WorldWideScience

Sample records for collider magnet test

  1. Particle collider magnet self-destructs

    CERN Multimedia

    Higgins, Alexander G

    2007-01-01

    "A 43-foot-long magnet for the world's largest particle collider broke "with a loud band and a cloud of dust" during a high-pressure test, and officils said Tuesday they are working to find a replacement part." (1 page)

  2. Cryogenic testing of by-pass diode stacks for the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Della Corte, A; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Turtu, S; Basile, G L; Catitti, A; Chiarelli, S; Di Ferdinando, E; Taddia, G; Talli, M; Verdini, L; Viola, R

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated facility prepared by ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy and Environment) for the cryogenic testing of by-pass diodes for the protection of the CERN Large Hadron Collider main magnets will be described. This experimental activity is in the frame of a contract awarded to OCEM, an Italian firm active in the field of electronic devices and power supplies, in collaboration with ENEA, for the manufacture and testing of all the diode stacks. In particular, CERN requests the measurement of the reverse and forward voltage diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, and endurance test cycles at liquid helium temperature. The experimental set-up at ENEA and data acquisition system developed for the scope will be described and the test results reported. (3 refs).

  3. Cryogenic instrumentation of an SSC (superconducting super collider) magnet test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.; Strait, J.; Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes the system used to acquire cryogenic data for the testing of SSC magnets at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. An array of pressure transducers, resistance thermometers, vapor pressure thermometers, and signal conditioning circuits are used. Readings with time resolution appropriate for quench recording are obtained with a waveform digitizer and steady-state measurements are obtained with higher accuracy using a digital voltmeter. The waveform digitizer is clocked at a 400 Hz sampling rate and these readings are stored in local ring buffers. The system is modular and can be expanded to add more channels. The software for the acquisition, control, logging, and display of cryogenic data consist of two programs which run as separate tasks. These programs (as well as a third program which acquires quench and magnetic data) communicate and pass data using shared global resources. The acquired data are available for analysis via a nationwide DECnet network.

  4. B&W Vertical Test Facility for SSC collider quadrupole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, K.D.; Billingsly, A.L.; Boyes, D.W.; Cantor, B.I.; Hlasnicek, P.; Kelley, J.P.; Leamon, C.K.; Maloney, J.E.; Pare, G.; Rey, C.M. [Babcock & Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Developmental or {open_quotes}model{close_quotes} SSC quadrupole cold masses and collared coils are successfully being tested at the Vertical Test Facility (VTF) in Lynchburg, Virginia. Within this facility, a vertical dewar maintains a pool boiling liquid helium environment of 3.85 K to 4.5 K in order to observe the quenching and magnetic field characteristics of these coils. A description of the facility performance and its contents, including the dewar and ancillary equipment, is described hereafter.

  5. Last magnet in place for colossal collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Workers have installed the last magnet for the world's mew highest-energy particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The installation marks an important milestone; however, researchers still may not get the collider completed in time to start it up in November as planned." (1 page)

  6. Test of QCD at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations measure QCD processes in a wide kinematic range using proton--proton colliding data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A variety of recent results is presented. The results provide validation of the current understanding of QCD, such as the proton structure and interactions and radiations of partons.

  7. Testing Saturation at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, C

    2003-01-01

    We extend the saturation models a la Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff to cross-sections of hard processes initiated by virtual-gluon probes separated by large rapidity intervals at hadron colliders. We derive their analytic expressions and apply them to physical examples, such as saturation effects for Mueller-Navelet jets. By comparison to gamma*-gamma* cross-sections we find a more abrupt transition to saturation. We propose to study observables with a potentially clear saturation signal and to use heavy vector and flavored mesons as alternative virtual-gluon probes.

  8. Design and test of the benches for the magnetic measurement of the LHC dipoles. [Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billan, J.; Buckley, J.; Saban, R.; Sievers, P.; Walckiers, L. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic measurement of more than 1,300 LHC dipoles comprises the content of higher harmonic field components, field direction and field integrals. The measurements will be carried out along a warm bore installed inside the magnet cold bore, thus allowing the use of rotating coils at room temperature. This coil, together with Hall and NMR detectors is mounted at one end of a 12.5 m long shaft which is specially designed for very high rotational stiffness and which is controlled from its far end by a motor, an angular encoder and a level meter, all standard components placed outside the magnetic field without space restrictions. Particular emphasis has been put on the user-friendliness of the bench and its automated, computer-controlled operation requiring a minimum of staff, an important issue during production measurements of large series of magnets. The bench and its performed and precision achieved during its commissioning are described.

  9. Testing supersymmetry at the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    If new particles are discovered, it will be important to determine if they are the supersymmetric partners of standard model bosons and fermions. Supersymmetry predicts relations among the couplings and masses of these particles. The authors discuss the prospects for testing these relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider with measurements that exploit the availability of polarized beams.

  10. Magnetic reconnection between colliding magnetized laser-produced plasma plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Barnak, D H; Chang, P-Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2014-09-05

    Observations of magnetic reconnection between colliding plumes of magnetized laser-produced plasma are presented. Two counterpropagating plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic (CH) targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the Omega EP Laser System. The interaction region between the plumes is prefilled with a low-density background plasma and magnetized by an externally applied magnetic field, imposed perpendicular to the plasma flow, and initialized with an X-type null point geometry with B=0 at the midplane and B=8  T at the targets. The counterflowing plumes sweep up and compress the background plasma and the magnetic field into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing the first detailed observations of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The dynamics of current sheet formation are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations that model the experiments.

  11. A model for correlating 4. 2-K performance with room-temperature mechanical characteristics in superconducting test dipole magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ige, O.O.; Lyon, R.H.; Iwasa, Y. (Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States))

    1992-03-15

    The longitudinal attenuation of impact-generated pulses in ten superconducting dipole magnets was measured at room temperature. A lumped-parameter model was constructed for the collared dipole. Using the method of nonlinear least-squares, the model was used to estimate the internal damping in the main components of the dipoles and the coupling resistances between the components: collars, inner, and outer coils. A positive correlation was found between the collar-inner coil coupling resistance and the 4.2-K performance of the magnets: the higher the coupling resistance, the fewer the number of quenches required to reach design operating current. There was virtually no correlation between any of the other internal or coupling resistances and 4.2-K performance. These observations are explained in terms of frictional slip of the inner coil against the collars causing premature quenches. The magnets are more susceptible to quenches at the collar-inner coil interface than at the collar-outer coil interface because the inner coil is subject to higher fields and forces. The experiment is potentially useful as a technique for screening high-performance superconducting magnets such as Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles at room temperature.

  12. CERN completes magnet set for Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN, the European Oganization for Nuclear Research, took delivery of the last superconducting main magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on Monday, completint the full set of 1624 main magnets required to build the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator."

  13. COLLIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Howie Day, Collide, Based on the original parody "Collide" by USLHC, inspired by the original song "Collide" written by Howie Day and Kevin Griffin. Re-record Produced by Mike Denneen Engineered by Patrick DiCenso -Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards- Howie Day -Guitar Patrick DiCenso -Bass- Ed Valuskas -Drums- Dave Brophy

  14. Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This document presents the scientific justification and the conceptual design for the {open_quotes}Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator{close_quotes} (NLCTA) at SLAC. The goals of the NLCTA are to integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and rf systems being developed for the Next Linear Collider, to measure the growth of the {open_quotes}dark current{close_quotes} generated by rf field emission in the accelerator, to demonstrate multi-bunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, and to measure any transverse components of the accelerating field. The NLCTA will be a 42-meter-long beam line consisting, consecutively, of a thermionic-cathode gun, an X-band buncher, a magnetic chicane, six 1.8-meter-long sections of 11.4-GHz accelerator structure, and a magnetic spectrometer. Initially, the unloaded accelerating gradient will be 50 MV/m. A higher-gradient upgrade option eventually would increase the unloaded gradient to 100 MV/m.

  15. Collider tests of (composite) diphoton resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing excess around 750 GeV reported by ATLAS and CMS. The two scenarios lead respectively to a narrow and a wide resonance. We first provide a model-independent analysis via effective operators and then introduce minimal models of composite dynamics where the diphoton channel is characterized by their topological sector. The relevant state here is the pseudoscalar associated with the axial anomaly of the new composite dynamics. If the Standard Model top mass is generated via four-fermion operators the coupling of this state to the top remarkably explains the wide-width resonance reported by ATLAS. Beyond the excess, our analysis paves the way to test dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking via topological sectors.

  16. Collider tests of (composite diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Molinaro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing excess around 750 GeV reported by ATLAS and CMS. The two scenarios lead respectively to a narrow and a wide resonance. We first provide a model-independent analysis via effective operators and then introduce minimal models of composite dynamics where the diphoton channel is characterized by their topological sector. The relevant state here is the pseudoscalar associated with the axial anomaly of the new composite dynamics. If the Standard Model top mass is generated via four-fermion operators the coupling of this state to the top remarkably explains the wide-width resonance reported by ATLAS. Beyond the excess, our analysis paves the way to test dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking via topological sectors.

  17. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  18. Coil end design for the SSC collider dipole magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, J.; Bartlett, N.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Konc, J.; Lee, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Cook, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Caspi, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Gordon, M.; Nobrega, F. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1991-07-01

    This paper describes the design of the coil end for the 50mm aperture SSC collider dipole magnets built at Fermilab. The cable paths are determined from both magnetic and mechanical considerations. The end spacers are designed using the developable surface, grouped end approach, which allows the analysis of strain energy within the conductor groups. Techniques for strain energy minimization are presented and the behavior of individual conductors within a group is analyzed. The relationship between optimization of magnetic and mechanical variables is discussed. Requirements of manufacturing and inspection of coil end parts are outlined. 7 refs.

  19. Collider Tests of (Composite) Diphoton Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing...

  20. Overview of Linear Collider Test Facilities and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, H

    2004-01-01

    Linear Collider technology will be recommended by the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) to the International Linear Collider Steering Committee (ILCSC), soon. Towards this recommendation, many efforts of the developments and the output results of each technology have been made to satisfy the requirements of the technical review committee report (TRC). The test facilities of each linear collider design are the place of the key technology demonstration and realization. The overview of the LC test facilities activities and outputs of TTF, NLCTA, ATF/GLCTA and CTF are summarized and reviewed.

  1. Perturbative QCD tests from the LEP, HERA, and TEVATRON colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A review of QCD tests from LEP, HERA and the TEVATRON colliders is presented. This includes jet production, quark/gluon jet separation, quark/gluon propagator spin, {alpha}{sub s} updates, photon production, and rapidity gap experiments.

  2. Magnet trouble likely to complicate start of large hadron collider Repairs may preclude a test run before the particle smasher starts tackling the Higgs boson

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Researchers building the world's next top particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that straddles the Franco-Swiss border, may not get a chance to work out the bugs before they fire up the machine in earnest." (1/2 page)

  3. Particle collider magnet failure blamed on faulty engineering Experts are still weighing whether the hitch will delay the start-up of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Researchers have identified the cause of a hiccup in the construction of the world's next top particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During stress tests last week at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), a support structure tore loose from the housing of a keay ultracold magnet."(1 page)

  4. TRANSPORT AND INSTALLATION OF CRYO-MAGNETS IN CERN'S LARGE HADRON COLLIDER TUNNEL

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Coin, A; Gielen, M; Hauviller, Claude; Kershaw, K

    2004-01-01

    The arcs of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will contain around 1700 main superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles. The long and heavy magnets are supported on fragile composite support posts inside a cryostat to reduce the heat in-leak to the magnets' super fluid helium bath. The presence of fragile components and the need to avoid geometry changes make the cryo-magnets very difficult to handle and transport. The transport and installation of the LHC cryo-magnets in the LEP tunnels originally designed for smaller, lighter LEP magnets has required development of completely new handling solutions. The paper explains the constraints imposed by the cryo-magnet characteristics, the existing tunnel infrastructure and schedule considerations. The development and realisation of transport and handling solutions are described, starting from conceptual design, through manufacture and testing to the installation of the first cryo-magnet. Integration studies to verify and reserve space needed for manoeuvre and the prepara...

  5. Colliding-wind Binaries with strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kissmann, R; Reimer, O; Reimer, A; Grimaldo, E

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of colliding wind binary systems and conditions for efficient particle acceleration therein have attracted multiple numerical studies in the recent years. These numerical models seek an explanation of the thermal and non-thermal emission of these systems as seen by observations. In the non-thermal regime, radio and X-ray emission is observed for several of these colliding-wind binaries, while gamma-ray emission has so far only been found in $\\eta$ Carinae and possibly in WR 11. Energetic electrons are deemed responsible for a large fraction of the observed high-energy photons in these systems. Only in the gamma-ray regime there might be, depending on the properties of the stars, a significant contribution of emission from neutral pion decay. Thus, studying the emission from colliding-wind binaries requires detailed models of the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons. This in turn requires a detailed understanding of the magnetic field, which will not only affect the energy losses of...

  6. Superconducting Cable and Magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a high energy, high luminosity particle accelerator under construction at CERN and it will be the largest application of superconductivity. Most of the existing 27 km underground tunnel will be filled with superconducting magnets, mainly 15 m long dipoles and 3 m long quadrupoles. These 1232 dipole and 400 quadrupole magnets as well as many other magnets, are wound with copper stabilized NbTi Rutherford cables and will be operated at 1.9 K by means of pressurized superfluid helium. The operating dipole field is 8.33 T; however the whole system is designed for possible operation up to 9 T. The coils are powered at about 12 kA and about 12 GJ of magnetic energy will be stored in superconducting devices. After a brief review of the main characteristics of the superconductors and of the magnets, the special measures taken to fulfill the mass production with the necessary accuracy are presented. The results on one third of the superconducting cable production and on the first f...

  7. Turbulent amplification of magnetic fields in colliding laboratory jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Meinecke, J.; Bell, A. R.; Doyle, H.; Bingham, R.; Churazov, E. M.; Crowston, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Woolsey, N. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; MacDonald, M. J.; Wan, W. C.; Koenig, M.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Park, H.-S.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Lamb, D. Q.; Gregori, G.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the universe. In galaxy clusters, turbulence is believed to amplify seed magnetic fields to values of a few μG, as observed through diffuse radio-synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation measurements. In this study we present experiments that emulate such a process in a controlled laboratory environment. Two laser-driven plasma flows collide to mimic the dynamics of a cluster merger. From the measured density fluctuations we infer the development of Kolmogorov-like turbulence. Measurements of the magnetic field show it is amplified by turbulent motions, reaching a non-linear regime that is a precursor to turbulent dynamo. We also present numerical simulations with the FLASH code that model these experiments. The simulations reproduce the measured plasma properties and enable us to disentangle and characterize the complex physical processes that occur in the experiment. This study provides a promising experimental platform to probe magnetic field amplification by turbulence in plasmas, a process thought to occur in many astrophysical phenomena.

  8. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  9. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Sammut

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CERN is currently assembling the LHC (Large Hadron Collider that will accelerate and bring in collision 7 TeV protons for high energy physics. Such a superconducting magnet-based accelerator can be controlled only when the field errors of production and installation of all magnetic elements are known to the required accuracy. The ideal way to compensate the field errors obviously is to have direct diagnostics on the beam. For the LHC, however, a system solely based on beam feedback may be too demanding. The present baseline for the LHC control system hence requires an accurate forecast of the magnetic field and the multipole field errors to reduce the burden on the beam-based feedback. The field model is the core of this magnetic prediction system, that we call the field description for the LHC (FIDEL. The model will provide the forecast of the magnetic field at a given time, magnet operating current, magnet ramp rate, magnet temperature, and magnet powering history. The model is based on the identification and physical decomposition of the effects that contribute to the total field in the magnet aperture of the LHC dipoles. Each effect is quantified using data obtained from series measurements, and modeled theoretically or empirically depending on the complexity of the physical phenomena involved. This paper presents the developments of the new finely tuned magnetic field model and, using the data accumulated through series tests to date, evaluates its accuracy and predictive capabilities over a sector of the machine.

  10. Short sample testing facility for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbasnik, J.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Royet, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-06-01

    In this paper we present the system requirements of the apparatus measuring the short sample critical current of the cable for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), and the current status of our development work. Key features of the system presented here are: a sample holder which clamps the samples sufficiently well such that no training quenches are required to perform critical current measurements and another which may allow for faster sample mounting; voltage tap boards using a printed-circuit technique which eliminates the necessity of soldering wires for the voltage measurements; a 1-m ling, 5-cm-bore dipole magnet with close-in iron designed to produce 7.5 T with a 6000 A excitation current; and an air-lock system that allows repeated sample changes without the magnet chamber being contaminated with air and other impurities. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  12. ATF2 for Final Focus Test Beam for Future Linear Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, S.; ATF2 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    In future linear colliders, extremely small beam size is required at collision point for high luminosity. For example, it is of order of nanometer in ILC(International Linear Collider). ATF2 is a project at ATF(Accelerator Test Facility) in KEK which demonstrates performance of final focus system experimentally. ATF2 beam line is a prototype of ILC final focus system where the local chromaticity correction scheme is adopted. The optics is basically the same and the natural chromaticity, too. Thus the tolerance of magnet alignment and field error is similar for both of the beam lines. We report here observation of small beam size of about 45nm there. We also report plan for smaller beam size with higher beam intensity.

  13. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  14. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  15. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; Smiesko, J.; Tokar, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction-the "intrinsic" quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ / Z / W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsic heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.

  16. Reorienting MHD colliding flows: a shock physics mechanism for generating filaments normal to magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Erica; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2017-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow/ambient boundary, towards the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  17. Reorienting MHD Colliding Flows: A Shock Physics Mechanism for Generating Filaments Normal to Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Erica L; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns parsec-scale post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow-ambient boundary, toward the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  18. A summary of the quench behavior of B&W 1 m collider quadrupole model magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, C.M.; Xu, M.F.; Hlasnicek, P.; Kelley, J.P.; Dixon, K.; Savignano, J.; Letterman, S.; Craig, P.; Maloney, J.; Boyes, D. [Babcock & Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    In order to evaluate the quench performance of a B&W-Siemens designed quadrupole magnet at the earliest possible stage, a model magnet program was developed at B&W for the support of the Superconducting Super Collider. The authors report the quench performance, training behavior, and the ramp rate dependence for the QSH-801 through QSH-804 series of short (1.2 meter) quadrupole model magnets.

  19. FIRST BEAM TESTS OF THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET TEST BEAM LINE AT THE AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,K.A.; GASSNER,D.; GLENN,J.W.; PRIGL,R.; SIMOS,N.; SCADUTO,J.; TSOUPAS,N.

    2001-06-18

    In this report we will describe the muon collider target test beam line which operates off one branch of the AGS switchyard. The muon collider target test facility is designed to allow a prototype muon collider target system to be developed and studied. The beam requirements for the facility are ambitious but feasible. The system is designed to accept bunched beams of intensities up to 1.6 x 10{sup 13} 24 GeV protons in a single bunch. The target specifications require beam spot sizes on the order of 1 mm, 1 sigma rms at the maximum intensity. We will describe the optics design, the instrumentation, and the shielding design. Results from the commissioning of the beam line will be shown.

  20. Magnetic refrigeration down to 1.6 K for the future circular collider e$^+$e$^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Tkaczuk, Jakub; Millet, Francois; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean Marc

    2017-01-01

    High-field superconducting rf cavities of the future circular collider e+e− may require a kW-range superfluid helium refrigeration down to 1.6 K. Magnetic refrigeration operating below 4.2 K can be an alternative to the compression/expansion helium refrigeration. A significant difference between this application and previous magnetic refrigerator studies is its large cooling power, up to 103 times larger than the other designs. Principles of magnetic refrigeration are described and various technical solutions are compared. A numerical model for the static magnetic refrigerator is presented, validated, and adapted to the needs of the positron-electron version of the future circular collider. A preliminary design of magnetic refrigerator suitable for low temperature, kW-range cooling is studied.

  1. Wideband Precision Current Transformer for the Magnet Current of the Beam Extraction Kicker Magnet of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gräwer, G

    2004-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction system is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn of the collider and to safely dispose them on external absorbers. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The generator produces a magnet current pulse with 3 us rise time, 20 kA amplitude and 1.8 ms fall time, of which 90 us are needed to dump the beam. The beam extraction system requires a high level of reliability. To detect any change in the magnet current characteristics, which might indicate a slow degradation of the pulse generator, a high precision wideband current transformer will be installed. For redundancy reasons, the results obtained with this device will be cross-checked with a Rogowski coil, installed adjacent to the transformer. A prototype transformer has been successfully tested at nominal current levels and showed satisfactory results compared with the output of a high frequency resistive coaxial shunt. The annular core of the ring type transformer is composed of...

  2. Thermal Performance of the Supporting System for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, M; Parma, Vittorio; Vandoni, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    The LHC collider will be composed of approximately 1700 main ring superconducting magnets cooled to 1.9 K in pressurised superfluid helium and supported within their cryostats on low heat in-leak column-type supports. The precise positioning of the heavy magnets and the stringent thermal budgets imposed by the machine cryogenic system, require a sound thermo-mechanical design of the support system. Each support is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in glass-fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with its top part interfaced to the magnet at 1.9 K and its bottom part mounted onto the cryostat vacuum vessel at 293 K. In order to reduce the conduction heat in-leak at 1.9 K, each support mounts two heat intercepts at intermediate locations on the column, both actively cooled by cryogenic lines carrying helium gas at 4.5-10 K and 50-65 K. The need to assess the thermal performance of the supports has lead to setting up a dedicated test set-up for precision heat load measurements on prototype supports. This pa...

  3. Search for Magnetic Monopoles at the $p\\bar$p Colliding Ring

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to investigate the existence of particles carrying isolated magnetic charges at the @*p colliding ring. Such particles can be detected by solid state track detectors placed in a magnetic field and developed by subsequent chemical etching. In order to avoid possible interactions is simultaneous with the production and presence of substance is suppressed to the greatest possible extent between the production region and the detectors. A good sensitivity over a large range of magnetic charge values, the natural unit of which is the Dirac change .ce g = hC/4@pe is an important feature of the design. The high energy available at the @*p colliding ring allows to reach high mass values. Detailed study of the quality of the vacuum permitted to install detectors directly inside the vacuum pipe. Other detectors are being installed inside the UA1 apparatus.

  4. Selection of the optimum magnet design for the International Linear Collider positron source helical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of possible undulator designs for the International Linear Collider positron source has resulted in a superconducting bifilar wire design being selected. After a comprehensive paper study and fabrication of the two preeminent designs, the superconducting undulator was chosen instead of the permanent magnet alternative. This was because of its superior performance in terms of magnetic field strength and quality, operational flexibility, risk of radiation damage, ease in achieving the required vacuum, and cost. The superconducting undulator design will now be developed into a complete system design for the full 200 m long magnet that is required.

  5. Strain energy minimization in SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnet winding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.M.

    1990-09-24

    Differential geometry provides a natural family of coordinate systems, the Frenet frame, in which to specify the geometric properties of magnet winding. By a modification of the Euler-Bernoulli thin rod model, the strain energy is defined with respect to this frame. Then it is minimized by a direct method from the calculus of variations. The mathematics, its implementation in a computer program, and some analysis of an SSC dipole by the program will be described. 16 refs.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced squeezing effect at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Endrődi, Gergely; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In off-central heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is exposed to the strongest magnetic fields ever created in the universe. Because of the paramagnetic nature of the QGP at high temperatures, the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field configuration exerts an anisotropic force density that competes with the pressure gradients resulting from purely geometric effects. In this paper, we simulate (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with external magnetic fields to estimate the effect of this force density on the anisotropic expansion of the QGP in collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While negligible for quickly decaying magnetic fields, we find that long-lived fields generate a substantial force density that suppresses the momentum anisotropy of the plasma by up to 20 % at the LHC energy and also leaves its imprint on the elliptic flow v2 of charged pions.

  7. Design and Tests on the 30 to 600 A HTS Current Leads for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    1997-01-01

    Some 800 correction magnets of the Large Hadron Collider will be individually powered. Each of them needs a pair of current leads. To reduce the heat leak through these leads, the current has been chosen as low as reasonably possible, 30 to 600 A. For the same reason CERN started in-house a development of current leads using commercial bulk BSCCO-2212 material.This paper discusses the design and the test results of this lead. We tested several prototypes, measured the heat leak through the lead, studied and tested what happens if the lead is brought to critical temperature causing it to quench.

  8. Magnetic field generation, Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks, and magnetic reconnection in colliding laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.

    2016-10-01

    Colliding plasmas are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments and allow conversion of kinetic energy into heat and, most importantly, the acceleration of particles to extremely high energies to form the cosmic ray spectrum. In collisionless astrophysical plasmas, kinetic plasma processes govern the interaction and particle acceleration processes, including shock formation, self-generation of magnetic fields by kinetic plasma instabilities, and magnetic field compression and reconnection. How each of these contribute to the observed spectra of cosmic rays is not fully understood, in particular both shock acceleration processes and magnetic reconnection have been proposed. We will review recent results of laboratory astrophysics experiments conducted at high-power, inertial-fusion-class laser facilities, which have uncovered significant results relevant to these processes. Recent experiments have now observed the long-sought Weibel instability between two interpenetrating high temperature plasma plumes, which has been proposed to generate the magnetic field necessary for shock formation in unmagnetized regimes. Secondly, magnetic reconnection has been studied in systems of colliding plasmas using either self-generated magnetic fields or externally applied magnetic fields, and show extremely fast reconnection rates, indicating fast destruction of magnetic energy and further possibilities to accelerate particles. Finally, we highlight kinetic plasma simulations, which have proven to be essential tools in the design and interpretation of these experiments.

  9. Efficient twin aperture magnets for the future circular e+ /e_ collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report preliminary designs for the arc dipoles and quadrupoles of the FCC-ee double-ring collider. After recalling cross sections and parameters of warm magnets used in previous large accelerators, we focus on twin aperture layouts, with a magnetic coupling between the gaps, which minimizes construction cost and reduces the electrical power required for operation. We also indicate how the designs presented may be further optimized so as to optimally address any further constraints related to beam physics, vacuum system, and electric power consumption.

  10. Efficient twin aperture magnets for the future circular $e^+/e^- $ collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078698

    2016-01-01

    We report preliminary designs for the arc dipoles and quadrupoles of the FCC-ee double-ring collider. After recalling cross sections and parameters of warm magnets used in previous large accelerators, we focus on twin aperture layouts, with a magnetic coupling between the gaps, which minimizes construction cost and reduces the electrical power required for operation. We also indicate how the designs presented may be further optimized so as to optimally address any further constraints related to beam physics, vacuum system, and electric power consumption.

  11. Efficient twin aperture magnets for the future circular e^{+}/e^{_} collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Milanese

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We report preliminary designs for the arc dipoles and quadrupoles of the FCC-ee double-ring collider. After recalling cross sections and parameters of warm magnets used in previous large accelerators, we focus on twin aperture layouts, with a magnetic coupling between the gaps, which minimizes construction cost and reduces the electrical power required for operation. We also indicate how the designs presented may be further optimized so as to optimally address any further constraints related to beam physics, vacuum system, and electric power consumption.

  12. Efficient twin aperture magnets for the future circular e$^+$e$^-$ collider

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, Attilio

    2016-01-01

    We report preliminary designs for the arc dipoles and quadrupoles of the FCC-ee double-ring collider. After recalling cross sections and parameters of warm magnets used in previous large accelerators, we focus on twin aperture layouts, with a magnetic coupling between the gaps, which minimizes construction cost and reduces the electrical power required for operation. We also indicate how the designs presented may be further optimized so as to optimally address any further constraints related to beam physics, vacuum system, and electric power consumption.

  13. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  14. LHC Magnet test failure

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "On Tueday, March 22, a Fermilab-built quadrupole magnet, one of an "inner triplet" of three focusing magnets, failed a high-pressure test at Point 5 in the tunnel of the LHC accelerator at CERN. Since Tuesday, teams at CERN and Fermilab have worked closely together to address the problem and have identified the cause of the failure. Now they are at work on a solution.:" (1 page)

  15. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P N; Clarke, Christine; Frisch, Josef; Hartin, Anthony F; Kalinin, Alexander; Khah, H; Markiewicz, Thomas W; McCormick, Douglas; Molloy, Stephen; Perry, Colin; Ross, Marc; Smith, Stephen; Smith, Tonee; White, Glen

    2005-01-01

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype with delay-loop feedback operation. The achieved latency represents a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  16. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Frisch, J.C.; Markiewicz, T.W.; McCormick, D.J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; /SLAC; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Perry, C.; /Oxford Instruments

    2006-03-14

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype BPM processor. The achieved latency will allow a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  17. Correlation between magnetic field quality and mechanical components of the Large Hadron Collider main dipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellesia, B

    2006-12-15

    The 1234 superconducting dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider, working at a cryogenic temperature of 1.9 K, must guarantee a high quality magnetic field to steer the particles inside the beam pipe. Magnetic field measurements are a powerful way to detect assembly faults that could limit magnet performances. The aim of the thesis is the analysis of these measurements performed at room temperature during the production of the dipoles. In a large scale production the ideal situation is that all the magnets produced were identical. However all the components constituting a magnet are produced with certain tolerance and the assembly procedures are optimized during the production; due to these the reality drifts away from the ideal situation. We recollected geometrical data of the main components (superconducting cables, coil copper wedges and austenitic steel coil collars) and coupling them with adequate electro-magnetic models we reconstructed a multipolar field representation of the LHC dipoles defining their critical components and assembling procedures. This thesis is composed of 3 main parts: 1) influence of the geometry and of the assembling procedures of the dipoles on the quality of the magnetic field, 2) the use of measurement performed on the dipoles in the assembling step in order to solve production issues and to understand the behaviour of coils during the assembling step, and 3) a theoretical study of the uncertain harmonic components of the magnetic field in order to assess the dipole production.

  18. Design and System Integration of the Superconducting Wiggler Magnets for the Compact Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard, A; Bragin, A; Karppinen, M; Maccaferri, R; Mezentsev, N; Papaphilippou, Y; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Rumolo, G; Russenschuck, S; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  19. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  20. Thermomechanical properties of the coil of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio; Tommasini, D

    2002-01-01

    The correct definition and measurement of the thermomechanical properties of the superconducting cable used in high-field magnets is crucial to study and model the behavior of the magnet coil from assembly to the operational conditions. In this paper, the authors analyze the superconducting coil of the main dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider. They describe an experimental setup for measuring the elastic modulus at room and at liquid nitrogen temperature and for evaluating the thermal contraction coefficient. The coils exhibit strong nonlinear stress-strain behavior characterized by hysteresis phenomena, which decreases from warm to cold temperature, and a thermal contraction coefficient, which depends on the stress applied to the cable during cooldown. (35 refs).

  1. Tests of Scintillator+WLS Strips for Muon System at Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Evdokimov, Valery [Inst. for High Energy Physics (IHEP), Protvino (Russian Federation); Lukić, Strahinja [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-10-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been achieved, as well as time resolution of 0.5 ns and position resolution of ~ 7 cm.

  2. Iron-free detector magnet options for the future circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mentink, Matthias; Pais Da Silva, Helder Filipe; Rolando, Gabriella; Cure, Benoit; Gaddi, Andrea; Klyukhin, Slava; Gerwig, Hubert; Wagner, Udo; Ten Kate, Herman

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, several iron-free solenoid-based designs of a detector magnet for the future circular collider for hadron-hadron collisions (FCC-hh) are presented. The detector magnet designs for FCC-hh aim to provide bending power for particles over a wide pseudorapidity range (0≤|η|≤4). To achieve this goal, the main solenoidal detector magnet is combined with a forward magnet system, such as the previously presented force-and-torque-neutral dipole. Here, a solenoid-based alternative, the so-called balanced forward solenoid, is presented which comprises a larger inner solenoid for providing bending power to particles at |η|≥2.5, in combination with a smaller balancing coil for ensuring that the net force and torque on each individual coil is minimized. The balanced forward solenoid is compared to the force-and-torque-neutral dipole and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In addition, several conceptual solenoid-based detector magnet designs are shown, and quantitatively compared. The main dif...

  3. Iron-free detector magnet options for the future circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092466; Dudarev, Alexey; Pais Da Silva, Helder Filipe; Rolando, Gabriella; Cure, Benoit; Gaddi, Andrea; Klyukhin, Slava; Gerwig, Hubert; Wagner, Udo; Ten Kate, Herman

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, several iron-free solenoid-based designs of a detector magnet for the future circular collider for hadron-hadron collisions (FCC-hh) are presented. The detector magnet designs for FCC-hh aim to provide bending power for particles over a wide pseudorapidity range (0 ≤ jηj ≤ 4). To achieve this goal, the main solenoidal detector magnet is combined with a forward magnet system, such as the previously presented force-and-torque-neutral dipole. Here, a solenoid-based alternative, the so-called balanced forward solenoid, is presented which comprises a larger inner solenoid for providing bending power to particles at jηj ≥ 2.5, in combination with a smaller balancing coil for ensuring that the net force and torque on each individual coil is minimized. The balanced forward solenoid is compared to the force-and-torqueneutral dipole and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In addition, several conceptual solenoidbased detector magnet designs are shown, and quantitatively compared. The main...

  4. Energy helps accuracy: electroweak precision tests at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Marco

    2017-09-10

    We show that high energy measurements of Drell-Yan at the LHC can serve as electroweak precision tests. Dimension-6 operators, from the Standard Model Effective Field Theory, modify the high energy behavior of electroweak gauge boson propagators. Existing measurements of the dilepton invariant mass spectrum, from neutral current Drell-Yan at 8 TeV, have comparable sensitivity to LEP. We propose measuring the transverse mass spectrum of charged current Drell-Yan, which can surpass LEP already with 8 TeV data. The 13 TeV LHC will elevate electroweak tests to a new precision frontier.

  5. Magnetic refrigeration down to 1.6 K for the future circular collider e^{+}e^{-}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tkaczuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High-field superconducting rf cavities of the future circular collider e^{+}e^{-} may require a kW-range superfluid helium refrigeration down to 1.6 K. Magnetic refrigeration operating below 4.2 K can be an alternative to the compression/expansion helium refrigeration. A significant difference between this application and previous magnetic refrigerator studies is its large cooling power, up to 10^{3} times larger than the other designs. Principles of magnetic refrigeration are described and various technical solutions are compared. A numerical model for the static magnetic refrigerator is presented, validated, and adapted to the needs of the positron-electron version of the future circular collider. A preliminary design of magnetic refrigerator suitable for low temperature, kW-range cooling is studied.

  6. Instrumentation Status of the Low-β Magnet Systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C; Casas-Cubillos, J; Perin, A; Vauthier, N

    2011-01-01

    The low-β magnet systems are located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process allowing proton collisions at luminosity up to 1034cm-2s-1. Those systems are a contribution of the US-LHC Accelerator project. The systems are mainly composed of the quadrupole magnets (triplets), the separation dipoles and their respective electrical feed-boxes (DFBX). The low-β magnet systems operate in an environment of extreme radiation, high gradient magnetic field and high heat load to the cryogenic system due to the beam dynamic effect. Due to the severe environment, the robustness of the diagnostics is primordial for the operation of the triplets. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in February 2010. In the sake of a safer and more user-friendly operation, several consolidations and instrumentation modifications were implemented during this commissioning phase. This paper presents the in...

  7. Instrumentation status of the low-b magnet systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Perin, A.; Vauthier, N.

    2011-01-01

    The low-beta magnet systems are located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process allowing proton collisions at luminosity up to 10**34/cm**2s. Those systems are a contribution of the US-LHC Accelerator project. The systems are mainly composed of the quadrupole magnets (triplets), the separation dipoles and their respective electrical feed-boxes (DFBX). The low-beta magnet systems operate in an environment of extreme radiation, high gradient magnetic field and high heat load to the cryogenic system due to the beam dynamic effect. Due to the severe environment, the robustness of the diagnostics is primordial for the operation of the triplets. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in February 2010. In the sake of a safer and more user-friendly operation, several consolidations and instrumentation modifications were implemented during this commissioning phase. This paper presents ...

  8. Superconducting Magnet with the Minimum Steel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Dudarev, A.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mentink, M.; Da Silva, H. Pais; Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Berriaud, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T in combination with two superconducting dipole and two conventional toroid magnets is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 23.468 m long has seven 3.35 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 22.6 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and the 0.7 m thick nose disk and four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks each side. The maximum outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length is 62.6 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity about \\pm 2.7. The superconducting dipole magnets allow measuring the charged particle momenta in the pseudora...

  9. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069375

    2017-01-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3–4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  10. Beam Test of a High Pressure Cavity for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Kurup, A.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a high pressure RF cavity for use in the cooling channel of a muon collider, an experimental setup that utilizes 400-MeV Fermilab linac proton beam has been developed. In this paper, we describe the beam diagnostics and the collimator system for the experiment, and report the initial results of the beam commissioning. The transient response of the cavity to the beam is measured by the electric and magnetic pickup probes, and the beam-gas interaction is monitored by the optical diagnostic system composed of a spectrometer and two PMTs.

  11. Test of Relativistic Gravity for Propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated `antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  12. Proceedings of the 2. International Linear Collider Test-beam workshop - LCTW'09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormser, G.; Poeschl, R.; Takeshi, M.; Yu, J.; Hauptman, J.; Jeans, D.; Velthuis, J.; Repond, J.; Stanitzki, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Pauletta, G.; Hauptman, J.; Kulis, S.; Charpy, A.; Rivera, R.; Turchetti, M.; Vos, M.; Dehmelt, K.; Settles, R.; Decotigny, D.; Killenberg, M.; Haas, D.; Gaede, F.; Graf, N.; Wing, M.; Gaede, F.; Karstensen, S.; Meyners, N.; Hast, C.; Vrba, V.; Takeshita, T.; Kawagoe, K.; Linssen, L.; Ramberg, E.; Demarteau, M.; Fisk, H.E.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Videau, H.; Boudry, V.; Hauptman, J.; Lipton, R.; Nelson, T.

    2009-07-01

    At this workshop detector and simulation experts have described and discussed the necessary ILC (International Linear Collider) detector research and development program in view of its need for test beams. This workshop has provided an opportunity to evaluate the capabilities and shortcomings of existing facilities in the context of planned test beam activities. This document gathers together the slides of the presentations. The presentations have been classified into 4 topics: -) plans of sub-detectors - calorimetry, silicon and gaseous tracking, -) data acquisition, -) test beam facilities, and -) resources and infrastructure for future test beams

  13. Spread in Dipole Cable Magnetization and Consequences on the Spread of DC Persistent Currents in the Main Dipole of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Granata, V; Le Naour, S; Oberli, L R; Sanfilippo, S; Santoni, C; Scandale, Walter; Schwerg, N; Todesco, Ezio; Völlinger, C

    2004-01-01

    The production of more than 60% of superconducting cables for the main dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider has been completed. The results of the measurements of cable magnetization and the dependence on the manufacturer are presented. The strand magnetization produces field errors that have been measured in a large number of dipoles, all tested in cold conditions. We examine here the correlation between the available magnetic measurements and the large database of cable magnetization. The analysis is based on models documented in the literature. Finally, a forecast of the persistent current effects to be expected in the LHC main dipoles is presented, and the more critical parameters for beam dynamics are singled out.

  14. Superconducting Magnet with the Reduced Barrel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Berriaud, C; Curé, B; Dudarev, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mentink, M; Rolando, G; Da Silva, H F Pais; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 24.518 m long has seven 3.5 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 21 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and 0.7 m thick nose disk, four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks, and three 0.8 m thick muon toroid disks each side. The outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length without the forward muon toroids is 33 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity of \\pm 3.5. The conventional forward muon spectrometer provides the measuring of the muon momenta in the pseudorapidity region from \\pm 2.7...

  15. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  16. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  17. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged manget and retrofil others to correct the underlying design flaw.."(1 page)

  18. Determination of AC Characteristics of Superconducting Dipole Magnets in the Large Hadron Collider Based on Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ambjørndalen, Sara; Verweij, Arjan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) utilizes high-field superconducting Main Dipole Magnets that bend the trajectory of the beam. The LHC ring is electrically divided into eight octants, each allocating a 7 km chain of 154 Main Dipole Magnets. Dedicated de- tection and protection systems prevent irreversible magnet damage caused by quenches. Quench is a local transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. Triggering of such systems, along with other failure scenarios, result in fast transient phenomena. In order to analyze the consequence of such electrical transients and failures in the dipole chain, one needs a circuit model that is validated against measurements. Currently, there exists an equivalent circuit of the Main Dipole Magnet resolved at an aperture level. Each aperture model takes into account the dynamic effects occurring in the magnets, trough a lossy-inductance model and parasitic capacitances to ground. At low frequencies the Main Dipole Magnet behaves as a linear inductor. Ca...

  19. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  20. Prototype testing of magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, David P.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Frommer, David A.; Kirk, James A.; Anand, Davinder K.

    1987-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of the performance of a magnetic bearing assembly for flywheel energy storage applications are discussed. The experimental set up for determining the passive radial stiffness, active radial stiffness, and curent force sensitivity of the coils follows the method developed by Frommer (1986). Magnetic bearings design should preclude saturation and current limiting in the desired operating range, so that the system will be linear. A larger linear range will lead to a more stable magnetic bearing.

  1. Test Results for LHC Insertion Region Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Muratore, Joseph F; Cozzolino, John P; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Kumar-Jain, Animesh; Marone, Andrew; Richard-Plate, Stephen; Schmalzle, Jesse D; Thomas, Richard A; Wanderer, Peter; Willen, Erich; Wu, Kuo-Chen

    2005-01-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has made 20 insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These 9.45 m-long, 8 cm aperture magnets have the same coil design as the arc dipoles now operating in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL and are of single aperture, twin aperture, and double cold mass configurations. They produce fields up to 3.8 T for operation at 7.56 TeV. Eighteen of these magnets have been tested at 4.5 K using either forced flow supercritical helium or liquid helium. The testing was especially important for the twin aperture models, which have the most challenging design. In these, the dipole fields in both apertures point in the same direction, unlike LHC arc dipoles. This paper reports on the results of these tests, including spontaneous quench performance, verification of quench protection heater operation, and magnetic field quality. Magnetic field measurements were done at 4.5K and at room temperature, and warm-...

  2. Test of relativistic gravity for propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, Franklin

    2009-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. The first exact time-dependent solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirm that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated 'antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s^2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  3. On-Line Radiation Test Facility for Industrial Equipment needed for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rausch, R

    1999-01-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will use superconducting magnets cooled down to 1.2 K. To preserve the superconductivity, the energy deposition dose levels in equipment located outside the cryostat, in the LHC tunnel, are calculated to be of the order of 1 to 10 Gy per year. At such dose levels, no major radiation-damage problems are to be expected, and the possibility of installing Commercial Of The Shelf (COTS) electronic equipment in the LHC tunnel along the accelerator is considered. To this purpose, industrial electronic equipment and circuits have to be qualified and tested against radiation to insure their long term stability and reliability. An on-line radiation test facility has been setup at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and a program of on-line tests for electronic equipment is ongoing. Equipment tested includes Industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) from several manufacturers, standard VME modules, Fieldbuses like Profibus, WorldFIP and CAN, various electro...

  4. Quench tests at the Large Hadron Collider with collimation losses at 3.5 Z TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Bellodi, G; Brodzinski, K; Bruce, R; Burkart, F; Cauchi, M; Deboy, D; Dehning, B; Holzer, E B; Jowett, J M; Lari, L; Nebot del Busto, E; Pojer, M; Priebe, A; Rossi, A; Schmidt, R; Sapinski, M; Schaumann, M; Solfaroli Camollocci, M; Valentino, G; Versteegen, R; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operating since 2010 at 3.5 TeV and 4.0 TeV without experiencing quenches induced by losses from circulating beams. This situation might change at 7 TeV where the quench margins in the super-conducting magnets are reduced. The critical locations are the dispersion suppressors (DSs) at either side of the cleaning and experimental insertions, where dispersive losses are maximum. It is therefore crucial to understand the quench limits with beam loss distributions alike those occurring in standard operation. In order to address this aspect, quench tests were performed by inducing large beam losses on the primary collimators of the betatron cleaning insertion, for proton and lead ion beams of 3.5 Z TeV, to probe the quench limits of the DS magnets. Losses up to 500 kW were achieved without quenches. The measurement technique and the results obtained are presented, with observations of heat loads in the cryogenics system.

  5. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  6. Testing sterile neutrino extensions of the Standard Model at future lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Extending the Standard Model (SM) with sterile ('right-handed') neutrinos is one of the best motivated ways to account for the observed neutrino masses. We discuss the expected sensitivity of future lepton collider experiments for probing such extensions. An interesting testable scenario is given by 'symmetry protected seesaw models', which theoretically allow for sterile neutrino masses around the electroweak scale with up to order one mixings with the light (SM) neutrinos. In addition to indirect tests, e.g. via electroweak precision observables, sterile neutrinos with masses around the electroweak scale can also be probed by direct searches, e.g. via sterile neutrino decays at the Z pole, deviations from the SM cross section for four lepton final states at and beyond the WW threshold and via Higgs boson decays. We study the present bounds on sterile neutrino properties from LEP and LHC as well as the expected sensitivities of possible future lepton colliders such as ILC, CEPC and FCC-ee (TLEP).

  7. Linear Collider Test of a Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Mechanism in left-right Symmetric Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, James; Rodejohann, Werner

    2012-01-01

    There are various diagrams leading to neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric theories based on the gauge group SU(2)_L x SU(2)_R. All can in principle be tested at a linear collider running in electron-electron mode. We argue that the so-called lambda-diagram is the most promising one. Taking the current limit on this diagram from double beta decay experiments, we evaluate the relevant cross section e e to W_L W_R, where W_L is the Standard Model W-boson and W_R the one from SU(2)_R. It is observable if the life-time of double beta decay and the mass of the W_R are close to current limits. Beam polarization effects and the high-energy behavior of the cross section are also analyzed.

  8. Quench Protection and Powering in a String of Superconducting Magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Krainz, G

    1997-01-01

    Practical experience has been attained on the LHC Test String (String~1), composed of one 3~m long superconducting twin-aperture prototype quadrupole and three 10~m long superconducting twin-aperture prototype dipoles. The protection diodes are housed in the cold mass of the short straight section. The quench protection system acts on the half-cell level. During the operation of the LHC Test String, magnet quenches have been provoked manually by firing the quench heaters or occured manually by exceeding the critical temperature or critical current density of the superconductor. Most of the data could be measured while some parameters (magnet current, diode current, average temperature, etc.) cannot be directly measured. A simulation progam has been developed to calculate the missing data. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing measured and simulated data. The modelling of the quench behaviour of the final version of the LHC magnets show that hot-spot temperatures and voltages to ground ca...

  9. Concept of a Hybrid (Normal and Superconducting) Bending Magnet based on Iron Magnetization for 80-100km Lepton/Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Piekarz, H

    2014-01-01

    We present a concept of twin aperture iron dominated bending magnets. These compact “transmission line” dipoles are meant to be installed in the same 80-100 km tunnel of the Future Circular Colliders (FCC) currently being studied at CERN, where they shall be used for the high energy injector synchrotrons. The main feature is the coupling of a resistive cable (for first use in a leptons machine) with a superconducting one (for hadrons operation, presumably in a second phase of FCC). The main challenges in terms of operating field range are commented in the light of similar magnets already built.

  10. Demise of Texas collider has made Europe's lab a magnet for scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Had U.S. politics and science meshed more favorably, physicists from around the world would now be flocking to Waxahachie. The defunct Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) should by now have been smashing atoms, but now Europe's top nuclear research lab offers a more picturesque world capital of physics that the prairie south of Dallas

  11. Magnetic Launch Assist Demonstration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows a 1/9 subscale model vehicle clearing the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev), test track during a demonstration test conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies. To launch spacecraft into orbit, a Magnetic Launch Assist System would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a launch-assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  12. The electron lens test bench for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X., E-mail: xgu@bnl.gov; Altinbas, F.Z.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Frak, B.M.; Gassner, D.M.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Hoff, L.; Kankiya, P.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Mi, J.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Nemesure, S.; Okamura, M.; Olsen, R.H.; Pikin, A.I.; and others

    2014-04-11

    To compensate for the beam–beam effects from the proton–proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  13. The electron lens test bench for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, F. Z.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Frak, B. M.; Gassner, D. M.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Hoff, L.; Kankiya, P.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Mi, J.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Nemesure, S.; Okamura, M.; Olsen, R. H.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Rosas, P. J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.; Theisen, C.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2014-04-01

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  14. LLNL superconducting magnets test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, R; Martovetsky, N; Moller, J; Zbasnik, J

    1999-09-16

    The FENIX facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was upgraded and refurbished in 1996-1998 for testing CICC superconducting magnets. The FENIX facility was used for superconducting high current, short sample tests for fusion programs in the late 1980s--early 1990s. The new facility includes a 4-m diameter vacuum vessel, two refrigerators, a 40 kA, 42 V computer controlled power supply, a new switchyard with a dump resistor, a new helium distribution valve box, several sets of power leads, data acquisition system and other auxiliary systems, which provide a lot of flexibility in testing of a wide variety of superconducting magnets in a wide range of parameters. The detailed parameters and capabilities of this test facility and its systems are described in the paper.

  15. Testing CP-Violation in the Scalar Sector at Future $e^+e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-01-01

    We propose a {\\em model-independent} method to test CP-violation in the scalar sector through measuring the inclusive cross sections of $e^+e^-\\rightarrow Zh_1,Zh_2,h_1h_2$ processes with the recoil mass technique, where $h_1, h_2$ stand for the 125 GeV standard model (SM) like Higgs boson and a new lighter scalar respectively. This method effectively measures a quantity $K$ proportional to the product of the three couplings of $h_1ZZ,h_2ZZ,h_1h_2Z$ vertices. The value of $K$ encodes a part of information about CP-violation in the scalar sector. We simulate the signal and backgrounds for the processes mentioned above with $m_{2}=40\\textrm{GeV}$ at the Circular Electron-Positron Collider (CEPC) with the integrated luminosity $5\\textrm{ab}^{-1}$. We find that the discovery of both $Zh_2$ and $h_1h_2$ processes at $5\\sigma$ level will indicate an $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-2})$ $K$ value which can be measured to $16\\%$ precision. The method is applied to the weakly-coupled Lee model in which CP-violation can be tested ei...

  16. The Superconducting Super Collider: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwitters, R.F.

    1993-04-01

    The design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is briefly reviewed, including its key machine parameters. The scientific objectives are twofold: (1) investigation of high-mass, low-rate, rare phenomena beyond the standard model; and (2) investigation of processes within the domain of the standard model. Machine luminosity, a key parameter, is a function of beam brightness and current, and it must be preserved through the injector chain. Features of the various injectors are discussed. The superconducting magnet system is reviewed in terms of model magnet performance, including the highly successful Accelerator System String Test Various magnet design modifications are noted, reflecting minor changes in the collider arcs and improved installation procedures. The paper concludes with construction scenarios and priority issues for ensuring the earliest collider commissioning.

  17. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  18. Damage test for International Linear Collider positron generation target at KEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, M.; Mimashi, T.; Saito, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Kamitani, T.

    2006-07-01

    ILC (International Linear Collider) is aiming to conduct electron-positron collisions at 1 TeV center-of-mass energy. One bunch train will contain up to 2800 3.2 nC bunches with a 308 ns bunch spacing or 5600 1.6 nC bunches with a 154 ns spacing. The bunch-train length will be 0.9 ms. Because of this extremely large amount of beam in a train, serious damage to a positron production target driven by 6 GeV incident electron beam is of concern. As the ILC positron source, several different methods have been proposed. The target hardness is a key point concerning the selection. In this article, we report on a test experiment to examine the target hardness by using a stored electron beam in KEKB HER (High Energy Ring). The project name is IPPAK (ILC Positron Project At KEKB). By manipulating the abort kicker, a condition similar to that of the ILC positron production target can be reproduced. The experiment was carried out on June 29 and 30, 2005. The target was seriously damaged under the heaviest condition (KEKB mode), but the damage was less and nothing for those of the ILC mode. Possible impacts to the ILC positron production scheme are also discussed.

  19. Status of design, development and test of the dipole magnets for the high energy booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.M.; Boulios, G.; Finger, K.; Kaylor, L.; McConnon, A.; McConnon, S.; Osborne, S.; Sinnott, Z.; Pisz, F.; Swenson, C. [Westinghouse Magnet Systems Division, Round Rock, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Westinghouse Magnet Systems Division has a contract to design, develop, build and test the superconducting dipole magnets for the High Energy Booster. This paper covers the key requirements of the magnet and the design features to meet these requirements. Although similar to the Collider dipole magnets, there are some key differences in the functional requirements and design constraints which lead to design differences. Most significant is the requirement to prevent quench during bipolar operation at a ramp rate of 62 A/s compared to unipolar operation at 4 A/s for the Collider. Testing of 50 mm magnets made for the SSCL string test show that the design is sensitive to interstrand eddy currents and resultant heating at the higher ramp rate. The cryostat diameter is not constrained by the fixed distance between top and bottom rings as in the Collider. The authors are taking advantage of the additional space allowed. Emphasis in this paper is placed on the design differences and the reasons for them in both the cold mass and the cryostat. The cold testing requirements and plans for test facilities to carry out the tests are summarized.

  20. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  1. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B; Bednarek, M; Bellodi, G; Bracco, C; Bruce, R; Cerutti, F; Chetvertkova, V; Dehning, B; Granieri, P P; Hofle, W; Holzer, E B; Lechner, A; Del Busto, E Nebot; Priebe, A; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shetty, N; Skordis, E; Solfaroli, M; Steckert, J; Valuch, D; Verweij, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2015-01-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam- induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy depositio...

  2. A Study of Magnetic Shielding Performance of a Fermilab International Linear Collider Superconducting RF Cavity Cryomodule

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    This note presents measurements that support the conclusion that it is feasible to achieve magnetic field values at the level of 5 milliGauss for a cryomodule in a realistic and representative ambient magnetic field environment.

  3. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets. II. Dynamic field changes and scaling laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Sammut

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A superconducting particle accelerator like the LHC (Large Hadron Collider at CERN, can only be controlled well if the effects of the magnetic field multipoles on the beam are compensated. The demands on a control system solely based on beam feedback may be too high for the requirements to be reached at the specified bandwidth and accuracy. Therefore, we designed a suitable field description for the LHC (FIDEL as part of the machine control baseline to act as a feed-forward magnetic field prediction system. FIDEL consists of a physical and empirical parametric field model based on magnetic measurements at warm and in cryogenic conditions. The performance of FIDEL is particularly critical at injection when the field decays, and in the initial part of the acceleration when the field snaps back. These dynamic components are both current and time dependent and are not reproducible from cycle to cycle since they also depend on the magnet powering history. In this paper a qualitative and quantitative description of the dynamic field behavior substantiated by a set of scaling laws is presented.

  4. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  5. Design Studies and Optimization of High-Field Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Magnets for a Future Very High Energy PP Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V. V. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    High filed accelerator magnets with operating fields of 15-16 T based on the $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor are being considered for the LHC energy upgrade or a future Very High Energy pp Collider. Magnet design studies are being conducted in the U.S., Europe and Asia to explore the limits of the $Nb_3Sn$ accelerator magnet technology while optimizing the magnet design and performance parame-ters, and reducing magnet cost. The first results of these studies performed at Fermilab in the framework of the US-MDP are reported in this paper.

  6. Testing C P violation in the scalar sector at future e+e- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Mao, Ying-nan; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2017-02-01

    We propose a model-independent method to test C P violation in the scalar sector through measuring the inclusive cross sections of e+e-→Z h1,Z h2,h1h2 processes with the recoil mass technique, where h1 , h2 stand for the 125 GeV standard model-like Higgs boson and a new lighter scalar, respectively. This method effectively measures a quantity K proportional to the product of the three couplings of h1Z Z ,h2Z Z ,h1h2Z vertices. The value of K encodes a part of information about C P violation in the scalar sector. We simulate the signal and backgrounds for the processes mentioned above with m2=40 GeV at the Circular Electron-Positron Collider (CEPC) with the integrated luminosity 5 ab-1 . We find that the discovery of both Z h2 and h1h2 processes at 5 σ level indicates an O (10-2) K value that can be measured to 16% precision. The method is applied to the weakly coupled Lee model in which C P violation can be tested either before or after utilizing a "pT balance" cut (see Sec. II B for the definition). Lastly we point out that K ≠0 is a sufficient but not a necessary condition for the existence of C P violation in the scalar sector, namely, K =0 does not imply C P conservation in the scalar sector.

  7. Fault Tracking of the Superconducting Magnet System at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Griesemer, Tobias

    2016-03-25

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is one of the most complex machines ever built. It is used to explore the mysteries of the universe by reproducing conditions of the big bang. High energy particles are collide in particle detectors and as a result of the collision process secondary particles are created. New particles could be discovered during this process. The operation of such a machine is not straightforward and is subject to many different types of failures. A model of LHC operation needs to be defined in order to understand the impact of the various failures on availability. As an example a typical operational cycle is described: the beams are first injected, then accelerated, and finally brought into collisions. Under nominal conditions, beams should be in collision (so-called ‘stable beams’ period) for about 10 hours and then extracted onto a beam dump block. In case of a failure, the Machine Protection Systems ensure safe extraction of the beams. From the experience in LHC Run 1 (2009 - 20...

  8. First Cryogenic Testing of the ATLAS Superconducting Prototype Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Haug, F; Mayri, C; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroids and the barrel toroid made of eight coils (BT) symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. All these magnets will be individually tested in an experimental area prior to their final installation in the underground cavern of the LHC collider. A dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed and built for this purpose. It mainly consists of a 1'200 W at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit, a cryostat housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps, a distribution valve box and transfer lines. Prior to the start of the series tests of the BT magnets, two model coils are used at this facility. The first one, the so-called B00 of comparatively small size, contains the three different types of superconductors used for the ATLAS magnets which are wound on a cylindrical mandrel. The second magnet, the B0, is a reduced model of basically identical design concept as the...

  9. Testing Higgs coupling precision and new physics scales at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; He, Hong-Jian; Xiao, Rui-Qing

    2016-10-01

    The next-generation lepton colliders, such as CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC will make precision measurement of the Higgs boson properties. We first extract the Higgs coupling precision from Higgs observables at CEPC to illustrate the potential of future lepton colliders. Depending on the related event rates, the precision can reach percentage level for most couplings. Then, we try to estimate the new physics scales that can be indirectly probed with Higgs and electroweak precision observables. The Higgs observables, together with the existing electroweak precision observables, can probe new physics up to 10 TeV (40 TeV for the gluon-related operator 𝒪g) at 95% C.L. Including the Z/W mass measurements and Z-pole observables at CEPC further pushes the limit up to 35 TeV. Although Z-pole running is originally for the purpose of machine calibration, it can be as important as the Higgs observables for probing the new physics scales indirectly. The indirect probe of new physics scales at lepton colliders can mainly cover the energy range to be explored by the following hadron colliders of pp (50-100 TeV), such as SPPC and FCC-hh.

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in Colliding-Plasma-Jet Experiments with Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution in colliding-plasma-jet experiments with magnetic and viscous stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  12. Muon colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A. J.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Garren, A.; Green, M.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Popovic, M.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Summers, D.; Stumer, I.; Syphers, M.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.

    1996-05-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ+μ- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  13. Muon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Skrinsky, A. [BINP, RU-630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  14. Cryogenic magnet test facility for fair

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, C; Marzouki, F; Stafiniac, A; Floch, E; Schnizer, P; Moritz, G; Xiang, Y; Kauschke, M; Meier, J; Hess, G ,

    2009-01-01

    For testing fast-pulsed superconducting model and pre-series magnets for FAIR (Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research), a cryogenic magnet test facility was built up at GSI. The facility is able to cool either cold masses in a universal cryostat or complete magnets in their own cryo-module. It is possible to operate bath cooled, 2 phase cooled, and supercritical cooled magnets with a maximum current up to 11 kA and a ramp rate up to 14 kA/s. Measurements of magnet heat loss, with calorimetric and a V-I methods, are available, as are quench and magnetic field measurements. Design and functionality of the test facility will be described. Results of measurements with a supercritical cooled magnet and with a 2 phase cooled SIS100 model magnet will be shown.

  15. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring,; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; /Fermilab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  16. Results from colliding magnetized plasma jet experiments executed at the Trident laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rasmus, A. M.; Kurnaz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J. S.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Adams, C. S.; Pollock, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of high-velocity plasma flows in a background magnetic field has applications in pulsed-power and fusion schemes, as well as astrophysical environments, such as accretion systems and stellar mass ejections into the magnetosphere. Experiments recently executed at the Trident Laser Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory investigated the effects of an expanding aluminum plasma flow into a uniform 4.5-Tesla magnetic field created using a solenoid designed and manufactured at the University of Michigan. Opposing-target experiments demonstrate interesting collisional behavior between the two magnetized flows. Preliminary interferometry and Faraday rotation measurements will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the U.S Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  17. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  18. Testing Left-Right Symmetric Gauge Theories at $e^{+}e^{-}$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Raidal, Martti

    2000-01-01

    If the Standard Model is embedded in a left-right symmetric gauge theory at the TeV scale, the pair production of light W-bosons in e^+e^- collisions, e^+e^- -> W^+W^-, will be affected by mixings in the gauge and neutrino sectors, and by the t-channel exchange of a heavy right-handed neutrino. The modification of the cross section by these new effects is studied for high--energy e^+e^- colliders.

  19. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, Hitoshi; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; Appleby, Robert; Araki, Sakae; Bambade, Philip; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Blair, Grahame A; Boogert, Stewart Takashi; Boorman, Gary; Brachmann, Axel; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Burrows, P N; Carter, John; Choi Jae Young; Christian, Glenn B; Danagulyan, S; Delerue, Nicolas; Driouichi, Chafik; Gao, Jie; Grishanov, Boris I; Gronberg, Jeff; Higashi, Yasuo; Himel, Thomas; Honda, Yosuke; Howell, David Francis; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Jones, James; Kalinin, Alexander; Kanazawa, Ken Ichi; Kang Heung Sik; Kim Eun San; Kim Sang Hee; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kumada, Masayuki; Kume, T; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Lyapin, A; Liu Wan Ming; Logatchev, P V; Malton, Stephen; Markiewicz, Thomas W; Masuzawa, Mika; Mihara, Takanori; Molloy, Stephen; Mtingwa, S; Naito, Takashi; Napoly, Olivier; Nelson, Janice; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Payet, Jacques; Pei Guo Xi; Phinney, Nan; Pivi, M T F; Podgorny, Fedor; Price, Michael T; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Reichold, Armin; Ross, Marc; Ruland, Robert; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Schulte, Daniel; Seryi, Andrei; Soo Ko In; Spencer, Cherrill M; Suehara, Taikan; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Takahashi, Takeshi; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Telnov, Valery I; Tenenbaum, P G; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Toge, Nobu; Torrence, Eric; Urakawa, Junji; Urner, David; Vogel, Vladimir; Walker, Nicholas J; Wang Jiu Qing; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Yamaoka, Hiroshi; Yokoya, Kaoru; Yun Huang Jung; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The realization of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require the ability to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittancies are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 35nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  20. Testing Contact Interactions of Quarks and Gluons at Future pp Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyres, E. N.; Katsilieris, G. A.; Papadopoulos, C. G.; Vlassopulos, S. D. P.

    We calculate the contributions of the allowed qqqq, GGG, GGGG, qqG and qqGG contact interactions of the standard QCD quarks and gluons, at a common scale Λ, to jet cross sections at the future hadron colliders. Assuming that the two-jet normalized angular-distribution measurements will be consistent with QCD, to 95% CL we obtain bounds Λ>35-40 TeV at LHC or Λ>50-80 TeV at SSC. A similar analysis of the three-jet events would give Λ>13-15 TeV or Λ>10-25 TeV, respectively.

  1. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Higashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Toge, N.; Urakawa, J.; Vogel, V.; Yamaoka, H.; Yokoya, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /CERN /Hiroshima

    2005-05-27

    To reach design luminosity, the International Linear Collider (ILC) must be able to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittances are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 37 nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  2. Search For Magnetic Monopoles Possibly Produced By Proton-antiproton Collisions At The Tevatron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles can be used to explain the quantization of electric charge, and are predicted by gauge field theory. If monopoles exist, they could have been produced by the proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider—the highest energy accelerator existing in the world, and trapped in the CDF and DØ detectors. We took Al, Be, and Pb samples from the Tevatron and used the induction technique with SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) to detect monopoles in the samples. We did not find monopoles, but we have set new limits for the monopole mass and the relavant cross section based on a Drell-Yan model and Monte Carlo calculation.

  3. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The interna...

  4. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  5. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The internat...

  6. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider: testing critical string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, JoAnne L; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G

    2005-12-31

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With approximately 20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, . In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  7. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN large Hadron collider testing critical string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, J L; Rizzo, T G; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With ~20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, n. In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if n is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  8. Fluctuations as a test of chemical nonequilibrium at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that large chemical potential leads to the significant increase of multiplicity fluctuations for bosons, and makes the fluctuations infinite in the case of Bose-Einstein condensation. It allows us to distinguish between the models that explain the anomalous proton to pion ratio and the low transverse momentum enhancement of pion spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider within chemical equilibrium or nonequilibrium models. The effects of resonance decays, finite size of the system, requirements to the event statistics, different momentum cuts, and limited detector acceptance are considered. The obtained results show the possibility to observe a substantial increase of the normalized kurtosis for positively or negatively charged pions in the case of nonequilibrium or partial pion condensation using currently measured data.

  9. Investigation, modelling and control of the 1.9 K cooling loop for superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Flemsæter, Bjorn

    2000-01-01

    The temperature of the superconducting magnets for the 27 km LHC particle accelerator under construction at CERN is a control parameter with strict operating constraints imposed by (a) the maximum temperature at which the magnets can operate, (b) the cooling capacity of the cryogenic system, (c) the variability of applied heat loads and (d) the accuracy of the instrumentation. A pilot plant for studying aspects beyond single magnet testing has been constructed. This magnet test string is a 35-m full-scale model if the LHC and consists of four superconducting cryogmagnets operating in a static bath of He II at 1.9 K. An experimental investigation of the properties dynamic characteristics of the 1.9 K cooling loop of the magnet test string has been carried out. A first principle model of the system has been created. A series of experiments designed for system identification purposes have been carried out, and black box models of the system have been created on the basis on the recorded data. A Model Predictive ...

  10. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  11. Prototype HL-LHC magnet undergoes testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    A preliminary short prototype of the quadrupole magnets for the High-Luminosity LHC has passed its first tests.   The first short prototype of the quadrupole magnet for the High Luminosity LHC. (Photo: G. Ambrosio (US-LARP and Fermilab), P. Ferracin and E. Todesco (CERN TE-MSC)) Momentum is gathering behind the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project. In laboratories on either side of the Atlantic, a host of tests are being carried out on the various magnet models. In mid-March, a short prototype of the quadrupole magnet underwent its first testing phase at the Fermilab laboratory in the United States. This magnet is a pre-prototype of the quadrupole magnets that will be installed near to the ATLAS and CMS detectors to squeeze the beams before collisions. Six quadrupole magnets will be installed on each side of each experiment, giving a total of 24 magnets, and will replace the LHC's triplet magnets. Made of superconducting niobium-tin, the magnets will be more powerful than their p...

  12. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  13. Operational performance and improvements to the rf power sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5 GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  14. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  15. LHC’s cryogenic magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    1994-01-01

    This string of magnets was designed to test the cryogenic systems that will keep the LHC colder than 270 degrees below zero. The LHC’s beams will be accelerated to an energy of 7 TeV so powerful superconducting magnets must be used to hold the beams on course as they race around the giant accelerator. These magnets are kept at 1.9 K (-270.3°C).

  16. Experience with a Pre-Series Superfluid Helium Test Bench for LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Benda, V; Schouten, J A

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN is based on the use of high-field superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium. For the validation of the machine dipoles and quadrupoles, a magnet test plant is under construction requiring 12 so-called Cryogenic Feeder Units (CFU). Based on experience done at CERN, two pre-series CFUs were designed and built by industry and are currently in use prior to final series delivery. This presentation describes the features of a CFU, its typical characteristics and the experience acquired with the first units.

  17. Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rouëné,J

    2013-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9_9 cm2 silicon wafers. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5_5 mm2. This prototype enter sits construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R&D goal of10:1.

  18. Linear collider development at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  19. Manufacturing and Testing of Accelerator Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting magnet for accelerators is a quite complex process that is not yet fully industrialized. In this paper, after a short history of the evolution of the magnet design and construction, we review the main characteristics of the accelerator magnets having an impact on the construction technology. We put in evidence how the design and component quality impact on construction and why the final product calls for a total-quality approach. LHC experience is widely discussed and main lessons are spelled out. Then the new Nb3Sn technology, under development for the next generation magnet construction, is outlined. Finally, we briefly review the testing procedure of accelerator superconducting magnets, underlining the close connection with the design validation and with the manufacturing process.

  20. A versatile magnetic refrigeration test device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, C R H; Petersen, T F; Pryds, N; Smith, A

    2008-09-01

    A magnetic refrigeration test device has been built and tested. The device allows variation and control of many important experimental parameters, such as the type of heat transfer fluid, the movement of the heat transfer fluid, the timing of the refrigeration cycle, and the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. An advanced two-dimensional numerical model has previously been implemented in order to help in the optimization of the design of a refrigeration test device. Qualitative agreement between the results from model and the experimental results is demonstrated for each of the four different parameter variations mentioned above.

  1. A versatile magnetic refrigeration test device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Petersen, Thomas Frank; Pryds, Nini

    2008-01-01

    A magnetic refrigeration test device has been built and tested. The device allows variation and control of many important experimental parameters, such as the type of heat transfer fluid, the movement of the heat transfer fluid, the timing of the refrigeration cycle, and the magnitude...... of the applied magnetic field. An advanced two-dimensional numerical model has previously been implemented in order to help in the optimization of the design of a refrigeration test device. Qualitative agreement between the results from model and the experimental results is demonstrated for each of the four...

  2. Splice testing for LHC quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Barzi, E; Fehér, S; Kashikhin, V V; Kerby, J S; Lamm, M J; Orris, D; Ray, G; Tartaglia, M; Zlobin, A V

    2003-01-01

    Electrical splices between NbTi Rutherford type cables need to be made for the LHC IR inner triplet quadrupoles. Splices between magnets as well as internal to the magnets are necessary. Various splice configurations, solders, and fluxes have been considered. Testing of these splices at cryogenic temperatures and at various currents has been completed. The results were satisfactory; Fermilab is capable of making excellent low resistance (<1n Omega ) solder joints for the LHC project. (4 refs).

  3. Magnetic Nondestructive Testing Techniques of Constructional Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Er-gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel is a kind of ferromagnetic material, which is extensively applied in such fields as buildings, bridges, railways, machines and lifeline engineering etc. Those engineering structures built of constructional steel will unavoidably experience some damages during their service lifetime, thus which will influence the distribution regularity of internal forces in structures, result in over-stresses, cause the local failure of structures, and even lead to collapse of the whole structure. Therefore, it is a pressing topic to study how to directly evaluate the real-time stressed states of structural members, damages and steel characteristics in present structural health monitoring and diagnosing fields. And the achievements of this research will be of theoretical significance and of application value of engineering. This paper summarizes varieties of new magnetic nondestructive testing techniques used in constructional steel, respectively investigates the testing principles, characteristics and application for the magnetic Barkhausen noise technique, magnetic acoustic emission technique, magnetic flux leakage technique, magnetic memory technique and magnetic absorption technique, and points out the problems present in the application of these new techniques to actual testing and the further research objective.

  4. LHC Magnet Test Benches Controls Renovation

    CERN Document Server

    Andreassen, O O; Page, S; Raimondo, A; Rijllart, A; Zorin, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC magnet test benches controls were designed in 1996. They were based on VME data acquisition systems, Siemens PLCs control and interlocks systems. After a review of renovation of superconducting laboratories at CERN in 2009, it was decided to replace the VME systems with a PXI based systems and the obsolete Sun/Solaris workstations with Linux PC’s. This paper covers the requirements for the new system and shares the experience of the upgrade of the magnet test benches to these new platforms.

  5. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2005-01-01

    With Mike Struik (LHC Magnets Interconnection), Pascal Ponsot (LHC Magnet Transport), André Jacquemod (LHC Magnets Interconnection), Jean-Marc Balaguer (Ultrasound Welding), Davide Bozzini (Testing) and Lyn Evans (LHC Project Leader)

  6. Testing the LHC magnet cryogenic systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The magnets in the LHC will be cooled to 1.9 K (- 270.3°C). To keep this 27 km long machine at such a low temperatures requires one of the largest refrigeration systems in the world. These pictures show the cryogenics plant in the testing area.

  7. Magnetic monopole search with the MoEDAL test trapping detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katre Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IMoEDAL is designed to search for monopoles produced in high-energy Large Hadron Collider (LHC collisions, based on two complementary techniques: nucleartrack detectors for high-ionisation signatures and other highly ionising avatars of new physics, and trapping volumes for direct magnetic charge measurements with a superconducting magnetometer. The MoEDAL test trapping detector array deployed in 2012, consisting of over 600 aluminium samples, was analysed and found to be consistent with zero trapped magnetic charge. Stopping acceptances are obtained from a simulation of monopole propagation in matter for a range of charges and masses, allowing to set modelindependent and model-dependent limits on monopole production cross sections. Multiples of the fundamental Dirac magnetic charge are probed for the first time at the LHC.

  8. Magnetic Testing, and Modeling, Simulation and Analysis for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, Mary; Narvaez, Pablo; Herman, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation (Aerospace) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS) participated with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the implementation of a magnetic cleanliness program of the NASA/JPL JUNO mission. The magnetic cleanliness program was applied from early flight system development up through system level environmental testing. The JUNO magnetic cleanliness program required setting-up a specialized magnetic test facility at Lockheed Martin Space Systems for testing the flight system and a testing program with facility for testing system parts and subsystems at JPL. The magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis capability was set up and performed by Aerospace to provide qualitative and quantitative magnetic assessments of the magnetic parts, components, and subsystems prior to or in lieu of magnetic tests. Because of the sensitive nature of the fields and particles scientific measurements being conducted by the JUNO space mission to Jupiter, the imposition of stringent magnetic control specifications required a magnetic control program to ensure that the spacecraft's science magnetometers and plasma wave search coil were not magnetically contaminated by flight system magnetic interferences. With Aerospace's magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis and JPL's system modeling and testing approach, and LMSS's test support, the project achieved a cost effective approach to achieving a magnetically clean spacecraft. This paper presents lessons learned from the JUNO magnetic testing approach and Aerospace's modeling, simulation and analysis activities used to solve problems such as remnant magnetization, performance of hard and soft magnetic materials within the targeted space system in applied external magnetic fields.

  9. Beam-Based Nonlinear Optics Corrections in Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Malitsky, Nikolay; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, which gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 3 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non linear correction techniques.

  10. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  11. Magnetic Launch Assist System Demonstration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been testing Magnetic Launch Assist Systems, formerly known as Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) technologies. To launch spacecraft into orbit, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at a very high speed. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, the launch-assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This photograph shows a subscale model of an airplane running on the experimental track at MSFC during the demonstration test. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide, and about 1.5- feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  12. Cryogenic Active Magnetic Regenerator Test Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tura, A.; Roszmann, J.; Dikeos, J.; Rowe, A.

    2006-04-01

    An AMR Test Apparatus (AMRTA) used in experiments near room-temperature required a number of modifications to allow for testing at cryogenic temperatures and with a 5 T magnetic field. The impacts of parasitic heat leaks, frictional heat generation, and eddy current heating in the AMRTA are analyzed. A low temperature gas circulation (LTGC) system to control the operating temperature was developed. The LTGC consists of a GM cryocooler coupled to a compressor and helium circuit which circulates fluid through a set of heat exchangers and flexible transfer lines connected to the AMRTA. Design features are discussed as is some initial test data.

  13. [New technology for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  14. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  15. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered type...

  16. Testing the Model of Oscillating Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaforz, Ż.; Tomczak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the model of oscillating magnetic traps (the OMT model), proposed by Jakimiec and Tomczak ( Solar Phys. 261, 233, 2010). This model describes the process of excitation of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during solar flares. In the OMT model energetic electrons are accelerated within a triangular, cusp-like structure situated between the reconnection point and the top of a flare loop as seen in soft X-rays. We analyzed QPPs in hard X-ray light curves for 23 flares as observed by Yohkoh. Three independent methods were used. We also used hard X-ray images to localize magnetic traps and soft X-ray images to diagnose thermal plasmas inside the traps. We found that the majority of the observed pulsation periods correlates with the diameters of oscillating magnetic traps, as was predicted by the OMT model. We also found that the electron number density of plasma inside the magnetic traps in the time of pulsation disappearance is strongly connected with the pulsation period. We conclude that the observations are consistent with the predictions of the OMT model for the analyzed set of flares.

  17. Magnetically actuated peel test for thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowicki, G.T.; Sitaraman, S.K., E-mail: suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu

    2012-03-30

    Delamination along thin film interfaces is a prevalent failure mechanism in microelectronic, photonic, microelectromechanical systems, and other engineering applications. Current interfacial fracture test techniques specific to thin films are limited by either sophisticated mechanical fixturing, physical contact near the crack tip, or complicated stress fields. Moreover, these techniques are generally not suitable for investigating fatigue crack propagation under cyclical loading. Thus, a fixtureless and noncontact experimental test technique with potential for fatigue loading is proposed and implemented to study interfacial fracture toughness for thin film systems. The proposed test incorporates permanent magnets surface mounted onto micro-fabricated released thin film structures. An applied external magnetic field induces noncontact loading to initiate delamination along the interface between the thin film and underlying substrate. Characterization of the critical peel force and peel angle is accomplished through in situ deflection measurements, from which the fracture toughness can be inferred. The test method was used to obtain interfacial fracture strength of 0.8-1.9 J/m{sup 2} for 1.5-1.7 {mu}m electroplated copper on natively oxidized silicon substrates. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-contact magnetic actuation test for interfacial fracture characterization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applied load is determined through voltage applied to the driving electromagnet. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Displacement and delamination propagation is measured using an optical profiler. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical peel force and peel angle is measured for electroplated Cu thin-film on Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The measured interfacial fracture energy of Cu/Si interface is 0.8-1.9 J/m{sup 2}.

  18. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  19. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  20. Successful magnet quench test for CAST.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice Maximilien

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) consists of a prototype LHC dipole magnet with photon detectors at each end. It searches for very weakly interacting neutral particles called axions, which should originate in the core of the Sun. The telescope, located at Point 8, can move vertically within its wheeled platform, which travels horizontally along tracks in the floor. In this way, the telescope can view the Sun at sunrise through one end and at sunset through the other end. It has been cooled down to below 1.8 K and reached ~95% of its final magnetic field of 9 tesla before a quench was induced to test the whole cryogenic system under such conditions. The cryogenic system responded as expected to the magnet quench and CAST is now ready to start its three-year search for solar axions. Photos 01 & 02 : Members of the LHC cryogenics team pose in front of the axion telescope on the day of the first quench test, together with some of the CAST collaboration.

  1. Construction and tests of a model of the LHC superconducting corrector magnet MDSBV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ijspeert, A.; Perin, R. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Baynham, E.; Clee, P.; Coombs, R.; Evans, D. (Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)); Begg, M.; Landgrebe, D. (Tesla Engineering, Storrington (GB))

    1992-01-01

    A full-scale model of the 1.25 m long MDSBV (Magnet Decapole Sextupole Bending Vertical) correction magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been constructed and is currently being tested. The model contains the desired dipole and sextupole but not the decapole which was decided upon later. The magnet was built in a very compact way by placing the dipole coil around the sextupole coil. The two coils were vacuum impregnated and prestressed by shrink-fitted aluminum rings. The design took into account the high positional accuracy requirements for the coils and incorporated manufacturing techniques which are compatible with mass production methods, as approximately 800 of these magnets will be required for the LHC. The model is being tested in liquid helium at the temperature of 4.2 K and will be tested later at 2.0 K. The paper describes the construction, the experience gained during assembly, the test conditions and gives the first test-results.

  2. The feasibility of low-mass conductors for toroidal superconducting magnets for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luton, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    An earlier study by Luton and Bonanos concluded that the design and fabrication of superconducting toroidal bending magnets would require a major effort but would be feasible. This study is an extension to examine the feasibility of low-mass conductors for such use. It included a literature search, consultations, with conductor manufacturers, and design calculations, but no experimental work. An unoptimized sample design that used a residual resistivity ratio for aluminum of 1360 and a current density of 3.5 kA/cm{sup 2} over the uninsulated conductor for a 4.5-T toroid with 1 GJ of stored energy obtained a hot-spot temperature of 120 K with a maximum dump voltage of 3.6 kV and 24% of the initial current inductively transferred into the shorted aluminum structure. The stability margin was 200 mJ/cm{sup 3} of cable space. Limiting the quench pressure to 360 atm to give conservative stresses in the sheath and assuming that the whole flow path quenched immediately resulted in helium taps that could be a kilometer apart if the flow friction factor were the same as that experienced in the Westinghouse (W) Large Coil Task (LCT) coil. This indicates that the 520-m conductor length of each of the 72 individual coil segments of a toroid would be a single flow path. If some practical uncertainties can be favorably resolved by producing and testing sample conductors, the use of a conductor with clad-aluminum stabilizer and extruded aluminum-alloy sheath should be feasible and economical. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Testing the theory of colliding winds: the periastron passage of 9 Sagittarii. I. X-ray and optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauw, G.; Blomme, R.; Nazé, Y.; Spano, M.; Mahy, L.; Gosset, E.; Volpi, D.; van Winckel, H.; Raskin, G.; Waelkens, C.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The long-period, highly eccentric O-star binary 9 Sgr, known for its non-thermal radio emission and its relatively bright X-ray emission, went through its periastron in 2013. Aims: Such an event can be used to observationally test the predictions of the theory of colliding stellar winds over a broad range of wavelengths. Methods: We conducted a multi-wavelength monitoring campaign of 9 Sgr around the 2013 periastron. In this paper, we focus on X-ray observations and optical spectroscopy. Results: The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solution of 9 Sgr and to refine its orbital period to 9.1 years. The X-ray flux is maximum at periastron over all energy bands, but with clear differences as a function of energy. The largest variations are observed at energies above 2 keV, whilst the spectrum in the soft band (0.5-1.0 keV) remains mostly unchanged, indicating that it arises far from the collision region, in the inner winds of the individual components. The level of the hard emission at periastron clearly deviates from the 1 /r relation expected for an adiabatic wind-interaction zone, whilst this relation seems to hold at the other phases that are covered by our observations. The spectra taken at phase 0.946 reveal a clear Fe xxv line at 6.7 keV, but no such line is detected at periastron (φ = 0.000), although a simple model predicts a strong line that should be easily visible in the data. Conclusions: The peculiarities of the X-ray spectrum of 9 Sgr could reflect the effect of radiative inhibition as well as a phase-dependent efficiency of particle acceleration on the shock properties. Based on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and the USA (NASA). Also based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) and with the Mercator Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish

  4. Magnetic Field Requirements for a Detector at the Linear Collider Using a TPC as Main Tracking Device

    CERN Document Server

    Klempt, W

    2010-01-01

    This note describes the requirements to the magnetic field which occur in an ILD like detector at ILC or CLIC. In particular we describe requirements introduced by choosing a TPC as main tracking detector.

  5. Cryogenic magnet tests for the LHC process operation using web-based tools and facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hemelsoet, G H; Chohan, V; Veyrunes, E

    2005-01-01

    For the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN, an essential requirement is the acceptance test of its 1706 Cryo-magnets in cryogenic conditions in a purpose-built facility at CERN. Several teams ensure the proper operation of the infrastructure on a round the clock basis. The cold test part is one of the key elements amongst many other essential activities requiring magnet transport and connections/disconnections, cryogenic preparation and pumping, cooling down to 1.9 K as well warm up before disconnection & removal. All these operations involve multi-tasking and usage of 12 test benches with nominal turn-round time per dipole magnet of 120 hours. It also involves multiple teams of industrial contractors, a support contract for cryogenics operation, CERN staff in magnet testing Operation, aided by a large external collaboration of visiting staff for round the clock operation. This paper gives a flavour of the operation and exposes the software tools that were necessary, designed and developed t...

  6. Test Station for Magnetization Measurements on Large Quantities of Superconducting Strands

    CERN Document Server

    Le Naour, S; Billan, J; Genest, J

    2001-01-01

    In the superconducting main magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), persistent currents in the superconductor determine the field quality at injection field. For this reason it is necessary to check the magnetization of the cable strands during their production. During four years, this requires measurements of the width of the strand magnetization hysteresis loop at 0.5 T, 1.9 K, at a rate of up to eight samples per day. This paper describes the design, construction and the first results of a magnetization test station built for this purpose. The samples are cooled in a cryostat, with a 2-m long elliptic tail. This tail is inserted in a normal conducting dipole magnet with a field between ± 1.5 T. Racetrack pick-up coils, integrated in the cryostat, detect the voltage due to flux change, which is then integrated numerically. The sample holder can contain eight strand samples, each 20 cm long. The test station operates in two modes: either the sample is fixed while the external field is changed, or the sa...

  7. 293 K - 1.9 K supporting systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryo-magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, M; Renaglia, T; Rohmig, P; Williams, L R

    1998-01-01

    The LHC machine will incorporate some 2000 main ring super-conducting magnets cooled at 1.9 K by super-fluid pressurized helium, mainly 15m-long dipoles with their cryostats and 6m-long quadrupoles housed in the Short Straight Section (SSS) units. This paper presents the design of the support system of the LHC arc cryo-magnets between 1.9 K at the cold mass and 293 K at the cryostat vacuum vessel. The stringent positioning precision for magnet alignment and the high thermal performance for cryogenic efficiency are the main conflicting requirements, which have lead to a trade-off design. The systems retained for LHC are based on column-type supports positioned in the vertical plane of the magnets inside the cryostats. An ad-hoc design has been achieved both for cryo-dipoles and SSS. Each column is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in composite material (glass-fibre/epoxy resin, for its low thermal conductivity properties), interfaced to both magnet and cryostat via stainless steel flanges. The t...

  8. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  9. Steel Tape-wound Cut Cores as Magnet Yokes for the Beam Dump Kickers of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, M; Jansson, U; Fox, D

    2004-01-01

    Fast pulsed magnets, also called kickers, are used in particle accelerators for beam injection, extraction and similar applications. To excite these magnets, typically current pulses with rise and fall times in the range of 100 ns to 10 µs, with pulse duration of up to 100 µs and amplitudes in the order of kilo Amperes, are used. The short rise time imposes low inductance circuits and high voltage operation. The yokes are usually made out of ferrite, with reaches field saturation at about 0.5 T.

  10. Test particles in a magnetized conformastatic spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.; Capistrano, Abraão J. S.; Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-06-01

    A class of exact conformastatic solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations is presented in which the gravitational and electromagnetic potentials are completely determined by a harmonic function. We derive the equations of motion for neutral and charged particles in a spacetime background characterized by this class of solutions. As an example, we focus on the analysis of a particular harmonic function, which generates a singularity-free and asymptotically flat spacetime that describes the gravitational field of a punctual mass endowed with a magnetic field. In this particular case, we investigate the main physical properties of equatorial circular orbits. We show that due to the electromagnetic interaction, it is possible to have charged test particles which stay at rest with respect to a static observer located at infinity. Additionally, we obtain an analytic expression for the perihelion advance of test particles and the corresponding explicit value in the case of a punctual magnetic mass. We show that the analytical expressions obtained from our analysis are sufficient for being confronted with observations in order to establish whether such objects can exist in nature.

  11. Test particles in a magnetized conformastatic spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C; Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    A class of exact conformastatic solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations is presented in which the gravitational and electromagnetic potentials are completely determined by a harmonic function. We derive the equations of motion for neutral and charged particles in a spacetime background characterized by this class of solutions. As an example, we focus on the analysis of a particular harmonic function which generates a singularity-free and asymptotically flat spacetime and, therefore, describes the gravitational field of a punctual mass endowed with a magnetic field. In this particular case, we investigate the main physical properties of equatorial circular orbits. We show that due to the electromagnetic interaction, it is possible to have charged test particles which stay at rest with respect to a static observer located at infinity. Additionally, we obtain an analytic expression for the perihelion advance of test particles. Our theoretical predictions are compared with the observational data calibra...

  12. High Momentum Resolution tracking In a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M; Oskarsson, A

    2011-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been made within the LCTPC-collaboration, an international collaboration for studying the technical aspects af a possible tracking detector at a linear collider. The collaboration has built a prototype Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for testing the properties of dierent readout structures. A TPC is a tracking detector consisting of a gas lled drift volume placed in a solenoidal magnetic eld where the readout is made using a segmented plane of so called pads. When a char...

  13. Magnetic Particle Testing, RQA/M1-5330.16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    As one in the series of classroom training handbooks, prepared by the U.S. space program, instructional material is presented in this volume concerning familiarization and orientation on magnetic particle testing. The subject is divided under the following headings: Introduction, Principles of Magnetic Particle Testing, Magnetic Particle Test…

  14. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  15. Status of the Zee-Babu model for neutrino mass and possible tests at a like-sign linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Daniel; Zhang, He

    2014-01-01

    We provide an updated scan of the allowed parameter space of the two-loop Zee-Babu model for neutrino mass. Taking into account most recent experimental data on $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$ as well as the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ we obtain lower bounds on the masses of the singly and doubly charged scalars of between 1 to 2 TeV, with some dependence on perturbativity and fine-tuning requirements. This makes the scalars difficult to observe at LHC with 14 TeV even with optimistic assumptions on the luminosity, and would require a multi-TeV linear collider to see the scalar resonances. We point out, however, that a sub-TeV linear collider in the like-sign mode may be able to observe lepton flavour violating processes such as $e^- e^- \\to \\mu^- \\mu^-$ due to contact interactions induced by the doubly charged scalar with masses up to around 10 TeV. We investigate the possibility to distinguish the Zee-Babu model from the Higgs triplet model using such processes.

  16. Cryogenic infrastructure for superfluid helium testing of LHC prototype superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benda, V.; Duraffour, G.; Guiard-Marigny, A.; Lebrun, Ph.; Momal, F.; Saban, R.; Sergo, V.; Tavian, L.; Vullierme, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN will require about 1800 high-field superconducting magnets, operating below 1.9 K in pressurized helium II. All magnets will be reception-tested before their installation in the 26.7 km circumference ring tunnel. For this purpose, the authors have installed large-capacity cryogenic facilities, beginning to operate for tests of full-scale prototype magnets produced by European industry. Based around a 6 kW@4.5 K helium refrigerator and a 25 m{sup 3} liquid helium storage, the system includes a low-pressure, 6 to 18 g/s helium pumping unit for 1.8 K refrigeration, a set of magnet cooldown and warmup units delivering each up to 120 kW of refrigeration at precisely controlled temperature, and a network of cryogenic lines for transferring liquid nitrogen, liquid helium and cold gaseous helium. All components are controlled by embedded PLCs, connected to a general supervision system for operator interface. The authors present the system layout and describe the design and performance of the main components.

  17. MMS Observations of Large Guide Field Symmetric Reconnection Between Colliding Reconnection Jets at the Center of a Magnetic Flux Rope at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Haggerty, C.; Shay, M. A.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gershman, D. J.; Drake, J. F.; Fujimoto, M.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report evidence for reconnection between colliding reconnection jets in a compressed current sheet at the center of a magnetic flux rope at Earth's magnetopause. The reconnection involved nearly symmetric Inflow boundary conditions with a strong guide field of two. The thin (2.5 ion-skin depth (d(sub i) width) current sheet (at approximately 12 d(sub i) downstream of the X line) was well resolved by MMS, which revealed large asymmetries in plasma and field structures in the exhaust. Ion perpendicular heating, electron parallel heating, and density compression occurred on one side of the exhaust, while ion parallel heating and density depression were shifted to the other side. The normal electric field and double out-of-plane (bifurcated) currents spanned almost the entire exhaust. These observations are in good agreement with a kinetic simulation for similar boundary conditions, demonstrating in new detail that the structure of large guide field symmetric reconnection is distinctly different from antiparallel reconnection.

  18. Future colliders at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsesmelis, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    Following an outline of the Large Hadron Collider, this paper will analyze CERN's scientific plans for high-energy colliders for the years to come. The immediate plans include the upgrades to the Large Hadron Collider and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, the Compact Linear Collider. This paper describes the design of these future colliders at CERN, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Research on magnetic testing method of stress distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李路明; 黄松岭; 汪来富; 杨海青; 施克仁

    2002-01-01

    For implementing nondestructive evaluation of stress distribution inside ferromagnetic material, a magnetic testing method was developed which does not need artificial magnetizing field. This method was implemented by testing the normal component of the magnetic flux leakage above the object being tested with a constant lift-off from 1 to 10*!mm. The distribution of the stress inside the specimen can be gotten from that of the normal component of the magnetic flux leakage. A stress concentration specimen, which is a 10*!mm thickness mild steel plate with a welding seam on it, was tested using this method. The stress distribution of the magnetic testing was identical with that of small hole stress testing method. It indicates that the stress distribution of ferromagnetic material can be known by the magnetic testing method.

  20. Designing, fabricating, and testing cost effective structural composite for the SSCL magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobrega, F.

    1993-05-01

    Particle accelerators like the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) use superconducting dipole magnets to bend the particle bunches around the 54-mile ring and superconducting quadrupole magnets to focus the particles. The heart of these magnets is the superconducting niobium-titanium copper cable which carries extremely high current because the internal resistance is zero at liquid helium temperatures. With these high currents,the magnets generate large magnetic fields on the order of 6.7 Tesla. The superconducting cable is insulated with a wrap of polyimide film on the first layer and a second layer wrap of either a polyimide film with adhesive or a fiberglass epoxy prepreg. The insulated cable is wound into long coils and cured. All coil materials must withstand temperature extremes from 220{degree}C (428{degree}F) to {minus}269{degree}C ({minus}452{degree}F) at loads as high as 104 MPa (15 ksi). In addition, all magnet components must survive for 25 years with a total radiation dose of 1000 MRad. The parts at the end of a coil are used to support and restrain the conductors during magnet energization. The most common end part materials used to date have been G-10 and G-11 fiberglass and epoxy tubes and laminates in NEMA grades and CR type. Developments in polyimides like bismaleimides, copolymers like the newly developed PT resins and advanced epoxy blends like CTD101 and CTD102 are materials of choice for magnet components because of their radiation resistance. An extensive testing program is currently underway by the SSCL to measure the radiation degradation of these and many other materials.

  1. Whither colliders after the Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rolf-Dieter Heuer

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron–positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider, by a high-energy electron– proton machine, the LHeC, and/or by a muon collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining the key messages for the way forward.

  2. Photon collider Higgs factories

    CERN Document Server

    Telnov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  3. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisov D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  4. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  5. LHC Magnet Tests Operational Techniques and Empowerment for Successful Completion

    CERN Document Server

    Chohan, V; Priestnall, K; Pirotte, F; Veyrunes, E; Ali, N; Awale, P; Bahuguna, S; Bhunia, U; Chauhan, V; Dixit, M; Gore, J; John, J; Kandaswamy, E; Kasbekar, A; Kashyap, P; Kasliwal, A; Kulkarni, C; Laddha, A; Malhotra, S; Mascarenhas, M; Mishra, J; Motiwala, P; Nair, K; Narayanan, R; Padmakumar, S; Pagare, A; Peruppayikkad, D; Raghunathan, S; Rao, S; Roy, D; Sharma, S; Shimjith, S; Singh, S; Sonnis, S; Sridhar, S; Surendran, P; Tikaria, A

    2007-01-01

    The LHC magnet tests operation team developed various innovative techniques, particularly since early 2004, to complete the superconductor magnet tests by Feb. 2007. Overall and cryogenic priority handling, rapid on-bench thermal cycling, rule-based goodness evaluation on round-the-clock basis, multiple, mashed web systems are some of these techniques applied with rigour for successful tests completion in time. This paper highlights these operation empowerment tools which had a pivotal role for success. A priority handling method was put in place to enable maximum throughput from twelve test benches, having many different constraints. For the cryogenics infrastructure, it implied judicious allocation of limited resources to the benches. Rapid On-Bench Thermal Cycle was a key strategy to accelerate magnets tests throughput, saving time and simplifying logistics. First level magnet appraisal was developed for 24 hr decision making so as to prepare a magnet further for LHC or keep it on standby. Web based system...

  6. Inflight magnetic characterization of the test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Lobo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, the latter aiming to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, one of which is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of the differential acceleration noise between the test masses due to magnetic effects. This subsystem is composed of two onboard coils intended to produce controlled magnetic fields at the location of the test masses. These magnetic fields couple with the remanent magnetic moment and susceptibility and produce forces and torques on the test masses. These, in turn, produce kinematic excursions of the test masses which are sensed by the onboard interferometer. We prove that adequately processing these exc...

  7. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  8. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Laenen; D. Wackeroth

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these corr

  9. Magnetic Test Facility - Sensor and Coil Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Magnetometers were taken to a low-noise magnetic facility located at the Defence Es- tablishment, Orchard Hills in Sydney. Sensors were then individually...Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer, Journal of Applied Physics, 99(8), pp. 08D913 –08D913–3. WANG-X. (2008). Automatic and adaptive correction of

  10. Supplementary magnetic tests for railway wheel sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Hilary ŻUREK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During manufacturing process the wheel set is subjected to many different flaw detection methods; however, these methods are not sufficient while the wheel set is in service. The paper presents an example of monitoring of magnetic parameters changes of wheel set rolling surface (changes result from material degradation due to materialfatigue.

  11. The development of colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50`s and the 60`s colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible.

  12. Muon collider design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; P., Chen; W-H., Cheng; Y., Cho; Cline, D.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Y., Lee; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; K-Y., Ng; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity \\mu^+ \\mu^- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  13. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Testing of LHC Series Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Axensalva, J; Herblin, L; Lamboy, J P; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Vuillerme, B

    2005-01-01

    The ~1800 superconducting magnets for the LHC machine shall be entirely tested at reception before their installation in the tunnel. For this purpose and in order to reach the reliability and efficiency at the nominal load required for an industrial operation for several years, we have gradually upgraded and retrofitted the cryogenic facilities installed in the early nineties for the testing at CERN of prototypes and preseries magnets. The final infrastructure of the test station, dedicated to check industrially the quality of the series magnets, is now nearly complete. We present the general layout and describe the overall performance of the system.

  14. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  15. A new building for testing magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    A ceremony to mark the laying of the foundation stone of Building 311, which will house a magnetic measurement laboratory, took place on 22 September.   Olaf Dunkel, head of the Building 311 project, José Miguel Jiménez, head of the Technology Department, and Lluis Miralles, head of the Site Management and Buildings Department, during the ceremony for the laying of the foundation stone of Building 311. Lluis Miralles, head of the Site Management and Buildings Department, José Miguel Jiménez, head of the Technology Department, Roberto Losito, head of the Engineering Department, and Simon Baird, head of the Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit, officially laid the foundation stone of Building 311 during a ceremony on Thursday, 22 September. Situated beside the water tower, the building will house a magnetic measurement laboratory for the Technology Department. With a floor space of around 1400 square metres, it will comprise a...

  16. Super Conducting and Conventional Magnets Test & Mapping Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vertical Magnet Test Facility: Accommodate a device up to 3.85 m long, 0.61 m diameter, and 14,400 lbs. Configured for 5 psig sub-cooled liquid helium bath cooling...

  17. Procedure and comparative analysis of results of silicon tracker modules testing for D0 (FNAL) collider experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, P F; Karmanov, D E; Leflat, A; Merkin, M M; Shabalina, E K

    2002-01-01

    The silicon microstrip tracker consists of three main parts: the central cylindrical one, internal disks and face disks. All the parts of the tracker have modular structure. The modulus contains one or several silicon detectors and a flexible printed circuit with an integral read-out system. The methodology for testing the D0 tracker parts on their functional efficiency, reliability and defectiveness is described. Comparison of the results of the disks modules testing with the disk detectors parameters before their assembling is carried out. The comparative analysis results make it possible to optimize the process of the detector mass testing and work out the criteria for the detectors quality evaluation

  18. The world's largest superconducting magnet has gone into action as Europe's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator begins to take shape

    CERN Multimedia

    Turner, Adam

    2006-01-01

    "Built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the LHC is located inside a 27 kilometre ciruclar underground tunnel, lying 100 metres below ground beneath Swizerland and France. Scientists will use the LHC to recreate the conditions just after the Big Bang, by colliding two beams of protons travelling in opposite directions at close to the speed of light." (1/2 page)

  19. Radiation test results on COTS components needed for the large hadron collider at CERN; Resultats de tests aux radiations de composants COTS necessaires pour le large hadron collider au CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, R.; Tavlet, M. [CERN Conseil Europeen pour la recherche nucleaire, Lab. europeen pour la physique des particules, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    Calculations have shown that the level of absorbed radiation dose inside the tunnel of the future LHC will be between 1 and 10 Gy pro year. This level of radiation allows the use of industry standard commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices. For some COTS to be used at the LHC, on-line testing have started in a typical proton-accelerator radiation-field; mainly gammas and neutrons, plus some high-energy particles. After irradiations at about 100 Gy and a few 1.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2} (eq. 1 MeV-Si), fatal faults and important upset rates appear.

  20. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Drozhdin, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occured at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  1. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...... on square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements...... as a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....

  2. Observation and Characterization of Coherent Optical Radiation and Microbunching Instability in the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Xiang, D.; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC is currently configured for a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment using an 120 MeV beam. During commissioning, unexpected coherent optical undulator radiation (CUR) and coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) was observed when beam is accelerated off-crest and compressed after the chicanes. The CUR and COTR is likely due to a microbunching instability where the initial small ripples in cathode drive laser is compressed and amplified. In this paper we present the observation and characterization of the CUR, COTR and microbunching instability at NLCTA.

  3. A test for the theory of colliding winds: the periastron passage of 9 Sagittarii I. X-ray and optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, Gregor; Naze, Yael; Spano, Maxime; Mahy, Laurent; Gosset, Eric; Volpi, Delia; van Winckel, Hans; Raskin, Gert; Waelkens, Christoffel

    2016-01-01

    The long-period, highly eccentric O-star binary 9 Sgr, known for its non-thermal radio emission and its relatively bright X-ray emission, went through its periastron in 2013. Such an event can be used to observationally test the predictions of the theory of colliding stellar winds over a broad range of wavelengths. We have conducted a multi-wavelength monitoring campaign of 9 Sgr around the 2013 periastron. In this paper, we focus on X-ray observations and optical spectroscopy. The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solution of 9 Sgr and to refine its orbital period to 9.1 years. The X-ray flux is maximum at periastron over all energy bands, but with clear differences as a function of energy. The largest variations are observed at energies above 2 keV, whilst the spectrum in the soft band (0.5 - 1.0 keV) remains mostly unchanged indicating that it arises far from the collision region, in the inner winds of the individual components. The level of the hard emission at periastron clearly deviates fr...

  4. Characterization of the International Linear Collider damping ring optics

    CERN Document Server

    Shanks, James; Sagan, David

    2013-01-01

    A method is presented for characterizing the emittance dilution and dynamic aperture for an arbitrary closed lattice that includes guide field magnet errors, multipole errors and misalignments. This method, developed and tested at CesrTA, has been applied to the damping ring lattice for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The effectiveness of beam based emittance tuning is limited by beam position monitor (BPM) measurement errors, disposition of corrector magnets, and tuning algorithm. The specifications for damping ring magnet alignment, multipoles, and number and precision of the BPMs are shown to be consistent with the required emittances and dynamic aperture. Further analysis of the ILC damping ring lattice demonstrates the implications of reducing the number of BPMs and relaxing the constraints on guide field multipoles.

  5. Cryomdoule Test Stand Reduced-Magnetic Support Design at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Wu, Genfa [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These devices will be tested at Fermilab's Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) within the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS-1) cave. The problem of magnetic pollution became one of major issues during design stage of the LCLS-II cryomodule as the average quality factor of the accelerating cavities is specified to be 2.7 x 10¹⁰. One of the possible ways to mitigate the effect of stray magnetic fields and to keep it below the goal of 5 mGauss involves the application of low permeable materials. Initial permeability and magnetic measurement studies regarding the use of 316L stainless steel material indicated that cold work (machining) and heat affected zones from welding would be acceptable.

  6. Virtual test system for permanent-magnet DC motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔淑梅; 王悦; 柴凤; 吴红星; 刘宝廷; 程树康

    2003-01-01

    In order to obtain the primary parameters and operating characteristics of a DC motor without directlymeasuring its torque and rational speed, it is proposed to use a PC and a data acquisition card to acquire boththe dynamic and static data of armature current to establish the performance of a DC permanent-magnet motor.The accuracy and validity of this virtual test system proposed were verified by comparing the measurements madewith the system proposed with the measurements made with conventional torque meters. It is concluded from theresults of comparison that from the mathematic model established for the DC permant-magnet motors, both majorparameters and operating characteristics can be directly established for the DC motors without measuring theirtorques and rotational speed, a perfect on-line measurement and test system has been established for the DCpermanent-magnet motors using the theory of virtual test system. The system proposed features shorter test time,higher efficiency and lower cost.

  7. Volume magnetization for system-level testing of magnetic materials within small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, David T.; Palo, Scott E.

    2016-10-01

    Passive Magnetic Attitude Control (PMAC) is a popular among small satellites due to its low resource cost and simplicity of installation. However, predicting the performance of these systems can be a challenge, chiefly due to the difficulty of measurement and simulation of hysteresis materials. We present a low-cost method of magnetic measurement allowing for characterization of both hard and soft magnetic materials. A Helmholtz cage uniformly magnetizes a 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm test volume. The addition of a thin sense coil allows this system to characterize individual hysteresis rod performance when in close proximity to other hard and/or soft magnetic materials. This test setup is applied to hard and soft magnetic materials used aboard the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE), a 3U CubeSat for space weather investigation which used a PMAC system. The measured hard magnet dipole of 0.80±0.017 A m2 is in good agreement with the dynamics-based satellite dipole moment fits. Five hysteresis rods from the same set as the CSSWE flight rods are tested; significant differences in dampening abilities are found. In addition, a limitation of the widely-used Flatley model is described. The interaction of two hysteresis rods in a variety of relative geometries are tested; perpendicular rods are found to have no significant interaction while parallel rods could have their dampening ability reduced by half, depending on the rod separation distance. Finally, the performance of the hysteresis rods are measured in their flight configuration, with hard and soft magnetic material dispersed as it is on CSSWE itself. For the CSSWE PMAC system design, interactions between rods have a greater affect than the magnetic flux density offset due to the onboard bar magnet.

  8. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  9. Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glinka, Marek, E-mail: mag@iq.pl [Research and Development Centre of Electrical Machines. 188 Rozdzienskiego Street, 40-203 Katowice (Poland); Gawron, Stanisław, E-mail: s.gawron@komel.katowice.pl [Research and Development Centre of Electrical Machines. 188 Rozdzienskiego Street, 40-203 Katowice (Poland); Sieroń, Aleksander, E-mail: sieron1@tlen.pl [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Pawłowska–Góral, Katarzyna, E-mail: kgoral@sum.edu.pl [Department of Food and Nutrition in Sosnowiec. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 8 Jednosci Street, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland); Cieślar, Grzegorz, E-mail: cieslar1@tlen.pl [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Sieroń–Stołtny, Karolina [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland)

    2013-04-15

    Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2–4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells′ cultures margins). -- Highlights: ► We present test chamber to be used for in vitro cell culture in static magnetic field. ► The technical data of the chamber construction was presented. ► 2D versus 3D simulation of static magnetic field distribution in chamber was reported. ► We report the accuracy of 2D calculation than 3D.

  10. Measurement of the magnetic-field parameters of the NICA Booster dipole magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Borisov, V. V.; Bichkov, A. V.; Golubitsky, O. M.; Donyagin, A. N.; Morozov, N. A.; Samsonov, E. V.; Omelyanenko, M. M.; Khodzhibagiyan, H. G.; Shemchuk, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Serial assembly and tests of dipole and quadrupole magnets of the NICA Booster have started at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The accelerator is fitted with Nuclotron-type magnets with a superconducting winding and an iron yoke for shaping the needed magnetic field. The design of magnets for NICA was optimized (based on the experience gained in constructing and operating the JINR Nuclotron) for the production of magnetic fields of the required configuration in terms of the beam dynamics in the accelerator and the collider. Measurements of parameters of the field of each magnet are expected to be performed in the process of assembly and testing of each module of the magnet-cryostat system of the NICA Booster and Collider. The results of magnetic measurements for the NICA Booster dipole magnet are presented.

  11. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleksander Filip Żarnecki

    2007-11-01

    The CAIN simulation program was used to study the outgoing beam profile for the photon collider at ILC. The main aim of the analysis was to verify the feasibility of the photon linear collider running with 20 mrad electron beam crossing angle. The main problem is the distorted electron beam, which has to be removed from the interaction region. It is shown that with a new design of the final dipole, it should be possible to avoid large energy losses at the face of the magnet.

  12. Development and Testing of a Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical applications, manufacturing equipment, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  13. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  14. Conical Magnetic Bearing Development and Magnetic Bearing Testing for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Jansen, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The main proposed research of this grant were: to design a high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility, to test the high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing facility to higher speeds, to investigate different backup bearing designs and materials, to retrofit the high-temperature test facility with a magnetic thrust bearing, to evaluate test bearings at various conditions, and test several lubricants using a spiral orbit tribometer. A high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility has been fully developed using Solidworks. The facility can reuse many of the parts of the current high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing, helping to reduce overall build costs. The facility has the ability to measure bearing force capacity in the X, Y, and Z directions through a novel bearing mounting design. The high temperature coils and laminations, a main component of the facility, are based upon the current radial design and can be fabricated at Texas A&M University. The coil design was highly successful in the radial magnetic bearing. Vendors were contacted about fabrication of the high temperature lamination stack. Stress analysis was done on the laminations. Some of the components were procured, but due to budget cuts, the facility build up was stopped.

  15. Magnetoviscosity in magnetic fluids: Testing different models of the magnetization equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Chu Weng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite a long research history, theoretical predictions for the material properties as well as the flow fields and characteristics of magnetic fluids were not well consistent with the experimental data. The lack of a universally accepted magnetization equation for accurately modeling hydrodynamics of magnetic fluids/nanofluids is particularly a major issue. In this paper, we give an overview on the continuum theory and test the six well-known models via comparisons with magnetoviscosity measurements to make clear the magnetization relaxation due to the rotation of magnetic particles and see how well they make predictions on the basis of numerical calculations. Results reveal that the ML model leads to unexplainable behavior. Moreover, the WC model with a ‘relaxation rate’ modification is found to reproduce the predictions of the MRSh model, which agree well with experimental data. The revised WC model (WCC should therefore be preferred.

  16. The Test Facility for the EAST Superconducting Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yu; Weng Peide

    2005-01-01

    A large facility for testing superconducting magnets has been in operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences since the completion of its construction that began in 1999. A helium refrigerator is used to cool the magnets and liquefy helium which can provide 3.8 K ~ 4.5 K, 1.8 bar ~ 5 bar, 20 g/s ~ 40 g/s supercritical helium for the coils or a 150 L/h liquefying helium capacity. Other major parts include a large vacuum vessel (3.5 m in diameter and 6.1 m in height) with a liquid nitrogen temperature shield, two pairs of current lead,three sets of 14.5 kA~ 50 kA power supply with a fast dump quench protection circuitry, a data acquisition and control system, a vacuum pumping system, and a gas tightness inspecting devise.The primary goal of the test facility is to test the EAST TF and PF magnets in relation to their electromagnetic, stability, thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical performance. The construction of this facility was completed in 2002, followed by a series of systematic coil testing. By now ten TF magnets, a central solenoid model coil, a central solenoid prototype coil, and a model coil of the PF large coil have been successfully tested in the facility.

  17. The Test Facility for the EAST Superconducting Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Weng, Peide

    2005-08-01

    A large facility for testing superconducting magnets has been in operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences since the completion of its construction that began in 1999. A helium refrigerator is used to cool the magnets and liquefy helium which can provide 3.8 K-4.5 K, 1.8 bar-5 bar, 20 g/s-40 g/s supercritical helium for the coils or a 150 L/h liquefying helium capacity. Other major parts include a large vacuum vessel (3.5 m in diameter and 6.1 m in height) with a liquid nitrogen temperature shield, two pairs of current lead, three sets of 14.5 kA-50 kA power supply with a fast dump quench protection circuitry, a data acquisition and control system, a vacuum pumping system, and a gas tightness inspecting devise. The primary goal of the test facility is to test the EAST TF and PF magnets in relation to their electromagnetic, stability, thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical performance. The construction of this facility was completed in 2002, followed by a series of systematic coil testing. By now ten TF magnets, a central solenoid model coil, a central solenoid prototype coil, and a model coil of the PF large coil have been successfully tested in the facility.

  18. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  19. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: Superconducting magnet system cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-01

    At the request of Victor Karpenko, Project manager for LLL`s Mirror Fusion Test Facility, EG&G has prepared this independent cost analysis for the proposed MFTF Superconducting Magnet System. The analysis has attempted to show sufficient detail to provide adequate definition for a basis of estimating costs.

  20. The International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barish, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe the key features of the recently completed technical design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 200-500 GeV linear electron-positron collider (expandable to 1 TeV) that is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) technology. The machine parameters and detector characteristics have been chosen to complement the Large Hadron Collider physics, including the discovery of the Higgs boson, and to further exploit this new particle physics energy frontier with a precision instrument. The linear collider design is the result of nearly twenty years of R&D, resulting in a mature conceptual design for the ILC project that reflects an international consensus. We summarize the physics goals and capability of the ILC, the enabling R&D and resulting accelerator design, as well as the concepts for two complementary detectors. The ILC is technically ready to be proposed and built as a next generation lepton collider, perhaps to be built in stages beginning as a Hig...

  1. The development of colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices.

  2. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  3. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Harwood, Leigh [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, Fulvia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cai, Yunhai [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sullivan, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M.-H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wienands, Uli [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gerity, James [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Mann, Thomas [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); McIntyre, Peter [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Pogue, Nathaniel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Sattarov, Akhdiyor [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  4. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-07-14

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  5. First test of a power-pulsed electronics system on a GRPC detector in a 3-Tesla magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Caponetto, L; de la Taille, C; Dulucq, F; Kieffer, R; Laktineh, I; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Seguin-Moreau, N

    2012-01-01

    An important technological step towards the realization of an ultra-granular hadronic calorimeter to be used in the future International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments has been made. A 33X50 cm2 GRPC detector equipped with a power-pulsed electronics board offering a 1cm2 lateral segmentation was successfully tested in a 3-Tesla magnet operating at the H2 beam line of the CERN SPS. An important reduction of power consumption with no deterioration of the detector performance is obtained when the power-pulsing mode is applied. This important result shows that ultra-granular calorimeters for ILC experiments are not only an attractive but also a realistic option.

  6. The CGEM-IT of the BESIII experiment: project update and test results in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzadri, G.

    2016-08-01

    The BESIII experiment is a multi-purpose detector operating on the electron- positron collider BEPCII in Beijing. Since 2008, the world's largest sample of J/ψ, ψ’ were collected. Due to increasing luminosity, the inner drift chamber is showing signs of aging. In 2014, an upgrade was proposed by the Italian collaboration based on the Cylindrical Gas Electron Multipliers (CGEM) technology, developed within the KLOE-II experiment, but with several new features and innovations. In this contribution, an overview of the project will be presented. Preliminary results of a beam test will be shown, with particular focus on the detector performance in magnetic field, with different configurations of electric field. A new readout mode, the µTPC readout, will also be described. The project has been recognized as a Significant Research Project within the Executive Programme for Scientific and Technological Cooperation between Italy and P.R.C for the years 2013-2015, and more recently has been selected as one of the project funded by the European Commission within the call H2020- MSCA-RISE-2014.

  7. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  8. Testing of Photomultiplier Tubes in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Zachary; A1 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The A1 collaboration at MAMI in Mainz, Germany has designed a neutron detector that can be used in experiments to measure the electric form factor of the neutron. They will measure elastic scattering from the neutron, using the polarized electron beam from MAMI at A1's experimental hall. The detector will be composed of two walls of staggered scintillator bars which will be read out by photomultiplier tubes (PMT), connected to both ends of each scintillator via light guides. The experiment requires a magnetic field with strength of 1 Tesla, 2m away from the first scintillator wall. The resulting fringe field is sufficient to disrupt the PMTs, despite the addition of Mu Metal shielding. The effects of the fringe field on these PMTs was tested to optimize the amplification of the PMTs. A Helmholtz Coil was designed to generate a controlled magnetic field with equivalent strength to the field that the PMTs will encounter. The PMTs were read out using a multi-channel analyzer, were tested at various angles relative to the magnetic field in order to determine the optimal orientation to minimize signal disruption. Tests were also performed to determine: the neutron detector response to cosmic radiation; and the best method for measuring a magnetic field's strength in two dimensions. National Science Foundation Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  9. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  10. Muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Skrinsky, A. [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1996-03-01

    The possibility of muon colliders was introduced by Skrinsky et al., Neuffer, and others. More recently, several workshops and collaboration meetings have greatly increased the level of discussion. In this paper we present scenarios for 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV colliders based on an optimally designed proton source, and for a lower luminosity 0.5 TeV demonstration based on an upgraded version of the AGS. It is assumed that a demonstration version based on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible. 53 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Numerical Tests of Fast Reconnection in Weakly Stochastic Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kowal, G; Vishniac, E T; Otmianowska-Mazur, K

    2009-01-01

    We study the effects of turbulence on magnetic reconnection using 3D numerical simulations. This is the first attempt to test a model of fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of weak turbulence proposed by Lazarian & Vishniac (1999). This model predicts that weak turbulence, generically present in most of astrophysical systems, enhances the rate of reconnection by reducing the transverse scale for reconnection events and by allowing many independent flux reconnection events to occur simultaneously. As a result the reconnection speed becomes independent of Ohmic resistivity and is determined by the magnetic field wandering induced by turbulence. To quantify the reconnection speed we use both an intuitive definition, i.e. the speed of the reconnected flux inflow, as well as a more sophisticated definition based on a formally derived analytical expression. Our results confirm the predictions of the Lazarian & Vishniac model. In particular, we find that Vrec Pinj^(1/2), as predicted by the model. The...

  12. Evaluation of Surface Cracks Using Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution characteristics of surface cracks with various widths are discussed based on finite element (FEM) results. The crack depth was 0.20 mm, the width range was from 0.02 to 1.00 mm. The results showed that crack width and lift-off (the distance between surface and sensor) will influence signals. Discussed in this paper is the influence of various lift-off parameters on the peak to peak values of the normal component in magnetic flux leakage testing. The effects can be applied to evaluate surface breaking cracks of different widths and depths.An idea is presented to smooth narrow, sharp crack tips using alternating current (AC) field magnetization.

  13. Magnetic mirror structure for testing shell-type quadrupole coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, N.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents magnetic and mechanical designs and analyses of the quadrupole mirror structure to test single shell-type quadrupole coils. Several quadrupole coils made of different Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, cable insulation and pole materials were tested using this structure at 4.5 and 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, spot heaters, temperature sensors and strain gauges to study their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. The results of the quadrupole mirror model assembly and test are reported and discussed.

  14. Magnetic mirror structure for testing shell-type quadrupole coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, N.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents magnetic and mechanical designs and analyses of the quadrupole mirror structure to test single shell-type quadrupole coils. Several quadrupole coils made of different Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, cable insulation and pole materials were tested using this structure at 4.5 and 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, spot heaters, temperature sensors and strain gauges to study their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. The results of the quadrupole mirror model assembly and test are reported and discussed.

  15. Test particle acceleration in torsional spine magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, M.

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection is taking place commonly in astrophysical and space plasmas, especially in solar flares which are rich sources of highly energetic particles. One of the proposed mechanisms for steady-state 3D magnetic reconnection is "torsional spine reconnection". By using the magnetic and electric fields for "torsional spine reconnection", we numerically investigate the features of test particle acceleration with input parameters for the solar corona. We show that efficient acceleration of a relativistic proton is possible near the null point where it can gain up to 100 MeV of kinetic energy within a few milliseconds. However, varying the injection position results in different scenarios for proton acceleration. A proton is most efficiently accelerated when it is injected at the point where the magnetic field lines change their curvature in the fan plane. Moreover, a proton injected far away from the null point cannot be accelerated and, even in some cases, it is trapped in the magnetic field. In addition, adopting either spatially uniform or non-uniform localized plasma resistivity does not much influence the features of trajectory.

  16. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  17. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  18. Collider signatures of hylogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2015-02-01

    We consider collider signatures of the hylogenesis—a variant of the antibaryonic dark matter model. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from results of the first LHC run. Also we suggest several new channels relevant for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at LHC.

  19. Collider signatures of Hylogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Demidov, S V; Kirpichnikov, D V

    2014-01-01

    We consider collider signatures of the hylogenesis --- a variant of antibaryonic dark matter model. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from results of the first LHC run. Also we suggest several new channels relevant for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at LHC.

  20. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  1. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  2. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  3. Toponium at hadronic colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finjord, J. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Girardi, G.; Sorba, P. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Mery, P. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1982-05-27

    We calculate hadronic toponium production by specific diagrams obeying colour conservation and charge conjugation. The resulting rates, though lower than those calculated using semi-local duality arguments are encouraging and may allow for toponium discovery at hadronic colliders currently in development.

  4. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  5. When stars collide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Pols, O.R.

    2007-01-01

    When two stars collide and merge they form a new star that can stand out against the background population in a star cluster as a blue straggler. In so called collision runaways many stars can merge and may form a very massive star that eventually forms an intermediate mass blackhole. We have perfor

  6. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  7. Laboratory Testing of Magnetic Tracers for Soil Erosion Measurement*1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-Qing; DONG Yuan-Jie; WANG Hui; QIU Xian-Kui; WANG Yan-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Soil erosion, which includes soil detachment, transport, and deposition, is one of the important dynamic land surface processes. The magnetic tracer method is a useful method for studying soil erosion processes. In this study, five types of magnetic tracers were made with fine soil, fly ash, cement, bentonite, and magnetic powder (reduced iron powder) using the method of disk granulation. The tracers were uniformly mixed with soil and tested in the laboratory using simulated rainfall and inflow experiments to simulate the interrill and rill components of soil erosion, in order to select one or more tracers which could be used to study detachment and deposition by the erosive forces of raindrops and surface flow of water on a slope. The results showed that the five types of magnetic tracers with high magnetic susceptibility and a wide range of sizes had a range of 0.99-1.29 gcm-s in bulk density. In the interrill and rill experiments, the tracers FC1 and FC2 which consisted of fly ash and cement at ratios of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, were transported in phase with soil particles since the magnetic susceptibility of sediment approximated that of the soil which was uneroded and the slopes of the regression equations between the detachment of sediment and magnetic tracers FC1 and FC2 were very close to the expected value of 20, which was the original soil/tracer ratio. The detachment and deposition on slopes could be accurately reflected by the magnetic susceptibility differences. The change in magnetic susceptibility depended on whether deposition or detachment occurred. However, the tracer FS which consisted of fine soil and the tracers FB1 and FB2 which consisted of fly ash and bentonite at ratios of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, were all unsuitable for soil erosion study since there was no consistent relationship between sediment and tracer detachment for increasing amounts of runoff. Therefore, the tracers FC1 and FC2 could be used to study soil erosion by water.

  8. The Magnetic Field Model of the Large Hadron Collider: Overview of Operation at 3.5 and 4 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; Fiscarelli, L; Garcia Tomás, R; Giovannozzi, M; Hagen, P; Lamont, M; Maclean, E; Redaelli, S; Schmidt, F; Strzelczyk, M; Walckiers, L; Wenninger, J; Sammut, N

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic model of the LHC is based on a fit of the magnetic measurements through equations that model the field components (geometric, saturation, persistent) at different currents. In this paper we will review the main results related to the magnetic model during the run of the LHC in 2010-2011: with a top energy of 3.5 TeV, all components of the model but the saturation are visible. We first review the main results relative to the decay at injection plateau, dependence on powering history, and snapback at the beginning of the ramp for both tune and chromaticity. We discuss the precision obtained in tracking the magnets during the ramp, where the persistent current components gradually disappear. We conclude by presenting the behaviour of the quadrupoles model during the squeeze.

  9. High luminosity muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  10. A Project to Design and Build the Magnets for a New Test Beamline, the ATF2, at KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; /slac; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Masuzawa, Mika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bolzon, Benoit; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP

    2011-02-07

    In order to achieve the high luminosity required at the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System, and to maintain the beams collisions with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, a special beamline has been designed and built as an extension of the existing extraction beamline of the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK, Japan. The ATF provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam that is comparable to the ILC requirements; the ATF2 mimics the ILC final focus system to create a tightly focused, stable beam. There are 37 magnets in the ATF2, 29 quadrupoles, 5 sextupoles and 3 bends. These magnets had to be acquired in a short time and at minimum cost, which led to various acquisition strategies; but nevertheless they had to meet strict requirements on integrated strength, physical dimensions, compatibility with existing magnet movers and beam position monitors, mechanical stability and field stability and quality. This paper will describe how 2 styles of quadrupoles, 2 styles of sextupoles, one dipole style and their supports were designed, fabricated, refurbished or modified, measured and aligned by a small team of engineers from 3 continents.

  11. The LHC as a Proton-Nucleus Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, C

    2006-01-01

    Following its initial operation as a proton-proton (p-p) and heavy-ion (208Pb82+-208Pb82+) collider, the LHC is expected to operate as a p-Pb collider. Later it may collide protons with other lighter nuclei such as 40Ar18+ or 16O8+. We show how the existing proton and lead-ion injector chains may be efficiently operated in tandem to provide these hybrid collisions. The two-in-one magnet design of the LHC main rings imposes different revolution frequencies for the two beams in part of the magnetic cycle. We discuss and evaluate the consequences for beam dynamics and estimate the potential performance of the LHC as a proton-nucleus collider.

  12. Disentangling heavy flavor at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilten, Philip; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike

    2017-09-01

    We propose two new analysis strategies for studying charm and beauty quarks at colliders. The first strategy is aimed at testing the kinematics of heavy-flavor quarks within an identified jet. Here, we use the SoftDrop jet-declustering algorithm to identify two subjets within a large-radius jet, using subjet flavor tagging to test the heavy-quark splitting functions of QCD. For subjets containing a J /ψ or ϒ , this declustering technique can also help probe the mechanism for quarkonium production. The second strategy is aimed at isolating heavy-flavor production from gluon splitting. Here, we introduce a new FlavorCone algorithm, which smoothly interpolates from well-separated heavy-quark jets to the gluon-splitting regime where jets overlap. Because of its excellent ability to identify charm and beauty hadrons, the LHCb detector is ideally suited to pursue these strategies, though similar measurements should also be possible at ATLAS and CMS. Together, these SoftDrop and FlavorCone studies should clarify a number of aspects of heavy-flavor physics at colliders, and provide crucial information needed to improve heavy-flavor modeling in parton-shower generators.

  13. Intense ion-beam dynamics in the NICA collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, O. S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2016-12-01

    The problems of intense ion-beam dynamics in the developed and optimized optical structure of the NICA collider are considered. Conditions for beam collisions and obtaining the required parameters of luminosity in the operation energy range are discussed. The restriction on collider luminosity is related to effects of the domination of the space charge and intrabeam scattering. Applying methods of cooling, electron and stochastic ones, will permit one to suppress these effects and reach design luminosity. The work also deals with systems of magnetic field correction and problems of calculating the dynamic aperture of the collider.

  14. Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

  15. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beirsdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J Crespo R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Utter, S. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-26

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron' s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to

  16. High temperature superconducting current leads for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    1999-01-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) will be equipped with about 8000 superconducting magnets. Some 3380 leads will feed the currents ranging from 60 to 13000 A. To reduce the heat inleak into the liquid helium, CERN aims to use high temperature superconducting material for leads having current ratings between 600 and 13000 A. Specifications have been written for 13000 A current leads, incorporating a high temperature superconducting section, for the main of the LHC, and contracts have been placed with several firms for the supply of prototypes for comparative testing. The leads used for feeding locally the 60 and 120 A dipole orbit correctors will be conventional conduction cooledmagnets resistive leads. An optimized lead of variable cross section has been tested, and an integral design has been initiated. This report describes the design status of the current leads for the LHC, emphasizing, for the different solutions, the principle of optimization and the choice of cooling methods. (8 refs).

  17. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute. Its main purpose and long-term goal is to design an energyfrontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV in a new 80–100 km tunnel. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90–350 GeV highluminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines are being assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed by the end of 2018, in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. This overview summarizes the status of machine designs and parameters, and it discusses the essential technical components being developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets wit...

  18. Challenges for highest energy circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01

    A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

  19. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  20. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  1. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Roy

    2011-05-01

    I discuss LHC physics in the historical perspective of the progress in particle physics. After a recap of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, I discuss the high energy colliders leading up to LHC and their role in the discovery of these SM particles. Then I discuss the two main physics issues of LHC, i.e. Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. I briefly touch upon Higgs and SUSY searches at LHC along with their cosmological implications.

  2. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Kopp, Robert E; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetite crystals in carbonate from Martian meteorite ALH84001 have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria. It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001 magnetite crystals are aligned in chains. Alignment of magnetosomes in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test, and ferromagnetic resonance, to sense the bulk composition and crystallography of millions of ALH84001 magnetite crystals. The magnetic data demonstrate that although the magnetite is unusually pure and fine-grained in a manner similar to terrestrial magnetofossils, most or all of the crystals are not arranged in chains.

  3. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produce...

  4. Discovery of a magnetic field in the rapidly-rotating O-type secondary of the colliding-wind binary HD 47129 (Plaskett's star)

    CERN Document Server

    Grunhut, J H; Leutenegger, M; Petit, V; Rauw, G; Neiner, C; Martins, F; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Ignace, R; Mathis, S; de Mink, S E; Moffat, A F J; Owocki, S; Shultz, M; Sundqvist, J

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the secondary component of the massive O8III/I+O7.5V/III double-lined spectroscopic binary system HD 47129 (Plaskett's star), in the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) survey. Eight independent Stokes $V$ observations were acquired using the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Narval spectropolarimeter at the T\\'elescope Bernard Lyot. Using Least-Squares Deconvolution we obtain definite detections of signal in Stokes $V$ in 3 observations. No significant signal is detected in the diagnostic null ($N$) spectra. The Zeeman signatures are broad and track the radial velocity of the secondary component; we therefore conclude that the rapidly-rotating secondary component is the magnetized star. Correcting the polarized spectra for the line and continuum of the (sharp-lined) primary, we measured the longitudinal magnetic field from each observation. The longitudinal field of the secondary is variable...

  5. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  6. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  7. Analytical magnetic torque calculations and experimental testing of radial flux permanent magnet-type eddy current brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang-Young; Jang, Seok-Myeong

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports on analytical magnetic torque calculations and experimental tests of a radial flux permanent magnet (RFPM)-type eddy current brake (ECB). Analytical solutions for permanent magnet-generated magnetic fields that consider the eddy current reaction are obtained by using a magnetic vector potential and a two dimensional (2D) polar coordinate system. On the basis of these solutions, the analytical expressions for a magnetic torque are also derived. All analytical results are validated extensively by non-linear finite element calculations. In particular, magnetic torque measurements are obtained in tests to confirm the analyses. Finally, practical issues related to the analytical study of RFPM-type ECBs are fully discussed.

  8. Motion of test particles in a magnetized conformastatic background

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C

    2015-01-01

    A class of exact conformastatic solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations is presented in which the gravitational and electromagnetic potentials are completely determined by a harmonic function only. The motion of test particles is investigated in the background of a space-time characterized by this class of solutions. We focus on the study of circular stable and unstable orbits obtained by taking account particular harmonic functions defining the gravitational potential. We show that is possible to have repulsive force generated by the charge distribution of the source. As the space-time here considered is singularity free we conclude that this phenomena is not exclusive to the case of naked singularities. Additionally, we obtain an expression for the perihelion advance of the test particles in a general magnetized conformastatic space-time.

  9. Detector tests in a high magnetic field and muon spectrometer triggering studies on a small prototype for an LHC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosi, G; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bergsma, F; Castro, H; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; De Pasquale, S; Gálvez, J; Gentile, S; Giusti, P; Laurent, G; Levi, G; Lin, Q; Maccarrone, G D; Mattern, D; Nania, R; Rivera, F; Schioppa, M; Sharma, A; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    The "Large Area Devices" group of the LAA project is working on R&D for muon detection at a future super-collider. New detectors are under development and the design of a muon spectrometer for an LHC experiment is under study. Our present choice is for a compact, high field, air-core toroidal muon spectrometer. Good momentum resolution is achievable in this compact solution, with at least one plane of detection elements inside the high field region. A new detector, the Blade Chamber, making use of blades instead of wires, has been developed for the forward and backward regions of the spectrometer, where polar coordinate readings are desirable.The assembling of a CERN high energy beam line, equipped with high resolution drift chambers and a strong field magnet could give us the opportunity to test our chambers in a high magnetic field and to study the muon trigger capabilities of a spectrometer, like the one proposed, on a small prototype.

  10. Nonlinear Energy Collimation System for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The post-linac energy collimation system of multi-TeV linear colliders is designed to fulfil an important function of protection of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) against miss-steered beams likely generated by failure modes in the main linac. For the case of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), the energy collimators are required to withstand the impact of a full bunch train in case of failure. This is a very challenging task, assuming the nominal CLIC beam parameters at 1.5 TeV beam energy. The increase of the transverse spot size at the collimators using nonlinear magnets is a potential solution to guarantee the survival of the collimators. In this paper we present an alternative nonlinear optics based on a skew sextupole pair for energy collimation. Performance simulation results are also presented.

  11. The Big Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Barna-Alper Productions Inc. Toronto

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is a gigantic particle-smasher, designed to discover the origins of the universe. Awe-inspiring in vision and scope, it’s also the most expensive physics experiment in history with a price-tag of 4 billion dollars.Documentary series "Mega builders" : a fast-paced, character-driven show that focuses on the world’s biggest and most intriguing engineering challenges – the projects that are making history, and the people who are making it happen.

  12. Hadron-hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-06-21

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

  13. Fatigue damage evaluation by metal magnetic memory testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧鹏; 董丽虹; 董世运; 徐滨士

    2014-01-01

    Tension-compression fatigue test was performed on 0.45% C steel specimens. Normal and tangential components of magnetic memory testing signals, Hp(y) and Hp(x) signals, with their characteristics, K of Hp(y) and Hp(x)M of Hp(x), throughout the fatigue process were presented and analyzed. Abnormal peaks of Hp(y) and peak of Hp(x) reversed after loading;Hp(y) curves rotated clockwise and Hp(x) curves elevated significantly with the increase of fatigue cycle number at the first a few fatigue cycles, both Hp(y) and Hp(x) curves were stable after that, the amplitude of abnormal peaks of Hp(y) and peak value of Hp(x) increased more quickly after fatigue crack initiation. Abnormal peaks of Hp(y) and peak of Hp(x) at the notch reversed again after failure. The characteristics were found to exhibit consistent tendency in the whole fatigue life and behave differently in different stages of fatigue. In initial and crack developing stages, the characteristics increased significantly due to dislocations increase and crack propagation, respectively. In stable stage, the characteristics remained constant as a result of dislocation blocking, K value ranged from 20 to 30 A/(m·mm)-1, and Hp(x)M ranged from 270 to 300 A/m under the test parameters in this work. After failure, both abnormal peaks of Hp(y) and peak of Hp(x) reversed, K value was 133 A/(m·mm)-1 and Hp(x)M was-640 A/m. The results indicate that the characteristics of Hp(y) and Hp(x) signals were related to the accumulation of fatigue, so it is feasible and applicable to monitor fatigue damage of ferromagnetic components using metal magnetic memory testing (MMMT).

  14. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  15. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Geer, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(1021) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  16. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  17. TO EVALUATION TEST OF QUALITY OF MAGNETIC FLUIDS FOR MAGNETOFLUID DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bashtovoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluid is a colloid of magnetic nanoparticles. Using of magnetic fluids in technical devices demands applying of strong non-uniform magnetic fields for a long time. One of the most widespread magnetic fluid devices are magnetic fluid seals of mobile shafts, magnetic fluid supports, bearings, acceleration and angle of inclination gauges, devices for information input in the computer and etc. These devices demand high quality of used fluids. Processes of magnetophoresis and Brownian diffusion in magnetic fluid lead to concentration of magnetic particles in the areas with higher intensity of magnetic field and increase of fluid magnetization in these areas. A local change of particles concentration in the fluid leads to variation of its physical properties. Formation of aggregates from the particles and the further stratification of magnetic fluid, up to its destruction, may be the most serious consequence of redistribution of concentration of magnetic particles. These factors lead to variation of parameters of magnetic fluid devices; cause disturbance of their normal operation and even failure. Therefore, the consistent, high quality magnetic fluids which are not subject to fast stratification in a non-uniform magnetic field are necessary for effective work of the devices. The procedure of evaluation test of quality of magnetic fluids is proposed in this paper. The test is based on studying of influence of processes of magnetophoresis and Brownian diffusion of magnetic particles in magnetic fluid on the forces acting on the volume of fluid in an external non-uniform magnetic field. The procedure is developed on the basis of analysis of magnetic force variation in time under the action of non-uniform field of permanent magnets. Methods of determination of stability of magnetic fluid, known at present, demand rather complicated equipment and laborious and complex investigations. Proposed procedure can be used as an express method for

  18. Detector for a linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mnich, J

    2003-01-01

    The proposals under discussion for a new e^{+}e^{-} linear collider with centre-of-mass energies around 1 TeV include designs for large detectors with unprecedented performances in energy, momentum and position resolution. These very stringent requirements are dictated by the precision measurements aimed at this collider to complement the exploratory experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Here a status report on detector R&D projects for the liner collider is given focused on the technologies under study for the vertex detector, the large tracking chamber and the calorimeters.

  19. Hypersensitivity test to electric magnetic fields; Test de hipersensibilidad a exposiciones residenciales a campos magneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda Maeso, A.; Martinez Pascual, M. A.

    2004-07-01

    The so-called electromagnetic hypersensitivity (RH) syndrome includes a number of unspecific, medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electric and magnetic fields. As a whole, laboratory tests have provided inconclusive results, in part due to the fact that many individuals show nuclear, inconsistent responses to repeated experimental field-exposures. It has been proposed that such inconsistencies could be due in part to distress caused by the lab test itself. We have developed a test to be conducted at the patient's residence, allowing for long-term follow up of exposure-response assessment and avoiding the laboratory environment and the presence of the researcher as potential stressors and confounding factors. In a pilot test, EMDEX-II magnetometers were used to continuously recording power-frequency magnetic fields in the residence of a patient with perceived EH. The patient's symptoms included distress, headache and dizziness, among other ailments. Magnetographic data of a total of 123 recording days were plotted against the corresponding data on occurrence of the symptoms episodes. As a whole, the results did not show positive linear correlation between the daily occurrence of the episode and the exposures levels recorded during the day or during the day before. These preliminary results are little supportive of the hypothesis that the patient's ailments are caused or worsened by a putative hypersensitivity to residential exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields in the 0.02-4.00 {mu}T range. (Author) 29 refs.

  20. Test of Optimized 120-mm LARP $Nb_{3}S_n$ Quadrupole Coil Using Magnetic Mirror Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Chlachidze, G; Andreev, N; Anerella, M; Barzi, E; Bossert, R; Caspi, S; Cheng, D; Dietderich, D; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Ghosh, A; Godeke, A; Hafalia, A R; Kashikhin, V V; Lamm, M; Marchevsky, M; Nobrega, A; Novitski, I; Orris, D; Sabbi, G L; Schmalzle, J; Wanderer, P; Zlobin, A V

    2013-01-01

    The US LHC accelerator research program (LARP) is developing a new generation of large - aperture high - field quadrupoles based on Nb 3 Sn conductor for the High luminosity upgrade of Large Hadron Collider (HiLumi - LHC). Tests of the first series of 120 - mm aperture HQ coils revealed the necessity for further optimization of the coil design and fabrication process. Modifications in coil design were gradually implemented in two HQ coils previously tested at Fermi National Accelerato r Laboratory (Fermilab) using a magnetic mirror structure (HQM01 and HQM02). This paper describes the construction and test of an HQ mirror model with a coil of optimized design and with an interlayer resistive core in the conductor. The cable for this co il was made of a smaller diameter strand, providing more room for coil expansion during reaction. The 0.8 - mm strand, used in all previous HQ coils was replaced with a 0.778 - mm Nb 3 Sn strand of RRP 108/127 sub - element design. The coil was instrumented with voltage taps, h...

  1. Did Patagonia collide against Gondwana in the Late Paleozoic? Some Insights From Magnetic Fabrics of Granitoids in the North Patagonian Massif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalini, A. E.; Lopez de Luchi, M. G.; Tomezzoli, R. N.

    2008-05-01

    The Paleozoic tectonic evolution of Patagonia has been a matter of much debate in the last two decades. There is no consensus on whether the North Patagonian Massif (NPM) was accreted by a frontal collision to Gondwana in the Late Paleozoic or if it shared a similar paleotectonic evolution with other Gondwana blocks during the Paleozoic. Different geologic, geochronologic, geophysical and structural data have been interpreted either as supporting or refuting the collisional model. Paleomagnetic data obtained so far is consistent with an authochtonous evolution since the Devonian, but it does not rule out relative displacements of up to 1500 km between Patagonia and Gondwana.Therefore, a Late Paleozoic frontal collision cannot be definitely ruled out on the basis of paleomagnetic data alone. As part of a muldisciplinary research project a magnetic fabric study, by means of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), was carried out on Late Paleozoic granitoids exposed in northeastern NPM. Two main composite units were studied, the highly to variably foliated Yaminue Complex, poorly dated as Late Carboniferous and ranging in composition from tonalite to leuco-granite, and the much less deformed granodiorites to monzoganites of the Early Permian (283 Ma) Navarrete complex. While the former is composed of both ferro and paramagnetic units, with a dominance of the latter; the Navarrete plutons are basically ferromagnetic. Directional and scalar AMS results joined with meso and microstructural studies permitted the characterization of the deformational and magmatic fabric of the different units. An evolutionary picture of the succesive intrusive events in NPM emerged which confirms an important NNE-SSW contractional event associated with intrusion of the different units that compose the Yaminue Complex. This event ended before the intrusion of the Navarrete Complex, which is governed by a different stress regime. Our results fit the hypothesis of a collisional event

  2. Magnet Test Setup of the CMS Tracker ready for installation

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The pieces of the Tracker that will be operated in the forthcoming Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) have been transported inside the dummy tracker support tube to the CMS experimental hall (Point 5, Cessy). The operation took place during the night of 12th May, covering the ~15km distance in about three hours. The transport was monitored for shocks, temperature and humidity with the help of the CERN TS-IC section. The Tracker setup comprises segments of the Tracker Inner Barrel (TIB), the Tracker Outer Barrel (TOB) and Tracker EndCaps (TEC) detectors. It represents roughly 1% of the final CMS Tracker. Installation into the solenoid is foreseen to take place on Wednesday 17th May.

  3. Fermilab "Dumbfounded" by fiasco that broke magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In what is being described as a "pratfall on the world stage", the quadrupole magnet that Fermilab built for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator failed high-pressure testing dramatically last week, resulting in a loud "bang" and a cloud of dust in the LHC tunnel." (1,5 page)

  4. Magnetic core test stand for energy loss and permeability measurements at a high constant magnetization rate and test results for nanocrystalline and ferrite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdt, Russell; Curry, Randy D

    2008-09-01

    A test stand was developed to measure the energy losses and unsaturated permeability of toroidal magnetic cores, relevant to applications of magnetic switching requiring a constant magnetization rate of the order of 1-10 T/micros. These applications in pulsed power include linear induction accelerators, pulse transformers, and discharge switches. The test stand consists of a coaxial transmission line pulse charged up to 100 kV that is discharged into a magnetic core load. Suitable diagnostics measure the voltage across and the current through a winding on the magnetic core load, from which the energy losses and unsaturated permeability are calculated. The development of the test stand is discussed, and test results for ferrite CN20 and the nanocrystalline material Finemet FT-1HS are compared to demonstrate the unique properties of a nanocrystalline material. The experimental data are compared with published data in a similar parameter space to demonstrate the efficacy of the experimental methods.

  5. Monitoring of aquifer pump tests with Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, Esben; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) can provide valuable data to constrain and calibrate groundwater flow and transport models. With this non-invasive geophysical technique, field measurements of water content and hydraulic conductivities can be obtained. We developed a hydrogeophyiscal forward met...... to pump tests in which a partially penetrating pumping well is used, because the limited drawdown around the extraction well causes smaller changes in received signal compared to a fully penetrating well....... method, which calculates the MRS-signal generated by an aquifer pump test. A synthetic MRS-dataset was subsequently used to determine the hydrogeological parameters in an inverse parameter estimation approach. This was done for a pump test with a partially and fully penetrating well. With the MRS data we...... were able to retrieve the hydrogeological parameters of the aquifer. However, the differences in MRS signal in time, when the instrument is positioned on top of the extraction well, were small compared to the electromagnetic noise. This could especially limit the applicability of the MRS technique...

  6. Heavy Neutrinos at Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the current status and future prospects of heavy neutrino searches at the energy frontier, which might play an important role in vindicating the simplest seesaw paradigm as the new physics responsible for neutrino mass generation. After summarizing the current search limits and potential improvements at hadron colliders, we highlight the unparalleled sensitivities achievable in the clean environment of future lepton colliders.

  7. Challenges in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2002-01-01

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e/sup -/e /sup +/ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e/sup -/e/sup + / linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the "Future Linear Collider " (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomi...

  8. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  9. Beyond the Large Hadron Collider: a first look at cryogenics for CERN future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Following the first experimental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study, conducted with the collaborative participation of interested institutes world-wide, considers several options for very high energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders to be installed in a quasi-circular underground tunnel in the Geneva basin, with a circumference of 80 km to 100 km. All these machines would make intensive use of advanced superconducting devices, i.e. high-field bending and focusing magnets and/or accelerating RF cavities, thus requiring large helium cryogenic systems operating at 4.5 K or below. Based on preliminary sets of parameters and layouts for the particle colliders under study, we discuss the main challenges of their cryogenic systems and present first estimates of the cryogenic refrigeration capacities req...

  10. Testing a multiwire proportional chamber inside a magnet

    CERN Document Server

    1974-01-01

    The magnet was one of the two large gap C-magnets (MNP 22A and 22B, 150x150x50 cm3) designed by Guido Petrucci at the end of the sixties and since then used in many experiments at the PS. The pair could also be used as a large H-magnet.

  11. Test particle transport in perturbed magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rover, M.; Schilham, A.M.R.; Montvai, A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical calculations of magnetic field line trajectories in a tokamak are used to investigate the common hypotheses that (i) field lines in a chaotic field make a Gaussian random walk and (ii) that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is uniform in regions with a chaotic magnetic field. Bo

  12. The Dark Penguin Shines Light at Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Primulando, Reinard; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-01-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling -- given by the Dark Penguin -- in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the $8$ and $14$ TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the $100$ TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold fo...

  13. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  14. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Ya. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Harwood, L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, V. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Y. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sullivan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M-H [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wienands, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  15. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fangei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Harwood, Leigh [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, Fulvia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sullivan, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M.-H [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wienands, Uli [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  16. LHC - Large Hadon Collider Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will accelerate two proton beams to an energy corresponding to about 7,000 times their mass (7000 GeV). The collision of the two beams reproduces the conditions in the Universe when it was about 10 -1 2 sec old. Many innovative techniques - such as cooling with superfluid helium, the extensive use of high temperature superconducting cables, the two-in-one design for super-conducting dipole magnets, and new ultra-high vacuum technologies - had to be developed to make its construc-tion possible.

  17. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  18. Specifications, quality control, manufacturing, and testing of accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Einfeld, D

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the magnets plays an important role in the functioning of an accelerator. Most of the magnets are designed at the accelerator laboratory and built by industry. The link between the laboratory and the manufacturer is the contract containing the Technical Specifications of the magnets. For an overview of the contents of the Technical Specifications, the specifications for the magnets of ALBA (bending, quadrupole, and sextupole) are described in this paper. The basic rules of magnet design are reviewed in Appendix A.

  19. Demonstration of concurrent tensile testing and magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, Spencer; Klatt, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a technique used to measure the mechanical properties of soft tissues and has already shown its diagnostic potential for pathologies involving fibrogenesis and neurodegeneration. Experimental investigation of loading during MRE is fairly unexplored and may help to better understand changing mechanical properties in relation to organ function. Tensile testing is a common technique for examining mechanical properties of materials and is used as the simultaneous comparison method with MRE in this study. 3D MRE data was acquired during quasistatic uniaxial tensile loading of an Ecoflex 0010 cylindrical specimen. Individual MRE scans at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5kHz where performed on engineering strain increments of 20% from 0% to 140% while tensile reaction force was recorded using a load cell attached to an adjustable elongation slide. Tensile stress-strain relation resembled the Fung hyperelastic strain energy model. We observe that the MRE shear storage modulus is related to the state of tensile deformation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous tensile testing during MRE and the new design can potentially be used for MRE calibration using pre-tension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The status of RandD for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    Formal development of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been funded for the past three years. Prototype superconducting magnets and cryostats have been tested. Detailed designs have been prepared for the arc sections, the insertion regions and injection and ejection systems. The rf system has undergone significant revisions in order to enhance the experimental capability of RHIC. Progress has been made with the design of detectors. We are putting in place a management information system in anticipation of an expeditious start of construction. 20 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. submitter Training Behavior of the Main Dipoles in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, Ezio; Bajko, Marta; Bottura, Luca; Bruning, Oliver; De Rijk, Gijs; Fessia, Paolo; Hagen, Per; Naour, Sandrine Le; Modena, Michele; Perez, Juan Carlos; Rossi, Lucio; Schmidt, Rudiger; Siemko, Andrzej; Tock, Jean-Philippe; Tommasini, Davide; Verweij, Arjan; Willering, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the 1232 Nb-Ti dipole magnets in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been commissioned to 7.8 T operational field, with 172 quenches. More than 80% of these quenches occurred in the magnets of one of the three cold mass assemblers (3000 series), confirming what was already observed in 2008. In this paper, the recent analysis carried out on the quench performance of the Large Hadron Collider dipole magnets is reported, including the individual reception tests and the 2008 and 2015 commissioning campaigns, to better understand the above-mentioned anomaly and give an outlook for future operation and possible increase of the operational field. The lower part of the quench probability spectrum is compatible with Gaussian distributions; therefore, the training curve can be fit through error functions. An essential ingredient in this analysis is the estimate of the error to be associated with the training data due to sampling of rare events, allowing to test different hypothesis. Using this approach, an es...

  2. Study for cryogenic testing the Super-FRS magnets of FAIR in a new test facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Derking, J H; Benda, V; Pirotte, O

    2015-01-01

    The Super-FRS magnets of the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) being built at GSI in Germany will be tested at a new cryogenic test facility currently under construction at CERN. During nominal operation the magnets will be cooled with liquid helium to 4.5 K. Over a period of three years in total 57 magnets will be tested of three different types. A study is performed to determine the cryogenic requirements for testing the Super-FRS magnets. The required operational parameters for the cool down, magnet test and warm up phases are determined and the results are discussed in this paper. For pre-cooling the magnets to 90 K with a rate of 1 Kcenterdoth-1, a maximum cooling power of 5.6 kW is required. Cooling down the magnets further to 4.5 K and filling will be performed with LHe within 24 h. For warming up the magnets a maximum heater power of 14 kW is needed. It is concluded that the planned test facility currently under construction at CERN fulfills the cryogenic requirements for t...

  3. Large Hadron Collider The Discovery Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The mammoth machine, after a nine-year construction period, is scheduled (touch wood) to begin producing its beams of particles later this year. The commissioning process is planned to proceed from one beam to two beams to colliding beams; from lower energies to the terascale; from weaker test intensities to stronger ones suitable for producing data at useful rates but more difficult to control.

  4. Considerations about an improved superconducting cable for Linear Collider Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2009-01-01

    This note puts together arguments, discussed within the Linear Collider Detector community in the last months, about setting up an R&D program aiming to demonstrate the industrial feasibility and build a significant prototype length (tbd) of superconducting cable for next HEP detector magnets.

  5. Unraveling supersymmetry at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xerxes Tata

    2004-02-01

    After a quick review of the current limits on sparticle masses, we outline the prospects for their discovery at future colliders. We then proceed to discuss how precision measurements of sparticle masses can provide information about how SM suprpartners acquire their masses. Finally, we examine how we can proceed to establish whether or not any new physics discovered in the future is supersymmetry, and describe how we might zero in on the framework of SUSY breaking. In this connection, we review sparticle mass measurements at future colliders, and point out that some capabilities of experiments at $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders may have been over-stated in the literture.

  6. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-08-07

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  7. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  8. Physics at future hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  9. Tests and Field Map of LHCb Dipole Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Losasso, Marcello; Flegel, Wilfried; Giudici, Pierre-Ange; Hernando, Jose Angel; Jamet, Olivier; Lindner, Rolf; Renaud, Jean; Teubert, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC at CERN is aimed to study CP violation and to measure the rare decays of B-mesons with exceptionally high precision. A 4 Tm dipole magnet is required for particle separation and momentum measurements. The 1600 ton warm magnet with sloping poles was installed and fully commissioned by the end of 2004. It is the first detector magnet of the four LHC experiments to have been aligned and commissioned in its final position. In this paper the magnet installation in the underground cavern of Point 8 and its alignment on the beam line are shortly reviewed. Results of a first magnetic field mapping in the region of the magnet poles and the fringe field in the location of the RICH detectors are presented. The mechanical equipment used for the automatic displacement of the Hall probe array is described together with the precision of the measurements obtained which are compared with TOSCA finite element calculations.

  10. Performance Evaluation and Quality Assurance Management during the Series Power Tests of LHC Main Lattice Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Siemko, A

    2008-01-01

    Within the LHC magnet program a series production of superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles has recently been completed in industry and all magnets were cold tested at CERN. The main features of these magnets are: two-in-one structure, 56 mm aperture, two layer coils wound from 15.1 mm wide Nb-Ti cables, and all-polyimide insulation. This paper reviews the process of the power test quality assurance and performance evaluation, which was applied during the LHC magnet series tests. The main test results of magnets tested in both supercritical and superfluid helium, including the quench training, the conductor performance, the magnet protection efficiency and the electrical integrity are presented and discussed in terms of the design parameters and the requirements of the LHC project.

  11. A 233 km Tunnel for Lepton and Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, D J; Datta, A; Duraisamy, M; Luo, T; Lyons, G T

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of $e^+e^-$, $p \\bar{p}$, and $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV $e^+e^-$ colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV $e^+ e^-$ collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV $p \\bar{p}$ collider uses the high intensity Fermilab $\\bar{p}$ source, exploits high cross sections for $p \\bar{p}$ production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconduct...

  12. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  13. Accelerator Magnet Quench Heater Technology and Quality Control Tests for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Meuter, Florian

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) foresees the installation of new superconducting Nb3Sn magnets. For the protection of these magnets, quench heaters are placed on the magnet coils. The quench heater circuits are chemically etched from a stainless steel foil that is glued onto a flexible Polyimide film, using flexible printed circuit production technology. Approximately 500 quench heaters with a total length of about 3000 m are needed for the HL-LHC magnets. In order to keep the heater circuit electrical resistance in acceptable limits, an approximately 10 µm-thick Cu coating is applied onto the steel foil. The quality of this Cu coating has been found critical in the quench heater production. The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterisation of Cu coatings produced by electrolytic deposition, sputtering and electron beam evaporation. The quality of the Cu coatings from different manufacturers has been assessed for instance by ambient temperature electrical res...

  14. QCD at collider energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, A.; Bordes, G.

    1986-05-01

    We examine available experimental distributions of transverse energy and transverse momentum, obtained at the CERN pp¯ collider, in the context of quantum chromodynamics. We consider the following. (i) The hadronic transverse energy released during W+/- production. This hadronic transverse energy is made out of two components: a soft component which we parametrize using minimum-bias events and a semihard component which we calculate from QCD. (ii) The transverse momentum of the produced W+/-. If the transverse momentum (or the transverse energy) results from a single gluon jet we use the formalism of Dokshitzer, Dyakonov, and Troyan, while if it results from multiple-gluon emission we use the formalism of Parisi and Petronzio. (iii) The relative transverse momentum of jets. While for W+/- production quarks play an essential role, jet production at moderate pT and present energies is dominated by gluon-gluon scattering and therefore we can study the Sudakov form factor of the gluon. We suggest also how through a Hankel transform of experimental data we can have direct access to the Sudakov form factors of quarks and gluons.

  15. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  16. The study, design and testing of a linear oscillating generator with moving permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Susana Oros (Pop

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study, design and testing of a Linear Oscillating Generator. There are presented the main steps of the magnetic and electric calculations for a permanent magnet linear alternator of fixed coil and moving magnets type. Finally it has been shown the comparative analysis between the linear oscillating generator with moving permanent magnets in no load operation and load operation.

  17. A New 1000 F Magnetic Bearing Test Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Palazzolo, Alan B.

    1997-01-01

    NASA and the Army are currently exploring the possibility of using magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines. The use of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines could increase the reliability by eliminating the lubrication system. The use of magnetic bearings could also increase the speed and the size of the shafts in the engine, thus reducing vibrations and possibly eliminating third bearings. Magnetic bearings can apply forces to the shafts and move them so that blade tips and seals do not rub. This could be part of an active vibration cancellation system. Also, whirling (displacing the shaft center line) may delay rotating stall and increase the stall margin of the engine. Magnetic bearings coupled with an integral starter generator could result in a more efficient 'more electric' engine. The IHPTET program, a joint DOD-industry program, has identified a need for a high temperature, (as high as 1200 F), magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase m engine. A magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. The magnetic bearing has a laminated rotor and stator made out of cobalt steel. The stator has a series of coils of wire wound around it. These coils f u. a series of electromagnets around the circumference. These magnets exert a force on the rotor to keep the rotor in the center of the cavity. The centering force is commanded by a controller based on shaft position, (measured by displacement probes). The magnetic bearing can only pull and is basically unstable before active control is applied The engine shafts, bearings, and case form a flexible structure which contain a large number of modes. A controller is necessary to stabilize these modes. A power amplifier is also necessary to provide the current prescribed by the controller to the magnetic bearings. In case of very high loads, a conventional back up bearing will engage and stop the rotor and stator from rubbing.

  18. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  19. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  20. Physicists dream of supersized collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Cindy

    2015-12-01

    Particle physicists in China are hopeful that the Chinese government will allocate 1 billion yuan (about £104m) to design what would be the world's largest particle accelerator - the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC).

  1. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  2. Prospects for Future Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-01-01

    One item on the agenda of future colliders is certain to be the Higgs boson. What is it trying to tell us? The primary objective of any future collider must surely be to identify physics beyond the Standard Model, and supersymmetry is one of the most studied options. it Is supersymmetry waiting for us and, if so, can LHC Run 2 find it? The big surprise from the initial 13-TeV LHC data has been the appearance of a possible signal for a new boson X with a mass ~750 GeV. What are the prospects for future colliders if the X(750) exists? One of the most intriguing possibilities in electroweak physics would be the discovery of non-perturbative phenomena. What are the prospects for observing sphalerons at the LHC or a future collider?

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  4. The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2014-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavor spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing LEP tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of an idea first proposed by Bob Palmer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1978, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact 2-in-1 structure was essential for the LHC due to both the limited space available in the existing Large Electron-Positron collider tunnel and the cost. The second innovation was the bold move to use superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor. In this article, no attempt is made to give a comprehensive review of the machine design. This can be found in the LHC Design Report {[}1], w...

  5. Sfermion production at photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, M. E-mail: michael.klasen@desy.de

    2001-10-11

    We calculate total and differential cross-sections for sfermion production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation and in photon-photon collisions with arbitrary photon polarization. The total cross-section at a polarized photon collider is shown to be larger than the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation cross-section up to the kinematic limit of the photon collider.

  6. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Clendenin, J E; Garwin, E L; Kirby, R E; Luh, D A; Maruyama, T; Prescott, C Y; Sheppard, J C; Turner, J; Prepost, R

    2005-01-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  7. Colorize magnetic nanoparticles using a search coil based testing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kai; Wang, Yi; Feng, Yinglong; Yu, Lina; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu

    2015-04-15

    Different magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) possess unique spectral responses to AC magnetic field and we can use this specific magnetic property of MNPs as “colors” in the detection. In this paper, a detection scheme for magnetic nanoparticle size distribution is demonstrated by using an MNPs and search-coils integrated detection system. A low frequency (50 Hz) sinusoidal magnetic field is applied to drive MNPs into saturated region. Then a high frequency sinusoidal field sweeping from 5 kHz to 35 kHz is applied in order to generate mixing frequency signals, which are collected by a pair of balanced search coils. These harmonics are highly specific to the nonlinearity of magnetization curve of the MNPs. Previous work focused on using the amplitude and phase of the 3rd harmonic or the amplitude ratio of the 5th harmonic over 3rd harmonic. Here we demonstrate to use the amplitude and phase information of both 3rd and 5th harmonics as magnetic “colors” of MNPs. It is found that this method effectively reduces the magnetic colorization error. - Highlights: • We demonstrated to use the amplitude and phase information of both 3rd and 5th harmonics as magnetic “colors” of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). • An easier and simpler way to calibrate amounts of MNPs was developed. • With the same concentration, MNP solution with a larger average particle size could induce higher amplitude, and its amplitude changes greatly with sweeping high frequency. • At lower sweeping frequency, the 5 samples have almost the same phase lag. As the sweeping frequency goes higher, phase lag of large particles drop faster.

  8. Metal magnetic memory testing for early damage assessment in ferromagnetic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-hong; XU Bin-shi; DONG Shi-yun; CHEN Qun-zhi; WANG Yu-ya; ZHANG Lei; WANG Dan; YIN Da-wei

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the physical mechanism of metal magnetic memory testing, both the influences of earth magnetic field and applied stress on magnetic domain structure were discussed. Static tension and fatigue tests for low carbon steel plate specimens were carried out on hydraulic servo testing machine of MTS810 type and magnetic signals were measured during the processes by the type of EMS-2003 instrument. The results indicate that the initial magnetic signals of specimens are different before loading. The magnetic signals curves are transformed from initial random to regular pattern due to the effect of two types of loads. However, the shape and distribution of magnetic signal curves in the elastic region are different from that of plastic region in tension test. While in fatigue test those magnetic signals curves corresponding to different cycles are similar. The Hp (y) value of magnetic signals on the fracture zone increases dramatically at the breaking transient time and positive-negative magnetic poles occur on the two parts of fracture zone.

  9. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II. Module 32-3, Fundamentals of Magnetic Particle Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groseclose, Richard

    This third in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II explains the principles of magnets and magnetic fields and how they are applied in magnetic particle testing, describes the theory and methods of magnetizing test specimens, describes the test equipment used, discusses the principles and…

  11. Collider study on the loop-induced dark matter mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yuhsin, E-mail: yhtsai@umd.edu [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For DM couplings involving light mediators, especially for the loop-mediated interactions, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory. In this note we discuss the study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, focusing on a model with anarchic dark flavor structure. By including the momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling – given by the Dark Penguin – in collider processes, we study bounds from monophoton, diphoton, and non-pointing photon searches at the LHC. We also compare our results to constraints from the direct detection experiments.

  12. A concept of the photon collider beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Shekhtman, L I

    2014-01-01

    Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

  13. broken magnet highlights largest collider's engineering challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Inman, Mason

    2007-01-01

    "Even at the world's soon-to-be largest particle accelerator - a device that promises to push the boundaries of physics - scientists need to be mindful of one of the most fundamental laws in the universe: Murphy's Law. (2 pages)

  14. Crab Waist collision scheme: a novel approach for particle colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zobov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    A new concept of nonlinear focusing of colliding bunches, called Crab Waist (CW)collision scheme, has been proposed at LNF INFN. It has been successfully tested at the Italian lepton collider DAFNE in operational conditions providing luminosity for two different experimental detectors, SIDDHARTA and KLOE-2. Considering a high efficiency of the scheme for increasing collision luminosity and its relative simplicity for implementation several new collider projects have been proposed and are under development at present. These are the SuperKEKB B-factory ready to start commissioning in 2016 in Japan, the SuperC-Tau factory proposed in Novosibirsk and entered in the short list of Russian mega-science projects, the new 100-km electron-positron Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) under design study at CERN and some others. In this paper we describe the CW collision scheme, discuss its advantages and report principal results achieved at the electron-positron Phi-factory DAFNE.

  15. Testing a Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Extrapolation Code with the Titov-Demoulin Magnetic Flux Rope Model

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    In the solar corona, magnetic flux rope is believed to be a fundamental structure accounts for magnetic free energy storage and solar eruptions. Up to the present, the extrapolation of magnetic field from boundary data is the primary way to obtain fully three-dimensional magnetic information of the corona. As a result, the ability of reliable recovering coronal magnetic flux rope is important for coronal field extrapolation. In this paper, our coronal field extrapolation code (CESE-MHD-NLFFF, Jiang & Feng 2012) is examined with an analytical magnetic flux rope model proposed by Titov & Demoulin (1999), which consists of a bipolar magnetic configuration holding an semi-circular line-tied flux rope in force-free equilibrium. By using only the vector field in the bottom boundary as input, we test our code with the model in a representative range of parameter space and find that the model field is reconstructed with high accuracy. Especially, the magnetic topological interfaces formed between the flux rop...

  16. Failure Accommodation Tested in Magnetic Suspension Systems for Rotating Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenza, Andy J.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and Texas A&M University are developing techniques for accommodating certain types of failures in magnetic suspension systems used in rotating machinery. In recent years, magnetic bearings have become a viable alternative to rolling element bearings for many applications. For example, industrial machinery such as machine tool spindles and turbomolecular pumps can today be bought off the shelf with magnetically supported rotating components. Nova Gas Transmission Ltd. has large gas compressors in Canada that have been running flawlessly for years on magnetic bearings. To help mature this technology and quiet concerns over the reliability of magnetic bearings, NASA researchers have been investigating ways of making the bearing system tolerant to faults. Since the potential benefits from an oil-free, actively controlled bearing system are so attractive, research that is focused on assuring system reliability and safety is justifiable. With support from the Fast Quiet Engine program, Glenn's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is working to demonstrate fault-tolerant magnetic suspension systems targeted for aerospace engine applications. The Flywheel Energy Storage Program is also helping to fund this research.

  17. High magnetic field test of bismuth Hall sensors for ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, I.; Entler, S.; Kohout, M.; Kočan, M.; Vayakis, G.

    2016-11-01

    Performance of bismuth Hall sensors developed for the ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic was investigated for high magnetic fields in the range ±7 T. Response of the sensors to the magnetic field was found to be nonlinear particularly within the range ±1 T. Significant contribution of the planar Hall effect to the sensors output voltage causing undesirable cross field sensitivity was identified. It was demonstrated that this effect can be minimized by the optimization of the sensor geometry and alignment with the magnetic field and by the application of "current-spinning technique."

  18. Searching for dark matter at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Francois; Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Dark Matter (DM) detection prospects at future colliders are reviewed under the assumption that DM particles are fermions of the Majorana or Dirac type. Although the discussion is quite general, one will keep in mind the recently proposed candidate based on an excess of energetic photons observed in the center of our Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT satellite. In the first part we will assume that DM interactions are mediated by vector bosons, or . In the case of -boson Direct Detection limits force only axial couplings with the DM. This solution can be naturally accommodated by Majorana DM but is disfavored by the GC excess. Viable scenarios can be instead found in the case of mediator. These scenarios can be tested at colliders through ISR events, . A sensitive background reduction can be achieved by using highly polarized beams. In the second part scalar particles, in particular Higgs particles, have been considered as mediators. The case of the SM Higgs mediator is excluded by limits on the invisible branching ratio of the Higgs. On the contrary particularly interesting is the case in which the DM interactions are mediated by the pseudoscalar state in two Higgs-doublet model scenarios. In this last case the main collider signature is.

  19. Development of superconducting links for the Large Hadron Collider machine

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine, new superconducting lines are being developed for the feeding of the LHC magnets. The proposed electrical layout envisages the location of the power converters in surface buildings, and the transfer of the current from the surface to the LHC tunnel, where the magnets are located, via superconducting links containing tens of cables feeding different circuits and transferring altogether more than 150 kA. Depending on the location, the links will have a length ranging from 300 m to 500 m, and they will span a vertical distance of about 80 m. An overview of the R&D program that has been launched by CERN is presented, with special attention to the development of novel types of cables made from MgB 2 and high temperature superconductors (Bi-2223 and REBCO) and to the results of the tests performed on prototype links. Plans for future activities are presented, together with a timeline for potential future integration in the LHC machine.

  20. Testing the origin of the magnetic record of chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Pesonen, L. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    The method for determination of the meteorite magnetic record origin has been developed by Kletetschka et al, 2005. The technique utilizes a detailed AF (Alternating Field) demagnetization of NRM (Natural Remanent Magnetization), followed by AF demagnetization of the SIRM (Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization) in the very same AF steps. The ratio of NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) is plotted against AF demagnetization field. The slope of the NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) curve contains information about the nature of NRM acquisition process. In the case of the TRM (ThermoRemanent Magnetization) or CRM (ChemoRemanent Magnetization) the coercivity spectrum of NRM should cover equally both the SD and MD particles resulting in the constant NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) ratio. In the case of the IRM (Isothermal Remanent Magnetization) the low coercivity grains are much more susceptible to the magnetizing field that the high coercivity grains resulting in the increase of the NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) ratio in the low coercivity (low AF field) region. We applied this method on three chondritic meteorites. The Neuschwanstein (EL6) reveals significant IRM component due to negative NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) slope in the low AF fields. The chondrules of Bjurbole (L4) reveals constant NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) ratio pointing on TRM (or CRM) origin of the NRM. The interesting feature was observed on chondrules from the Avanhandava (H4) meteorite. Systematically lower values of the NRM(AF)/SIRM(AF) ratio in the low AF range points to partial demagnetization of MD grains what can be explained as an effect of the impact demagnetization of the parent body or as an effect of the time-decay of the magnetization. The method can serve as fast tool to determine the nature and origin of the magnetic record of the extraterrestrial and terrestrial materials and has potential application in the paleointensity studies. Kletetschka G., Kohout T., Wasilewski P. J., Fuller M. (2005): Recognition of thermal remanent magnetization in rocks and meteorites

  1. A Novel Collimation Method for Large Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Ye; Tang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel collimation method for large hadron colliders by arranging betatron and momentum collimation systems in the same insertion to improve the overall cleaning efficiency. The method has the potential of avoiding beam losses at the downstream dispersion suppression section following the conventional betatron collimation section, which is caused by those particles with single diffractive scattering at the collimators. Evident beam loss in arc sections should be avoided to protect the superconducting magnets from quenching, especially when the stored beam energy is up to hundreds of MJ level or even higher in modern proton-proton collider. Our studies show that it is beneficial to arrange the momentum collimation system just after the betatron collimation system so that it can clean the particles with lower momentum due to the single diffractive scattering in the betatron collimators. This method is being applied to the future proton-proton collider SPPC. Preliminary multi-particle simula...

  2. A Conduction-Cooled Superconducting Magnet System-Design, Fabrication and Thermal Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Holbøll, Joachim; Wang, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high-vacuumed c......A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high...

  3. TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F., E-mail: pavelmi@bu.edu, E-mail: clemens@bu.edu, E-mail: apinnick@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150 Degree-Sign ) with 17 pointings of the 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' field of view between -75 Degree-Sign < b < 10 Degree-Sign , with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to -6 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign .

  4. Colliding. gamma. e- and. gamma gamma. -beams on the basis of electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Tel' nov, V.I.

    1983-08-01

    Main properties of the ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. collisions are discussed in some detail with application to the generation of colliding ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams basing on the designed linear accelerators with colliding e/sup +/e/sup -/ beams, VLEEP and SLC, as it was proposed in a previous work. Intensive ..gamma.. beams with the energy 50 GeV would be produced from scattering of the laser light focused to the electron beams of the accelerators. Laser radiation is focused to the electron beam in the conversion region at a distance of about 10 cm from the place of collision. After scattering on electrons high-energy photons move practically along the electron primary trajectories and are focused in the collision region. The electrons are deflected from the collision region by means of approximately 1 T magnetic field. Then the produced ..gamma..-beam collides with an electron beam or a similar ..gamma..-beam. In the case when the maximum luminosity (L) is attained, the luminosity distribution in the invariant mass of the ..gamma..e or ..gamma gamma.. systems is wide. A monochromatization of the collisions up to the level of 5-10% is possible. That will entail a decrease in the luminosity, the procedure is most effective if one uses the electrons and the laser photons with opposite helicities. Examples of physically interesting problems to be investigated with the proposed ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams are suggested.

  5. Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

  6. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Mike; Arnold, Ray; Bailey, D; Barlow, Roger J; Beard, Carl D; Boogert, Stewart Takashi; Burrows, P N; Burton, D; Christian, Glenn B; Clarke, Christine; Cussans, D; Densham, C; Erickson, Roger; Frisch, Josef; Greenhalgh, J; Hartin, Anthony F; Hast, Carsten; Hildreth, Michael; Jackson, Frank; Kalinin, Alexander; Jobe, R Keith; Keller, Lewis; Kolomensky, Yury; Kourevlev, German Yu; Lyapin, A; Malton, Stephen; Markiewicz, Thomas W; Maruyama, Takashi; McCormick, Douglas; Mercer, Adam; Miller, David J; Molloy, Stephen; Nelson, Janice; Phinney, Nan; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Ross, Marc; Seryi, Andrei; Shales, N; Sinev, N; Slater, Mark; Smith, J; Smith, Stephen; Sopczak, A; Sugimoto, Y; Szalata, Zen M; Tenenbaum, P G; Thomson, Mark; Torrence, Eric; Tucker, R W; Walston, Sean; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Weiland, Thomas; White, Glen; Wing, Matthew; Woodley, Mark; Zagorodnov, Igor; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  7. Test Results of HTS Coil and Magnet R&D for RIA

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Sampson, William; Schmalzle, Jesse D; Zeller, Al

    2005-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is developing quadrupole magnets for the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) based on commercially available High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). These quadrupoles will be used in the Fragment Separator region and are one of the more challenging elements in the RIA proposal. They will be subjected to several orders of magnitude more energy and radiation deposition than typical beam line and accelerator magnets receive during their entire lifetime. The proposed quadrupoles will operate in the 20-40 K temperature range for efficient heat removal. HTS coils that have been tested so far indicate that the coils meet the magnetic field requirements of the design. We will report the test results of about 10 HTS coils and of a magnetic mirror configuration that simulates the magnetic field and Lorentz force in the proposed quadrupole. In addition, the preliminary design of an HTS dipole magnet for the Fragment Separator region will also be presented.

  8. Collider to use cold technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is being developed for use by particle physicists to make detailed studies of the Higgs boson and many other new particles. The two technologies for the ILC use different types of cavities to accelerate electrons and positrons. The German technology involves superconducting cavities operating at 2 K, whereas the approach proposed by the US and Japan relied on copper cavities that would be run at room temperature. However, due to the huge cost of the linear collider the physicists selected only one. Following evaluation of limitations of each cavity, the physicists opted for the superconducting approach. Assuming that the design work is completed on time, and if funding agencies and politicians can agree on where to build the collider, construction of the machine could start by 2010. (Edited abstract).

  9. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC and ILC, which led to a host of good results and important decisions. The International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) studies both call for cutting-edge technologies. At first glance they may appear to be in competition, but they are in fact complementary and have a common objective – namely to propose a design , as soon as possible and at the lowest possible cost, for the linear accelerator best suited to taking over the baton of physics research at the high-energy frontier after the LHC.

  10. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the International Linear Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Stefanov; for the Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration is continuing the work to develop column-parallel CCDs (CPCCD) and CMOS readout chips to be used in the vertex detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The CPCCD achieves several orders of magnitude faster readout than conventional CCDs because every column is equipped with amplifier and ADC, enabling efficient data taking with low occupancy. Already two generations of CPCCDs and readout chips have been manufactured and the first chips have been fully tested. The second generation devices are now being evaluated. A new CCD-based device, the in-situ storage image sensor (ISIS) has also been developed. The ISIS offers numerous advantages in terms of relaxed readout, increased radiation hardness and great immunity to EMI. In this paper we present the results from the tests of the CPCCDs, readout chips and ISIS, as well as the plans for future developments.

  11. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  12. Mirror fusion test facility magnet system. Final design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, C.D.; Hodges, A.J.; VanSant, J.H.; Dalder, E.N.; Hinkle, R.E.; Horvath, J.A.; Scanlan, R.M.; Shimer, D.W.; Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.

    1980-09-03

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) magnet description, (2) superconducting manufacture, (3) mechanical behavior of conductor winding, (4) coil winding, (5) thermal analysis, (6) cryogenic system, (7) power supply system, (8) structural analysis, (9) structural finite element analysis refinement, (10) structural case fault analysis, and (11) structural metallurgy. (MOW)

  13. A Solar Axion Search Using a Decommissioned LHC Test Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Lozza, V; Christensen, F E; Jakobsen, A C; Neff, S H; Carmona martinez, J M; Giomataris, I; Krcmar, M; Vafeiadis, T; Luzon marco, G M; Gracia garza, J; Lakic, B; Cantatore, G; Solanki, S K; Ozbey, A; Davenport, M; Funk, W; Desch, K K; Laurent, J; Villar, J A; Jakovcic, K; Eleftheriadis, C; Diago ortega, A; Zioutas, K; Gardikiotis, A; Cetin, S A; Hasinoff, M D; Castel pablo, J F; Gninenko, S; Ferrer ribas, E; Liolios, A; Anastasopoulos, V; Kaminski, J; Dafni, T; Garcia irastorza, I; Ruiz choliz, E; Krieger, C; Lutz, G; Fanourakis, G; Ruz armendariz, J; Vogel, J K; Pivovaroff, M J

    2002-01-01

    Previous solar axion searches have been carried out in Brookhaven (1990) and in Tokyo (2000- ), tracking the Sun with a dipole magnet. QCD inspired axions should be produced after the Big Bang, being thus candidates for the dark matter. The Sun is a very useful source of weakly interacting particles for fundamental research. Axions can be produced also in the Sun's core through the scattering of thermal photons in the Coulomb field of electric charges (Primakoff effect). In a transverse magnetic field the Primakoff effect can work in reverse, coherently converting the solar axions or other axion-like particles (ALPS) back into X-ray photons in the keV range. The conversion efficiency increases with $(B⋅L)^2$. In the CAST experiment an LHC prototype dipole magnet (B = 9 T and L = 10 m) with straight beam pipes provides a conversion efficiency exceeding that of the two earlier solar axion telescopes by almost a factor of 100. This magnet is mounted on a moving platform and coupled to both gas filled and soli...

  14. Validation of a Micrometric remotely controlled pre-alignment system for the CLIC Linear Collider using a test setup (Mock-Up) with 5 degrees of freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, H; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Leuxe, R; Sosin, M

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC main beam quadrupoles need to be prealigned within 17 um rms with respect to a straight reference line along a sliding window of 200 m. A readjustment system based on eccentric cam movers, which will provide stiffness to the support assembly, is being studied. The cam movers were qualified on a 1 degree of freedom (DOF) test setup, where a repeatability of adjustment below 1um was measured along their whole range. This paper presents the 5 DOF mock-up, built for the validation of the eccentric cam movers, as well as the first results of tests carried out: resolution of displacement along the whole range, measurements of the support eigenfrequencies.

  15. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  16. Physics beyond Colliders Kickoff Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kickoff workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  17. Workshop on Physics Beyond Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kick-off workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  18. Polarization for the by-pass SLAC/PEP collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1980-06-01

    It was suggested that one can collide the store e/sup +/ beam in PEP with the e/sup /minus// beam from SLAC to reach a center-of-mass energy higher than that achieved by the PEP colliding beams. Although the future of this PEP/SLAC collider is not yet certain, it is useful to first explore its physics possibilities. One possible version of the SLAC/PEP collider utilizes a by-pass at the interaction point; the stored beam is displaced vertically by a set of vertical bending magnets every time the linac beam arrives. One feature of this by-pass scheme that makes it attractive is that the amount of the vertical displacement of the by-pass can be chosen so that the spin polarization of the stored beam is made longitudinal at the point of interaction. In this note, we have studied the various depolarization effects of the stored e/sup +/ beam due to the perturbation of the by-pass magnets. 1 fig.

  19. Magnet Coil Test Facility for Researching Magnetic Activity of Pico/Nano/Micro Satellites (PNMSats)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-16

    of mapping magnetic fields of nearby planets , moons, asteroids, and such. Impact on Other Disciplines As stated in the previous sections, cross...disciplinary research has been initiated. It is well understood that life form is always under the influence of electro-magnetic force, which is one of...the fundamental forces in nature. An ability to artificially alter the intensity or direction of this force in an environment and subjecting life form

  20. Performance of a continuous flow ventricular assist device: magnetic bearing design, construction, and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, P; Hilton, E; Baloh, M; Maslen, E; Bearnson, G; Noh, D; Khanwilkar, P; Olsen, D

    1998-06-01

    A new centrifugal continuous flow ventricular assist device, the CFVAD III, which is fully magnetic bearing suspended, has been developed. It has only one moving part (the impeller), has no contact (magnetic suspension), is compact, and has minimal heating. A centrifugal impeller of 2 inch outer diameter is driven by a permanent magnet brushless DC motor. This paper discusses the design, construction, testing, and performance of the magnetic bearings in the unit. The magnetic suspension consists of an inlet side magnetic bearing and an outlet side magnetic bearing, each divided into 8 pole segments to control axial and radial displacements as well as angular displacements. The magnetic actuators are composed of several different materials to minimize size and weight while having sufficient load capacity to support the forces on the impeller. Flux levels in the range of 0.1 T are employed in the magnetic bearings. Self sensing electronic circuits (without physical sensors) are employed to determine the impellar position and provide the feedback control signal needed for the magnetic bearing control loops. The sensors provide position sensitivity of approximately 0.025 mm. A decentralized 5 axis controller has been developed using modal control techniques. Proportional integral derivative controls are used for each axis to levitate the magnetically supported impeller.

  1. Hanle Effect Diagnostics of the Coronal Magnetic Field - A Test Using Realistic Magnetic Field Configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N -E; Wiegelmann, T

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of coronal phenomena, such as coronal plasma thermodynamics, faces a major handicap caused by missing coronal magnetic field measurements. Several lines in the UV wavelength range present suitable sensitivity to determine the coronal magnetic field via the Hanle effect. The latter is a largely unexplored diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields with a very high potential. Here we study the magnitude of the Hanle-effect signal to be expected outside the solar limb due to the Hanle effect in polarized radiation from the H {\\sc{i}} Ly$\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ lines, which are among the brightest lines in the off-limb coronal FUV spectrum. For this purpose we use a magnetic field structure obtained by extrapolating the magnetic field starting from photospheric magnetograms. The diagnostic potential of these lines for determining the coronal magnetic field, as well as their limitations are studied. We show that these lines, in particular H {\\sc{i}} Ly$\\beta$, are useful for such measurements.

  2. Influence of the magnetic field profile on ITER conductor testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, A.; Ilyin, Y.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed simulations with the numerical CUDI-CICC code on a typical short ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conductor test sample of dual leg configuration, as usually tested in the SULTAN test facility, and made a comparison with the new EFDA-Dipole test facility offering

  3. Nonlinear Control for Magnetic Bearings in Deployment Test Rigs : Simulation and Experimental Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpen, J.M.A.; Kerk, B. van der; Klaassens, J.B.; Lazeroms, M.; Kan, S.Y.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper three control schemes for a test set-up of a magnetic bearing system for deployment rigs of solar arrays are described. The air gap of the magnet has to be controlled to a constant value independent of the deployment of the solar array. The deployment of the rig has been modeled as a

  4. Nonlinear Control for Magnetic Bearings in Deployment Test Rigs : Simulation and Experimental Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpen, J.M.A.; Kerk, B. van der; Klaassens, J.B.; Lazeroms, M.; Kan, S.Y.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper three control schemes for a test set-up of a magnetic bearing system for deployment rigs of solar arrays are described. The air gap of the magnet has to be controlled to a constant value independent of the deployment of the solar array. The deployment of the rig has been modeled as a v

  5. Nonlinear Control for Magnetic Bearings in Deployment Test Rigs : Simulation and Experimental Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpen, J.M.A.; Kerk, B. van der; Klaassens, J.B.; Lazeroms, M.; Kan, S.Y.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper three control schemes for a test set-up of a magnetic bearing system for deployment rigs of solar arrays are described. The air gap of the magnet has to be controlled to a constant value independent of the deployment of the solar array. The deployment of the rig has been modeled as a v

  6. The LHC magnet system and its status of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Maurizio; Perin, Romeo; Vlogaert, Jos

    1995-01-01

    CERN is preparing for the construction of a new high energy accelerator/collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This new facility will mainly consist of two superconducting magnetic beam channels, 27 km long, to be installed in the existing LEP tunnel. The magnetic system comprises about 1200 twin-aperture dipoles, 13.145 m long, with an operational field of 8.65 T, about 600 quadrupoles, 3 m long, and a very large number of other superconducting magnetic components. A general description of the system is given together with the main features of the design of the regular lattice magnets. The paper also describes the present state of the magnet R & D program. Results from short model work, as well as from full scale prototypes will be presented, including the recently tested 10 m long full-scale prototype dipole manufactured in industry.

  7. Rf power sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Nelson, E.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Boyd, J.K.; Houk, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Live

    1990-06-01

    The next generation of linear colliders requires peak power sources of over 200 MW per meter at frequencies above 10 GHz at pulse widths of less than 100 nsec. Several power sources are under active development, including a conventional klystron with rf pulse compression, a relativistic klystron (RK) and a crossed-field amplifier. Power from one of these has energized a 0.5 meter two- section High Gradient Accelerator (HGA) and accelerated a beam at over 80 MeV meter. Results of tests with these experimental devices are presented here.

  8. The large-angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Ghofrani, Mehran; Britton, Thomas C.; Groom, Nelson J.

    1992-05-01

    As part of a NASA effort to develop the technology and techniques required to demonstrate the magnetic suspension of objects over wide ranges of attitudes, a small-scale demonstration project was undertaken. The objectives here are to suspend a cylindrical element containing a permanent magnet core, to demonstrate stability and control in five degrees-of-freedom, and to permit controlled rotation of the model in one degree-of-freedom over the full range of 360 deg. Further constraints are that all suspension and control electromagnets are to be behind a flat plane, located some distance from the model. Since this is a ground-based experiment and in order to maintain generality, the plane is chosen to be horizontal with the model levitated above the plane by repulsive forces.

  9. Test the chiral magnetic effect with isobaric collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Ma, Guo-Liang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The quark-gluon matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions may contain local domains in which P and CP symmetries are not preserved. When coupled with an external magnetic field, such P- and CP-odd domains will generate electric currents along the magnetic field --- a phenomenon called the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Recently, the STAR Collaboration at RHIC and the ALICE Collaboration at the LHC released data of charge-dependent azimuthal-angle correlators with features consistent with the CME expectation. However, the experimental observable is contaminated with significant background contributions from elliptic-flow-driven effects, which makes the interpretation of the data ambiguous. In this Letter, we show that the collisions of isobaric nuclei, $^{96}_{44}$Ru + $^{96}_{44}$Ru and $^{96}_{40}$Zr + $^{96}_{40}$Zr, provide an ideal tool to disentangle the CME signal from the background effects. Our simulation demonstrates that the two collision types at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=200$ GeV have more than...

  10. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e+e- collider rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oide, K.; Aiba, M.; Aumon, S.; Benedikt, M.; Blondel, A.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Boscolo, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Cai, Y.; Doblhammer, A.; Haerer, B.; Holzer, B.; Jowett, J. M.; Koop, I.; Koratzinos, M.; Levichev, E.; Medina, L.; Ohmi, K.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; Sinyatkin, S.; Sullivan, M.; Wenninger, J.; Wienands, U.; Zhou, D.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-11-01

    A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider-e+e- (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called "tapering" of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC'16, 9-13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016).] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA) has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2 % has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this paper is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. A number of issues have been identified for further

  11. Large Hadron Collider momentum calibration and accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051266; Todesco, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the excellent quality of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experimental detectors and the accurate calibration of the luminosity at the LHC, uncertainties on the LHC beam energy may contribute significantly to the measurement errors on certain observables unless the relative uncertainty is well below 1%. Direct measurements of the beam energy using the revolution frequency difference of proton and lead beams combined with the magnetic model errors are used to provide the energy uncertainty of the LHC beams. Above injection energy the relative uncertainty on the beam energy is determined to be ±0.1%. The energy values as reconstructed and distributed online to the LHC experiments do not require any correction above injection energy. At injection a correction of +0.31 GeV/c must be applied to the online energy values.

  12. Large Hadron Collider momentum calibration and accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todesco, E.; Wenninger, J.

    2017-08-01

    As a result of the excellent quality of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experimental detectors and the accurate calibration of the luminosity at the LHC, uncertainties on the LHC beam energy may contribute significantly to the measurement errors on certain observables unless the relative uncertainty is well below 1%. Direct measurements of the beam energy using the revolution frequency difference of proton and lead beams combined with the magnetic model errors are used to provide the energy uncertainty of the LHC beams. Above injection energy the relative uncertainty on the beam energy is determined to be ±0.1 %. The energy values as reconstructed and distributed online to the LHC experiments do not require any correction above injection energy. At injection a correction of +0.31 GeV /c must be applied to the online energy values.

  13. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang; Leng Liao; Ruiqiang Zhao; Jianting Zhou; Mao Yang; Runchuan Xia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obta...

  14. A forecast of new test capabilities using Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, Pierce L.; Johnson, William G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the potential of Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) technology to solve existing problems related to support interference in wind tunnels. Improvement of existing test techniques and exciting new techniques are envisioned as a result of applying MSBS. These include improved data accuracy, dynamic stability testing, two-body/stores release testing, and pilot/designer-in-the-loop tests. It also discusses the use of MSBS for testing exotic configurations such as hybrid hypersonic vehicles. A new facility concept that combines features of ballistic tubes, magnetic suspension, and cryogenic tunnels is described.

  15. Physics at the Fermilab Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shochet, M.J. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider have produced many results from the search for the top quark, the study of both the electroweak and strong interactions, the production and decay of b quarks, and the search for new high mass objects. A sample of recently obtained results are presented.

  16. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunanda Banerjee; Rohini M Godbole; Sreerup Raychaudhuri; Ben Allanach; Sunanda Banerjee; Satyaki Bhattacharyya; Debajyoti Choudhury; Siba Prasad Das; Anindya Datta; Rohini M Godbole; Monoranjan Guchait; Sabine Kraml; Gobinda Majumdar; David Miller; Margarete Mühlleitner; Nobuchika Okada; Maxim Perelstein; Santosh K Rai; Sreerup Raychaudhuri; Saurabh D Rindani; D P Roy; K Sridhar; Rishikesh Vaidya; D Zeppenfeld

    2006-10-01

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is included in this report.

  17. B physics at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  18. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcel Demarteau

    1999-09-02

    A very brief summary of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. The emphasis is placed on inclusive W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production, the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings.

  19. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  20. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  1. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  2. Testing the structure of magnetic paints with and without superimposed shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potanin, A.; Potanin, Andrei A.; Shrauti, Suresh M.; Arnold, David W.; Lane, Alan M.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    The structure development in dispersions of magnetic barium ferrite particles in cyclohexanone with polyvinylchloride wetting resin was tested by oscillatory rheological measurements and orthogonal superposition of steady and oscillatory shear. The optimum dispersion is achieved at the resin

  3. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2010-01-01

    "New physics from the Large Hadron Collider can best be explored with a large lepton collider; realizing one will require mobilizing accelerator and particle physicists, funding agencies, and politicians" (3 pages)

  4. Design and Demonstration of a Test-Rig for Static Performance-Studies of Permanent Magnet Couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, Stig; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Bendixen, Flemming Buus

    2013-01-01

    The design and construction of an easy-to-use test-rig for permanent magnet couplings is presented. Static torque of permanent magnet couplings as a function of angular displacement is measured of permanent magnet couplings through an semi-automated test system. The test-rig is capable of measuring...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  6. Construction and Power Test of the Extraction Kicker Magnet for the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Pai, Chien; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Meng, Wuzheng; Mi, Jian-Lin; Raparia, Deepak; Sandberg, Jon; Todd, Robert J; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Warburton, David S; Wei, Jie; Weiss, Daniel; Yung Lee, Yong; Zhang, Wu

    2005-01-01

    Two extraction kicker magnet assemblies that contain seven individual pulsed magnet modules each will kick the proton beam vertically out of the SNS accumulator ring into the aperture of the extraction lambertson septum magnet. The proton beam then travels to the 1.4 MW SNS target assembly. The 14 kicker magnets and major components of the kicker assembly have been fabricated in BNL. The inner surfaces of the kicker magnets were coated with TiN to reduce the secondary electron yield. All 14 PFN power supplies have been built, tested and delivered to ORNL. Before final installation, a partial assembly of the kicker system with three kicker magnets was assembled to test the functions of each critical component in the system. In this paper we report the progress of the construction of the kicker components, the TiN coating of the magnets, the installation procedure of the magnets and the full power test of the kicker with the PFN power supply.

  7. Testing the intrinsic noise of a coil-magnet actuator for cryogenic gravitational wave interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falferi, Paolo, E-mail: falferi@science.unitn.it [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Sezione di Padova, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2011-07-21

    The third generation gravitational wave interferometers that will operate underground and at cryogenic temperatures will need a complex and sophisticated control system to satisfy the requirements on the alignment and position of its optics and keep the detector at its working point. The force actuators of the control systems of the present interferometers are for the most part coil-magnet actuators. To check the possibility of using these actuators also at low temperature we have tested the magnetization and the magnetization noise of an SmCo magnet at 4.2 K. The magnetization loss, measured with a fluxgate magnetometer, is 7%. The magnetization noise has been measured with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The application of dc and ac (0.1 Hz) magnetic fields of an amplitude comparable to that needed to produce on the magnet a force large enough for the control system does not change the measured noise. The equivalent maximum force noise produced by the actuator as a result of the magnetization noise of the magnet has been evaluated. Its effect on the sensitivity of a third generation interferometer (Einstein Telescope) is negligible with respect to the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

  8. Automatic Test Bench for the Measurement of the Magnetic Interference on LVDTs

    CERN Document Server

    Spiezia, G; Masi, A; Pierno, A; Martino, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a rigorous and repeatable measurement procedure to analyze the effects of magnetic interferences on Linear Variable Differential Transformer sensors. This issue is neither addressed in the sensor datasheet, nor in the scientific literature. The potential of the method and the performance of an automated test bench, that implements the procedure, are proved by measuring the drift of the position reading due to external magnetic interferences on a commercial LVDT. Finally, the repeatability of the test bench is shown.

  9. Design of beam optics for the Future Circular Collider e+e- -collider rings

    CERN Document Server

    Oide, K.; Aumon, S.; Benedikt, M.; Blondel, A.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Boscolo, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Cai, Y.; Doblhammer, A.; Haerer, B.; Holzer, B.; Jowett, J.M.; Koop, I.; Koratzinos, M.; Levichev, E.; Medina, L.; Ohmi, K.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; Sinyatkin, S.; Sullivan, M.; Wenninger, J.; Wienands, U.; Zhou, D.; Zimmermann, F.; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    A beam optics scheme has been designed for the Future Circular Collider-e+e- (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [1] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called "tapering" of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [2] as closely as possible. Su...

  10. P{bar P} collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demarteau, M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1992-04-01

    A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

  11. QCD at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements from the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb collaborations are testing QCD with unprecedented precision and in a new energy regime. Inclusive jet, isolated photon, vector boson and heavy quark production cross section measurements are reported here including a selection of first results at the new frontier collision energy of 13 TeV.

  12. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  13. Error Correction for the JLEIC Ion Collider Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Guohui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, Fulvia C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Nosochkov, Yuri [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, Min-Huey [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity to misalignment, magnet strength error, and BPM noise is investigated in order to specify design tolerances for the ion collider ring of the Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) project. Those errors, including horizontal, vertical, longitudinal displacement, roll error in transverse plane, strength error of main magnets (dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole), BPM noise, and strength jitter of correctors, cause closed orbit distortion, tune change, beta-beat, coupling, chromaticity problem, etc. These problems generally reduce the dynamic aperture at the Interaction Point (IP). According to real commissioning experiences in other machines, closed orbit correction, tune matching, beta-beat correction, decoupling, and chromaticity correction have been done in the study. Finally, we find that the dynamic aperture at the IP is restored. This paper describes that work.

  14. Intense beams at the micron level for the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    High brightness beams with sub-micron dimensions are needed to produce a high luminosity for electron-positron collisions in the Next Linear Collider (NLC). To generate these small beam sizes, a large number of issues dealing with intense beams have to be resolved. Over the past few years many have been successfully addressed but most need experimental verification. Some of these issues are beam dynamics, emittance control, instrumentation, collimation, and beam-beam interactions. Recently, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has proven the viability of linear collider technology and is an excellent test facility for future linear collider studies.

  15. Tune variations in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilina, N. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Giovannozzi, M.; Lamont, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Sammut, N. [University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Steinhagen, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Todesco, E., E-mail: ezio.todesco@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Wenninger, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The horizontal and vertical betatron tunes of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly depend on the strength of the quadrupole magnets, but are also affected by the quadrupole component in the main dipoles. In case of systematic misalignments, the sextupole component from the main dipoles and sextupole corrector magnets also affect the tunes due to the feed down effect. During the first years of operation of the LHC, the tunes have been routinely measured and corrected through either a feedback or a feed forward system. In this paper, the evolution of the tunes during injection, ramp and flat top are reconstructed from the beam measurements and the settings of the tune feedback loop and of the feed forward corrections. This gives the obtained precision of the magnetic model of the machine with respect to quadrupole and sextupole components. Measurements at the injection plateau show an unexpected large decay whose origin is not understood. This data is discussed together with the time constants and the dependence on previous cycles. We present results of dedicated experiments that show that this effect does not originate from the decay of the main dipole component. During the ramp, the tunes drift by about 0.022. It is shown that this is related to the precision of tracking the quadrupole field in the machine and this effect is reduced to about 0.01 tune units during flat top.

  16. Testing Chameleon Theories with Light Propagating through a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P; Davis, A C; Mota, D F; Shaw, D J

    2007-01-01

    It was recently argued that the observed PVLAS anomaly can be explained by chameleon field theories in which large deviations from Newton's law can be avoided. Here we present the predictions for the dichroism and the birefringence induced in the vacuum by a magnetic field in these models. We show that chameleon particles behave very differently from standard axion-like particles (ALPs). We find that, unlike ALPs, the chameleon particles are confined within the experimental set-up. As a consequence, the birefringence is always bigger than the dichroism in PVLAS-type experiments.

  17. A cryogenic test stand for full length SSC magnets with superfluid capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.J.; Mazur, P.O.

    1989-02-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility performs testing of the full scale SSC magnets on test stands capable of simulating the cryogenic environment of the SSC main ring. One of these test stands, Stand 5, also has the ability to operate the magnet under test at temperatures from 1.8K to 4.5K with either supercritical helium or subcooled liquid, providing at least 25 Watts of refrigeration. At least 50 g/s flow is available from 2.3K to 4.5K, whereas superfluid operation occurs with zero flow. Cooldown time from 4.5K to 1.8K is 1.5 hours. A maximum current capability of 10,000 amps is provided, as is instrumentation to monitor and control the cryogenic conditions. This paper describes the cryogenic design of this test stand. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Coupling method of magnetic memory and eddy current nondestructive testing for retired crankshafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Chen; Hua, Lin; Wang, Xiaokai; Wang, Zhou; Qin, Xunpeng; Fang, Zhou [Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To verify the validity of the Coupling method of magnetic memory and eddy current (CMMEC) testing for crankshafts, we use this technique to test a 12-cylinder V-design diesel crankshaft. First, the stress distribution in the crankshaft was obtained under 12 working conditions using a Finite element (FE) model that complied with the commercial FE code ABAQUS. Second, Magnetic memory testing (MMT) and Eddy current testing (ECT) were adopted to detect the regions of stress concentration in the crankshaft and the specific location of cracks based on simulation results. Lastly, magnetic particle testing was conducted to detect and display the corresponding crack to verify the CMMEC testing results. The MMT and ECT results can provide basis and guidance for the remanufacture and life evaluation of retired crankshafts.

  19. Mechanical behavior of the mirror fusion test Facility superconducting magnet coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical response to winding and electromagnetic loads of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) superconducting coil pack is presented. The 375-ton (3300 N) MFTF Yin-Yang magnet, presently the world's largest superconducting magnet, is scheduled for acceptance cold-testing in May of 1981. The assembly is made up of two identical coils which together contain over 15 miles (24 km) of superconductor wound in 58 consecutive layers of 24 turns each. Topics associated with mechanical behavior include physical properties of the coil pack and its components, winding pre-load effects, finite element analysis, magnetic load redistribution, and the design impact of predicted conductor motion.

  20. The effect of cooling water on magnet vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Coosemans, Williame; Schnell, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The quadrupole magnets in the CLIC Test Facility II (CTF2) incorporate a water cooling circuit. In the frame-work of the CLIC stability study, the mechanical vibrations of the magnets were measured for different flows of cool-ing water. We present the results and compare them with simple theoretical estimates. It is shown that the vibra-tion requirements of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) quadrupoles with cooling water can basically be met.

  1. Effect of CSR shielding in the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, J; Apsimon, R; Schulte, D

    2014-01-01

    The Drive Beam complex of the Compact Linear Collider must use short bunches with a large charge making beam transport susceptible to unwanted effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation emitted in the dipole magnets. We present the effects of transporting the beam within a limited aperture which decreases the magnitude of the CSR wake. The effect, known as CSR shielding, eases the design of key components of the facility.

  2. A Moment Equation Approach to a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, C.M.; Sessler, A.M.; Lee, P.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1998-06-01

    Equations are derived which describe the evolution of the second order moments of the beam distribution function in the ionization cooling section of a muon collider. Ionization energy loss, multiple scattering, and magnetic fields have been included, but forces are linearized. A computer code using the equations agrees well with tracking calculations. The code is extremely fast, and can be used for preliminary design, where such issues as beam halo, which must be explored using a tracking code, are not the focus.

  3. Manufacture and test of seismic bellows for ITER magnet feeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chen, E-mail: liuchen@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, ShuShanhu Road No. 350, Hefei (China); Lu, Kun [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, ShuShanhu Road No. 350, Hefei (China); Sheng, Liang [AEROSUN-TOLA Expansion Joint Co., Ltd., Jiangjun Road No. 199, Nanjing (China); Song, Yuntao; Su, Jinjin [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, ShuShanhu Road No. 350, Hefei (China); Su, Man; Gung, Chenyu [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The design of the double bellows was iterated with the results of analysis based on the Expansion Joint Manufacturers Association (EJMA) standard. • The seismic bellows was tested with cyclic pressurization of the interlayer space to 2 bars absolute pressure for 5 cycles. • 200 cycles of tensile fatigue test with 90 mm of stretching from the nominal design length. • A full tensile test with 315 mm of stretching from its nominal length was conducted. • The prototype bellows was qualified for its leak tightness (less than 1 × 10{sup −9} Pam{sup 3}/s of helium) at all time during the qualification test. - Abstract: This paper presents the key manufacturing and testing processes of the prototype ITER feeder seismic bellows. The design of the double bellows was iterated with the results of analysis based on the Expansion Joint Manufacturers Association (EJMA) standard. Each inner and outer bellows was supported in dedicated molds and formed by a hydraulic pressure machine rated at 800 tons. The double bellows were constructed by welding individual collars to the end flanges. The seismic bellows was tested with cyclic pressurization of the interlayer space to 2 bars absolute pressure for 5 cycles. This was followed by 200 cycles of tensile fatigue test with 90 mm of stretching from the nominal design length. After the mechanical fatigue test, a full tensile test with 315 mm of stretching from its nominal length was conducted. Helium leak tests, with the sensitivity of the helium leak detector set to 1 × 10{sup −9} Pa m{sup 3}/s of helium, were performed at different stages of pressure and mechanical tests. The prototype bellows was qualified for its leak tightness at all time during the qualification test.

  4. Magnet tests and status of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance source SERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Cafici, M.; Castro, M.; Chines, F.; Marletta, S. [INFN-Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Alessandria, F. [INFN-LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate (Midway Islands) (Italy); Bourg, F.; Briand, P.; Melin, G.; Lagnier, R.; Seyfert, P. [CEA-Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, Centre detudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gaggero, G.; Losasso, M.; Penco, R. [ANSALDO-GIE, Via N. Lorenzi 8, 16152 Genova (Italy)

    1996-03-01

    At Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud a superconducting 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source will be used as injector for the K-800 superconducting cyclotron. The original project of its magnetic system has been upgraded by taking into account the results of the high B mode operation of the 6.4 GHz SC-ECRIS at MSU-NSCL and now the mirror field may achieve 2.7 T, which is much higher than the confining field of any other ECR source. The magnet design will allow us to operate in a wide range of magnetic configurations making it easy to tune the source. The status of the project will be outlined and the preliminary results of the tests of the superconducting magnets will be described. A brief description of the tests to be carried out on the source during the first period of operation on the test bench in Grenoble follows. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Dynamic aperture computation for the as-built CERN Large Hadron Collider and impact of main dipoles sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.

    2012-04-01

    During the design phase of the CERN Large Hadron Collider the dynamic aperture, i.e. the amplitude of the domain in phase space where the particle motion is stable, was used as one of the most important figures-of-merit to specify the field quality of the various types of superconducting magnets and to quantify the machine performance. The programme of magnetic measurements performed during the production and acceptance testing of the magnets generated a large amount of information, which was used to obtain a best estimate of the dynamic aperture of the actual machine. In this paper the results of massive numerical simulations based on the measured field quality of several optical configurations and beam energies, are presented and discussed. The effect of the sorting of the main dipoles on the final value of the dynamic aperture has also been studied and the results are reviewed in detail.

  6. Dynamic aperture computation for the AS-built CERN Large Hadron Collider and impact of main dipoles sorting

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2012-01-01

    During the design phase of the CERN Large Hadron Collider the dynamic aperture, i.e., the amplitude of the domain in phase space where the particle motion is stable, was used as one of the most important figures-of-merit to specify the field quality of the various types of superconducting magnets and to quantify the machine performance. The programme of magnetic measurements performed during the production and acceptance testing of the magnets generated a large amount of information, which was used to obtain a best estimate of the dynamic aperture of the actual machine. In this paper the results of massive numerical simulations based on the measured field quality of several optical configurations and beam energies, are presented and discussed. The effect of the sorting of the main dipoles on the final value of the dynamic aperture has also been studied and the results are reviewed in detail.

  7. Mechanical property tests on structural materials for ITER magnet system at low temperatures in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    High field superconducting magnets need strong non-superconducting components for structural reinforcement. For instance, the ITER magnet system (MS) consists of cable-in-conduit conductor, coil case, magnet support, and insulating materials. Investigation of mechanical properties at magnet operation temperature with specimens machined at the final manufacturing stages of the conductor jacket materials, magnet support material, and insulating materials, even the component of the full-size conductor jacket is necessary to establish sound databases for the products. In China, almost all mechanical property tests of structural materials for the ITER MS, including conductor jacket materials of TF coils, PF coils, CCs, case material of CCs, conductor jacket materials of Main Busbars (MB) and Corrector Busbars (CB), material of magnet supports, and insulating materials of CCs have been carried out at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (TIPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). In this paper, the mechanical property test facilities are briefly demonstrated and the mechanical tests on the structural materials for the ITER MS, highlighting test rigs as well as test methods, are presented.

  8. The magnet components database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggett, M.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Leedy, R.; Saltmarsh, C.; Tompkins, J.C. (Superconducting Supercollider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The philosophy, structure, and usage MagCom, the SSC magnet components database, are described. The database has been implemented in Sybase (a powerful relational database management system) on a UNIX-based workstation at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL); magnet project collaborators can access the database via network connections. The database was designed to contain the specifications and measured values of important properties for major materials, plus configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet) and the test results on completed magnets. These data will facilitate the tracking and control of the production process as well as the correlation of magnet performance with the properties of its constituents. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  9. High Energy Booster Options for a Future Circular Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Stoel, Linda; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Burkart, Florian; Goddard, Brennan; Herr, Werner; Kramer, Thomas; Milanese, Attilio; Rumolo, Giovanni; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In case a Future Circular Collider for hadrons (FCC-hh) is constructed at CERN, the tunnels for SPS, LHC and the 100 km collider will be available to house a High Energy Booster (HEB). The different machine options cover a large technology range from an iron-dominated machine in the 100 km tunnel to a superconducting machine in the SPS tunnel. Using a modified LHC as reference, these options are compared with respect to their energy reach, magnet technology and filling time of the collider. Potential issues with beam transfer, reliability and beam stability are presented.

  10. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  11. 120-mm superconducting quadrupole for interaction regions of hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zlobin, A V; Mokhov, N V; Novitski, I

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic and mechanical designs of a Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet with 120-mm aperture suitable for interaction regions of hadron colliders are presented. The magnet is based on a two-layer shell-type coil and a cold iron yoke. Special spacers made of a low-Z material are implemented in the coil mid-planes to reduce the level of radiation heat deposition and radiation dose in the coil. The quadrupole mechanical structure is based on aluminum collars supported by an iron yoke and a stainless steel skin. Magnet parameters including maximum field gradient and field harmonics, Nb3Sn coil pre-stress and protection at the operating temperatures of 4.5 and 1.9 K are reported. The level and distribution of radiation heat deposition in the coil and other magnet components are discussed.

  12. New Photocathode materials for electron-ion-colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaszew, Rosa A. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-25

    Our aim has been to explore new photocathode materials and schemes to develop strategies and technologies for next generation nuclear physics accelerator capabilities, particularly for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC). Thus, we investigated thin film deposition and ensuing properties for several adequate magnetic materials applicable to spin-polarized photocathodes. We also implemented a full experimental setup for light incidence at an acute angle onto the photocathode surface in order to excite surface Plasmon resonance hence increasing light absorption by a metallic surface. We successfully tested the setup with a thermionic cathode as well as Plasmonic silver-MgO samples and obtained very encouraging results. Our first results are very encouraging since the photocurrent measured on this preliminary plasmonic Ag-MgO sample under low power (~ 1mW) cw red light from a HeNe laser was 256 pA, thus two orders magnitude larger than that reported by others following also plasmonic approaches. We extended our studies to shorter wavelengths and we also started preliminary work on chemically ordered MnAl thin films –a component of the tertiary Ag-Mn-Al (silmanal) alloy in order to develop spin-polarized photocathodes capable of sustaining surface Plasmon resonance. It is worthwhile mentioning that a graduate student has been directly involved during this project ensuring the training of next generation of scientists in this area of research.

  13. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  14. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  15. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  16. Status and Challenges of the Future Circular Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude above the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) fitting the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed, concepts for experiments be worked out, and complete accelerator designs be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. Beside superconductor improvements and high-field magnet prototyping, the FCC R&D program includes the advancement of SRF cavities based on thin film coating, the development of ...

  17. Thermal stability at 1.9 K and 4.3 K of Nb3Sn cables for quadrupole magnets for the LHC upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapper, de W.M.; Dhalle, M.M.J.; Bordini, B.; Ballarino, A.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the planned luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider, new quadrupole and dipole magnets are being designed and tested. Cabled conductors have been tested in the FRESCA test station to aid this effort. Part of this work is to characterize the thermal stability of the Nb3Sn cond

  18. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  19. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  20. Optimal Controller Tested for a Magnetically Suspended Five-Axis Dynamic Spin Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin B.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch has developed a fully suspended magnetic bearing system for their Dynamic Spin Rig, which performs vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under spinning conditions in a vacuum. Two heteropolar radial magnetic bearings and a thrust magnetic bearing and the associated control system were integrated into the Dynamic Spin Rig to provide magnetic excitation as well as noncontact magnetic suspension of the 35-lb vertical rotor with blades to induce turbomachinery blade vibration (ref. 1). The new system can provide longer run times at higher speeds and larger vibration amplitudes for rotating blades. Also, it was proven that bearing mechanical life was substantially extended and flexibility was increased in the excitation orientation (direction and phasing).

  1. Design, Construction and Test Arrangement of a Fast-Cycling HTS Accelerator Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarz, H; Hays, Steven; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Design, fabrication and assembly of a novel fast-cycling accelerator magnet is presented. A short-sample magnet is powered with a single-turn HTS cable capable to carry 80 kA current at 20 K and generate 1.75 T field in a 40 mm magnet gap. The applied conventional leads and the power supply, however, allow only for a sin-wave 24 kA, 20 Hz current limiting test magnet to a B-field of 0.5 T and to a maximum cycling rate of 20 T/s. The critical aspects of the cable construction and the splicing connection to the power leads are described. Tentative power losses of the proposed HTS accelerator magnet in a possible application for proton and muon accelerators are presented.

  2. Extra dimensions at particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvergsnes, Erik Wolden

    2004-08-01

    This thesis consists of an introduction where we consider different aspects of theories involving extra dimensions, together with four research publications (Papers I-IV) attached at the end. The introductional chapters should serve as background material for better understanding the models on which the articles are based. In Chap. 4 we also present some plots not included in the papers. The topic of Papers I-III is graviton induced Bremsstrahlung. In Paper I we consider the contribution to this process from graviton exchange through gluon-gluon fusion at the LHC, compared to the QED background. Only final-state radiation is considered in Paper I, whereas in Paper II we extend this work to include also the quark-antiquark annihilation with graviton exchange, as well as initial-state radiation for both graviton and Standard Model exchange. Paper III is a study of graviton-induced Bremsstrahlung at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, including both initial- and final-state radiation. Paper IV is devoted to a study of the center-edge asymmetry at hadron colliders, an asymmetry which previously had been studied for e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. The center-edge asymmetry can be used as a method of distinguishing between spin-1 and spin-2 exchange, something which will be of major importance if a signal is observed.

  3. Disambiguating Seesaw Models using Invariant Mass Variables at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Mohapatra, Rabindra N

    2015-01-01

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we dis...

  4. When Rubble Piles Collide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D. C.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Quinn, T.

    1999-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that many km-sized bodies in the Solar System may be rubble piles, gravitationally bound collections of solid material (Richardson, Bottke, & Love 1998, Icarus 134, 47). If true, then collisions may occur in free space between rubble piles. Here we present results from a project to map the parameter space of collisions between km-sized spherical rubble piles. The results will assist in parameterization of collision outcomes for Solar System formation models and may give insight into catastrophic disruption scaling laws. We use a direct numerical method (Richardson, Quinn, Stadel, & Lake 1999, Icarus, in press) to evolve the positions and velocities of the rubble pile particles under the constraints of gravity and physical collisions. We test the dependence of the collision outcomes on impact speed and angle, spin, mass ratio, and dissipation parameter. Speeds are kept low so that the maximum strain on the component material does not exceed the crushing strength, appropriate for dynamically cool systems such as the primordial disk during early planet formation. We compare our results with analytic estimates, laboratory experiments, hydrocode simulations, and stellar system collision models. We find that net accretion dominates the outcomes in head-on, slow encounters while net erosion dominates for off-axis, fast encounters. The dependence on impact angle is almost equally as important as the dependence on impact speed. Off-axis encounters can result in fast-spinning elongated remnants or contact binaries while fast encounters result in smaller fragments overall. Reaccumulation of debris escaping from the remnant can occur, leading to the formation of smaller rubble piles. Less than 2% of the system mass ends up in orbit around the remnant. Initial spin can reduce or enhance collision outcomes, depending on the relative orientation of the spin and orbital angular momenta. We derive a relationship between impact speed and angle for

  5. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  6. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Ferrando, Belen Salvachua; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  7. Development of eddy current testing system using magnetic saturation in ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Je Joong; Ahn, Hyung Keun; Shin, Yong Hoon [Sae An Engineering Corperation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Dong Man [Kunjang College, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-15

    Ferromagnetic materials have difficulties of eddy current test using traditional eddy current equipment due to their electric character of high permeability and anomalous magnetic flux. Development of on-line eddy current test equipment for ferromagnetic materials is a goal of this research. as the first step for it, in this paper, a prove for ferromagnetic materials was developed and practical test was performed with it at a manufactory. For magnetic saturation of inside of ferromagnetic material, DC power supply was used. As increasement of applied voltage, signals of defects were distinguished.

  8. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Fang, Hui; Li, Long; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xiaoming; Kang, Yihua; Sun, Yanhua; Tang, Chaoqing

    2017-01-01

    To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage) inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety. PMID:28117721

  9. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety.

  10. Labview based testing system for the aim of construction of energy efficient magnetic cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pluta Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents an example of an application for testing the system based on Labview platform for quality checking of large magnetic cores in the order of 1000 kg. Example of testing data for one and three phase core are presented.

  11. CERN to start Large Hadron Collider november 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to provide its first collisions in November 2007, CERN has announced. A two-month run at 0.9 TeV is planned for 2007 to test the accelerating and detecting equipment, and a full power run at 14 TeV is expected in the spring of 2008."

  12. Calibration beams at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autin, A.; Edwards, H. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA)); Bensinger, J.R. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA) Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA)); Baller, B.; Browning, F.; Coleman, R.; Cooper, J.; Cossairt, D.; Kula, L.; Malensek, A.; Stefanski, R.; Stutte, L. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1989-04-30

    This paper discusses the following topics on the Superconducting Super Collider: beam specification at calibration halls; high energy booster options with tunnels to surface; switchyard; six beams with high and low power options; switchyard optics for both high and low energy transport; secondary beams; wide band beams; radiation shielding; tagging system; and test and calibration halls.

  13. Testing the axial dipole hypothesis for the Moon by modeling the direction of crustal magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. S.; Wieczorek, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Orbital magnetic field data show that portions of the Moon's crust are strongly magnetized, and paleomagnetic data of lunar samples suggest that Earth strength magnetic fields could have existed during the first several hundred million years of lunar history. The origin of the fields that magnetized the crust are not understood and could be the result of either a long-lived core-generated dynamo or transient fields associated with large impact events. Core dynamo models usually predict that the field would be predominantly dipolar, with the dipole axis aligned with the rotation axis. We test this hypothesis by modeling the direction of crustal magnetization using a global magnetic field model of the Moon derived from Lunar Prospector and Kaguya magnetometer data. We make use of a model that assumes that the crust is unidirectionally magnetized. The intensity of magnetization can vary with the crust, and the best fitting direction of magnetization is obtained from a nonnegative least squares inversion. From the best fitting magnetization direction we obtain the corresponding north magnetic pole predicted by an internal dipolar field. Some of the obtained paleopoles are associated with the current geographic poles, while other well-constrained anomalies have paleopoles at equatorial latitudes, preferentially at 90° east and west longitudes. One plausible hypothesis for this distribution of paleopoles is that the Moon possessed a long-lived dipolar field but that the dipole was not aligned with the rotation axis as a result of large-scale heat flow heterogeneities at the core-mantle boundary.

  14. Photometric magnetic-activity metrics tested with the Sun: application to Kepler M dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Savita

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Kepler mission has been providing high-quality photometric data leading to many breakthroughs in the exoplanet search and in stellar physics. Stellar magnetic activity results from the interaction between rotation, convection, and magnetic field. Constraining these processes is important if we want to better understand stellar magnetic activity. Using the Sun, we want to test a magnetic activity index based on the analysis of the photometric response and then apply it to a sample of M dwarfs observed by Kepler. We estimate a global stellar magnetic activity index by measuring the standard deviation of the whole time series, Sph. Because stellar variability can be related to convection, pulsations or magnetism, we need to ensure that this index mostly takes into account magnetic effects. We define another stellar magnetic activity index as the average of the standard deviation of shorter subseries which lengths are determined by the rotation period of the star. This way we can ensure that the measured photometric variability is related to starspots crossing the visible stellar disc. This new index combined with a time-frequency analysis based on the Morlet wavelets allows us to determine the existence of magnetic activity cycles. We measure magnetic indexes for the Sun and for 34 M dwarfs observed by Kepler. As expected, we obtain that the sample of M dwarfs studied in this work is much more active than the Sun. Moreover, we find a small correlation between the rotation period and the magnetic index. Finally, by combining a time-frequency analysis with phase diagrams, we discover the presence of long-lived features suggesting the existence of active longitudes on the surface of these stars.

  15. Interpolation of the magnetic field at the test masses in eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I.; Díaz-Aguiló, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; García-Berro, E.; Lobo, A.

    2015-08-01

    A feasible design for a magnetic diagnostics subsystem for eLISA will be based on that of its precursor mission, LISA Pathfinder. Previous experience indicates that magnetic field estimation at the positions of the test masses has certain complications. This is due to two reasons. The first is that magnetometers usually back-act due to their measurement principles (i.e., they also create their own magnetic fields), while the second is that the sensors selected for LISA Pathfinder have a large size, which conflicts with space resolution and with the possibility of having a sufficient number of them to properly map the magnetic field around the test masses. However, high-sensitivity and small-sized sensors that significantly mitigate the two aforementioned limitations exist, and have been proposed to overcome these problems. Thus, these sensors will be likely selected for the magnetic diagnostics subsystem of eLISA. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the new magnetic subsystem, as it is currently conceived, and assess the feasibility of selecting these sensors in the final configuration of the magnetic diagnostic subsystem.

  16. Heat load tests of superconducting magnets vibrated electromagnetically for the Maglev train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, J.; Nakao, H.; Yamashita, T.; Sanada, Y.; Shudou, M.; Kawai, M.; Fujita, M.; Terai, M.; Miura, A.

    Superconducting magnets on Maglev trains vibrate due to harmonic ripples of electromagnetic flux generated by ground coils. Heat load caused by vibration in the magnet amounted to several tens of watts in the electromagnetic vibration test. This was mainly because a.c. loss was induced in the helium vessel housing the superconducting coil, due to relative vibration between the aluminium thermal shield and the coil. The heat load caused by vibration should be strictly restricted to less than 4W due to limited cryogenic refrigeration capacity. The heat load was tested using electromagnetic flux ripples for a superconducting magnet model of one coil which corresponds to 1/4 of an actual magnet. The flux ripples simulated the 6th harmonic of the actual ground levitation coil. Some ideas to reduce the heat load were tried for the magnet model, such as applying high resistance thermal radiation shielding, increasing rigidity of the vacuum vessel, and using high purity copper plating on the helium vessel. These ideas proved effective, and the maximum heat load due to vibration was held to less than 4 W per magnet for the one coil magnet model.

  17. Design of Magnetic Shielding and Field Coils for a TES X-Ray Microcalorimeter Test Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniussi, Antoine R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Doriese, William B.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The performance of Transition-Edge Sensors (TES) and their SQUID multiplexed read-outs are very sensitive to the ambient magnetic field from Earth and fluctuations that can arise due to fluctuating magnetic fields outside of the focal plane assembly from the Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR).Thus, the experimental platform we are building to test the FPA of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) of the Athena mission needs to include a series of shields and a coil in order to meet the following requirement of magnetic field density and uniformity.

  18. Alignment Challenges for a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, H; Stern, G

    2013-01-01

    The preservation of ultra-low emittances in the main linac and Beam Delivery System area is one of the main challenges for linear colliders. This requires alignment tolerances never achieved before at that scale, down to the micrometre level. As a matter of fact, in the LHC, the goal for the smoothing of the components was to obtain a 1σ deviation with respect to a smooth curve of 0.15 mm over a 150 m long sliding window, while for the CLIC project for example, it corresponds to 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m in the Beam Delivery System area. Two complementary strategies are being studied to fulfil these requirements: the development and validation of long range alignment systems over a few hundreds of metres and short range alignment systems over a few metres. The studies undertaken, with associated tests setups and the latest results will be detailed, as well as their application for the alignment of both CLIC and ILC colliders.

  19. Transverse Diagnostics For High Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Castro Carballo, Maria Elena

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a circular synchrotron accelerator that will explore new Physics at the higher energies ever achieved, aiming to find the Higgs boson. The LHC is being built at CERN and by 2007 it will be ready to produce head-on collisions of protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The employment of superconducting magnets for achieving high energies, the high luminosity required for physics, the limited dynamic aperture and the large energy stored in the beams will make the machine very challenging to operate, especially during the injection process and the energy ramp. Two particular problems will be a high sensitivity to beam losses and a relatively poor field quality requiring the use of many types of magnetic correction elements. This may lead to the inclusion of certain beam measurements in feedback loops, making special demands on the control system. The injection and acceleration of the LHC proton beams without particle losses and emittance blow up will require an accurate co...

  20. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36'000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m3 static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for non-isothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressors. T...

  1. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m/sup 3/ static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for nonisothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressor...

  2. Mitigating the effects of higher order multipole fields in the magnets of the Accelerator Test Facility 2 at KEK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Sha; P. Bambade; WANG Dou; GAO Jie; M. Woodley; M. Masuzawa

    2012-01-01

    The ATF2 project is the final focus system prototype for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects,with the purpose of reaching a 37nm vertical beam size at the interaction point.In the nanometer beam size regime,higher order multipoles in magnets become a crucial point for consideration.The strength and rotation angle of the ATF2 QEA magnets were reconstructed from the IHEP measurements and compared with the KEK ones to be identical.Based on the study of the skew multipoles sensitivity,we report on the analysis of the possible mitigation of the measured multipoles.A suggestion is given which will benefit the ATF2 present commissioning to reach the goal beam size,and also the reduced β optics in future.

  3. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew James [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  4. TESTING OF FRAMED STRUCTURE PARTS OF COMPACT MUON SOLENOID BY NONDESTRUCTIVE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Larchenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension parts of a compact muon solenoid for Large Hadron Collider have been tested in the paper. The paper describes a steady-state and cyclic “tension-compression” load created by superconducting electromagnet with energy of 3 GJ and magnetic induction of 4 tesla. A nondestructive testing method has been applied in the paper.

  5. Scheduling the powering tests

    CERN Document Server

    Barbero-Soto, E; Casas-Lino, M P; Fernandez-Robles, C; Foraz, K; Pojer, M; Saban, R; Schmidt, R; Solfaroli-Camillocci, M; Vergara-Fernandez, A

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now entering in its final phase before receiving beam, and the activities at CERN between 2007 and 2008 have shifted from installation work to the commissioning of the technical systems ("hardware commissioning"). Due to the unprecedented complexity of this machine, all the systems are or will be tested as far as possible before the cool-down starts. Systems are firstly tested individually before being globally tested together. The architecture of LHC, which is partitioned into eight cryogenically and electrically independent sectors, allows the commissioning on a sector by sector basis. When a sector reaches nominal cryogenic conditions, commissioning of the magnet powering system to nominal current for all magnets can be performed. This paper briefly describes the different activities to be performed during the powering tests of the superconducting magnet system and presents the scheduling issues raised by co-activities as well as the management of resources.

  6. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  7. A Magnetic Suspension and Excitation System for Spin Vibration Testing of Turbomachinery Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Mehmed, Oral

    1998-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR) is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under spinning conditions in a vacuum. A heteropolar radial active magnetic bearing was integrated into the DSR to provide non-contact magnetic suspension and mechanical excitation of the rotor to induce turbomachinery blade vibrations. The magnetic bearing replaces one of the two existing conventional radial ball bearings. Prior operation of the DSR used two voice-coil type linear electromagnetic shakers which provided axial excitation of the rotor. The new magnetic suspension and excitation system has provided enhanced testing capabilities. Tests were performed at high rotational speeds for longer duration and higher vibration amplitudes. Some characteristics of the system include magnetic bearing stiffness values up to 60,000 lb./in., closed loop control bandwidth around 500 Hz, and multi-directional radial excitation of the rotor. This paper reports on the implementation and operation of this system and presents some test results using this system.

  8. Simulation of relativistically colliding laser-generated electron flows

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Sarri, Gianluca; Borghesi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The plasma dynamics resulting from the simultaneous impact, of two equal, ultra-intense laser pulses, in two spatially separated spots, onto a dense target is studied via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The simulations show that electrons accelerated to relativistic speeds, cross the target and exit at its rear surface. Most energetic electrons are bound to the rear surface by the ambipolar electric field and expand along it. Their current is closed by a return current in the target, and this current configuration generates strong surface magnetic fields. The two electron sheaths collide at the midplane between the laser impact points. The magnetic repulsion between the counter-streaming electron beams separates them along the surface normal direction, before they can thermalize through other beam instabilities. This magnetic repulsion is also the driving mechanism for the beam-Weibel (filamentation) instability, which is thought to be responsible for magnetic field growth close to the internal shocks of ...

  9. Nearly finished LHC particle smasher breaks at support point to magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Atkins, William

    2007-01-01

    "The proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator is being built at Geneva, Switzerland's CERN - the world's largest particle physics laboratory. However, a support assembly structure for critical magnets failed while being tested on March 27, 2007." (1/2 page)

  10. Nearly finished LHC particle smasher breaks at support point to magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Atkins, William

    2007-01-01

    "The proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator is being built at Geneva, Switzerland's CERN - the world's largest particle physics laboratory. However, a support assembly structure for critical magnets failed while being tested on March 27, 2007." (1/2 page)

  11. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  12. Study on Design of Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Instrument for gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang,Changlong; Jin,Yingwei; Xu,Zhangsui; Fu,Junmei

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the magnetic Dipole model of magnetic flux leakage (MFL) based on the principle of MFL testing, proposes the effects of surface defect width and depth on MFL field, and presents the peak-peak amplitude algorithm that the features of defect signal are extracted. The peak-peak amplitude and separation, signal gradient variation are used as the distinguish criterions of defects. The principle of instrumental hardware design is also introduced. The introduced gun MFL testing instrument is successfully employed in the nondestructive evaluation of gun.

  13. Regeneration tests of a room temperature magnetic refrigerator and heat pump

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, G V

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic heat pump apparatus consisting of a solid magnetic refrigerant, gadolinium, and a liquid regenerator column of ethanol and water has been tested. Utilizing a 7T field, it produced a maximum temperature span of 80 K, and in separate tests, a lowest temperature of 241 K and a highest temperature of 328 K. Thermocouples, placed at intervals along the regenerator tube, permitted measurement of the temperature distribution in the regenerator fluid. No attempt was made to extract refrigeration from the device, but analysis of the temperature distributions shows that 34 watts of refrigeration was produced.

  14. Interpolation of the magnetic field at the test masses in eLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Ramos-Castro, J; García-Berro, E; Lobo, A

    2016-01-01

    A feasible design for a magnetic diagnostics subsystem for eLISA will be based on that of its precursor mission, LISA Pathfinder. Previous experience indicates that magnetic field estimation at the positions of the test masses has certain complications. This is due to two reasons. The first one is that magnetometers usually back-act due to their measurement principles (i.e., they also create their own magnetic fields), while the second is that the sensors selected for LISA Pathfinder have a large size, which conflicts with space resolution and with the possibility of having a sufficient number of them to properly map the magnetic field around the test masses. However, high-sensitivity and small-size sensors that significantly mitigate the two aforementioned limitations exist, and have been proposed to overcome these problems. Thus, these sensors will be likely selected for the magnetic diagnostics subsystem of eLISA. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the new magnetic subsystem, as it is currently con...

  15. Scaling behavior of circular colliders dominated by synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard

    2015-08-01

    RF cavities that restore the lost energy. To the contrary, until now, the large proton to electron mass ratio has caused synchrotron radiation to be negligible in proton accelerators. The LHC beam energy has still been low enough that synchrotron radiation has little effect on beam dynamics; but the thermodynamic penalty in cooling the superconducting magnets has still made it essential for the radiated power not to be dissipated at liquid helium temperatures. Achieving this has been a significant challenge. For the next generation p, p collider this will be even more true. Furthermore, the radiation will effect beam distributions on time scales measured in minutes, for example causing the beams to be flattened, wider than they are high. In this regime scaling relations previously valid only for electrons will be applicable also to protons.

  16. New facility for testing LHC HTS power leads

    CERN Document Server

    Rabehl, Roger Jon; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D; Pischalnikov, Y; Sylvester, C D; Tartaglia, M

    2005-01-01

    A new facility for testing HTS power leads at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been designed and operated. The facility has successfully tested 19 pairs of HTS power leads, which are to be integrated into the Large Hadron Collider Interaction Region cryogenic feed boxes. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. HTS power lead test results from the commissioning phase of the project are also presented.

  17. Post Mortem System - Playback of the RHIC Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Laster, J S; D'Ottavio, T; Marusic, A; Skelly, J F

    2001-01-01

    A Post Mortem System was developed for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory to provide a playback of the collider state at the time of a beam abort, quench, or other failure event. Post Mortem data is used to provide diagnostics about the failure and to improve future stores. This data is read from hardware buffers and is written directly to the main file system by Accelerator Device Objects in the front-end computers. The Post Mortem System has facilitated analysis of loss monitor and power supply data, such as beam loss during magnet quenches, dump kicker misfires and power supply malfunctions. System details and recent operating experience will be discussed.

  18. Non-collider searches for stable massive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, S. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Fairbairn, M. [Department of Physics, King’s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Mermod, P., E-mail: philippe.mermod@cern.ch [Particle Physics Department, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Milstead, D., E-mail: milstead@physto.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Pinfold, J. [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 0V1 (Canada); Sloan, T. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Taylor, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2015-06-26

    The theoretical motivation for exotic stable massive particles (SMPs) and the results of SMP searches at non-collider facilities are reviewed. SMPs are defined such that they would be sufficiently long-lived so as to still exist in the cosmos either as Big Bang relics or secondary collision products, and sufficiently massive such that they are typically beyond the reach of any conceivable accelerator-based experiment. The discovery of SMPs would address a number of important questions in modern physics, such as the origin and composition of dark matter and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review outlines the scenarios predicting SMPs and the techniques used at non-collider experiments to look for SMPs in cosmic rays and bound in matter. The limits so far obtained on the fluxes and matter densities of SMPs which possess various detection-relevant properties such as electric and magnetic charge are given.

  19. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  20. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Albert De Roeck

    2012-10-01

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including top quarks. The results are based on data samples of up to 5.4 fb-1 for the Tevatron experiments and 1.1 fb−1 for the LHC experiments.

  1. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  2. Development and Coil Fabrication Test of the $Nb_3Sn$ Dipole Magnet FRESCA2

    CERN Document Server

    Manil, P; Clement, S; Devaux, M; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Munoz Garcia, J E; Garcia, L; Gauthier, R; Oberli, L; Perez, J C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E

    2014-01-01

    The key objective of the High Field Magnet work package of the European Project EuCARD is to design and fabricate the Nb3Sn dipole magnet FRESCA2. It has an aperture of 100 mm and a target bore field of 13 T. The design features four 1.5 m long double-layer coils wound with a 21 mm wide cable. The project has now entered its experimental phase in view of the magnet fabrication. We present the experimental test campaign conducted on cable samples in order to understand and to control better the cable behavior and geometry. One full scale double-layer coil using copper cable with the final dimensions and insulation scheme has been wound and heat treated in order to check the fabrication process. This has given useful feedback on the fabrication procedure and on the expected magnet dimensions, as well as on the tooling itself.

  3. Standard Model Background of the Cosmological Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xingang; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The inflationary universe can be viewed as a "Cosmological Collider" with energy of Hubble scale, producing very massive particles and recording their characteristic signals in primordial non-Gaussianities. To utilize this collider to explore any new physics at very high scales, it is a prerequisite to understand the background signals from the particle physics Standard Model. In this paper we describe the Standard Model background of the Cosmological Collider.

  4. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, P.S. Bhupal [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Physik-Department T30d, Technische Univertität München,James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kim, Doojin [Department of Physics, University of Florida,Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Mohapatra, Rabindra N. [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics and Department of Physics,University of Maryland,College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-01-19

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same “smoking-gun” collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at the √s=14 and 100 TeV hadron colliders.

  5. Prospects for Colliders and Collider Physics to the 1 PeV Energy Scale

    CERN Document Server

    King, B J

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing our progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC -- one each of e+e- and hadron colliders and three muon colliders -- and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R&D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory

  6. Performance Assessment of 239 Series Sub-cooling Heat Exchangers for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riddone, G; Roussel, P; Moracchioli, R; Tavian, L

    2006-01-01

    Helium sub-cooling heat exchangers of the counter-flow type are used to minimize the vapor fraction produced in the final expansion of the 1.9 K distributed cooling loops used for cooling the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These components are of compact design, featuring low-pressure drop and handling very low pressure vapor at low temperature. Following a qualification phase of prototypes, a contract has been placed in European industry for the supply of 239 heat exchanger units. Different levels of extracted heat load require three different variants of heat exchangers. This paper will describe the manufacturing phase with emphasis on the main difficulties encountered to keep the production quality after a brief recall of the prototype phase. Finally, the acceptance tests performed at room temperature and at the nominal cryogenic condition at the factory and at CEA-Grenoble will be presented.

  7. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  8. Towards a Small Emittance Design of the JLEIC Electron Collider Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, Fulvia C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The electron collider ring of the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is designed to provide an electron beam with a small beam size at the IP for collisions with an ion beam in order to reach a desired high luminosity. For a chosen beta-star at the IP, electron beam size is determined by the equilibrium emittance that can be obtained through a linear optics design. This paper briefly describes the baseline design of the electron collider ring reusing PEP-II components and considering their parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and reports a few approaches to reducing the equilibrium emittance in the electron collider ring.

  9. High Energy Hadron Colliders - Report of the Snowmass 2013 Frontier Capabilities Hadron Collider Study Group

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, William; Battaglia, Marco; Klute, Markus; Mangano, Michelangelo; Prestemon, Soren; Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been the tools for discovery at the highest mass scales of the energy frontier from the SppS, to the Tevatron and now the LHC. This report reviews future hadron collider projects from the high luminosity LHC upgrade to a 100 TeV hadron collider in a large tunnel, the underlying technology challenges and R&D directions and presents a series of recommendations for the future development of hadron collider research and technology.

  10. Coherent bremsstrahlung at colliding beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F. (Inst. of Mathematics, Novosibirsk (Russia)); Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G. (Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russia)); Polityko, S.I. (Irkutsk State Univ. (Russia))

    1992-07-30

    We consider a new type of radiation at colliders with short bunches - coherent bremsstrahlung (CBS). CBS can be treated as radiation of the first bunch particles caused by the collective electromagnetic field of the short second bunch. A general method for the calculation of this CBS is presented. The number of CBS photons per single collision is dN{sub {gamma}}{approx equal}N{sub 0}dE{sub {gamma}}/E{sub {gamma}} in the energy range E{sub {gamma}}colliders VEPP-4M, BEPC, CESR, TRISTAN the quantity N{sub 0}{approx equal}10{sup 8} and E{sub c}{approx equal}1-100 keV. Unusual properties of CBS and the possibility of using CBS for measuring the beam parameters are discussed. (orig.).

  11. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  12. The thermometry system of superconducting magnets test bench for the Nica accelerator complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Sedykh, G. S.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    Precise temperature control in various parts of the magnet and thermostat is one of the vital problems during cryogenic tests. The report describes design of the thermometry system, developed at LHEP JINR. This system is the operational prototype for the NICA thermometry system. Besides, the report describes generic software tools, developed for the TANGO-based control system web client software design.

  13. Protection of a test magnet wound with a Ag/BSCCO high-temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1992-10-01

    The properties of Ag/BSCCO conductor are studied and used to evaluate the feasibility of detecting normal zones in the conductor before the hot-spot temperature reaches critical levels. The results are applied to the protection of a 5-kJ test magnet.

  14. Test of piezo-ceramic motor technology in ITER relevant high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.monti@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Besi Vetrella, Ugo; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo; Viola, Rosario [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Dubus, Gregory; Damiani, Carlo [Fusion for Energy, c/ Josep Pla, 2 Torres Diagonal Litoral, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    In the framework of a Fusion for Energy (F4E) grant, a test campaign started in 2012 in order to assess the performance of the in-vessel viewing system (IVVS) probe concept and to verify its compatibility when exposed to ITER typical working conditions. ENEA laboratories went through with several tests simulating high magnetic fields, high temperature, high vacuum, gamma radiation and neutron radiation. A customized motor has been adopted to study the performances of ultrasonic piezo motors technology in high magnetic field conditions. This paper reports on the testing activity performed on the motor in a multi Tesla magnetic field. The job was carried out in a test facility of ENEA laboratories able to achieve 14 T. A maximum field of 10 T, fully compliant with ITER requirements (8 T), was applied. A specific mechanical assembly has been designed and manufactured to hold the motor in the region with high homogeneity of the field. Results obtained so far indicate that the motor is compatible with high magnetic fields, and are presented in the paper.

  15. Does assessment of personal exposure matter during experimental neurocognitive testing in MRI-related magnetic fields?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nierop, Lotte E; Christopher-de Vries, Y.; Slottje, Pauline; Kromhout, Hans

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether the use of quantitative personal exposure measurements in experimental research would result in better estimates of the associations between static and time-varying magnetic field exposure and neurocognitive test performance than when exposure categories were based sole

  16. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. Photos 01, 02: Felix Rodriguez Mateos (right) explains some of a cryomagnet's myriad connections to the Minister.

  17. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarz, H; Blowers, J; Shiltsev, V

    2012-01-01

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0 deg. to 10 deg., in steps of 1 deg.. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  18. gamma Peg: testing Vega-like magnetic fields in B stars

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, C; Leroy, B; Mathis, S; Bohlender, D

    2013-01-01

    gam Peg is a bright B pulsator showing both p and g modes of beta Cep and SPB types. It has also been claimed to be a magnetic star by some authors while others do not detect a magnetic field. We aimed at checking for the presence of a field, characterise it if it exists or provide a firm upper limit of its strength if it is not detected. If gam Peg is magnetic, it would make an ideal asteroseismic target to test various theoretical scenarios. If it is very weakly magnetic, it would be the first observation of an extension of Vega-like fields to early B stars. Finally, if it is not magnetic and we can provide a very low upper limit on its non-detected field, it would make an important result for stellar evolution models. We acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric Narval data at TBL. We also gathered existing dimaPol@DAO and Musicos@TBL spectropolarimetric data. We analysed the Narval and Musicos observations using the LSD technique to derive the longitudinal magnetic field and Zeema...

  19. [New technology for linear colliders]. Annual progress report and renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  20. Control System and Operation of the Cryogenic Test Facilities for LHC Series Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Axensalva, J; Lamboy, J P; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Vullierme, B

    2005-01-01

    Prior to their final preparation before installation in the tunnel, the ~1800 series superconducting magnets of the LHC machine will be entirely tested at reception on modular test facilities using dedicated control systems. The test facilities are operated by teams of high-skilled and trained operators. This paper describes the architecture of the control & supervision system of the cryogenic test facilities as well as the tools and management systems developed to help in real time all involved operation teams in order to reach the required industrial production level.

  1. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  2. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...

  3. Crab Waist collision scheme: a novel approach for particle colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobov, M.; DAΦNE Team

    2016-09-01

    A new concept of nonlinear focusing of colliding bunches, called Crab Waist (CW) collision scheme, has been proposed at LNF INFN. It has been successfully tested at the Italian lepton collider DAΦNE in operational conditions providing luminosity for two different experimental detectors, SIDDHARTA and KLOE-2. Considering a high efficiency of the scheme for increasing collision luminosity and its relative simplicity for implementation several new collider projects have been proposed and are under development at present. These are the SuperKEKB B-factory ready to start commissioning in 2016 in Japan, the SuperC-Tau factory proposed in Novosibirsk and entered in the short list of Russian mega-science projects, the new 100-km electron-positron Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) under design study at CERN and some others. In this paper we describe the CW collision scheme, discuss its advantages and report principal results achieved at the electron-positron Φ-factory DAΦNE.

  4. The LHC magnets seen from the air, stored at Point 19 just alongside SM18 the magnet assembly and testing hall

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    The little matchstick-like objects, neatly lined up like colouring pencils in their box, are in fact LHC magnets seen from the air. These particular ones are being stored at Point 19 just alongside SM18, the magnet assembly and testing hall, which can be seen on the right of the picture. On the right in the background, is the Meyrin site.

  5. The Global Future Circular Colliders Effort

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This presentation has been given during the P5 Workshop at BNL Brookhaven (US). It contains - Global Future Circular Collier Studies Overview and Status - Main challenges and R&D areas for hadron collider - Main challenges and R&D areas for lepton collider - Conclusions

  6. Possible limits of plasma linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, F.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma linear colliders have been proposed as next or next-next generation energy-frontier machines for high-energy physics. I investigate possible fundamental limits on energy and luminosity of such type of colliders, considering acceleration, multiple scattering off plasma ions, intrabeam scattering, bremsstrahlung, and betatron radiation. The question of energy efficiency is also addressed.

  7. Multibillion-dolalr collider plans unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    "Particle physicists released an outline design for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) at a meeting in Beijing this morning. The design details the components needed to build the 31 km-long facility and comes with and initial estimate of the collider's cost: a cool $6.5bn for the core project. (1 page)

  8. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  9. Reconnection of Colliding Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, A; Hanany, Amihay; Hashimoto, Koji

    2005-01-01

    For vortex strings in the Abelian Higgs model and D-strings in superstring theory, both of which can be regarded as cosmic strings, we give analytical study of reconnection (recombination, inter-commutation) when they collide, by using effective field theories on the strings. First, for the vortex strings, via a string sigma model, we verify analytically that the reconnection is classically inevitable for small collision velocity and small relative angle. Evolution of the shape of the reconnected strings provides an upper bound on the collision velocity in order for the reconnection to occur. These analytical results are in agreement with previous numerical results. On the other hand, reconnection of the D-strings is not classical but probabilistic. We show that a quantum calculation of the reconnection probability using a D-string action reproduces the nonperturbative nature of the worldsheet results by Jackson, Jones and Polchinski. The difference on the reconnection -- classically inevitable for the vortex...

  10. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  11. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  12. A muon collider as a Higgs factory

    CERN Document Server

    Neuffer, D; Alexahin, Y; Ankenbrandt, C; Delahaye, J P

    2015-01-01

    Because muons connect directly to a standard-model Higgs particle in s-channel production, a muon collider would be an ideal device for precision measurement of the mass and width of a Higgs-like particle, and for further exploration of its production and decay properties. Parameters of a high-precision muon collider are presented and the necessary components and performance are described. An important advantage of the muon collider approach is that the spin precession of the muons will enable energy measurements at extremely high accuracy (dE/E to 10-6 or better). The collider could be a first step toward a high-luminosity multi-TeV lepton collider, and extensions toward a higher-energy higher-luminosity device are also discussed.

  13. Chaotic Dynamics of Test Particle in the Gravitational Field with Magnetic Dipoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ju-Hua; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the test particle in the gravitational field with magnetic dipoles in thispaper. At first we study the gravitational potential by numerical simulations. We find, for appropriate parameters, thatthere are two different cases in the potential curve, one of which is the one-well case with a stable critical point, and theother is the three-well case with three stable critical points and two unstable ones. As a consequence, the chaotic motionwill rise. By performing the evolution of the orbits of the test particle in the phase space, we find that the orbits of thetest particle randomly oscillate without any periods, even sensitively depending on the initial conditions and parameters.chaotic motion of the test particle in the field with magnetic dipoles becomes even obvious as the value of the magneticdipoles increases.

  14. Develop and test an Internally Cooled, Cabled Superconductor (ICCS) for large scale MHD magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, P. G.; Hale, J. R.; Dawson, A. M.

    1990-04-01

    The work included four principal tasks: (1) development of a design requirements definition for a retrofit MHD magnet system; (2) analysis of an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) to use in that design; (3) design of an experiment to test a subscale version of that conductor, which is a NbTi, copper stabilized superconductor; and (4) proof-of-concept testing of the conductor. The program was carried forth through the third task with very successful development and test of a conventional ICCS conductor with 27 multifilamentary copper-superconductor composite strands and a new concept conductor in which, in each triplet, two strands were pure copper and the third strand was a multifilamentary composite. In reviewing the magnet design and the premises for the conductor design it became obvious that an extra barrier might be highly effective in enhancing magnet stability and protection. This concept was developed and a sample conductor manufactured and tested in comparison with an identical conductor lacking such an additional barrier. Results of these conductor tests confirm the potential value of such a barrier. Since the work of tasks 1 through 3 has been reported in detail in quarterly and semiannual reports, as well as in special reports prepared throughout the course of this project, this report reviews early work briefly and then discusses this last phase in great detail.

  15. Development and testing of a magnetic position sensor system for automotive and avionics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bryan C.; Nelson, Carl V.

    2001-08-01

    A magnetic sensor system has been developed to measure the 3-D location and orientation of a rigid body relative to an array of magnetic dipole transmitters. A generalized solution to the measurement problem has been formulated, allowing the transmitter and receiver parameters (position, orientation, number, etc.) to be optimized for various applications. Additionally, the method of images has been used to mitigate the impact of metallic materials in close proximity to the sensor. The resulting system allows precise tracking of high-speed motion in confined metal environments. The sensor system was recently configured and tested as an abdomen displacement sensor for an automobile crash-test dummy. The test results indicate a positional accuracy of approximately 1 mm rms during 20 m/s motions. The dynamic test results also confirmed earlier covariance model predictions, which were used to optimize the sensor geometry. A covariance analysis was performed to evaluate the applicability of this magnetic position system for tracking a pilot's head motion inside an aircraft cockpit. Realistic design parameters indicate that a robust tracking system, consisting of lightweight pickup coils mounted on a pilot's helmet, and an array of transmitter coils distributed throughout a cockpit, is feasible. Recent test and covariance results are presented.

  16. High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros, S. J. [Mississippi U.; Acosta, J. G. [Mississippi U.; Cremaldi, L. M. [Mississippi U.; Hart, T. L. [Mississippi U.; Summers, D. J. [Mississippi U.

    2016-10-01

    The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the potential need for a collider beyond the LHC. A $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored. Prior engineering studies for 233 and 270 km circumference tunnels were done for Illinois dolomite and Texas chalk signaling manageable tunneling costs. At a $p\\bar{p}$ the cross section for high mass states is of order 10x higher with antiproton collisions, where antiquarks are directly present rather than relying on gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. In our design the increased momentum acceptance (11 $\\pm$ 2.6 GeV/c) in a Fermilab-like antiproton source is used with septa to collect 12x more antiprotons in 12 channels. For stochastic cooling, 12 cooling systems would be used, each with one debuncher/momentum equalizer ring and two accumulator rings. One electron cooling ring would follow. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  17. Low-cost hadron colliders at Fermilab: A discussion paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, G.W.; Malamud, E.

    1996-06-21

    New more economic approaches are required to continue the dramatic exponential rise in collider energies as represented by the well known Livingston plot. The old idea of low cost, low field iron dominated magnets in a small diameter pipe may become feasible in the next decade with dramatic recent advances in technology: (1) advanced tunneling technologies for small diameter, non human accessible tunnels, (2) accurate remote guidance systems for tunnel survey and boring machine steering, (3) high T{sub c} superconductors operating at liquid N{sub 2} or liquid H{sub 2} temperatures, (4) industrial applications of remote manipulation and robotics, (5) digitally multiplexed electronics to minimize cables, (6) achievement of high luminosities in p-p and p-{anti P} colliders. The goal of this paper is to stimulate continuing discussions on approaches to this new collider and to identify critical areas needing calculations, construction of models, proof of principle experiments, and full scale prototypes in order to determine feasibility and arrive at cost estimates.

  18. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion acceleratora)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  19. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitarin, G. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Engineering and Management, University of Padova, Vicenza (Italy); Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  20. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.