasma with variable collision frequency in Mermin's approach

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    Formulas for transverse conductance and dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenerate and Maxwellian collisional plasma with arbitrary variable collision frequency in Mermin's approach are deduced. Frequency of collisions of particles depends arbitrarily on a wave vector. The special case of frequency of collisions proportional to the module of a wave vector is considered. The graphic analysis of the real and imaginary parts of dielectric function is made.

  18. Kinetic theory of the filamentation instability in a collisional current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir; Rastbood, E. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The evolution of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma with nonextensive distribution was studied in the diffusion frequency region, taking into account the effects of electron-neutral collisions. Using the kinetic theory, Lorentz transformation formulas, and Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, the generalized dielectric permittivity functions of this plasma system were achieved. By obtaining the dispersion relation of low-frequency waves, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate were investigated. It was shown that collisions can increase the maximum growth rate of instability. The analysis of temporal evolution of filamentation instability revealed that the growth rate of instability increased by increasing the q-parameter and electron drift velocity. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions were compared and discussed.

  19. Modulational Instability of Dust Ion Acoustic Waves in a Collisional Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEJu-Kui

    2003-01-01

    The modulational instability of dust ion accoustic waves in a dust plasma with ion-dust collision effects is studied.Using the perturbation method,a modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation contains a damping term that comes from the effect of the ion-dust collision is derived.It is found that the inclusion of the ion-dust collision would modify the modulational instability of the wave packet and could not admit any stationary envelope solitary waves.

  20. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  1. Nonlinear penetration of whistler pulses into collisional plasmas via conductivity modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    A strong electromagnetic impulse (about 0.2 microsec) with central frequency in the whistler-wave regime is applied to a large laboratory plasma dominated by Coulomb collisions. Local electron heating at the antenna and transport along B0 create a channel of high conductivity along which the whistler pulse penetrates with little damping. Because of its rapid temporal evolution, this new form of modulational instability does not involve ducting by density gradients which require ion time scales to develop.

  2. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 02 November 2016 – 30 November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma...Briefing Charts 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/ A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  3. High Fidelity and Multiscale Algorithms for Collisional-radiative and Nonequilibrium Plasmas (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Magnetized plasmas are often modeled with MHD with a hierarchy of descriptions: Ideal, resistive, Hall MHD . – Generalized model : multi-fluid (Braginskii... modeling of the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) – Detailed state-to-state model of atomic transition, i.e., excitation and ionization...moment of the kinetic equations with fluid closure – 5-moment model yields Euler/NS systems: multi-species, multi- temperature CR models

  4. Electron-ion collisional effect on Weibel instability in a Kappa distributed unmagnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Kuri, Deep, E-mail: deepkuri303@gmail.com; Das, Nilakshi, E-mail: ndas@tezu.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784 028 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Weibel instability has been investigated in the presence of electron-ion collisions by using standard Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The presence of suprathermal electrons has been included here by using Kappa distribution for the particles. The growth rate γ of Weibel instability has been calculated for different values of spectral index κ, collision frequency ν{sub ei}, and temperature anisotropy parameter β. A comparative study between plasma obeying Kappa distribution and that obeying Maxwellian distribution shows that the growth of instability is higher for the Maxwellian particles. However, in the presence of collisions, the suprathermal particles result in lower damping of Weibel mode.

  5. A lattice based solution of the collisional Boltzmann equation with applications to microchannel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, B. I.; Vedula, Prakash

    2013-07-01

    An alternative approach for solution of the collisional Boltzmann equation for a lattice architecture is presented. In the proposed method, termed the collisional lattice Boltzmann method (cLBM), the effects of spatial transport are accounted for via a streaming operator, using a lattice framework, and the effects of detailed collisional interactions are accounted for using the full collision operator of the Boltzmann equation. The latter feature is in contrast to the conventional lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) where collisional interactions are modeled via simple equilibrium based relaxation models (e.g. BGK). The underlying distribution function is represented using weights and fixed velocity abscissas according to the lattice structure. These weights are evolved based on constraints on the evolution of generalized moments of velocity according to the collisional Boltzmann equation. It can be shown that the collision integral can be reduced to a summation of elementary integrals, which can be analytically evaluated. The proposed method is validated using studies of canonical microchannel Couette and Poiseuille flows (both body force and pressure driven) and the results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from conventional LBMs and experiments where available. Unlike conventional LBMs, the proposed method does not involve any equilibrium based approximations and hence can be useful for simulation of highly nonequilibrium flows (for a range of Knudsen numbers) using a lattice framework.

  6. Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.E.

    1981-10-15

    Research on this contract can be divided into two general topics: (1) D/sup -/ formation collision processes, and (2) the determination of scattering cross sections used to diagnose properties of magnetically-confined plasmas. For topic (1) during last year, we completed theoretical calculations on the differential (angular) scattering of H/sup 0/ and D/sup 0/ on Cs, and determined the mechanisms and trends in the electron detachment cross sections for collisions of H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ on He, Ne, and the alkali and heavy alkaline earth atom systems. On topic (2) a major accomplishment was the determination of the electron capture and ionization cross sections for the C/sup 5 +/, N/sup 5 +/, and O/sup 6 +/ + H systems in the energy range from 13 eV/amu to 2.1 MeV/amu.

  7. Efficient generation of highly ionized calcium and titanium plasma columns for collisionally excited soft-x-ray lasers in a fast capillary discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, J.J.; Cortazar, O.D.; Tomasel, F.G.; Szapiro, B.T. (Department of Electrical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Fast discharges through 1.5-mm-diam capillaries have produced dense Ca and Ti plasma columns with an abundance of Ne-like ions, which are of interest for the development of small-scale, collisionally excited soft-x-ray lasers. Current pulses of 30 ns full width at half maximum and peak currents of less than 70 kA produced plasmas with line emission from ions with charge up to the F-like state. Line emission at the wavelengths of the 3[ital p]-3[ital s] and 3[ital d]-3[ital p] transitions of the Ne-like ions has been observed.

  8. A New Hybrid Scheme for Simulations of Highly Collisional RF-Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, Denis; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a new 1D hybrid approach for modeling atmospheric pressure discharges featuring complex chemistry. In this approach electrons are described fully kinetically using Particle-In-Cell/Monte-Carlo (PIC/MCC) scheme, whereas the heavy species are modeled within a fluid description. Validity of the popular drift-diffusion approximation is verified against a "full" fluid model accounting for the ion inertia and a fully kinetic PIC/MCC code for ions as well as electrons. The fluid models require knowledge of the momentum exchange frequency and dependence of the ion mobilities on the electric field when the ions are in equilibrium with the latter. To this end an auxiliary Monte-Carlo scheme is constructed. It is demonstrated that the drift-diffusion approximation can overestimate ion transport in simulations of RF-driven discharges with heavy ion species operated in the $\\gamma$ mode at the atmospheric pressure or in all discharge simulations for lower pressures. This can lead to exaggerated plasma ...

  9. Jeans instability in collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma with radiative condensation and polarization force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, R. P., E-mail: prajapati-iter@yahoo.co.in; Bhakta, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Central University, Bilaspur-495009 (C.G.) (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [Retired from School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain-456010 (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-15

    The influence of dust-neutral collisions, polarization force, and electron radiative condensation is analysed on the Jeans (gravitational) instability of partially ionized strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) using linear perturbation (normal mode) analysis. The Boltzmann distributed ions, dynamics of inertialess electrons, charged dust and neutral particles are considered. Using the plane wave solutions, a general dispersion relation is derived which is modified due to the presence of dust-neutral collisions, strong coupling effect, polarization force, electron radiative condensation, and Jeans dust/neutral frequencies. In the long wavelength perturbations, the Jeans instability criterion depends upon strong coupling effect, polarization interaction parameter, and thermal loss, but it is independent of dust-neutral collision frequency. The stability of the considered configuration is analysed using the Routh–Hurwitz criterion. The growth rates of Jeans instability are illustrated, and stabilizing influence of viscoelasticity and dust-neutral collision frequency while destabilizing effect of electron radiative condensation, polarization force, and Jeans dust-neutral frequency ratio is observed. This work is applied to understand the gravitational collapse of SCDP with dust-neutral collisions.

  10. Determination of the Electron Density and Electron Temperature in A Magnetron Discharge Plasma Using Optical Spectroscopy and the Collisional-Radiative Model of Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimov, K. E.; Konishchev, M. E.; Pichugin, V. F.; Pustovalova, A. A.; Ivanova, N. M.; Sun', Ch.

    2017-09-01

    A method for determining the electron temperature and electron density in a plasma is proposed that is based on minimization of the difference between the experimental relative intensities of the spectral argon (Ar) lines and those same intensities calculated with the aid of the collisional-radiative model. The model describes the kinetics of the ground state and 40 excited states of the Ar atom and takes into account the following processes: excitation and deactivation of the states of the atom by electron impact, radiative decay of the excited states, self-absorption of radiation, ionization of excited states by electron impact, and quenching of metastable states as a consequence of collisions with the chamber walls. Using the given method, we have investigated the plasma of a magnetron discharge on a laboratory setup for intermediate-frequency magnetron sputtering for a few selected operating regimes.

  11. Numerical MHD Simulation of the Coupled Evolution of Collisional Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Solar Chromosphere. I. Gradual and Impulsive Energisation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseeva, L M

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical coupling between the solar chromospheric plasma and magnetic field is investigated by numerically solving a fully self-consistent, two-dimensional initial-value problem for the nonlinear collisional MHD equations including electric resistivity, thermal conduction, and, in some cases, gas-dynamic viscosity. The processes in the contact zone between two horizontal magnetic fields of opposite polarities are considered. The plasma is assumed to be initially motionless and having a temperature of 50,000 K uniform throughout the plasma volume; the characteristic magnetic field corresponds to a plasma $\\beta\\gtrsim 1$. In a physical-time interval of 17~seconds typically covered by a computational run, the plasma temperature gradually increases by a factor of two to three. Against this background, an impulsive (in 0.1 seconds or less) increase in the current-aligned plasma velocity occurs at the site of the current-layer thinning (sausage-type deformation, or $m=0$ pinch instability). Such a "velocity b...

  12. Isotropic inelastic and superelastic collisional rates in a multiterm atom

    CERN Document Server

    Belluzzi, L; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2013-01-01

    The spectral line polarization of the radiation emerging from a magnetized astrophysical plasma depends on the state of the atoms within the medium, whose determination requires considering the interactions between the atoms and the magnetic field, between the atoms and photons (radiative transitions), and between the atoms and other material particles (collisional transitions). In applications within the framework of the multiterm model atom (which accounts for quantum interference between magnetic sublevels pertaining either to the same J-level or to different J-levels within the same term) collisional processes are generally neglected when solving the master equation for the atomic density matrix. This is partly due to the lack of experimental data and/or of approximate theoretical expressions for calculating the collisional transfer and relaxation rates (in particular the rates for interference between sublevels pertaining to different J-levels, and the depolarizing rates due to elastic collisions). In th...

  13. A collisional radiative model for caesium and its application to an RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünderlich, D.; Wimmer, C.; Friedl, R.

    2015-04-01

    A collisional radiative (CR) model for caesium atoms in low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas is introduced. This model includes the caesium ground state, 14 excited states, the singly charged caesium ion and the negative hydrogen ion. The reaction probabilities needed as input are based on data from the literature, using some scaling and extrapolations. Additionally, new cross sections for electron collision ionization and three-body recombination have been calculated. The relevance of mutual neutralization of positive caesium ions and negative hydrogen ions is highlighted: depending on the densities of the involved particle species, this excitation channel can have a significant influence on the population densities of excited states in the caesium atom. This strong influence is successfully verified by optical emission spectroscopy measurements performed at the IPP prototype negative hydrogen ion source for ITER NBI. As a consequence, population models for caesium in electronegative low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas need to take into account the mutual neutralization process. The present CR model is an example for such models and represents an important prerequisite for deducing the total caesium density in surface production based negative hydrogen ion sources.

  14. A collisional radiative model for caesium and its application to an RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wünderlich, D., E-mail: dirk.wuenderlich@ipp.mpg.de; Wimmer, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Friedl, R. [AG Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Universität Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2015-04-08

    A collisional radiative (CR) model for caesium atoms in low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas is introduced. This model includes the caesium ground state, 14 excited states, the singly charged caesium ion and the negative hydrogen ion. The reaction probabilities needed as input are based on data from the literature, using some scaling and extrapolations. Additionally, new cross sections for electron collision ionization and three-body recombination have been calculated. The relevance of mutual neutralization of positive caesium ions and negative hydrogen ions is highlighted: depending on the densities of the involved particle species, this excitation channel can have a significant influence on the population densities of excited states in the caesium atom. This strong influence is successfully verified by optical emission spectroscopy measurements performed at the IPP prototype negative hydrogen ion source for ITER NBI. As a consequence, population models for caesium in electronegative low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas need to take into account the mutual neutralization process. The present CR model is an example for such models and represents an important prerequisite for deducing the total caesium density in surface production based negative hydrogen ion sources.

  15. Relativistic high-current electron-beam stopping-power characterization in solids and plasmas: collisional versus resistive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauzour, B; Santos, J J; Debayle, A; Hulin, S; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Vaisseau, X; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Honrubia, J J; Nicolaï, Ph; Beg, F N; Benocci, R; Chawla, S; Coury, M; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; d'Humières, E; Jarrot, L C; McKenna, P; Rhee, Y J; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Yahia, V

    2012-12-21

    We present experimental and numerical results on intense-laser-pulse-produced fast electron beams transport through aluminum samples, either solid or compressed and heated by laser-induced planar shock propagation. Thanks to absolute K(α) yield measurements and its very good agreement with results from numerical simulations, we quantify the collisional and resistive fast electron stopping powers: for electron current densities of ≈ 8 × 10(10) A/cm(2) they reach 1.5 keV/μm and 0.8 keV/μm, respectively. For higher current densities up to 10(12)A/cm(2), numerical simulations show resistive and collisional energy losses at comparable levels. Analytical estimations predict the resistive stopping power will be kept on the level of 1 keV/μm for electron current densities of 10(14)A/cm(2), representative of the full-scale conditions in the fast ignition of inertially confined fusion targets.

  16. Plasma conditions for improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R F; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N; Rocca, J J; Hunter, J R; Marconi, M C

    2004-10-04

    We have directly probed the plasma conditions in which the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser is generated and propagates by measuring the near-field image and by utilizing picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser interferometry of the preformed Pd plasma gain medium. The electron density and gain region of the plasma have been determined experimentally and are found to be in good agreement with simulations. We observe a strong dependence of the laser pump-gain medium coupling on the laser pump parameters. The most efficient coupling of laser pump energy into the gain region occurs with the formation of lower density gradients in the pre-formed plasma and when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for mid-Z Ni-like schemes). This increases the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the commonly utilized case where the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). In contrast, the higher intensity heating pulses are observed to be absorbed at higher electron densities and in regions where steep density gradients limit the effective length of the gain medium.

  17. Uniform rovibrational collisional N2 bin model for DSMC, with application to atmospheric entry flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E.; Bondar, Ye. A.; Magin, T. E.

    2016-11-01

    A state-to-state model for internal energy exchange and molecular dissociation allows for high-fidelity DSMC simulations. Elementary reaction cross sections for the N2 (v, J)+ N system were previously extracted from a quantum-chemical database, originally compiled at NASA Ames Research Center. Due to the high computational cost of simulating the full range of inelastic collision processes (approx. 23 million reactions), a coarse-grain model, called the Uniform RoVibrational Collisional (URVC) bin model can be used instead. This allows to reduce the original 9390 rovibrational levels of N2 to 10 energy bins. In the present work, this reduced model is used to simulate a 2D flow configuration, which more closely reproduces the conditions of high-speed entry into Earth's atmosphere. For this purpose, the URVC bin model had to be adapted for integration into the "Rarefied Gas Dynamics Analysis System" (RGDAS), a separate high-performance DSMC code capable of handling complex geometries and parallel computations. RGDAS was developed at the Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics in Novosibirsk, Russia for use by the European Space Agency (ESA) and shares many features with the well-known SMILE code developed by the same group. We show that the reduced mechanism developed previously can be implemented in RGDAS, and the results exhibit nonequilibrium effects consistent with those observed in previous 1D-simulations.

  18. Aerospace applications of pulsed plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    The use of a thermal equilibrium plasma for combustion control dates back more than a hundred years to the advent of internal combustion (IC) engines and spark ignition systems. The same principles are still applied today to achieve high efficiency in various applications. Recently, the potential use of nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion control has garnered increasing interest due to the possibility of plasma-assisted approaches for ignition and flame stabilization. During the past decade, significant progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of plasma chemistry interactions, energy redistribution and the nonequilibrium initiation of combustion. In addition, a wide variety of fuels have been examined using various types of discharge plasmas. Plasma application has been shown to provide additional combustion control, which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine (GTE) relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines (PDE) and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition (HCCI) engines, among others. The present paper describes the current understanding of the nonequilibrium excitation of combustible mixtures by electrical discharges and plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates an ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions.

  19. Spectroscopic diagnostics of low-pressure inductively coupled Kr plasma using a collisional-radiative model with fully relativistic cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Reetesh K.; Dipti; Srivastava, Rajesh; Stafford, Luc

    2016-06-01

    A collisional-radiative (C-R) model for krypton plasma using fully relativistic distorted-wave cross sections for electron excitations was developed. The model was applied to the characterization of inductively coupled Kr plasma with cylindrical geometry over the pressure regime 1-50 mTorr. Radially averaged emission intensities from transitions of Kr (4p55p  →  4p55s) in the range 500-900 nm were recorded at 17 cm from the planar RF-driven coil, with the plasma operated in the inductive regime (H mode). The measured emission intensities were then fitted by varying the electron density, n e, and electron temperature, T e, in the C-R model. At both low and high pressures, variations of the electron density by over two orders of magnitude had only a minor role on the relative emission intensities. On the other hand, T e values deduced from the comparison between experiment and model decreased from 6.7 to 2.6 eV as pressure increased from 1 to 50 mTorr. These results are found to be in good agreement with the effective electron temperature determined from Langmuir probe measurements and the predictions of a model based on the particle balance equation of charged particles.

  20. Mass Hierarchy of Collisional Energy Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Kolevatov, Rodion

    2008-01-01

    Collisional parton energy loss is revisited within a simple model assuming incoherent elastic scattering of on-shell projectile partons on partonic constituents of the QGP with HTL screening. The thermal motion of plasma particles is carefully taken into account. Results on $dE/dx$ are found to be consistent with other authors. There is a significant discrepancy in the energy loss pattern for the cases with thermal motion on and off, which illustrates the importance of taking the kinematics into account exactly. The dependence on the mass of the partons forming the plasma is included in the calculations and its influence on the collisional energy loss is studied. The mass hierarchy of collisional energy loss is found to have a strong dependence on the mass introduced for plasma particles. Due to difference in the mass hierarchy with radiative energy loss, the collisional one when included increases the relative suppression of heavy quarks compared to light quarks.

  1. Collisional Excitation and De-Excitation of N2 and N2+ in High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurunczi, P.; Abramzon, N.; Figus, M.; Becker, K.

    2003-05-01

    Emission spectroscopy using the 2nd positive system of N2 and the 1st negative system of N2+ can be used to determine important plasma parameters such the translational, vibrational, and rotational temperatures of the plasma species. The rotational temperature is perhaps the most frequently determined quantity as its determination may reflect the gas temperature in the plasma and/or provide insight into the reaction kinetics of important plasma species. If the emitting species are in equilibrium with the bulk gas in the plasma, then this temperature can be interpreted as the gas kinetic temperature in the plasma. We determined rotational temperatures for N2 and N2+ in high-pressure (400 Torr) discharges in mixtures in Ne with a trace admixture of N2. Significantly different values were obtained for respectively N2 and N2+. The relation of these rotational temperatures to the gas kinetic temperature and to the reaction kinetics leading to the formation and the decay of the emitting species will be discussed. We also carried out a rotational analysis of the unresolved N2 second positive system emitted by an atmospheric-pressure capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharge in ambient air. Work supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  2. [Plasma technology for biomedical material applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    In this paper is introduced the plasma technology for the applications of several species biomaterial such as ophthalmological material, drug delivery system, tissue culture material, blood anticoagulant material as well as plasma surface clearing and plasma sterilization, and so on.

  3. I/asterisk/ /6s 4P/ collisional quenching - Application to the IF 491-nm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, S. B.; Verdeyen, J. T.; Eden, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the rate constants for quenching of the excited I (6s 4P) states by Ar, Xe, CF39I, UF6, and NF3 are described. Each rate constant is determined by recording the exponential time decay of the excited IF or excited I2 (342 nm) fluorescence in the afterglow of the e-beam-excited plasmas containing Ar, CF3I, NF3, and the desired quenching gas. In addition, further experimental evidence in support of neutral channel formation of excited IF in e-beam-pumped Ar/CF3I/NF3 mixtures is presented. Details of the experimental apparatus and gas handling procedures are given, and the kinetics model developed to interpret the experimental data is described.

  4. Modulation instability and dissipative ion-acoustic structures in collisional nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasma: solitary and shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Ya-Ling; Ma, Chenchen; Sun, Youfa

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear behavior of an ion-acoustic wave packet is investigated in a three-component plasma consisting of warm ions, nonthermal electrons and positrons. The nonthermal components are assumed to be inertialess and hot where they are modeled by the kappa distribution. The relevant processes, including the kinematic viscosity amongst the plasma constituents and the collision between ions and neutrals, are taken into consideration. It is shown that the dynamics of the modulated ion-acoustic wave is governed by the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a linear dissipative term. The dispersion relation and modulation instability criterion for the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation are investigated numerically. In the general dissipation regime, the effect of the plasma parameters on the dissipative solitary (dissipative soliton) and shock waves is also discussed in detail. The project is supported by NSF of China (11501441, 11371289, 11371288), National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1261112), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M560756), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (xjj2015067).

  5. Collisional effects on molecular spectra laboratory experiments and models, consequences for applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Robert, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Gas phase molecular spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining information on the geometry and internal structure of isolated molecules as well as on the interactions that they undergo. It enables the study of fundamental parameters and processes and is also used for the sounding of gas media through optical techniques. It has been facing always renewed challenges, due to the considerable improvement of experimental techniques and the increasing demand for accuracy and scope of remote sensing applications. In practice, the radiating molecule is usually not isolated but diluted in a mixture

  6. Jeans stability in collisional quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M.; Asif, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Mir, Zahid [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Superior University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-09-15

    Jeans instability is examined in detail in uniform dusty magnetoplasmas taking care of collisional and non-zero finite thermal effects in addition to the quantum characteristics arising through the Bohm potential and the Fermi degenerate pressure using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. It is found that the presence of the dust-lower-hybrid wave, collisional effects of plasma species, thermal effects of electrons, and the quantum mechanical effects of electrons have significance over the Jeans instability. Here, we have pointed out a new class of dissipative instability in quantum plasma regime.

  7. Plasma applications for biochip technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiki, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Taura, R.; Koidesawa, T.; Horiike, Y

    2003-07-01

    Biochip technology has emerged from the fusion of biotechnology and micro/nanofabrication technology. Biochips enable us to realize revolutionary new bioanalysis systems that can directly manipulate and analyze the micro/nano-scale world of biomolecules, organelles and cells. This paper describes a few bioanalysis systems and the microfabrication technology being developed as examples of the application of plasma technologies for upcoming nanobiotechnology. Deep dry etching of glass plates has been developed and applied to fabricate microfluidic devices that can manipulate biological cells. Moreover, ultra-high-rate localized etching of silicon wafers has been developed using a microplasma jet apparatus for rapid micromachining.

  8. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.; Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Selwyn, G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O) which flows between two concentric cylindrical electrodes: an outer grounded electrode and an inner electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, ionized or dissociated by electron impact. The fast-flowing effluent consists of ions and electrons, which are rapidly lost by recombination, highly reactive radicals (e.g., O, OH), and metastable species (e.g., O2). The metastable O2, which is reactive to hydrocarbon and other organic species, has been observed through optical emission spectroscopy to decrease by a factor of 2 from the APPJ nozzle exit to a distance of 10 cm. Unreacted metastable O2, and that which does not impinge on a surface, will then decay back to ordinary ground state O2, resulting in a completely dry, environmentally-benign form of surface cleaning. Applications such as removal of photoresist, oxide films and organic residues from wafers for the electronics industry, decontamination of civilian and military areas and personnel exposed to chemical or biological warfare agents, and paint (e.g., graffiti) removal are being considered.

  10. Eigenvalue solution to the electron-collisional effect on ion-acoustic and entropy waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Jian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Braginskii,S.I.,Transport processes in a plasma,in Reviews of Plasma Physics,Vol.1,New York:Consultants Bureau,1965,205-311.[2]Ono,M.,Kulsrud,R.M.,Frequency and damping of ion acoustic waves,Phys.Fluids,1975,18(10):1287-1293.[3]Randall,C.J.,Effect of ion collisionality on ion-acoustic waves,Phys.Fluids,1982,25(12):2231-2233.[4]Tracy,M.D.,Williams,E.A.,Estabrook,K.G.et al.,Eigenvalue solution for the ion-collisional effects on ion-acoustic and entropy waves,Phys.Fluids,1993,B5(5):1430.[5]Bell,A.R.,Electron energy transport in ion waves and its relevance to laser produced plasmas,Phys.Fluids,1983,26(1):279-284.[6]Epperlein,E.M.,Short,R.W.,Simon,A.,Damping of ion-acoustic waves in the presence of electron-ion collisions,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1992,69(12):1765-1768.[7]Epperlein,E.M.,Effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow,Phys.Plasmas,1994,1(1):109-115.[8]Bychenkov,V.Y.,Myatt,J.,Rozmus,W.et al.,Quasihydrodynamic description of ion acoustic waves in a collisional plasmas,Phys.Plasmas,1994,1(8):2419-2429.[9]Bychenkov,V.Y.,Myatt,J.,Rozmus,W.et al.,Ion acoustic waves in plasmas with collisional electrons,Phys.Rev.E,1994,50(6):5134-5137.[10]Bychenkov,V.Y.,Rozmus,W.,Tikhonchuk,V.T.et al.,Nonlocal electron transport in a plasma,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1995,75(24):4405-4408.[11]Zhang,Y.Q.et al.,Density fluctuation spectra of a collision-dominated plasma measured by light scattering,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1989,62(16):1848-1851.[12]Hinton,F.L.,Collisional transport in plasma,in Handbook of Plasma Physics,Vol.1,Amsterdam:North-Holland,1983,147-199.[13]Zheng Jian,Yu Changxuan,A numerical approach to the frequencies and damping rates of ion-acoustic waves in ion-collisional plasmas,Chin.Phys.Lett.,1999,16(12):905-907.[14]Hammett,G.W.,Perkins,F.,Fluid moment models for Landau damping with application to the ion-temperature-gradient instability,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1990,64(25):3019-3022.

  11. Practical applications of plasma surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Radio frequency activated gas plasma is an environmentally conscious manufacturing process which provides surface treatments for improved product quality. Plasma processing offers significant potential for reducing the use of solvents and other wet processing chemicals now used in surface treatments such as cleaning, activation for bonding, and moisture removal. Plasma treatments are generally accomplished without creating hazardous waste streams to dispose of. Plasma process development and application is ongoing at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division.

  12. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  13. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  14. The diverse applications of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Dubey, Shivani; Darwhekar, Gajanan; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  15. The diverse applications of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mukul, E-mail: mukulsharma@acropolis.edu.in; Darwhekar, Gajanan, E-mail: gdarwhekar@acropolis.edu.in [Acropolis Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research, Indore MP India (India); Dubey, Shivani, E-mail: dubeyshivani08@rediffmail.com [Mata Gujri College of Professional Studies, Indore MP India (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar, E-mail: sudhirkjain1@rediffmail.com [School of Studies in Microbiology, Vikram University, Ujjain MP India (India)

    2015-07-31

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  16. Plasma Cathode Electron Sources Physics, Technology, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oks, Efim

    2006-01-01

    This book fills the gap for a textbook describing this kind of electron beam source in a systematic and thorough manner: from physical processes of electron emission to examples of real plasma electron sources and their applications.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  18. Application of Plasma finishing on Cotton Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Shankar Joshi,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Plasma” word is derived from the Greek and referring to the “something molded or fabricated”. Plasma treatments are gaining popularity in the textile industry. Plasma treatment has to be controlled carefully to avoid detrimental action of the plasma onto the substrate. Plasma surface treatments show distinct advantages, because they are able to modify the surface properties of inert materials, sometimes with environment friendly devices. For fabrics, cold plasma treatments require the development of reliable and large systems. Application of “Plasma Technology” in chemical processing of textiles is one of the revolutionary ways to boost the textile wet processing right from pre-treatments to finishing.

  19. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  20. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  1. Collisional Effects on Nonlinear Ion Drag Force for Small Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2013-01-01

    The ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded spherical grain is calculated self-consistently and non-linearly using particle in cell codes, accounting for ion-neutral collisions. Using ion velocity distribution appropriate for ion drift driven by a force field gives wake potential and force greatly different from a shifted Maxwellian distribution, regardless of collisionality. The low-collisionality forces are shown to be consistent with estimates based upon cross-sections for scattering in a Yukawa (shielded) grain field, but only if non-linear shielding length is used. Finite collisionality initially enhances the drag force, but only by up to a factor of 2. Larger collisionality eventually reduces the drag force. In the collisional regime, the drift distribution gives larger drag than the shift distribution even at velocities where their collisionless drags are equal. Comprehensive practical analytic formulas for force that fit the calculations are provided.

  2. Plasma Sources for Medical Applications - A Comparison of Spot Like Plasmas and Large Area Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Plasma applications in life science are currently emerging worldwide. Whereas today's commercially available plasma surgical technologies such as argon plasma coagulation (APC) or ablation are mainly based on lethal plasma effects on living systems, the newly emerging therapeutic applications will be based on selective, at least partially non-lethal, possibly stimulating plasma effects on living cells and tissue. Promising results could be obtained by different research groups worldwide revealing a huge potential for the application of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma in fields such as tissue engineering, healing of chronic wounds, treatment of skin diseases, tumor treatment based on specific induction of apoptotic processes, inhibition of biofilm formation and direct action on biofilms or treatment of dental diseases. The development of suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapies requires an in-depth knowledge of their physics, chemistry and parameters. Therefore much basic research still needs to be conducted to minimize risk and to provide a scientific fundament for new plasma-based medical therapies. It is essential to perform a comprehensive assessment of physical and biological experiments to clarify minimum standards for plasma sources for applications in life science and for comparison of different sources. One result is the DIN-SPEC 91315, which is now open for further improvements. This contribution intends to give an overview on the status of commercial cold plasma sources as well as cold plasma sources still under development for medical use. It will discuss needs, prospects and approaches for the characterization of plasmas from different points of view. Regarding the manageability in everyday medical life, atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) and dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are of special interest. A comprehensive risk-benefit assessment including the state of the art of commercial sources for medical use

  3. SOLAR WIND COLLISIONAL AGE FROM A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhiber, R; Usmanov, AV; Matthaeus, WH [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, ML [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Simple estimates of the number of Coulomb collisions experienced by the interplanetary plasma to the point of observation, i.e., the “collisional age”, can be usefully employed in the study of non-thermal features of the solar wind. Usually these estimates are based on local plasma properties at the point of observation. Here we improve the method of estimation of the collisional age by employing solutions obtained from global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. This enables evaluation of the complete analytical expression for the collisional age without using approximations. The improved estimation of the collisional timescale is compared with turbulence and expansion timescales to assess the relative importance of collisions. The collisional age computed using the approximate formula employed in previous work is compared with the improved simulation-based calculations to examine the validity of the simplified formula. We also develop an analytical expression for the evaluation of the collisional age and we find good agreement between the numerical and analytical results. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications for an improved estimation of collisionality along spacecraft trajectories, including Solar Probe Plus.

  4. Overview of current applications in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.

    2017-02-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly growing field of treatment, with the number and type of medical applications growing annually, such as dentistry, cancer treatment, wound treatment, Antimicrobial (bacteria, biofilm, virus, fungus, prions), and surface sterilization. Work promoting muscle and blood vessel regeneration and osteointegration is being investigated. This review paper will cover the latest treatments using gas-based plasmas in medicine. Disinfection of water and new commercial systems will also be reviewed, as well as vaccine deactivation. With the rapid increase in new investigators, development of new devices and systems for treatment, and wider clinical applications, Plasma medicine is becoming a powerful tool in in the field of medicine. There are a wide range of Plasma sources that allows customization of the effect. These variations include frequency (DC to MHz), voltage capacity (kV), gas source (He, Ar; O2, N2, air, water vapor; combinations), direct/indirect target exposure, and water targets.

  5. Atmospheric plasma processes for environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shapoval, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Plasma chemistry is a rapidly growing field which covers applications ranging from technological processing of materials, including biological tissues, to environmental remediation and energy production. The so called atmospheric plasma, produced by electric corona or dielectric barrier discharges in a gas at atmospheric pressure, is particularly attractive for the low costs and ease of operation and maintenance involved. The high concentrations of energetic and chemically active species (e.g...

  6. Atmospheric plasma processes for environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shapoval, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Plasma chemistry is a rapidly growing field which covers applications ranging from technological processing of materials, including biological tissues, to environmental remediation and energy production. The so called atmospheric plasma, produced by electric corona or dielectric barrier discharges in a gas at atmospheric pressure, is particularly attractive for the low costs and ease of operation and maintenance involved. The high concentrations of energetic and chemically active species (e.g...

  7. Breakdown of a space charge limited regime of a sheath in a weakly collisional plasma bounded by walls with secondary electron emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydorenko, D; Kaganovich, I; Raitses, Y; Smolyakov, A

    2009-10-02

    A new regime of plasma-wall interaction is identified in particle-in-cell simulations of a hot plasma bounded by walls with secondary electron emission. Such a plasma has a strongly non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function and consists of bulk plasma electrons and beams of secondary electrons. In the new regime, the plasma sheath is not in a steady space charge limited state even though the secondary electron emission produced by the plasma bulk electrons is so intense that the corresponding partial emission coefficient exceeds unity. Instead, the plasma-sheath system performs relaxation oscillations by switching quasiperiodically between the space charge limited and non-space-charge limited states.

  8. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  9. Transition from Collisionless to Collisional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prateek Sharma; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert

    2003-07-24

    Recent calculations by Quataert et al. (2002) found that the growth rates of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma can differ significantly from those calculated using MHD. This can be important in hot accretion flows around compact objects. In this paper, we study the transition from the collisionless kinetic regime to the collisional MHD regime, mapping out the dependence of the MRI growth rate on collisionality. A kinetic closure scheme for a magnetized plasma is used that includes the effect of collisions via a BGK operator. The transition to MHD occurs as the mean free path becomes short compared to the parallel wavelength 2*/k(sub)||. In the weak magnetic field regime where the Alfven and MRI frequencies w are small compared to the sound wave frequency k(sub)||c(sub)0, the dynamics are still effectively collisionless even if omega << v, so long as the collision frequency v << k(sub)||c(sub)0; for an accretion flow this requires n less than or approximately equal to *(square root of b). The low collisionality regime not only modifies the MRI growth rate, but also introduces collisionless Landau or Barnes damping of long wavelength modes, which may be important for the nonlinear saturation of the MRI.

  10. Dynamical collisional energy loss and transport properties of on- and off-shell heavy quarks in vacuum and in the Quark Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Berrehrah, Hamza; Aichelin, Jörg; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the dynamical collisional energy loss of heavy quarks, their interaction rate as well as the different transport coefficients (drag and diffusion coefficients, $\\hat{q}$, etc). We calculate these different quantities for i) perturbative partons (on-shell particles in the vacuum with fixed and running coupling) and ii) for dynamical quasi-particles (off-shell particles in the QGP medium at finite temperature $T$ with a running coupling in temperature as described by the dynamical quasi-particles model). We use the perturbative elastic $(q(g) Q \\rightarrow q (g) Q)$ cross section for the first case, and the Infrared Enhanced Hard Thermal Loop cross sections for the second. The results obtained in this work demonstrate the effects of a finite parton mass and width on the heavy quark transport properties and provide the basic ingredients for an explicit study of the microscopic dynamics of heavy flavors in the QGP - as formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions - within transport approa...

  11. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-27

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma.

  12. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-28

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma

  13. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with hexapole collision cell: figures of merit and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen]|[Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    2000-11-01

    The use of gas-filled multipole collision cells represents important progress in ICP-MS instrumentation. It enables an increase in element sensitivity based on the improvement of ion transmission efficiency from near thermalization and collisional focusing of ions. In addition, gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry can be applied in order to reduce mass spectral interferences via charge transfer reaction of interfering ions with reaction gas or via fragmentation of interfering molecular ions by collision-induced dissociation. The application of a hexapole collision cell in quadrupole based ICP-MS (HEX-ICP-QMS) was studied systematically in order to characterize the analytical figures of merit of this approach. Additionally, the performance of different solution introduction systems as well as an inductively coupled plasma shielded torch was studied for use with HEX-ICP-QMS. (orig.)

  14. Modeling of collisional excited x-ray lasers using short pulse laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Moribayashi, Kengo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A simple atomic kinetics model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers has been developed. The model consists of a collisional radiative model using the average ion model (AIM) and a detailed term accounting (DTA) model of Ni-like Ta. An estimate of plasma condition to produce gain in Ni-like Ta ({lambda}=44A) is given. Use of the plasma confined in a cylinder is proposed to preform a uniform high density plasma from 1-D hydrodynamics calculations. (author)

  15. Free electron degeneracy effects on collisional excitation, ionization, de-excitation and three-body recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models enable average ionization and ionization populations, plus the rates of absorption and emission of radiation to be calculated for plasmas not in thermal equilbrium. At high densities and low temperatures, electrons may have a high occupancy of the free electron quantum states and evaluations of rate coefficients need to take into account the free electron degeneracy. We demonstrate that electron degeneracy can reduce collisional rate coefficients by orders-of-magnitude from values calculated neglecting degeneracy. We show that assumptions regarding the collisional differential cross-section can alter collisional ionization and recombination rate coefficients by a further factor two under conditions relevant to inertial fusion.

  16. Evaluating a Contribution of the Knock-on Deuterons to the Neutron Yield in the Experiments with Weakly Collisional Plasma Jets (Part 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Laser-generated interpenetrating plasma jets are widely used in the studies of collisionless interaction of counter-streaming plasmas in conjunction with possible formation of collisionless shocks. In a number of experiments of this type the plasma is formed on plastic targets made of CH or CD. The study of the DD neutron production from the interaction between two CD jets on the one hand and between a CD jet and a CH jet could serve as a qualitative indicator of the collisionless shock formation. The purpose of this memo is a discussion of the effect of collisions on the neutron generation in the interpenetrating CH and CD jets. First, the kinematics of the large-deflection collisions of the deuterons and carbon are discussed. Then the scattering angles are related with the corresponding Rutherford cross-section. After that expression for the number of the backscattered deuterons is provided, and their contribution to the neutron yield is evaluated. The results may be of some significance to the kinetic codes benchmarking and developing the neutron diagnostic.

  17. Clinical applications of plasma based electrosurgical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszko, Jean; Endler, Ashley; Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 18 years, several electrosurgical systems generating a low temperature plasma in an aqueous conductive solution have been commercialized for various clinical applications and have been used in over 10 million patients to date. The most popular utilizations are in arthroscopic surgery, otorhinolaryngology surgery, spine and neurosurgery, urology and wound care. These devices can be configured to bring saline to the tip and to have concomitant aspiration to remove by-products and excess fluid. By tuning the electrode geometry, waveform and fluid dynamic at the tip of the devices, tissue resection and thermal effects can be adjusted individually. This allows one to design products that can operate as precise tissue dissectors for treatment of articular cartilage or debridement of chronic wounds, as well as global tissue debulking devices providing sufficient concomitant hemostasis for applications like tonsillectomies. Effects of these plasma based electrosurgical devices on cellular biology, healing response and nociceptive receptors has also been studied in various models. This talk will include a review of the clinical applications, with product descriptions, results and introductory review of some of the research on the biological effects of these devices.

  18. FLYCHK Collisional-Radiative Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 160 FLYCHK Collisional-Radiative Code (Web, free access)   FLYCHK provides a capability to generate atomic level populations and charge state distributions for low-Z to mid-Z elements under NLTE conditions.

  19. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  20. Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrödinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

  1. Effect of self-gravitation and dust-charge fluctuations on the shielding and energy loss of N×M projectiles in a collisional dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, M. Adnan; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2007-03-01

    A simple derivation of the electrostatic potential and energy loss of N×M test charge projectiles traveling through dusty plasma has been presented. The effect of dust-charge fluctuations, dust neutral collisions, and self-gravitation on the shielded potential and energy loss of charge projectiles has been investigated both analytically as well as numerically. An interference contribution of these projectiles to the shielded potential and energy loss has been observed, which depends upon their relative orientation and separation distance. A comparison has been made for correlated and uncorrelated motion of the two projectiles. The amplitude of the shielded potential is enhanced with the increase of dust Jeans frequency for separation less than the effective Debye length. The dust-charge fluctuations produce a potential well for a slow charge relaxation rate and energy is gained, not lost, by the test charge projectiles. However, a fast charge relaxation rate with a fixed value of Jeans frequency enhances the energy loss. The dust neutral collisions are also found to enhance the energy loss for the test charge velocities greater than the dust acoustic speeds. The present investigation might be useful to explain the coagulation of dust particles such as those in molecular clouds, the interstellar medium, comet tails, planetary rings, etc.

  2. Evaluating a Contribution of the Knock-on Deuterons to the Neutron Yield in the Experiments with Weakly Collisional Plasma Jets (Part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-08

    Part 1 of this note considered the kinematics of large-angle scattering (LAS) of the deuterons on the counter-streaming carbon ions, with both flows having the same velocity V. Due to a large mass ratio mC/mD, the backscattered deuterons have high velocity of up to (24/7)V. This significantly increases the cross-section for the neutron production in the collisions between the back-scattered and incoming deuterons and may provide significant contribution to the total neutron yield, despite the smallness of a large-angle Coulomb cross-section. This effect becomes particularly important when only one of the colliding streams is made of CD, whereas the other stream is made of CH. Part 1 evaluated the neutron yield produced by this mechanism and have found that its relative role increases for higher plasma densities and lower velocities. Part 2 discusses signatures of this effect which can be used to identify it experimentally and also discusses in some more detail its spatio-temporal characteristics. It goes without saying that a complete quantitative assessment should be based on numerical simulations accounting for the large-angle scattering.

  3. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  4. Plasma medicine—current state of research and medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th

    2017-01-01

    Plasma medicine means the direct application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on or in the human body for therapeutic purposes. Further, the field interacts strongly with results gained for biological decontamination. Experimental research as well as first practical application is realized using two basic principles of CAP sources: dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) and atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ). Originating from the fundamental insights that the biological effects of CAP are most probably caused by changes of the liquid environment of cells, and are dominated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), basic mechanisms of biological plasma activity are identified. It was demonstrated that there is no increased risk of cold plasma application and, above all, there are no indications for genotoxic effects. The most important biological effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma were identified: (1) inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms including multidrug resistant ones; (2) stimulation of cell proliferation and tissue regeneration with lower plasma treatment intensity (treatment time); (3) inactivation of cells by initialization of programmed cell death (apoptosis) with higher plasma treatment intensity (treatment time). In recent years, the main focus of clinical applications was in the field of wound healing and treatment of infective skin diseases. First CAP sources are CE-certified as medical devices now which is the main precondition to start the introduction of plasma medicine into clinical reality. Plasma application in dentistry and, above all, CAP use for cancer treatment are becoming more and more important research fields in plasma medicine. A further in-depth knowledge of control and adaptation of plasma parameters and plasma geometries is needed to obtain suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapeutic indications and to open up new fields of medical application.

  5. Protoplanetary Accretion by Collisional Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Wettlaufer, J S

    2009-01-01

    The formation of a solar system is believed to have followed a multi-stage process around a protostar. Whipple first noted that planetesimal growth by particle agglomeration is strongly influenced by gas drag; there is a ``bottleneck'' at the meter scale with such bodies rapidly spiraling into the central star, whereas much smaller or larger particles do not. Thus, successful planetary accretion requires rapid planetesimal growth to km scale. A commonly accepted picture is that for collisional velocities $V_c$ above a certain threshold collisional velocity, ${V_{th}} \\sim$ 0.1-10 cm s$^{-1}$, particle agglomeration is not possible; elastic rebound overcomes attractive surface and intermolecular forces. However, if perfect sticking is assumed for all collisions the bottleneck can be overcome by rapid planetesimal growth. While previous work has dealt explicitly with the influences of collisional pressures and the possibility of particle fracture or penetration, the basic role of the phase behavior of matter--p...

  6. Aqueous Plasma Pharmacy: Preparation Methods, Chemistry, and Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Jessica M.; McCall, James R.; Bzdek, Justin P.; Johnson, Derek C.; Hybertson, Brooks M.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma pharmacy is a subset of the broader field of plasma medicine. Although not strictly defined, the term aqueous plasma pharmacy (APP) is used to refer to the generation and distribution of reactive plasma-generated species in an aqueous solution followed by subsequent administration for therapeutic benefits. APP attempts to harness the therapeutic effects of plasma-generated oxidant species within aqueous solution in various applications, such as disinfectant solutions, cell proliferation related to wound healing, and cancer treatment. The subsequent use of plasma-generated solutions in the APP approach facilitates the delivery of reactive plasma species to internal locations within the body. Although significant efforts in the field of plasma medicine have concentrated on employing direct plasma plume exposure to cells or tissues, here we focus specifically on plasma discharge in aqueous solution to render the solution biologically active for subsequent application. Methods of plasma discharge in solution are reviewed, along with aqueous plasma chemistry and the applications for APP. The future of the field also is discussed regarding necessary research efforts that will enable commercialization for clinical deployment. PMID:28428835

  7. A unified numerical model of collisional depolarization and broadening rates due to hydrogen atom collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, M; Barklem, P S

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of solar polarization spectra accounting for partial or complete frequency redistribution requires data on various collisional processes. Data for depolarization and polarization transfer are needed but often missing, while data for collisional broadening are usually more readily available. Recent work by Sahal-Br\\'echot and Bommier concluded that despite underlying similarities in the physics of collisional broadening and depolarization processes, relationships between them are not possible to derive purely analytically. We aim to derive accurate numerical relationships between the collisional broadening rates and the collisional depolarization and polarization transfer rates due to hydrogen atom collisions. Such relationships would enable accurate and efficient estimation of collisional data for solar applications. Using earlier results for broadening and depolarization processes based on general (i.e. not specific to a given atom), semi-classical calculations employing interaction potentials...

  8. Paradigm shifts in plasma processing and application of fundamental kinetics to problems targeting 5 nm technology device technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee

    2016-09-01

    It is often said that semiconductor technology is approaching the end of scaling. While fundamental device limits do approach, plasma etching has been doing the heavy lifting to supplement the basic limits in lithography. RF plasmas, pulsing in many forms, diffusion plasmas are but a few of the important developments over the last 20 years that have succeeded in the seemingly impossible tasks. The commonality of these plasmas is being self-consistent: their near-Boltzmann EEDf maintains ionization with its tail while providing charge-balance with its Te . To control the plasma chemistry is to control its EEDf; the entanglement of ionization with charge-balance in self-consistent plasmas places a constraint on the decoupling of plasma chemistry from ionization. Example like DC/RF parallel-plate hybridizes stochastic heating with DC-cathode injected e- -beam. While such arrangement offers some level of decoupling, it raised more questions than what it helped answered along the lines of beam-plasma instabilities, bounce-resonance ionization, etc. Pure e- -beam plasmas could be a drastic departure from the self-consistent plasmas. Examples like the NRL e- -beam system and the more recent TEL NEP (Nonambipolar e- Plasma) show strong decoupling of Te from ionization but it is almost certain, many more questions lurk: the functions connecting collisional relaxation with instabilities, the channels causing the dissociation of large fluorocarbons (controlling the ion-to- radical ratio), the production of the damaging deep UV in e- -beam plasmas, etc., and the list goes on. IADf is one factor on feature-profile and IEDf determines the surgical surface-excitation governing the selectivity, and both functions have Ti as the origin; what controls the e- -beam plasmas' Ti ? RF-bias has served well in applications requiring energetic excitation but, are there ways to improve the IEDf tightness? What are the adverse side-effects of ``improved IEDf''? Decades ago an infant RF-plasma

  9. Calculation of fully relativistic cross sections for electron excitation of cesium atom and its application to the diagnostics of hydrogen-cesium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti; Dipti; Gangwar, R. K.; Srivastava, R.

    2017-01-01

    Electron impact excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients have been calculated using fully relativistic distorted wave theory for several fine-structure transitions from the ground as well as excited states of cesium atom in the wide range of incident electron energy. These processes play dominant role in low pressure hydrogen-cesium plasma, which is relevant to the negative ion based neutral beam injectors for the ITER project. As an application, the calculated detailed cross-sections are used to construct a reliable collisional radiative (CR) model to characterize the hydrogen-cesium plasma. Other processes such as radiative population transfer, electron impact ionization and mutual neutralization of Cs+ ion with negative hydrogen ion along with their reverse processes are also taken into account. The calculated cross-sections and the extracted plasma parameters from the present model are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  10. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-05-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produces large (about 25 cm diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense ({gt}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7 cm (5 in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed.

  11. Introduction to Plasma Technology Science, Engineering and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Harry, John Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Written by a university lecturer with more than forty years experience in plasma technology, this book adopts a didactic approach in its coverage of the theory, engineering and applications of technological plasmas. The theory is developed in a unified way to enable brevity and clarity, providing readers with the necessary background to assess the factors that affect the behavior of plasmas under different operating conditions. The major part of the book is devoted to the applications of plasma technology and their accompanying engineering aspects, classified by the various pressure and densit

  12. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2006-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has established a plasma prize at the annual Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). The 2006 prize was awarded for a project that investigated the correlation of GPS errors with various measures of near-earth plasma activity. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. In addition to the ISEF plasma award, CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org; developing educational literature; organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs; and responding to questions about plasmas. In addition, the CPS has begun as effort to examine the plasma content of state education standards with the goal of promoting the adoption of standards with appropriate plasma conten; e.g. are there three or four states of matter. The success of this and other activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. Please send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information if you would like to become involved in spreading the good word about plasmas.

  13. Simulation of transient collisional x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Moribayashi, Kengo; Zhidkov, A.; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kado, Masataka; Hasegawa, Noboru [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a collisional radiative model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers. We calculate the ion abundance and soft x-ray gain for the Ne-like 3s-3p transition and Ni-like 4d-4p transition, in short pulse laser irradiated plasmas. We combine a detailed model using the atomic data calculated by the HULLAC code and the averaged model based on the screened hydrogenic approximation to develop a compact model. Effects of dielectronic recombination channels and radiation trapping of the lower laser level are investigated. The calculation of the transient gain is carried out using the plasma temperature and density obtained from a 1D hydrodynamics code. (author)

  14. Preface to Special Topic: Plasmas for Medical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael, E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Neurological Surgery, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Robert, Eric [GREMI, CNRS/Université d' Orleans, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Intense research effort over last few decades in low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasma application in bioengineering led to the foundation of a new scientific field, plasma medicine. Cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) produce various chemically reactive species including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). It has been found that these reactive species play an important role in the interaction of CAP with prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells triggering various signaling pathways in cells.

  15. Preface to Special Topic: Plasmas for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael; Robert, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Intense research effort over last few decades in low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasma application in bioengineering led to the foundation of a new scientific field, plasma medicine. Cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) produce various chemically reactive species including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). It has been found that these reactive species play an important role in the interaction of CAP with prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells triggering various signaling pathways in cells.

  16. Biomedical applications and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Puač, N.; Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Spasić, K.; Malović, G.

    2012-03-01

    Numerous applications of non-equilibrium (cold, low temperature) plasmas require those plasmas to operate at atmospheric pressure. Achieving non-equilibrium at atmospheric pressure is difficult since the ionization growth is very fast at such a high pressure. High degree of ionization on the other hand enables transfer of energy between electrons and ions and further heating of the background neutral gas through collisions between ions and neutrals. Thus, all schemes to produce non-equilibrium plasmas revolve around some form of control of ionization growth. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas is difficult and some of the techniques cannot be employed at all. The difficulties stem mostly from the small size. Optical emission spectroscopy and laser absorption spectroscopy require very high resolution in order to resolve the anatomy of the discharges. Mass analysis is not normally applicable for atmospheric pressure plasmas, but recently systems with triple differential pumping have been developed that allow analysis of plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressures which is essential for numerous applications. Application of such systems is, however, not free from problems. Applications in biomedicine require minimum heating of the ambient air. The gas temperature should not exceed 40 °C to avoid thermal damage to the living tissues. Thus, plasmas should operate at very low powers and power control is essential. We developed unique derivative probes that allow control of power well below 1 W and studied four different sources, including dielectric barrier discharges, plasma needle, atmospheric pressure jet and micro atmospheric pressure jet. The jet operates in plasma bullet regime if proper conditions are met. Finally, we cover results on treatment of bacteria and human cells as well as treatment of plants by plasmas. Localized delivery of active species by plasmas may lead to a number of medical procedures that may also involve removal of bacteria, fungi and

  17. Development, diagnostic and applications of radio-frequency plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, N.

    2008-07-01

    In many areas of the industry, plasma processing of materials is a vital technology. Nonequilibrium plasmas proved to be able to produce chemically reactive species at a low gas temperature while maintaining highly uniform reaction rates over relatively large areas (Makabe and Petrovic 2006). At the same time nonequilibrium plasmas provide means for good and precise control of the properties of active particles that determine the surface modification. Plasma needle is one of the atmospheric pressure sources that can be used for treatment of the living matter which is highly sensitive when it comes to low pressure or high temperatures (above 40 C). Dependent on plasma conditions, several refined cell responses are induced in mammalian cells (Sladek et al. 2005). It appears that plasma treatment may find many biomedical applications. However, there are few data in the literature about plasma effects on plant cells and tissues. So far, only the effect of low pressure plasmas on seeds was investigated. It was shown that short duration pretreatments by non equilibrium low temperature air plasma were stimulative in light induced germination of Paulownia tomentosa seeds (Puac et al. 2005). As membranes of plants have different properties to those of animals and as they show a wide range of properties we have tried to survey some of the effects of typical plasma which is envisaged to be used in biotechnological applications on plant cells. In this paper we will make a comparison between two configurations of plasma needle that we have used in treatment of biological samples (Puac et al. 2006). Difference between these two configurations is in the additional copper ring that we have placed around glass tube at the tip of the needle. We will show some of the electrical characteristics of the plasma needle (with and without additional copper ring) and, also, plasma emission intensity obtained by using fast ICCD camera.

  18. A simple but accurate potential for the naphthalene-argon complex: applications to collisional energy transfer and matrix isolated IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal

    2013-01-21

    An explicit polarizable potential for the naphthalene-argon complex has been derived assuming only atomic contributions, aiming at large scale simulations of naphthalene under argon environment. The potential was parametrized from dedicated quantum chemical calculations at the CCSD(T) level, and satisfactorily reproduces available structural and energetic properties. Combining this potential with a tight-binding model for naphthalene, collisional energy transfer is studied by means of dedicated molecular dynamics simulations, nuclear quantum effects being accounted for in the path-integral framework. Except at low target temperature, nuclear quantum effects do not alter the average energies transferred by the collision or the collision duration. However, the distribution of energy transferred is much broader in the quantum case due to the significant zero-point energy and the higher density of states. Using an ab initio potential for the Ar-Ar interaction, the IR absorption spectrum of naphthalene solvated by argon clusters or an entire Ar matrix is computed via classical and centroid molecular dynamics. The classical spectra exhibit variations with growing argon environment that are absent from quantum spectra. This is interpreted by the greater fluxional character experienced by the argon atoms due to vibrational delocalization.

  19. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Schechter, D.E.; Stirling, W.L.

    1990-03-01

    An electric cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produces large (about 25-cm- diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}--cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Following a brief review of the large plasma source developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the configuration and operation of the source are described and a discharge model is presented. Results from this new ECR plasma source and potential applications for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Applications and challenges of plasma processes in nanobiotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F; Colpo, P, E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), I-21020, Ispra (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    We present an overview of the possibilities offered by plasma technologies, in particular the combination plasma polymers deposition, colloidal lithography, e-beam lithography and microcontact printing, to produce micro- and nanostructured surfaces with chemical and topographical contrast for applications in nanobiotechnology. It is shown that chemical and topographical patterns can be obtained on different substrates, with dimensions down to a few tenths of 10 nm. The applications of these nanostructured surfaces in biology, biochemistry and biodetection are presented and the advantages and limitation of the plasma techniques in this context underlined.

  1. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  2. Investigation of the AC Plasma Torch Working Conditions for the Plasma Chemical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronov, A. A.; Vasilieva, O. B.; Dudnik, J. D.; E Kuznetsov, V.; Shiryaev, V. N.; Subbotin, D. I.; Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    The presented design and parameters of a three-phase AC plasma torch with the power up to 500 kW, flow rate of air 30-50 g/s (temperature up to 5000 K) could be used in different plasma chemical processes. Range of measured plasma temperature is 3500-5000 K. The paper presents investigations of the plasma torch operation modes for its application in plasma chemical technologies. Plasma chemical technologies for various purposes (processing, destruction of various wastes, including technological and hazardous waste, conversion or production of chemicals to obtain nanoscale materials, etc.) are very promising in terms of the process efficiency. Their industrial use is difficult due to the lack of inexpensive and reliable plasma torches providing the desired level of temperature, enthalpy of the working gas and other necessary conditions for the process. This problem can be solved using a considered design of a three-phase alternating current plasma torch with power of 150-500 kW with working gas flow rate of 30-50 g/s with mass average temperature up to 5000K on the basis of which an industrial plasma chemical plant can be created. The basis of the plasma torch operation is a railgun effect that is the principle of arc movement in the field of its own current field. Thanks to single supply of power to the arc, arcs forming in the discharge chamber of the plasma torch move along the electrodes under the action of electrodynamic forces resulting from the interaction of the arc current with its own magnetic field. Under the condition of the three-phase supply voltage, arc transits from the electrode to the electrode with change in the anodic and cathodic phases with frequency of 300 Hz. A special feature of this design is the ability to organize the movement of the arc attachment along the electrode, thus ensuring an even distribution of the thermal load and thus achieve long time of continuous operation of the plasma torch. The parameters of the plasma jet of the

  3. Acceleration of weakly collisional solar-type winds

    CERN Document Server

    Zouganelis, I; Landi, S; Maksimovic, M; Pantellini, F

    2005-01-01

    One of the basic properties of the solar wind, that is the high speed of the fast wind, is still not satisfactorily explained. This is mainly due to the theoretical difficulty of treating weakly collisional plasmas. The fluid approach implies that the medium is collision dominated and that the particle velocity distributions are close to Maxwellians. However the electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind depart significantly from Maxwellians. Recent kinetic collisionless models (called exospheric) using velocity distributions with a suprathermal tail have been able to reproduce the high speeds of the fast solar wind. In this letter we present new developments of these models by generalizing them over a large range of corona conditions. We also present new results obtained by numerical simulations that include collisions. Both approaches calculate the heat flux self-consistently without any assumption on the energy transport. We show that both approaches - the exospheric and the collisional one...

  4. Double layers in a modestly collisional electronegative discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, T E

    1999-01-01

    The effect of ion-neutral collisions on the structure and ion flux emanating from a steady-state, planar discharge with two negative components is investigated. The positive ion component is modelled as a cold fluid subject to constant-mobility collisions, while the electrons and negative ions obey Boltzmann relations. The model includes the collisionless limit. When the negative ions are sufficiently cold three types of discharge structures are found. For small negative ion concentrations or high collisionality, the discharge is 'stratified', with an electronegative core and an electropositive edge. For the opposite conditions, the discharge is 'uniform' with the negative ion density remaining significant at the edge of the plasma. Between these cases lies the special case of a double-layer-stratified discharge, where quasi-neutrality is violated at the edge of the electronegative core. Double-layer-stratified solutions are robust in that they persist for moderate collisionality. Numerical solutions for fini...

  5. Optimal electric potential profile in a collisional magnetized thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Makrinich, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    A major figure of merit in propulsion in general and in electric propulsion in particular is the thrust per unit of deposited power, the ratio of thrust over power. We have recently demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that for a fixed deposited power in the ions, the momentum delivered by the electric force is larger if the accelerated ions collide with neutrals during the acceleration. As expected, the higher thrust for given power is achieved for a collisional plasma at the expense of a lower thrust per unit mass flow rate. Operation in the collisional regime can be advantageous for certain space missions. We analyze a Hall thruster configuration in which the flow is only weakly ionized but there are frequent ion-neutral collisions. With a variational method we seek an electric potential profile that maximizes thrust over power. We then examine what radial magnetic field profile should determine such a potential profile. Supported by the Israel Science Foundation Grant 765/11.

  6. Collisional Energy Loss of Non Asymptotic Jets in a QGP

    CERN Document Server

    Adil, A; Horowitz, W A; Wicks, S

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the collisional energy loss suffered by a heavy (charm) quark created at a finite time within a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in the classical linear response formalism. We pay close attention to the problem of formulating a conserved current and accounting for binding and radiative energy loss effects. We find that the finite time correction is on the order of a Debye length as expected and the overall energy loss is similar in magnitude to the energy loss suffered by a charge created in the asymptotic past. This result has significant implications for the relative contribution to energy loss from collisional and radiative sources and will have ramifications for the ``single electron puzzle'' at RHIC as well as other experimental observables.

  7. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, M. J.-E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Flaig, M.; Plewa, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  8. Supported plasma-made 1D heterostructures: perspectives and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Borras, Ana; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Romero-Gomez, Pablo; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Plasma related methods have been widely used in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres and semiconducting inorganic nanowires. A natural progression of the research in the field of 1D nanostructures is the synthesis of multicomponent nanowires and nanofibres. In this article we review the state of the art of the fabrication by plasma methods of 1D heterostructures including applications and perspectives. Furthermore, recent developments on the use of metal seeds (Ag, A...

  9. PLATELET RICH PLASMA (PRP) APPLICATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY (TKA)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To find out the PRP application effects in TKA on pain syndrome, wound healing, postoperative blood loss, range of motion and the knee circumference (centimetry). MATERIAL AND METHOD: The preparation of the platelet-rich plasma is based on our treatment algorithm. 20 patients have been subject to TKA within the period from October 2012 to November 2014 and underwent TKA, as platelet rich plasma was used intraoperatively. The average patient age is 72,3; 9 male and 11 female patien...

  10. Ozone modeling within plasmas for ozone sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Arshak, Khalil; Forde, Edward; Guiney, Ivor

    2007-01-01

    peer-reviewed Ozone (03) is potentially hazardous to human health and accurate prediction and measurement of this gas is essential in addressing its associated health risks. This paper presents theory to predict the levels of ozone concentration emittedfrom a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma for ozone sensing applications. This is done by postulating the kinetic model for ozone generation, with a DBD plasma at atmospheric pressure in air, in the form of a set of rate equations....

  11. Ozone modeling within plasmas for ozone sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Arshak, Khalil; Forde, Edward; Guiney, Ivor

    2007-01-01

    peer-reviewed Ozone (03) is potentially hazardous to human health and accurate prediction and measurement of this gas is essential in addressing its associated health risks. This paper presents theory to predict the levels of ozone concentration emittedfrom a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma for ozone sensing applications. This is done by postulating the kinetic model for ozone generation, with a DBD plasma at atmospheric pressure in air, in the form of a set of rate equations....

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy for burning plasma diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2008-10-01

    Ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS, 200-750 nm) atomic spectroscopy of neutral and ionized fuel species (H, D, T, and Li) and impurities (e.g., He, Be, C, and W) is a key element of plasma control and diagnosis on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and future magnetically confined burning plasma experiments (BPXs). Spectroscopic diagnostic implementation and performance issues that arise in the BPX harsh nuclear environment in the UV-VIS range, e.g., degradation of first mirror reflectivity under charge-exchange atom bombardment (erosion) and impurity deposition, permanent and dynamic loss of window, and optical fiber transmission under intense neutron and gamma-ray fluxes, are either absent or not as severe in the near-infrared (NIR, 750-2000 nm) range. An initial survey of NIR diagnostic applications has been undertaken on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. It is demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy can be used for machine protection and plasma control applications, as well as contribute to plasma performance evaluation and physics studies. Emission intensity estimates demonstrate that NIR measurements are possible in the BPX plasma operating parameter range. Complications in the NIR range due to the parasitic background emissions are expected to occur at very high plasma densities, low impurity densities, and at high plasma-facing component temperatures.

  13. Novel application of plasma treatment for pharmaceutical and biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Masayuki; Sasai, Yasushi; Kondo, Shin-Ichi; Yamauchi, Yukinori

    2009-06-01

    The nature of plasma-induced surface radicals formed on a variety of organic polymers has been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR), making it possible to provide a sound basis for future experimental design of polymer surface processing using plasma treatment. On the basis of the findings from such studies, several novel bio-applications in the field of drug- and biomedical- engineering have been developed. Applications for drug engineering include the preparation of reservoir-type drug delivery system (DDS) of sustained- and delayed-release, and floating drug delivery system (FDDS) possessing gastric retention capabilities, followed by preparation of "Patient-Tailored DDS". Furthermore, the preparation of composite powders applicable to matrix-type DDS was developed by making a mechanical application to the surface radical-containing polymer powders with drug powders. In applications for biomedical engineering, the novel method to introduce the durable surface hydrophilicity and lubricity on hydrophobic biomedical polymers was developed by plasma-assisted immobilization of carboxyl group-containing polymer on the polymer substrate. The surfaces thus prepared were further used for the covalent immobilization of oligo-nucleotides (DNA) onto the polymer surfaces applicable to constructing DNA diagnosis system, and also plasma-assisted preparation of functionalized chemo-embolic agent of vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate copolymer (PVA- PAANa).

  14. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Case, Andrew [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Brockington, Samuel [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Messer, Sarah [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Bomgardner, Richard [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Phillips, Mike [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Elton, Ray [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-11-11

    Plasma jets with high density and velocity have a number of important applications in fusion energy and elsewhere, including plasma refueling, disruption mitigation in tokamaks, magnetized target fusion, injection of momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, plasma thrusters, and high energy density plasmas (HEDP). In Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), for example, an imploding material liner is used to compress a magnetized plasma to fusion conditions and to confine the resulting burning plasma inertially to obtain the necessary energy gain. The imploding shell may be solid, liquid, gaseous, or a combination of these states. The presence of the magnetic field in the target plasma suppresses thermal transport to the plasma shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target to fusion conditions. This allows the required imploding momentum flux to be generated electromagnetically using off-the-shelf pulsed power technology. Practical schemes for standoff delivery of the imploding momentum flux are required and are open topics for research. One approach for accomplishing this, called plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF), uses a spherical array of pulsed plasma guns to create a spherically imploding shell of very high velocity, high momentum flux plasma. This approach requires development of plasma jet accelerators capable of achieving velocities of 50-200 km/s with very precise timing and density profiles, and with high total mass and density. Low-Z plasma jets would require the higher velocities, whereas very dense high-Z plasma shells could achieve the goal at velocities of only 50-100 km/s. In this report, we describe our work to develop the pulsed plasma gun technology needed for an experimental scientific exploration of the PJMIF concept, and also for the other applications mentioned earlier. The initial goal of a few hundred of hydrogen at 200 km/s was eventually replaced with accelerating 8000 μg of argon or xenon to 50 km

  15. Collisional properties of weakly bound heteronuclear dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, B.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.; Petrov, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    We consider collisional properties of weakly bound heteronuclear molecules (dimers) formed in a two-species mixture of atoms with a large mass difference. We focus on dimers containing light fermionic atoms as they manifest collisional stability due to an effective dimer-dimer repulsion originating

  16. Low Collisionality Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity in Tokamaks and Quasi-symmetric Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2008-11-01

    Non-resonant magnetic perturbations can affect plasma rotation in toroidally confined plasmas through their modification to |B|. Variations along a field line induce nonambipolar radial transport and produce a global neoclassical toroidal viscous force [NTV]. In this work, previously calculated radial particle fluxes for the low-collisionality ``ν'' and ``1/ν'' regimes [1] are unified into a single particle flux (or toroidal viscous force). Provided pitch-angle scattering dominates over collisional energy exchange, the energy component of phase space can be decoupled into independent regions (E >Ec. for ν regime, E Callen, Phys. Fluids 19, 667 (1976).

  17. Plasma processes and applications in NanoBiotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F; Colpo, P, E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), I-21020, Ispra (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Nanostructured surfaces presenting chemical or topographical patterns are now being increasingly developed in nanobiotechnology. Major applications are related to cell culture models and biodetection. We show that plasma technologies, in particular the combination plasma polymers deposition and etching, together with colloidal lithography, e-beam lithography and microcontact printing, are essential tools to produce nanostructured surfaces. We show that chemical and topographical patterns can be obtained on different substrates, with dimensions down to some 10 nm. The applications of these nanostructured surfaces in biology and bio-detection are reviewed and the advantages and limitation of the techniques underlined.

  18. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Case, Andrew [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Brockington, Samuel [HyperV Technologies Corp.y; Messer, Sarah [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Bomgardner, Richard [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Phillips, Mike [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Elton, Ray [University of Maryland

    2014-11-11

    Plasma jets with high density and velocity have a number of important applications in fusion energy and elsewhere, including plasma refueling, disruption mitigation in tokamaks, magnetized target fusion, injection of momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, plasma thrusters, and high energy density plasmas (HEDP). In Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), for example, an imploding material liner is used to compress a magnetized plasma to fusion conditions and to confine the resulting burning plasma inertially to obtain the necessary energy gain. The imploding shell may be solid, liquid, gaseous, or a combination of these states. The presence of the magnetic field in the target plasma suppresses thermal transport to the plasma shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target to fusion conditions. This allows the required imploding momentum flux to be generated electromagnetically using off-the-shelf pulsed power technology. Practical schemes for standoff delivery of the imploding momentum flux are required and are open topics for research. One approach for accomplishing this, called plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF), uses a spherical array of pulsed plasma guns to create a spherically imploding shell of very high velocity, high momentum flux plasma. This approach requires development of plasma jet accelerators capable of achieving velocities of 50-200 km/s with very precise timing and density profiles, and with high total mass and density. Low-Z plasma jets would require the higher velocities, whereas very dense high-Z plasma shells could achieve the goal at velocities of only 50-100 km/s. In this report, we describe our work to develop the pulsed plasma gun technology needed for an experimental scientific exploration of the PJMIF concept, and also for the other applications mentioned earlier. The initial goal of a few hundred of hydrogen at 200 km/s was eventually replaced with accelerating 8000 μg of argon or xenon to 50 km

  19. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases.

  20. Clinical application of plasma thermograms. Utility, practical approaches and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Mekmaysy, Chongkham S; DeLeeuw, Lynn; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2015-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies of blood plasma are part of an emerging area of the clinical application of DSC to biofluid analysis. DSC analysis of plasma from healthy individuals and patients with various diseases has revealed changes in the thermal profiles of the major plasma proteins associated with the clinical status of the patient. The sensitivity of DSC to the concentration of proteins, their interactions with other proteins or ligands, or their covalent modification underlies the potential utility of DSC analysis. A growing body of literature has demonstrated the versatility and performance of clinical DSC analysis across a range of biofluids and in a number of disease settings. The principles, practice and challenges of DSC analysis of plasma are described in this article.

  1. Collisional Aggregation due to Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pumir, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars, and also to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favoured by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles, and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modelling these processes. These advances lead to a semi-quantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates, and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  2. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  3. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  4. Industrial application of electron sources with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Belyuk, S I; Rempe, N G

    2001-01-01

    Paper contains a description, operation, design and parameters of electron sources with plasma emitters. One presents examples of application of these sources as part of automated electron-beam welding lines. Paper describes application of such sources for electron-beam deposition of composite powders. Electron-beam deposition is used to rebuild worn out part and to increase strength of new parts of machines and tools. Paper presents some examples of rebuilding part and the advantages gained in this case

  5. Collisional stochastic ripple diffusion of alpha particles and beam ions on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, M.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; White, R.B.; Budny, R.V.; Janos, A.C.; Owens, D.K.; Schivell, J.F.; Scott, S.D.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Predictions for ripple loss of fast ions from TFTR are investigated with a guiding center code including both collisional and ripple effects. A synergistic enhancement of fast ion diffusion is found for toroidal field ripple with collisions. The total loss is calculated to be roughly twice the sum of ripple and collisional losses calculated separately. Discrepancies between measurements and calculations of plasma beta at low current and large major radius are resolved when both effects are included for neutral beam ions. A 20--30% reduction in alpha particle heating is predicted for q{sub a} = 6--14, R = 2.6 m DT plasmas on TFTR due to first orbit and collisional stochastic ripple diffusion.

  6. Application of non-equilibrium plasmas in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojsilović S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the potential of plasma medical applications, the connections to nanotechnologies and the results obtained by our group. A special issue in plasma medicine is the development of the plasma sources that would achieve non-equilibrium at atmospheric pressure in atmospheric gas mixture with no or only marginal heating of the gas, and with desired properties and mechanisms that may be controlled. Our studies have shown that control of radicals or chemically active products of the discharge such as ROS (reactive oxygen species and/or NO may be used to control the growth of the seeds. At the same time specially designed plasma needle and other sources were shown to be efficient to sterilize not only colonies of bacteria but also planctonic samples (microorganisms protected by water or bio films. Finally we have shown that plasma may induce differentiation of stem cells. Non-equilibrium plasmas may be used in detection of different specific markers in medicine. For example proton transfer mass spectroscopy may be employed in detection of volatile organic compounds without their dissociation and thus as a technique for instantaneous measurement of the presence of markers for numerous diseases. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON171037 i br. III41011

  7. Plasma assisted deposition of metal fluorides for 193nm applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gaebler, Dieter; Kaiser, Norbert; Tuennermann, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    The ArF lithography technology requires a minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters, and the vacuum conditions. Until now the best results were achieved by metal boat evaporation with high substrate temperature and without plasma assistance. In fact, it was demonstrated that the plasma assisted deposition process results in optical thin films with high packing density but the losses due to absorption were extremely high for deep and vacuum ultraviolet applications. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides can be deposited by electron beam evaporation with plasma assistance. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films show low absorption in the VUV spectral range, high packing density, and less water content. The densification of the thin films was performed by a Leybold LION plasma source. As working gas, a variable mixture of fluorine and argon gas was chosen. To understand the deposition process and the interaction of the plasma with the deposition material, various characterization methods like plasma emission spectroscopy and ion current measurements were implemented.

  8. Application of Nonlocal Electron Kinetics to Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2011-10-01

    Partially ionized plasmas are typically in a highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic state: the electrons are not in equilibrium with the neutral particle species or the ions, and the electrons are also not in equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas-discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Significant progress in understanding the formation of non-Maxwellian EVDF in the self-consistent electric fields has been one of the major achievements in the low-temperature plasmas during the last decade. This progress was made possible by a synergy between full-scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. Specific examples include rf discharges, dc discharges with auxiliary electrodes, Hall thruster discharges. In each example, nonlocal kinetic effects are identified as the main mechanisms responsible for the surprising degree of discharge self-organization. These phenomena include: explosive generation of cold electrons with rf power increase in low-pressure rf discharges; abrupt changes in discharge structure with increased bias voltage on a third electrode in a dc discharge with hot cathode; absence of a steady-state regime in Hall thruster discharges with intense secondary electron emission due to coupling of the sheath properties and the EVDF. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, M. Campanell, V. I. Demidov, D. Sydorenko, I. Schweigert, and A. S. Mustafaev. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Analysis of the transient collisional x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Moribayashi, Kengo; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kado, Masataka; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Daido, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the gain of a transient collisional x-ray lasers had been investigated using a plasma hydrodynamics code coupled with a detailed atomic kinetics code. The calculated gain of a Ni-like Ag laser pumped by two 100ps laser pulses agrees qualitatively with the experiment. Calculations for a thin foil target irradiated by two 2ps laser pulses shows that a high gain (>50/cm) can be obtained by adjusting the temporal interval between the two pump pulses. (author)

  10. Influence of collisional dephasing processes on superfluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Jeffery J.; Malcuit, Michelle S.; Raymer, Michael G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Drummond, Peter D.

    1989-11-01

    We present a quantum-mechanical treatment of the influence of collisional dephasing processes on the statistical properties of superfluorescence (SF). The theory, which treats nonlinear propagation effects as well as quantum noise, shows how the nature of the cooperative emission process changes from that of SF to that of amplified spontaneous emission as the collisional dephasing rate is varied. The predictions of how the SF delay time varies with the collisional dephasing rate are in good agreement with the results of a recent experiment [M. S. Malcuit, J. J. Maki, D. J. Simkin, and R. W. Boyd, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1189 (1987)].

  11. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2008-04-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement—MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  12. Plasma Surface Treatment of Powder Materials — Process and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pavlatová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyolefin particles are hydrophobic, and this prevents their use for various applications. Plasma treatment is an environment-friendly polyolefin hydrophilisation method. We developed an industrial-scale plant for plasma treatment of particles as small as micrometers in diameter. Materials such as PE waxes, UHMWPE and powders for rotomolding production were tested to verify their new surface properties. We achieved significantly increased wettability of the particles, so that they are very easily dispersive in water without agglomeration, and their higher surface energy is retained even after sintering in the case of rotomolding powders.

  13. A collisional extension of time-dependent Hartree-Fock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, L.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a collisional extension of time-dependent mean-field theories on the basis of a recently proposed stochastic extension of mean-field dynamics (stochastic time-dependent Hartree-Fock, STDHF). The latter theory is unfortunately too involved to envision practical applications in realistic systems in the near future and is thus bound to model systems. It is also hard to explore moderate to low energies with STDHF, because of vanishing transition probabilities that are impossible to sample properly. For such moderately excited situations covering small fluctuations, we compactify sampling by employing the same average mean field for all STDHF trajectories. The new approach, coined average STDHF (ASTDHF), ignores the fluctuations of the mean field but still accounts correctly for the collisional correlations responsible for dissipative features on top of mean-field dynamics. We detail the main features of the new approach in relation to existing equations, in particular quantum kinetic theories. The new theory is directly connected to STDHF, both formally and practically. We thus discuss in detail how the two approaches are related to each other. We apply the new scheme to illustrative examples taking as benchmark STDHF dynamics in 1D. ASTDHF provides results that are in remarkable agreement with the more elaborate STDHF. It makes it a promising approach to deal with dissipative dynamics in finite quantum systems, because of its moderate cost allowing applications in realistic systems and the possibility of exploring any excitation energy range where collisional correlations are expected to play a role.

  14. Selective Plasma Etching of Polymeric Substrates for Advanced Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliyalil, Harinarayanan; Cvelbar, Uroš

    2016-06-07

    In today's nanoworld, there is a strong need to manipulate and process materials on an atom-by-atom scale with new tools such as reactive plasma, which in some states enables high selectivity of interaction between plasma species and materials. These interactions first involve preferential interactions with precise bonds in materials and later cause etching. This typically occurs based on material stability, which leads to preferential etching of one material over other. This process is especially interesting for polymeric substrates with increasing complexity and a "zoo" of bonds, which are used in numerous applications. In this comprehensive summary, we encompass the complete selective etching of polymers and polymer matrix micro-/nanocomposites with plasma and unravel the mechanisms behind the scenes, which ultimately leads to the enhancement of surface properties and device performance.

  15. Selective Plasma Etching of Polymeric Substrates for Advanced Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinarayanan Puliyalil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s nanoworld, there is a strong need to manipulate and process materials on an atom-by-atom scale with new tools such as reactive plasma, which in some states enables high selectivity of interaction between plasma species and materials. These interactions first involve preferential interactions with precise bonds in materials and later cause etching. This typically occurs based on material stability, which leads to preferential etching of one material over other. This process is especially interesting for polymeric substrates with increasing complexity and a “zoo” of bonds, which are used in numerous applications. In this comprehensive summary, we encompass the complete selective etching of polymers and polymer matrix micro-/nanocomposites with plasma and unravel the mechanisms behind the scenes, which ultimately leads to the enhancement of surface properties and device performance.

  16. Low voltage drop plasma switch for inverter and modulator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, D. M.; Poeschel, R. L.; Schumacher, R. W.

    1993-08-01

    A low forward voltage drop plasma switch has been developed for high-efficiency inverter and modulator applications. The switch, called the HOLLOTRON, is based on a grid-controlled, thermionic hollow-cathode discharge. A low forward voltage drop (10-20 V) is achieved by operating the hollow-cathode discharge in a static gas pressure of xenon. The dense plasma generated in the Ba-oxide dispenser hollow cathode is spread over a relatively large control grid area by a diverging magnetic field superimposed on the discharge. Interruption of the discharge current at high current densities (≳4 A/cm2) over the grid area is achieved by biasing the control grid sufficiently negative with respect to the plasma. The HOLLOTRON switch has demonstrated voltage stand-off of up to 20 kV, switching times of ≤0.3 μs, and pulse repetition frequencies of 20 kHz at 50% duty.

  17. Advanced targets, diagnostics and applications of laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity sub-nanosecond-pulsed lasers irradiating thin targets in vacuum permit generation of electrons and ion acceleration and high photon yield emission in non-equilibrium plasmas. At intensities higher than 1015 W/cm2 thin foils can be irradiated in the target-normal sheath acceleration regime driving ion acceleration in the forward direction above 1 MeV per charge state. The distributions of emitted ions in terms of energy, charge state and angular emission are controlled by laser parameters, irradiation conditions, target geometry and composition. Advanced targets can be employed to increase the laser absorption in thin foils and to enhance the energy and the yield of the ion acceleration process. Semiconductor detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer and streak camera can be employed as online plasma diagnostics to monitor the plasma parameters, shot by shot. Some applications in the field of the multiple ion implantation, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are reported.

  18. Plasma promoted manufacturing of hydrogen and vehicular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Leslie

    2003-10-01

    Plasmas can be used for promoting reformation of fuels. Plasma-based reformers developed at MIT use a low temperature, low power, low current electrical discharge to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The very fuel rich mixture is hard to ignite, and the plasmatron provides a volume-ignition. To minimize erosion and to simplify the power supply, a low current high voltage discharge is used, with wide area electrodes. The plasmatron fuel reformer operates at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. The plasma-based reformer technology provides the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels. These advantages enable use of hydrogen-manufacturing reformation technology in cars using available fuels, such as gasoline and diesel. This plasma-based reformer technology can provide substantial throughputs even without the use of a catalyst. The electrical power consumption of the device is minimized by design and operational characteristics (less than 500 W peak and 200 W average). The product from these plasma reactors is a hydrogen rich mixture that can be used for combustion enhancement and emissions aftertreatment in vehicular applications. By converting a small fraction of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas, in-cylinder combustion can be improved. With minor modification of the engine, use of hydrogen rich gas results in increased fuel efficiency and decreased emissions of smog producing gases. The status of plasma based reformer technology and its application to vehicles will be described.

  19. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  20. Application of nonlinear dynamic techniques to high pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2010-02-01

    Arcs and arc plasmas have been known and used for welding, cutting, chemical synthesis and multitude of other industrial applications for more than hundred years. Though a copious source of heat, light and active species, plasma arc is inherently unstable, turbulent and difficult to control. During recent years, primarily driven by the need of new and energy efficient materials processing, various research groups around the world have been studying new and innovative ways of looking at the issues related to arc dynamics, arc stabilization, species non equilibrium, flow and heat transfer in a stabilized arc plasma device. In this context, experimental determination of nature of arc instabilities using tools of non-linear dynamics, theoretical model formulation, prediction of instability behavior under given operating conditions and possible control methods for the observed instabilities in arcs are reviewed. Space selective probing of the zones inside arc plasma devices without disturbing the system is probably the best way to identify the originating zone of instabilities inside such devices. Existence of extremely high temperature and inaccessibility to direct experimentations due to mechanical obstructions make this task extremely difficult. Probing instabilities in otherwise inaccessible inner regions of the torches, using binary gas mixture as plasma gas is a novel technique that primarily rests on a process known as demixing in arcs. Once a binary gas mixture enters the constricted plasma column, the demixing process sets in causing spatial variations for each of the constituent gases depending on the diffusion coefficients and the gradient of the existing temperature field. By varying concentrations of the constituent gases in the feeding line, it is possible to obtain spatial variations of the plasma composition in a desired manner, enabling spatial probing of the associated zones. Detailed compositional description of different zones inside the torch may be

  1. Applications of plasma sources for nitric oxide medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilets, Victor; Shekhter, Anatoly; Pekshev, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in the function of many tissues and organs. Wound healing processes are always accompanying by the increase of nitric oxide concentration in wound tissue. These facts suggest a possible therapeutic use of various NO donors for the acceleration of the wound healing and treatment of other diseases. Our previous studies indicated that gaseous NO flow produced by air-plasma generators acts beneficially on the wound healing. This beneficial effect could be caused by the mechanism involving peroxynitrite as an intermediate. As a result of mobilization of various antioxidant reactions more endogenous NO molecules become available as signaling molecules. to regulate the metabolic processes in wound tissue. In this paper different air plasma sources generated therapeutic concentrations of NO are discussed. The concentration of NO and other therapeutically important gas products are estimated by thermodynamic simulation. Synergy effects of NO with other plasma components are discussed as a factor enhancing therapeutic results. Some new medical application of plasma devices are presented. Advanced Plasma Therapies Inc.

  2. Supported plasma-made 1D heterostructures: perspectives and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borras, Ana; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Romero-Gomez, Pablo; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R, E-mail: anaisabel.borras@icmse.csic.es [Materials Science Institute of Seville (CSIC-Universidad Sevilla), C/Americo Vespucio 49 41092, Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-05-04

    Plasma-related methods have been widely used in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (NFs) and semiconducting inorganic nanowires (NWs). A natural progression of the research in the field of 1D nanostructures is the synthesis of multicomponent NWs and NFs. In this paper we review the state of the art of the fabrication by plasma methods of 1D heterostructures including applications and perspectives. Furthermore, recent developments on the use of metal seeds (Ag, Au, Pt) to obtain metal-oxide nanostructures are also extensively described. Results are shown for various metal substrates, either metal foils or supported nanoparticles/thin films of the metal where the effects of the size, surface coverage, percolation degree and thickness of the metal seeds have been systematically evaluated. The possibilities of the process are illustrated by the preparation of nanostructured films and supported NFs of different metal-oxides (Ag, Au and SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, ZnO). Particularly, in the case of silver, the application of an oxygen plasma treatment prior to the deposition of the oxide was critical for efficiently controlling the growth of the 1D heterostructures. A phenomenological model is proposed to account for the thin-film nanostructuring and fibre formation by considering basic phenomena such as stress relaxation, inhomogeneities in the plasma sheath electrical field and the local disturbance of the oxide growth.

  3. A Global Modeling Framework for Plasma Kinetics: Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsey, Guy Morland

    The modern study of plasmas, and applications thereof, has developed synchronously with com- puter capabilities since the mid-1950s. Complexities inherent to these charged-particle, many- body, systems have resulted in the development of multiple simulation methods (particle-in-cell, fluid, global modeling, etc.) in order to both explain observed phenomena and predict outcomes of plasma applications. Recognizing that different algorithms are chosen to best address specific topics of interest, this thesis centers around the development of an open-source global model frame- work for the focused study of non-equilibrium plasma kinetics. After verification and validation of the framework, it was used to study two physical phenomena: plasma-assisted combustion and the recently proposed optically-pumped rare gas metastable laser. Global models permeate chemistry and plasma science, relying on spatial averaging to focus attention on the dynamics of reaction networks. Defined by a set of species continuity and energy conservation equations, the required data and constructed systems are conceptually similar across most applications, providing a light platform for exploratory and result-search parameter scan- ning. Unfortunately, it is common practice for custom code to be developed for each application-- an enormous duplication of effort which negatively affects the quality of the software produced. Presented herein, the Python-based Kinetic Global Modeling framework (KGMf) was designed to support all modeling phases: collection and analysis of reaction data, construction of an exportable system of model ODEs, and a platform for interactive evaluation and post-processing analysis. A symbolic ODE system is constructed for interactive manipulation and generation of a Jacobian, both of which are compiled as operation-optimized C-code. Plasma-assisted combustion and ignition (PAC/PAI) embody the modernization of burning fuel by opening up new avenues of control and optimization

  4. Development of Multistep and Degenerate Variational Integrators for Applications in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Charles Leland

    Geometric integrators yield high-fidelity numerical results by retaining conservation laws in the time advance. A particularly powerful class of geometric integrators is symplectic integrators, which are widely used in orbital mechanics and accelerator physics. An important application presently lacking symplectic integrators is the guiding center motion of magnetized particles represented by non-canonical coordinates. Because guiding center trajectories are foundational to many simulations of magnetically confined plasmas, geometric guiding center algorithms have high potential for impact. The motivation is compounded by the need to simulate long-pulse fusion devices, including ITER, and opportunities in high performance computing, including the use of petascale resources and beyond. This dissertation uses a systematic procedure for constructing geometric integrators --- known as variational integration --- to deliver new algorithms for guiding center trajectories and other plasma-relevant dynamical systems. These variational integrators are non-trivial because the Lagrangians of interest are degenerate - the Euler-Lagrange equations are first-order differential equations and the Legendre transform is not invertible. The first contribution of this dissertation is that variational integrators for degenerate Lagrangian systems are typically multistep methods. Multistep methods admit parasitic mode instabilities that can ruin the numerical results. These instabilities motivate the second major contribution: degenerate variational integrators. By replicating the degeneracy of the continuous system, degenerate variational integrators avoid parasitic mode instabilities. The new methods are therefore robust geometric integrators for degenerate Lagrangian systems. These developments in variational integration theory culminate in one-step degenerate variational integrators for non-canonical magnetic field line flow and guiding center dynamics. The guiding center integrator

  5. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Akiba, M.; Bonal, J. P.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Nakamura, K.; Pacher, H. D.; Rödig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C. H.

    1998-10-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R&D needs are critically discussed.

  6. Treatment of textile surfaces by plasma technology for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Labay, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Medical applications of technical textiles are an expanding field of research. One of the added values of these new materials would be that they were suitable to contain and release active compounds in a controlled and sustained manner. Drug incorporation and release from synthetic fibers is related to the interaction of the drug with the polymer and probably greatly depends on the surface chemistry of the fiber. Plasma technology is a tool that enables to modify physical and chemical prop...

  7. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  8. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source plasma: Hydrogen atom production density profile and H{sub α} intensity by collisional radiative model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T., E-mail: t.yamamoto@ppl.appi.keio.ac.jp; Shibata, T.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Mattei, S.; Lettry, J. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Sawada, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Fantz, U. [Max-Plank-Instutut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To control the H{sup 0} atom production profile in the H{sup −} ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H{sup −} production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H{sup 0} atoms from H{sub 2} molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H{sup −} ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H{sup 0} production and the Balmer H{sub α} photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H{sup −} ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established.

  9. Microplasmas, a platform technology for a plethora of plasma applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kurt

    2017-08-01

    Publications describing microplasmas, which are commonly defined as plasmas with at least one dimension in the submillimeter range, began to appear to the scientific literature about 20 years ago. As discussed in a recent review by Schoenbach and Becker [1], interest and activities in basic microplasma research as well as in the use of microplasma for a variety of application has increased significatly over the past 20 years. The number of papers devoted to basic microplasma science increased by an order of magnitude between 1995 and 2015, a count that excludes publications dealing exclusively with technological applications of microplasmas, where the microplasma is used solely as a tool. In reference [1], the authors limited the topical coverage largely to the status of microplasma science and our understanding of the physics principles that enable microplasma operation and further stated that the rapid proliferation of microplasma applications made it impossible to cover both basic microplasma science and their application in a single review article.

  10. Scalable graphene production: perspectives and challenges of plasma applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Igor; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken); Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo; Keidar, Michael; B. K. Teo, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, a newly discovered and extensively investigated material, has many unique and extraordinary properties which promise major technological advances in fields ranging from electronics to mechanical engineering and food production. Unfortunately, complex techniques and high production costs hinder commonplace applications. Scaling of existing graphene production techniques to the industrial level without compromising its properties is a current challenge. This article focuses on the perspectives and challenges of scalability, equipment, and technological perspectives of the plasma-based techniques which offer many unique possibilities for the synthesis of graphene and graphene-containing products. The plasma-based processes are amenable for scaling and could also be useful to enhance the controllability of the conventional chemical vapour deposition method and some other techniques, and to ensure a good quality of the produced graphene. We examine the unique features of the plasma-enhanced graphene production approaches, including the techniques based on inductively-coupled and arc discharges, in the context of their potential scaling to mass production following the generic scaling approaches applicable to the existing processes and systems. This work analyses a large amount of the recent literature on graphene production by various techniques and summarizes the results in a tabular form to provide a simple and convenient comparison of several available techniques. Our analysis reveals a significant potential of scalability for plasma-based technologies, based on the scaling-related process characteristics. Among other processes, a greater yield of 1 g × h-1 m-2 was reached for the arc discharge technology, whereas the other plasma-based techniques show process yields comparable to the neutral-gas based methods. Selected plasma-based techniques show lower energy consumption than in thermal CVD processes, and the ability to produce graphene flakes of various

  11. A solar powered handheld plasma source for microbial decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Modic, M.; Whalley, R. D.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    A fully portable atmospheric pressure air plasma system is reported to be suitable for the microbial decontamination of both surfaces and liquids. The device operates in quiescent air, and includes an integrated battery which is charged from a solar cell and weighs less than 750 g, making it highly amenable for a wide variety of applications beyond the laboratory. Using particle imaging velocimetry to visualise air flows around the device, the geometric configuration of the plasma generating electrodes was enhanced to induce a gas flow on the order of 0.5 m s-1 directed towards a sample placed downstream, thus improving the transport of plasma generated reactive species to the sample. The microbial decontamination efficiency of the system was assessed using potable water samples inoculated with common waterborne organisms Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The reduction in the number of microorganisms was found to be in the range of 2-8 log and was strongly dependent on the plasma generation conditions.

  12. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  13. Collisional Scaling of the Energy Transfer in Drift-Wave Zonal Flow Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B; Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2017-02-03

    The collisionality scaling of density and potential coupling together with zonal flow energy transfer and spectral power is investigated at the stellarator experiment TJ-K. With a poloidal probe array, consisting of 128 Langmuir probes, density and potential fluctuations are measured on four neighboring flux surfaces simultaneously over the complete poloidal circumference. By analyzing Reynolds stress and pseudo-Reynolds stress, it is found that, for increasing collisionality, the coupling between density and potential decreases which hinders the zonal flow drive. Also, as a consequence, the nonlinear energy transfer, as well as the zonal flow contribution to the complete turbulent spectrum, decreases the same way. This is in line with theoretical expectations and is a first experimental verification of the importance of collisionality for large-scale structure formation in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas.

  14. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2016-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without...... simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model, which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field...... located at the outboard midplane of a tokamak. The model domain has two regions modeling open and closed field lines. The model employs a computational expedient model for collisional transport. Numerical simulations show good agreement between the full and the simplified model for collisional transport....

  15. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its application for polymer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sarani, Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet is a suitable source for polymer treatment. The main characteristic of this plasma jet is the remote operation and its scalable dimension, thus, allowing local treatment of 3D surfaces. In this work an atmospheric pressure DBD plasma jet has been constructed and the application of the plasma jet for polymer treatment is investigated.

  16. Study on the application of plasma technology to advanced global environmental harmony type technology; Kankyo chowagata gijutsu no kodoka eno plasma no oyo ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Plasma application technology is systematically investigated. Fundamental feature of plasma, method of plasma generation, special features of plasma, and its application area are arranged. The present application area of plasma chemical reaction in industry has been arranged for each utilization and process according to the patents research and scientific journals. For the global environmental harmony type technology, functions required for the membrane separators are investigated by assuming the recovery of environmental load substances, and possible manufacturing process of the membrane by using plasma technology is also investigated. For the improvement of catalysis by the plasma process, the requirement for the catalyst, a fine particle effect for catalyst, production of catalyst, plasma technology applicable to the improvement of catalyst, thermal plasma, and low-temperature plasma are described. For the application of plasma to enhance the catalysis reaction, synthesis of ammonia and methanol are described. 177 refs., 67 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli ( E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H2O2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H2O2 addition with O2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O2 injected and H2O2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  18. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H2O2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H2O2 addition with O2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O2 injected and H2O2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  19. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U. [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K. [Jeju National University, Faculty of Biotechnology (Korea, Republic of); Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J., E-mail: hjlee@jejunu.ac.kr [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O{sub 2}) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition with O{sub 2} injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH{sup •}, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O{sub 2} injected and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  20. The expansion of a plasma into a vacuum - Basic phenomena and processes and applications to space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1983-01-01

    In this review attention is called to basic phenomena and physical processes involved in the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, or the expansion of a plasma into a more tenuous plasma, in particular the fact that upon the expansion, ions are accelerated and reach energies well above their thermal energy. Also, in the process of the expansion a rarefaction wave propagates into the ambient plasma, an ion front moves into the expansion volume, and discontinuities in plasma parameters occur. The physical processes which cause the above phenomena are discussed, and their possible application is suggested for the case of the distribution of ions and electrons (hence plasma potential and electric fields) in the wake region behind artificial and natural obstacles moving supersonically in a rarefied space plasma. To illustrate this, some in situ results are reexamined. Directions for future work in this area via the utilization of the Space Shuttle and laboratory work are also mentioned.

  1. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  2. Collisional excitation of water by hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, F; Dagdigian, P J; Dubernet, M -L; lique, F; forêts, G Pineau des

    2014-01-01

    We present quantum dynamical calculations that describe the rotational excitation of H$_2$O due to collisions with H atoms. We used a recent, high accuracy potential energy surface, and solved the collisional dynamics with the close-coupling formalism, for total energies up to 12 000 cm$^{-1}$. From these calculations, we obtained collisional rate coefficients for the first 45 energy levels of both ortho- and para-H$_2$O and for temperatures in the range T = 5-1500 K. These rate coefficients are subsequently compared to the values previously published for the H$_2$O / He and H$_2$O / H$_2$ collisional systems. It is shown that no simple relation exists between the three systems and that specific calculations are thus mandatory.

  3. Plasma Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Nanocomposite Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Kong; Alex W. Kawczak

    2008-09-01

    The nanocomposite energy applications for plasma reactor produced nanoparticles are reviewed. Nanoparticles are commonly defined as particles less than 100 nm in diameter. Due to this small size, nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio. This increases the surface energy compared to the bulk material. The high surface-to-volume ratio and size effects (quantum effects) give nanoparticles distinctive chemical, electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties from those of the bulk material. Nanoparticles synthesis can be grouped into 3 broad approaches. The first one is wet phase synthesis (sol-gel processing), the second is mechanical attrition, and the third is gas-phase synthesis (aerosol). The properties of the final product may differ significantly depending on the fabrication route. Currently, there are no economical large-scale production processes for nanoparticles. This hinders the widespread applications of nanomaterials in products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is engaging in research and development of advanced modular hybrid plasma reactors for low cost production of nanoparticles that is predicted to accelerate application research and enable the formation of technology innovation alliances that will result in the commercial production of nanocomposites for alternative energy production devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaics and electrochemical double layer capacitors.

  4. Progress in the applicability of plasma X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, T., E-mail: T.Kuehl@gsi.de; Aurand, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Ecker, B.; Eisenbarth, U. [GSI (Germany); Guilbaud, O. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Fils, J.; Goette, S. [GSI (Germany); Habib, J. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Hochhaus, D.; Javorkova, D. [GSI (Germany); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, EMMI (Germany); Kazamias, S.; Pittman, M.; Ros, D. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Seres, J.; Spielmann, Ch. [Friedrich Schiller-University (Germany); Zielbauer, B.; Zimmer, D. [GSI (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Proposed as satellite-based weapons during the 1980s, X-ray lasing was for a long time only achieved with enormous amounts of pump energy in either nuclear explosions or at kilojoule-class laser installations. During the last few years a tremendous development was achieved, most visible in the realisation of the FEL lasers at DESY and SLAC. As important for a wider applicability is the enormous reduction in pump energy for laser pumped plasma X-ray lasers, which now brings such devices into the range of applications for diagnostics and spectroscopy even in smaller laboratories. Main developments were the transient excitation scheme and the optimized pumping concepts. This paper concentrates on developments at the GSI Helmholtzcenter at Darmstadt aiming towards reliable X-ray laser sources in the range from 50 to several 100 eV. The main driving forces for the laser development at GSI are the possible application for the spectroscopy of Li-like ions in the storage ring ESR and the future storage ring NESR at FAIR, and the interest in novel plasma diagnostics.

  5. Coblation technology: plasma-mediated ablation for otolaryngology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszko, Jean; Gilbride, Charles

    2000-05-01

    Coblation is a unique method of delivering radio frequency energy to soft tissue for applications in Otolaryngology (ENT). Using radio frequency in a bipolar mode with a conductive solution, such as saline, Coblation energizes the ions in the saline to form a small plasma field. The plasma has enough energy to break the tissue's molecular bonds, creating an ablative path. The thermal effect of this process is approximately 45 - 85 degrees Celsius, significantly lower than traditional radio-frequency techniques. Coblation has been used for Otolaryngological applications such as Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP), tonsillectomy, turbinate reduction, palate reduction, base of tongue reduction and various Head and Neck cancer procedures. The decreased thermal effect of Coblation anecdotally has led to less pain and faster recovery for cases where tissue is excised. In cases where Coblation is applied submucosally to reduce tissue volume (inferior turbinate, soft palate), the immediate volume reduction may lead to immediate clinical benefits for the patient. Coblation is currently being tested in various clinical studies to document the benefits for otolaryngological applications.

  6. Modeling non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasma using the Flexible Atomic Code data

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Bo; Salzmann, David; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new code, RCF("Radiative-Collisional code based on FAC"), which is used to simulate steady-state plasmas under non local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, especially photoinization dominated plasmas. RCF takes almost all of the radiative and collisional atomic processes into rate equation to interpret the plasmas systematically. The Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) supplies all the atomic data RCF needed, which insures calculating completeness and consistency of atomic data. With four input parameters relating to the radiation source and target plasma, RCF calculates the population of levels and charge states, as well as potentially emission spectrum. In preliminary application, RCF successfully reproduces the results of a photoionization experiment with reliable atomic data. The effects of the most important atomic processes on the charge state distribution are also discussed.

  7. Expansion of Collisional Radiative Model for Helium line ratio spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquegrani, David; Cooper, Chris; Forest, Cary; Milhone, Jason; Munoz-Borges, Jorge; Schmitz, Oliver; Unterberg, Ezekial

    2015-11-01

    Helium line ratio spectroscopy is a powerful technique of active plasma edge spectroscopy. It enables reconstruction of plasma edge parameters like electron density and temperature by use of suitable Collisional Radiative Models (CRM). An established approach is successful at moderate plasma densities (~1018m-3 range) and temperature (30-300eV), taking recombination and charge exchange to be negligible. The goal of this work is to experimentally explore limitations of this approach to CRM. For basic validation the Madison Plasma Dynamo eXperiment (MPDX) will be used. MPDX offers a very uniform plasma and spherical symmetry at low temperature (5-20 eV) and low density (1016 -1017m-3) . Initial data from MPDX shows a deviation in CRM results when compared to Langmuir probe data. This discrepancy points to the importance of recombination effects. The validated model is applied to first time measurement of electron density and temperature in front of an ICRH antenna at the TEXTOR tokamak. These measurements are important to understand RF coupling and PMI physics at the antenna limiters. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the UW - Madison, USA and NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210.

  8. Evolution of a Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, M. J.; Jafari Milani, M. R.; Niknam, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the spatial evolution of an intense circularly polarized Gaussian laser beam propagated through a warm plasma is investigated, taking into account the ponderomotive force, Ohmic heating, external magnetic field, and collisional effects. Using the momentum transfer and energy equations, both modified electron temperature and electron density in plasma are obtained. By introducing the complex dielectric permittivity of warm magnetized plasma and using the complex eikonal function, coupled differential equations for beam width parameter are established and solved numerically. The effects of polarization state of laser and magnetic field on the laser spot size evolution are studied. It is observed that in case of the right-handed polarization, an increase in the value of external magnetic field causes an increase in the strength of the self-focusing, especially in the higher values, and consequently, the self-focusing occurs in shorter distance of propagation. Moreover, the results demonstrate the existence of laser intensity and electron temperature ranges where self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of these regions; meanwhile, in these intervals, there exists a turning point for each of intensity and temperature in which the self-focusing process has its strongest strength. Finally, it is found that the self-focusing effect can be enhanced by increasing the plasma frequency (plasma density).

  9. Application of piezodetectors for diagnostics of pulsed and quasi-steady-state plasma streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, A.N.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Garkusha, I.E.; Tereshin, V.I.; Ladygina, M.S. [NSC KIPT, Kharkov (Ukraine). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2006-04-15

    The paper reports on studies of the plasma streams generated by two experimental devices: the quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator (QSPA) Kh-50 and the pulsed plasma gun PROSVET. The radial distributions of the plasma pressure for different times and varied distances from the accelerator output have been used for investigation of the plasma stream dynamics and study the plasma compression in the focus region for different operational regimes of plasma accelerators. In experiments for the application of pulsed plasma streams for surface modification of different industrial steels, optimal regimes of surface processing have been chosen on the basis of the plasma pressure measurements. Examples of application of the piezodetectors in simulation experiments on plasma surface interaction under high heat loads are presented.

  10. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar; Rajkumar; Dinesh Kumar; P J George

    2002-11-01

    Many semiconductor integrated circuit manufacturing processes require high dose of implantation at very low energies. Conventional beam line ion implantation system suffers from low beam current at low energies, therefore, cannot be used economically for high dose applications. Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is emerging as a potential technique for such implantations. This method offers high dose rate irrespective of implantation energy. In the present study nitrogen ions were implanted using PIII in order to modify the properties of silicon and some refractory metal films. Oxidation behaviour of silicon was observed for different implantation doses. Diffusion barrier properties of refractory barrier metals were studied for copper metallization.

  11. Plasma in dentistry: a review of basic concepts and applications in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Mi-Ae; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-related technologies are essential in modern industries. Recently, plasma has attracted increased attention in the biomedical field. This paper provides a basic knowledge of plasma and a narrative review of plasma applications in dentistry. To review plasma applications in dentistry, an electronic search in PubMed, SCOPUS and Google scholar up to December 2012 was done. This was followed by extensive hand searching using reference lists from relevant articles. There have been attempts to apply plasma technology in various fields of dentistry including surface modifications of dental implants, adhesion, caries treatment, endodontic treatment and tooth bleaching. Although many studies were in early stages, the potential value of plasma for dental applications has been demonstrated. To enlarge the scope of plasma applications and put relevant research to practical use, interdisciplinary research with participation of dental professionals is required.

  12. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  13. Development of atmospheric pressure plasma needle jet for sterilization applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfa, Rizan Rizon; Ahmad, Mohd Khairul; Soon, Chin Fhong; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Lias, Jais; Wibowo, Kusnanto Mukti; Bakar, Ahmad Shuhaimi Abu; Arshad, Mohd Khairuddin Md; Hashim, Uda; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2017-09-01

    Inactivation of bacteria or sterilization has been a major issue in the medical field, especially regarding of human safety, whereby, in a huge scenario fatality can be caused by hazardous bacteria. Often, E-coli as gram-negative bacteria are selected as a key indicator of proper sterilization process as E-coli is tough and dormant bacteria. The technology in sterilization has moved on from chemical, wet and irradiation sterilization to a high promising device such as atmospheric pressure plasma needle jet (APPNJ). It has been reported that atmospheric pressure plasma has provided bundle of advantages over earlier sterilization process. The APPNJ is developed in our lab using high frequency and high voltage neon transformer power supply connected to copper needle and copper sheet electrodes. The gas discharge is Ar gas flowing at 40 L/min through a quartz glass tube. The E-coli bacteria are self-cultured from waste water and then treated with APPNJ. The treatment processes are run into two difference gaps between the plasma orifice and sample with various treatment times. Only 40s is required by direct treatment to achieve 100% killing of E-coli. On the other hand, indirect treatment has inactivated 50% of the E-coli in 40s. In this study, direct and indirect effect of APPNJ to the E-coli can be observed which can be utilized into sterilization of bio-compatible material applications.

  14. Plasma process optimization for N-type doping applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Deven; Persing, Harold; Salimian, Siamak; Lacey, Kerry; Qin Shu; Hu, Jeff Y.; McTeer, Allen [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Micron Technology, Inc., 8000 S. Federal Way, Boise, ID 83707 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma doping (PLAD) has been adopted across the implant technology space and into high volume production for both conventional DRAM and NAND doping applications. PLAD has established itself as an alternative to traditional ion implantation by beamline implantation. The push for high doping concentration, shallow doping depth, and conformal doping capability expand the need for a PLAD solution to meet such requirements. The unique doping profile and doping characteristics at high dose rates allow for PLAD to deliver a high throughput, differentiated solution to meet the demand of evolving transistor technology. In the PLAD process, ions are accelerated to the wafer as with a negative wafer bias applied to the wafer. Competing mechanisms, such as deposition, sputtering, and etching inherent in plasma doping require unique control and process optimization. In this work, we look at the distinctive process tool control and characterization features which enable an optimized doping process using n-type (PH{sub 3} or AsH{sub 3}) chemistries. The data in this paper will draw the relationship between process optimization through plasma chemistry study to the wafer level result.

  15. Comparison of secondary islands in collisional reconnection to Hall reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, L S; Cassak, P A

    2010-07-02

    Large-scale resistive Hall-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the transition from Sweet-Parker (collisional) to Hall (collisionless) magnetic reconnection are presented; the first to separate secondary islands from collisionless effects. Three main results are described. There exists a regime with secondary islands but without collisionless effects, and the reconnection rate is faster than Sweet-Parker, but significantly slower than Hall reconnection. This implies that secondary islands do not cause the fastest reconnection rates. The onset of Hall reconnection ejects secondary islands from the vicinity of the X line, implying that energy is released more rapidly during Hall reconnection. Coronal applications are discussed.

  16. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  17. X-ray photoionized plasma diagnostics with Helium-like ions Application to Warm Absorber-Emitter in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Porquet, D; Porquet, Delphine

    2000-01-01

    We present He-like line ratios (resonance, intercombination and forbiddenlines) for totally and partially photoionized media. For solar plasmas, theseline ratios are already widely used for density and temperature diagnostics ofcoronal (collisional) plasmas. In the case of totally and partiallyphotoionized plasmas, He-like line ratios allow for the determination of theionization processes involved in the plasma (photoionization with or without anadditional collisional ionization process), as well as the density and theelectronic temperature. With the new generation of X-ray satellites,Chandra/AXAF, XMM and Astro-E, it will be feasible to obtain both high spectralresolution and high sensitivity observations. Thus in the coming years, theratios of these three components will be measurable for a large number ofnon-solar objects. In particular, these ratios could be applied to the WarmAbsorber-Emitter, commonly present in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). A betterunderstanding of the Warm Absorber connection to other...

  18. Dependence of intermittent density fluctuations on collisionality in TJ-K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuther, Kyle; Garland, Stephen; Ramisch, Mirko [Institut fuer Grenzflaechenverfahrenstechnikund Plasmatechnologie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Manz, Peter [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Particle and heat transport losses due to edge turbulence are well known phenomena commonly seen in toroidal magnetic confinement devices. Furthermore in the scrape-off layer (SOL), turbulent density fluctuations are often observed to be intermittent and dominate particle transport to the vessel walls. In the adiabatic limit (small collisionality), of the two-field Hasegawa-Wakatani model, simulated turbulent density fluctuations are observed to couple to potential fluctuations and exhibit Gaussian behavior. However, in the hydrodynamic limit (large collisionality) the density and potential decouple. As a result, the density becomes passively advected, evolves towards the vorticity, and exhibits intermittent behavior. The relationship between collisionality and intermittency is investigated experimentally at the stellarator TJ-K. To vary the plasma collisionality, which is related to electron density and temperature, parameters such as gas type, neutral gas pressure, magnetic field, and heating power are varied. Radial profiles of plasma density, temperature, floating potential, and vorticity are recorded via a scanning 7-tip Langmuir probe array. First results are presented.

  19. Jeans instability of inhomogeneous dusty plasma with polarization force, ionization and recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shweta; Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2017-05-01

    The self-gravitational Jeans instability has been studied in dusty plasma containing significant background of neutral pressure and recombination of ions and electrons on the dust surface. The full dynamics of charged dust grains, ions and neutral species are employed considering the electrons as Maxwellian. We have derived the general dispersion relation for collisional dusty plasma with ionization, recombination and polarization force. The general dispersion relation describes the effects of considered parameters which are solved in different dusty plasma situations. Further, the dispersion relation is solved numerically. The present work is applicable to understand the structure formation of interstellar molecular clouds in astrophysical plasma.

  20. Plasma-etched nanostructures for optical applications (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Ulrike; Rickelt, Friedrich; Munzert, Peter; Kaiser, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    A basic requirement for many optical applications is the reduction of Fresnel-reflections. Besides of interference coatings, nanostructures with sub-wavelength size as known from the eye of the night-flying moth can provide antireflective (AR) properties. The basic principle is to mix a material with air on a sub-wavelength scale to decrease the effective refractive index. To realize AR nanostructures on polymers, the self-organized formation of stochastically arranged antireflective structures using a low-pressure plasma etching process was studied. An advanced procedure involves the use of additional deposition of a thin oxide layer prior etching. A broad range of different structure morphologies exhibiting antireflective properties can be generated on almost all types of polymeric materials. For applications on glass, organic films are used as a transfer medium. Organic layers as thin film materials were evaluated to identify compounds suitable for forming nanostructures by plasma etching. The vapor deposition and etching of organic layers on glass offers a new possibility to achieve antireflective properties in a broad spectral range and for a wide range of light incidence.

  1. Collisional evolution of eccentric planetesimal swarms

    CERN Document Server

    Wyatt, M C; Payne, M J; Churcher, L J

    2009-01-01

    Models for the steady state collisional evolution of low eccentricity planetesimal belts identify debris disks with hot dust at 1AU, like eta Corvi and HD69830, as anomalous since collisional processing should have removed most of the planetesimal mass over their >1 Gyr lifetimes. This paper looks at the effect of large planetesimal eccentricities (e>>0.3) on their collisional lifetime and the amount of mass that can remain at late times M_{late}. For an axisymmetric planetesimal disk with common pericentres and eccentricities e, we find that M_{late} \\propto e^{-5/3}(1+e)^{4/3}(1-e)^{-3}. For a scattered disk-like population (i.e., common pericentres), in the absence of dynamical evolution, the mass evolution at late times would be as if only planetesimals with the largest eccentricity were present. Despite the increased remaining mass, higher eccentricities do not increase the hot emission from the collisional cascade until e>0.99, partly because most collisions occur near pericentre thus increasing the dus...

  2. Microwave plasma: its characteristics and applications in thin film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, J.

    Microwave plasmas differ significantly from other plasmas, exhibit many interesting properties and so offer new possibilities for the plasma processing of thin films. Plasma properties strongly depend on the conditions and methods used to excite the gas. Due to the existence of a direct connection between the properties of plasma-prepared thin films and plasma micro-parameters a perfect knowledge of the plasma generation is a basic requirement for mastering a plasma deposition process. Therefore, different methods of generating microwave isotropic and anisotropic plasmas are discussed. Special attention is devoted to the mechanisms of plasma excitation and to the generation of a dense and homogeneous plasma in thin film technology are also presented.

  3. Plasma dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rincon, F; Schekochihin, A A; Valentini, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire Universe and, through their dynamical interactions with matter, affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. How primordial cosmological seed fields arose and were further amplified to $\\mu$Gauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs, is a major theoretical puzzle still largely unconstrained by observations. Extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to collisional magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic-field growth and its sustainment through an efficient dynamo instability driven by chaotic motions is possible in such plasmas is not known. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a six-dimensional phase space necessary to answer this question have until recently remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic-field a...

  4. Buoyancy Instabilities in a Weakly Collisional Intracluster Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Matthew W; Reynolds, Christopher S; Stone, James M

    2012-01-01

    The intracluster medium of galaxy clusters is a weakly collisional, high-beta plasma in which the transport of heat and momentum occurs primarily along magnetic-field lines. Anisotropic heat conduction allows convective instabilities to be driven by temperature gradients of either sign, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the outskirts of non-isothermal clusters and the heat-flux buoyancy-driven instability (HBI) in their cooling cores. We employ the Athena MHD code to investigate the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities, self-consistently including the effects of anisotropic viscosity (i.e. Braginskii pressure anisotropy), anisotropic conduction, and radiative cooling. We highlight the importance of the microscale instabilities that inevitably accompany and regulate the pressure anisotropies generated by the HBI and MTI. We find that, in all but the innermost regions of cool-core clusters, anisotropic viscosity significantly impairs the ability of the HBI to reorient magnetic-field lines orthogonal...

  5. Analyses of the short pulse laser pumped transient collisional excited X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, A.; Utsumi, T.; Moribayashi, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Kado, M.; Tanaka, M.; Hasegawa, N.; Kawachi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Osaka (Japan). Advanced Photon Research Center

    2001-07-01

    The soft X-ray gain of the transient collisional excited (TCE) Ni-like Ag laser is investigated using the plasma hydrodynamics and atomic kinetics codes. The gain is calculated for a plasma produced from two 100ps laser irradiated solid target to show qualitative agreement with the experiment. The calculation shows significant improvement of the gain using a thin foil target pumped by two short laser pulses, because of a better coupling of the pump laser energy into the gain region of the plasma. The codes will provide performance prediction as well as optimization of the experimental studies of the TCE X-ray lasers. (orig.)

  6. Hybrid accretionary/collisional mechanism of Paleozoic Asian continental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmann, Karel; Lexa, Ondrej; Janousek, Vojtech; Pavla, Stipska; Yingde, Jiang; Alexandra, Guy; Min, Sun

    2016-04-01

    Continental crust is formed above subduction zones by well-known process of "juvenile crust growth". This new crust is in modern Earth assembled into continents by two ways: (i) short-lived collisions of continental blocks with the Eurasian continent along the "Alpine-Himalayan collisional/interior orogens" in the heart of the Pangean continental plates realm; and (ii) long lived lateral accretion of ocean-floor fragments along "circum-Pacific accretionary/peripheral orogens" at the border of the Pacific oceanic plate. This configuration has existed since the late Proterozoic, when the giant accretionary Terra Australis Orogen developed at periphery of an old Palaeo-Pacific ocean together with collisional Caledonian and Variscan orogens. At the same time, the large (ca. 9 millions km2) Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) developed in the NE part of the Pangea. This orogen reveals features of both peripheral and interior orogens, which implies that the generally accepted "peripheral-accretionary" and "interior- collisional" paradigm is not applicable here. To solve this conundrum a new model of unprecedented Phanerozoic continental growth is proposed. In this model, the CAOB precursor evolved at the interface of old exterior and young interior oceans. Subsequently, the new lithospheric domain was transferred by advancing subduction into the interior of the Pangean mostly continental realm. During this process the oceanic crust was transformed into continental crust and it was only later when this specific lithosphere was incorporated into the Asian continent. If true, this concept represents revolutionary insight into processes of crustal growth explaining the enigma of anchoring hybrid lithosphere inside a continent without its subduction or Tibetan-type thickening.

  7. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Iasi Plasma Advanced Research Center (IPARC), Bd. Carol I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  8. Th.P-19. Collisional effects and dynamic aperture in high-intensity storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, Bologna 40126 (Italy)]. E-mail: benedetti@bo.infn.it; Rambaldi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, Bologna 40126 (Italy)

    2005-05-21

    We analyze the dynamic aperture in the presence of strong sextupolar errors for a high-intensity beam. The scaling laws for the short-term dynamic aperture are examined and its dependence on the perveance is discussed in a mean field approximation for a coasting beam. The collisional effects of Coulombian interaction are estimated for a linear lattice using a scaling law for the relaxation time. The collisional effects on the long-time dynamic aperture are discussed by comparing the results of full Hamiltonian integration with a mean field theory. An application to a storage ring with the HIDIF parameters is briefly outlined.

  9. [Application of platelet-rich plasma in clinical orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weili; Li, Qi; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the application status and progress of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in clinical orthopedics. The recent related literature concerning the application of PRP in clinical orthopedics was extensively reviewed and analyzed. Recently, a large number of clinical studies on PRP have been carried out, which are applied in bone defects or nonunion, spinal fusion, osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries, ligament reconstruction, muscle strain, tendon terminal diseases, and a variety of acute and chronic soft tissue injuries. Some results show certain effectiveness, while others demonstrate invalid. Easily drawing, achieving autologous transplantation, and the biological repair potential of the musculoskeletal tissues make PRP to be widely used in clinical orthopedics. However, there are still no uniform standards accepted and reliable clinical guidelines about the application of PRP. Furthermore, a variety of PRP products and their respective indications are also different. The clinical evidences with the greater sample size and higher quality are still needed to further support the safety and effectiveness of PRP in clinical orthopedics.

  10. Robust regression with CUDA and its application to plasma reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diogo R; Carvalho, Pedro J; Fernandes, Horácio

    2015-11-01

    In many applications, especially those involving scientific instrumentation data with a large experimental error, it is often necessary to carry out linear regression in the presence of severe outliers which may adversely affect the results. Robust regression methods do exist, but they are much more computationally intensive, making it difficult to apply them in real-time scenarios. In this work, we resort to graphics processing unit (GPU)-based computing to carry out robust regression in a time-sensitive application. We illustrate the results and the performance gains obtained by parallelizing one of the most common robust regression methods, namely, least median of squares. Although the method has a complexity of O(n(3)logn), with GPU computing, it is possible to accelerate it to the point that it becomes usable within the required time frame. In our experiments, the input data come from a plasma diagnostic system installed at Joint European Torus, the largest fusion experiment in Europe, but the approach can be easily transferred to other applications.

  11. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  12. PLATELET RICH PLASMA (PRP APPLICATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY (TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pencho Kosev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To find out the PRP application effects in TKA on pain syndrome, wound healing, postoperative blood loss, range of motion and the knee circumference (centimetry. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The preparation of the platelet-rich plasma is based on our treatment algorithm. 20 patients have been subject to TKA within the period from October 2012 to November 2014 and underwent TKA, as platelet rich plasma was used intraoperatively. The average patient age is 72,3; 9 male and 11 female patients. Control group consisted of 17 patients, who underwent surgery in the same period but no platelet rich plasma was used during surgery. Average patient age 73,1; 8 male and 9 female patients. RESULTS: The following results have been reported for the PRP group of patients: the average amount of blood in the aspiration drainage tube in 24 hours - 285 ml.; postoperative pain on the 1st postoperative day was - 7 p., on the 5th day - 5 p., on the 10th day - 2 p., average circumference (centimetry of the knee between the 1st and the 10th postoperative day decreased on average by 1,5-2 cm., range of motion – reported average degrees per patient on the 1st postoperative day in sagittal plane: 0-10-20 degrees; on the 10th postoperative day: 0-0-55 degrees, surgical wounds of all patients healed primarily without any complications. No PRP group: average amount of blood in the aspiration drainage in 24 hours – 300 pl., postoperative pain on the 1st, 5th , and 10th postoperative day - 8 p., on the 5th day - 6 p., on the 10th day - 3 p., average knee circumference (centimetry between 1 and 10 postoperative day has decreased by 1 cm on average, range of motion - reported average degrees per patient on the 1st postoperative day in sagittal plane 0-5-20 degrees, on the 10th: 0-0-50 degrees, surgical wounds healed primarily without any complications in 10 patients, but in 7 patients we observed superficial wound edge skin necrosis. CONCLUSION: Our results unequivocally

  13. Eigenvalue solution to the electron-collisional effect on ion-acoustic and entropy waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The linearized electron Fokker-Planck and cold-ion fluid equations are solved as an eigenvalue problem in the quasineutral limit for ionization state,Z=1,8,and 64 for ion-acoustic and entropy waves.The perturbed electron distribution function is written as a moment expansion of eigenvectors,and is used to compute collisionality-dependence macroscopic quantities in the plasma such as the generalized specific heat ratio,and the electron thermal conductivity.

  14. Characteristics and potential applications of an ORNL microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source that has two ECR plasma production regions and uses multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasma over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2} and could be scaled up to produce uniform plasma over 700 cm{sup 2} or larger. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The working gases used were argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of the discharge parameters. The discharge characteristics and a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source are described and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam sources for manufacturing advanced microelectronics, for space electric propulsion, and for fusion research, are discussed. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Modeling and simulations on the propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in sub-atmospheric pressure plasma slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. B.; Nie, Q. Y.; Li, B. W.; Kong, F. R.

    2017-01-01

    Sub-atmospheric pressure plasma slabs exhibit the feature of relatively high plasma number density and high collisional frequency between electrons and neutral gases, as well as similar thickness to the electromagnetic (EM) wavelength in communication bands. The propagation characteristics of EM waves in sub-atmospheric pressure plasma slabs are attracting much attention of the researchers due to their applications in the plasma antenna, the blackout effect during reentry, wave energy injection in the plasma, etc. In this paper, a numerical model with a one-dimensional assumption has been established and therefore, it is used for the investigations of the propagation characteristics of the EM waves in plasma slabs. In this model, the EM waves propagating in both sub-wavelength plasma slabs and plasmas with thicker slabs can be studied simultaneously, which is superior to the model with geometrical optics approximation. The influence of EM wave frequencies and collisional frequencies on the amplitude of the transmitted EM waves is discussed in typical plasma profiles. The results will be significant for deep understanding of the propagation behaviors of the EM waves in sub-atmospheric pressure nonuniform plasma slabs, as well as the applications of the interactions between EM waves and the sub-atmospheric pressure plasmas.

  16. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  17. Collisional Simulations of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen, J.; Porco, C.

    1997-03-01

    The currently accepted model for Neptune arc confinement relies on the radial and azimuthal confining perturbations due to the nearby satellite, Galatea. This model calls for arc particle orbits exhibiting a negative eccentricity gradient and crossing at quadrature, a configuration that paradoxically leads to collisions energetic enough to disrupt arc confinement. We confirm with numerical collisional N-body simulations that the confinement mechanism relying on a 42:43 corotation-inclination resonance and a 42:43 outer Lindblad resonance with Galatea is indeed capable of confining a large population of 10-m-size and bigger particles over short time scales. Moreover, we find that an 84:86 outer vertical resonance, also due to Galatea, falling within 20 m of the arcs' radial position, effectively reduces the collision frequency and relative collisional velocities and consequently stabilizes the arcs over long time scales against the disruptive effects of collisions.

  18. Collisional and collisionless expansion of Yukawa balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Goree, John A

    2013-12-01

    The expansion of Yukawa balls is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations of collisionless and collisional situations. High computation speed was achieved by using the parallel computing power of graphics processing units. When the radius of the Yukawa ball is large compared to the shielding length, the expansion process starts with the blow-off of the outermost layer. A rarefactive wave subsequently propagates radially inward at the speed of longitudinal phonons. This mechanism is fundamentally different from Coulomb explosions, which employ a self-similar expansion of the entire system. In the collisionless limit, the outer layers carry away most of the available energy. The simulations are compared with analytical estimates. In the collisional case, the expansion process can be described by a nonlinear diffusion equation that is a special case of the porous medium equation.

  19. Development of plasma needle to be used for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, B.; Jain, J.; Inestrosa-Izurieta, M. J.; Avaria, G.; Moreno, J.; Pavez, C.; Marcelain, K.; Armisen, R.; Soto, L.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma needle is a novel design of a plasma source at atmospheric pressure to achieve a non-thermal plasma jet. The advantage of the plasma needle is that it can be operated in open air, outside a vessel. The plasma that is generated with the plasma needle is small (about one millimetre) and non-thermal, the temperature of the neutral particles and ions is in about room temperature and suitably can interact with living biological cell without damaging the cell. In this work, we report the development of a plasma needle, which is operated by a dc power source and produced a stable plasma jet on water surface. Argon gas is used to operate the plasma needle. The preliminary electrical diagnostics of the plasma needle shows that the discharge is filamentary in nature. For diagnostic of the plasma jet produced by the developed plasma needle, the produced plasma jet is directed to water surface and characterization are carried out by means of electrical discharge characteristics and optical emission spectroscopy. In this work, preliminary results of the diagnostic will be presented.

  20. Esterification by the Plasma Acidic Water: Novel Application of Plasma Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling

    2014-03-01

    This work explores the possibility of plasma acid as acid catalyst in organic reactions. Plasma acidic water was prepared by dielectric barrier discharge and used to catalyze esterification of n-heptanioc acid with ethanol. It is found that the plasma acidic water has a stable and better performance than sulfuric acid, meaning that it is an excellent acid catalyst. The plasma acidic water would be a promising alternative for classic mineral acid as a more environment friendly acid.

  1. Molecular spectroscopy and collisional excitation. [in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S.

    1975-01-01

    The paper examines the basic principles underlying the molecular transitions responsible for interstellar molecular spectra. The energy levels of molecules are discussed in detail with special attention given to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic Hamiltonian, and the parameters of vibrational and rotational energy. The probabilities for radiative and collisional transitions are calculated. A brief review of techniques for molecular spectroscopy is presented along with methods used to determine collision cross sections on both an experimental and a theoretical basis.

  2. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I. [Departments of Chemistry and Electro-Optics and the Ilse Katz Center for Nano-Science, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  3. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  4. Kinetic Theory of Instability-Enhanced Collisional Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2009-11-01

    A generalization of the Lenard-Balescu collision operator is derived which accounts for the scattering of particles by instability amplified fluctuations that originate from the thermal motion of discrete particles (in contrast to evoking a fluctuation level externally, as is done in quasilinear kinetic theory) [1]. Emphasis is placed on plasmas with convective instabilities. It is shown that an instability-enhanced collective response results which can be the primary mechanism for scattering particles, being orders of magnitude more frequent than conventional Coulomb collisions, even though the fluctuations are in a linear growth phase. The resulting collision operator is shown to obey conservation laws (energy, momentum, and density), Galilean invariance, and the Boltzmann H-theorem. It has the property that Maxwellian is the unique equilibrium distribution function; again in contrast to weak turbulence or quasilinear theories. Instability-enhanced collisional effects can dominate particle scattering and cause strong frictional forces. For example, this theory has been applied to two outstanding problems: Langmuir's paradox [2] and determining Bohm's criterion for plasmas with multiple ion species [3]. Langmuir's paradox is a measurement of anomalous electron scattering rapidly establishing a Maxwellian distribution in gas discharges with low temperature and pressure. This may be explained by instability-enhanced scattering in the plasma-boundary transition region (presheath) where convective ion-acoustic instabilities are excited. Bohm's criterion for multiple ion species is a single condition that the ion fluid speeds must obey at the sheath edge; but it is insufficient to determine the speed of individual species. It is shown that an instability-enhanced collisional friction, due to streaming instabilities in the presheath, determines this criterion.[4pt] [1] S.D. Baalrud, J.D. Callen, and C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 15, 092111 (2008).[0pt] [2] S.D. Baalrud, J

  5. Acceleration of compact toroid plasma rings for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Barr, W.L.; Eddleman, J.L.; Gee, M.; Hammer, J.H.; Ho, S.K.; Logan, B.G.; Meeker, D.J.; Mirin, A.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1988-08-26

    We describe experimental results for a new type of collective accelerator based on magnetically confined compact torus (CT) plasma rings and discuss applications to both inertial and magnetic fusion. We have demonstrated the principle of CT acceleration in the RACE device with acceleration of 0.5 mg ring masses to 400 km/s and 0.02 mg ring masses to 1400 km/s at greater than or equal to30% efficiency. Scaling the CT accelerator to the multi-megajoule level could provide an efficient, economical driver for inertial fusion (ICF) or magnetically insulated inertial fusion. Efficient conversion to x-rays for driving hohlraum-type ICF targets has been modeled using a radiation-hydrodynamics code. At less demanding conditions than required for ICF, a CT accelerator can be applied to fueling and current drive in tokamaks. Fueling is accomplished by injecting CTs at the required rate to sustain the particle inventory and at a velocity sufficient to penetrate to the magnetic axis before CT dissolution. Current drive is a consequence of the magnetic helicity content of the CT, which is approximately conserved during reconnection of the CT fields with the tokamak. Major areas of uncertainty in CT fueling and current drive concern the mechanism by which CTs will stop in a tokamak plasma and the effects of the CT on energy confinement and magnetic stability. Bounds on the required CT injection velocity are obtained by considering drag due to emission of an Alfven-wave wake and rapid reconnection and tilting on the internal Alfven time scale of the CT. Preliminary results employing a 3-D, resistive MHD code show rapid tilting with the CT aligning its magnetic moment with the tokamak field. Requirements for an experimental test of CT injection and scenarios for fueling a reactor will also be discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen Rydberg states in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1982-08-01

    Hydrogen Rydberg states in a hydrogen plasma are optically excited from the plasma-excited n = 2 state. Photoionization and optogalvanic, which are due to electron-impact ionization and other collisional processes, are used to monitor the Rydberg states. This process may be used to study collisional ionization of the Rydberg states.

  7. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen Rydberg states in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glab, W; Nayfeh, M H

    1982-08-01

    Hydrogen Rydberg states in a hydrogen plasma are optically excited from the plasma-excited n = 2 state. Photoionization and optogalvanic ionization, which is due to electron-impact ionization and other collisional processes, are used to monitor the Rydberg states. This process may be used to study collisional ionization of the Rydberg states.

  8. PLASMA-2013: International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas (Warsaw, Poland, 2-6 September 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The PLASMA-2013 International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas was held in Warsaw (Poland) from 2 to 6 September 2013. The conference was organized by the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, under the auspices of the Polish Physical Society. The scope of the PLASMA conferences, which have been organized every two years since 1993, covers almost all issues of plasma physics and fusion research as well as selected problems of plasma technology. The PLASMA-2013 conference topics included: •Elementary processes and general plasma physics. •Plasmas in tokamaks and stellarators (magnetic confinement fusion). •Plasmas generated by laser beams and inertial confinement fusion. •Plasmas produced by Z-pinch and plasma-focus discharges. •Low-temperature plasma physics. •Space plasmas and laboratory astrophysics. •Plasma diagnostic methods and applications of plasmas. This conference was designed not only for plasma researchers and engineers, but also for students from all over the world, in particular for those from Central and Eastern Europe. Almost 140 participants had the opportunity to hear 9 general lectures, 11 topical talks and 26 oral presentations, as well as to see and discuss around 120 posters. From about 140 contributions, after the preparation of about 100 papers and the peer review process, only 74 papers have been accepted for publication in this topical issue. Acknowledgments Acting on behalf of the International Scientific Committee I would like to express our thanks to all the invited speakers and all the participants of the PLASMA-2013 conference for their numerous contributions. In particular, I wish to thank all of the authors of papers submitted for publication in this topical issue of Physica Scripta . Particular thanks are due to all of the reviewers for their valuable reports and comments, which helped to improve the quality of many of the papers. International Scientific Committee Marek J Sadowski, NCBJ

  9. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C. (Fusion Energy Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-05-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300-400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. (orig.).

  11. A Novel Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Fluidized Bed and Its Application in Mutation of Plant Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guang-Liang; WANG Zhen-Quan; HAN Er-Li; FU Ya-Bo; YANG Si-Ze; FAN Song-Hua; LI Chun-Ling; GU Wei-Chao; FENG Wen-Ran; ZHANG Gu-Ling; WANG Jiu-Li; Latif K.; ZHANG Shu-Gen

    2005-01-01

    @@ An atmospheric pressure plasma fluidized bed (APPFB) is designed to generate plasma using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with one liquid electrode. In the APPFB system, the physical properties of DBD discharge and its application in plant-seed mutating are studied fundamentally. The results show that the generated plasma is a typical glow discharge free from filament and arc plasma, and the macro-temperature of the plasma fluidized bed is nearly at room temperature. There are no obvious changes in the pimientos when their seeds are treated by APPFB, but great changes are found for coxcombs.

  12. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near...

  13. Naphthalene and acenaphthene decomposition by electron beam generated plasma application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapczuk, A.; Hakoda, T.; Shimada, A.; Kojima, T. [Institute for Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-08-15

    The application of non-thermal plasma generated by electron beam (EB) was investigated in laboratory scale to study decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like naphthalene and acenaphthene in flue gas. PAH compounds were treated by EB with the dose up to 8 kGy in dry and humid base gas mixtures. Experimentally established G-values gained 1.66 and 3.72 mol/100 eV for NL and AC at the dose of 1 kGy. NL and AC removal was observed in dry base gas mixtures showing that the reaction with OH radical is not exclusive pathway to initialize PAH decomposition; however in the presence of water remarkably higher decomposition efficiency was observed. As by-products of NL decomposition were identified compounds containing one aromatic ring and oxygen atoms besides CO and CO{sub 2}. It led to the conclusion that PAH decomposition process in humid flue gas can be regarded as multi-step oxidative de-aromatization analogical to its atmospheric chemistry.

  14. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Material Applications for Thruster Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Sandra; Holmes, Richard; Hickman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A variety of vacuum plasma spray (VPS) material systems have been successfully applied to injector and thrust chamber components. VPS offers a versatile fabrication process with relatively low costs to produce near net shape parts. The materials available with VPS increase operating margins and improve component life by providing superior thermal and oxidation protection in specific engine environments. Functional gradient materials (FGM) formed with VPS allow thrust chamber liners to be fabricated with GRCop-84 (an alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium) and a protective layer of NiCrAlY on the hot wall. A variety of thrust chamber liner designs have been fabricated to demonstrate the versatility of the process. Hot-fire test results have confined the improved durability and high temperature performance of the material systems for thrust chamber liners. Similar FGM s have been applied to provide superior thermal protection on injector faceplates with NiCrAlY and zirconia coatings. The durability of the applied materials has been demonstrated with hot-fire cycle testing on injector faceplates in high temperature environments. The material systems can benefit the components used in booster and main engine propulsion systems. More recent VPS efforts are focused on producing rhenium based material systems for high temperature applications to benefit in-space engines like reaction control system (RCS) thrusters.

  15. Application of nonlinear methods to the study of ionospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, A. A.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Kozelov, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the processes taking place in the auroral region of Earth's ionosphere are reflected in a variety of dynamic forms of the aurora borealis. In order to study these processes it is necessary to consider temporary and spatial variations of the characteristics of ionospheric plasma. Most traditional methods of classical physics are applicable mainly for stationary or quasi-stationary phenomena, but dynamic regimes, transients, fluctuations, selfsimilar scaling could be considered using the methods of nonlinear dynamics. Special interest is the development of the methods for describing the spatial structure and the temporal dynamics of auroral ionosphere based on the ideas of percolation theory and fractal geometry. The fractal characteristics (the Hausdorff fractal dimension and the index of connectivity) of Hall and Pedersen conductivities are used to the description of fractal patterns in the ionosphere. To obtain the self-consistent estimates of the parameters the Hausdorff fractal dimension and the index of connectivity in the auroral zone, an additional relation describing universal behavior of the fractal geometry of percolation at the critical threshold is applied. Also, it is shown that Tsallis statistics can be used to study auroral ionosphere

  16. Collisional-radiative model for the visible spectrum of W{sup 26+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xiaobin, E-mail: dingxb@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Liu, Jiaxin [Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Koike, Fumihiro [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo, 102-8554 (Japan); Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Dong, Chenzhong [Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2016-02-22

    Plasma diagnostics in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas by using visible spectrum strongly depends on the knowledge of fundamental atomic properties. A detailed collisional-radiative model of W{sup 26+} ions has been constructed by considering radiative and electron excitation processes, in which the necessary atomic data had been calculated by relativistic configuration interaction method with the implementation of Flexible Atomic Code. The visible spectrum observed at an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) in Shanghai in the range of 332 nm to 392 nm was reproduced by present calculations. Some transition pairs of which the intensity ratio is sensitive to the electron density were selected as potential candidates of plasma diagnostics. Their electron density dependence is theoretically evaluated for the cases of EBIT plasmas and magnetic confinement fusion plasmas.

  17. Collisional-Radiative Model for the visible spectrum of $W^{26+}$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Xiaobin; Koike, Fumihiro; Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Dong, Chenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Plasma diagnostics in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas by using visible spectrum strongly depends on the knowledge of fundamental atomic properties. A detailed collisional-radiative model of W$^{26+}$ ions has been constructed by considering radiative and electron excitation processes, in which the necessary atomic data had been calculated by relativistic configuration interaction method with the implementation of Flexible Atomic Code. The visible spectrum observed at an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) in Shanghai in the range of 332 nm to 392 nm was reproduced by present calculations. Some transition pairs of which the intensity ratio are sensitive to the electron density were selected as potential candidate of plasma diagnostics. Their electron density dependence are theoretically evaluated for the cases of EBIT plasmas and magnetic confinement fusion plasmas.

  18. Collisional-Radiative Modeling of Tungsten at Temperatures of 1200–2400 eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colgan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss new collisional-radiative modeling calculations of tungsten at moderate temperatures of 1200 to 2400 eV. Such plasma conditions are relevant to ongoing experimental work at ASDEX Upgrade and are expected to be relevant for ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL collisional-radiative modeling ATOMIC code. These calculations formed part of a submission to the recent NLTE-8 workshop that was held in November 2013. This series of workshops provides a forum for detailed comparison of plasma and spectral quantities from NLTE collisional-radiative modeling codes. We focus on the LANL ATOMIC calculations for tungsten that were submitted to the NLTE-8 workshop and discuss different models that were constructed to predict the tungsten emission. In particular, we discuss comparisons between semi-relativistic configuration-average and fully relativistic configuration-average calculations. We also present semi-relativistic calculations that include fine-structure detail, and discuss the difficult problem of ensuring completeness with respect to the number of configurations included in a CR calculation.

  19. Electrical discharges of plasma ozonizer and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirawanichakul, S.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ozone synthesis is one of the applications of near atmospheric plasma processing. An ozone generator in this research comprised two annular cylindrical-shaped electrodes. The inner electrode was made ofstainless steel covered with the dielectric glass and the outer electrode was also made of stainless steel. The electric spacing gap was 0.0075 m and length of ozonizer was 0.21 m. Oxygen gas passing through thedischarge gap between two electrodes supplied by an alternating current (AC high voltage power supply, frequency 50 Hz, ranging of 6-10 kVAC was used for producing ozone. The amount of ozone was determinedby the KI standard method. The result showed that the concentration of ozone is proportional to the AC applied voltage. For determining effect of purified oxygen feed rate of 6-10 L/min on quantity of ozone, theresults indicated that at the volumetric flow rate of 8 L/min produced the largest amount of ozone. In addition, ozone concentration at a flow rate of 8 L/min and an electrical discharge time of 3 minutes wasapproximately determined as 41, 60, 80 and 135 mg/L at 8, 9, 10 and 11 kVAC, respectively. Moreover, study of dye wastewater of Krajud mat was proposed and treated by three different methods. Firstly, dye wastewater was solely treated by a plasma ozonation. Secondly, a combination ofozonation and alum coagulation was used for dye wastewater treatment. Finally, the combined ozonation and activated carbon adsorption were used for dye wastewater treatment. The experimental results showedthat the percentage of light absorbance reduction of pink dyed wastewater for these three different methods was about 56%, 35% and 10%, respectively compared to the reference sample. In addition, For thesemethods, the percentage of BOD of treated dye wastewater could be reduced to 64%, 54% and 46% respectively, the percentage of COD could be reduced to approximately 78%, 62% and 27%, respectively, comparedto the reference sample. In conclusion, the

  20. Collisional blockade in microscopic optical dipole traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, N; Reymond, G; Grangier, P

    2002-07-08

    We analyze the operating regimes of a very small optical dipole trap, loaded from a magneto-optical trap, as a function of the atom loading rate, i.e., the number of atoms per second entering the dipole trap. We show that, when the dipole trap volume is small enough, a "collisional blockade" mechanism locks the average number of trapped atoms on the value 0.5 over a large range of loading rates. We also discuss the "weak loading" and "strong loading" regimes outside the blockade range, and we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these three regimes.

  1. Collisional evolution of the early asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, Ricardo; Brunini, Adrián

    1999-04-01

    We present numerical results obtained by a simulation of the collisional process between asteroids and scattered comets from the Uranus-Neptune zone. This mechanism allows the use of single exponent incremental size distributions for the initial belt reaching a final distribution that matches the observed population very well. Since the cometary bombardment was extremely efficient removing mass from the primordial asteroid belt in a very short time, we always obtained belts with total masses less than 0.001 M ⊕ after ≈ 2×10 7 yrs. This result allows processes with an important initial mass preserving Vestas basaltic crust.

  2. Missing Mass in Collisional Debris from Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, F; Brinks, E; Boquien, M; Amram, P; Lisenfeld, U; Koribalski, B S; Walter, F; Charmandaris, V

    2007-01-01

    Recycled dwarf galaxies can form in the collisional debris of massive galaxies. Theoretical models predict that, contrary to classical galaxies, they should be free of non-baryonic Dark Matter. Analyzing the observed gas kinematics of such recycled galaxies with the help of a numerical model, we demonstrate that they do contain a massive dark component amounting to about twice the visible matter. Staying within the standard cosmological framework, this result most likely indicates the presence of large amounts of unseen, presumably cold, molecular gas. This additional mass should be present in the disks of their progenitor spiral galaxies, accounting for a significant part of the so-called missing baryons.

  3. Studying surface glow discharge for application in plasma aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshonok, D. V.

    2014-02-01

    Surface glow discharge in nitrogen between two infinite planar electrodes occurring on the same plane has been studied in the framework of a diffusion-drift model. Based on the results of numerical simulations, the plasma structure of this discharge is analyzed and the possibility of using it in plasma aerodynamics is considered.

  4. Rare-earth plasma light source for VUV applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, G; Carroll, P K; McLlrath, T J; Ginter, M L

    1981-09-01

    A compact versatile light source for producing VUV radiation from laser produced plasmas is described. Measurements of the spectral irradiance from CO(2) laser-produced plasmas on targets of gadolinium and ytterbium in the 115-220-nm range are given, and a comparison is made with analogous results obtained using a ruby laser.

  5. Model for collisional fast ion diffusion into Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor loss cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.S. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences]|[Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zweben, S.J.; Schivell, J.; Budny, R.; Scott, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-08-01

    An analytic model is developed to estimate the classical pitch angle scattering loss of energetic fusion product ions into prompt loss orbits in a tokamak geometry. The result is applied to alpha particles produced by deutrium-tritium fusion reactions in a plasma condition relevant to Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A poloidal angular distribution of collisional fast ion loss at the first wall is obtained and the numerical result from the TRANSP code is discussed. The present model includes the effect that the prompt loss boundary moves away from the slowing-down path due to reduction in banana thickness, which enables us to understand, for the first time. the dependence of the collisional loss rate on Z{sub eff}.

  6. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Rasmussen, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without altering the drift-fluid energy integral. We demonstrate that the inclusion of collisional transport in drift-fluid models gives rise to diffusion of particle density, momentum and pressures in drift-fluid turbulence models and thereby obviate the customary use of artificial diffusion in turbulence simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field located at the outboard midplane of a tokamak. The model domain has two regions modeling open and closed field lines. The model...

  7. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without...... altering the drift-fluid energy integral. We demonstrate that the inclusion of collisional transport in drift-fluid models gives rise to diffusion of particle density, momentum, and pressures in drift-fluid turbulence models and, thereby, obviates the customary use of artificial diffusion in turbulence...... simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model, which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field...

  8. Application of plasma technology for the modification of polymer and textile materials

    OpenAIRE

    Radetić Maja M.; Petrović Zoran Lj.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma treatment is based on the physico-chemical changes of the material surface and as an ecologically and economically acceptable process it can be an attractive alternative to conventional modifications. The possibilities of plasma technology application to the modification of polymer and textile materials are discussed. Different specific properties of the material can be achieved by plasma cleaning, etching, functionalization or polymerization. The final effects are strongly influenced ...

  9. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  10. Gliding arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a gliding arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) AC source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.

  11. Intense sediment transport: Collisional to turbulent suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    A recent simple analytical approach to the problem of steady, uniform transport of sediment by a turbulent shearing fluid dominated by interparticle collisions is extended to the case in which the mean turbulent lift may partially or totally support the weight of the sediment. We treat the granular-fluid mixture as a continuum and make use of constitutive relations of kinetic theory of granular gases to model the particle phase and a simple mixing-length approach for the fluid. We focus on pressure-driven flows over horizontal, erodible beds and divide the flow itself into layers, each dominated by different physical mechanisms. This permits a crude analytical integration of the governing equations and to obtain analytical expressions for the distribution of particle concentration and velocity. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing laboratory measurements on the flow of glass spheres and sand particles in water. We also show how to build a regime map to distinguish between collisional, turbulent-collisional, and fully turbulent suspensions.

  12. The Creation of Haumea's Collisional Family

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting, Hilke E

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the first collisional family was discovered in the Kuiper belt. The parent body of this family, Haumea, is one of the largest objects in the Kuiper belt and is orbited by two satellites. It has been proposed that the Haumea family was created from dispersed fragments that resulted from a giant impact. This proposed origin of the Haumea family is however in conflict with the observed velocity dispersion between the family members (\\sim 140 m/s) which is significantly less than the escape velocity from Haumea's surface (\\sim 900 m/s). In this paper we propose a different formation scenario for Haumea's collisional family. In our scenario the family members are ejected while in orbit around Haumea. This scenario, therefore, gives naturally rise to a lower velocity dispersion among the family members than expected from direct ejection from Haumea's surface. In our scenario Haumea's giant impact forms a single moon that tidally evolves outward until it suffers a destructive collision from which the famil...

  13. Collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A.; Barker, John R.

    1996-07-01

    The collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (C4N2H4) in the electronic ground state by 19 collider gases was studied using the time-resolved infrared fluorescence (IRF) technique. The pyrazine was photoexcited with a 308 nm laser and its vibrational deactivation was monitored following rapid radiationless transitions to produce vibrationally excited molecules in the electronic ground state. The IRF data were analyzed by a simple approximate inversion method, as well as with full collisional master equation simulations. The average energies transferred in deactivating collisions (d) exhibit a near-linear dependence on vibrational energy at lower energies and less dependence at higher energies. The deactivation of ground state pyrazine was found to be similar to that of ground state benzene [J. R. Barker and B. M. Toselli, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 12, 305 (1990)], but it is strikingly different from the deactivation of triplet state pyrazine [T. J. Bevilacqua and R. B. Weisman, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 6316 (1993)].

  14. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attree, Nicholas Oliver; Murray, Carl; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's highly dynamic F ring contains a population of small (radius ~ 1 km) moonlets embedded within its core or on nearby orbits. These objects interact, both gravitationally and collisionally, with the ring producing a range of features, some of which are unique to it. Here we present a brief overview of F ring collisional processes, investigated using a combination of Cassini imaging, simulations and orbital dynamics. Collisions produce linear debris clouds, known as 'jets' and 'mini-jets', which evolve, due to differential orbital motion, over periods ranging from hours to months. Mini-jet-forming collisions occur daily in the F ring whilst larger, more dramatic, events are rarer but produce jets that persist for many months, 'wrapping around' the ring to form almost parallel strands. Measuring jet properties, such as formation rates and relative orbits, allows us to infer a local population of order hundreds of objects colliding at relative velocities of a few metres per second. N-body modelling of the collisions shows good agreement with observations when two aggregates are allowed to impact and partially fragment (as opposed to a solid moonlet encountering dust), implying massive objects both in the core and nearby. Multiple, repeated collisions by the same, or fragments of the same, object are also important in explaining some jet morphology, showing that many objects survive the collisions. The F ring represents a natural laboratory for observing low-velocity collisions between icy objects as well as the ongoing aggregation and accretion that most-likely forms them.

  15. Properties and Commercial Application of Manual Plasma Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    A new method and a device for plasma hardening of various parts are considered. Installation of the new device does not require too much investment (the active mechanical productions are appropriate for its accommodation) and special choice of personnel (welders train to use it without difficulty). Plasma hardening does not deform and worsen the smoothness of the surface, which makes it possible to employ many hardened parts without finishing mechanical treatment required after bulk or induction hardening. The hardened layer (about 1 mm) produced by plasma hardening exhibits better wear resistance than after bulk hardening with tempering, which prolongs the service life of the parts.

  16. Application of particle image velocimetry to dusty plasma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2016-06-01

    > Particle image velocimetry is a fluid measurement technique that has been used for more than 20 years to characterize the particle transport and thermal state of dusty plasma systems. This manuscript provides an overview of this diagnostic technique, highlighting the strengths and limitations that are associated with its use. Additionally, the variations of this technique that have been applied in the study of dusty plasma systems will be discussed, along with a small selection of measurements that can be made with the technique. Potential future directions for this diagnostic tool within the dusty plasma community will also be discussed.

  17. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near boundary sheaths or double layers, where the passing interval can be modeled as Maxwellian with a lower temperature than the trapped interval. The depleted Maxwellian is used as an example to demonstrate the utility of using the incomplete plasma dispersion function for calculating modifications to wave dispersion relations.

  18. Hydrodynamic Models for Multicomponent Plasmas with Collisional-Radiative Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    characteristics. Paper AIAA- 2011-61, January 2011. [18] J.-L. Cambier, T. Roth , C. Zeineh, and A. R. Karagozian. The pulse deto- nation rocket induced MHD...Cole, T. Roth , A. R. Karagozian, and J.-L. Cambier. Magnetohydrodynamic augmentation of pulse detonation rocket engines. Journal of Propulsion and...Glinsky, W. L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Wood- worth, E. M. Campbell, M. D. Perry, and R. J. Mason . Ignition and high gain with ultrapowerful lasers

  19. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, E. E., E-mail: escime@wvu.edu; Keesee, A. M.; Elliott, D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G. [Advanced Research Corporation, White Bear Lake, Minnesota 55110 (United States); Barrie, A.; Rager, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  20. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scime, E. E.; Keesee, A. M.; Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G.; Barrie, A.; Rager, A.; Elliott, D.

    2016-11-01

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  1. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  2. Screening length in dusty plasma crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V. S.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Particles interaction and value of the screening length in dusty plasma systems are of great interest in dusty plasma area. Three inter-particle potentials (Debye potential, Gurevich potential and interaction potential in the weakly collisional regime) are used to solve equilibrium equations for two dusty particles suspended in a parabolic trap. The inter-particle distance dependence on screening length, trap parameter and particle charge is obtained. The functional form of inter-particle distance dependence on ion temperature is investigated and compared with experimental data at 200-300 K in order to test used potentials applicability to dusty plasma systems at room temperatures. The preference is given to the Yukawa-type potential including effective values of particle charge and screening length. The estimated effective value of the screening length is 5-15 times larger than the Debye length.

  3. Effect of sterilization procedures on properties of plasma polymers relevant to biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemenko, A. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Kylian, O., E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Choukourov, A.; Gordeev, I.; Petr, M. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Vandrovcova, M. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Department of Growth and Differentiation of Cell Populations, Videnska 1083, 142 20, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Polonskyi, O. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Bacakova, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Department of Growth and Differentiation of Cell Populations, Videnska 1083, 142 20, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Slavinska, D.; Biederman, H. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-01

    This study is focused on the evaluation of resistance of plasma polymers toward common sterilization techniques, i.e. property important for possible use of such materials in biomedical applications. Three kinds of plasma polymers having different bioadhesive natures were studied: plasma polymerized poly(ethylene oxide), fluorocarbon plasma polymers, and nitrogen-rich plasma polymers. These plasma polymers were subjected to dry heat, autoclave and UV radiation treatment. Their physical, chemical and bioresponsive properties were determined by means of different techniques (ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, wettability measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and biological tests with osteoblast-like cells MG63). The results clearly show that properties of thin films of plasma polymers may be significantly altered by a sterilization process. Moreover, observed changes induced by selected sterilization methods were found to depend strongly on the sterilized plasma polymer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of common sterilization methods on three kinds of plasma polymers is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical, chemical and bioresponsive properties of plasma polymers are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes induced by sterilization depend strongly on type of the plasma polymer.

  4. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milchberg, Howard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This grant supported basic experimental, theoretical and computer simulation research into developing a compact, high pulse repetition rate laser accelerator using the direct laser acceleration mechanism in plasma-based slow wave structures.

  5. Recent progress in the application of glow-discharge electrolysis plasma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jie Ren; Mengqi Yao; Wu Yang; Yan Li; Jinzhang Gao

    2014-01-01

    ... produced during the glow-discharge electrolysis (GDE) process. A brief review is already available regarding applications of glow-discharge electrolysis plasma technique in chemistry and environmental science during the past decade...

  6. Some applications of thermal field theory to quark-gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Munshi G Mustafa

    2006-04-01

    We briefly introduce the thermal field theory within imaginary time formalism, the hard thermal loop perturbation theory and some of its applications to the physics of the quark-gluon plasma, possibly created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  7. Atomic properties in hot plasmas from levels to superconfigurations

    CERN Document Server

    Bauche, Jacques; Peyrusse, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to the calculation of hot-plasma properties which generally requires a huge number of atomic data. It is the first book that combines information on the details of the basic atomic physics and its application to atomic spectroscopy with the use of the relevant statistical approaches. Information like energy levels, radiative rates, collisional and radiative cross-sections, etc., must be included in equilibrium or non-equilibrium models in order to describe both the atomic-population kinetics and the radiative properties. From the very large number of levels and transitions involved in complex ions, some statistical (global) properties emerge. The book presents a coherent set of concepts and compact formulas suitable for tractable and accurate calculations. The topics addressed are: radiative emission and absorption, and a dozen of other collisional and radiative processes; transition arrays between level ensembles (configurations, superconfigurations); effective temperatures of configurat...

  8. Experimental Investigation of the Plasma Bullet and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    as well as fast photography diagnostic results that shed new light on the mechanisms of creation and propagation of the plasma bullets. We then...generates the plasma bullets. Then we presented spectroscopic as well as fast photography diagnostic results that shed new light on the mechanisms of...The fact that amyloid fibrils are the cause behind such debilitating disease as Parkinson and probably also Alzheimer’s makes these results of even

  9. Gas plasma sterilization--application of space-age technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, S; Smith, J H

    1995-08-01

    Gas plasma sterilization is new to the healthcare field. The first such sterilizer has been manufactured by Advanced Sterilization Products (J&J, Irvine, CA). The system uses hydrogen peroxide as the substrate gas and radio frequency emissions to generate plasma. This system is a low-temperature, quick-acting process with no toxic residues. It appears that this sterilizer system holds promise in the healthcare field and could help to reduce the use of ethylene oxide.

  10. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Cicogna; Francesco Ceccherini; Francesco Pegoraro

    2006-01-01

    The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-...

  11. Plasma treatment for biomedical application on polymeric substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Ziano,

    2010-01-01

    This work arises from the possibility of changing the surface properties of materials with the use of plasma. It proved to be a very good method for treating surfaces, it is in fact able to modify surface properties of materials without altering their bulk properties. In particular, with the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) is feasible sustaining the polymerization of a specific monomer depositing thin films containing interesting chemical groups. For these reasons, this ...

  12. Quantification and clinical application of carboplatin in plasma ultrafiltrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kim; Jensen, Berit Packert; Grant, Sue; Strother, Matthew; George, Peter

    2017-05-10

    Carboplatin is a chemotherapy drug used in a variety of cancers with the primary toxicity being exposure-dependant myelosuppression. We present the development and validation of a simple, robust inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method to measure carboplatin in plasma ultrafiltrate. Plasma ultrafiltrates samples were prepared using Amicon Ultra 30,000da cut-off filters and then diluted with ammonia EDTA before ICP-MS analysis. The assay was validated in the range 0.19-47.5mg/L carboplatin in ultrafiltrate. The assay was linear (r(2)>0.9999), accurate (plasma ultrafiltrate and aqueous platinum calibrators and recovery was complete. The assay was applied to 10 clinical samples from patients receiving carboplatin. Incurred sample reanalysis showed reproducible values over 3 analysis days (plasma stability prior to ultrafiltration has been a major concern in previous clinical studies this was studied extensively at room temperature (22°C) over 24h. Carboplatin was found to be stable in both spiked plasma (n=3) and real patient samples (n=10) at room temperature for up to 8h before ultrafiltration. This makes routine measurement of carboplatin concentrations in clinical settings feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of plasma technology for the modification of polymer and textile materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radetić Maja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma treatment is based on the physico-chemical changes of the material surface and as an ecologically and economically acceptable process it can be an attractive alternative to conventional modifications. The possibilities of plasma technology application to the modification of polymer and textile materials are discussed. Different specific properties of the material can be achieved by plasma cleaning, etching, functionalization or polymerization. The final effects are strongly influenced by the treatment parameters (treatment time, pressure, power, gas flow, the applied gas and nature of the material. The plasma treatment of polymers is predominantly focused on cleaning and activation of the surfaces to increase adhesion, binding, wettability, dye ability and printability. Current studies deal more with plasma polymerization where an ultra thin film of plasma polymer is deposited on the material surface and, depending on the applied monomer, different specific properties can be obtained (i.e. chemical and thermal resistance, abrasion resistance, antireflexion, water repellence, etc.. Plasma application to textiles is mostly oriented toward wool and synthetic fibres, though some studies also consider cotton, hemp, flax and silk. The main goal of plasma treatment is to impart a more hydrophilic fibre surface and accordingly increase wettability, dye ability, printability and particularly, shrink resistance in the case of wool. Recent studies have favored technical textiles, where plasma polymerization can offer a wide range of opportunities.

  14. Clinical and Biological Principles of Cold Atmospheric Plasma Application in Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Mimbrera, Jesús; García, Maria Carmen; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz; Rodero-Serrano, Antonio; García-Nieto, Antonio Vélez; Ruano, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Plasma-based electrosurgical devices have long been employed for tissue coagulation, cutting, desiccation, and cauterizing. Despite their clinical benefits, these technologies involve tissue heating and their effects are primarily heat-mediated. Recently, there have been significant developments in cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) science and engineering. New sources of CAP with well-controlled temperatures below 40 °C have been designed, permitting safe plasma application on animal and human bodies. In the last decade, a new innovative field, often referred to as plasma medicine, which combines plasma physics, life science, and clinical medicine has emerged. This field aims to exploit effects of mild plasma by controlling the interactions between plasma components (and other secondary species that can be formed from these components) with specific structural elements and functionalities of living cells. Recent studies showed that CAP can exert beneficial effects when applied selectively in certain pathologies with minimal toxicity to normal tissues. The rapid increase in new investigations and development of various devices for CAP application suggest early adoption of cold plasma as a new tool in the biomedical field. This review explores the latest major achievements in the field, focusing on the biological effects, mechanisms of action, and clinical evidence of CAP applications in areas such as skin disinfection, tissue regeneration, chronic wounds, and cancer treatment. This information may serve as a foundation for the design of future clinical trials to assess the efficacy and safety of CAP as an adjuvant therapy for skin cancer.

  15. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  16. Studies of high repetition rate laser-produced plasma soft-X-ray amplifiers; Etudes d'amplificateurs plasma laser a haute cadence dans le domaine X-UV et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassou, K

    2006-12-15

    The progress made as well on the Ti:Sa laser system, as in the control and the knowledge of laser produced X-UV sources allowed the construction of a X-UV laser station dedicated to the applications. My thesis work falls under the development of this station and more particularly on the characterization of a X-UV laser plasma amplifier. The experimental study relates to the coupling improvement of the pump infra-red laser with plasma within the framework of the transient collisional X-UV laser generation. These X-UV lasers are generated in a plasma formed by the interaction of a solid target and a laser pulse of approximately 500 ps duration, followed by a second infra-red laser pulse known as of pump (about 5 ps) impinging on the target in grazing incidence. For the first time, a complete parametric study was undertaken on the influence of the grazing angle on the pumping of the amplifying medium. One of the results was to reach very high peak brightness about 10{sup 28} ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/(0.1%bandwidth), which compares well with the free-electron laser brightness. Moreover, we modified then used a new two-dimensional hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement in order to understand the influence of the space-time properties of the infra-red laser on the formation and the evolution of the amplifying plasma. Our modeling highlighted the interest to use a super Gaussian transverse profile for the line focus leading to an increase in a factor two of the gain region size and a reduction of the electron density gradient by three orders of magnitude. These improvements should strongly increase the energy contained in X-UV laser beam. We thus used X-UV laser to study the appearance of transient defects produced by a laser IR on a beam-splitter rear side. We also began research on the mechanisms of DNA damage induced by a very intense X-UV radiation. (author)

  17. Fabrication of hybrid nanostructures by liquid plasma for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponraj, Sri Balaji; Dai, Xiujuan Jane; Li, Luhua; Chen, Zhiqiang; Surya Narayanan, Jayanth; Kanwar, Jagat; Du Plessis, Johan

    2013-09-01

    Liquid plasma, generated by a nanosecond pulsed generator at atmospheric pressure, was used to treat bamboo-like boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). It was observed that the length of the BNNTs was reduced and found more cup like structures called boron nitride nanocups (BNNCs). Interestingly, a new peak appeared at 406.86 eV in the N1s X-ray photoelectron spectrum, which seems to be attributable to the oxidation of nitrogen (N-O) in BNNTs. The C1s spectrum showed that oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the BNNT/BNNC surface. The liquid plasma was also used to assemble gold nanoparticles onto the treated BNNTs/BNNCs. This hybrid nanostructure was fabricated efficiently, compared with normal equilibrium conditions. The pH values and conductivity of all samples were measured. After plasma treatment, the pH values were greatly reduced and conductivity was significantly increased. We propose that the plasma acid, hydrogen peroxide, OH-, H ions and radicals formed in liquid plasma as well as the pulsed electric field contribute to the oxidation of nitrogen, reduced length of the BNNTs(forming BNNCs), surface functionalization, and to the fabrication of hybrid nanostructure. The cytotoxic tests for these hybrid nanostructures is underway. The authors acknowledge Rosey van Driel and Prabhukumar Sellamuthu for assisting with TEM and SEM, and the access of the XPS facility at RMIT University.

  18. Industrial plasma immersion ion implanter and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tong Hong Hui; Huo Yan Feng; Wang Ke; Mu Li Lan; Feng Tie Min; Zhao Jun; Yan Bing; Geng Man

    2002-01-01

    A new generation industrial plasma immersion ion implanter was developed recently in South-western Institute of Physics and some experimental results are reported. The vacuum chamber with 900 mm in diameter and 1050 mm in height stands vertically. The pumping system includes turbo -pump and mechanical pump and it can be automatically controlled by PLC. The background pressure is less than 4 x 10 sup - sup 4 Pa. The plasma in the chamber can be generated by hot-filament discharge and three high-efficiency magnetic filter metal plasma sources, so that the plasma immersion ion implantation and enhanced deposition can be done. The maximum pulse voltage output is 80 kV, maximum pulse current is 60 A, repetition frequency is 50-500 Hz, and the pulse rise time is less than 2 mu s. The power modulator can operate in the pulse bunching mode if necessary. In general, the plasma density is 10 sup 8 -10 sup 1 sup 0 cm sup - sup 3 , the film deposition rate is 0.1-0.5 nm/s

  19. Effects of plasma on polyethylene fiber surface for prosthodontic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPYRIDES, Silvana Marques Miranda; do PRADO, Maíra; de ARAUJO, Joyce Rodrigues; SIMÃO, Renata Antoun; BASTIAN, Fernando Luis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasma technology has the potential to improve the adherence of fibers to polymeric matrices, and there are prospects for its application in dentistry to reinforce the dental particulate composite. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of oxygen or argon plasma treatment on polyethylene fibers. Material and Methods Connect, Construct, InFibra, and InFibra treated with oxygen or argon plasma were topographically evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemically by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For bending analysis, one indirect composite (Signum) was reinforced with polyethylene fiber (Connect, Construct, or InFibra). The InFibra fiber was subjected to three different treatments: (1) single application of silane, (2) oxygen or argon plasma for 1 or 3 min, (3) oxygen or argon plasma and subsequent application of silane. The samples (25x2x2 mm), 6 unreinforced and 60 reinforced with fibers, were subjected to three-point loading tests to obtain their flexural strength and deflection. The results were statistically analyzed with ANOVA and the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparison tests. Results SEM analysis showed that oxygen and argon plasma treatments promote roughness on the polyethylene fiber surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that both plasmas were effective in incorporating oxygenated functional groups. Argon or oxygen plasma treatment affected the flexural strength and deflection of a fiber reinforced composite. The application of silane does not promote an increase in the flexural strength of the reinforced composites. Conclusions Oxygen and argon plasma treatments were effective in incorporating oxygenated functional groups and surface roughness. The highest strength values were obtained in the group reinforced with polyethylene fibers treated with oxygen plasma for 3 min. PMID:26814463

  20. Effects of plasma on polyethylene fiber surface for prosthodontic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Marques Miranda SPYRIDES

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Plasma technology has the potential to improve the adherence of fibers to polymeric matrices, and there are prospects for its application in dentistry to reinforce the dental particulate composite. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of oxygen or argon plasma treatment on polyethylene fibers. Material and Methods Connect, Construct, InFibra, and InFibra treated with oxygen or argon plasma were topographically evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and chemically by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. For bending analysis, one indirect composite (Signum was reinforced with polyethylene fiber (Connect, Construct, or InFibra. The InFibra fiber was subjected to three different treatments: (1 single application of silane, (2 oxygen or argon plasma for 1 or 3 min, (3 oxygen or argon plasma and subsequent application of silane. The samples (25x2x2 mm, 6 unreinforced and 60 reinforced with fibers, were subjected to three-point loading tests to obtain their flexural strength and deflection. The results were statistically analyzed with ANOVA and the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparison tests. Results SEM analysis showed that oxygen and argon plasma treatments promote roughness on the polyethylene fiber surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis shows that both plasmas were effective in incorporating oxygenated functional groups. Argon or oxygen plasma treatment affected the flexural strength and deflection of a fiber reinforced composite. The application of silane does not promote an increase in the flexural strength of the reinforced composites. Conclusions Oxygen and argon plasma treatments were effective in incorporating oxygenated functional groups and surface roughness. The highest strength values were obtained in the group reinforced with polyethylene fibers treated with oxygen plasma for 3 min.

  1. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  2. Dust dynamics and diagnostic applications in quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catalin M.; Si, Jiahe; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Gianni; Wurden, Glen

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about dust dynamics in highly ionized quasi-neutral plasmas with ca. 1.0 e+20 per cubic meter density and ion temperature at a few eV and above, including in magnetic fusion. For example, dust motion in fusion, better known as UFO's, has been observed since 1980's but not explained. Solid understanding of dust dynamics is also important to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) because of concerns about safety and dust contamination of fusion core. Compared with well studied strongly-coupled dusty plasma regime, new physics may arise in the higher density quasi-neutral plasma regime because of at least four orders of magnitude higher density and two orders of magnitude hotter ion temperature. Our recent laboratory experiments showed that plasma-flow drag force dominates over other forces in a quasi-neutral flowing plasma. In contrast, delicate balance among different forces in dusty plasma has led to many unique phenomena, in particular, the formation of dust crystal. Based on our experiments, we argue that 1) dust crystal will not form in the highly ionized plasmas with flows; 2) the UFO's are moving dust dragged by plasma flows; 3) dust can be used to measure plasma flow. Two diagnostic applications using dust for laboratory quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion will also be presented.

  3. Intrinsic rotation driven by non-Maxwellian equilibria in Tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M; Parra, F I; Lee, J P; Belli, E A; Nave, M F F; White, A E

    2013-08-02

    The effect of small deviations from a Maxwellian equilibrium on turbulent momentum transport in tokamak plasmas is considered. These non-Maxwellian features, arising from diamagnetic effects, introduce a strong dependence of the radial flux of cocurrent toroidal angular momentum on collisionality: As the plasma goes from nearly collisionless to weakly collisional, the flux reverses direction from radially inward to outward. This indicates a collisionality-dependent transition from peaked to hollow rotation profiles, consistent with experimental observations of intrinsic rotation.

  4. Intrinsic rotation driven by non-Maxwellian equilibria in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Lee, J P; Belli, E A; Nave, M F F; White, A E

    2013-01-01

    The effect of small deviations from a Maxwellian equilibrium on turbulent momentum transport in tokamak plasmas is considered. These non-Maxwellian features, arising from diamagnetic effects, introduce a strong dependence of the radial flux of co-current toroidal angular momentum on collisionality: As the plasma goes from nearly collisionless to weakly collisional, the flux reverses direction from radially inward to outward. This indicates a collisionality-dependent transition from peaked to hollow rotation profiles, consistent with experimental observations of intrinsic rotation.

  5. Discharge Characteristics of DC Arc Water Plasma for Environmental Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianming; Sooseok CHOI; Takayuki WATANABE

    2012-01-01

    A water plasma was generated by DC arc discharge with a hafnium embedded rodtype cathode and a nozzle-type anode. The discharge characteristics were examined by changing the operation parameter of the arc current. The dynamic behavior of the arc discharge led to significant fluctuations in the arc voltage and its frequency. Analyses of the high speed image and the arc voltage waveform showed that the arc discharge was in the restrike mode and its frequency varied within several tens of kilohertz according to the operating conditions. The larger thermal plasma volume was generated by the higher flow from the forming steam with a higher restrike frequency in the higher arc current conditions. In addition, the characteristics of the water plasma jet were investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy to identify the abundant radicals required in an efficient waste treatment process.

  6. Underwater plasma discharge and its water treatment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sukhwal; Huh, Jin Young; Kim, Kangil; Hong, Yong Cheol; National Fusion Research Institute Team; Chonbuk National University Team; Kwangwoon University Team; NPAC Team

    2016-09-01

    In recent, the quality of water has been exacerbated by the influx of wastewater and water pollutants. There have been frequent occurrences of water blooms due to the eutrophication of river. Therefore, the needs for water treatment are increased through effective and environment-friendly method. In this work, we propose the plasma system to overcome the problems mentioned above using underwater discharge plasma. The underwater discharges are generated by capillary electrode, and have the advantages of low cost, high efficiency and eco-friendly processing. The proposed technologies can be suitable for eliminating cyanobacteria, decreasing the concentration of oil dissolved in water, and purifying wastewater. Cyanobacteria is killed directly by the underwater discharge and water-dissolved oil and heavy-metal wastewater are purified by coagulation effect, which may result from the chemical reactions of underwater plasma. Consequently, these technologies using underwater discharge can be alternative methods to replace the existing technologies.

  7. Applicability of the molecular dynamics technique to a Coulomb plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.G.; Galeev, R.Kh.

    1993-09-01

    In the present work, we report the calculations of the local Lyapunov parameter which determines the nature of the motion for a system of n particles interacting according to Coulomb`s law. These calculations have been performed for the most probable states of a fully ionized plasma, and they were performed using a Microvax-3 computer with the NAG(FO2) program package for a plasma consisting of particles with the same mass and for a fully ionized hydrogen plasma. The particle coordinates were prescribed as a uniformly distributed set of random numbers obtained using the NAG(GO5) routine. Results for the Lyapunov parameter are presented, and it is shown that the values of the parameter increases sharply as a function of particle number up to n=100 and then saturate. This latter observation is attributed to shielding, related to Debye effects.

  8. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen species for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, J. S.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Tresp, H.; Duennbier, M.; Iseni, S.; Martin, V.; Puech, V.; Weltmann, K. D.; Reuter, S.

    2012-10-01

    To get a better insight into the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cellular components, fundamental studies are essential to determine the nature and concentration of plasma-generated ROS, and the chemistry induced in biological liquids by those ROS. In this context, we have measured the absolute density of the main ROS created in three different atmospheric pressure plasma sources: two geometrically distinct RF-driven microplasma jets (μ-APPJ [1] and kinpen [2]), and an array of microcathode sustained discharges [3]. Optical diagnostics of the plasma volumes and effluent regions have been performed: UV absorption for O3 and IR emission for O2(a^1δ) [4]. High concentrations of both ROS have been obtained (10^14--10^17cm-3). The effect of different parameters, such as gas flows and mixtures and power coupled to the plasmas, has been studied. For plasma biomedicine, the determination of the reactive species present in plasma-treated liquids is of great importance. In this work, we focused on the measurement of the concentration of H2O2 and NOX radicals, generated in physiological solutions like NaCl and PBS.[4pt] [1] N. Knake et al., J. Phys. D: App. Phys. 41, 194006 (2008)[0pt] [2] K.D. Weltmann et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 82, 1223 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 141502 (2010)[0pt] [4] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011502 (2008)

  9. Plasma Diagnostic in laser ablation plumes for isotope separation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Juliana B. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: juliana@ieav.cta.br; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Neri, Jose W.; Silveira, Carlos A.B. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica

    2008-07-01

    The plasma plume produced in vacuum by ablation of copper, aluminum and tungsten samples, illuminated by copper laser pulses, was investigated. A Langmuir probe was used to study the macroscopic parameters electron number density (Ne) and electron temperature (Te). Plasma expansion velocity (Vp) was also investigated and it was studied the dependence of these parameters with the laser irradiance. Typical values are respectively N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} {approx} 15 eV and Vp {approx} 10 km/s. (author)

  10. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Cicogna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-invariant solutions, and the symmetry classification of a nonlinear PDE.

  11. NEW CATHODE MATERIALS FOR INERT AND OXIDIZING ATMOSPHERE PLASMA APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    This study has been carried out to develop new cathode materials for two types of thermionic cathode. First is concerning to the tungsten electrodes for the plasma furnace and welding torches. The second one is the electrodes for air plasma cutting torch. Tungsten electrodes activated with a single and combined additives of rare earth metal oxides, such as La2O3, Y2O3 and CeO2, are produced and pared with pure and thoriated tungsten electrode conventionally used, from the point of view of ele...

  12. Kappa distributions: theory and applications in space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V

    2010-01-01

    Particle velocity distribution functions (VDF) in space plasmas often show non Maxwellian suprathermal tails decreasing as a power law of the velocity. Such distributions are well fitted by the so-called Kappa distribution. The presence of such distributions in different space plasmas suggests a universal mechanism for the creation of such suprathermal tails. Different theories have been proposed and are recalled in this review paper. The suprathermal particles have important consequences concerning the acceleration and the temperature that are well evidenced by the kinetic approach where no closure requires the distributions to be nearly Maxwellians. Moreover, the presence of the suprathermal particles take an important role in the wave-particle interactions.

  13. Application possibilities of plasmas generated by high power laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi, L.

    2009-01-01

    High-power pulsed lasers emitting IR and visible radiation with intensities ranging between 10^8 and 10^16 W/cm2, pulse duration from 0.4 to 9 ns and energy from 100 mJ up to 600 J, operating in single mode or in repetition rate, can be employed to produce non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum by irradiating solid targets. Such a laser-produced plasma generates highly charged and high-energy ions of various elements, as well as soft and hard X-ray radiations. Heavy ions with charge state up to 58+...

  14. Application of non-equilibrium plasmas in treatment of wool fibers and seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran

    2003-10-01

    While large effort is under way to achieve stable, large area, non-equilibrium plasma reactors operating at atmospheric pressure we should still consider application of low pressure reactors, which provide well defined, easily controlled reactive plasmas. Therefore, the application of low pressure rf plasmas for the treatment of wool and seed was investigated. The studies were aimed at establishing optimal procedure to achieve better wettability, dyeability and printability of wool. Plasma treatment led to a modification of wool fiber topography and formation of new polar functional groups inducing the increase of wool hydrophylicity. Plasma activation of fiber surface was also used to achieve better binding of biopolymer chitosan to wool in order to increase the content of favorable functional groups and thus improving sorption properties of recycled wool fibers for heavy metal ions and acid dyes. In another study, the increase of germination percentage of seeds induced by plasmas was investigated. We have selected dry (unimbibed) Empress tree seeds (Paulownia tomentosa Steud.). Empress tree seed has been studied extensively and its mechanism of germination is well documented. Germination of these seeds is triggered by light in a limited range of wavelengths. Interaction between activated plasma particles and seed, inside the plasma reactor, leads to changes in its surface topography, modifies the surface layer and increases the active surface area. Consequently, some bioactive nitrogeneous compounds could be bound to the activated surface layer causing the increment of germination percentage.

  15. Dielectric barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator Characterization and Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correale, G.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation about nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuator is presented in this thesis. This work aimed to answer fundamental questions on the actuation mechanism of this device. In order to do so, parametric studies in a quiescent air as well as laminar

  16. Dielectric barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator Characterization and Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correale, G.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation about nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuator is presented in this thesis. This work aimed to answer fundamental questions on the actuation mechanism of this device. In order to do so, parametric studies in a quiescent air as well as laminar bou

  17. Application of an impedance matching transformer to a plasma focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bures, B L; James, C; Krishnan, M; Adler, R

    2011-10-01

    A plasma focus was constructed using an impedance matching transformer to improve power transfer between the pulse power and the dynamic plasma load. The system relied on two switches and twelve transformer cores to produce a 100 kA pulse in short circuit on the secondary at 27 kV on the primary with 110 J stored. With the two transformer systems in parallel, the Thevenin equivalent circuit parameters on the secondary side of the driver are: C = 10.9 μF, V(0) = 4.5 kV, L = 17 nH, and R = 5 mΩ. An equivalent direct drive circuit would require a large number of switches in parallel, to achieve the same Thevenin equivalent. The benefits of this approach are replacement of consumable switches with non-consumable transformer cores, reduction of the driver inductance and resistance as viewed by the dynamic load, and reduction of the stored energy to produce a given peak current. The system is designed to operate at 100 Hz, so minimizing the stored energy results in less load on the thermal management system. When operated at 1 Hz, the neutron yield from the transformer matched plasma focus was similar to the neutron yield from a conventional (directly driven) plasma focus at the same peak current.

  18. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  19. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its applications for disinfection and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2013-01-01

    In this work an atmospheric pressure non-thermal resistive barrier (RB) plasma jet was constructed, characterized and was applied for biomedical applications. The RB plasma source can operate in both DC (battery) as well as in standard 60/50 Hz low frequency AC excitation, and it functions effectively in both direct and indirect plasma exposure configurations. The characteristics of the RB plasma jet such as electrical properties, plasma gas temperature and nitric oxides concentration were determined using voltage-current characterization, optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzer diagnostic techniques. Plasma discharge power of 26.33 W was calculated from voltage-current characterization. An optical emission spectroscopy was applied and the gas temperature which is equivalent to the nitrogen rotational (Trot) temperatures was measured. The concentrations of the reactive oxygen species at different spatial distances from the tip of the plasma jet were measured and the ppm concentration of NO is at the preferred level for a wide range of standard biomedical treatment applications. The ppm values of nitric oxides after the cooling unit are observed to be of the same order of magnitude as compared to plasma jet. The portable RB plasma source was tested to be very effective for decontamination and disinfection of a wide range of foodborne and opportunistic nosocomial pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and the preliminary results are presented. The effects of indirect exposure of the portable RBP source on monocytic leukemia cancer cells (THP-1) were also tested and the results demonstrate that a preference for apoptosis in plasma treated THP-1 cells under particular plasma parameters and dosage levels.

  20. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  1. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  2. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  3. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Medicine: State of Research and Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Basic research in plasma medicine has made excellent progress and resulted in the fundamental insights that biological effects of cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) are significantly caused by changes of the liquid environment of cells, and are dominated by redox-active species. First CAP sources are CE-certified as medical devices. Main focus of plasma application is on wound healing and treatment of infective skin diseases. Clinical applications in this field confirm the supportive effect of cold plasma treatment in acceleration of healing of chronic wounds above all in cases where conventional treatment fails. Cancer treatment is another actual and emerging field of CAP application. The ability of CAP to kill cancer cells by induction of apoptosis has been proved in vitro. First clinical applications of CAP in palliative care of cancer are realized. In collaboration with Hans-Robert Metelmann, University Medicine Greifswald; Helmut Uhlemann, Klinikum Altenburger Land GmbH Altenburg; Anke Schmidt and Kai Masur, Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald); Renate Schönebeck, Neoplas Tools GmbH Greifswald; and Klaus-Dieter Weltmann, Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald).

  4. The Application of Thermal Plasma to Extraction Metallurgy and Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Various applications of thermal plasma to extraction metallurgy and related fields are surveyed, chiefly on the basis of documents published during the past two or three years. Applications to melting and smelting, to thermal decomposition, to reduction, to manufacturing of inorganic compounds, and to other fields are considered.

  5. Multi-field plasma sandpile model in tokamaks and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, X. D.; Xu, J. Q.

    2016-08-01

    A multi-field sandpile model of tokamak plasmas is formulated for the first time to simulate the dynamic process with interaction between avalanche events on the fast/micro time-scale and diffusive transports on the slow/macro time-scale. The main characteristics of the model are that both particle and energy avalanches of sand grains are taken into account simultaneously. New redistribution rules of a sand-relaxing process are defined according to the transport properties of special turbulence which allows the uphill particle transport. Applying the model, we first simulate the steady-state plasma profile self-sustained by drift wave turbulences in the Ohmic discharge of a tokamak. A scaling law as f = a q0 b + c for the relation of both center-density n ( 0 ) and electron (ion) temperatures T e ( 0 ) ( T i ( 0 ) ) with the center-safety-factor q 0 is found. Then interesting work about the nonlocal transport phenomenon observed in tokamak experiments proceeds. It is found that the core electron temperature increases rapidly in response to the edge cold pulse and inversely it decreases in response to the edge heat pulse. The results show that the nonlocal response of core electron temperature depending on the amplitudes of background plasma density and temperature is more remarkable in a range of gas injection rate. Analyses indicate that the avalanche transport caused by plasma drift instabilities with thresholds is a possible physical mechanism for the nonlocal transport in tokamaks. It is believed that the model is capable of being applied to more extensive questions occurring in the transport field.

  6. Advanced modeling techniques in application to plasma pulse treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashchenko, A. F.; Pashchenko, F. F.

    2016-06-01

    Different approaches considered for simulation of plasma pulse treatment process. The assumption of a significant non-linearity of processes in the treatment of oil wells has been confirmed. Method of functional transformations and fuzzy logic methods suggested for construction of a mathematical model. It is shown, that models, based on fuzzy logic are able to provide a satisfactory accuracy of simulation and prediction of non-linear processes observed.

  7. Plasma treatments of wool fiber surface for microfluidic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, So-Hyoun; Hwang, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Jin Su [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Boo, Jin-Hyo, E-mail: jhboo@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sang H., E-mail: shy@kth.se [Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We used atmospheric plasma for tuning the wettability of wool fibers. • The wicking rates of the wool fibers increased with increasing treatment time. • The increasing of wettability results in removement of fatty acid on the wool surface. - Abstract: Recent progress in health diagnostics has led to the development of simple and inexpensive systems. Thread-based microfluidic devices allow for portable and inexpensive field-based technologies enabling medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety analysis. However, controlling the flow rate of wool thread, which is a very important part of thread-based microfluidic devices, is quite difficult. For this reason, we focused on thread-based microfluidics in the study. We developed a method of changing the wettability of hydrophobic thread, including wool thread. Thus, using natural wool thread as a channel, we demonstrate herein that the manipulation of the liquid flow, such as micro selecting and micro mixing, can be achieved by applying plasma treatment to wool thread. In addition to enabling the flow control of the treated wool channels consisting of all natural substances, this procedure will also be beneficial for biological sensing devices. We found that wools treated with various gases have different flow rates. We used an atmospheric plasma with O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and Ar gases.

  8. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunoiu M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator’s body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%, equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  9. THE COLLISIONAL EVOLUTION OF DEBRIS DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Andras; Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Balog, Zoltan, E-mail: agaspar@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: balog@mpia.de [Max-Plank Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    We explore the collisional decay of disk mass and infrared emission in debris disks. With models, we show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a slower value. The total disk mass falls off {proportional_to}t {sup -0.35} at its fastest point (where t is time) for our reference model, while the dust mass and its proxy-the infrared excess emission-fades significantly faster ({proportional_to}t {sup -0.8}). These later level off to a decay rate of M{sub tot}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.08} and M{sub dust}(t) or L{sub ir}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.6}. This is slower than the {proportional_to}t {sup -1} decay given for all three system parameters by traditional analytic models. We also compile an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 {mu}m observations. Assuming a log-normal distribution of initial disk masses, we generate model population decay curves for the fraction of stars harboring debris disks detected at 24 {mu}m. We also model the distribution of measured excesses at the far-IR wavelengths (70-100 {mu}m) at certain age regimes. We show general agreement at 24 {mu}m between the decay of our numerical collisional population synthesis model and observations up to a Gyr. We associate offsets above a Gyr to stochastic events in a few select systems. We cannot fit the decay in the far-infrared convincingly with grain strength properties appropriate for silicates, but those of water ice give fits more consistent with the observations (other relatively weak grain materials would presumably also be successful). The oldest disks have a higher incidence of large excesses than predicted by the model; again, a plausible explanation is very late phases of high dynamical activity around a small number of stars. Finally, we constrain the variables of our numerical model by comparing the evolutionary trends generated from the exploration

  10. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina, E-mail: sinajahanbakhsh@gmail.com; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bogazici University, Istanbul 34342 (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  11. FAR-TECH's Nanoparticle Plasma Jet System and its Application to Disruptions, Deep Fueling, and Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    Hyper-velocity plasma jets have potential applications in tokamaks for disruption mitigation, deep fueling and diagnostics. Pulsed power based solid-state sources and plasma accelerators offer advantages of rapid response and mass delivery at high velocities. Fast response is critical for some disruption mitigation scenario needs, while high velocity is especially important for penetration into tokamak plasma and its confining magnetic field, as in the case of deep fueling. FAR-TECH is developing the capability of producing large-mass hyper-velocity plasma jets. The prototype solid-state source has produced: 1) >8.4 mg of H2 gas only, and 2) >25 mg of H2 and >180 mg of C60 in a H2/C60 gas mixture. Using a coaxial plasma gun coupled to the source, we have successfully demonstrated the acceleration of composite H/C60 plasma jets, with momentum as high as 0.6 g.km/s, and containing an estimated C60 mass of ˜75 mg. We present the status of FAR-TECH's nanoparticle plasma jet system and discuss its application to disruptions, deep fueling, and diagnostics. A new TiH2/C60 solid-state source capable of generating significantly higher quantities of H2 and C60 in <0.5 ms will be discussed.

  12. Micro patterning of cell and protein non-adhesive plasma polymerized coatings for biochip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouaidat, Salim; Berendsen, C.; Thomsen, P.;

    2004-01-01

    Micro scale patterning of bioactive surfaces is desirable for numerous biochip applications. Polyethyleneoxide-like (PEO-like) coating with non-fouling functionality has been deposited using low frequency AC plasma polymerization. The non-fouling properties of the coating were tested with human...... cells ( HeLa) and fluorescence labeled proteins (isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, i.e. FITC-BSA). The PEO-like coatings were fabricated by plasma polymerization of 12-crown-4 (ppCrown) with plasma polymerized hexene (ppHexene) as adhesion layer. The coatings were micro patterned using...

  13. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio

  14. Efficient collisional blockade loading of single atom into a tight microtrap

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Y H

    2015-01-01

    We show that controlled inelastic collisions can improve the single atom loading efficiency in the collisional blockade regime of optical microtraps. A collisional loss process where only one of the colliding atoms are lost, implemented during loading, enables us to kick out one of the atoms as soon as a second atom enters the optical microtrap. When this happens faster than the pair loss, which has limited the loading efficiency of previous experiments to about 50%, we experimentally observe an enhancement to 80%. A simple analytical theory predicts the loading dynamics. Our results opens up an efficient and fast route for loading individual atoms into optical tweezers and arrays of microtraps that are too tight for easy implementation of the method reported in [1,2]. The loading of tight traps with single atoms is a requirement for their applications in future experiments in quantum information processing and few-body physics.

  15. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  16. Deterministic single-file dynamics in collisional representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesoni, F; Taloni, A

    2007-12-01

    We re-examine numerically the diffusion of a deterministic, or ballistic single file with preassigned velocity distribution (Jepsen's gas) from a collisional viewpoint. For a two-modal velocity distribution, where half the particles have velocity +/-c, the collisional statistics is analytically proven to reproduce the continuous time representation. For a three-modal velocity distribution with equal fractions, where less than 12 of the particles have velocity +/-c, with the remaining particles at rest, the collisional process is shown to be inhomogeneous; its stationary properties are discussed here by combining exact and phenomenological arguments. Collisional memory effects are then related to the negative power-law tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions, predicted earlier in the continuous time formalism. Numerical and analytical results for Gaussian and four-modal Jepsen's gases are also reported for the sake of a comparison.

  17. Plasma research and applications in the lighting industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Timothy

    1999-11-01

    Plasmas are at the heart of modern high-efficiency general-purpose light sources: fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps. In fluorescent lamps a weakly ionized positive column discharge in a mixture of a rare-gas (few torr) and mercury vapor (few mtorr) converts electrical power into mercury atomic radiation (254 and 185 nm) with an efficiency around two-thirds. The atoms and ions remain near room temperature, while the electrons are non-Maxwellian with an average energy near 1 eV. A phosphor then downconverts the mercury radiation into a spectrum of visible light. The monochromatic yellow low-pressure sodium lamps used in street lighting have an analogous neon-sodium discharge that emits directly into the visible on the sodium D lines. In high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps visible light is generated directly by a weakly ionized arc where all species are in approximate thermal equilibrium, at least near the arc core. Typical total gas pressures are 0.5--50 atm and typical peak temperatures are 5000 K. Mercury accounts for the overwhelming majority of the atoms in the vapor, but the visible light is produced by comparatively small numbers of other metals such as sodium, scandium, thallium, indium, tin, and some of the lanthanides. In many lamps a significant fraction of the emitting species can be ionized, but the presence of a large ``buffer'' gas background means that ionization fractions are typically less than 10-3. Current topics of potential interest to this audience include breakdown and lamp starting; plasma-wall interactions (which are nonequilibrium regions even in HID arcs); plasma-electrode sheaths (which can be fully ionized); induction drive (electrodeless lamps); and radiation transport.

  18. Spark Plasma Sintering of Fuel Cermets for Nuclear Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhong; Robert C. O' Brien; Steven D. Howe; Nathan D. Jerred; Kristopher Schwinn; Laura Sudderth; Joshua Hundley

    2011-11-01

    The feasibility of the fabrication of tungsten based nuclear fuel cermets via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is investigated in this work. CeO2 is used to simulate fuel loadings of UO2 or Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels within tungsten-based cermets due to the similar properties of these materials. This study shows that after a short time sintering, greater than 90 % density can be achieved, which is suitable to possess good strength as well as the ability to contain fission products. The mechanical properties and the densities of the samples are also investigated as functions of the applied pressures during the sintering.

  19. Laser Diagnostics Study of Plasma Assisted Combustion for Scramjet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    treatment of the fuel or reactants into hydrogen rich syngas prior to thermal oxidation [11-12], enhanced ignition of hydrocarbon fuels [9,13-14...dramatically, and a significant rise of OH in the post combustion gas region is evident. It is 532 nm Power Supply N d: YA G L as er Dye Laser...plasma, ne~1014-1015 cm-3). The power supply is a 2 kW magnetron (2.45 GHz), although no more than 40 W seems to be required for most test conditions due

  20. SVSCf plasma desorption mass spectrometry: recent advances and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamensky, I.; Craig, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    SVSCf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS) as utilized in the BIO-ION instruments is described. The sensitivity of the technique is investigated for varying amounts of bovine insulin. The results show accurate mass assignment for pmole amounts of sample. Several methods, currently used for sample preparation in PDMS, are described. Spectra of the antibiotic nisin using two different sample preparation techniques show significant variation. The fragmentation pattern of reduced acetylated maltoheptaose is also presented. The initial results obtained using a new PDMS instrument equipped with variable flight path are shown. The increased resolution is illustrated using the extended flight path to measure the molecular ion region of the maltoheptaose.

  1. Controlling plasma stimulated media in cancer treatment application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dayun; Sherman, Jonathan H.; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Ratovitski, Edward; Canady, Jerome; Keidar, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) constitutes a "cocktail" of various reactive species. Accumulating evidence shows the effectiveness of CAP in killing cancer cells and decreasing the tumor size, which provides a solid basis for its potential use in cancer treatment. Currently, CAP is mainly used to directly treat cancer cells and trigger the death of cancer cells via apoptosis or necrosis. By altering the concentration of fetal bovine serum in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and the temperature to store CAP stimulated media, we demonstrated controllable strategies to harness the stimulated media to kill glioblastoma cells in vitro. This study demonstrated the significant role of media in killing cancer cells via the CAP treatment.

  2. Evolution of Collisionally Merged Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K; Baumgardt, H; Ibukiyama, A; Makino, J; Ebisuzaki, & T; Suzuki, Takeru K; Nakasato, Naohito; Baumgardt, Holger; Ibukiyama, Akihiro; Makino, Junichiro

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of collisionally merged stars with mass of ~100 Msun which might be formed in dense star clusters. We assumed that massive stars with several tens Msun collide typically after ~1Myr of the formation of the cluster and performed hydrodynamical simulations of several collision events. Our simulations show that after the collisions, merged stars have extended envelopes and their radii are larger than those in the thermal equilibrium states and that their interiors are He-rich because of the stellar evolution of the progenitor stars. We also found that if the mass-ratio of merging stars is far from unity, the interior of the merger product is not well mixed and the elemental abundance is not homogeneous. We then followed the evolution of these collision products by a one dimensional stellar evolution code. After an initial contraction on the Kelvin-Helmholtz (thermal adjustment) timescale (~10^{3-4} yr), the evolution of the merged stars traces that of single homogeneous stars with co...

  3. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  4. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    , this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead...

  5. Clinical Applications of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Patellar Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, D. U.; Lee, C.-R.; Lee, J. H.; Pak, J.; Kang, L.-W.; Jeong, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers. PMID:25136568

  6. Diffusion and transport phenomena in a collisional magnetoplasma having both streaming and temperature anisotropy: Collisional kinetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J N Mohanty; K C Baral; G Nath

    2007-03-01

    Boltzmann-transport equation is analytically solved for two-component magnetoplasma using Chapman-Enskog analysis to include collisional diffusion transport having anisotropies in both streaming velocity and temperature components. The modified collisional integrals are analytically solved with flux integrals and perturbed kinetic equation to arrive at drift diffusion velocity and resulting transport coefficients which are markedly affected by both streaming and temperature anisotropy. The early isotropic results are recovered in the limit $V_{0} = 0$ and $T_{\\|} = T_{\\bot}$ which reduce to eqs (11.30) and (11.31) of [1] and eqs (2.7) and (2.13) of [2]. The electrical resistivity (n_{\\bot}) diminishes sharply in fusion temperature limit $kT_{\\bot} = 1$ keV. The shape of the curves for both electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity is rectangular hyperbolic. However, for low thermal ratio $(T_{\\|}/T_{\\bot} < 1)$, the curves are raised up and for high thermal ratio $(T_{\\|}/T_{\\bot} > 1)$, they are lowered down the isotropic case $(T_{\\|}/T_{\\bot} > 1)$, showing comparatively diminished magnitudes of the quantities.

  7. Collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    The degree of disruption in collisions in free space is determined by specific impact energy, and the mass fraction of the largest remnant is a monotonically decreasing function of impact energy. However, it has not been shown whether such a relationship is applicable to collisions under the influence of a planet's tidal force, which is important in ring dynamics and satellite accretion. Here we examine the collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment by using local N-body simulations. We find that outcomes of such a collision largely depend on the impact velocity, the direction of impact, and the radial distance from the planet. In the case of a strong tidal field corresponding to Saturn's F ring, collisions in the azimuthal direction are much more destructive than those in the radial direction. Numerical results of collisions sensitively depend on the impact velocity, and a complete disruption of aggregates can occur even in impacts with velocity much lower than their escape velocity. In such low-velocity collisions, the deformation of colliding aggregates plays an essential role in determining collision outcomes, because the physical size of the aggregate is comparable to its Hill radius. On the other hand, the dependence of collision outcomes on impact velocity becomes similar to the case in free space when the distance from the planet is sufficiently large. Our results are consistent with Cassini observations of the F ring, which suggest ongoing creation and disruption of aggregates within the ring.

  8. Evolution of the construction and performances in accordance to the applications of non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Brisset, J. L.; Astanei, D.; Ursache, M.; Mares, M.; Hnatiuc, E.; Felea, C.

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to present the evolution of the construction and performances of non-thermal plasma reactors, identifying specific requirements for various known applications, setting out quality indicators that would allow on the one hand comparing devices that use different kinds of electrical discharges but also their rigorous classification by identification of criteria in order to choose the correct cold plasma reactors for a specific application. It briefly comments the post-discharge effect but also the current dilemma on non-thermal plasma direct treatments versus indirect treatments, using plasma activated water (PAW) or plasma activated medium (PAM), promising in cancer treatment.

  9. Modelling of transitions between L- and H-mode in JET high plasma current plasmas and application to ITER scenarios including tungsten behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechl, F.; Loarte, A.; Parail, V.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Corrigan, G.; Harting, D.; Koskela, T.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Polevoi, A. R.; Romanelli, M.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Eich, T.; Contributors, JET

    2017-08-01

    The dynamics for the transition from L-mode to a stationary high Q DT H-mode regime in ITER is expected to be qualitatively different to present experiments. Differences may be caused by a low fuelling efficiency of recycling neutrals, that influence the post transition plasma density evolution on the one hand. On the other hand, the effect of the plasma density evolution itself both on the alpha heating power and the edge power flow required to sustain the H-mode confinement itself needs to be considered. This paper presents results of modelling studies of the transition to stationary high Q DT H-mode regime in ITER with the JINTRAC suite of codes, which include optimisation of the plasma density evolution to ensure a robust achievement of high Q DT regimes in ITER on the one hand and the avoidance of tungsten accumulation in this transient phase on the other hand. As a first step, the JINTRAC integrated models have been validated in fully predictive simulations (excluding core momentum transport which is prescribed) against core, pedestal and divertor plasma measurements in JET C-wall experiments for the transition from L-mode to stationary H-mode in partially ITER relevant conditions (highest achievable current and power, H 98,y ~ 1.0, low collisionality, comparable evolution in P net/P L-H, but different ρ *, T i/T e, Mach number and plasma composition compared to ITER expectations). The selection of transport models (core: NCLASS  +  Bohm/gyroBohm in L-mode/GLF23 in H-mode) was determined by a trade-off between model complexity and efficiency. Good agreement between code predictions and measured plasma parameters is obtained if anomalous heat and particle transport in the edge transport barrier are assumed to be reduced at different rates with increasing edge power flow normalised to the H-mode threshold; in particular the increase in edge plasma density is dominated by this edge transport reduction as the calculated neutral influx across the

  10. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel Science Fair: A Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2009-11-01

    For the past five years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Eligible projects have ranged from grape-based plasma production in a microwave oven to observation of the effects of viscosity in a fluid model of quark-gluon plasma. Most projects have been aimed at applications, including fusion, thrusters, lighting, materials processing, and GPS improvements. However diagnostics (spectroscopy), technology (magnets), and theory (quark-gluon plasmas) have also been represented. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with two awards going to women students and three to men. Since the award was initiated, both the number and quality of plasma projects has increased. The CPS expects this trend to continue, and looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2010 fair in San Jose on May 11-12.

  11. Recent developments in plasma spray processes for applications in energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, G.; Jarligo, M. O.; Marcano, D.; Rezanka, S.; Zhou, D.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-03-01

    This work focuses on recent developments of plasma spray processes with respect to specific demands in energy technology. High Velocity Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (HV-APS) is a novel variant of plasma spraying devoted to materials which are prone to oxidation or decomposition. It is shown how this process can be used for metallic bondcoats in thermal barrier coating systems. Furthermore, Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS) is a new method to process submicron-sized feedstock powders which are not sufficiently flowable to feed them in dry state. SPS is presently promoted by the development of novel torch concepts with axial feedstock injection. An example for a columnar structured double layer thermal barrier coating is given. Finally, Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) is a novel technology operating in controlled atmosphere at low pressure and high plasma power. At such condition, vaporization even of high-melting oxide ceramics is possible enabling the formation of columnar structured, strain tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity. Applying different conditions, the deposition is still dominated by liquid splats. Such process is termed Low Pressure Plasma Spraying-Thin Film (LPPS-TF). Two examples of applications are gas-tight and highly ionic and electronic conductive electrolyte and membrane layers which were deposited on porous metallic substrates.

  12. Challenges in the characterization of plasma-processed three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ellen R

    2013-10-09

    Low-temperature plasmas offer a versatile method for delivering tailored functionality to a range of materials. Despite the vast array of choices offered by plasma processing techniques, there remain a significant number of hurdles that must be overcome to allow this methodology to realize its full potential in the area of biocompatible materials. Challenges include issues associated with analytical characterization, material structure, plasma processing, and uniform composition following treatment. Specific examples and solutions are presented utilizing results from analyses of three-dimensional (3D) poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds treated with different plasma surface modification strategies that illustrate these challenges well. Notably, many of these strategies result in 3D scaffolds that are extremely hydrophilic and that enhance human Saos-2 osteoblast cell growth and proliferation, which are promising results for applications including tissue engineering and advanced biomedical devices.

  13. Construction, calibration, and application of a compact spectrophotometer for EUV (300-2500-A) plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, H W; Chen, K I; Terry, J L; Fastie, W G

    1979-04-15

    A 400-mm normal incidence concave grating spectrophotometer, specifically designed for plasma diagnostics, is described. The wavelength drive, in which the grating is translated as well as rotated, is discussed in detail; the wavelength linearity of the sine drive and methods of improving it are analyzed. The instrument can be used in any orientation, is portable under vacuum, and quite rugged. The construction techniques utilized produce a high quality vacuum making the instrument compatible with both high purity plasma devices and synchrotron radiation sources. The photometric sensitivity calibration was found to be very stable during extended use on high temperature plasma devices. The applications of the instrument to diagnose plasmas in two tokamaks and a mirror device are described. A facility used for photometric calibration of extreme ultraviolet (lambda > 300-A) spectrophotometers against NBS standard diodes is described. The instrumental calibration obtained using this facility was checked by using synchrotron radiation from SURF II; very good agreement was observed.

  14. NanoRocks: Experimental Study of Collisional Damping and Aggregation at Low Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua E.; Brisset, Julie; Dove, Adrienne R.; Metzger, Jessica; Rascon, Allison

    2015-11-01

    The NanoRocks experiment on the International Space Station consists of 8 separate sample trays of particles from ~0.1 mm - 2.0 mm in diameter that undergo collisional evolution. The microgravity environment of the ISS allows collision speeds of less than 1 mm/s to be studied. At these speeds the experiment reproduces the velocity dispersion found in unperturbed regions of Saturn’s rings. Observations of the rings from Cassini instruments hint at aggregation and fragmentation of clumps depending on the local surface mass density, particle size distribution and velocity dispersion.The eight NanoRocks samples include plastic beads, copper, glass, and JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant. The samples are shaken at 1 minute intervals to provide initial collision velocities of a few cm/s, and video is recorded of the collisional evolution of the particle samples. We derive mean coefficients of restitution for the different samples based on the damping of the mean velocity dispersion as well as tracking of individual particle trajectories. The evolution of the velocity distribution is consistent with a uniform random distribution of the coefficient of restitution, independent of collision velocity. This is consistent with results of Heißelmann et al. (Icarus Vol. 206, pp. 424-430, 2010) using larger icy particles. We also find the onset of cluster formation at speeds of a few mm/s. We will present our results and discuss applications to models of the collisional evolution of Saturn’s rings.

  15. Modeling the Collisional-Plastic Stress Transition for Bin Discharge of Granular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C. Stuart; Finney, Charles E. A.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Syamlal, Madhava; O'Brien, Thomas J.

    2009-06-01

    We propose a heuristic model for the transition between collisional and frictional/plastic stresses in the flow of granular material. Our approach is based on a physically motivated, nonlinear `blending' function that produces a weighted average of the limiting stresses, depending on the local void fraction in the flow field. Previously published stress models are utilized to describe the behavior in the collisional (Lun et al., 1984) and quasi-static limits (Schaeffer, 1987 and Syamlal et al.., 1993). Sigmoidal and hyperbolic tangent functions are used to mimic the observed smooth yet rapid transition between the collisional and plastic stress zones. We implement our stress transition model in an open-source multiphase flow solver, MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges, www.mfix.org) and demonstrate its application to a standard bin discharge problem. The model's effectiveness is illustrated by comparing computational predictions to the experimentally derived Beverloo correlation. With the correct choice of function parameters, the model predicts bin discharge rates within the error margins of the Beverloo correlation and is more accurate than one of the alternative granular stress models proposed in the literature. Although a second granular stress model in the literature is also reasonably consistent with the Beverloo correlation, we propose that our alternative blending function is likely to be more adaptable to situations with more complex solids properties (e.g., `sticky' solids).

  16. Modeling the Collisional-Plastic Stress Transition for Bin Discharge of Granular Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Benyahia, S. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Syamlal, M. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); O' Brien, T. J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    2009-01-01

    We propose a heuristic model for the transition between collisional and frictional/plastic stresses in the flow of granular material. Our approach is based on a physically motivated, nonlinear blending function that produces a weighted average of the limiting stresses, depending on the local void fraction in the flow field. Previously published stress models are utilized to describe the behavior in the collisional (Lun et al., 1984) and quasi-static limits (Schaeffer, 1987 and Syamlal et al., 1993). Sigmoidal and hyperbolic tangent functions are used to mimic the observed smooth yet rapid transition between the collisional and plastic stress zones. We implement our stress transition model in an opensource multiphase flow solver, MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges, www.mfix.org) and demonstrate its application to a standard bin discharge problem. The model s effectiveness is illustrated by comparing computational predictions to the experimentally derived Beverloo correlation. With the correct choice of function parameters, the model predicts bin discharge rates within the error margins of the Beverloo correlation and is more accurate than one of the alternative granular stress models proposed in the literature. Although a second granular stress model in the literature is also reasonably consistent with the Beverloo correlation, we propose that our alternative blending function is likely to be more adaptable to situations with more complex solids properties (e.g., sticky solids).

  17. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  18. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Joh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-cancer cell interactions, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the morphology and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level of human lung adenocarcinoma cell (A549 and human bladder cancer cell (EJ were explored. The experimental results show that the plasma can effectively control the intracellular concentrations of ROS. Although there exist slight differences in the production of ROS, helium, argon, or nitrogen plasma jets are found to be useful in enhancing the intracellular ROS concentrations in cancer cells.

  19. Applications of continuous and orthogonal wavelet transforms to MHD and plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Wavelet analysis and compression tools are presented and different applications to study MHD and plasma turbulence are illustrated. We use the continuous and the orthogonal wavelet transform to develop several statistical diagnostics based on the wavelet coefficients. We show how to extract coherent structures out of fully developed turbulent flows using wavelet-based denoising and describe multiscale numerical simulation schemes using wavelets. Several examples for analyzing, compressing and computing one, two and three dimensional turbulent MHD or plasma flows are presented. Details can be found in M. Farge and K. Schneider. Wavelet transforms and their applications to MHD and plasma turbulence: A review. Support by the French Research Federation for Fusion Studies within the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) is thankfully acknowledged.

  20. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet characterization and applications on melanoma cancer treatment (B/16-F10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashayekh, Shahriar [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 19839-63113 Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajaee, Hajar; Hassan, Zuhir M. [Imonology Department, Faculty of Medical Science, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghi, Morteza [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 19839-63113 Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, Babak [Physics Department and Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 19839-63113 Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    A new approach in medicine is the use of cold plasma for various applications such as sterilization blood coagulation and cancer cell treatment. In this paper, a pin-to-hole plasma jet for biological applications has been designed and manufactured and characterized. The characterization includes power consumption via Lissajous method, thermal behavior of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by using Infra-red camera as a novel method and using Speicair software to determine vibrational and transitional temperatures, and optical emission spectroscopy to determine the generated species. Treatment of Melanoma cancer cells (B16/F10) was also implemented, and tetrazolium salt dye (MTT assay) and flow cytometry were used to evaluate viability. Effect of ultraviolet photons on cancerous cells was also observed using an MgF{sub 2} crystal with MTT assay. Finally, in-vivo studies on C57 type mice were also done in order to have a better understanding of the effects in real conditions.

  1. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet characterization and applications on melanoma cancer treatment (B/16-F10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekh, Shahriar; Rajaee, Hajar; Akhlaghi, Morteza; Shokri, Babak; Hassan, Zuhir M.

    2015-09-01

    A new approach in medicine is the use of cold plasma for various applications such as sterilization blood coagulation and cancer cell treatment. In this paper, a pin-to-hole plasma jet for biological applications has been designed and manufactured and characterized. The characterization includes power consumption via Lissajous method, thermal behavior of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by using Infra-red camera as a novel method and using Speicair software to determine vibrational and transitional temperatures, and optical emission spectroscopy to determine the generated species. Treatment of Melanoma cancer cells (B16/F10) was also implemented, and tetrazolium salt dye (MTT assay) and flow cytometry were used to evaluate viability. Effect of ultraviolet photons on cancerous cells was also observed using an MgF2 crystal with MTT assay. Finally, in-vivo studies on C57 type mice were also done in order to have a better understanding of the effects in real conditions.

  2. Magnetic Flux Compression Using Detonation Plasma Armatures and Superconductor Stators: Integrated Propulsion and Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron; Robertson, Tony; Hawk, Clark; Turner, Matt; Koelfgen, Syri

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use of magnetic flux compression for space flight applications as a propulsion and other power applications. The qualities of this technology that make it suitable for spaceflight propulsion and power, are that it has high power density, it can give multimegawatt energy bursts, and terawatt power bursts, it can produce the pulse power for low impedance dense plasma devices (e.g., pulse fusion drivers), and it can produce direct thrust. The issues of a metal vs plasma armature are discussed, and the requirements for high energy output, and fast pulse rise time requires a high speed armature. The plasma armature enables repetitive firing capabilities. The issues concerning the high temperature superconductor stator are also discussed. The concept of the radial mode pulse power generator is described. The proposed research strategy combines the use of computational modeling (i.e., magnetohydrodynamic computations, and finite element modeling) and laboratory experiments to create a demonstration device.

  3. PREFACE: Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, V.; Giulietti, D.; Torrisi, L.; Delle Side, D.

    2014-04-01

    The ''Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications'' Conference (PPLA 2013) is a biennial meeting in which the National teams involved in Laser-Plasma Interaction at high intensities communicate their late results comparing with the colleagues from the most important European Laser Facilities. The sixth appointment has been organized in Lecce, Italy, from 2 to 4 October 2013 at the Rector Palace of the University of Salento. Surprising results obtained by laser-matter interaction at high intensities, as well as, non-equilibrium plasma generation, laser-plasma acceleration and related secondary sources, diagnostic methodologies and applications based on lasers and plasma pulses have transferred to researchers the enthusiasm to perform experiments ad maiora. The plasma generated by powerful laser pulses produces high kinetic particles and energetic photons that may be employed in different fields, from medicine to microelectronics, from engineering to nuclear fusion, from chemistry to environment. A relevant interest concerns the understanding of the fundamental physical phenomena, the employed lasers, plasma diagnostics and their consequent applications. For this reason we need continuous updates, meetings and expertise exchanges in this field in order to follow the evolution and disclose information, that has been done this year in Lecce, discussing and comparing the experiences gained in various international laboratories. The conference duration, although limited to just 3 days, permitted to highlight important aspects of the research in the aforementioned fields, giving discussion opportunities about the activities of researchers of high international prestige. The program consisted of 10 invited talks, 17 oral talks and 17 poster contributions for a total of 44 communications. The presented themes covered different areas and, far from being exhaustive gave updates, stimulating useful scientific discussions. The Organizers belong to three Italian Universities

  4. Effects of repetitive platelet-rich plasma application on human tenocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocca, Augustus D; O'Malley, Michael; Beitzel, Knut; McCarthy, Mary Beth R; Chowaniec, David M; Cote, Mark P; Bradley, James P; Romeo, Anthony; Arciero, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical application of platelet-rich plasma is showing a trend toward multiple treatments. The goal of this study was to show the benefit of interval platelet-rich plasma application in the healing and recovery of human tenocytes using an in vitro cell model. Eight volunteers (6 men and 2 women) were included in this study (mean±SD age, 31.6±10.9 years). Venous blood was collected from new blood draws at 3 different times. Two blood products were prepared on each day of treatment: platelet-rich plasma derived from a single-spin process (PRPSS) and platelet-rich plasma derived from a double-spin process (PRPDS). The study had 2 limbs: 2-day and 4-day intervals. Cell proliferation, measured as disintegrations per minute, was then examined via a radioactive thymidine assay. In the 2-day-interval group, the difference in disintegrations per minute between days 0 and 2 in the PRPSS group reached statistical significance (P =.006). In the PRPDS group, statistical difference was seen between days 0 and 4 (P=.001) and between days 2 and 4 (P=.030). In the 4-day-interval group, the difference in disintegrations per minute between days 4 and 8 in the PRPSS group reached statistical significance, showing a decrease in cell proliferation (P =.013). In the PRPDS group, a statistical difference was seen between days 0 and 8 (P=.021), also showing a decrease in cell proliferation. The greatest effect of platelet-rich plasma, which has a positive effect on tenocyte proliferation and recovery, is seen on initial application. Its effect is diminished with repetitive application, and this finding leads to questioning of the efficacy of interval platelet-rich plasma dosing.

  5. Gas-Phase Plasma Synthesis of Free-Standing Silicon Nanoparticles for Future Energy Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dogan, I.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) are considered as possible candidates for a wide spectrum of future technological applications. Research in the last decades has shown that plasmas are one of the most suitable environments for the synthesis of Si-NPs. This review discusses the unique size-dependent

  6. Gas-Phase Plasma Synthesis of Free-Standing Silicon Nanoparticles for Future Energy Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dogan, I.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) are considered as possible candidates for a wide spectrum of future technological applications. Research in the last decades has shown that plasmas are one of the most suitable environments for the synthesis of Si-NPs. This review discusses the unique size-dependent fe

  7. Application of electron beam equipment based on a plasma cathode gun in additive technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galchenko, N. K.; Kolesnikova, K. A.; Semenov, G. V.; Rau, A. G.; Raskoshniy, S. Y.; Bezzubko, A. V.; Dampilon, B. V.; Sorokova, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    The paper discusses the application of electron beam equipment based on a plasma cathode gun for three-dimensional surface modification of metals and alloys. The effect of substrate surface preparation on the adhesion strength of gas thermal coatings has been investigated.

  8. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  9. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongfeng, DENG; Jian, JIANG; Xianwei, HAN; Chang, TAN; Jianguo, WEI

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  10. Demonstration of Plasma Arc Environmental Technology Applications for the Demilitarization of DOD Stockpiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ed; Zaghloul, Hany; Filius, Krag; Rivers, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Since 1989 the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) have been active participants in the research and development toward establishing Plasma Arc Technology (PAT) as an efficient, economical, and safe hazardous waste immobilization tool. A plasma torch capable of generating high temperatures makes this technology a viable and powerful tool for the thermal destruction of various military industrial waste streams into an innocuous ceramic material no longer requiring hazardous waste landfill (Class 1) disposal. The emerging pl asma environmental thermal treatment process, has been used to safely and efficiently meet the waste disposal needs for various demilitarized components disposal needs, such as: pyrotechnic smoke assemblies, thermal batteries, proximity fuses, cartridge actuated devices (CAD's), and propellant actuated devices (PAD's). MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (MSE) has proposed and fabricated a Mobile Plasma Treatment System to be a technology demonstrator for pilot-scale mobile plasma waste processing. The system is capable of providing small-scale waste remediation services, and conducting waste stream applicability demonstrations. The Mobile Plasma Treatment System's innovative concept provides the flexibility to treat waste streams at numerous sites and sites with only a limited quantity of waste, yet too hazardous to transport to a regional fixed facility. The system was designed to be operated as skid mounted modules; consisting of a furnace module, controls module, offgas module, and ancillary systems module. All system components have been integrated to be operated from a single control station with both semi-continuous feeding and batch slag-pouring capability.

  11. Collisional interaction between metastable neon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drunen, Wouter Johannes van

    2008-07-07

    In this thesis, the study of cold gases of neon atoms in different metastable states is described. It contains measurements of the collisional parameters for both the 3s[3/2]{sub 2} and the 3s'[1/2]{sub 0} metastable state and the dependence of the inelastic loss on external fields. Furthermore, the investigation of frequency dependent laser-induced collisions, and the possibility to excite photoassociation resonances is presented. For the measurements described here, neon atoms have been confined in a magnetooptical trap, in a magnetostatic trap, or in an optical dipole trap, respectively. By laser cooling inside the magnetic trap, atomic samples with more than 95 percent occupation of the magnetic substate m{sub J} = +2 could be prepared. They have a typical temperature of 0.5 mK, central densities up to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and a central phase-space density of up to 2.2.10{sup -7}. After loading the optical dipole trap from the magnetic trap, 2.5.10{sup 6} atoms with typical temperatures of 0.1 mK, and central densities up to 5.10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} were trapped. By evaporative cooling of the atoms in the magnetic trap we could increase the phase-space density by a factor of 200 to 5.10{sup -5}. Investigating the frequency dependence of laser-induced collisions did not reveal an experimental signature for the excitation of photoassociation resonances. For the {sup 3}D{sub 3} line a frequency dependence of laser enhanced Penning ionization was observed. Measurement of the two-body loss coefficient as function of the magnetic field showed a field dependence of the inelastic loss. These losses increase towards both small and large offset fields. The implementation of an optical dipole trap allowed us to trap the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state. From the trap loss measurements we determined the two-body loss coefficient of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state for both bosonic isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne. For {sup 20}Ne we obtained {beta}=6{sup +5}{sub

  12. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  13. Application of inertia-induced excitation theory for nonlinear acoustic modes in colloidal plasma equilibrium flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Karmakar

    2007-04-01

    Application of inertia-induced acoustic excitation theory offers a new resonant excitation source channel of acoustic turbulence in the transonic domain of plasma flow. In bi-ion plasmas like colloidal plasma, two well-defined transonic points exist corresponding to the parent ion and the dust grain-associated acoustic modes. As usual, the modified ion acoustic mode (also known as dust ion-acoustic (DIA) wave) dynamics associated with parent ion inertia is excitable for both nanoscale- and micronscale-sized dust grains. It is found that the so-called (ion) acoustic mode (also known as dust-acoustic (DA) wave) associated with nanoscale dust grain inertia is indeed resonantly excitable through the active role of weak but finite parent ion inertia. It is interestingly conjectured that the same excitation physics, as in the case of normal plasma sound mode, operates through the active inertial role of plasma thermal species. Details of the nonlinear acoustic mode analyses of current interest in transonic domains of such impure plasmas in hydrodynamic flow are presented.

  14. Plasma treatment for improving cell biocompatibility of a biodegradable polymer scaffold for vascular graft applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valence, Sarra de; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Chaabane, Chiraz; Gurny, Robert; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Walpoth, Beat H; Möller, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds are being evaluated by many groups for the application of vascular tissue engineering. In addition to the choice of the material and the structure of the scaffold, tailoring the surface properties can have an important effect on promoting adequate tissue regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an increased hydrophilicity of a polycaprolactone vascular graft by treatment with a cold air plasma. To this end, treated and untreated scaffolds were characterized, evaluated in vitro with smooth muscle cells, and implanted in vivo in the rat model for 3 weeks, both in the subcutaneous location and as an aortic replacement. The plasma treatment significantly increased the hydrophilicity of the scaffold, with complete wetting after a treatment of 60 sec, but did not change fiber morphology or mechanical properties. Smooth muscle cells cultured on plasma treated patches adopt a spread out morphology compared to a small, rounded morphology on untreated patches. Subcutaneous implantation revealed a low foreign body reaction for both types of scaffolds and a more extended and dense cellular infiltrate in the plasma treated scaffolds. In the vascular position, the plasma treatment induced a better cellularization of the graft wall, while it did not affect endothelialization rate or intimal hyperplasia. Plasma treatment is therefore an accessible tool to easily increase the biocompatibility of a scaffold and accelerate tissue regeneration without compromising mechanical strength, which are valuable advantages for vascular tissue engineering.

  15. Plasma-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, R.; Kaneko, T.; Kato, T.; Li, Y. F.

    2011-05-01

    Plasma-based nanotechnology is a rapidly developing area of research ranging from physics of gaseous and liquid plasmas to material science, surface science and nanofabrication. In our case, nanoscopic plasma processing is performed to grow single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled chirality distribution and to further develop SWNT-based materials with new functions corresponding to electronic and biomedical applications. Since SWNTs are furnished with hollow inner spaces, it is very interesting to inject various kinds of atoms and molecules into their nanospaces based on plasma nanotechnology. The encapsulation of alkali-metal atoms, halogen atoms, fullerene or azafullerene molecules inside the carbon nanotubes is realized using ionic plasmas of positive and negative ions such as alkali-fullerene, alkali-halogen, and pair or quasipair ion plasmas. Furthermore, an electrolyte solution plasma with DNA negative ions is prepared in order to encapsulate DNA molecules into the nanotubes. It is found that the electronic and optical properties of various encapsulated SWNTs are significantly changed compared with those of pristine ones. As a result, a number of interesting transport phenomena such as air-stable n- and p-type behaviour, p-n junction characteristic, and photoinduced electron transfer are observed. Finally, the creation of an emerging SWNTs-based nanobioelectronics system is challenged. Specifically, the bottom-up electric-field-assisted reactive ion etching is proposed to control the chirality of SWNTs, unexplored SWNT properties of magnetism and superconductivity are aimed at being pioneered, and innovative biomedical-nanoengineering with encapsulated SWNTs of higher-order structure are expected to be developed by applying advanced gas-liquid interfacial plasmas.

  16. The application of Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) for the sterilisation of spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Morfill, Gregor; Thomas, Hubertus; Satoshi Shimizu, .; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias

    2012-07-01

    Plasma, oft called the fourth state of matter after solid, liquid and gas, is defined by its ionized state. Ionization can be induced by different means, such as a strong electromagnetic field applied with a microwave generator. The concentration and composition of reactive atoms and molecules produced in Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) depends on the gases used, the gas flow, the power applied, the humidity level etc.. In medicine, low-temperature plasma is already used for the sterilization of surgical instruments, implants and packaging materials as plasma works at the atomic level and is able to reach all surfaces, even the interior of small hollow items like needles. Its ability to sterilise is due to the generation of biologically active bactericidal agents, such as free radicals and UV radiation. In the project PLASMA-DECON (DLR/BMWi support code 50JR1005) a prototype of a device for sterilising spacecraft material and components was built based on the surface micro-discharge (SMD) plasma technology. The produced plasma species are directed into a closed chamber which contains the parts that need to be sterilised. To test the inactivation efficiency of this new device bacterial spores were used as model organisms because in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy all bioburden constraints are defined with respect to the number of spores (and other heat-tolerant aerobic microorganisms). Spores from different Bacillus species and strains, i.e. wildtype strains from culture collections and isolates from spacecraft assembly cleanrooms, were dried on three different spacecraft relevant materials and exposed to CAP. The specificity, linearity, precision, and effective range of the device was investigated. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the application of CAP proved to be a suitable method for bioburden reduction / sterilisation in the frame of planetary protection measures and the design of a larger plasma device is planned in the future.

  17. Wavelet transforms and their applications to MHD and plasma turbulence: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Farge, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Wavelet analysis and compression tools are reviewed and different applications to study MHD and plasma turbulence are presented. We introduce the continuous and the orthogonal wavelet transform and detail several statistical diagnostics based on the wavelet coefficients. We then show how to extract coherent structures out of fully developed turbulent flows using wavelet-based denoising. Finally some multiscale numerical simulation schemes using wavelets are described. Several examples for analyzing, compressing and computing one, two and three dimensional turbulent MHD or plasma flows are presented.

  18. Fundamentals and applications of the combination of plasma nitrocarburizing and oxidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, S. [METAPLAS IONON Oberflaechenveredelungstechnik GmbH, Bergisch-Gladbach (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    With the so-called IONIT {sup trademark} OX process, a combined plasma nitrocarburizing and oxidizing, iron based materials, especially non-alloyed steel, had been treated. It is shown that the oxidation of the nitrocarburized layers lead to a significant improvement of the corrosion resistance. The basic fundamentals of the formation of the oxide layer on nitrocarburized surfaces are discussed. The results of metallographic examinations explain the technological figures. Inspections of the oxide layer growth kinetics show a parabolic law. The growth rate depends on the oxidation temperature. Properties of plasma nitrocarburized and further oxidized components are summarized. Examples are given which demonstrate the wide range of potential applications. (orig.) 16 refs.

  19. [Application of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and its derivatives in dental implantologie and plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Maczy; Arteaga-Vizcaíno, Melvis; Benito, Marisol; Benito, Mariluz

    2012-12-01

    The platelet rich plasma (PRP), as its name implies, has a high concentration of thrombocytes; is a non-toxic and non-allergenic autologous preparation, obtained by blood centrifugation at low speed. Its function is directly linked to the release of growth factors (FC) by platelets. These factors have properties of induction of tissue regeneration. For the preparation of the present work, a literature search was performed in different documentary sources using the following descriptors: platelet rich plasma, PRP, growth factors, GF, dentistry and cosmetic surgery. This article is a description of some relevant aspects of the PRP and its application in the areas of dentistry and cosmetic surgery.

  20. Determination of desmethyldiazepam in plasma by electron-capture GLC: application to pharmacokinetic studies of clorazepate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, D J

    1978-03-01

    Plasma desmethyldiazepam concentrations were quantitated by a rapid and sensitive technique using electron-capture GLC. Following addition of diazepam as the internal standard, plasma is extracted at physiological pH into benzene-isoamyl alcohol. The extract is evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with toluene-isoamyl alcohol prior to chromatography. Both diazepam and desmethyldiazepam are quantitatively extracted. The variation of identical samples is 5%, and the sensitivity is 5 ng of desmethyldiazepam/ml of original sample. The method is applicable to pharmacokinetic studies of clorazepate, a benzodiazepine derivative transformed to desmethyldiazepam prior to absorption.

  1. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    to 1990 with only 31 papers per year on average, and a total of some 1300 papers, precedes a considerable growth of some 35-50% in research activity every five years, over the last 20 years or so. As shown in the table, the annual dissemination of the field is more than 1600 papers and the total number of papers is in excess of 20000. This upwards trajectory is typical of a strong and growing subject area in physical science, with considerable capacity in both fundamental science and applications. PeriodNumber of papersPapers per annum 1948-1990130031 1991-19952279456 1996-20003447689 2001-20054571914 2006-201066401328 2011 1658 In many of the dense plasma jets discussed above, strong physical forces generated by the plasma are often desired and this favours plasma generation at elevated gas pressure, including atmospheric pressure, which favours a high level of gas ionization. Historically it has been challenging to reduce and control the strong physical forces in high-pressure plasmas for applications where these are unwanted, for example, surface modification of polymeric sheets [5]. Indeed, there is a real need for a vast range of material processing applications at temperatures below 100oC (or below 400 K) and this favours atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained far from thermal equilibrium with the dissipated electrical energy largely used not in heat generation but in unleashing non-equilibrium chemical reactions. The long-standing difficulty of effectively controlling the level of gas ionization at atmospheric pressure was overcome by the technological breakthrough of achieving atmospheric-pressure glow discharges in the late 1980s [6]. A related challenge stemming from high collisionality of atmospheric-pressure plasmas (v >> ω0) means that large-area plasmas sustained between parallel-plate electrodes are very susceptible to strong plasma instabilities when molecular gases are introduced for processing applications. This led to an effective

  2. Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy and collision cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takashi; Nakai, Manabu [Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    In Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS), we observe the polarized spectral lines emitted from a plasma. For berylliumlike oxygen lines from a tokamak plasma the polarization feature is interpreted as due to the anisotropic velocity distribution of electrons which excite the ions. In this interpretation in terms of the population-alignment collisional-radiative (PACR) model various collision processes are involved concerning the population and the alignment, e.g., transfer of the alignment, and the coherence by collisional excitation and production of an alignment from a population by elastic collisions. These latter processes are little known so far. (author)

  3. BASECOL2012: A collisional database repository and web service within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernet, M.-L.; Alexander, M. H.; Ba, Y. A.; Balakrishnan, N.; Balança, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; Dayou, F.; Doronin, M.; Dumouchel, F.; Faure, A.; Feautrier, N.; Flower, D. R.; Grosjean, A.; Halvick, P.; Kłos, J.; Lique, F.; McBane, G. C.; Marinakis, S.; Moreau, N.; Moszynski, R.; Neufeld, D. A.; Roueff, E.; Schilke, P.; Spielfiedel, A.; Stancil, P. C.; Stoecklin, T.; Tennyson, J.; Yang, B.; Vasserot, A.-M.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    2013-05-01

    The BASECOL2012 database is a repository of collisional data and a web service within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.eu). It contains rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of rotational, ro-vibrational, vibrational, fine, and hyperfine levels of molecules by atoms, molecules, and electrons, as well as fine-structure excitation of some atoms that are relevant to interstellar and circumstellar astrophysical applications. Submissions of new published collisional rate coefficients sets are welcome, and they will be critically evaluated before inclusion in the database. In addition, BASECOL2012 provides spectroscopic data queried dynamically from various spectroscopic databases using the VAMDC technology. These spectroscopic data are conveniently matched to the in-house collisional excitation rate coefficients using the SPECTCOL sofware package (http://vamdc.eu/software), and the combined sets of data can be downloaded from the BASECOL2012 website. As a partner of the VAMDC, BASECOL2012 is accessible from the general VAMDC portal (http://portal.vamdc.eu) and from user tools such as SPECTCOL.

  4. Advances in experimental spectroscopy of Z-pinch plasmas and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Wilcox, P. G.; Stafford, A.

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in experimental work on plasma spectroscopy of Z-pinches are presented. The results of experiments on the 1.7 MA Z-pinch Zebra generator at UNR with wire arrays of various configurations and X-pinches are overviewed. A full x-ray and EUV diagnostic set for detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of such plasmas together with theoretical support from relativistic atomic structure and non-LTE kinetic codes used in the analysis are discussed. The use of a variety of wire materials in a broad range from Al to W provided an excellent opportunity to observe and study specific atomic and plasma spectroscopy features. In addition, the applications of such features to fusion and astrophysics will be considered.

  5. Kinetic theory of twisted waves: Application to space plasmas having superthermal population of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Kashif; Poedts, Stefaan; Lazar, Marian

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays electromagnetic (EM) fields have various applications in fundamental research, communication, and home appliances. Even though, there are still some subtle features of electromagnetic field known to us a century ago, yet to be utilized. It is because of the technical complexities to sense three dimensional electromagnetic field. An important characteristic of electromagnetic field is its orbital angular momentum (OAM). The angular momentum consists of two distinct parts; intrinsic part associated with the wave polarization or spin, and the extrinsic part associated with the orbital angular momentum (OAM). The orbital angular momentum (OAM) is inherited by helically phased light or helical (twisted) electric field. The investigations of Allen on lasers carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), has initiated a new scientific and technological advancement in various growing fields, such as microscopy and imaging, atomic and nano-particle manipulation, ultra-fast optical communications, quantum computing, ionospheric radar facility to observe 3D plasma dynamics in ionosphere, photonic crystal fibre, OAM entanglement of two photons, twisted gravitational waves, ultra-intense twisted laser pulses and astrophysics. Recently, the plasma modes are also investigated with orbital angular momentum. The production of electron vortex beams and its applications are indicated by Verbeeck et al. The magnetic tornadoes (rotating magnetic field structures) exhibit three types of morphology i.e., spiral, ring and split. Leyser pumped helical radio beam carrying OAM into the Ionospheric plasma under High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) and characteristic ring shaped morphology is obtained by the optical emission spectrum of pumped plasma turbulence. The scattering phenomenon like (stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering) is observed to be responsible for the interaction between electrostatic and electromagnetic waves through orbital angular momentum. The

  6. Shear Viscosity of Turbulent Chiral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Das, Amita; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.

  7. Emerging applications of low temperature gas plasmas in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alex; Shama, Gilbert; Iza, Felipe

    2015-06-16

    The global burden of foodborne disease due to the presence of contaminating micro-organisms remains high, despite some notable examples of their successful reduction in some instances. Globally, the number of species of micro-organisms responsible for foodborne diseases has increased over the past decades and as a result of the continued centralization of the food processing industry, outbreaks now have far reaching consequences. Gas plasmas offer a broad range of microbicidal capabilities that could be exploited in the food industry and against which microbial resistance would be unlikely to occur. In addition to reducing the incidence of disease by acting on the micro-organisms responsible for food spoilage, gas plasmas could also play a role in increasing the shelf-life of perishable foods and thereby reduce food wastage with positive financial and environmental implications. Treatment need not be confined to the food itself but could include food processing equipment and also the environment in which commercial food processing occurs. Moreover, gas plasmas could also be used to bring about the degradation of undesirable chemical compounds, such as allergens, toxins, and pesticide residues, often encountered on foods and food-processing equipment. The literature on the application of gas plasmas to food treatment is beginning to reveal an appreciation that attention needs also to be paid to ensuring that the key quality attributes of foods are not significantly impaired as a result of treatment. A greater understanding of both the mechanisms by which micro-organisms and chemical compounds are inactivated, and of the plasma species responsible for this is forming. This is significant, as this knowledge can then be used to design plasma systems with tailored compositions that will achieve maximum efficacy. Better understanding of the underlying interactions will also enable the design and implementation of control strategies capable of minimizing variations in

  8. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure HF plasma source: generation of nitric oxide and ozone for bio-medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, S.; Bibinov, N.; Gesche, R.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new miniature high-frequency (HF) plasma source intended for bio-medical applications is studied using nitrogen/oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be used as an element of a plasma source array for applications in dermatology and surgery. Nitric oxide and ozone which are produced in this plasma source are well-known agents for proliferation of the cells, inhalation therapy for newborn infants, disinfection of wounds and blood ozonation. Using optical emission spectroscopy, microphotography and numerical simulation, the gas temperature in the active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined for varied nitrogen/oxygen flows. The influence of the gas flows on the plasma conditions is studied. Ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in the effluent of the plasma source are measured using absorption spectroscopy and electro-chemical NO-detector at variable gas flows. Correlations between plasma parameters and concentrations of the particles in the effluent of the plasma source are discussed. By varying the gas flows, the HF plasma source can be optimized for nitric oxide or ozone production. Maximum concentrations of 2750 ppm and 400 ppm of NO and O3, correspondingly, are generated.

  9. Stirring Unmagnetized Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, C; Wallace, J; Jara-Almonte, J; Reese, I; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.115001

    2012-01-01

    A new concept for spinning unmagnetized plasma is demonstrated experimentally. Plasma is confined by an axisymmetric multi-cusp magnetic field and biased cathodes are used to drive currents and impart a torque in the magnetized edge. Measurements show that flow viscously couples momentum from the magnetized edge (where the plasma viscosity is small) into the unmagnetized core (where the viscosity is large) and that the core rotates as a solid body. To be effective, collisional viscosity must overcome the ion-neutral drag due to charge exchange collisions.

  10. PREFACE: 12th International Conference on Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, N.; Landl, N.; Bogdan, A.; Yudin, A.

    2015-11-01

    The 12th International Conference ''Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications'' (GDP 2015) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 6-11, 2015. GDP 2015 represents a continuation of the conferences on physics of gas discharge held in Russia since 1984 and seminars and conferences on the technological applications of low temperature plasmas traditionally organized in Tomsk. The six-day Conference brought together the specialists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussions on the topics that are of interest to the Conference participants. The selected papers of the Conference cover a wide range of technical areas and modern aspects of the physical processes in the generators of low-temperature plasma, the low and high-pressure discharges, the pulsed plasma sources, the surface modification, and other gas-discharge technologies. The Conference was hosted by Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk Scientific Center, and Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building.

  11. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. Three near real time space weather tools under development for ISS applications are described here including: (a) Ne from ground based ionosonde measurements of foF2 (b) Ne from near real time satellite radio occultation measurements of electron density profiles (c) Ne, Te from a physics based ionosphere model These applications are used to characterize the ISS space plasma environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large changes in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the "persistence of conditions" forecast assumption. In addition, the tools are useful for providing space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  12. A new application field of plasma spraying technique to environmental depollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Fu-xing; A.Ohmori

    2004-01-01

    To expand the application of plasma spraying technique, TiO2 coatings were prepared using agglomerated anatase TiO2 powder to solve the environmental problems. The composition and photocatalytic activity of plasma sprayed TiO2 coatings were investigated systematically. The content of anatase TiO2 in the sprayed coatings was approximate to 7%- 15%, which was influenced by the melting state of TiO2 powder in plasma spraying process. The surface of sprayed coating was very rough and the arithmetical mean deviation of the surface profiles (Ra) was in the range of 5.7 - 8.8 μm. Under lower arc current, the surface of the coating became rougher. The anatase to rutile phase transformation temperature of agglomerated anatase TiO2 powder was approximate to 1 173 K. The TiO2 coating sprayed under the arc current of 400 A had good photocatalytic activity for the relative high content of anatase phase in it. It is concluded that the application of plasma spraying technique to environmental field has been developed.

  13. Low temperature plasma vapor treatment of thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Tang, X. L.; Chen, B. T.; Qiu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the novel methods of depositing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish by plasma polymerization are provided. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide by using the self-made equipment of plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials. On the deposition of PNIPAAm onto Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) melt-blown nonwovens in atmospheric pressure plasma, water permeability was significantly modified at around LCST. Due to the LCST is close to the temperature of human body, it has advantage on application of PBT melt-blown nonwovens.

  14. Transient and Capillary Collisional X-ray Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlyaptsev, V N; Dunn, J; Fournier, K B; Moon, S; Osterheld, A L; Rocca, J J; Detering, F; Rozmus, W; Matte, J P; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Kanouff, M

    2001-12-17

    In this work we report our numerical modeling results of laser-generated transient inversion and capillary discharge X-ray lasers. In the search for more efficient X-ray lasers we look closely at other approaches in conjunction with experiments at LLNL. In the search for improved X-ray lasers we perform modeling and experimental investigations of low density targets including gas puff targets. We have found the importance of plasma kinetics in transient X-ray lasers by expanding the physical model beyond hydrodynamics approach with Particle In Cell (PIC) and Fokker-Planck codes. The evidence of the Langdon effect was inferred from the recent experimental data obtained with the Ni-like Pd X-ray laser. We continue modeling different kinds of capillary discharge plasma configurations directed toward shorter wavelength X-ray lasers, plasma diagnostics and other applications.

  15. Hydrodynamic theory for ion structure and stopping power in quantum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P K; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M

    2013-04-01

    coupling parameter alone cannot be a good measure for determining ion correlation effects in a collisional quantum plasma, and such a characteristic of a dense quantum plasma should be evaluated against each of the plasma parameters involved. The present investigation thus provides testable predictions for the DISF and ISP and is henceforth applicable to a wide range of compressed plasma categories ranging from laboratory to astrophysical warm dense matter.

  16. Hydrodynamic theory for ion structure and stopping power in quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-01

    coupling parameter alone cannot be a good measure for determining ion correlation effects in a collisional quantum plasma, and such a characteristic of a dense quantum plasma should be evaluated against each of the plasma parameters involved. The present investigation thus provides testable predictions for the DISF and ISP and is henceforth applicable to a wide range of compressed plasma categories ranging from laboratory to astrophysical warm dense matter.

  17. Integration of ammonia-plasma-functionalized graphene nanodiscs as charge trapping centers for nonvolatile memory applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jer-Chyi

    2016-11-23

    Graphene nanodiscs (GNDs), functionalized using NH3 plasma, as charge trapping sites (CTSs) for non-volatile memory applications have been investigated in this study. The fabrication process relies on the patterning of Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs), whose thicknesses are tuned to adjust the GND density and size upon etching. A GND density as high as 8 × 1011 cm−2 and a diameter of approximately 20 nm are achieved. The functionalization of GNDs by NH3 plasma creates Nsingle bondH+ functional groups that act as CTSs, as observed by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This inherently enhances the density of CTSs in the GNDs, as a result, the memory window becomes more than 2.4 V and remains stable after 104 operating cycles. The charge loss is less than 10% for a 10-year data retention testing, making this low-temperature process suitable for low-cost non-volatile memory applications on flexible substrates.

  18. Biological and Agricultural Studies on Application of Discharge Plasma and Electromagnetic Fields 2.Sterilization by Electrical Discharges and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki

    The use of electrical discharges and plasmas for sterilization is reviewed. Plasmas generated by a silent discharge, a pulse discharge, and a radio frequency discharge under atmospheric pressure have been used for sterilization. Furthermore, a microwave plasma, a radio frequency plasma, and a low temperature plasma with hydrogen peroxide under low pressure conditions have been also used for sterilization. Sterilization results from injury caused by the discharge current, and from the reaction of species affected by the discharge. A silent discharge with air or oxygen is most effective for the sterilization. Nitrogen discharge also has a significant effect, however, argon discharge does not have a significant effect.

  19. PREFACE: IX International Conference on Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnostics and their Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savjolov, A. S.; Dodulad, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    The IX Conference on ''Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnosis and their Application'' was held on 5 - 7 November, 2014 at National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI). The goal of the conference was an exchange of information on both high-temperature and low-temperature plasma diagnostics as well as deliberation and analysis of various diagnostic techniques and their applicability in science, industry, ecology, medicine and other fields. The Conference also provided young scientists from scientific centres and universities engaged in plasma diagnostics with an opportunity to attend the lectures given by the leading specialists in this field as well as present their own results and findings. The first workshop titled ''Modern problems of plasma diagnostics and their application for control of chemicals and the environment'' took place at Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MEPhI) in June 1998 with the support of the Section on Diagnostics of the Council of Russian Academic of Science on Plasma Physics and since then these forums have been held at MEPhI every two years. In 2008 the workshop was assigned a conference status. More than 150 specialists on plasma diagnostics and students took part in the last conference. They represented leading Russian scientific centres (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'', Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Belgium and Sweden. About 30 reports were made by young researchers, students and post-graduate students. All presentations during the conference were broadcasted online over the internet with viewers in Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities. The Conference was held within the framework of the Centre of Plasma, Laser Research and Technology supported by MEPhI Academic Excellence Project (Russian

  20. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  1. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  2. Quantum theory of the dielectric constant of a magnetized plasma and astrophysical applications. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Ventura, J.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of an electron plasma in a constant and homogeneous magnetic field is considered, with the aim of (1) defining the range of validity of the magnetoionic theory (2) studying the deviations from this theory, in applications involving high densities, and intense magnetic field. While treating the magnetic field exactly, a perturbation approach in the photon field is used to derive general expressions for the dielectric tensor. Numerical estimates on the range of applicability of the magnetoionic theory are given for the case of the 'one-dimensional' electron gas, where only the lowest Landau level is occupied.

  3. Validity of the Taylor Hypothesis for Linear Kinetic Waves in the Weakly Collisional Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, G G; TenBarge, J M

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis---that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame---is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range o...

  4. Validity of the Taylor hypothesis for linear kinetic waves in the weakly collisional solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); TenBarge, J. M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis—that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame—is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range of solar wind turbulence supported by whistler waves is likely to violate the Taylor hypothesis, while one supported by kinetic Alfvén waves is not.

  5. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  6. Application of mid-infrared tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to plasma diagnostics: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roepcke, J [INP-Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19 (Germany); Lombardi, G [CNRS LIMHP, Universite Paris XIII, 99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Rousseau, A [Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Davies, P B [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-01

    Within the last decade mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy over a region from 3 to 17{mu}m and based on tuneable lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy or TDLAS, has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry in molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, organo-silicon and boron compounds has led to further applications of TDLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. TDLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetic phenomena. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from TDLAS measurements. A variety of free radicals and molecular ions have been detected by TDLAS. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of infrared spectroscopic techniques to industrial requirements. The recent development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offers an attractive new option for the monitoring and control of industrial plasma processes. The aim of the present paper is threefold: (i) to review recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas (ii) to report on selected studies of the spectroscopic properties and kinetic behaviour of radicals and (iii) to describe the current status of advanced instrumentation for TDLAS in the mid-infrared.

  7. Electron scattering by biomass molecular fragments: useful data for plasma applications?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenti, Marco A.; Amorim Filho, Jayr; Brunger, Michael J.; da Costa, Romarly F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent data obtained for electron scattering by biomass molecular fragments, indicated that low-energy resonances may have an important role in the de-lignification of biomass through a plasma pre-treatment. To support these findings, we present new experimental evidence of the predicted dissociation pathways on plasma treatment of biomass. An important question is how accurate must the experimental and/or the theoretical data be in order to indicate that plasma modelings can be really useful in understanding plasma applications? In this paper, we initiate a discussion on the role of data accuracy of experimental and theoretical electron-molecule scattering cross sections in plasma modeling. First we review technological motivations for carrying out electron-molecule scattering studies. Then we point out the theoretical and experimental limitations that prevent us from obtaining more accurate cross sections. We present a few examples involving biomass molecular fragments, to illustrate theoretical inaccuracies on: resonances positions and widths, electronic excitation, superelastic cross sections from metastable states and due to multichannel effects on the momentum transfer cross sections. On the experimental side we briefly describe challenges in making absolute cross sections measurements with biomass species and radicals. And finally, through a simulation of a N2 plasma, we illustrate the impact on the simulation due to inaccuracies on the resonance positions and widths and due to multichannel effects on the momentum transfer cross sections. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf and two mp4 files available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70272-8

  8. Agricultural and Food Processing Applications of Pulsed Power and Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi

    Agricultural and food processing applications of pulsed power and plasma technologies are described in this paper. Repetitively operated compact pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power are developed for the agricultural and the food processing applications. These applications are mainly based on biological effects and can be categorized as germination control of plants such as Basidiomycota and arabidopsis inactivation of bacteria in soil and liquid medium of hydroponics; extraction of juice from fruits and vegetables; decontamination of air and liquid, etc. Types of pulsed power that have biological effects are caused with gas discharges, water discharges, and electromagnetic fields. The discharges yield free radicals, UV radiation, intense electric field, and shock waves. Biologically based applications of pulsed power and plasma are performed by selecting the type that gives the target objects the adequate result from among these agents or byproducts. For instance, intense electric fields form pores on the cell membrane, which is called electroporation, or influence the nuclei. This paper mainly describes the application of the pulsed power for the germination control of Basidiomycota i.e. mushroom, inactivation of fungi in the soil and the liquid medium in hydroponics, and extraction of polyphenol from skins of grape.

  9. Subcritical excitation of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    1996-01-01

    Theory of current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in plasmas is developed in the presence of collisional transport. Double-valued amplitude of stationary fluctuations is expressed in terms of the pressure gradient. The backward bifurcation is shown to appear near the linear stability boundary. The subcritical nature of the turbulence is explicitly illustrated. Critical pressure gradient at which the transition from collisional transport to the turbulent one is to occur is predicted. This provides a prototype of the transport theory for nonlinear-non-equilibrium systems. (author).

  10. Subcritical excitation of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Yagi, Masatoshi; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    1996-09-01

    Theory of current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in plasmas in the presence of collisional transport is developed. Amplitude of stationary fluctuations is expressed in terms of the double-valued function of the pressure gradient. The backward bifurcation is shown to appear near the linear stability boundary. The subcritical nature of the turbulence is explicitly illustrated. The critical pressure gradient at which the transition from collisional transport to the turbulent one is to occur is predicted. This work provides a prototype of the transport theory for nonlinear-nonequilibrium systems. (author)

  11. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  12. On the two weighting scheme for {delta}f collisional transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two weighting {delta}f scheme (Wang et al., Research Report of National Institute for Fusion Science NIFS-588, 1999) for collisional or neoclassical transport calculations, which can solve the drift kinetic equation taking account of effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and the non-standard orbit topology near the axis. The marker density functions in weight equations are successively solved by using the idea of {delta}f method and a hierarchy of equations for weight and marker density functions is obtained. These hierarchy equations are solved by choosing an appropriate source function for each marker density. Thus the validity of the two weighting {delta}f scheme is mathematically proved. (author)

  13. Optimization of CFETR confinement by controlling rotation shear and pedestal collisionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Xiang; Chen, Jiale; Chan, Vincent; Li, Guoqiang; Zhuang, Ge; Cfetr Physics Team

    2016-10-01

    Optimization of a CFETR baseline scenario (Chan et al. 2015 Nucl. Fusion. 55) with EC and NB H&CD is performed using a multi-dimensional code suite. Rotation shear is controlled using NB, with injection angle being constrained to avoid edge heating and to maintain q_min >2. The NB power is adjusted to keep the plasma fully non-inductive. The NB energy that maximize the fusion gain Q is identified. Trade-off between the pedestal density and temperature is performed with the pedestal pressure fixed. It is found that Q increases with pedestal density, while the density peaking factor (DPF) remains unchanged. Linear analysis shows that the transport is dominated by TEM and ITG turbulence. Collisionality affects these turbulences in such a way that the induced changes in DPF cancel out. A weaker dependence of DPF makes higher density operation more favorable for fusion gain.

  14. Collisional effect on the Weibel instability with the bi-Maxwellian distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M.; Khanzadeh, H. [Physics Department, Mazandaran University, P. O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, the Coulomb collision effect of electron-ion is investigated based on the equilibrium bi-Maxwellian anisotropic distribution function in dense and unmagnetized plasma. An analytical expression is derived for the real frequency and the growth rate of the Weibel instability for two limiting cases |ξ=(ω{sup ′}/k{sub ||}θ{sub ||})|≫1 and |ξ|≪1. In the limit |ξ|≪1, the quantity η that is due to a collisional term will appear in the growth and condition of the rate of the Weibel instability, which leads to a constraining condition of the growth rate. When η increases, the growth rate will increase and the wave instability will be distant from its own damping mode.

  15. Argon plasma inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching study for smooth sidewall thin film lithium niobate waveguide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulliac, G.; Calero, V.; Ndao, A.; Baida, F. I.; Bernal, M.-P.

    2016-03-01

    Lithium Niobate (LN) exhibits unique physical properties such as remarkable electro-optical coefficients and it is thus an excellent material for a wide range of fields like optic communications, lasers, nonlinear optical applications, electric field optical sensors etc. In order to further enhance the optical device performance and to be competitive with silicon photonics, sub-micrometric thickness lithium niobate films are crucial. A big step has been achieved with the development of LN thin films by using smart cut technology and wafer bonding and these films are nowadays available in the market. However, it is a challenge to obtain the requirements of the high quality thin LN film waveguide. In this letter, we show smooth ridge waveguides fabricated on 700 nm thickness thin film lithium niobate (TFLN). The fabrication has been done by developing and optimizing three steps of the technological process, the mask fabrication, the plasma etching, and a final cleaning wet etching step in order to remove the lithium niobate redeposition on the side walls. We have obtained single mode propagation with light overall losses of only 5 dB/cm.

  16. ELECTRON HEAT FLUX IN THE SOLAR WIND: ARE WE OBSERVING THE COLLISIONAL LIMIT IN THE 1 AU DATA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, L. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot 5, place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2014-07-20

    Using statistically significant data at 1 AU, it has recently been shown (Bale et al.) that in the solar wind, when the Knudsen number K {sub T} (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux q intensity rapidly approaches the classical collisional Spitzer-Härm limit. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we observe that the heat flux strength does indeed approach the collisional value for Knudsen numbers smaller than about 0.3 in very good agreement with the observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its variation with the heliocentric distance and its dependence on the plasma parameters, shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Härm formula. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity approaches the collisional limit when the Knudsen drops below ∼0.3, the collisional limit is not a generally valid closure for a Knudsen larger than 0.01. Moreover, the good agreement between the heat flux from our model and the heat flux from solar wind measurements in the high-Knudsen number regime seems to indicate that the heat flux at 1 AU is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities as both wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are neglected in our calculations.

  17. Simplifying plasma chemistry via ILDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, T.; Kemaneci, E.; Graef, W.; van Dijk, J.

    2016-02-01

    A plasma fluid model containing a large number of chemical species and reactions yields a high computational load. One of the methods to overcome this difficulty is to apply Chemical Reduction Techniques as used in combustion engineering. The chemical reduction technique that we study here is ILDM (Intrinsic Lower Dimensional Manifold). The ILDM method is used to simplify an argon plasma model and then a comparison is made with a CRM (Collisional Radiative Model).

  18. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  19. Multi-Modality Pulsed AC Source for Medical Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Daniel; Gilbert, James

    2014-10-01

    A burgeoning field has developed around the use of non-equilibrium (``cold'') plasmas for various medical applications, including wound treatment, surface sterilization, non-thermal hemostasis, and selective cell destruction. Proposed devices typically utilize pulsed DC power sources, which have no other therapeutic utility, and may encounter significant regulatory restrictions regarding their safety for use in patient care. Additionally, dedicated capital equipment is difficult for healthcare facilities to justify. In this work, we have demonstrated for the first time the generation of non-equilibrium plasma using pulsed AC output from a specially-designed electrosurgical generator. The ability to power novel non-equilibrium plasma devices from a piece of equipment already ubiquitous in operating theatres should significantly reduce the barriers to adoption of plasma devices. We demonstrate the ability of a prototype device, coupled to this source, to reduce bacterial growth in vitro. Such a system could allow a single surgical instrument to provide both non-thermal sterilization and thermal tissue dissection.

  20. Application of Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma in Noninvasive Prenatal Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵茵; 邹丽

    2004-01-01

    Summary: To explore the application of fetal DNA in maternal plasma for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis, the DNA template was extracted by hydroxybenzene-chloroform from 44 maternal (7-41weeks) plasma. The Fetus-derived Y sequence DYZ-1 gene (149bp) was chosen to be amplified by PCR. The fragment was identified in all the plasma of male bearing pregnant women with the diagnostic accordance rate being 100.00 %. Two of the 22 female bearing pregnant women had false positive results. Among the 44 pregnant women, the diagnostic accordance rate was 88. 89 % at early pregnant stage, 100.00 % at medium pregnant stage, and 96.55 % at late stage respectively.The final accuracy of 95. 45 % was obtained in all cases. It was concluded that by means of hydroxybenzene-chloroform extraction the authors of this article promoted the concentration and purity of the DNA template, and diagnosed more accurately. The results showed that free fetal DNA in the maternal plasma could be regarded as the gene resource for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.