WorldWideScience

Sample records for collapse negative world

  1. The heterogeneity of world trade collapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses drivers of imports during the major world trade collapses of the Great Depression (1930s; 34 countries) and the Great Recession (1930s; 173 countries). The analysis deals with the first year of these episodes and develops a small empirical model that shows a

  2. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  3. Upper airway collapsibility evaluated by a negative expiratory pressure test in severe obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Romano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the usefulness of measuring upper airway collapsibility with a negative expiratory pressure application as a screening test for severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. INTRODUCTION: OSA is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and it may have serious consequences. Its recognition may have important implications during the perioperative period. Increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, and its evaluation could be useful for identifying this condition. METHODS: Severe OSA and normal subjects (24 in each group were matched by body mass index and referred to our sleep laboratory. The subjects were enrolled in an overnight sleep study, and a diurnal negative expiratory pressure test was performed. Flow drop (DV and expiratory volume were measured in the first 0.2 s (V02 of the negative expiratory pressure test. RESULTS: DV (% and V02 (% values were statistically different between normal and OSA subjects. OSA patients showed a greater decrease in flow than normal subjects. In addition, severely OSA patients exhaled during the first 0.2 s of the negative expiratory pressure application was an average of only 11.2% of the inspired volume compared to 34.2% for the normal subjects. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristics showed that V02 (% and DV (% could accurately identify severe OSA in subjects with sensitivities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively, and specificities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: V02 (% and DV (% are highly accurate parameters for detecting severe OSA. The pharyngeal collapsibility measurement, which uses negative expiratory pressure during wakefulness, is predictive of collapsibility during sleep.

  4. Why did the world trade center collapse? Science, engineering, and speculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Thomas W.; Musso, Christopher

    2001-12-01

    There have been numerous reports detailing the cause of the World Trade Center Tower collapse on September 11, 2001. Most have provided qualitative explanations; however, simple quantitative analyses show that some common conclusions are incorrect; for example, the steel could not melt in these flames and there was more structural damage than merely softening of the steel at elevated temperatures. Some guidelines for improvements in future structures are presented.

  5. Materials characterization of dusts generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Gregory P.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Lowers, Heather; Bern, Amy M.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Clark, Roger N.; Gent, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    The major inorganic components of the dusts generated from the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001 were concrete materials, gypsum, and man-made vitreous fibers. These components were likely derived from lightweight Portland cement concrete floors, gypsum wallboard, and spray-on fireproofing and ceiling tiles, respectively. All of the 36 samples collected by the USGS team had these materials as the three major inorganic components of the dust. Components found at minor and trace levels include chrysotile asbestos, lead, crystalline silica, and particles of iron and zinc oxides. Other heavy metals, such as lead, bismuth, copper, molybdenum, chromium, and nickel, were present at much lower levels occurring in a variety of chemical forms. Several of these materials have health implications based on their chemical composition, morphology, and bioaccessibility.

  6. When the world collapses: changed worldview and social reconstruction in a traumatized community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka Corkalo Biruski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic experience can affect the individual's basic beliefs about the world as a predictable and safe place. One of the cornerstones in recovery from trauma is reestablishment of safety, connectedness, and the shattered schema of a worldview. Objective: This study explored the role of negatively changed worldview in the relationship between war-related traumatization and readiness for social reconstruction of intergroup relations in a post-conflict community measured by three processes: intergroup rapprochement, rebuilding trust, and need for apology. It was hypothesized that more traumatized people are less supportive of social reconstruction and that this relationship is mediated by the changed worldview. Method: The study included a community random sample of 333 adults in the city of Vukovar, Croatia, that was most devastated during the 1991–1995 war. Six instruments were administered: Stressful Events Scale, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Changed Worldview Scale, and three scales measuring the post-conflict social reconstruction processes: Intergroup Rapprochement, Intergroup Trust and Need for Apology. Results: Mediation analyses showed that the worldview change fully mediated between traumatization and all three aspects of social reconstruction. Conclusions: In a population exposed to war traumatization the worldview change mediates post-conflict social recovery of community relations.

  7. Sustainability, collapse and oscillations in a simple World-Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzbon, Jan; Heitzig, Jobst; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    The Anthropocene is characterized by close interdependencies between the natural Earth system and the global human society, posing novel challenges to model development. Here we present a conceptual model describing the long-term co-evolution of natural and socio-economic subsystems of Earth. While the climate is represented via a global carbon cycle, we use economic concepts to model socio-metabolic flows of biomass and fossil fuels between nature and society. A well-being-dependent parametrization of fertility and mortality governs human population dynamics. Our analysis focuses on assessing possible asymptotic states of the Earth system for a qualitative understanding of its complex dynamics rather than quantitative predictions. Low dimension and simple equations enable a parameter-space analysis allowing us to identify preconditions of several asymptotic states and hence fates of humanity and planet. These include a sustainable co-evolution of nature and society, a global collapse and everlasting oscillations. We consider different scenarios corresponding to different socio-cultural stages of human history. The necessity of accounting for the ‘human factor’ in Earth system models is highlighted by the finding that carbon stocks during the past centuries evolved opposing to what would ‘naturally’ be expected on a planet without humans. The intensity of biomass use and the contribution of ecosystem services to human well-being are found to be crucial determinants of the asymptotic state in a (pre-industrial) biomass-only scenario without capital accumulation. The capitalistic, fossil-based scenario reveals that trajectories with fundamentally different asymptotic states might still be almost indistinguishable during even a centuries-long transient phase. Given current human population levels, our study also supports the claim that besides reducing the global demand for energy, only the extensive use of renewable energies may pave the way into a

  8. Summary of the development of a signature for detection of residual dust from collapse of the World Trade Center buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Heather A; Meeker, Gregory P; Lioy, Paul J; Lippmann, Morton

    2009-03-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers on September 11, 2001, caused lower Manhattan and adjacent areas to be covered in millimeters to centimeters of dust. WTC dust penetrated into indoor spaces, and public health concerns remain regarding exposure to possible residual dust in the affected areas. The goal of the studies outlined in this review was to determine which, if any, components of the bulk WTC dust are sufficiently above typical background dust levels in New York City to develop an analytical method to screen for the component(s). Components of the concrete, man-made vitreous fibers (MMVFs), silica, lead, chrysotile asbestos, and other materials. Slag wool was the most common WTC MMVF, whereas soda-lime glass and rock wool were minor to trace constituents. Most background samples also contained gypsum, phases compatible with concrete, and MMVF. However, the proportions of the various MMVF in background samples are typically unlike those characteristic of bulk WTC dust. Results indicate that slag wool can be used as a signature marker to identify areas that contain potential residual WTC dust contamination at concentrations that are less than average background levels for the material.

  9. Inorganic chemical composition and chemical reactivity of settled dust generated by the World Trade Center building collapse: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Ziegler, Thomas L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Adams, Monique G.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Taggart, Joseph E.; Clark, Roger N.; Wilson, S.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of dust deposited around lower Manhattan by the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have inorganic chemical compositions that result in part from the variable chemical contributions of concrete, gypsum wallboard, glass fibers, window glass, and other materials contained in the buildings. The dust deposits were also modified chemically by variable interactions with rain water or water used in street washing and fire fighting. Chemical leach tests using deionized water as the extraction fluid show the dust samples can be quite alkaline, due primarily to reactions with calcium hydroxide in concrete particles. Calcium and sulfate are the most soluble components in the dust, but many other elements are also readily leached, including metals such as Al, Sb, Mo Cr, Cu, and Zn. Indoor dust samples produce leachates with higher pH, alkalinity, and dissolved solids than outdoor dust samples, suggesting most outdoor dust had reacted with water and atmospheric carbon dioxide prior to sample collection. Leach tests using simulated lung fluids as the extracting fluid suggest that the dust might also be quite reactive in fluids lining the respiratory tract, resulting in dissolution of some particles and possible precipitation of new phases such as phosphates, carbonates, and silicates. Results of these chemical characterization studies can be used by health scientists as they continue to track and interpret health effects resulting from the short-term exposure to the initial dust cloud and the longer-term exposure to dusts resuspended during cleanup.

  10. Characterization of the dust/smoke aerosol that settled east of the World Trade Center (WTC) in lower Manhattan after the collapse of the WTC 11 September 2001.

    OpenAIRE

    Lioy, Paul J.; Weisel, Clifford P.; Millette, James R.; Eisenreich, Steven; Vallero, Daniel; Offenberg, John; Buckley, Brian; Turpin, Barbara; Zhong, Mianhua; Cohen, Mitchell D.; Prophete, Colette; Yang, Ill; Stiles, Robert; Chee, Glen; Johnson, Willie

    2002-01-01

    The explosion and collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) was a catastrophic event that produced an aerosol plume impacting many workers, residents, and commuters during the first few days after 11 September 2001. Three bulk samples of the total settled dust and smoke were collected at weather-protected locations east of the WTC on 16 and 17 September 2001; these samples are representative of the generated material that settled immediately after the explosion and fire and the concurrent coll...

  11. Collapsing Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  12. Zombie projects, negative networks, and multigenerational science: The temporality of the International Map of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, William

    2017-06-01

    The International Map of the World was a hugely ambitious scheme to create standardized maps of the entire world. It was first proposed in 1891 and remained a going concern until 1986. Over the course of the project's official life, nearly every country in the world took part, and map sheets were published showing all but a few areas of the planet. But the project ended quite unceremoniously, repudiated by cartographers and mapping institutions alike, and it is now remembered as a 'sad story' of network failure. How can we evaluate this kind of sprawling, multigenerational project? In order to move beyond practitioners' (and historians') habit of summarizing the entire endeavor using the blunt categories of success and failure, I propose a more temporally aware reading, one that both disaggregates the (persistent) project from the (always changing) network and sees project and network as invertible, with the possibility of zombie projects and negative networks that can remain robust even when disconnected from their original goals. I therefore see the abandonment of the International Map of the World as resulting from vigorous collaboration and new norms in cartography, not from lack of cooperation or other resources. New categories are required for analyzing science over the long durée.

  13. Collapsed City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Nacho Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Currently, when the socio-economic circumstances seem to announce another change of cultural paradigm for the 21st century, the interest in the urban fact seems to have been renewed in architecture. However, this is no longer focused on models of growth and efficiency, as happened in the 70s...... with its imminent breakdown, the architectural interests have shifted to urban environments like Tokyo, Detroit, Lagos or Rio de Janeiro; places that demonstrate, somehow, an urban culture of collapse....

  14. The effect of social support derived from World of Warcraft on negative psychological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longman, Huon; O'Connor, Erin; Obst, Patricia

    2009-10-01

    Previous research examining players of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) suggests that players form meaningful relationships with each other. Other research indicates that people may derive social support from online sources, and this social support has been associated with greater well-being. This study used an online survey of players (N = 206) of the MMOG World of Warcraft (WoW) to examine if social support can be derived from MMOGs and to examine its relationship with negative psychological symptoms. Players of WoW were found to derive social support from playing and a positive relationship was found between game engagement and levels of in-game social support. Higher levels of in-game social support were associated with fewer negative psychological symptoms, although this effect was not maintained after accounting for social support derived from the offline sources. Additionally, a small subsample of players (n = 21) who played for 44 to 82 hours per week (M = 63.33) was identified. These players had significantly lower levels of offline social support and higher levels of negative symptoms compared to the rest of the sample. This study provides evidence that social support can be derived from MMOGs and the associated potential to promote well-being but also highlights the potential harm from spending excessive hours playing.

  15. The Art World's Concept of Negative Space Applied to System Safety Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Ronnie

    2005-12-01

    Tools from several different disciplines can improve system safety management. This paper relates the Art World with our system safety world showing useful art schools of thought applied to system safety management; developing an art theory- system safety bridge. This bridge is then used to demonstrate relations with risk management, the legal system, personnel management and basic management (establishing priorities.) One goal of this presentation/paper is simply to be a fun diversion from the many technical topics presented during the conference.

  16. Collapse of a Bose gas: Kinetic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stability and collapse of the Bose–Einstein condensates with negative scattering lengths have already been observed in the clouds of ultracold 7Li [2] and 85Rb [3] for temperatures (T) close to zero or well below the condensation point (Tc). Soon after the observation, many theories for the collapse have been proposed ...

  17. The Art World's Concept of Negative Space Applied to System Safety Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Tools from several different disciplines can improve system safety management. This paper relates the Art World with our system safety world, showing useful art schools of thought applied to system safety management, developing an art theory-system safety bridge. This bridge is then used to demonstrate relations with risk management, the legal system, personnel management and basic management (establishing priorities). One goal of this presentation/paper is simply to be a fun diversion from the many technical topics presented during the conference.

  18. Geotechnical properties of Egyptian collapsible soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled E. Gaaver

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of constructing structures on collapsible soils presents significant challenges to geotechnical engineers due to sudden reduction in volume upon wetting. Identifying collapsible soils when encountered in the field and taking the needed precautions should substantially reduce the risk of such problems usually reported in buildings and highways. Collapsible soils are those unsaturated soils that can withstand relatively high pressure without showing significant change in volume, however upon wetting; they are susceptible to a large and sudden reduction in volume. Collapsible soils cover significant areas around the world. In Egypt, collapsible soils were observed within the northern portion of the western desert including Borg El-Arab region, and around the city of Cairo in Six-of-October plateau, and Tenth-of-Ramadan city. Settlements associated with development on untreated collapsible soils usually lead to expensive repairs. One method for treating collapsible soils is to densify their structure by compaction. The ongoing study presents the effect of compaction on the geotechnical properties of the collapsible soils. Undisturbed block samples were recovered from test pits at four sites in Borg El-Arab district, located at about 20 km west of the city of Alexandria, Egypt. The samples were tested in both unsoaked and soaked conditions. Influence of water inundation on the geotechnical properties of collapsible soils was demonstrated. A comparative study between natural undisturbed and compacted samples of collapsible soils was performed. An attempt was made to relate the collapse potential to the initial moisture content. An empirical correlation between California Bearing Ratio of the compacted collapsible soils and liquid limit was adopted. The presented simple relationships should enable the geotechnical engineers to estimate the complex parameters of collapsible soils using simple laboratory tests with a reasonable accuracy.

  19. The Nimitz Freeway Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most tragic sights created by the Loma Prieta earthquake of Oct. 17, 1989, was the collapse of the double-deck Nimitz Freeway (the Cypress Street Viaduct on Interstate 880) just south and east of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in Oakland. Along a 1.4-km north-south stretch, the upper deck of the freeway fell on top of the lower deck of the freeway, killing 42 motorists (see Fig. 1). Even though the earthquake occurred during rush hour (5:04 p.m.), traffic was extremely light that day because the third game of the World Series between the Oakland Athletics and the San Francisco Giants was about to begin and many commuters were already at home in front of their television sets.

  20. A path model investigation of neurocognition, theory of mind, social competence, negative symptoms and real-world functioning in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Shannon M; Granholm, Eric L; Fish, Scott C

    2011-02-01

    Problems in real-world functioning are pervasive in schizophrenia and much recent effort has been devoted to uncovering factors which contribute to poor functioning. The goal of this study was to examine the role of four such factors: social cognition (theory of mind), neurocognition, negative symptoms, and functional capacity (social competence). 178 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder completed measures of theory of mind, neurocognition, negative symptoms, social competence, and self-reported functioning. Path models sought to determine the relationships among these variables. Theory of mind as indexed by the Hinting Task partially mediated the relationship between neurocognition and social competence, and negative symptoms and social competence demonstrated significant direct paths with self-reported functioning. Study results suggest theory of mind serves as an important mediator in addition to previously investigated social cognitive domains of emotional and social perception. The current study also highlights the need to determine variables which mediate the relationship between functional capacity and real-world functioning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Positive and Negative Impacts of Non-Native Bee Species around the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Russo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Though they are relatively understudied, non-native bees are ubiquitous and have enormous potential economic and environmental impacts. These impacts may be positive or negative, and are often unquantified. In this manuscript, I review literature on the known distribution and environmental and economic impacts of 80 species of introduced bees. The potential negative impacts of non-native bees include competition with native bees for nesting sites or floral resources, pollination of invasive weeds, co-invasion with pathogens and parasites, genetic introgression, damage to buildings, affecting the pollination of native plant species, and changing the structure of native pollination networks. The potential positive impacts of non-native bees include agricultural pollination, availability for scientific research, rescue of native species, and resilience to human-mediated disturbance and climate change. Most non-native bee species are accidentally introduced and nest in stems, twigs, and cavities in wood. In terms of number of species, the best represented families are Megachilidae and Apidae, and the best represented genus is Megachile. The best studied genera are Apis and Bombus, and most of the species in these genera were deliberately introduced for agricultural pollination. Thus, we know little about the majority of non-native bees, accidentally introduced or spreading beyond their native ranges.

  2. Collapsing dynamics of attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The self-similar collapse of 3D and quasi-2D atom condensates with negative scattering length is examined. 3D condensates are shown to blow up following the scenario of weak collapse, for which 3-body recombination weakly dissipates the atoms. In contrast, 2D condensates undergo a strong collapse...

  3. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  4. The Negative Association between Religiousness and Children's Altruism across the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decety, Jean; Cowell, Jason M; Lee, Kang; Mahasneh, Randa; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Selcuk, Bilge; Zhou, Xinyue

    2015-11-16

    Prosocial behaviors are ubiquitous across societies. They emerge early in ontogeny and are shaped by interactions between genes and culture. Over the course of middle childhood, sharing approaches equality in distribution. Since 5.8 billion humans, representing 84% of the worldwide population, identify as religious, religion is arguably one prevalent facet of culture that influences the development and expression of prosociality. While it is generally accepted that religion contours people's moral judgments and prosocial behavior, the relation between religiosity and morality is a contentious one. Here, we assessed altruism and third-party evaluation of scenarios depicting interpersonal harm in 1,170 children aged between 5 and 12 years in six countries (Canada, China, Jordan, Turkey, USA, and South Africa), the religiousness of their household, and parent-reported child empathy and sensitivity to justice. Across all countries, parents in religious households reported that their children expressed more empathy and sensitivity for justice in everyday life than non-religious parents. However, religiousness was inversely predictive of children's altruism and positively correlated with their punitive tendencies. Together these results reveal the similarity across countries in how religion negatively influences children's altruism, challenging the view that religiosity facilitates prosocial behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-de Sitter gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Husain, V; Preston, B; Birukou, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe a formalism for studying spherically symmetric collapse of the massless scalar field in any spacetime dimension, and for any value of the cosmological constant LAMBDA. The formalism is used for numerical simulations of gravitational collapse in four spacetime dimensions with negative LAMBDA. We observe critical behaviour at the onset of black-hole formation, and find that the critical exponent is independent of LAMBDA. (letter to the editor)

  6. Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Some possible benefits of dynamical collapse for a quantum theory of cosmogenesis are discussed. These are a possible long wait before creation begins, creation of energy and space, and choice of a particular universe out of a superposition.

  7. Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Pearle, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Some possible benefits of dynamical collapse for a quantum theory of cosmogenesis are discussed. These are a possible long wait before creation begins, creation of energy and space, and choice of a particular universe out of a superposition.

  8. Collapse of axion stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States); Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L.C.R. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  9. Chronogenesis, Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-01-01

    A simple quantum model describing the onset of time is presented. This is combined with a simple quantum model of the onset of space. A major purpose is to explore the interpretational issues which arise. The state vector is a superposition of states representing "instants." The sample space and probability measure are discussed. Critical to the dynamics is state vector collapse: it is argued that a tenable interpretation is not possible without it. Collapse provides a mechanism whereby the u...

  10. Gravitational collapse with decaying vacuum energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    β, showing that both naked singularities as well as black holes can form. The case α = 0.125, β = 0 yields a quadratic equation which corresponds to Vaidya collapse [8]. In general, for each value of α in the cubic, there corresponds a range of values of β which yield both positive and negative roots. For example, for α = 0.1, if.

  11. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  12. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-02

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  13. Chronogenesis, Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearle, Philip

    2013-06-01

    A simple quantum model describing the onset of time is presented. This is combined with a simple quantum model of the onset of space. A major purpose is to explore the interpretational issues which arise. The state vector is a superposition of states representing different "instants." The sample space and probability measure are discussed. Critical to the dynamics is state vector collapse: it is argued that a tenable interpretation is not possible without it. Collapse provides a mechanism whereby the universe size, like a clock, is narrowly correlated with the quantized time eigenvalues.

  14. COLLAPSED BUILDINGS IN NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    2016-05-23

    May 23, 2016 ... STRUCTURAL. FAILURES. Ajayi (1988) has attributed building failures and collapse in Nigeria to poor design of structure and foundation detailing. ... contributors to structural failures in buildings. ... A. E. Archibong, Department of Architecture, Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria.

  15. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  16. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  17. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  18. Collapse settlement in compacted soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Booth, AR

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Research into collapse settlement in compacted soils is described, with special reference to recent cases in Southern Africa where collapse settlement occurred in road embankments following wetting of the soil. The laboratory work described...

  19. Collapse of an antibubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)(1/2), according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film.

  20. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  1. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2011-1.

  2. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  4. Avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after negative provocation tests in urticaria/angioedema reactions: Real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommarito, Luisa; Zisa, Giuliana; Riccobono, Francesca; Villa, Elisa; D'Antonio, Cristian; Calamari, Ambra M; Poppa, Mariangela; Moschella, Adele; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are the gold standard in diagnosing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity; however, only few data about follow-up of patients with negative DPTs are actually available. The aim of this study was to assess patients' behavior in taking NSAIDs again and to evaluate NSAID tolerability after negative allergological workup. This is a follow-up study involving patients evaluated for history of cutaneous reactions (urticaria and or angioedema) after NSAID intake and with negative DPTs with the suspected NSAID. Patients were asked during a phone interview about the intake of NSAIDs, tolerance, or reasons of avoidance. The negative predictive value (NPV) of NSAIDs DPTs was calculated. One hundred eleven of 142 patients were successfully contacted; 46/111 (41.44%) took the same NSAID previously tested with two adverse reactions reported (4.34%). Fifty-three of 111 (47.74%) patients did not take the same NSAID, but 34 of them took at least another strong cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 inhibitor, with 1 adverse reaction (2.94%) and 19 of them took only weak COX-1 inhibitors. Twelve of 111 patients (10.8%) did not take any NSAID. Reasons for drug avoidance were mainly fear of reactions (70.8%) and no need (29.2%). NPV, overall, was 96.97% (95% confidence interval, 91-99%). Although NSAID hypersensitivity diagnosis was ruled out by oral provocation test, the majority of patients with a history of urticaria/angioedema avoided the intake of the tested NSAIDs for fear of new reactions, particularly when strong COX-1 inhibitor NSAIDs were involved. The high NPV value of DPT resulting from this study should reassure NSAID intake.

  5. How negative experiences shape long-term food preferences. Fifty years from the World War II combat front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; van Ittersum, Koert; Werle, Carolina

    2009-06-01

    How does a person's first experience with a foreign or unfamiliar food shape their long-term preference and behavior toward that food? To investigate this, 493 American veterans of World War II were surveyed about their preference for Japanese and Chinese food. Pacific veterans who experienced high levels of combat had a stronger dislike for these Asian foods than those Pacific veterans experiencing lower levels of combat. Consistent with expectations, combat experience for European veterans had no impact on their preference for Asian food. The situation in which one is initially exposed to an unfamiliar food may long continue to shape preferences.

  6. Black hole free energy during charged collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Ariel; Beauchesne, Hugues

    2012-03-01

    Numerical work on gravitational collapse in isotropic coordinates has recently shown that the negative of the gravitational Lagrangian approaches the (Helmholtz) free energy of a Schwarzschild black hole at late times of the collapse. We investigate numerically this association during the collapse of a charged scalar field to a Reissner-Nordström (RN) black hole in isotropic coordinates. Charged collapse yields a large outgoing matter wave in the exterior region but this has a negligible effect on the interior. The thermodynamics via the free energy can therefore be investigated by focusing on the interior. We find that the percentage discrepancy between the numerical value for the Lagrangian and the analytical expression for the free energy reach values as low as 3% depending on the initial state. As a consistency check, we also implement a procedure for prolonging the evolution of the exterior region. The matter Lagrangian approaches zero everywhere (interior and exterior) showing clearly that the entropy of the charged black hole is gravitational in origin.

  7. Nonspherically Symmetric Collapse in Asymptotically AdS Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantilan, Hans; Figueras, Pau; Kunesch, Markus; Romatschke, Paul

    2017-11-01

    We numerically simulate gravitational collapse in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes away from spherical symmetry. Starting from initial data sourced by a massless real scalar field, we solve the Einstein equations with a negative cosmological constant in five spacetime dimensions and obtain a family of nonspherically symmetric solutions, including those that form two distinct black holes on the axis. We find that these configurations collapse faster than spherically symmetric ones of the same mass and radial compactness. Similarly, they require less mass to collapse within a fixed time.

  8. Einstein-Cartan gravitational collapse of a homogeneous Weyssenhoff fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Ziaie, Amir Hadi; Moniz, Paulo Vargas; Ranjbar, Arash; Sepangi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    We consider the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric homogeneous matter distribution consisting of a Weyssenhoff fluid in the presence of a negative cosmological constant. Our aim is to investigate the effects of torsion and spin averaged terms on the final outcome of the collapse. For a specific interior spacetime setup, namely the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW metric, we obtain two classes of solutions to the field equations where depending on the relation between spin source ...

  9. Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world's most inbred wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Emily L; Grueber, Catherine E; Kennedy, Euan S; Jamieson, Ian G

    2016-01-01

    Inbreeding depression, the reduced fitness of offspring of related individuals, is a central theme in evolutionary biology. Inbreeding effects are influenced by the genetic makeup of a population, which is driven by any history of genetic bottlenecks and genetic drift. The Chatham Island black robin represents a case of extreme inbreeding following two severe population bottlenecks. We tested whether inbreeding measured by a 20-year pedigree predicted variation in fitness among individuals, despite the high mean level of inbreeding and low genetic diversity in this species. We found that paternal and maternal inbreeding reduced fledgling survival and individual inbreeding reduced juvenile survival, indicating that inbreeding depression affects even this highly inbred population. Close inbreeding also reduced survival for fledglings with less-inbred mothers, but unexpectedly improved survival for fledglings with highly inbred mothers. This counterintuitive interaction could not be explained by various potentially confounding variables. We propose a genetic mechanism, whereby a highly inbred chick with a highly inbred parent inherits a "proven" genotype and thus experiences a fitness advantage, which could explain the interaction. The positive and negative effects we found emphasize that continuing inbreeding can have important effects on individual fitness, even in populations that are already highly inbred. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Spherical Collapse in Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Ph; Steer, D A

    2010-01-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of an overdensity of nonrelativistic matter under the action of gravity and a chameleon scalar field. We show that the spherical collapse model is modified by the presence of a chameleon field. In particular, we find that even though the chameleon effects can be potentially large at small scales, for a large enough initial size of the inhomogeneity the collapsing region possesses a thin shell that shields the modification of gravity induced by the chameleon field, recovering the standard gravity results. We analyse the behaviour of a collapsing shell in a cosmological setting in the presence of a thin shell and find that, in contrast to the usual case, the critical density for collapse depends on the initial comoving size of the inhomogeneity.

  11. Astrophysics of Collapsing Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Axion stars are condensed states of large numbers of axion particles, bound by self-gravitation and quantum self-interactions. The mass of weakly bound axion stars is limited by gravitational stability, with condensates exceeding the maximum mass subject to collapse. During the collapse process, the axion density increases and higher-order self-interactions become increasingly relevant. By taking these terms into account, we provide evidence that in spite of a leading attractive interaction, collapsing axion stars stabilize in a dense state which is larger than its Schwarzschild radius, and so do not form black holes. During the last moments of collapse, number changing processes take place in the axion star with a very large rate, leading to emission of many highly energetic axions which escape from galaxies and galaxy clusters. Finally, if axion stars are a significant fraction of cold dark matter, then frequent collisions with each other or with ordinary stars could catalyze this collapse process as well.

  12. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Dierichs, Karola; Menges, Achim; Behringer, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from non-convex grains can be stable without external support. In the current experiments, we investigate the effect of vibration on destroying such columns. The change of column height during vertical vibration, can be well characterized by stretched exponential relaxation when the column is short, which is in agreement with previous work, while a faster collapse happens when the column is tall. We investigate the collapse after the fast process including its dependence on column geometry, and on interparticle and basal friction.

  13. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casadio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell gravitons that account for the (negative Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose–Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  14. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Roberto, E-mail: casadio@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Alma Mater Universià di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, IS FLAG, viale B. Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Giugno, Andrea, E-mail: A.Giugno@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Theresienstraße 37, 80333 München (Germany); Giusti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.giusti@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Alma Mater Universià di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, IS FLAG, viale B. Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2016-12-10

    We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell) gravitons that account for the (negative) Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive) interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose–Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  15. Radiative gravitational collapse to spherical, toroidal and higher genus black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Filipe C.; Oliveira, João M.

    2017-12-01

    We derive the matching conditions between FLRW and generalised Vaidya spacetimes with spherical, planar or hyperbolic symmetry, across timelike hypersurfaces. We then construct new models of gravitational collapse of FLRW spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant having electromagnetic radiation in the exterior. The final state of the collapse are asymptotically AdS black holes with spherical, toroidal or higher genus topologies. We analyse the collapse dynamics including trapped surface formation, for various examples.

  16. Seismic Progressive Collapse: Qualitative Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wibowo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive collapse is a catastrophic structural phenomenon that can occur because of human-made and natural hazards. In progressive collapse mechanism, a single local failure may cause a significant deformation which then may lead to collapse of a structure. The current practices in progressive collapse analysis and design method generally focus on preventing progressive collapse due to abnormal gravity and blast loads. Progressive collapse behaviour of structures due to earthquake loads has not received as much attention. This paper presents a brief overview of the current state-of-knowledge, insights, and issues related to progressive collapse behaviour of structures caused by earthquake loading.

  17. Moduli destabilization via gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dong-il [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Pedro, Francisco G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Yeom, Dong-han [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-06-15

    We examine the interplay between gravitational collapse and moduli stability in the context of black hole formation. We perform numerical simulations of the collapse using the double null formalism and show that the very dense regions one expects to find in the process of black hole formation are able to destabilize the volume modulus. We establish that the effects of the destabilization will be visible to an observer at infinity, opening up a window to a region in spacetime where standard model's couplings and masses can differ significantly from their background values.

  18. Protostellar Collapse Induced by Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebelle, P.; Whitworth, A. P.; Gladwin, P. P.; Andre, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the evolution of low-mass, isothermal, molecular cores which are subjected to an increase in external pressure $P\\xt$. If $P\\xt$ increases very slowly, the core approaches instability quite quasistatically. However, for larger (but still quite modest) $dP\\xt/dt$ a compression wave is driven into the core, thereby triggering collapse from the outside in. If collapse of a core is induced by increasing $P\\xt$, this has a number of interesting consequences. (i)...

  19. Real-World Treatment Patterns for Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Rita; Scazafave, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines generally recommend endocrine therapy over chemotherapy for hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer (unless life-threatening metastases are present). This study aimed to assess the real-world treatment patterns of patients with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer in Europe and the United States. Treatment patterns in Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK) and the United States from January 2012 to December 2014 were investigated using a patient record database (Global Oncology Monitor©). Sample data were projected to the wider clinical population to provide running annual estimates every 3 months. Sample sizes ranged from 1272 to 1640 patients in Europe and from 2225 to 2760 patients in the United States. Across all lines of therapy, 37-43% (Europe) and 45-50% (United States) of patients received chemotherapy. More patients received endocrine therapy than chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced breast cancer (Europe: 51-54% vs. 33-35%; United States: 53-60% vs. 34-42%). In contrast, endocrine therapy-only regimens were given less commonly than chemotherapy-only regimens in the third-line setting in both Europe and the United States. Chemotherapy is used extensively in routine clinical practice for hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer. The results also suggest that the treatment patternsin Europe and the United States are qualitatively different. Funding : Ipsos Healthcare and AstraZeneca.

  20. Collapse of simple harmonic universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander, E-mail: audrey.todhunter@tufts.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper Graham et al constructed oscillating and static universe models which are stable with respect to all classical perturbations. Here we show that such universes are quantum-mechanically unstable and can collapse by quantum tunneling to zero radius. We also present instantons describing nucleation of oscillating and static universes from nothing.

  1. Critical behavior of collapsing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Sourdis, C.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the mean curvature evolution of rotationally symmetric surfaces. Using numerical methods, we detect critical behavior at the threshold of singularity formation resembling that of gravitational collapse. In particular, the mean curvature simulation of a one-parameter family of initial...

  2. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gravitational collapse is one of the most striking phenomena in gravitational physics. The cosmic censorship conjecture has provided strong motivation for research in this field. In the absence of a general proof for censorship, many examples have been proposed, in which naked singularity is the outcome of gravitational ...

  3. The collapsed football pla yer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sello Motaung, BSc, MB ChB, DOH. FIFA Medical Officer and Honorary Part-time Lecturer, Wits Centre for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Johannesburg ... parts of the body that may be affected by blows that result in the collapse of a ... temperatures and humidity), especially if players are not acclimatised to such.

  4. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physical relevance of gravitational collapse is now robust. We have observational evidence for massive and/or supermassive black holes. It is well-understood that there exists an upper limit to the maximum possible mass of a spherical body of cold nuclear matter. We can also naturally consider that black holes may have.

  5. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    numerous models that noncausal transport equations predict thermodynamical behaviours that can be far .... A radiating model. Following Govender et al [10] we consider a model in which the star undergoes dissipative collapse and evolves to a stable equilibrium state. .... Govender et al [8,9] have shown that the choice.

  6. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained. Keywords. Gravitational ... a perfect fluid. As the final stages of collapse might involve dissipative processes as well, ... by Christodoulou [5], Goswami and Joshi [6], Giambo [7] and also by numerical work of. Choptuik [3] ...

  7. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by ...

  8. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a ˜60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 μs. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (˜0.03 μm) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial

  9. Einstein-Cartan gravitational collapse of a homogeneous Weyssenhoff fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaie, Amir Hadi; Sepangi, Hamid Reza [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vargas Moniz, Paulo [Universidade da Beira Interior, Departamento de Fisica, Covilha (Portugal); Universidade da Beira Interior, Centro de Matematica e Aplicacoes (CMA-UBI), Covilha (Portugal); Ranjbar, Arash [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Centro de Estudios Cientficos (CECs), Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-11-15

    We consider the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric homogeneous matter distribution consisting of a Weyssenhoff fluid in the presence of a negative cosmological constant. Our aim is to investigate the effects of torsion and spin averaged terms on the final outcome of the collapse. For a specific interior space-time setup, namely the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW metric, we obtain two classes of solutions to the field equations where depending on the relation between spin source parameters, (i) the collapse procedure culminates in a space-time singularity or (ii) it is replaced by a non-singular bounce. We show that, under certain conditions, for a specific subset of the former solutions, the formation of trapped surfaces is prevented and thus the resulted singularity could be naked. The curvature singularity that forms could be gravitationally strong in the sense of Tipler. Our numerical analysis for the latter solutions shows that the collapsing dynamical process experiences four phases, so that two of which occur at the pre-bounce and the other two at post-bounce regimes. We further observe that there can be found a minimum radius for the apparent horizon curve, such that the main outcome of which is that there exists an upper bound for the size of the collapsing body, below which no horizon forms throughout the whole scenario. (orig.)

  10. Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse in higher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider a collapsing spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust cloud in higher dimensional space-time. We show that the central singularity of collapse can be a strong curvature or a weak curvature naked singularity depending on the initial density distribution.

  11. Meeting Environmental Requirements after a Bridge Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This report is intended to assist transportation and environmental professionals in the event of a bridge collapse or similar emergency. It analyzes the environmental review process in five cases of bridge reconstruction following collapse in Florida...

  12. Perelman's collapsing theorem for 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jianguo; Ge, Jian

    2009-01-01

    We will simplify the earlier proofs of Perelman's collapsing theorem of 3-manifolds given by Shioya-Yamaguchi and Morgan-Tian. Among other things, we use Perelman's semi-convex analysis of distance functions to construct the desired local Seifert fibration structure on collapsed 3-manifolds. The verification of Perelman's collapsing theorem is the last step of Perelman's proof of Thurston's Geometrization Conjecture on the classification of 3-manifolds. Our proof of Perelman's collapsing theo...

  13. Current collapse in tunneling transport through benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, M H; Wenzel, W; Wegewijs, M R; Schoeller, H

    2003-02-21

    We investigate the electrical transport through a system of benzene coupled to metal electrodes by electron tunneling. Using electronic structure calculations, a semiquantitative model for the pi electrons of the benzene is derived that includes general two-body interactions. After exact diagonalization of the benzene model the transport is computed using perturbation theory for weak electrode-benzene coupling (golden rule approximation). We include the effect of an applied electric field on the molecular states, as well as radiative relaxation. We predict a current collapse and strong negative differential conductance due to a "blocking" state when the electrode is coupled to the para-position of benzene. In contrast, for coupling to the meta-position, a series of steps in the I-V curve is found.

  14. Reusable collapsible impact energy absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alghamdi, A.A.A. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper experimental study of plastic deformation of aluminum frusta when reinverted is presented. Effects of changing the angle of frustum as well as frustum wall thickness on the absorbed energy are investigated. The details of the experimental plastic inversion and reinversion are given. Obtained results show that it is possible to use the inverted aluminum frusta several times, thus they are reusable collapsible absorbers. (orig.)

  15. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  16. Collapse models and perceptual processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo Ghirardi, Gian; Romano, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Theories including a collapse mechanism have been presented various years ago. They are based on a modification of standard quantum mechanics in which nonlinear and stochastic terms are added to the evolution equation. Their principal merits derive from the fact that they are mathematically precise schemes accounting, on the basis of a unique universal dynamical principle, both for the quantum behavior of microscopic systems as well as for the reduction associated to measurement processes and for the classical behavior of macroscopic objects. Since such theories qualify themselves not as new interpretations but as modifications of the standard theory they can be, in principle, tested against quantum mechanics. Recently, various investigations identifying possible crucial test have been discussed. In spite of the extreme difficulty to perform such tests it seems that recent technological developments allow at least to put precise limits on the parameters characterizing the modifications of the evolution equation. Here we will simply mention some of the recent investigations in this direction, while we will mainly concentrate our attention to the way in which collapse theories account for definite perceptual process. The differences between the case of reductions induced by perceptions and those related to measurement procedures by means of standard macroscopic devices will be discussed. On this basis, we suggest a precise experimental test of collapse theories involving conscious observers. We make plausible, by discussing in detail a toy model, that the modified dynamics can give rise to quite small but systematic errors in the visual perceptual process.

  17. Backreaction of Hawking radiation on a gravitationally collapsing star I: Black holes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Particle creation leading to Hawking radiation is produced by the changing gravitational field of the collapsing star. The two main initial conditions in the far past placed on the quantum field from which particles arise, are the Hartle–Hawking vacuum and the Unruh vacuum. The former leads to a time-symmetric thermal bath of radiation, while the latter to a flux of radiation coming out of the collapsing star. The energy of Hawking radiation in the interior of the collapsing star is negative and equal in magnitude to its value at future infinity. This work investigates the backreaction of Hawking radiation on the interior of a gravitationally collapsing star, in a Hartle–Hawking initial vacuum. It shows that due to the negative energy Hawking radiation in the interior, the collapse of the star stops at a finite radius, before the singularity and the event horizon of a black hole have a chance to form. That is, the star bounces instead of collapsing to a black hole. A trapped surface near the last stage of the star's collapse to its minimum size may still exist temporarily. Its formation depends on the details of collapse. Results for the case of Hawking flux of radiation with the Unruh initial state, will be given in a companion paper II.

  18. HIERARCHICAL GRAVITATIONAL FRAGMENTATION. I. COLLAPSING CORES WITHIN COLLAPSING CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naranjo-Romero, Raúl; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Loughnane, Robert M. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 3-72, Morelia, Michoacán, 58089, México (Mexico)

    2015-11-20

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor–Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like r{sup −2} density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with the background, has a time-variable mass, and evolves along the locus of the ensemble of observed prestellar cores in a plot of M/M{sub BE} versus M, where M is the core's mass and M{sub BE} is the critical BE mass, spanning the range from the “stable” to the “unstable” regimes, even though it is collapsing at all times. We conclude that the presence of an unstable background allows a core to evolve dynamically from the time when it first appears, even when it resembles a pressure-confined, stable BE-sphere. The core can be thought of as a ram-pressure confined BE-sphere, with an increasing mass due to the accretion from the unstable background.

  19. Are collapse models testable with quantum oscillating systems? The case of neutrinos, kaons, chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, M; Donadi, S; Ferialdi, L; Bassi, A; Curceanu, C; Di Domenico, A; Hiesmayr, B C

    2013-01-01

    Collapse models provide a theoretical framework for understanding how classical world emerges from quantum mechanics. Their dynamics preserves (practically) quantum linearity for microscopic systems, while it becomes strongly nonlinear when moving towards macroscopic scale. The conventional approach to test collapse models is to create spatial superpositions of mesoscopic systems and then examine the loss of interference, while environmental noises are engineered carefully. Here we investigate a different approach: We study systems that naturally oscillate-creating quantum superpositions-and thus represent a natural case-study for testing quantum linearity: neutrinos, neutral mesons, and chiral molecules. We will show how spontaneous collapses affect their oscillatory behavior, and will compare them with environmental decoherence effects. We will show that, contrary to what previously predicted, collapse models cannot be tested with neutrinos. The effect is stronger for neutral mesons, but still beyond experimental reach. Instead, chiral molecules can offer promising candidates for testing collapse models.

  20. Collapse Scenarios of High-Rise Buildings Using Plastic Limit Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center (WTC in New York, USA collapsed on 11 September, 2001. The incident is regarded as the most severe disaster for high-rise buildings in history. Investigations into the collapse scenarios are still being conducted. Possible collapse scenarios assessed by local and international experts were reported. Another possible collapse scenario of the WTC based on two hypotheses was proposed in this paper, and the idea of plastic limit analysis was applied to evaluate the approximate limit load. According to the theory analysis and numerical calculations, a conclusion can be drawn that the large fires, aroused by the terrorist attack, play a significant role on the collapse of the WTC.

  1. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  2. The World of Sports Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeagwali, N. Susan

    2008-01-01

    Soon, the best athletes in the world will face each other at the Summer Olympics in Beijing. Many of them will sustain injuries, or seek to prevent them, and will be thankful that among their entourages are some of the best sports medicine professionals in the world. When an athlete collapses from fatigue, or something else, there will be a group…

  3. Collapse Analysis of Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2008-01-01

    A probabilistic based collapse analysis has been performed for a glulam frame structure supporting the roof over the main court in a Norwegian sports centre. The robustness analysis is based on the framework for robustness analysis introduced in the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety of Struc......A probabilistic based collapse analysis has been performed for a glulam frame structure supporting the roof over the main court in a Norwegian sports centre. The robustness analysis is based on the framework for robustness analysis introduced in the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety...... of Structures and a probabilistic modelling of the timber material proposed in the Probabilistic Model Code (PMC) of the Joint Committee on Structural Safety (JCSS). Due to the framework in the Danish Code the timber structure has to be evaluated with respect to the following criteria where at least one shall...... be fulfilled: a) demonstrating that those parts of the structure essential for the safety only have little sensitivity with respect to unintentional loads and defects, or b) demonstrating a load case with „removal of a limited part of the structure‟ in order to document that an extensive failure...

  4. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  5. Real-world and trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis of bevacizumab in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients: a study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, R J W; Ramaekers, B L T; Lobbezoo, D J A; de Boer, M; Dercksen, M W; van den Berkmortel, F; Smilde, T J; van de Wouw, A J; Peters, F P J; van Riel, J M G; Peters, N A J B; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Joore, M A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of our analysis was to assess the real-world cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab in addition to taxane treatment versus taxane monotherapy for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer compared with the cost-effectiveness based on the efficacy results from a trial. A state transition model was built to estimate costs, life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for both treatments. Two scenarios were examined: a real-world scenario and a trial-based scenario in which transition probabilities were primarily based on a real-world cohort study and the E2100 trial, respectively. In both scenarios, costs and utility parameter estimates were extracted from the real-world cohort study. Moreover, the Dutch health care perspective was adopted. In both the real-world and trial scenarios, bevacizumab-taxane is more expensive (incremental costs of €56,213 and €52,750, respectively) and more effective (incremental QALYs of 0.362 and 0.189, respectively) than taxane monotherapy. In the real-world scenario, bevacizumab-taxane compared to taxane monotherapy led to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €155,261 per QALY gained. In the trial scenario, the ICER amounted to €278,711 per QALY gained. According to the Dutch informal threshold, bevacizumab in addition to taxane treatment was not considered cost-effective for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer both in a real-world and in a trial scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sharper criteria for the wave collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Rypdal, K.

    1995-01-01

    Sharper criteria for three-dimensional wave collapse described by the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation (NLSE) are derived. The collapse threshold corresponds to the ground state soliton which is known to be unstable. Thus, for nonprefocusing distributions this represents the separatrix between...... collapsing and noncollapsing sectors. Numerical results support the theoretical results. Generalizations of the criteria for the NLSE with arbitrary power nonlinearity are also presented....

  7. Marginalization and Collapsibility in Graphical Interaction Models

    OpenAIRE

    Frydenberg, Morten

    1990-01-01

    The behaviour of a graphical interaction model under marginalization is discussed. A graphical interaction model is called collapsible onto a set of variables if the class of marginal distributions is the same as that implied by the related subgraph. The necessary and sufficient condition for collapsibility is found and it is shown that collapsibility is equivalent to a range of other important statistical properties of the model.

  8. Geophysical Processes - MO 2013 Collapse Potential (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Collapse potential correlates with locations of underground mines and sinkholes. Computer-generated hazard calculations include areas in close proximity to mines and...

  9. Constructing black hole entropy from gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I M

    2016-01-01

    Based on a recent proposal for the gravitational entropy of free gravitational fields, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of black hole formation through gravitational collapse in the framework of the semitetrad 1+1+2 covariant formalism. In the simplest case of an Oppenheimer-Snyder-Datt collapse we prove that the change in gravitational entropy outside a collapsing body is related to the variation of the surface area of the body itself, even before the formation of horizons. As a result, we are able to relate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole endstate to the variation of the vacuum gravitational entropy outside the collapsing body.

  10. Constructing black hole entropy from gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I M

    2014-01-01

    Based on a recent proposal for the gravitational entropy of free gravitational fields, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of black hole formation through gravitational collapse in the framework of the semitetrad 1+1+2 covariant formalism. In the simplest case of an Oppenheimer-Snyder-Datt collapse we prove that the change in gravitational entropy outside a collapsing body is related to the variation of the surface area of the body itself, even before the formation of horizons. As a result, we are able to relate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole endstate to the variation of the vacuum gravitational entropy outside the collapsing body.

  11. Quantum radiation from quantum gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7079 (United States); Stojkovic, Dejan [HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7079 (United States)], E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu

    2008-05-15

    We study quantum radiation emitted during the collapse of a quantized, gravitating, spherical domain wall. The amount of radiation emitted during collapse now depends on the wavefunction of the collapsing wall and the background spacetime. If the wavefunction is initially in the form of a sharp wavepacket, the expectation value of the particle occupation number is determined as a function of time and frequency. The results are in good agreement with our earlier semiclassical analysis and show that the quantum radiation is non-thermal and evaporation accompanies gravitational collapse.

  12. Quantum radiation from quantum gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2008-05-01

    We study quantum radiation emitted during the collapse of a quantized, gravitating, spherical domain wall. The amount of radiation emitted during collapse now depends on the wavefunction of the collapsing wall and the background spacetime. If the wavefunction is initially in the form of a sharp wavepacket, the expectation value of the particle occupation number is determined as a function of time and frequency. The results are in good agreement with our earlier semiclassical analysis and show that the quantum radiation is non-thermal and evaporation accompanies gravitational collapse.

  13. Collapse of granular media subjected to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Korchi Fatima Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the collapse of granular materials subjected to wetting action. For soils, the collapse potential depends on several parameters such as liquid limit, matric suction, compactness, initial water content and the amount of fine particles. The effect of grain size, which plays a key role in the rearrangement of grains, remains little studied and poorly understood. To investigate the capillary origin of the collapse phenomenon, we present an experimental study on macroscopic and local scales. Our results show the effect of grain size and water content on collapse.

  14. Collapsing Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in a Patient with Acute Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najamus Sehar

    2015-01-01

    seen in association with HIV infection. Rare data is available about the association between collapsing FSGS and malaria. Case Description. A 72-year-old African male patient presented to the hospital for generalized body aches, fatigue, fever, and night sweats for three days. He had history of recent travel to Ghana. Patient looked in acute distress and was shivering. Laboratory tests showed elevated serum creatinine (Cr of 2.09 mg/dL (baseline was 1.5 mg/dL in 2012. Hospital course was significant for rapid elevation of Cr to 9.5 mg/dL and proteinuria of 7.9 grams. Autoimmune studies resulted negative. Blood smear resulted positive for Plasmodium falciparum and patient was treated with Artemether/Lumefantrine. Patient’s fever and pain improved, but kidney function continued to deteriorate and he became oliguric. On day seven, he was started on Hemodialysis. Tests for different causes of glomerular pathology were also negative. He underwent left kidney biopsy which resulted in findings consistent with severe collapsing glomerulopathy. Discussion. This case illustrates a biopsy proven collapsing FSGS likely secondary to malarial infection requiring renal replacement therapy. Literature review revealed only few case reports that suggested the possible association of malaria with secondary form of FSGS.

  15. Gravitational collapse: The story so far

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Then we have the formation of a black hole in the universe as a result of the gravitational collapse. On the other hand, if the formation of event horizon gets delayed sufficiently during the collapse, the result is the development of a naked singularity, or a visible fire ball, which can possibly send out massive radiations to ...

  16. Collapse of Electrostatic Waves in Magnetoplasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Yu, M. Y.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1984-01-01

    The two-fluid model is employed to investigate the collapse of electrostatic waves in magnetized plasmas. It is found that nonlinear interaction of ion cyclotron, upper-, and lower-hybrid waves with adiabatic particle motion along the external magnetic field can cause wave-field collapse....

  17. Plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Corroded steel plate; plastic collapse; FEM; rough surface. ... The main aim of present work is to study plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates with irregular surfaces under tension. Non-linear finite element method ... Department of Ocean Engineering, AmirKabir University of Technology, 15914 Tehran, Iran ...

  18. Collapse of UOE manufactured steel pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, A.M.; Foeken, R.J. van; Chen, S.

    2000-01-01

    The manufacturing method (seamless, UO, UOE) has a con-siderable influence on the collapse pressure of steel pipes. For UOE manufactured pipe, a significant reduction in collapse strength has been observed compared to not expanded pipe. A research program has been carried out to investigate the

  19. The Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is a long-standing problem in stellar astrophysics. We briefly outline the main contenders for a solution and review recent efforts to model core-collapse supernova explosions by means of multi-dimensional simulations. Focusing on the neutrino-driven mechanism, we summarize currents efforts to predict supernova explosion and remnant properties.

  20. The Collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' Narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An account of the factors that led to the collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in 2008 and an explanation of the political effects and implications for Irish identity.......An account of the factors that led to the collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in 2008 and an explanation of the political effects and implications for Irish identity....

  1. Fishing, fast growth and climate variability increase the risk of collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Malin L; Byler, David

    2015-08-22

    Species around the world have suffered collapses, and a key question is why some populations are more vulnerable than others. Traditional conservation biology and evidence from terrestrial species suggest that slow-growing populations are most at risk, but interactions between climate variability and harvest dynamics may alter or even reverse this pattern. Here, we test this hypothesis globally. We use boosted regression trees to analyse the influences of harvesting, species traits and climate variability on the risk of collapse (decline below a fixed threshold) across 154 marine fish populations around the world. The most important factor explaining collapses was the magnitude of overfishing, while the duration of overfishing best explained long-term depletion. However, fast growth was the next most important risk factor. Fast-growing populations and those in variable environments were especially sensitive to overfishing, and the risk of collapse was more than tripled for fast-growing when compared with slow-growing species that experienced overfishing. We found little evidence that, in the absence of overfishing, climate variability or fast growth rates alone drove population collapse over the last six decades. Expanding efforts to rapidly adjust harvest pressure to account for climate-driven lows in productivity could help to avoid future collapses, particularly among fast-growing species. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  3. Collapse Dynamics of an Attractive Box-Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, Christoph; Gaunt, Alexander; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Smith, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We study the collapse dynamics of an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an optical box potential. After initiating the collapse (by suddenly changing the interaction to sufficiently negative) the wave-function shrinks in an accelerating manner. At some point (the collapse time), there is a sudden loss of atoms due to three-body recombination and an almost simultaneous emission of a shell of atoms with excess kinetic energy leaving the remnant condensate. We find that the collapse time, which we observe to vary over two orders of magnitude, can be expressed as a universal function of atom number, interaction strength and box size. Furthermore, we measure how the energy of the emitted shell and the remnant condensate atom number vary across this parameter space. In certain finely tuned conditions we observe a striking and unexplained bifurcation of possible outcomes.

  4. Collapsed Lung: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Pneumothorax - infants (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Collapsed Lung updates ... Lung surgery Pneumothorax - slideshow Pneumothorax - infants Related Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders ...

  5. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Natural populations can collapse suddenly in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery from such a collapse can be difficult. We have used laboratory microbial ecosystems to directly measure theoretically proposed early warning signals of impending population collapse. Yeast cooperatively break down the sugar sucrose, meaning that below a critical size the population cannot sustain itself. We have demonstrated experimentally that changes in the fluctuations of the population size can serve as an early warning signal that the population is close to collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to ``cheater'' cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We confirm this possibility experimentally and find that such social parasitism decreases the resilience of the population.

  6. Simple Analytic Models of Gravitational Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, R.

    2005-02-09

    Most general relativity textbooks devote considerable space to the simplest example of a black hole containing a singularity, the Schwarzschild geometry. However only a few discuss the dynamical process of gravitational collapse, by which black holes and singularities form. We present here two types of analytic models for this process, which we believe are the simplest available; the first involves collapsing spherical shells of light, analyzed mainly in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates; the second involves collapsing spheres filled with a perfect fluid, analyzed mainly in Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates. Our main goal is pedagogical simplicity and algebraic completeness, but we also present some results that we believe are new, such as the collapse of a light shell in Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  7. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  8. Lobar collapse with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, S.F.; Erickson, S.; Oshman, D.; Hayden, F.

    1985-05-01

    In a study of 30 children with uncomplicated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonias, a high incidence of lobar collapse (8/30-26%) was noted. This involved the right upper lobe in seven patients and the left upper lobe in one patient. It is probably attributable to anatomical predispositions, sloughing of necrotic epithelium, and stimulation of mucus production. Lobar collapse should be considered part of the spectrum of RSV pneumonitis.

  9. Laryngeal collapse in seven brachycephalic puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, J J; Doyle, R S; Hughes, J M L; Tobin, E; Bellenger, C R

    2006-03-01

    To document the histories, clinical findings, and management of seven puppies with laryngeal collapse occurring secondarily to brachycephalic airway syndrome. Seven brachycephalic puppies aged between 4.5 and six months underwent surgery for management of brachycephalic airway syndrome following presentation for exercise intolerance and increased respiratory noise and effort. Stenotic nares of varying severity and an elongated soft palate were common to all dogs. All dogs had tracheal hypoplasia and this was severe in four dogs. Laryngeal collapse was present in all dogs. Two dogs had stage I, four dogs stage II, and one dog stage III laryngeal collapse. The dog with stage III laryngeal collapse and one dog with stage II laryngeal collapse died. There was no apparent association between the changes evident on thoracic radiographs or the degree of tracheal hypoplasia and postoperative outcome. The development of severe secondary laryngeal changes in dogs aged six months or less supports the suggestion that immature brachycephalic dogs should undergo assessment and, if indicated, surgery as soon as any clinical signs of BAS are apparent.

  10. Signalment, clinical presentation, concurrent diseases, and diagnostic findings in 28 dogs with dynamic pharyngeal collapse (2008-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, J A; Holt, D E; Reetz, J A; Clarke, D L

    2015-01-01

    Most information about pharyngeal collapse in dogs is anecdotal and extrapolated from human medicine. A single case report describing dynamic pharyngeal collapse in a cat has been published, but there is no literature describing this disease process in dogs. To describe the signalment, clinical presentation, concurrent disease processes, and imaging findings of a population of client-owned dogs with pharyngeal collapse. Twenty-eight client-owned dogs with pharyngeal collapse. Radiology reports of dogs for which fluoroscopy of the respiratory system was performed were reviewed retrospectively. Patients with a fluoroscopic diagnosis of pharyngeal collapse were included in the study population. Data regarding clinical signs, diagnostic, and pathologic findings were evaluated. Twenty-eight dogs met the inclusion criteria. The median age of affected patients was 6.6 years, whereas median body condition score was 7/9. The most common clinical signs were coughing (n = 20) and stertor (n = 5). In 27 of 28 cases, a concurrent or previously diagnosed cardiopulmonary disorder was detected. The most common concurrent disease processes were mainstem bronchi collapse (n = 18), tracheal collapse (n = 17), and brachycephalic airway syndrome (n = 8). Fluoroscopy identified complete pharyngeal collapse in 20 of 28 dogs. Pharyngeal collapse is a complex disease process that likely is secondary to long-term negative pressure gradients and anatomic and functional abnormalities. Based on the findings of this study, pharyngeal fluoroscopy may be useful diagnostic test in patients with suspected tracheal and mainstem bronchial collapse to identify concurrent pharyngeal collapse. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Simulations of protostellar collapse using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics. II. The second collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaytet, N.; Chabrier, G.; Audit, E.

    2013-01-01

    Star formation begins with the gravitational collapse of a dense core inside a molecular cloud. As the collapse progresses, the centre of the core begins to heat up as it becomes optically thick. The temperature and density in the centre eventually reach high enough values where fusion reactions...... and dust opacities present large variations as a function of frequency. In this paper, we follow-up on a previous paper on the collapse and formation of Larson's first core using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics (Paper I) by extending the calculations to the second phase of the collapse and the formation...... of Larson's second core. We have made the use of a non-ideal gas equation of state as well as an extensive set of spectral opacities in a spherically symmetric fully implicit Godunov code to model all the phases of the collapse of a 0.1, 1 and 10 solar mass cloud cores. We find that, for a same central...

  12. Progressive Collapse of High-Rise Buildings from Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pershakov Valerii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considers ensuring the stability of structures of high-rise buildings against progressive collapse due to fire, proposed measures to ensure the stability of high-rise buildings due to progressive collapse. The analysis of large fires in high-rise buildings with progressive collapse and review of the literature on the issue of progressive collapse. The analysis of the Ukrainian normative documents on progressive collapse resistance.

  13. Uncertainties in Core Collapse Supernovae Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Jefferson; Cunningham, J.; Kuhlmann, S.; Biswas, R.; Kovacs, E.; Spinka, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a study of selection criteria to identify Type Ia supernovae photometrically in a simulated mixed sample of Type Ia supernovae and core collapse supernovae. The simulated sample is a mockup of the expected results of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using the supernovae simulation and fitting package of SNANA [Kessler et al. arXiv:0908.4280]. This is an extension of a previous analysis, [Gjergo et al. arXiv:1205.1480], with updated core collapse templates that are used to simulate the supernovae. We have also studied how systematic variations in the input parameters of the core collapse supernovae, such as absolute brightness and brightness smearing, affect the measured purity of the Type Ia supernova sample.

  14. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mariani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  15. Anterior chamber collapse syndrome in a koala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Vl; Naranjo, C; Bernays, Me

    2014-05-01

    Anterior chamber collapse syndrome has been recognised in various species and is associated with early-life ocular disease or trauma. It is important to differentiate this acquired condition from a congenital malformation. An adult female koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) was referred for assessment of buphthalmos and severe keratitis of the right eye. The degree of keratitis obstructed examination of intraocular structures. Enucleation of the affected eye was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was anterior chamber collapse syndrome and secondary glaucoma. This case contributes to the limited information available in the literature on anterior chamber collapse syndrome, a disease unique in having secondary glaucoma with minimal or no inflammation. The case also expands the literature available on ocular disease in koalas. More specifically, this is the only reported case of glaucoma, of any aetiology, in the koala. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Mauro, E-mail: mariani@carina.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); León, Gabriel, E-mail: gleon@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria – Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-10

    The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  17. InSAR Measurement of Precursor and Post-Collapse Sinkhole Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Rachel; McCormack, Harry; Larkin, Hayley; Wooster, Michael; Thomas, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Sinkholes occur across the world, often posing an obvious hazard to communities, infrastructure and the environment. Regions prone to sinkhole formation can often be identified; however prediction of exact sinkhole locations and occurrences is exceedingly difficult. This case study from Wink, in the Permian Basin of Texas, demonstrates how InSAR can measure both precursor and post-collapse deformation associated with sinkholes. ERS, ALOS PALSAR and Sentinel-1A datasets are used to show precursor signals at least nine years before sinkhole formation, and post-collapse effects continuing over several decades. The rate of deformation is variable, but reaches many tens of centimetres per year during some periods.

  18. Unfolding Dynamics of Single Collapsed DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Y.; Wada, H.; Ishida, R.; Sano, M.

    We observed elastic responses of single DNA molecules and visualized them during the collapsing transition induced by trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD). The force-extension curves show worm-like behavior, force plateau, and stick-release responses depending on SPD concentration. The periodic stick-release responses may reflect the unraveling of toroidal condensates. At much higher SPD concentration, we observed re-elongation of a single collapsed DNA. For the visualization, a fluorescent dye, YOYO, was used. We observed bright spots in the fluorescence intensity profile of a collapsed DNA during stretching, which may correspond to the collapsed parts within the single DNA. The decrease of the intensity of the spots in stretching implies the mechanical unfolding of collapsed parts. Towards achieving a microscopic understanding of these experimental results, we also investigate the elastic properties of a highly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chain by Brownian dynamics simulation method. In our dynamic simulation, a PE has a small intrinsic stiffness (i.e., the PE is semiflexible) to model the stiffness of DNA chain, and added multivalent counterions are explicitly taken into account. As the electrostatic coupling parameter (proportional to counterion valency) is increased, counterion condensation is observed, leading finally to the PE collapse through the discontinuous transition for a sufficiently large coupling parameter. Mechanical unfolding of a PE globule reveals its molecular elasticities including force plateau, in agreement with the experimental observations. A numerically deduced electrostatic condensation energy is compared to the experimental value. Charge ordering in the PE-counterion complex and its deformation by the external forcing are elucidated in conjunction with the PE elastic responses. Other dynamic effects such as the effect of a pulling speed are also discussed.

  19. Structural control on karst collapse sinkhole formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Antonio; Ascione, Alessandra; Mazzoli, Stefano; Santangelo, Nicoletta

    2013-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes owing their formation to erosion and deformation phenomena caused by subsurface karstification are widespread in the carbonate massifs of peninsular Italy. In contrast with solution dolines, which are densely distributed on the subplanar top surfaces of the carbonate massifs, the collapse sinkholes (hereinafter labelled karst collapse sinkholes) generally occur as isolated landforms and mostly affect the slopes and piedmont areas. In the latter instances, the sinkholes also affect alluvial fan conglomerates, or slope debris, overlying the carbonate rocks. We investigated the karst collapse sinkholes of the southern-central Apennines mountain belt (Italy), which is representative of a young orogenic system, characterised by recent tectonic activity and strong seismicity. The aim of the study is the identification of the causative factors which control the occurrence of such hazardous phenomena. The study was based on a regional scale analysis on sinkhole distribution in relation to the local geological-structural, geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, and was paralleled with field analysis of some selected areas. The regional scale analysis indicates that the karst collapse sinkholes are not the mere response to the concurrence of the climatic and lithological conditions which commonly favour the development of karst processes, the occurrence of such landforms appearing strongly influenced by distinctive structural and hydrogeological conditions. In particular, a close relationship between the karst collapse sinkholes and the main extensional faults showing evidence of late Quaternary activity may be envisaged. This is inferred from the spatial distribution of the karst collapse sinkholes, which is strikingly uneven, the sinkholes generally occurring in alignments following large late Quaternary fault zones, or being clustered at the terminations of those faults. In addition, areas affected by the occurrence of groups of sinkholes, are

  20. Role of evaporation in gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Baccetti, Valentina; Terno, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We study collapse of evaporating thin dust shells using two families of metrics to describe the {exterior geometry: the outgoing Vaidya metric and the retarded Schwarzschild metric. Both allow incorporation of Page's evaporation law (the latter in terms of the time at infinity), resulting in a modified equation} of motion for the shell. In these scenarios we find in each case that the collapse is accelerated due to evaporation, but the Schwarzschild radius is not crossed. Instead the shell is always at a certain sub-Planckian distance from this would-be horizon that depends only on the mass and evaporation rate.

  1. State-of-the-Art-Review of Collapsible Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. AL-Rawas

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Collapsible soils are encountered in arid and semi-arid regions. Such soils cause potential construction problems due to their collapse upon wetting. The collapse phenomenon is primarily related to the open structure of the soil. Several soil collapse classifications based on parameters such as moisture content, dry density, Atterberg limits and clay content have been proposed in the literature as indicators of the soil collapse potential. Direct measurement of the magnitude of collapse, using laboratory and/or field tests, is essential once a soil showed indications of collapse potential. Treatment methods such as soil replacement, compaction control and chemical stabilization showed significant reduction in the settlement of collapsible soils. The design of foundations on collapsible soils depends on the depth of the soil, magnitude of collapse and economics of the design. Strip foundations are commonly used when collapsing soil extends to a shallow depth while piles and drilled piers are recommended in cases where the soil extends to several meters. This paper provides a comprehensive review of collapsible soils. These include the different types of collapsible soils, mechanisms of collapse, identification and classification methods, laboratory and field testing, treatment methods and guidelines for foundation design.

  2. Upper Airway Collapsibility and Genioglossus Activity in Adolescents during Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Yuan, Haibo; Katz, Eliot S.; Karamessinis, Laurie R.; Bradford, Ruth M.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Hannigan, James T.; Nixon, Thomas; Ward, Michelle B.; Lee, Yin N.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obese patients develop obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), at least in part because of a narrowed upper airway. However, many obese adolescents do not develop OSAS, despite having a presumably narrower airway. The reasons for this phenomenon are unclear. The authors hypothesized that obese controls have a compensatory neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them less likely to develop upper airway collapse. Design: Patients underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep while wearing intraoral electrodes to measure genioglossal electromyography (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease nasal pressure (PN) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: There were 35 obese patients with OSAS, 28 obese controls, and 43 lean controls. Results: In the activated state, the two control groups had a flatter slope of the pressure-flow relationship and a more negative critical closing pressure (less collapsible) than the OSAS group. In the hypotonic state, the lean controls had a flatter slope of the pressure-flow relationship than the OSAS and obese control groups. In the activated state, the slope of EMGgg versus PN was greater in the obese control group than in the OSAS or lean control groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.028, respectively); there were no differences in the hypotonic state. Conclusions: Obese controls have vigorous upper airway neuromuscular responses during sleep. Upper airway reflexes normally decline during adolescent development. It is speculated that obese adolescents without OSAS maintain protective upper airway reflexes during adolescent development, whereas those who go on to develop OSAS do not. Citation: Huang J; Pinto SJ; Yuan H; Katz ES; Karamessinis LR; Bradford RM; Gallagher PR; Hannigan JT; Nixon T; Ward MB; Lee YN; Marcus CL. Upper airway collapsibility and genioglossus activity in adolescents

  3. Gravitational collapse with decaying vacuum energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of dark energy on the end state of spherical radiation collapse is considered within the context of the cosmic censorship hypothesis. It is found that it is possible to have both black holes as well as naked singularities.

  4. Identification and behavior of collapsible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Loess is a soil that can exhibit large deformations upon wetting. Cases of wetting induced collapse in loess have : been documented for natural deposits and man-made fills. These issues are of concern to the Indiana DOT due to the growth : of the sta...

  5. Measurements and von Neumann projection/collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unwanted superpositions of (system + apparatus)-states can be shown to be suppressed, leading eventually to the projection/collapse rule postulated in von Neumann's treatment of measurements [3]. In the next section, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics (QM) is recalled. In §3, some proposed improvements ...

  6. LISA pathfinder appreciably constrains collapse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Bassam; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; McClelland, David E.; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous collapse models are phenomological theories formulated to address major difficulties in macroscopic quantum mechanics. We place significant bounds on the parameters of the leading collapse models, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model, and the Diosi-Penrose (DP) model, by using LISA Pathfinder's measurement, at a record accuracy, of the relative acceleration noise between two free-falling macroscopic test masses. In particular, we bound the CSL collapse rate to be at most (2.96 ±0.12 ) ×10-8 s-1 . This competitive bound explores a new frequency regime, 0.7 to 20 mHz, and overlaps with the lower bound 10-8 ±2 s-1 proposed by Adler in order for the CSL collapse noise to be substantial enough to explain the phenomenology of quantum measurement. Moreover, we bound the regularization cutoff scale used in the DP model to prevent divergences to be at least 40.1 ±0.5 fm , which is larger than the size of any nucleus. Thus, we rule out the DP model if the cutoff is the size of a fundamental particle.

  7. Granular Eruptions: Void Collapse and Jet Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikkelsen, R.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Koene, Elmer; Bruggert, Gert-Wim; van der Meer, Roger M.; van der Weele, J.P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Upon impact, sand is blown away in all directions, forming a splash. The ball digs a cylindrical void in the sand and the jet is formed when this void collapses: The focused sand pressure pushes the jet straight up into the air. When the jet comes down again, it breaks up into fragments, i.e.,

  8. Fire-induced collapses of steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondera, Alexandru; Giuliani, Luisa

    Single-story steel buildings such as car parks and industrial halls are often characterised by stiff beams and flexible columns and may experience an outward (sway) collapse during a fire, endangering people and properties outside the building. It is therefore a current interest of the research t...

  9. Collapse of wave function and special relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Rosevaldo de [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), MT (Brazil); Yoshida, Alexandre Calzavara [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In this work we show that for no incompatibility between Quantum Physics and Special Relativity, necessarily more postulates should be includes in Quantum Physics. What we want to show is that there is no inconsistency between collapse instantaneous of one entangled state with special relativity. We discovered the necessity to include one more postulate into Quantum Physics when we are studying entangled states in different reference systems. When we perform a Lorentz transformation into one entangled system, we realized that we need to make one more choice. This choice was not predicted by quantum physics nor by special relativity. Other options are: 1. if we define a privileged reference system where the collapse is instantaneous only in it, we will be back to the old discussion about the ether. I do not think that is a very interesting option, but I confess that it would also be an experimental question. 2. one could also define that the collapse was not simultaneous any reference system. 3. postulate: the collapse of the states is simultaneous to the observer carrying out the measure on the state. Adding one more postulate that we do not know if it is true or not, we can make Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity consistently. An assumption has validity when has no inconsistency with the theories and is known to be proved experimentally. So the question about the validity of the postulates should be an experimental question. (author)

  10. Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse in higher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Higher dimensional space-time; naked singularity; cosmic censorship. PACS Nos 04.20.Dw; 04.50. ... The existence of strong curvature naked singularities in gravitational collapse of spherically symmetric space-times ..... distributions (in an appropriate metric space) can be discussed along the lines of [16]. 3. Strength of the ...

  11. Collapsing spherical null shells in general relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khakshournia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric null shell with the flat interior and a charged Vaidya exterior spacetimes is studied. There is no gravitational impulsive wave present on the null hypersurface which is shear-free and contracting. It follows that there is a critical radius at which the shell bounces and starts expanding.

  12. Probabilistic assessment of steel moment frames incremental collapse (ordinary, intermediate and special under earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Mehdizadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Building collapse is a level of the structure performance in which the amount of financial and life loss is maximized, so this event could be the worst incident in the construction. Regarding to the possibility of destructive earthquakes in different parts of the world, detailed assessment of the structure's collapse has been one of the major challenges of the structural engineering. In this regard, offering models based on laboratory studies, considering the effective parameters and appropriate earthquakes could be a step towards achieving this goal. In this research, a five-story steel structure with a system of ordinary, intermediate and special moment frame (low, intermediate and high ductility has been designed based on the local regulations. In this study, the effect of resistance and stiffness deterioration of the structural elements based on the results of the laboratory models have been considered and the ductility role in the collapse capacity of steel moment frames has been investigated as probabilistic matter. For this purpose, incremental dynamic analysis has been done under 50 pairs of earthquake records proposing FEMA P695 instruction and fragility curves of various performance levels are developed. Results showed higher collapse capacity of special moment steel frame than the intermediate and ordinary moment frames. In the 50 percent probability level, the collapse capacity of special moment frame increased 34 % compared to the intermediate moment frame and 66 % to the ordinary moment frame. Also, the results showed that for different collapse spectral accelerations, the use of special moment frame instead of intermediate and ordinary moment frames reduces the collapse probability to 30 and 50 % respectively.

  13. Physical properties and collapse force of according to the z-position of poly-Si pattern using nano-tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo In; Lee, Chang Woo

    2011-02-01

    Nowadays, many researchers try to measure the collapse force of fine pattern. However, most of the researches use LFM to gauge it indirectly and LFM can measure not for collapse force directly but only limited for horizontal force. Thus, nano-scratch is suggested to measure the collapse force possibly. We used poly-Si pattern on Si plate and changed the z-location of the pattern. From these experiments, the stiffness was decease as depth increase from surface and well fitted with negative exponential curve. Also, the elastic modulus was decreased. From the results, the collapse force of poly-Si nano-patterns was decreased as the depth increased over than 30% from the surface and the maximum collapse force was 26.91 microN and pattern was collapsed between poly-Si and plate.

  14. Globalization in world economy

    OpenAIRE

    Garifullina, A.; Ilyasova, I.

    2013-01-01

    Globalization is objective process of formation, development and action of new world, global system. Undoubtedly, consequences of globalization can carry both positive, and negative character, however to it isn’t present alternative

  15. Non-singular Brans–Dicke collapse in deformed phase space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasouli, S.M.M., E-mail: mrasouli@ubi.pt [Departamento de Física, Universidade da Beira Interior, Rua Marquês d’Avila e Bolama, 6200 Covilhã (Portugal); Centro de Matemática e Aplicações (CMA - UBI), Universidade da Beira Interior, Rua Marquês d’Avila e Bolama, 6200 Covilhã (Portugal); Physics Group, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziaie, A.H., E-mail: ah_ziaie@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, 19839 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, PO Box 76175, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalalzadeh, S., E-mail: shahram.jalalzadeh@unila.edu.br [Federal University of Latin-American Integration, Technological Park of Itaipu PO box 2123, Foz do Iguaçu-PR, 85867-670 (Brazil); Moniz, P.V., E-mail: pmoniz@ubi.pt [Departamento de Física, Universidade da Beira Interior, Rua Marquês d’Avila e Bolama, 6200 Covilhã (Portugal); Centro de Matemática e Aplicações (CMA - UBI), Universidade da Beira Interior, Rua Marquês d’Avila e Bolama, 6200 Covilhã (Portugal)

    2016-12-15

    We study the collapse process of a homogeneous perfect fluid (in FLRW background) with a barotropic equation of state in Brans–Dicke (BD) theory in the presence of phase space deformation effects. Such a deformation is introduced as a particular type of non-commutativity between phase space coordinates. For the commutative case, it has been shown in the literature (Scheel, 1995), that the dust collapse in BD theory leads to the formation of a spacetime singularity which is covered by an event horizon. In comparison to general relativity (GR), the authors concluded that the final state of black holes in BD theory is identical to the GR case but differs from GR during the dynamical evolution of the collapse process. However, the presence of non-commutative effects influences the dynamics of the collapse scenario and consequently a non-singular evolution is developed in the sense that a bounce emerges at a minimum radius, after which an expanding phase begins. Such a behavior is observed for positive values of the BD coupling parameter. For large positive values of the BD coupling parameter, when non-commutative effects are present, the dynamics of collapse process differs from the GR case. Finally, we show that for negative values of the BD coupling parameter, the singularity is replaced by an oscillatory bounce occurring at a finite time, with the frequency of oscillation and amplitude being damped at late times.

  16. All-Possible-Worlds: Unifying Many-Worlds and Copenhagen, in the Light of Quantum Contextuality

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    "All-Possible-Worlds" is a novel interpretation of quantum physics, which results from a unified reformulation of Many-Worlds and Copenhagen ("collapse") in the light of quantum contextuality, and proposes "nonlocality at detection" as a principle ruling the whole quantum realm, including single qubit and qutrit experiments.

  17. Unifying Research on Social-Ecological Resilience and Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Graeme S; Peterson, Garry D

    2017-09-01

    Ecosystems influence human societies, leading people to manage ecosystems for human benefit. Poor environmental management can lead to reduced ecological resilience and social-ecological collapse. We review research on resilience and collapse across different systems and propose a unifying social-ecological framework based on (i) a clear definition of system identity; (ii) the use of quantitative thresholds to define collapse; (iii) relating collapse processes to system structure; and (iv) explicit comparison of alternative hypotheses and models of collapse. Analysis of 17 representative cases identified 14 mechanisms, in five classes, that explain social-ecological collapse. System structure influences the kind of collapse a system may experience. Mechanistic theories of collapse that unite structure and process can make fundamental contributions to solving global environmental problems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Identification and behavior of collapsible soils : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Collapsible soils are susceptible to large volumetric strains when they become saturated. Numerous soil types : fall in the general category of collapsible soils, including : loess, a well-known aeolian deposit, present throughout : most of Indiana. ...

  19. Dynamic control of collapse in a vortex Airy beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chew, Khian-Hooi; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01

    Here we study systematically the self-focusing dynamics and collapse of vortex Airy optical beams in a Kerr medium. The collapse is suppressed compared to a non-vortex Airy beam in a Kerr medium due to the existence of vortex fields. The locations of collapse depend sensitively on the initial power, vortex order, and modulation parameters. The collapse may occur in a position where the initial field is nearly zero, while no collapse appears in the region where the initial field is mainly distributed. Compared with a non-vortex Airy beam, the collapse of a vortex Airy beam can occur at a position away from the area of the initial field distribution. Our study shows the possibility of controlling and manipulating the collapse, especially the precise position of collapse, by purposely choosing appropriate initial power, vortex order or modulation parameters of a vortex Airy beam.

  20. Gravitational and electric energies in collapse of spherically thin capacitor

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    In our previous article (PHYSICAL REVIEW D 86, 084004 (2012)), we present a study of strong oscillating electric fields and electron-positron pair-production in gravitational collapse of a neutral stellar core at or over nuclear densities. In order to understand the back-reaction of such electric energy building and radiating on collapse, we adopt a simplified model describing the collapse of a spherically thin capacitor to give an analytical description how gravitational energy is converted to both kinetic and electric energies in collapse. It is shown that (i) averaged kinetic and electric energies are the same order, about an half of gravitational energy of spherically thin capacitor in collapse; (ii) caused by radiating and rebuilding electric energy, gravitational collapse undergoes a sequence of "on and off" hopping steps in the microscopic Compton scale. Although such a collapse process is still continuous in terms of macroscopic scales, it is slowed down as kinetic energy is reduced and collapsing tim...

  1. Observations on cyanobacterial population collapse in eutrophic lake water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Ebert, J.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Van den Hove, L.; Pel, R.; Takkenberg, W.; Woldringh, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    In two laboratory-scale enclosures of water from the shallow, eutrophic Lake Loosdrecht (the Netherlands), the predominating filamentous cyanobacteria grew vigorously for 2 weeks, but then their populations simultaneously collapsed, whereas coccoid cyanobacteria and algae persisted . The collapse

  2. Cod Collapse and the Climate in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, K. C.; Oremus, K. L.; Gaines, S.

    2014-12-01

    Effective fisheries management requires forecasting population changes. We find a negative relationship between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and subsequently surveyed biomass and catch of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, off the New England coast. A 1-unit NAO increase is associated with a 17% decrease in surveyed biomass of age-1 cod the following year. This relationship persists as the cod mature, such that observed NAO can be used to forecast future adult biomass. We also document that an NAO event lowers catch for up to 15 years afterward. In contrast to forecasts by existing stock assessment models, our NAO-driven statistical model successfully hindcasts the recent collapse of New England cod fisheries following strong NAO events in 2007 and 2008 (see figure). This finding can serve as a template for forecasting other fisheries affected by climatic conditions.

  3. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast ...

  4. Collapse of the Late Proterozoic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over the past two decades is now sufficient to permit an initial quantitative assessment of the patterns of biotic diversity and extinction that occurred during Proterozoic time. Because of limitations in both the quality and quantity of data currently available, however, generalizations thus derived must be regarded as tentative. Nevertheless, read literally, available palaeontological data appear to indicate that the global ecosystem experienced a gradual but massive collapse between 1 000 Ma and the beginning of the Phanerozoic, a supposition consistent with other lines of geological and geochemical evidence. A possible forcing agent for such a collapse appears to have been a decrease in ambient levels of carbon dioxide and a resultant decrease in average global temperature, photosynthetic efficiency, and primary productivity.

  5. Collapse and revival in holographic quenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  6. Progenitors of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Cristini, A.; Georgy, C.; Meakin, C.; Walkington, I.

    2017-02-01

    Massive stars have a strong impact on their surroundings, in particular when they produce a core-collapse supernova at the end of their evolution. In these proceedings, we review the general evolution of massive stars and their properties at collapse as well as the transition between massive and intermediate-mass stars. We also summarise the effects of metallicity and rotation. We then discuss some of the major uncertainties in the modelling of massive stars, with a particular emphasis on the treatment of convection in 1D stellar evolution codes. Finally, we present new 3D hydrodynamic simulations of convection in carbon burning and list key points to take from 3D hydrodynamic studies for the development of new prescriptions for convective boundary mixing in 1D stellar evolution codes.

  7. Simulated cytoskeletal collapse via tau degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Sendek

    Full Text Available We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06-0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse.

  8. Galactic collapse of scalar field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubierre, Miguel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Guzman, F Siddhartha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Nunez, Dario [Centre for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urena-Lopez, L Arturo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Wiederhold, Petra [Departamento de Control Automatico, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2002-10-07

    We present a scenario for core galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for the formation of a galactic core plus a remnant halo, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  9. Ground deformations in collapsed caldera structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Natale, Giuseppe; Pingue, Folco

    1993-09-01

    A method is presented to analyze the effect of stress-strain discontinuities on the ground deformations generated by a pressure source. This is meant to simulate the effects due to caldera structures, likely to present fractured zones at the borders of the collapsed area. A method originally developed by Crouch (1976) to solve plane-strain problems has been used to simulate deformation curves for several source and discontinuity geometries. The main result is that the location of the discontinuities controls the extension of the deformed zone, and always reduces it with respect to a continuous medium. With respect to a homogeneous medium the presence of lateral discontinuities also acts towards lowering the overpressure required to produce a given amount of deformation. These results indicate that, when analyzing ground deformations in calderas, the use of classical methods involving continuous media should be avoided, or at least taken with caution. These methods, in fact, assume that the extension of the deformed zone is only linked to the source depth. Some examples of ground deformations in active calderas have been analyzed in the framework of the results obtained from theoretical modeling. Four calderas recently affected by ground deformations have been considered: Rabaul (New Guinea), Campi Flegrei (Italy), Long Valley and Yellowstone (U.S.A.). The effects of collapsed structures on the deformation field are possibly evidenced for all the four calderas. At Rabaul and Campi Flegrei, the fracture systems mainly affecting the ground deformations probably represent younger, innermost collapses and are well evidenced by seismicity studies. Ground deformations are here concentrated in an area much smaller than the one enclosed by geologically visible caldera rims. In particular, at Rabaul, the effect of the innermost collapse can explain the high concentration of the uplift in the period 1971-1985, previously modeled by a very shallow source (1-3 km) in terms of

  10. Adsorption-like Collapse of Diblock Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Orlandini, E.; Seno, F.; Stella, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    A linear copolymer made of two reciprocally attracting N-monomer blocks collapses to a compact phase through a novel transition, whose exponents are determined with extensive MC simulations in two and three dimensions. In the former case, an identification with the statistical geometry of suitable percolation paths allows to predict that the number of contacts between the blocks grows like $N^{9/16}$. In the compact phase the blocks are mixed and, in two dimensions, also zipped, in such a way...

  11. Ultrasonographic evaluation of tracheal collapse in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Kidong; Moon, Kumjung; Seong, Yunsang; Oh, Taeho; Yi, Sungjoon; Lee, Keunwoo

    2008-01-01

    Tracheal ultrasonography was performed to measure the width of the tracheal ring shadow and to assess the clinical relevance of these measurements for identifying tracheal collapse. The first tracheal ring width (FTRW) and thoracic inlet tracheal ring width (TITRW) were measured on both expiration and inspiration. The mean of the FTRW width (129 dogs) was greater in expiration (10.97 ± 1.02 mm, p = 0.001) than that in inspiration (9.86 ± 1.03 mm). For 51 normal dogs, the mean of the TITRW width was greater in expiration (9.05 ± 1.52 mm, p = 0.001) than in inspiration (8.02 ± 1.43 mm). For 78 tracheal collapse dogs, the mean of the TITRW width was greater in expiration (15.89 ± 1.01 mm, p = 0.001) than in inspiration (14.85 ± 1.17 mm). The TITRW/FTRW ratio of the normal dogs was higher (p = 0.001) in expiration (0.81 ± 0.09) than that in inspiration (0.79 ± 0.10). When compared between the normal and tracheal collapse dogs, the TITRW/FTRW ratio was also increased (p = 0.001) both in expiration (1.54 ± 0.09) and inspiration (1.47 ± 0.08), respectively. Based on these results, the cutoff level of the TITRW/FTRW ratio was statistically analyzed according to the receiver operating characteristic curve and it could be set at 1.16 in expiration and at 1.13 in inspiration. We have demonstrated that tracheal ultrasonography is a useful technique for the evaluation of tracheal collapse and it can be a supportive tool together with the radiographic findings for making the correct diagnosis. PMID:19043316

  12. The Collapse of Ecosystem Engineer Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Fontanari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are the ultimate ecosystem engineers who have profoundly transformed the world’s landscapes in order to enhance their survival. Somewhat paradoxically, however, sometimes the unforeseen effect of this ecosystem engineering is the very collapse of the population it intended to protect. Here we use a spatial version of a standard population dynamics model of ecosystem engineers to study the colonization of unexplored virgin territories by a small settlement of engineers. We find that during the expansion phase the population density reaches values much higher than those the environment can support in the equilibrium situation. When the colonization front reaches the boundary of the available space, the population density plunges sharply and attains its equilibrium value. The collapse takes place without warning and happens just after the population reaches its peak number. We conclude that overpopulation and the consequent collapse of an expanding population of ecosystem engineers is a natural consequence of the nonlinear feedback between the population and environment variables.

  13. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Natural populations can suffer catastrophic collapse in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery after such a collapse can be exceedingly difficult. We have used laboratory yeast populations to study proposed early warning signals of impending extinction. Yeast cooperatively breakdown the sugar sucrose, meaning that there is a minimum number of cells required to sustain the population. We have demonstrated experimentally that the fluctuations in the population size increase in magnitude and become slower as the population approaches collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to cheater cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We have confirmed this possibility experimentally by using a cheater yeast strain that lacks the gene encoding the cooperative behavior [1]. However, recent results in the lab demonstrate that the presence of a bacterial competitor may drive cooperation within the yeast population.[4pt] [1] Gore et al, Nature 459, 253 -- 256 (2009)

  14. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Raphael Hix

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  15. Collapse of tall granular columns in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna; Soga, Kenichi; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Avalanches, landslides, and debris flows are geophysical hazards, which involve rapid mass movement of granular solids, water, and air as a multi-phase system. In order to describe the mechanism of immersed granular flows, it is important to consider both the dynamics of the solid phase and the role of the ambient fluid. In the present study, the collapse of a granular column in fluid is studied using 2D LBM - DEM. The flow kinematics are compared with the dry and buoyant granular collapse to understand the influence of hydrodynamic forces and lubrication on the run-out. In the case of tall columns, the amount of material destabilised above the failure plane is larger than that of short columns. Therefore, the surface area of the mobilised mass that interacts with the surrounding fluid in tall columns is significantly higher than the short columns. This increase in the area of soil - fluid interaction results in an increase in the formation of turbulent vortices thereby altering the deposit morphology. It is observed that the vortices result in the formation of heaps that significantly affects the distribution of mass in the flow. In order to understand the behaviour of tall columns, the run-out behaviour of a dense granular column with an initial aspect ratio of 6 is studied. The collapse behaviour is analysed for different slope angles: 0°, 2.5°, 5° and 7.5°.

  16. Novel vacuum conditions in inflationary collapse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengochea, Gabriel R.; León, Gabriel

    2017-11-01

    Within the framework of inflationary models that incorporate a spontaneous reduction of the wave function for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, we study the effects on the primordial scalar power spectrum by choosing a novel initial quantum state that characterizes the perturbations of the inflaton. Specifically, we investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities when the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum is replaced by another one that minimizes the renormalized stress-energy tensor via a Hadamard procedure. We think that this new prescription for selecting the vacuum state is better suited for the self-induced collapse proposal than the traditional one in the semiclassical gravity picture. We show that the parametrization for the time of collapse, considered in previous works, is maintained. Also, we obtain an angular spectrum for the CMB temperature anisotropies consistent with the one that best fits the observational data. Therefore, we conclude that the collapse mechanism might be of a more fundamental character than previously suspected.

  17. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  18. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. 2: Collapse induced by stellar shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    The standard scenario for low-mass star formation involves 'inside-out' collapse of a dense molecular cloud core following loss of magnetic field support through ambipolar diffusion. However, isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and meteoritical inclusions imply that the collapse of the presolar cloud may have been triggered by a stellar shock wave. This paper explores 'outside-in' collapse, that is, protostellar collapse initiated directly by the compression of quiescent dense cloud cores impacted by relatively slow stellar shock waves. A second-order accurate, gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to study both the spherically symmetrical and three-dimensional evolution of initially centrally condensed, isothermal, self-gravitating, solar-mass cloud cores that are struck by stellar shock waves with velocities up to 25 km/s and postshock temperatures of 10 to 10,000 K. The models show that such mild shock waves do not completely shred and destroy the cloud, and that the dynamical ram pressure can compress the cloud to the verge of self-gravitational collapse. However, compression caused by a high postshock temperature is a considerably more effective means of inducing collapse. Shock-induced collapse produces high initial mass accretion rates (greater than 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr in a solar-mass cloud) that decline rapidly to much lower values, depending on the presence (approximately 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr) or absence (approximately 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr) of an infinite reservoir of mass. Stellar mass accretion rates approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr have been previously inferred from the luminosities of T Tauri stars; balanced mass accretion (stellar rate = envelope rate) at approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr could then be possible if accretion occurs from a finite mass reservoir. Fluid tracers are used to determine what fraction of the stellar shock material is incorporated into the resulting protostellar object and disk

  19. Negative ... concord?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannakidou, A

    The main claim of this paper is that a general theory of negative concord (NC) should allow for the possibility of NC involving scoping of a universal quantifier above negation. I propose that Greek NC instantiates this option. Greek n-words will be analyzed as polarity sensitive universal

  20. Subminimal negation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colacito, A.; de Jongh, D.; Vargas Sandoval, A.L.

    Minimal logic, i.e., intuitionistic logic without the ex falso principle, is investigated in its original form with a negation symbol instead of a symbol denoting the contradiction. A Kripke semantics is developed for minimal logic and its sublogics with a still weaker negation by introducing a

  1. Negative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Negative Leadership by Colonel David M. Oberlander United States Army United States Army War...SUBTITLE Negative Leadership 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel David M...Dr. Richard C. Bullis Department of Command Leadership , and Management 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  2. Implication of infectious agents and parasites in the Colony Collapse Disorder of the bee Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Giménez Bonillo, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Pòster The Apis mellifera bee is a pollinator with a very important role and it is indispensable for the growth of the productivity of some agricultural crops. In the last years there is the worry for the increasing loss of mellifera bee colonies all over the world. The CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder) is a sudden death of bee colonies and, in many cases, swarm abandonment

  3. Observation of Weak Collapse in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Eigen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the collapse of an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate prepared in the uniform potential of an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for collapse and the collapse dynamics, observing universal behavior in agreement with theoretical expectations. Most importantly, we observe a clear experimental signature of the counterintuitive weak collapse, namely, that making the system more unstable can result in a smaller particle loss. We experimentally determine the scaling laws that govern the weak-collapse atom loss, providing a benchmark for the general theories of nonlinear wave phenomena.

  4. Observation of Weak Collapse in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, Christoph; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Suleymanzade, Aziza; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Smith, Robert P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the collapse of an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate prepared in the uniform potential of an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for collapse and the collapse dynamics, observing universal behavior in agreement with theoretical expectations. Most importantly, we observe a clear experimental signature of the counterintuitive weak collapse, namely, that making the system more unstable can result in a smaller particle loss. We experimentally determine the scaling laws that govern the weak-collapse atom loss, providing a benchmark for the general theories of nonlinear wave phenomena.

  5. Impossible Worlds and Logical Omniscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Jens Christian Krarup

    2013-01-01

    , and considerably less investigated challenge is to ensure that the resulting modal space can also be used to model moderately ideal agents that are not logically omniscient but nevertheless logically competent. Intuitively, while such agents may fail to rule out subtly impossible worlds that verify complex logical...... falsehoods, they are nevertheless able to rule out blatantly impossible worlds that verify obvious logical falsehoods. To model moderately ideal agents, I argue, the job is to construct a modal space that contains only possible and non-trivially impossible worlds where it is not the case that “anything goes......”. But I prove that it is impossible to develop an impossible-world framework that can do this job and that satisfies certain standard conditions. Effectively, I show that attempts to model moderately ideal agents in a world-involving framework collapse to modeling either logical omniscient agents...

  6. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  7. Quantum dust collapse in 2+1 dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Souvik; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will examine the consequence of a canonical theory of quantum dust collapse in 2+1 dimensions. The solution of the WDW equation describing the collapse indicates that collapsing shells outside the apparent horizon are accompanied by outgoing shells within the apparent horizon during their collapse phase and stop collapsing once they reach the apparent horizon. Taking this picture of quantum collapse seriously, we determine a static solution with energy density corresponding to a dust ball whose collapse has terminated at the apparent horizon. We show that the boundary radius of the ball is larger than the BTZ radius confirming that no event horizon is formed. The ball is sustained by radial pressure which we determine and which we attribute to the Unruh radiation within it.

  8. Simulations of protostellar collapse using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics. I. The first collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaytet, Neil; Audit, Edouard; Chabrier, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Radiative transfer plays a major role in the process of star formation. Many simulations of gravitational collapse of a cold gas cloud followed by the formation of a protostellar core use a grey treatment of radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. However, dust opacities which dominate...... the spherically symmetric collapse of a 1 solar mass cloud core. Monochromatic dust opacities for five different temperature ranges were used to compute Planck and Rosseland means inside each frequency group. The results are very consistent with previous studies and only small differences were observed between...... the grey and multigroup simulations. For a same central density, the multigroup simulations tend to produce first cores with a slightly higher radius and central temperature. We also performed simulations of the collapse of a 10 and 0.1 solar mass cloud, which showed the properties of the first core...

  9. Memory effect in the chain-collapse process in a dilute polymer solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yasuyuki; Sasaki, Naoki; Nakata, Mitsuo

    2004-12-01

    The effect of temperature perturbation on a single-chain-collapse process was studied for poly(methyl methacrylate) with the molecular weight Mw=1.05×107 in the mixed solvent of tert-butyl alcohol+water (2.5 vol %). In the chain-collapse process after a quench from the θ temperature to a temperature T1, the temperature was changed from T1 to T2 at the time t1 after the quench and returned to T1 at the time t1+t2. In the three stages at T1, T2, and T1, measurements of the mean-square radius of gyration of polymer chains were carried out by static light scattering and the chain-collapse process was represented by the expansion factor as a function of time. An effect of chain aggregation on the measurements was negligibly small because of the very slow phase separation. For the negative temperature perturbation (T1>T2), the chain-collapse processes observed in the first and third stages were connected smoothly and agreed with the collapse process due to a single-stage quench to T1. A memory of the chain collapse in the first stage at T1 was found to persist into the third stage at the same temperature T1 without being affected by the temperature perturbation of T2 during t2. The memory effect was observed irrespective of the time period of t2. The positive temperature perturbation (T1process.

  10. Worlds Fantastic, Worlds Familiar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2017-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Mercury: the hottest little place; 2. Venus: an even hotter place; 3. Mars: the abode of life?; 4. Asteroids and comets: sweat the small stuff; 5. Galileo's treasures: worlds of fire and ice; 6. Enceladus: an active iceball in space; 7. Titan: an Earth in deep freeze?; 8. Iapetus and its friends: the weirdest 'planets' in the Solar System; 9. Pluto: the first view of the 'third zone'; 10. Earths above: the search for exoplanets and life in the universe; Epilogue; Glossary; Acknowledgements; Index.

  11. Evaluation of collapse and non-collapse of parallel bridges affected by liquefaction and lateral spreading.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Benjamin; Brandenberg, Scott J.; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented of the authors’ ongoing investigation of the performance of a railroad bridge and adjacent highway bridge during the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California, Mexico. A span of the pile-supported railroad bridge collapsed due to movement of a pier from lateral spreading. The highway bridge, supported on drilled shafts, suffered moderate structural damage but did not collapse. An overview of the site, structural details of the bridges, and the proposed geote...

  12. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  13. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-038, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1494 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  14. Climate and the collapse of Maya civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Gerald H; Günther, Detlef; Peterson, Larry C; Sigman, Daniel M; Hughen, Konrad A; Aeschlimann, Beat

    2003-03-14

    In the anoxic Cariaco Basin of the southern Caribbean, the bulk titanium content of undisturbed sediment reflects variations in riverine input and the hydrological cycle over northern tropical South America. A seasonally resolved record of titanium shows that the collapse of Maya civilization in the Terminal Classic Period occurred during an extended regional dry period, punctuated by more intense multiyear droughts centered at approximately 810, 860, and 910 A.D. These new data suggest that a century-scale decline in rainfall put a general strain on resources in the region, which was then exacerbated by abrupt drought events, contributing to the social stresses that led to the Maya demise.

  15. Enzymatic collapse of artificial polymer composite material containing double-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masanori; Amoo, Mariko

    2008-06-01

    Large amounts of DNA-enriched biomaterials, such as salmon milts and shellfish gonads, are discarded as industrial waste around the world. Therefore, the utilizations of DNA with the specific function are important for the biomaterial science and the curce technology. We could convert the discarded DNA to an enzymatic collapsible material by the addition of DNA to the artificial polymer material, such as nylon. Although these DNA-artificial polymer composite materials were stable in water, these materials indicated the collapsibility at the DNA-hydrolyzed enzyme, such as Micrococcal nuclease, condition. Additionally, these collapsibilities under enzyme condition were controlled by the number of imino groups in the components of the artificial polymer. Furthermore, these composite materials could create the fiber form with a highly ordered molecular orientation by the reaction at the liquid/liquid interface. The DNA-artificial polymer composite materials may have the potential utility as a novel bio-, medical-, and environmental materials with the enzymatic collapsibility and degradability.

  16. The risk of collapse in abandoned mine sites: the issue of data uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longoni Laura

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ground collapses over abandoned underground mines constitute a new environmental risk in the world. The high risk associated with subsurface voids, together with lack of knowledge of the geometric and geomechanical features of mining areas, makes abandoned underground mines one of the current challenges for countries with a long mining history. In this study, a stability analysis of Montevecchia marl mine is performed in order to validate a general approach that takes into account the poor local information and the variability of the input data. The collapse risk was evaluated through a numerical approach that, starting with some simplifying assumptions, is able to provide an overview of the collapse probability. The final results is an easy-accessible-transparent summary graph that shows the collapse probability. This approach may be useful for public administrators called upon to manage this environmental risk. The approach tries to simplify this complex problem in order to achieve a roughly risk assessment, but, since it relies on just a small amount of information, any final user should be aware that a comprehensive and detailed risk scenario can be generated only through more exhaustive investigations.

  17. Quantitative insights into the role of gravitational collapse in major orogenic belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mantovani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous works have proposed gravitational collapse as the driving mechanism of extensional deformation of thickened continental crust. In this work we investigate the physical plausibility of this interpretation for the most important orogenic belts of the world by computing the spreading force induced by lateral variations of crustal thickness and the possible resisting forces. Two collapse mechanisms, one involving the upper crust only and the other the whole crust, have been considered. Particular attention has been devoted to constrain the uncertainty affecting such computations, mostly due to the large variability of the thermal and mechanical properties of rocks. The results obtained show that gravitational collapse is not a plausible mechanism in the four Mediterranean orogens here considered (Northern Apennines, Calabrian Arc, Hellenic Arc and Carpathians. For the other orogenic zones we have taken into account (Western U.S. Cordillera, Central Andes, Himalayas and Central Alps, the large uncertainty that affects the estimate of spreading and resisting forces does not allow to firmly assess the feasibility of gravitational collapse.

  18. The two promising scenarios to explode core collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soker, Noam

    2017-10-01

    I compare to each other what I consider to be the two most promising scenarios to explode core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Both are based on the negative jet feedback mechanism (JFM). In the jittering jets scenario a collapsing core of a single slowly-rotating star can launch jets. The accretion disk or belt (a sub-Keplerian accretion flow concentrated toward the equatorial plane) that launches the jets is intermittent with varying directions of the axis. Instabilities, such as the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), lead to stochastic angular momentum variations that allow the formation of the intermittent accretion disks/belts. According to this scenario no failed CCSNe exist. According to the fixed axis scenario, the core of the progenitor star must be spun up during its late evolutionary phases, and hence all CCSNe are descendants of strongly interacting binary systems, most likely through a common envelope evolution (whether the companion survives or not). Due to the strong binary interaction, the axis of the accretion disk that is formed around the newly born neutron star has a more or less fixed direction. According to the fixed axis scenario, accretion disks/belts are not formed around the newly born neutron star of single stars; they rather end in failed CCSNe. I also raise the possibility that the jittering jets scenario operates for progenitors with initial mass of 8 {M}ȯ ≲ {M}{ZAMS}≲ 18 {M}ȯ , while the fixed axis scenario operates for {M}{ZAMS}≳ 18 {M}ȯ . For the first time these two scenarios are compared to each other, as well as to some aspects of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism. These new comparisons further suggest that the JFM plays a major role in exploding massive stars.

  19. Upper airway collapsibility and genioglossus activity in adolescents during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J; Yuan, Haibo; Katz, Eliot S; Karamessinis, Laurie R; Bradford, Ruth M; Gallagher, Paul R; Hannigan, James T; Nixon, Thomas; Ward, Michelle B; Lee, Yin N; Marcus, Carole L

    2012-10-01

    Obese patients develop obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), at least in part because of a narrowed upper airway. However, many obese adolescents do not develop OSAS, despite having a presumably narrower airway. The reasons for this phenomenon are unclear. The authors hypothesized that obese controls have a compensatory neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them less likely to develop upper airway collapse. Patients underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep while wearing intraoral electrodes to measure genioglossal electromyography (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease nasal pressure (P(N)) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. Sleep laboratory. There were 35 obese patients with OSAS, 28 obese controls, and 43 lean controls. In the activated state, the two control groups had a flatter slope of the pressure-flow relationship and a more negative critical closing pressure (less collapsible) than the OSAS group. In the hypotonic state, the lean controls had a flatter slope of the pressure-flow relationship than the OSAS and obese control groups. In the activated state, the slope of EMGgg versus P(N) was greater in the obese control group than in the OSAS or lean control groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.028, respectively); there were no differences in the hypotonic state. Obese controls have vigorous upper airway neuromuscular responses during sleep. Upper airway reflexes normally decline during adolescent development. It is speculated that obese adolescents without OSAS maintain protective upper airway reflexes during adolescent development, whereas those who go on to develop OSAS do not.

  20. Spherical collapse in νΛCDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVerde, Marilena

    2014-10-01

    The abundance of massive dark matter halos hosting galaxy clusters provides an important test of the masses of relic neutrino species. The dominant effect of neutrino mass is to lower the typical amplitude of density perturbations that eventually form halos, but for neutrino masses ≳0.4 eV the threshold for halo formation can be changed significantly as well. We study the spherical collapse model for halo formation in cosmologies with neutrino masses in the range mνi=0.05-1 eV and find that halo formation is differently sensitive to Ων and mν. That is, different neutrino hierarchies with a common Ων are in principle distinguishable. The added sensitivity to mν is small but potentially important for scenarios with heavier sterile neutrinos. Massive neutrinos cause the evolution of density perturbations to be scale dependent at high redshift which complicates the usual mapping between the collapse threshold and halo abundance. We propose one way of handling this and compute the correction to the halo mass function within this framework. For ∑mνi≲0.3 eV, our prescription for the halo abundance is only ≲15% different than the standard calculation. However for larger neutrino masses the differences approach 50-100% which, if verified by simulations, could alter neutrino mass constraints from cluster abundance.

  1. Online fuzzy voltage collapse risk quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berizzi, A.; Bovo, C.; Delfanti, M.; Merlo, M. [Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cirio, D. [CESI Ricerca (Italy); Pozzi, M. [CESI (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    Many voltage stability indicators have been proposed in the past for the voltage collapse assessment. Almost all of them are determined through quite complex analytical tools; therefore, it is difficult for system operators to give them a physical meaning. In order to perform a simple and reliable evaluation of the security margins, it is necessary to make a synthesis of the information given by the various indices. The present work proposes an Artificial Intelligence-based tool for the evaluation of the voltage security. In particular, a Fuzzy Inference Engine is developed and optimized by two different approaches (Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms). Starting from the state estimation, a given set of mathematical indices is computed to represent a snapshot of the current electric system operating point. The numerical values are then translated into a set of symbolic and linguistic quantities that are manipulated through a set of logical connectives and Inference Methods provided by the mathematical logic. As a result, the Fuzzy Logic gives a MW measure of the distance from the collapse limit, a metric usually appreciated by system operators. The Fuzzy System has been built and optimized by using, as a test system, a detailed model of the EHV Italian transmission network connected to an equivalent of the UCTE network (about 1700 buses). (author)

  2. Magnetic diffusivities in 3D radiative chemo-hydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Commerçon, Benoît; Lesaffre, Pierre; Semenov, Dimitry

    2017-07-01

    demonstrate that the assumption of a fixed dominant ion mass can lead to a one order of magnitude mismatch in the ambipolar diffusion magnitude. The negative Hall effect is dominant during the collapse in case of small dust, i.e. for the mean dust size of 0.02 μm and smaller; we connect this effect to the dominance of negatively charged grains. We find that the Hall effect reverses its sign for mean dust size of 0.1 μm and smaller. The phenomenon of the sign reversal strongly depends on the number of negatively charged dust relative to the ions and the quality of coupling of the charged dust to the magnetic fields. We have adopted different strengths of magnetic fields, β = Pgas/Pmag = 2,5,25. We observe that the variation on the field strength only shifts the Hall effect reversal along the radius of the collapsing cloud, but does not prevent it. Conclusions: The dust grain mean size appears to be the parameter with the strongest impact on the magnitude of the magnetic diffusivity, dividing the collapsing clouds in Hall-dominated and ambipolar-dominated clouds and affecting the size of the resulting disks. We propose to link the dust properties and occurrence and size of disk structures in Class 0 young stellar objects. The proper accounting for dust grain growth in the radiative magneto-hydrodynamical collapse models are as important as coupling the dynamics of the collapse with the chemistry.

  3. Holistic screening of collapsing honey bee colonies in Spain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepero, Almudena; Ravoet, Jorgen; Gómez-Moracho, Tamara; Bernal, José Luis; Del Nozal, Maria J; Bartolomé, Carolina; Maside, Xulio; Meana, Aránzazu; González-Porto, Amelia V; de Graaf, Dirk C; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano

    2014-09-15

    Here we present a holistic screening of collapsing colonies from three professional apiaries in Spain. Colonies with typical honey bee depopulation symptoms were selected for multiple possible factors to reveal the causes of collapse. Omnipresent were Nosema ceranae and Lake Sinai Virus. Moderate prevalences were found for Black Queen Cell Virus and trypanosomatids, whereas Deformed Wing Virus, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus strain Brookings and neogregarines were rarely detected. Other viruses, Nosema apis, Acarapis woodi and Varroa destructor were not detected. Palinologic study of pollen demonstrated that all colonies were foraging on wild vegetation. Consequently, the pesticide residue analysis was negative for neonicotinoids. The genetic analysis of trypanosomatids GAPDH gene, showed that there is a large genetic distance between Crithidia mellificae ATCC30254, an authenticated cell strain since 1974, and the rest of the presumed C. mellificae sequences obtained in our study or published. This means that the latter group corresponds to a highly differentiated taxon that should be renamed accordingly. The results of this study demonstrate that the drivers of colony collapse may differ between geographic regions with different environmental conditions, or with different beekeeping and agricultural practices. The role of other pathogens in colony collapse has to bee studied in future, especially trypanosomatids and neogregarines. Beside their pathological effect on honey bees, classification and taxonomy of these protozoan parasites should also be clarified.

  4. Ion assisted structural collapse of a single stranded DNA: A molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Dixit, Himanshu; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi, E-mail: rajarshi@chem.iitb.ac.in

    2015-09-28

    Highlights: • The dynamics of a single-stranded DNA in presence of different concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} is investigated. • The initial DNA chain collapse is characterized by the formation of non-sequentially stacked base pairs. • The DNA chain re-swells at high concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} as a consequence of overcharging. - Abstract: The structure and dynamics of negatively charged nucleic acids strongly correlate with the concentration and charge of the oppositely charged counterions. It is well known that the structural collapse of DNA is favoured in the presence of additional salt, a source of excess oppositely charged ions. Under such conditions single stranded DNA adopts a collapsed coil like conformation, typically characterized by stacking base pairs. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, we demonstrate that in the presence of additional divalent salt (MgCl{sub 2}) single stranded DNA with base sequence 5′-CGCGAATTCGCG-3′ (Dickerson Drew dodecamer) initially collapses and then expands with increasing salt concentration. This is due to the overcharging induced DNA chain swelling, a dominant factor at a higher divalent salt concentration. In a nutshell, our simulations show how in the presence of divalent salt, non-sequential base stacking and overcharging competes and affect single stranded DNA dynamics unlike a monovalent salt.

  5. Quantum gravitational dust collapse does not result in a black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Cenalo, E-mail: Cenalo.Vaz@uc.edu

    2015-02-15

    Quantum gravity suggests that the paradox recently put forward by Almheiri et al. (AMPS) can be resolved if matter does not undergo continuous collapse to a singularity but condenses on the apparent horizon. One can then expect a quasi-static object to form even after the gravitational field has overcome any degeneracy pressure of the matter fields. We consider dust collapse. If the collapse terminates on the apparent horizon, the Misner–Sharp mass function of the dust ball is predicted and we construct static solutions with no tangential pressure that would represent such a compact object. The collapse wave functions indicate that there will be processes by which energy extraction from the center occurs. These leave behind a negative point mass at the center which contributes to the total energy of the system but has no effect on the energy density of the dust ball. The solutions describe a compact object whose boundary lies outside its Schwarzschild radius and which is hardly distinguishable from a neutron star.

  6. Syntaxin 1B suppresses macropinocytosis and semaphorin 3A-induced growth cone collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabayama, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Tokushige, Naoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Mizutani, Akihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2011-05-18

    Growth cone collapse is a crucial process for repulsive axon guidance and is accompanied by a reduction in growth cone surface area. This process of reduction may be regulated by endocytosis; however, its molecular mechanism is unclear. Macropinocytosis is a clathrin-independent form of endocytosis in which large areas of plasma membrane can be engulfed. We have reported previously that macropinocytosis is induced in growth cones of chick dorsal root ganglion neurons by semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a repulsive axon guidance cue, and that Sema3A-induced reduction in growth cone surface area and macropinocytic vacuole area were correlated, suggesting a positive role for macropinocytosis in Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. In the present study, we found that syntaxin 1B (Syx1B), a membrane trafficking protein, is a negative regulator of macropinocytosis, and its expression is downregulated by Sema3A signaling. Macropinocytosis inhibitor ethylisopropylamiloride or Syx1B overexpression suppressed Sema3A-induced macropinocytosis and growth cone collapse. These results indicate that Syx1B couples macropinocytosis-mediated massive internalization of the plasma membrane to Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse.

  7. Quantum gravitational dust collapse does not result in a black hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenalo Vaz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity suggests that the paradox recently put forward by Almheiri et al. (AMPS can be resolved if matter does not undergo continuous collapse to a singularity but condenses on the apparent horizon. One can then expect a quasi-static object to form even after the gravitational field has overcome any degeneracy pressure of the matter fields. We consider dust collapse. If the collapse terminates on the apparent horizon, the Misner–Sharp mass function of the dust ball is predicted and we construct static solutions with no tangential pressure that would represent such a compact object. The collapse wave functions indicate that there will be processes by which energy extraction from the center occurs. These leave behind a negative point mass at the center which contributes to the total energy of the system but has no effect on the energy density of the dust ball. The solutions describe a compact object whose boundary lies outside its Schwarzschild radius and which is hardly distinguishable from a neutron star.

  8. Kinematic fingerprint of core-collapsed globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Webb, J. J.; Sills, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamical evolution drives globular clusters toward core collapse, which strongly shapes their internal properties. Diagnostics of core collapse have so far been based on photometry only, namely on the study of the concentration of the density profiles. Here we present a new method to robustly identify core-collapsed clusters based on the study of their stellar kinematics. We introduce the kinematic concentration parameter, ck, the ratio between the global and local degree of energy equipartition reached by a cluster, and show through extensive direct N-body simulations that clusters approaching core collapse and in the post-core collapse phase are strictly characterized by ck > 1. The kinematic concentration provides a suitable diagnostic to identify core-collapsed clusters, independent from any other previous methods based on photometry. We also explore the effects of incomplete radial and stellar mass coverage on the calculation of ck and find that our method can be applied to state-of-art kinematic datasets.

  9. A simple proof of Perelman's collapsing theorem for 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jianguo; Ge, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We will simplify earlier proofs of Perelman's collapsing theorem for 3-manifolds given by Shioya-Yamaguchi and Morgan-Tian. Among other things, we use Perelman's critical point theory (e.g., multiple conic singularity theory and his fibration theory) for Alexandrov spaces to construct the desired local Seifert fibration structure on collapsed 3-manifolds. The verification of Perelman's collapsing theorem is the last step of Perelman's proof of Thurston's Geometrization Conjecture on the class...

  10. An Empty Donut Hole: the Great Collapse of a North American Fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bailey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma is North America's most abundant and lucrative natural fishery, and is the world's largest fishery for human food. The little-known demise of the "Donut Hole" stock of pollock in the Aleutian Basin of the central Bering Sea during the 1980s is the most spectacular fishery collapse in North American history, dwarfing the famous crashes of the northern cod and Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax. This collapse has received scant recognition and became evident only in 1993 when fishing was banned by an international moratorium; nearly 20 years later it has not recovered. The history of fishing in the North Pacific Ocean after World War II offers some insights into how the Donut Hole pollock fishery developed, and the societal and economic pressures behind it that so influenced the stock's fate. Overfishing was, without a doubt, the greatest contributor to the collapse of the Aleutian Basin pollock fishery, but a lack of knowledge about population biocomplexity added to the confusion of how to best manage the harvest. Unfortunately, the big scientific questions regarding the relationship of Donut Hole fish to other stocks are still unanswered.

  11. Shell instability of a collapsing dense core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntormousi, Evangelia; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Understanding the formation of binary and multiple stellar systems largely comes down to studying the circumstances under which a condensing core fragments (or not) during the first stages of the collapse. However, both the probability of fragmentation and the number of fragments seem to be determined to a large degree by the initial conditions. In this work we explore this dependence by studying the fate of the linear perturbations of a homogeneous gas sphere, both analytically and numerically. Methods: In particular, we investigate the stability of the well-known homologous solution that describes the collapse of a uniform spherical cloud. One problem that arises in such treatments is the mathematical singularity in the perturbation equations, which corresponds to the location of the sonic point of the flow. This difficulty is surpassed here by explicitly introducing a weak shock next to the sonic point as a natural way of connecting the subsonic to the supersonic regimes. In parallel, we perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) numerical simulations of the linear stages of the collapse and compare the growth rates obtained by each method. Results: With this combination of analytical and numerical tools, we explore the behavior of both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric perturbations. The numerical experiments provide the linear growth rates as a function of the core's initial virial parameter and as a function of the azimuthal wave number of the perturbation. The overlapping regime of the numerical experiments and the analytical predictions is the situation of a cold and large cloud, and in this regime the analytically calculated growth rates agree very well with the ones obtained from the simulations. Conclusions: The use of a weak shock as part of the perturbation allows us to find physically acceptable solutions to the equations for a continuous range of growth rates. The numerical simulations agree very well with the analytical prediction for the most

  12. Experimental bounds on collapse models from gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso, Matteo; Bassi, Angelo; Falferi, Paolo; Vinante, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Wave function collapse models postulate a fundamental breakdown of the quantum superposition principle at the macroscale. Therefore, experimental tests of collapse models are also fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. Here, we compute the upper bounds on the collapse parameters, which can be inferred by the gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA Pathfinder, and AURIGA. We consider the most widely used collapse model, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model. We show that these experiments exclude a huge portion of the CSL parameter space, the strongest bound being set by the recently launched space mission LISA Pathfinder. We also rule out a proposal for quantum-gravity-induced decoherence.

  13. Elevated dissolved organic carbon biodegradability from thawing and collapsing permafrost

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Larouche, Julia R; Jones, Jeremy B; Bowden, William B; Balser, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    ...) in water flowing from collapsing permafrost (thermokarst) on the North Slope of Alaska and tested the role of DOC chemical composition and nutrient concentration in determining biodegradability...

  14. Final fate of charged anisotropic fluid collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suhail; Shah, Hassan; Ahmad, Zahid; Ramzan, Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the effects of charge on spherically symmetric collapse of anisotropic fluid with a positive cosmological constant. It is observed that electromagnetic field places restriction on the bounds of cosmological constant, which acts as repulsive force against the contraction of matter content and hence the rate of destruction is faster in the presence of electromagnetic field. We have also noted that the presence of charge affects the time interval between the formation of cosmological horizon (CH) and black hole horizon (BHH). When the electric field strength E(t, r) vanishes, our investigations are in full agreement with the results obtained by Ahmad and Malik [Int. J. Theor. Phys. 55, 600 (2016)].

  15. Collapse and bounce of null fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Creelman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Exact solutions describing the spherical collapse of null fluids can contain regions which violate the energy conditions. Physically the violations occur when the infalling matter continues to move inwards even when non-gravitational repulsive forces become stronger than gravity. In 1991 Ori proposed a resolution for these violations: spacetime surgery should be used to replace the energy condition violating region with an outgoing solution. The matter bounces. We revisit and implement this proposal for the more general Husain null fluids. We find that: 1) generically there is a thin shell discontinuity along the junction surface between ingoing and outgoing solutions, 2) there are special cases where the shell vanishes and 3) these conclusions also apply to charged Vaidya (the original paper argued that there were no shells at the junctions). Along the way we note an apparent error in the standard classification of energy condition violations for Type II stress-energy tensors.

  16. Inhomogeneities from quantum collapse scheme without inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Bengochea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider the problem of the emergence of seeds of cosmic structure in the framework of the non-inflationary model proposed by Hollands and Wald. In particular, we consider a modification to that proposal designed to account for breaking the symmetries of the initial quantum state, leading to the generation of the primordial inhomogeneities. This new ingredient is described in terms of a spontaneous reduction of the wave function. We investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities, and which are the dominant deviations that arise in the model as a consequence of the introduction of the collapse of the quantum state into that scenario.

  17. Inhomogeneities from quantum collapse scheme without inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Bengochea, Gabriel R; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we consider the problem of the emergence of seeds of cosmic structure in the framework of the non-inflationary model proposed by Hollands and Wald. In particular, we consider a modification to that proposal designed to account for breaking the symmetries of the initial quantum state, leading to the generation of the primordial inhomogeneities. This new ingredient is described in terms of a spontaneous reduction of the wave function. We investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities, and which are the dominant deviations that arise in the model as a consequence of the introduction of the collapse of the quantum state into that scenario.

  18. Magnetorotational Explosions of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Core-collapse supernovae are accompanied by formation of neutron stars. The gravitation energy is transformed into the energy of the explosion, observed as SN II, SN Ib,c type supernovae. We present results of 2-D MHD simulations, where the source of energy is rotation, and magnetic eld serves as a "transition belt" for the transformation of the rotation energy into the energy of the explosion. The toroidal part of the magnetic energy initially grows linearly with time due to dierential rotation. When the twisted toroidal component strongly exceeds the poloidal eld, magneto-rotational instability develops, leading to a drastic acceleration in the growth of magnetic energy. Finally, a fast MHD shock is formed, producing a supernova explosion. Mildly collimated jet is produced for dipole-like type of the initial field. At very high initial magnetic field no MRI development was found.

  19. Inhomogeneities from quantum collapse scheme without inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cañate, Pedro, E-mail: pedro.canate@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510, México (Mexico); Sudarsky, Daniel, E-mail: sudarsky@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510, México (Mexico)

    2015-04-09

    In this work, we consider the problem of the emergence of seeds of cosmic structure in the framework of the non-inflationary model proposed by Hollands and Wald. In particular, we consider a modification to that proposal designed to account for breaking the symmetries of the initial quantum state, leading to the generation of the primordial inhomogeneities. This new ingredient is described in terms of a spontaneous reduction of the wave function. We investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities, and which are the dominant deviations that arise in the model as a consequence of the introduction of the collapse of the quantum state into that scenario.

  20. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  1. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  2. Collapse of Synchronization in a Memristive Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Mi; Wang, Chun-Ni; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    For an oscillating circuit or coupled circuits, damage in electric devices such as inductor, resistance, memristor even capacitor can cause breakdown or collapse of the circuits. These damage could be associated with external attack or aging in electric devices, and then the bifurcation parameters could be deformed from normal values. Resonators or signal generators are often synchronized to produce powerful signal series and this problem could be investigated by using synchronization in network. Complete synchronization could be induced by linear coupling in a two-dimensional network of identical oscillators when the coupling intensity is beyond certain threshold. The collective behavior and synchronization state are much dependent on the bifurcation parameters. Any slight fluctuation in parameter and breakdown in bifurcation parameter can cause transition of synchronization even collapse of synchronization in the network. In this paper, a two-dimensional network composed of the resonators coupled with memristors under nearest-neighbor connection is designed, and the network can reach complete synchronization by carefully selecting coupling intensity. The network keeps synchronization after certain transient period, then a bifurcation parameter in a resonator is switched from the previous value and the adjacent resonators (oscillators) are affected in random. It is found that the synchronization area could be invaded greatly in a diffusive way. The damage area size is much dependent on the selection of diffusive period of damage and deformation degree in the parameter. Indeed, the synchronization area could keep intact at largest size under intermediate deformation degree and coupling intensity. Supported by the National Natural Science of China under Grant Nos. 11265008 and 11365014

  3. Numerical simulations of non-spherical bubble collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Eric; Colonius, Tim

    2009-06-01

    A high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme is used to simulate the collapse of a gas bubble in water. In order to better understand the damage caused by collapsing bubbles, the dynamics of the shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of a bubble near a planar rigid surface and in a free field are analysed. Collapse times, bubble displacements, interfacial velocities and surface pressures are quantified as a function of the pressure ratio driving the collapse and of the initial bubble stand-off distance from the wall; these quantities are compared to the available theory and experiments and show good agreement with the data for both the bubble dynamics and the propagation of the shock emitted upon the collapse. Non-spherical collapse involves the formation of a re-entrant jet directed towards the wall or in the direction of propagation of the incoming shock. In shock-induced collapse, very high jet velocities can be achieved, and the finite time for shock propagation through the bubble may be non-negligible compared to the collapse time for the pressure ratios of interest. Several types of shock waves are generated during the collapse, including precursor and water-hammer shocks that arise from the re-entrant jet formation and its impact upon the distal side of the bubble, respectively. The water-hammer shock can generate very high pressures on the wall, far exceeding those from the incident shock. The potential damage to the neighbouring surface is quantified by measuring the wall pressure. The range of stand-off distances and the surface area for which amplification of the incident shock due to bubble collapse occurs is determined.

  4. China's Future Intent: Responsible World Power or International Rogue State

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Brian

    1997-01-01

    ...") in the emerging new world order. The collapse of the Soviet Union, the subsequent end of the Cold War bipolar world, and the downsizing of US and Russian nuclear arsenals in compliance with START I and START II all make room...

  5. Ongoing collapse of coral-reef shark populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, William D; Hisano, Mizue; Connolly, Sean R; Choat, J Howard

    2006-12-05

    Marine ecosystems are suffering severe depletion of apex predators worldwide; shark declines are principally due to conservative life-histories and fisheries overexploitation. On coral reefs, sharks are strongly interacting apex predators and play a key role in maintaining healthy reef ecosystems. Despite increasing fishing pressure, reef shark catches are rarely subject to specific limits, with management approaches typically depending upon no-take marine reserves to maintain populations. Here, we reveal that this approach is failing by documenting an ongoing collapse in two of the most abundant reef shark species on the Great Barrier Reef (Australia). We find an order of magnitude fewer sharks on fished reefs compared to no-entry management zones that encompass only 1% of reefs. No-take zones, which are more difficult to enforce than no-entry zones, offer almost no protection for shark populations. Population viability models of whitetip and gray reef sharks project ongoing steep declines in abundance of 7% and 17% per annum, respectively. These findings indicate that current management of no-take areas is inadequate for protecting reef sharks, even in one of the world's most-well-managed reef ecosystems. Further steps are urgently required for protecting this critical functional group from ecological extinction.

  6. Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Paul R; Ehrlich, Anne H

    2013-03-07

    Environmental problems have contributed to numerous collapses of civilizations in the past. Now, for the first time, a global collapse appears likely. Overpopulation, overconsumption by the rich and poor choices of technologies are major drivers; dramatic cultural change provides the main hope of averting calamity.

  7. Collapse in a forced three-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lushnikov, P.M.; Saffman, M.

    2000-01-01

    We derive sufficient conditions for the occurrence of collapse in a forced three-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation without dissipation. Numerical studies continue the results to the case of finite dissipation.......We derive sufficient conditions for the occurrence of collapse in a forced three-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation without dissipation. Numerical studies continue the results to the case of finite dissipation....

  8. Stability of naked singularity arising in gravitational collapse of Type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to choose the velocity function and rest of the initial data so that the end state of collapse is either a black hole (BH) or a naked singularity (NS). This result is significant for two reasons: (1) It produces a substantially 'big' initial data set which under gravitational collapse results into a naked singularity. (2) Type I matter fields.

  9. Predicting epiglottic collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Marques, Melania; Sands, Scott A; Op de Beeck, Sara; Genta, Pedro R; Taranto-Montemurro, Luigi; de Melo, Camila M; Messineo, Ludovico; Vanderveken, Olivier M; White, David P; Wellman, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterised by pharyngeal obstruction occurring at different sites. Endoscopic studies reveal that epiglottic collapse renders patients at higher risk of failed oral appliance therapy or accentuated collapse on continuous positive airway pressure. Diagnosing epiglottic collapse currently requires invasive studies (imaging and endoscopy). As an alternative, we propose that epiglottic collapse can be detected from the distinct airflow patterns it produces during sleep.23 OSA patients underwent natural sleep endoscopy. 1232 breaths were scored as epiglottic/nonepiglottic collapse. Several flow characteristics were determined from the flow signal (recorded simultaneously with endoscopy) and used to build a predictive model to distinguish epiglottic from nonepiglottic collapse. Additionally, 10 OSA patients were studied to validate the pneumotachograph flow features using nasal pressure signals.Epiglottic collapse was characterised by a rapid fall(s) in the inspiratory flow, more variable inspiratory and expiratory flow and reduced tidal volume. The cross-validated accuracy was 84%. Predictive features obtained from pneumotachograph flow and nasal pressure were strongly correlated.This study demonstrates that epiglottic collapse can be identified from the airflow signal measured during a sleep study. This method may enable clinicians to use clinically collected data to characterise underlying physiology and improve treatment decisions. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  10. Collapse arresting in an inhomogeneous quintic nonlinear Schrodinger model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1999-01-01

    Collapse of (1 + 1)-dimensional beams in the inhomogeneous one-dimensional quintic nonlinear Schrodinger equation is analyzed both numerically and analytically. It is shown that in the vicinity of a narrow attractive inhomogeneity, the collapse of beams in which the homogeneous medium would blow up...

  11. The Role of Confinement in Bubble Collapse in a Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Mauro; Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric; Barbier, Charlotte

    2017-11-01

    In a variety of applications, cavitation bubbles collapse near solid objects give rise to damage in certain extreme cases. Numerous detailed computational studies have been conducted of a single bubble collapsing near a rigid wall. However, there are known situations where the bubbles collapse in a confined configuration, such as in biomedical applications and in the spallation neutron source. However, the effect of confinement (e.g., in the case of bubble collapse in a narrow channel) is poorly understood. In the present work, we quantify the effect of confinement on the bubble dynamics, pressures and temperatures produced from a single bubble collapsing in a channel. An in-house, solution-adaptive, high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing method is used to solve the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. We demonstrate the conditions under which the channel walls strengthen/weaken the violence of the collapse and result in amplifying/reducing the wall pressures and temperatures. We further determine the smallest channel width, relative to the initial bubble radius, for which the presence of a second wall affects the collapse. Additional simulations of multiple bubbles collapsing in a channel are underway and will be discussed. This research was supported in part by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0751 and NSF Grant CBET 1253157.

  12. Collapse of a Public-Private Partnership in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the collapse of a public-private partnership (PPP) in the district of U itenhage in 1999. Talks to revive the partnership are high on the agenda. It is therefore essential to examine the reasons for the collapse to avoid the pitfalls of the past and to ensure that a more sustainable and competent partnership ...

  13. Collapse arresters for deep water pipelines: identification of crossover mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, Rita G.; Mantovano, Luciano; Assanelli, Andrea; Amenta, Pablo; Johnson, Daniel; Charreau, Roberto; Dvorkin, Eduardo [Tenaris Center for industrial Research (CINI), Siderca, Campana (Argentina)

    2005-07-01

    Deep water pipelines, normally subjected to external pressure and bending, fail due to structural collapse when the external loading exceeds the pipes collapse limit surface. For steel pipes, the influence on this limit surface of manufacturing imperfections has been thoroughly studied by CINI using finite element models that have been validated via laboratory full-scale tests. After a steel pipeline collapses, the collapse is restrained to the collapse initiation section or it propagates along the pipeline, being this second alternative the most detrimental one for the pipeline integrity. Therefore, it is necessary to build in the pipeline periodic reinforcements, to act as arresters for the collapse propagation. Using finite element models, we study the crossover of collapse arresters by the propagating collapse. The occurrence of different crossover mechanisms is determined by the geometry of the pipes and of the arresters. Laboratory tests were carried out at CINI in order to obtain experimental results that could be used to validate the numerical models. In this paper, we compare the numerical and experimental results for external pressure lo (author)

  14. Fire-induced collapse mechanisms of steel buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Aiuti, Riccardo; Bontempi, Franco

    2013-01-01

    significant in case the fire has spread through several floors, occurrence which is not contemplated by current fire design requirements, but that has been observed in most high-rise building fires. The results of the studies show that unfavourable collapse of single-story buildings and progressive collapse...

  15. Maternal Postpartum Role Collapse as a Theory of Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwaa, Linda Clark

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a theory of maternal postpartum role collapse. The influences of traditional role theory and symbolic interactionism are presented. The development of the maternal postpartum role collapse theory emerged from the study of postpartum depression among African-American women (Amankwaa, 2000).…

  16. AN OVERVIEW OF COLLAPSE OF BUILDINGS IN NIGERIA: A MEDICO-SPATIAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FADAMIRO Joseph Akinlabi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The tripartite quality of buildings that qualify as architectural products has been traditionally held to be serviceability, stability and aesthetics. Unfortunately, the Nigerian built environment has lost the stability component of this trio with attendant socio-economic, political and cultural negative outcomes. This is obvious from the reported cases of building collapses in the country. While the literature is replete with numerous studies on the subject matter, the interaction of this spatial problem with medical practice has been grossly neglected. This review paper presents a medico-spatial dimension of building collapse towards understanding its implications on the medical practice, people and places. Through the aid of literature resources, results show multiple interactions among these key variables. The paper enumerates and argues in favour of holistic solutions and asserts that medical professionals should be co-opted as major stakeholders in the formulation, review and enforcement of the National Building Code in Nigeria and elsewhere.

  17. Boosted food web productivity through ocean acidification collapses under warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Silvan U; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Ferreira, Camilo M; Ullah, Hadayet; Connell, Sean D

    2017-10-01

    Future climate is forecast to drive bottom-up (resource driven) and top-down (consumer driven) change to food web dynamics and community structure. Yet, our predictive understanding of these changes is hampered by an over-reliance on simplified laboratory systems centred on single trophic levels. Using a large mesocosm experiment, we reveal how future ocean acidification and warming modify trophic linkages across a three-level food web: that is, primary (algae), secondary (herbivorous invertebrates) and tertiary (predatory fish) producers. Both elevated CO2 and elevated temperature boosted primary production. Under elevated CO2 , the enhanced bottom-up forcing propagated through all trophic levels. Elevated temperature, however, negated the benefits of elevated CO2 by stalling secondary production. This imbalance caused secondary producer populations to decline as elevated temperature drove predators to consume their prey more rapidly in the face of higher metabolic demand. Our findings demonstrate how anthropogenic CO2 can function as a resource that boosts productivity throughout food webs, and how warming can reverse this effect by acting as a stressor to trophic interactions. Understanding the shifting balance between the propagation of resource enrichment and its consumption across trophic levels provides a predictive understanding of future dynamics of stability and collapse in food webs and fisheries production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Film collapse behavior on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Abe, Yutaka [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    It is pointed out that large-scale vapor explosion may occurred during a severe accident of a nuclear power plant. It is important to predict the possibility of the vapor explosion for the accident management of the nuclear power plant during a severe accident. The thermal detonation model is proposed to predict the vapor explosion. In the thermal detonation model, vapor explosion is started by a trigger. The trigger is vapor film collapse around high temperature material droplets coarsely pre-mixed in low temperature liquid. In the premixing stage, high temperature material droplets are insulated from low temperature liquid by the vapor film. Once the vapor film is collapsed, very quick and large heat transfer starts followed by the atomization. In order to clarify the trigger condition of the vapor explosion, it is necessary to identify the mechanism of the film collapse on the high temperature droplet surface in low temperature particle surface. Since the steam film on a high temperature droplet is unstable in high subcooling condition of low temperature liquid, the possibility of the self-collapse of the steam film is high. On the other hand, the possibility of the film collapse is not high in low subcooling or saturated condition since the steam film is tough. There are many experimental studies on the vapor film collapse behavior on the high temperature material surface. Most of those studies, vapor film collapse follows by the atomization , since melted droplets are used in those experiments. And the experiments used solid material is limited for the cylindrical or flat plate geometry. At present, there is no experimental database on the microscopic mechanism of steam film collapse behavior in spherical geometry for wide range of subcooling conditions. In the present study, steam film collapse behavior on a stainless steel particle surface is experimentally investigated. The stainless steel particle heated up by a burner is immersed into water in a stainless

  19. Hypernatremia and intravenous fluid resuscitation in collapsed ultramarathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew-Butler, Tamara; Boulter, Jeremy; Mbchb, John Godlonton; Phd, Ross Tucker; Mbchb, Timothy Noakes

    2008-05-01

    To determine if a return to normonatremia is required for symptomatology to resolve in collapsed hypernatremic runners and if intravenous (IV) administration of an isotonic solution would adversely affect serum sodium concentration ([Na+]) in collapsed normonatremic runners. Observational study. 2006 Comrades Marathon. 103 collapsed runners. Final serum [Na] upon discharge. 58% of all collapsed runners were hypernatremic. Hypernatremic runners reported significantly more vomiting than normonatremic runners (79 versus 34%; P 145 mmol/L). A return to normonatremia was not required for hypernatremic runners to "recover" and be discharged from the medical tent. Vomiting either aggravated and/or facilitated the development of hypernatremia. IV administration of 1 L of either (1) a hypotonic solution to hypernatremic runners or (2) an isotonic solution to both normonatremic and hypernatremic runners did not produce any adverse biochemical or cardiovascular changes and can therefore be considered a safe and effective treatment for collapsed runners if used in this context.

  20. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in

  1. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  2. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  3. Nucleosynthesis in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Taylor Shannon; Viktoria Ohstrom, Eva; Harris, James Austin; Hix, William R.

    2018-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis which occurs in core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) is one of the most important sources of elements in the universe. Elements from Oxygen through Iron come predominantly from supernovae, and contributions of heavier elements are also possible through processes like the weak r-process, the gamma process and the light element primary process. The composition of the ejecta depends on the mechanism of the explosion, thus simulations of high physical fidelity are needed to explore what elements and isotopes CCSN can contribute to Galactic Chemical Evolution. We will analyze the nucleosynthesis results from self-consistent CCSN simulations performed with CHIMERA, a multi-dimensional neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics code. Much of our understanding of CCSN nucleosynthesis comes from parameterized models, but unlike CHIMERA these fail to address essential physics, including turbulent flow/instability and neutrino-matter interaction. We will present nucleosynthesis predictions for the explosion of a 9.6 solar mass first generation star, relying both on results of the 160 species nuclear reaction network used in CHIMERA within this model and on post-processing with a more extensive network. The lowest mass iron core-collapse supernovae, like this model, are distinct from their more massive brethren, with their explosion mechanism and nucleosynthesis being more like electron capture supernovae resulting from Oxygen-Neon white dwarves. We will highlight the differences between the nucleosynthesis in this model and more massive supernovae. The inline 160 species network is a feature unique to CHIMERA, making this the most sophisticated model to date for a star of this type. We will discuss the need and mechanism to extrapolate the post-processing to times post-simulation and analyze the uncertainties this introduces for supernova nucleosynthesis. We will also compare the results from the inline 160 species network to the post-processing results to study further

  4. Simultaneous monitoring of a collapsing landslide with video cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fujisawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective countermeasures and risk management to reduce landslide hazards require a full understanding of the processes of collapsing landslides. While the processes are generally estimated from the features of debris deposits after collapse, simultaneous monitoring during collapse provides more insights into the processes. Such monitoring, however, is usually very difficult, because it is rarely possible to predict when a collapse will occur. This study introduces a rare case in which a collapsing landslide (150 m in width and 135 m in height was filmed with three video cameras in Higashi-Yokoyama, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The cameras were set up in the front and on the right and left sides of the slide in May 2006, one month after a series of small slope failures in the toe and the formation of cracks on the head indicated that a collapse was imminent.

    The filmed images showed that the landslide collapse started from rock falls and slope failures occurring mainly around the margin, that is, the head, sides and toe. These rock falls and slope failures, which were individually counted on the screen, increased with time. Analyzing the images, five of the failures were estimated to have each produced more than 1000 m3 of debris, and the landslide collapsed with several surface failures accompanied by a toppling movement. The manner of the collapse suggested that the slip surface initially remained on the upper slope, and then extended down the slope as the excessive internal stress shifted downwards. Image analysis, together with field measurements using a ground-based laser scanner after the collapse, indicated that the landslide produced a total of 50 000 m3 of debris.

    As described above, simultaneous monitoring provides valuable information about landslide processes. Further development of monitoring techniques will help clarify landslide processes qualitatively as well as quantitatively.

  5. Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R.; Pettis, Jeffery S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Methods and Principal Findings Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. Conclusions/Significance This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted. PMID:19649264

  6. Tulsa Oklahoma Oktoberfest Tent Collapse Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E. Deal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system’s response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA, receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care.

  7. Colony collapse disorder: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Vanengelsdorp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels, no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted.

  8. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); CASS and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  9. Belief in a Just World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kilinc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Belief in a just world hypothesis is defined as the belief that the world is a just place where people generally get what they deserve. It states that individuals have a need to believe that they live in a just world; they believe in a world where people get what they deserve and where people deserve what they get. Individuals believe that who work hard or who perform good acts obtain rewards for their actions, while the sinners and the laggards receive punishments instead. Similarly, individuals want to believe that positive outcomes, whether money, success, or happiness, are obtained only by good people and, conversely, that negative outcomes only happen to bad persons. Justice beliefs have been hypothesized as adaptive for dealing with day-to-day stres. Just world beliefs protect individuals from the daily negative psychological consequences of living in what is realistically an unjust world. In addition, just world beliefs are thought to enhance feelings of security to the extent that if the individual satisfies the conditions for being "good," he or she is protected from injustice. The belief in a just world, like other positive illusions, should contribute to the maintenance of one's mental health. Belief in a just world's is discussed in two ways: personal belief in a just world's answers the question “how much justly is the world to me?”, whereas the belief in a just world's in general answers the question “how much justly is the world?”

  10. Predicting mining collapse: Superjerks and the appearance of record-breaking events in coal as collapse precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiang; Liu, Hanlong; Main, Ian G.; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2017-08-01

    The quest for predictive indicators for the collapse of coal mines has led to a robust criterion from scale-model tests in the laboratory. Mechanical collapse under uniaxial stress forms avalanches with a power-law probability distribution function of radiated energy P ˜E-ɛ , with exponent ɛ =1.5 . Impending major collapse is preceded by a reduction of the energy exponent to the mean-field value ɛ =1.32 . Concurrently, the crackling noise increases in intensity and the waiting time between avalanches is reduced when the major collapse is approaching. These latter criteria were so-far deemed too unreliable for safety assessments in coal mines. We report a reassessment of previously collected extensive collapse data sets using "record-breaking analysis," based on the statistical appearance of "superjerks" within a smaller spectrum of collapse events. Superjerks are defined as avalanche signals with energies that surpass those of all previous events. The final major collapse is one such superjerk but other "near collapse" events equally qualify. In this way a very large data set of events is reduced to a sparse sequence of superjerks (21 in our coal sample). The main collapse can be anticipated from the sequence of energies and waiting times of superjerks, ignoring all weaker events. Superjerks are excellent indicators for the temporal evolution, and reveal clear nonstationarity of the crackling noise at constant loading rate, as well as self-similarity in the energy distribution of superjerks as a function of the number of events so far in the sequence Es j˜nδ with δ =1.79 . They are less robust in identifying the precise time of the final collapse, however, than the shift of the energy exponents in the whole data set which occurs only over a short time interval just before the major event. Nevertheless, they provide additional diagnostics that may increase the reliability of such forecasts.

  11. Study of film boiling collapse behavior during vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Yamano, Norihiro; Sugimoto, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi

    1996-06-01

    Possible large scale vapor explosions are safety concern in nuclear power plants during severe accident. In order to identify the occurrence of the vapor explosion and to estimate the magnitude of the induced pressure pulse, it is necessary to investigate the triggering condition for the vapor explosion. As a first step of this study, scooping analysis was conducted with a simulation code based on thermal detonation model. It was found that the pressure at the collapse of film boiling much affects the trigger condition of vapor explosion. Based on this analytical results, basic experiments were conducted to clarify the collapse conditions of film boiling on a high temperature solid ball surface. Film boiling condition was established by flooding water onto a high temperature stainless steel ball heated by a high frequency induction heater. After the film boiling was established, the pressure pulse generated by a shock tube was applied to collapse the steam film on the ball surface. As the experimental boundary conditions, materials and size of the balls, magnitude of pressure pulse and initial temperature of the carbon and stainless steel balls were varied. The transients of pressure and surface temperature were measured. It was found that the surface temperature on the balls sharply decreased when the pressure wave passed through the film on balls. Based on the surface temperature behavior, the film boiling collapse pattern was found to be categorized into several types. Especially, the pattern for stainless steel ball was categorized into three types; no collapse, collapse and reestablishment after collapse. It was thus clarified that the film boiling collapse behavior was identified by initial conditions and that the pressure required to collapse film boiling strongly depended on the initial surface temperature. The present results will provide a useful information for the analysis of vapor explosions based on the thermal detonation model. (J.P.N.)

  12. Coexistence of collapse and stable spatiotemporal solitons in multimode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtyrina, Olga V.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal solitons in multimode optical fibers and demonstrate the existence of stable solitons, in a sharp contrast to earlier predictions of collapse of multidimensional solitons in three-dimensional media. We discuss the coexistence of blow-up solutions and collapse stabilization by a low-dimensional external potential in graded-index media, and also predict the existence of stable higher-order nonlinear waves such as dipole-mode spatiotemporal solitons. To support the main conclusions of our numerical studies we employ a variational approach and derive analytically the stability criterion for input powers for the collapse stabilization.

  13. Absorbable Implant to Treat Nasal Valve Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Nicoló, Marion; Stelter, Klaus; Sadick, Haneen; Bas, Murat; Berghaus, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an absorbable implant for lateral cartilage support in subjects with nasal valve collapse (NVC) with 12 months follow-up. Methods Thirty subjects with Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) score ≥ 55 and isolated NVC were treated; 14 cases were performed in an operating suite under general anesthesia and 16 cases were performed in a clinic-based setting under local anesthesia. The implant, a polylactic acid copolymer, was placed with a delivery tool within the nasal wall to provide lateral cartilage support. Subjects were followed up through 12 months postprocedure. Results Fifty-six implants were placed in 30 subjects. The mean preoperative NOSE score was 76.7 ± 14.8, with a range of 55 to 100. At 12 months, the mean score was 35.2 ± 29.2, reflecting an average within-patient reduction of -40.9 ± 31.2 points. The majority (76%) of the subjects were responders defined as having at least one NOSE class improvement or a NOSE score reduction of at least 20%. There were no adverse changes in cosmetic appearance at 12 months postprocedure. Three implants in three subjects required retrieval within 30 days postprocedure and resulted in no clinical sequelae. Conclusion This study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of an absorbable implant for lateral cartilage support in subjects with NVC at 12 months postprocedure. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  15. Cyclic eruptions and sector collapses at Monowai submarine volcano, Kermadec arc: 1998-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Wright, I. C.; Schwarz-Schampera, U.; Hyvernaud, O.; Reymond, D.; de Ronde, C. E. J.

    2008-10-01

    Repeated multibeam bathymetric surveys at Monowai Cone, a shallow submarine basaltic volcano and part of the Monowai Volcanic Center in the northern Kermadec arc, were conducted in 1998, 2004, and 2007. These surveys document dramatic depth changes at the volcano including negative changes up to -176 m from two sector collapses and positive changes up to +138 m from volcanic reconstruction near the summit and debris avalanche deposits downslope of the slide scars. One sector collapse occurred on the SE slope between 1998 and 2004 with a volume of ˜0.09 km3, and another occurred on the SW slope between 2004 and 2007 with a volume of ˜0.04 km3. The volume of positive depth change due to addition of volcanic material by eruption is of the same order: ˜0.05 km3 between 1998 and 2004 and ˜0.06 km3 between 2004 and 2007. During these time intervals, monitoring by the Polynesian Seismic Network detected frequent T wave swarms at Monowai, indicative of explosive eruptive activity every few months. An unusual T wave swarm on 24 May 2002 was previously interpreted as the collapse event between the 1998 and 2004 surveys, but no similarly anomalous T waves were detected between 2004 and 2007, probably because the Polynesian Seismic Network stations were acoustically shadowed from the second slide event. We interpret that the sector collapses on Monowai are caused by the unstable loading of fragmental erupted material on the summit and steep upper slopes of the volcano (>20°). Moreover, there appears to be a cyclic pattern in which recurrent eruptions oversteepen the cone and periodically lead to collapse events that transport volcaniclastic material downslope to the lower apron of the volcano. Volumetric rate calculations suggest that these two processes may be more or less in equilibrium. The repeated collapses at Monowai are relatively modest in volume (involving only 0.1-0.5% of the edifice volume), have occurred much more frequently than is estimated for larger debris

  16. Superhabitable worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world.

  17. Models of collapsing and expanding anisotropic gravitating source in f(R, T) theory of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, G. [The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Department of Mathematics, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Ahmed, Riaz [The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Department of Mathematics, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); University of the Central Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-07-15

    In this paper, we have formulated the exact solutions of the non-static anisotropic gravitating source in f(R, T) gravity which may lead to expansion and collapse. By assuming there to be no thermal conduction in gravitating source, we have determined parametric solutions in f(R, T) gravity with a non-static spherical geometry filled using an anisotropic fluid. We have examined the ranges of the parameters for which the expansion scalar becomes negative and positive, leading to collapse and expansion, respectively. Further, using the definition of the mass function, the conditions for the trapped surface have been explored, and it has been investigated that there exists a single horizon in this case. The impact of the coupling parameter λ has been discussed in detail in both cases. For the various values of the coupling parameter λ, we have plotted the energy density, anisotropic pressure and anisotropy parameter in the cases of collapse and expansion. The physical significance of the graphs has been explained in detail. (orig.)

  18. Study on tracheal collapsibility, compliance, and stress by considering nonlinear mechanical property of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Ochoa, Ignacio; Li, Zhiyong; Liao, Zijie; Lin, Yihan; Doblare, Manuel

    2009-11-01

    Tracheal cartilage has been widely regarded as a linear elastic material either in experimental studies or in analytic and numerical models. However, it has been recently demonstrated that, like other fiber-oriented biological tissues, tracheal cartilage is a nonlinear material, which displays higher strength in compression than in extension. Considering the nonlinearity requires a more complex theoretical frame work and costs more to simulate. This study aims to quantify the deviation due to the simplified treatment of the tracheal cartilage as a linear material. It also evaluates the improved accuracy gained by considering the nonlinearity. Pig tracheal rings were used to exam the mechanical properties of cartilage and muscular membrane. By taking into account the asymmetric shape of tracheal cartilage, the collapse behavior of complete rings was simulated, and the compliance of airway and stress in the muscular membrane were discussed. The results obtained were compared with those assuming linear mechanical properties. The following results were found: (1) Models based on both types of material properties give a small difference in representing collapse behavior; (2) regarding compliance, the relative difference is big, ranging from 10 to 40% under negative pressure conditions; and (3) the difference in determining stress in the muscular membrane is small too: transmural pressure is lower than -0.5 kPa. The results obtained in this study may be useful in both understanding the collapse behavior of trachea and in evaluating the error induced by the simplification of treating the tracheal cartilage as a linear elastic material.

  19. Negative Ions in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Thomas J; Walsh, Catherine; Field, Thomas A

    2017-02-08

    Until a decade ago, the only anion observed to play a prominent role in astrophysics was H - . The bound-free transitions in H - dominate the visible opacity in stars with photospheric temperatures less than 7000 K, including the Sun. The H - anion is also believed to have been critical to the formation of molecular hydrogen in the very early evolution of the Universe. Once H 2 formed, about 500 000 years after the Big Bang, the expanding gas was able to lose internal gravitational energy and collapse to form stellar objects and "protogalaxies", allowing the creation of heavier elements such as C, N, and O through nucleosynthesis. Although astronomers had considered some processes through which anions might form in interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes, including the important role that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons might play in this, it was the detection in 2006 of rotational line emission from C 6 H - that galvanized a systematic study of the abundance, distribution, and chemistry of anions in the interstellar medium. In 2007, the Cassini mission reported the unexpected detection of anions with mass-to-charge ratios of up to ∼10 000 in the upper atmosphere of Titan; this observation likewise instigated the study of fundamental chemical processes involving negative ions among planetary scientists. In this article, we review the observations of anions in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, Titan, and cometary comae. We then discuss a number of processes by which anions can be created and destroyed in these environments. The derivation of accurate rate coefficients for these processes is an essential input for the chemical kinetic modeling that is necessary to fully extract physics from the observational data. We discuss such models, along with their successes and failings, and finish with an outlook on the future.

  20. On the causes of collapse and sudden death by Avicenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, B; Wray, R

    1997-06-01

    Avicenna's views on the causes of collapse and sudden death are presented from a literal translation of the mediaeval Arabic text. Medical knowledge based on observation mixed with pure abstract reasoning forms the essence of Avicenna's medical writings.

  1. Algebraic properties and spectral collapse in nonlinear quantum Rabi models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, V.; Raffa, F. A.; Franzosi, R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the origin of spectral collapse occurring in nonlinear Rabi Hamiltonians with an su(1,1) coupling scheme, showing how the collapse can be triggered by the competition between the Rabi parameter g and the field frequency W. The collapse already appears in the model Hamiltonian where the atomic-energy term is absent. After showing that su(1,1) is the dynamical algebra of the Hamiltonian, we demonstrate how the occurrence of spectral collapse can be directly related to the three types of equivalence classes characterizing the structure of this algebra. We highlight how the dramatic change of the spectrum significantly affects the structure of eigenstates represented in a suitable momentum–coordinate picture.

  2. Critical fitness collapse in three-dimensional spatial population genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.

    2015-05-01

    If deleterious mutations near a fitness maximum in a spatially distributed population are sufficiently frequent or detrimental, the population can undergo a fitness collapse, similarly to the Muller's ratchet effect in well-mixed populations. Recent studies of 1D habitats (e.g. the frontier of a 2D range expansion) have shown that the onset of the fitness collapse is described by a directed percolation phase transition with its associated critical exponents. We consider population fitness collapse in 3D range expansions with both inflating and fixed-size frontiers (applicable to, e.g. expanding and treadmilling spherical tumors, respectively). We find that the onset of fitness collapse in these two cases obeys different scaling laws, and that competition between species at the frontier leads to a deviation from directed percolation scaling. As in 2D range expansions, inflating frontiers modify the critical behavior by causally disconnecting well-separated portions of the population.

  3. Gravitational collapses to bodies of a finite volume

    OpenAIRE

    Marsico, Tiziana; Loinger, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    We prove with an exact relativistic computation that the spherosymmetric gravitational collapses with a time-dependent pressure end in bodies with a small, but finite volume. Against a diffuse, wrong conviction.

  4. Modelling the self-organization and collapse of complex networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modelling the self-organization and collapse of complex networks. Sanjay Jain Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  5. The role of fluid viscosity in an immersed granular collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Geng Chao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Instabilities of immersed slopes and cliffs can lead to catastrophic events that involve a sudden release of huge soil mass. The scaled deposit height and runout distance are found to follow simple power laws when a granular column collapses on a horizontal plane. However, if the granular column is submerged in a fluid, the mobility of the granular collapse due to high inertia effects will be reduced by fluid-particle interactions. In this study, the effects of fluid viscosity on granular collapse is investigated qualitatively by adopting a numerical approach based on the coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM and discrete element method (DEM. It is found that the granular collapse can be dramatically slowed down due to the presence of viscous fluids. For the considered granular configuration, when the fluid viscosity increases. the runout distance decreases and the final deposition shows a larger deposit angle.

  6. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardall, Christian Y [ORNL; Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Budiardja, R. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Marronetti, Pedro [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrohysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observale by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes by collapse and explosion.

  7. Singularity in Gravitational Collapse of Plane Symmetric Charged Vaidya Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2010-01-01

    We study the final outcome of gravitational collapse resulting from the plane symmetric charged Vaidya spacetime. Using the field equations, we show that the weak energy condition is always satisfied by collapsing fluid. It is found that the singularity formed is naked. The strength of singularity is also investigated by using Nolan's method. This turns out to be a strong curvature singularity in Tipler's sense and hence provides a counter example to the cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  8. Seeing Core-Collapse Supernovae in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter

    Core-collapse supernovae are the catastrophic deaths of massive stars. Ultraviolet observations are needed to understand the energy of the explosion through the study of the bolometric light curves. Early-time ultraviolet observations constrain the size of the progenitor. Ultraviolet spectra can break the degeneracies between temperature/ionization, reddening, and metallicity which hinder our understanding of ultraviolet photometry. Optical observations of high-redshift supernovae probe rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, requiring space-based observations of nearby supernovae against which to compare. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae can also help distinguish them from type Ia supernovae, enabling cleaner photometric type Ia supernova samples for cosmological measurements. The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift satellite has observed over two hundred core-collapse supernovae in the ultraviolet, including sixty-nine ultraviolet grism spectra of twenty core-collapse SNe. Additional ultraviolet spectra have been obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer, Hubble Space Telescope, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer. We propose a project to reduce the Swift grism spectra and combine with the other ultraviolet and groundbased optical/NIR spectra to create time-series bolometric spectra. We will use these bolometric spectra to better understand temperature, reddening, and metallicity and create bolometric light curves of these core collapse SNe. We will also use early time ultraviolet photometry and spectroscopy to constrain the progenitors of core collapse SNe. The ultraviolet observations fill a critical niche in our understanding of core collapse supernovae, and this program will enhance the scientific use of this important dataset from multiple space missions. Beyond core-collapse supernovae, the templates will allow studies of the dust properties around the progenitor systems (including the wavelength dependence of the extinction

  9. Collapse of the soap-film bridge - Quasistatic description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Steven A.; Steen, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the collapse of a soap-film bridge from a connected to a disconnected state are recorded. The equilibrium framework for this nonequilibrium event is classical. Experiments confirm predictions of stable and unstable equilibria. A quasistatic description is introduced for the dynamic states to extend the static theory. It is found to adequately describe the collapse trajectory while the bridge is still connected.

  10. An Integral Condition for Core-collapse Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-01-01

    We derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in CCSN theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that the shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for spherically symmetric shock expansion, vs > 0. One of the most useful one-dimensional explosion conditions is the neutrino luminosity and mass-accretion rate ({L}ν {--}\\dot{{ M }}) critical curve. Below this curve, steady-state stalled solutions exist, but above this curve, there are no stalled solutions. Burrows & Goshy suggested that the solutions above this curve are dynamic and explosive. In this manuscript, we take one step closer to proving this supposition; we show that all steady solutions above this curve have vs > 0. Assuming that these steady vs > 0 solutions correspond to explosion, we present a new dimensionless integral condition for explosion, Ψ > 0. Ψ roughly describes the balance between pressure and gravity, and we show that this parameter is equivalent to the τ condition used to infer the {L}ν {--}\\dot{{ M }} critical curve. The illuminating difference is that there is a direct relationship between Ψ and vs. Below the critical curve, Ψ may be negative, positive, and zero, which corresponds to receding, expanding, and stalled-shock solutions. At the critical curve, the minimum Ψ solution is zero; above the critical curve, Ψmin > 0, and all steady solutions have vs > 0. Using one-dimensional simulations, we confirm our primary assumptions and verify that Ψmin > 0 is a reliable and accurate explosion diagnostic.

  11. Vapour and air bubble collapse analysis in viscous compressible water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Bazanini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the collapse of bubbles (or cavities are shown, using the finite difference method, taking into account the compressibility of the liquid, expected to occur in the final stages of the collapse process. Results are compared with experimental and theoretical data for incompressible liquids, to see the influence of the compressibility of the water in the bubble collapse. Pressure fields values are calculated in an area of 800 x 800 mm, for the case of one bubble under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry. Results are shown as radius versus time curves for the collapse (to compare collapse times, and pressure curves in the plane, for pressure fields. Such calculations are new because of their general point of view, since the existing works do not take into account the existence of vapour in the bubble, neither show the pressure fields seen here. It is also expected to see the influence of the compressibility of the water in the collapse time, and in the pressure field, when comparing pressure values.

  12. Characterization of the Dynamics of Vapor Bubble Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardia, Raunak; Trujillo, Mario

    2017-11-01

    A numerical/theoretical analysis is presented to characterize the dynamics of a spherical vapor bubble, collapsing at different degrees of severity, controlled and quantified by the nondimensional number, B (introduced by Florschuetz and Chao, 1965). The numerical framework is exercised and validated over the three regimes of bubble collapse, namely, thermal, intermediate, and inertial collapse in increasing order of B. The conventional Rayleigh-Plesset perspective used to discriminate between different regimes, is extended to include the bubble energy balance and jump conditions. It is discovered that the time history of vapor velocity more clearly illustrates the distinctions between the three regimes. For thermal collapse, vapor velocity suffers an initial transient and then equilibrates to nearly zero. At intermediate rates of collapse, the time scales of the process are such that an imbalance occurs between the condensation rate and interface regression rate, which results in a significant magnitude of vapor velocity. At even larger rates of collapse, the time scales become exceedingly small such that the thermal boundary layer is sufficiently thin to provide the necessary heat conduction to balance the large condensation rate, resulting in negligible vapor velocity. National Science Foundation.

  13. Cardiovascular risk and mortality in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis: sleep study, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life: a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis Santos, Israel; Danaga, Aline Roberta; de Carvalho Aguiar, Isabella; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Dias, Ismael Souza; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Martins, Aline Almeida; Ferraz, Leonardo Macario; Fonsêca, Nina Teixeira; Fernandes, Virgilio; Fernandes, Vinicius Alves Thomaz; Lopes, Viviane Cristina Delgado; Leitão Filho, Fernando Sérgio Studart; Nacif, Sérgio Roberto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Giannasi, Lílian Christiane; Romano, Salvatore; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Araujo, Ana Karina Fachini; Dellê, Humberto; Souza, Nadia Karina Guimarães; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2013-10-08

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most serious public health problems. The increasing prevalence of CKD in developed and developing countries has led to a global epidemic. The hypothesis proposed is that patients undergoing dialysis would experience a marked negative influence on physiological variables of sleep and autonomic nervous system activity, compromising quality of life. A prospective, consecutive, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial is proposed to address the effect of dialysis on sleep, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life in patients with CKD. The measurement protocol will include body weight (kg); height (cm); body mass index calculated as weight/height(2); circumferences (cm) of the neck, waist, and hip; heart and respiratory rates; blood pressures; Mallampati index; tonsil index; heart rate variability; maximum ventilatory pressures; negative expiratory pressure test, and polysomnography (sleep study), as well as the administration of specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life. CKD is a major public health problem worldwide, and its incidence has increased in part by the increased life expectancy and increasing number of cases of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Sleep disorders are common in patients with renal insufficiency. Our hypothesis is that the weather weight gain due to volume overload observed during interdialytic period will influence the degree of collapsibility of the upper airway due to narrowing and predispose to upper airway occlusion during sleep, and to investigate the negative influences of haemodialysis in the physiological variables of sleep, and autonomic nervous system, and respiratory mechanics and thereby compromise the quality of life of patients. The protocol for this study is registered with the Brazilian

  14. Making online business after world economic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova Jovanovska, Verica; Jovanovski, Vlatko; Radosavljevik-Bojceva, Marina

    2010-01-01

    2008 would be remembered as one of the most difficult years for the World Economy. Securities markets fell constantly, many banks and companies collapsed, while others were barely rescued by government intervention and many jobs were lost. Consolidating their ranks in terms of financial and business operations, companies in the post recession period create new policies for the development and application of new technologies in production and distribution of goods and services. The application...

  15. Finite element analysis of the collapse and post-collapse behavior of steel pipes applications to the oil industry

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorkin, Eduardo N

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a detailed discussion of the models that were developed to simulate the collapse and post-collapse behavior of steel pipes. The finite element method offers to engineers the possibility of developing models to simulate the collapse behavior of casings inside oil wells and the collapse behavior of deepwater pipelines. However, if technological decisions are going to be reached from these model results, with implications for the economic success of industrial operations, for the occupational safety and health and for the environment, the engineering models need to be highly reliable. Using these models engineers can quantify the effect of manufacturing tolerances, wear, corrosion, etc. This book describes in great details the experimental programs that are developed to validate the numerical results.

  16. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  17. Enhancing mechanical behaviors of collapsible soil using two biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ayeldeen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the possibility of using biopolymer (environmental friendly material to enhance the mechanical behaviors of collapsible soil. Two types of biopolymers were (xanthan gum and guar gum used in this study due to their stable behaviors under severe conditions and their availability with reasonable prices. The experimental program focused on three major soil properties, i.e. compaction characterizations, collapsible potential and shear parameters. These three properties are essential in process of soil improvement. Different biopolymer concentrations were used in this study and the experimental program was performed at two curing periods (soon after mixing the soil with the biopolymer and after one week curing time. Shear parameters were measured for the treated specimens under both soaked and unsoaked conditions, while a collapsible potential test was performed under different mixing conditions (wet mix and dry mix. A numerical model was built to predict the behavior of the treated collapsible soil after and before water immersing. The results indicated that the ability of both xanthan gum and guar gum can be used as improvement materials for collapsible soil treatment. The collapsible potential has been reduced from 9% to 1% after mixing the soil with 2% biopolymer concentration in the wet case. After one week curing, the cohesion has been increased from 8.5 kPa to 105 kPa by increasing the xanthan gum concentration from zero to 2%, leading to an overall improvement in soil shear strength. It also proves that the guar gum is superior to the xanthan gum. The shear strength of soil can be increased by about 30% when using the guar gum in comparison with the xanthan gum at the same conditions; however, the collapsible potential of soil material will be reduced by about 20%.

  18. Steroid-associated hip joint collapse in bipedal emus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhen Zheng

    Full Text Available In this study we established a bipedal animal model of steroid-associated hip joint collapse in emus for testing potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of steroid-associated joint collapse in preclinical settings. Five adult male emus were treated with a steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON induction protocol using combination of pulsed lipopolysaccharide (LPS and methylprednisolone (MPS. Additional three emus were used as normal control. Post-induction, emu gait was observed, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed, and blood was collected for routine examination, including testing blood coagulation and lipid metabolism. Emus were sacrificed at week 24 post-induction, bilateral femora were collected for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. Asymmetric limping gait and abnormal MRI signals were found in steroid-treated emus. SAON was found in all emus with a joint collapse incidence of 70%. The percentage of neutrophils (Neut % and parameters on lipid metabolism significantly increased after induction. Micro-CT revealed structure deterioration of subchondral trabecular bone. Histomorphometry showed larger fat cell fraction and size, thinning of subchondral plate and cartilage layer, smaller osteoblast perimeter percentage and less blood vessels distributed at collapsed region in SAON group as compared with the normal controls. Scanning electron microscope (SEM showed poor mineral matrix and more osteo-lacunae outline in the collapsed region in SAON group. The combination of pulsed LPS and MPS developed in the current study was safe and effective to induce SAON and deterioration of subchondral bone in bipedal emus with subsequent femoral head collapse, a typical clinical feature observed in patients under pulsed steroid treatment. In conclusion, bipedal emus could be used as an effective preclinical experimental model to evaluate potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of

  19. A validated approach for modeling collapse of steel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saykin, Vitaliy Victorovich

    A civil engineering structure is faced with many hazardous conditions such as blasts, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and fires during its lifetime. Even though structures are designed for credible events that can happen during a lifetime of the structure, extreme events do happen and cause catastrophic failures. Understanding the causes and effects of structural collapse is now at the core of critical areas of national need. One factor that makes studying structural collapse difficult is the lack of full-scale structural collapse experimental test results against which researchers could validate their proposed collapse modeling approaches. The goal of this work is the creation of an element deletion strategy based on fracture models for use in validated prediction of collapse of steel structures. The current work reviews the state-of-the-art of finite element deletion strategies for use in collapse modeling of structures. It is shown that current approaches to element deletion in collapse modeling do not take into account stress triaxiality in vulnerable areas of the structure, which is important for proper fracture and element deletion modeling. The report then reviews triaxiality and its role in fracture prediction. It is shown that fracture in ductile materials is a function of triaxiality. It is also shown that, depending on the triaxiality range, different fracture mechanisms are active and should be accounted for. An approach using semi-empirical fracture models as a function of triaxiality are employed. The models to determine fracture initiation, softening and subsequent finite element deletion are outlined. This procedure allows for stress-displacement softening at an integration point of a finite element in order to subsequently remove the element. This approach avoids abrupt changes in the stress that would create dynamic instabilities, thus making the results more reliable and accurate. The calibration and validation of these models are

  20. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier, E-mail: kuza@umich.edu [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 72-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michocán 58089, México (Mexico)

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  1. Reduction of excavation face collapse risk in tunnelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Filippo; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Muller, Alessandro; Biffino, Marco; Matteucci, Alessandro

    2017-12-14

    Two large road tunnels, recently developed near Florence, showed instabilities of the excavation face which subsequently caused sixteen collapses. Due to the risk for workers' safety, the public authority for occupational health and safety (ASL) has monitored the failure rate and other background variables in order to assess the possible correlations between risk reductions, its own actions, and those of the various safety actors involved. To evaluate if the interventions carried out by the design team were able to reduce the risks of collapse and which of the ASL actions and/or which other factors were more effective in changing the attitudes of the parties involved, leading to a more expensive but safer project variant. After adoption of the second of two project variants, no more collapses were observed. No correlation was found between trend of ASL inspections and observed variation of collapse rate. Conversely, the adoption of strongly coercive measures and investigation reporting by local media coincided with periods of risk reduction, even if the low number of events does not allow for statistical evaluation. These findings appear to be coherent with the ratio of the cost of penalties related to health and safety infringements (thousands of euros) to the overall cost of the safer project variant (a hundred times greater).  The safer variant required 7% more labour but avoided forced interruptions caused by the collapses, allowing a 13% faster excavation rate.

  2. Classical Collapse to Black Holes and Quantum Bounces: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Malafarina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, different programs have been carried out aiming at understanding the final fate of gravitational collapse of massive bodies once some prescriptions for the behaviour of gravity in the strong field regime are provided. The general picture arising from most of these scenarios is that the classical singularity at the end of collapse is replaced by a bounce. The most striking consequence of the bounce is that the black hole horizon may live for only a finite time. The possible implications for astrophysics are important since, if these models capture the essence of the collapse of a massive star, an observable signature of quantum gravity may be hiding in astrophysical phenomena. One intriguing idea that is implied by these models is the possible existence of exotic compact objects, of high density and finite size, that may not be covered by an horizon. The present article outlines the main features of these collapse models and some of the most relevant open problems. The aim is to provide a comprehensive (as much as possible overview of the current status of the field from the point of view of astrophysics. As a little extra, a new toy model for collapse leading to the formation of a quasi static compact object is presented.

  3. Magnetic field dependence of the atomic collapse state in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, D.; Ramezani Masir, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts that heavy atoms (Z > Zc ≈ 170 ) will undergo the process of atomic collapse where electrons sink into the positron continuum and a new family of so-called collapsing states emerges. The relativistic electrons in graphene exhibit the same physics but at a much lower critical charge (Zc ≈ 1 ) which has made it possible to confirm this phenomenon experimentally. However, there exist conflicting predictions on the effect of a magnetic field on atomic collapse. These theoretical predictions are based on the continuum Dirac–Weyl equation, which does not have an exact analytical solution for the interplay of a supercritical Coulomb potential and the magnetic field. Approximative solutions have been proposed, but because the two effects compete on similar energy scales, the theoretical treatment varies depending on the regime which is being considered. These limitations are overcome here by starting from a tight-binding approach and computing exact numerical results. By avoiding special limit cases, we found a smooth evolution between the different regimes. We predict that the atomic collapse effect persists even after the magnetic field is activated and that the critical charge remains unchanged. We show that the atomic collapse regime is characterized: (1) by a series of Landau level anticrossings and (2) by the absence of \\sqrt{B} scaling of the Landau levels with regard to magnetic field strength.

  4. Spinning worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis "Spinning Worlds" is about the characterisation of two types of gas-giant exoplanets: Hot Jupiters, with orbital periods of fewer than five days, and young, wide-orbit gas giants, with orbital periods as long as thousands of years. The thesis is based on near-infrared observations of 1

  5. Collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron stars in general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duez, Matthew D; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shibata, Masaru; Stephens, Branson C

    2006-01-27

    Hypermassive neutron stars (HMNSs)--equilibrium configurations supported against collapse by rapid differential rotation--are possible transient remnants of binary neutron-star mergers. Using newly developed codes for magnetohydrodynamic simulations in dynamical spacetimes, we are able to track the evolution of a magnetized HMNS in full general relativity for the first time. We find that secular angular momentum transport due to magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability results in the collapse of an HMNS to a rotating black hole, accompanied by a gravitational wave burst. The nascent black hole is surrounded by a hot, massive torus undergoing quasistationary accretion and a collimated magnetic field. This scenario suggests that HMNS collapse is a possible candidate for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

  6. Gravitational collapse to a Kerr-Newman black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanail, Antonios; Most, Elias R.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We present the first systematic study of the gravitational collapse of rotating and magnetized neutron stars to charged and rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes. In particular, we consider the collapse of magnetized and rotating neutron stars assuming that no pair-creation takes place and that the charge density in the magnetosphere is so low that the stellar exterior can be described as an electrovacuum. Under these assumptions, which are rather reasonable for a pulsar that has crossed the 'death line', we show that when the star is rotating, it acquires a net initial electrical charge, which is then trapped inside the apparent horizon of the newly formed back hole. We analyse a number of different quantities to validate that the black hole produced is indeed a Kerr-Newman one and show that, in the absence of rotation or magnetic field, the end result of the collapse is a Schwarzschild or Kerr black hole, respectively.

  7. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.; Mezzena, R.; Falferi, P.; Carlesso, M.; Bassi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  8. Gravitational collapse of thin shells of dust in Shape Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, Henrique; Mercati, Flavio; Napoletano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Shape dynamics is a theory of gravity whose physical configuration space is composed of spatial conformal equivalence classes of 3-dimensional geometries. This physical configuration space is not a priori related to the one given by 4-dimensional space-time geometries, familiar to general relativists. Although one can largely match dynamical solutions arising in each theory, this is not always the case. One expects such differences in collapse situations that lead to the formation of black holes. In this paper we study spherical collapse of thin-shells of pressureless dust as a fully back-reacting dynamical system, in a context related to both shape dynamics and general relativity in ADM form in Constant Mean Curvature (CMC) gauge -- the particular time slicing where any correspondence between ADM and shape dynamics is manifest. To better accommodate the relational setting of shape dynamics, we also begin a study of collapse of two such shells in a compact Universe.

  9. Gravitational collapse of a magnetized fermion gas with finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Gaspar, I. [Instituto de Geofisica y Astronomia (IGA), La Habana (Cuba); Perez Martinez, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Sussman, Roberto A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico); Ulacia Rey, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized fermion gas at finite temperature near the collapsing singularity of a Bianchi-I spacetime. Considering a general set of appropriate and physically motivated initial conditions, we transform Einstein-Maxwell field equations into a complete and self-consistent dynamical system amenable for numerical work. The resulting numerical solutions reveal the gas collapsing into both, isotropic (''point-like'') and anisotropic (''cigar-like''), singularities, depending on the initial intensity of the magnetic field. We provide a thorough study of the near collapse behavior and interplay of all relevant state and kinematic variables: temperature, expansion scalar, shear scalar, magnetic field, magnetization, and energy density. A significant qualitative difference in the behavior of the gas emerges in the temperature range T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -6} and T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -3}. (orig.)

  10. Exploring an S-matrix for gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Veneziano, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    We analyze further a recently proposed S-matrix description of transplanckian scattering in the specific case of axisymmetric collisions of extended sources, where some of the original approximations are not necessary. We confirm the claim that such an approximate description appears to capture the essential features of (the quantum counterpart of) classical gravitational collapse. More specifically, the S-matrix develops singularities whose location in the sources' parameter space are consistent with (and numerically close to) the bounds coming from closed-trapped-surface collapse criteria. In the vicinity of the critical "lines" the phase of the elastic S-matrix exhibits a universal fractional-power behaviour reminiscent of Choptuik's scaling near critical collapse.

  11. Magnetorotatioal Collapse of Supermassive Stars: Black Hole Formation and Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lunan; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Ruiz, Milton; Shapiro, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    We perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations in full general relativity of the collapse of radially unstable, uniformly rotating, massive stars to black holes. The stars spin at the mass-shedding limit, account for magnetic fields and obey a Γ = 4/3 EOS. The calculations lift the restriction of axisymmetry imposed in previous simulations. Our simulations model the direct collapse of supermassive stars to supermassive BHs (>=104M⊙) at high cosmological redshifts, which may explain the appearance of supermassive BHs and quasars by z 7. They also crudely model the collapse of massive Pop III stars to massive BHs, which could power some of the long gamma-ray bursts observed by FERMI and SWIFT at z 6-8. We analyze the properties of the electromagnetic and gravitational wave signatures of these events and discuss the detectability of such multimessenger sources.

  12. Gravitational Collapse of Massless Fields in an Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Chul-Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field with the periodic boundary condition in a cubic box is reported. This system can be regarded as a lattice universe model. The initial data is constructed for a Gaussian like profile of the scalar field taking the integrability condition associated with the periodic boundary condition into account. For a large initial amplitude, a black hole is formed after a certain period of time. While the scalar field spreads out in the whole region for a small initial amplitude. The difference of the late time expansion law of the lattice universe depending on the final fate of the gravitational collapse is discussed.

  13. Progressive collapse susceptibility of a long span suspension bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmati, Pierluigi; Giuliani, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    should be maintained in case of an accidental hanger detachment. Local damages in bridges, which are characterized by an horizontal load transfer system, may progress along the deck or along the suspension system, as the dynamic overloading of the structural elements immediately adjacent to the failed...... ones may lead to subsequent failures. In suspension bridges, which are characterized by a relatively low continuity of the system, the damage of the deck may favor a collapse standstill, in case of an early detachment of the deck collapsing section. In the paper, a long span suspension bridge is taken...

  14. Gravitational Collapse of Massless Fields in an Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2018-01-01

    Gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field with the periodic boundary condition in a cubic box is reported. This system can be regarded as a lattice universe model. The initial data is constructed for a Gaussian like profile of the scalar field taking the integrability condition associated with the periodic boundary condition into account. For a large initial amplitude, a black hole is formed after a certain period of time. While the scalar field spreads out in the whole region for a small initial amplitude. The difference of the late time expansion law of the lattice universe depending on the final fate of the gravitational collapse is discussed.

  15. Collapse mechanisms and strength prediction of reinforced concrete pile caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe G.; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an upper bound plasticity approach for strength prediction of reinforced concrete pile caps. A number of collapse mechanisms are identified and analysed. The procedure leads to an estimate of the load-carrying capacity and an identification of the critical collapse mechanism....... Calculations have been compared with nearly 200 test results found in the literature. Satisfactory agreement has been found. The analyses are conducted on concentrically loaded caps supported by four piles. The paper briefly outlines how the approach may be extended to more complicated loadings and geometries...

  16. Systematic Features and Progenitor Dependence of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    We present our latest results of two-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations for about 400 progenitors. Our self-consistent supernova models reveal the systematic features of core-collapse supernova properties such as neutrino luminosity and energy spectrum, explosion energy, remnant mass, and yield of radioactive 56Ni. We find that these explosion characteristics tend to show a monotonic increase as a function of mass accretion rate onto a shock. The accretion rate depends on the structure of the progenitor core and its envelope, which is well described by the compactness parameter.

  17. Diversity loss with persistent human disturbance increases vulnerability to ecosystem collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, A S; McCann, K S; Gellner, G; Turkington, R

    2013-02-07

    Long-term and persistent human disturbances have simultaneously altered the stability and diversity of ecological systems, with disturbances directly reducing functional attributes such as invasion resistance, while eliminating the buffering effects of high species diversity. Theory predicts that this combination of environmental change and diversity loss increases the risk of abrupt and potentially irreversible ecosystem collapse, but long-term empirical evidence from natural systems is lacking. Here we demonstrate this relationship in a degraded but species-rich pyrogenic grassland in which the combined effects of fire suppression, invasion and trophic collapse have created a species-poor grassland that is highly productive, resilient to yearly climatic fluctuations, and resistant to invasion, but vulnerable to rapid collapse after the re-introduction of fire. We initially show how human disturbance has created a negative relationship between diversity and function, contrary to theoretical predictions. Fire prevention since the mid-nineteenth century is associated with the loss of plant species but it has stabilized high-yield annual production and invasion resistance, comparable to a managed high-yield low-diversity agricultural system. In managing for fire suppression, however, a hidden vulnerability to sudden environmental change emerges that is explained by the elimination of the buffering effects of high species diversity. With the re-introduction of fire, grasslands only persist in areas with remnant concentrations of native species, in which a range of rare and mostly functionally redundant plants proliferate after burning and prevent extensive invasion including a rapid conversion towards woodland. This research shows how biodiversity can be crucial for ecosystem stability despite appearing functionally insignificant beforehand, a relationship probably applicable to many ecosystems given the globally prevalent combination of intensive long-term land

  18. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-03-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications.

  19. Area collapse algorithm computing new curve of 2D geometric objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Michał Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    The processing of cartographic data demands human involvement. Up-to-date algorithms try to automate a part of this process. The goal is to obtain a digital model, or additional information about shape and topology of input geometric objects. A topological skeleton is one of the most important tools in the branch of science called shape analysis. It represents topological and geometrical characteristics of input data. Its plot depends on using algorithms such as medial axis, skeletonization, erosion, thinning, area collapse and many others. Area collapse, also known as dimension change, replaces input data with lower-dimensional geometric objects like, for example, a polygon with a polygonal chain, a line segment with a point. The goal of this paper is to introduce a new algorithm for the automatic calculation of polygonal chains representing a 2D polygon. The output is entirely contained within the area of the input polygon, and it has a linear plot without branches. The computational process is automatic and repeatable. The requirements of input data are discussed. The author analyzes results based on the method of computing ends of output polygonal chains. Additional methods to improve results are explored. The algorithm was tested on real-world cartographic data received from BDOT/GESUT databases, and on point clouds from laser scanning. An implementation for computing hatching of embankment is described.

  20. Sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: an ongoing legacy of industrial whaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A M; Estes, J A; van Vliet, G B; Williams, T M; Doak, D F; Danner, E M; Forney, K A; Pfister, B

    2003-10-14

    Populations of seals, sea lions, and sea otters have sequentially collapsed over large areas of the northern North Pacific Ocean and southern Bering Sea during the last several decades. A bottom-up nutritional limitation mechanism induced by physical oceanographic change or competition with fisheries was long thought to be largely responsible for these declines. The current weight of evidence is more consistent with top-down forcing. Increased predation by killer whales probably drove the sea otter collapse and may have been responsible for the earlier pinniped declines as well. We propose that decimation of the great whales by post-World War II industrial whaling caused the great whales' foremost natural predators, killer whales, to begin feeding more intensively on the smaller marine mammals, thus "fishing-down" this element of the marine food web. The timing of these events, information on the abundance, diet, and foraging behavior of both predators and prey, and feasibility analyses based on demographic and energetic modeling are all consistent with this hypothesis.

  1. Sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: An ongoing legacy of industrial whaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A.M.; Estes, J.A.; Van Vliet, Gus B.; Williams, T.M.; Doak, D.F.; Danner, E.M.; Forney, K.A.; Pfister, B.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of seals, sea lions, and sea otters have sequentially collapsed over large areas of the northern North Pacific Ocean and southern Bering Sea during the last several decades. A bottom-up nutritional limitation mechanism induced by physical oceanographic change or competition with fisheries was long thought to be largely responsible for these declines. The current weight of evidence is more consistent with top-down forcing. Increased predation by killer whales probably drove the sea otter collapse and may have been responsible for the earlier pinniped declines as well. We propose that decimation of the great whales by post-World War II industrial whaling caused the great whales' foremost natural predators, killer whales, to begin feeding more intensively on the smaller marine mammals, thus "fishing-down" this element of the marine food web. The timing of these events, information on the abundance, diet, and foraging behavior of both predators and prey, and feasibility analyses based on demographic and energetic modeling are all consistent with this hypothesis.

  2. Prediction of the wetting-induced collapse behaviour using the soil-water characteristic curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wan-Li; Li, Ping; Vanapalli, Sai K.; Wang, Jia-Ding

    2018-01-01

    Collapsible soils go through three distinct phases in response to matric suction decrease during wetting: pre-collapse phase, collapse phase and post-collapse phase. It is reasonable and conservative to consider a strain path that includes a pre-collapse phase in which constant volume is maintained and a collapse phase that extends to the final matric suction to be experienced by collapsible soils during wetting. Upon this assumption, a method is proposed for predicting the collapse behaviour due to wetting. To use the proposed method, two parameters, critical suction and collapse rate, are required. The former is the suction value below which significant collapse deformations take place in response to matric suction decease, and the later is the rate at which void ratio reduces with matric suction in the collapse phase. The value of critical suction can be estimated from the water-entry value taking account of both the microstructure characteristics and collapse mechanism of fine-grained collapsible soils; the wetting soil-water characteristic curve thus can be used as a tool. Five sets of data of wetting tests on both compacted and natural collapsible soils reported in the literature were used to validate the proposed method. The critical suction values were estimated from the water-entry value with parameter a that is suggested to vary between 0.10 and 0.25 for compacted soils and to be lower for natural collapsible soils. The results of a field permeation test in collapsible loess soils were also used to validate the proposed method. The relatively good agreement between the measured and estimated collapse deformations suggests that the proposed method can provide reasonable prediction of the collapse behaviour due to wetting.

  3. Geophysical Assessment of Two Collapsed and Concealed Septic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A geophysical study was carried out in the vicinity of two collapsed and concealed septic tanks to delineate the structures responsible for their failure. Two-dimensional resistivity and seismic refraction tomography data were collected along a profile laid across the septic tanks. The data were collected using ABEM ...

  4. Explosion of a collapsing Bose-Einstein condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duine, R.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    We show that elastic collisions between atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive interactions can lead to an explosion that ejects a large fraction of the collapsing condensate. We study variationally the dynamics of this explosion and find excellent agreement with recent experiments on

  5. Explosion of a Collapsing Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duine, R.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    we show that elastic collisions between atoms in an Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive interactions lead to an explosion that ejects a large fraction of the collapsing condensate. We study variationally the dynamics of thes explosion and find excellent agreement with recent experiments on

  6. An elastocapillary model of wood-fibre collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-07-08

    An elastocapillary model for drying-induced collapse is proposed. We consider a circular elastic membrane with a hole at the centre that is deformed by the capillary pressure of simply and doubly connected menisci. The membrane overlays a cylindrical cavity with rigid walls, trapping a prescribed volume of water. This geometry may be suitable for studying structural failures and stiction in micro-electromechanical systems during wet etching, where capillary surfaces experience catastrophic transitions. The dry state is determined using the dihedral-angle and volume-turning-point stability criteria. Open and collapsed conformations are predicted from the scaled hole radius, cavity aspect ratio, meniscus contact angle with the membrane and cavity walls, and an elastocapillary number measuring the membrane stretching rigidity relative to the water surface tension. For a given scaled hole radius and cavity aspect ratio, there is a critical elastocapillary number above which the system does not collapse upon drying. The critical elastocapillary number is weakly influenced by the contact angle over a wide range of the scaled hole radius, thus indicating a limitation of surface hydrophobization for controlling the dry-state conformation. The model is applied to the drying of wood fibres above the fibre saturation point, determining the conditions leading to collapse.

  7. Deconvolution of acoustically detected bubble-collapse shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kristoffer; Song, Jae Hee; Johnston, Keith; Prentice, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The shock wave emitted by the collapse of a laser-induced bubble is detected at propagation distances of 30, 40and50mm, using a PVdF needle hydrophone, with a non-flat end-of-cable frequency response, calibrated for magnitude and phase, from 125kHz to 20MHz. High-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 5×106 frames per second, 10nstemporal resolution and 256 frames per sequence, records the bubble deflation from maximum to minimum radius, the collapse and shock wave generation, and the subsequent rebound in unprecedented detail, for a single sequence of an individual bubble. The Gilmore equation for bubble oscillation is solved according to the resolved bubble collapse, and simulated shock wave profiles deduced from the acoustic emissions, for comparison to the hydrophone recordings. The effects of single-frequency calibration, magnitude-only and full waveform deconvolution of the experimental data are presented, in both time and frequency domains. Magnitude-only deconvolution increases the peak pressure amplitude of the measured shock wave by approximately 9%, from single-frequency calibration, with full waveform deconvolution increasing it by a further 3%. Full waveform deconvolution generates a shock wave profile that is in agreement with the simulated profile, filtered according to the calibration bandwidth. Implications for the detection and monitoring of acoustic cavitation, where the role of periodic bubble collapse shock waves has recently been realised, are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reopening modes of a collapsed elasto-rigid channel

    CERN Document Server

    Ducloué, Lucie; Thompson, Alice B; Juel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the reopening mechanics of strongly collapsed airways, we study the steady propagation of an air finger through a collapsed oil-filled channel with a single compliant wall. In a previous study using fully-compliant elastic tubes, a `pointed' air finger was found to propagate at high speed and low pressure, which may enable rapid reopening of highly collapsed airways with minimal tissue damage (Heap & Juel 2008). In this paper, we identify the selection mechanism of that pointed finger, which remained unexplained, by conducting an experimental study in a rigid rectangular Hele-Shaw channel with an elastic top boundary. The constitutive behaviour of this elasto-rigid channel is broadly similar to that of an elastic tube, but unlike the tube the channel's cross-section adopts self-similar shapes from the undeformed state to the point of first near wall contact. The simplification of the vessel geometry enables the systematic investigation of the reopening dynamics in terms of initial collapse. W...

  9. A Collapsed Variational Bayesian Inference Algorithm for Latent Dirichlet Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-07

    A Collapsed Variational Bayesian Inference Algorithm for Latent Dirichlet Allocation Yee Whye Teh Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit University...thesis, Gatsby Computa- tional Neuroscience Unit, University College London, 2003. [12] J. Sung, Z. Ghahramani, and S. Choi. Variational Bayesian EM: A

  10. Flow and oscillations in collapsible tubes: Physiological applications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The motivation for this subject comes from physiology: Air-flow in the lungs, where flow limitation during forced expiration is a consequence of large-airway collapse, and wheezing, which is a manifestation of self-excited mechanical oscillations; Blood flow in veins, such as those of giraffes, in which the return of blood to the ...

  11. Gravitational Collapse and Structure Formation in an Expanding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. September 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Gravitational Collapse and Structure Formation in an. Expanding Universe. J S Bagla and Pritpal Kaur Sandhu. Keywords. Cosmology, gravitational col- lapse, galaxy formation. (left) Jasjeet Bagla works at IISER Mohali. His research is mainly in the area of cosmology.

  12. Tunneling into microstate geometries: quantum effects stop gravitational collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bena, I.; Mayerson, D.R.; Puhm, A.; Vercnocke, B.

    Collapsing shells form horizons, and when the curvature is small classical general relativity is believed to describe this process arbitrarily well. On the other hand, quantum information theory based (fuzzball/firewall) arguments suggest the existence of some structure at the black hole horizon.

  13. An infrequent cause of total lung collapse: Endobronchial lipoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fahd Ahmed Suhail

    2014-06-21

    Jun 21, 2014 ... Radiology;. Total lung collapse. Abstract Endobronchial lipomas are rare benign tumors of the lung. The reported case was a. 46-year-old man who came to our center for follow up of endobronchial ... 2014 Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine. ... attacks may induce sufficient nuclear atypia to suggest.

  14. Surviving a cluster collapse: risk aversion as a core value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, Holger; Hospers, Gerrit J.; van der Zee, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This paper analyses firms, which survived in a collapsed regional cluster. The target is to analyze whether the principles for enduring success identified researching success factors of very old firms also apply in such an environment. Design/methodology/approach – The authors conduct a

  15. Explosive X-point collapse in relativistic magnetically dominated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Sironi, Lorenzo; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    The extreme properties of the gamma-ray flares in the Crab nebula present a clear challenge to our ideas on the nature of particle acceleration in relativistic astrophysical plasma. It seems highly unlikely that standard mechanisms of stochastic type are at work here and hence the attention of theorists has switched to linear acceleration in magnetic reconnection events. In this series of papers, we attempt to develop a theory of explosive magnetic reconnection in highly magnetized relativistic plasma which can explain the extreme parameters of the Crab flares. In the first paper, we focus on the properties of the X-point collapse. Using analytical and numerical methods (fluid and particle-in-cell simulations) we extend Syrovatsky's classical model of such collapse to the relativistic regime. We find that the collapse can lead to the reconnection rate approaching the speed of light on macroscopic scales. During the collapse, the plasma particles are accelerated by charge-starved electric fields, which can reach (and even exceed) values of the local magnetic field. The explosive stage of reconnection produces non-thermal power-law tails with slopes that depend on the average magnetization . For sufficiently high magnetizations and vanishing guide field, the non-thermal particle spectrum consists of two components: a low-energy population with soft spectrum that dominates the number census; and a high-energy population with hard spectrum that possesses all the properties needed to explain the Crab flares.

  16. Temperature considerations in numerical simulations of collapsing bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Eric; Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin

    2014-11-01

    In naval and biomedical engineering applications, the inertial collapse of cavitation bubbles is known to damage its surroundings. While significant attention has been dedicated to investigating the pressures produced by this process, less is known about heating of the surrounding medium, which may be important when collapse occurs near objects whose properties strongly depend on temperature (e.g., polymers). Euler simulations are capable of predicting the high pressures thereby generated. However, numerical errors can occur when solving the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible interface problems. Using a newly developed computational approach that prevents such errors, we investigate the dynamics of shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of individual and collections of gas bubbles, in a free field and near rigid surfaces. We characterize the temperature rises based on the relevant non-dimensional parameters entering the problem. In particular, we show that the temperature of a neighboring object rises due to two mechanisms: the shock produced at collapse and heat diffusion from the hot bubble as it moves toward the object. This work was supported by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0751.

  17. European Neolithic societies showed early warning signals of population collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Sean S; Haas, W Randall; Shennan, Stephen J

    2016-08-30

    Ecosystems on the verge of major reorganization-regime shift-may exhibit declining resilience, which can be detected using a collection of generic statistical tests known as early warning signals (EWSs). This study explores whether EWSs anticipated human population collapse during the European Neolithic. It analyzes recent reconstructions of European Neolithic (8-4 kya) population trends that reveal regime shifts from a period of rapid growth following the introduction of agriculture to a period of instability and collapse. We find statistical support for EWSs in advance of population collapse. Seven of nine regional datasets exhibit increasing autocorrelation and variance leading up to collapse, suggesting that these societies began to recover from perturbation more slowly as resilience declined. We derive EWS statistics from a prehistoric population proxy based on summed archaeological radiocarbon date probability densities. We use simulation to validate our methods and show that sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes are unlikely to explain the observed EWS patterns. The implications of these results for understanding the dynamics of Neolithic ecosystems are discussed, and we present a general framework for analyzing societal regime shifts using EWS at large spatial and temporal scales. We suggest that our findings are consistent with an adaptive cycling model that highlights both the vulnerability and resilience of early European populations. We close by discussing the implications of the detection of EWS in human systems for archaeology and sustainability science.

  18. Spherical Domain Wall Collapse in a Dust Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    To clarify observational consequence of bubble nucleations in inflationary era, we analyse dynamics of a spherical domain wall in an expanding universe. We consider a spherical shell of the domain wall with tension $\\sigma$ collapsing in a spherically-symmetric dust universe, which is initially separated into the open Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker universe inside the shell and the Einstein-de Sitter universe outside. The domain wall shell collapses due to the tension, and sweeps the dust fluid. The universe after the collapse becomes inhomogeneous and is described by the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi model. We construct solutions describing this inhomogeneous universe by solving dynamical equations obtained from Israel's junction conditions applied to this system. We find that a black hole forms after the domain wall collapse for any initial condition, and that the black hole mass at the moment of its formation is universally given by $M_{\\rm BH}\\simeq 17 \\sigma/H_{\\rm hc}$, where $H_{\\rm hc}$ is the Hubble...

  19. Cardiovascular collapse due to intravenous verapamil in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    controlled with propranolol in one and sotalol in the other. Factors contributing to the cardiovascular collapse ... controlled for 8 months, during which the patient remained asymptomatic. Thereafter he returned to his home in ... decrease in cardiac output, cause marked hypotension. Circulatory arrest in patient 1 was due to ...

  20. Collapse of the roof of a football stadium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, H.; Renier, B.; Burggraaf, H.G.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2011 the Dutch football club FC Twente was building an extension of their stadium De Grolsch Veste, to increase the capacity of the stadium. On july 7th 2011, during construction, the roof of the partially finished extension collapsed. As a result of this accident two workers were

  1. Forensic collapse investigation of a concrete bridge with timber piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This report outlines the forensic investigation of the collapse of Bridge No. SN 019-5010 in DeKalb County, : Illinois on August 19, 2008. The bridge consisted of three 42 feet precast prestressed concrete deck beams : simply-supported by concrete pi...

  2. mode of collapse of square single panel reinforced concrete space

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    MODE OF COLLAPSE OF SQUARE SINGLE PANEL REINFORCED CONCRETE SPACE- FRAMED STRUCTURES.... L. M. Olantori, et al. Nigerian Journal of Technology. Vol. 35, No. 1, January 2016. 17 particularly in exterior joints where additional sources of shear transfer within the joint region cannot develop after first ...

  3. Negation and negative concord in romance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Henriëtte de; Sag, I.A.

    This paper addresses the two interpretations a combination of negative indefinites can get in concord languages like French, namely a concord reading which amounts to a single negation, or a double negation reading. We develop an analysis in a polyadic framework, in which a sequence of

  4. Critical collapse in (2+1)-dimensional AdS spacetime: quasi-CSS solutions and linear perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Gerard E-mail: gclement@lapp.in2p3.fr; Fabbri, Alessandro E-mail: fabbria@bo.infn.it

    2002-05-20

    We construct a one-parameter family of exact time-dependent solutions to 2+1 gravity with a negative cosmological constant and a massless minimally coupled scalar field as source. These solutions present a continuously self-similar (CSS) behavior near the central singularity, as observed in critical collapse, and an asymptotically AdS behavior at spatial infinity. We consider the linear perturbation analysis in this background, and discuss the crucial question of boundary conditions. These are tested in the special case where the scalar field decouples and the linear perturbations describe exactly the small-mass static BTZ black hole. In the case of genuine scalar perturbations, we find a growing mode with a behavior characteristic of supercritical collapse, the spacelike singularity and apparent horizon appearing simultaneously and evolving towards the AdS boundary. Our boundary conditions lead to the value of the critical exponent {gamma}=0.4.

  5. Dynamics of evanescent matter waves in negative-index media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamda, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Perales, F.; Baudon, J.; Dutier, G.; Mainos, C.; Boustimi, M.; Ducloy, M.

    2010-11-01

    Semi-evanescent and evanescent matter waves produced by an atom wave packet impinging on a repulsive barrier can be back-refracted and reconstructed by the application of negative-index 'comoving' potential pulses. One shows that those collapses and revivals generate a matter wave confined on both sides of the barrier border ('surface matter wave') and should be observable via the retardation of atom reflection from the barrier interface. This property, joined to the possibility recently demonstrated of inducing negative refraction of atom waves, makes such potentials a matter-wave counterpart of negative-index materials or 'meta materials' well known in light optics.

  6. Entanglement entropy production in gravitational collapse: covariant regularization and solvable models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Eugenio [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos & Physics Department,Penn State, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lorenzo, Tommaso De [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi”, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Smerlak, Matteo [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2015-06-25

    We study the dynamics of vacuum entanglement in the process of gravitational collapse and subsequent black hole evaporation. In the first part of the paper, we introduce a covariant regularization of entanglement entropy tailored to curved spacetimes; this regularization allows us to propose precise definitions for the concepts of black hole “exterior entropy” and “radiation entropy.” For a Vaidya model of collapse we find results consistent with the standard thermodynamic properties of Hawking radiation. In the second part of the paper, we compute the vacuum entanglement entropy of various spherically-symmetric spacetimes of interest, including the nonsingular black hole model of Bardeen, Hayward, Frolov and Rovelli-Vidotto and the “black hole fireworks” model of Haggard-Rovelli. We discuss specifically the role of event and trapping horizons in connection with the behavior of the radiation entropy at future null infinity. We observe in particular that (i) in the presence of an event horizon the radiation entropy diverges at the end of the evaporation process, (ii) in models of nonsingular evaporation (with a trapped region but no event horizon) the generalized second law holds only at early times and is violated in the “purifying” phase, (iii) at late times the radiation entropy can become negative (i.e. the radiation can be less correlated than the vacuum) before going back to zero leading to an up-down-up behavior for the Page curve of a unitarily evaporating black hole.

  7. Stabilisation and humanitarian access in a collapsed state: the Somali case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhaus, Ken

    2010-10-01

    Somalia today is the site of three major threats: the world's worst humanitarian crisis; the longest-running instance of complete state collapse; and a robust jihadist movement with links to Al-Qa'ida. External state-building, counter-terrorism and humanitarian policies responding to these threats have worked at cross-purposes. State-building efforts that insist humanitarian relief be channelled through the nascent state in order to build its legitimacy and capacity undermine humanitarian neutrality when the state is a party to a civil war. Counter-terrorism policies that seek to ensure that no aid benefits terrorist groups have the net effect of criminalising relief operations in countries where poor security precludes effective accountability. This paper argues that tensions between stabilisation and humanitarian goals in contemporary Somalia reflect a long history of politicisation of humanitarian operations in the country. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  8. Typical worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    2017-05-01

    Hugh Everett III presented pure wave mechanics, sometimes referred to as the many-worlds interpretation, as a solution to the quantum measurement problem. While pure wave mechanics is an objectively deterministic physical theory with no probabilities, Everett sought to show how the theory might be understood as making the standard quantum statistical predictions as appearances to observers who were themselves described by the theory. We will consider his argument and how it depends on a particular notion of branch typicality. We will also consider responses to Everett and the relationship between typicality and probability. The suggestion will be that pure wave mechanics requires a number of significant auxiliary assumptions in order to make anything like the standard quantum predictions.

  9. Shell worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  10. Distinct Element modeling of geophysical signatures during sinkhole collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Taheri, Abbas; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    A sinkhole forms due to the collapse of rocks or soil near the Earth's surface into an underground cavity. Such cavities represent large secondary pore spaces derived by dissolution and subrosion in the underground. By changing the stress field in the surrounding material, the growth of cavities can lead to a positive feedback, in which expansion and mechanical instability in the surrounding material increases or generates new secondary pore space (e.g. by fracturing), which in turn increases the cavity size, etc. A sinkhole forms due to the eventual subsidence or collapse of the overburden that becomes destabilized and fails all the way to the Earth's surface. Both natural processes like (sub)surface water movement and earthquakes, and human activities, such as mining, construction and groundwater extraction, intensify such feedbacks. The development of models for the mechanical interaction of a growing cavity and fracturing of its surrounding material, thus capturing related precursory geophysical signatures, has been limited, however. Here we report on the advances of a general, simplified approach to simulating cavity growth and sinkhole formation by using 2D Distinct Element Modeling (DEM) PFC5.0 software and thereby constraining pre-, syn- and post-collapse geophysical and geodetic signatures. This physically realistic approach allows for spontaneous cavity development and dislocation of rock mass to be simulated by bonded particle formulation of DEM. First, we present calibration and validation of our model. Surface subsidence above an instantaneously excavated circular cavity is tracked and compared with an incrementally increasing dissolution zone both for purely elastic and non-elastic material.This validation is important for the optimal choice of model dimensions and particles size with respect to simulation time. Second, a cavity growth approach is presented and compared to a well-documented case study, the deliberately intensified sinkhole collapse at

  11. Experimental study of the progressive collapse mechanism of excavations retained by cantilever piles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diao, Y; Nie, D.Q; Deng, C.H; Zheng, G; Cheng, X.S; Huang, T.M; Lei, Y.W

    2017-01-01

    ... (sudden failures of certain retaining piles) and progressive collapse. The model test results show that partial collapse can cause a sudden increase in the bending moments of adjacent piles via an arching effect...

  12. Polemic and Descriptive Negations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horslund, Camilla Søballe

    2011-01-01

    to semantics and pragmatics, negations can be used in three different ways, which gives rise to a typology of three different types of negations: 1) the descriptive negation, 2) the polemic negation, and 3) the meta-linguistic negation (Nølke 1999, 4). This typology illuminates the fact that the negation...... as such may be more or less central to the meaning of the utterance. The present paper investigates the role of morphosyntactic and prosodic prominence as well as register and social setting on the interpretation of negations. It seems plausible to expect that if the negation as such is central to the meaning...... of the utterance (as in polemic negations), the negation will be articulated prominently in order to emphasise this importance. Likewise, if the negation is not central to the meaning of the utterance, it should not be articulated prominently. Moreover, it is plausible to expect descriptive negations to be more...

  13. The application and realization of 3D geosimulation and forecast in the field of bank collapse research based on GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongyuan; He, Zongyi; Qi, Qingwen

    2008-10-01

    With the development of computer science, many kinds of three dimensional software come to the world one after another, and have been applied in many fields, such as PC games, military simulation and geographical information system (GIS) and so on, among which the application of the technique of three dimensional geo-simulation in GIS field has provided new platform, new ideas, and a new significant direction for the development of GIS. This paper is to discuss the methods and realization of three-dimensional(3D) geosimulation in the field of bank collapse based on GIS, with the research of bank collapse as the cut-in point, which is the important direction in the research of geological disasters, and to give 3D simulation result of the reservoir bank, taking the related data in three gorges reservoir area as the example, and at the same time to give the result of 3D simulation about bank collapse forecast, and at last to appraise these results.

  14. A UAV BASED 3-D POSITIONING FRAMEWORK FOR DETECTING LOCATIONS OF BURIED PERSONS IN COLLAPSED DISASTER AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Regarding spatial location positioning, indoor location positioning theories based on wireless communication techniques such as Wi-Fi, beacon, UWB and Bluetooth has widely been developing across the world. These techniques are mainly focusing on spatial location detection of customers using fixed wireless APs and unique Tags in the indoor environment. Besides, since existing detection equipment and techniques using ultrasound or sound etc. to detect buried persons and identify survival status for them cause 2nd damages on the collapsed debris for rescuers. In addition, it might take time to check the buried persons. However, the collapsed disaster sites should consider both outdoor and indoor environments because empty spaces under collapsed debris exists. In order to detect buried persons from the empty spaces, we should collect wireless signals with Wi-Fi from their mobile phone. Basically, the Wi-Fi signal measure 2-D location. However, since the buried persons have Z value with burial depth, we also should collect barometer sensor data from their mobile phones in order to measure Z values according to weather conditions. Specially, for quick accessibility to the disaster area, a drone (UAV; Unmanned Arial Vehicle system, which is equipped with a wireless detection module, was introduced. Using these framework, this study aims to provide the rescuers with effective rescue information by calculating 3-D location for buried persons based on the wireless and barometer sensor fusion.

  15. Electron-ion thermal equilibration after spherical shock collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rygg, J R; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Meyerhofer, D D; Stoeckl, C

    2009-08-14

    A comprehensive set of dual nuclear product observations provides a snapshot of imploding inertial confinement fusion capsules at the time of shock collapse, shortly before the final stages of compression. The collapse of strong convergent shocks at the center of spherical capsules filled with D{sub 2} and {sup 3}He gas induces D-D and D-{sup 3}He nuclear production. Temporal and spectral diagnostics of products from both reactions are used to measure shock timing, temperature, and capsule areal density. The density and temperature inferred from these measurements are used to estimate the electron-ion thermal coupling, and demonstrate a lower electron-ion relaxation rate for capsules with lower initial gas density.

  16. Quantum gravitational collapse: non-singularity and non-locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2008-06-01

    We investigate gravitational collapse in the context of quantum mechanics. We take primary interest in the behavior of the collapse near the horizon and near the origin (classical singularity) from the point of view of an infalling observer. In the absence of radiation, quantum effects near the horizon do not change the classical conclusions for an infalling observer, meaning the horizon is not an obstacle for him. However, quantum effects are able to remove the classical singularity at the origin, since the wave function is non-singular at the origin. Also, near the classical singularity, some non-local effects become important. In the Schrodinger equation describing behavior near the origin, derivatives of the wave function at one point are related to the value of the wave function at some other distant point.

  17. Radiation from a Collapsing Object is Manifestly Unitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Anshul; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2015-03-01

    The process of gravitational collapse excites the fields propagating in the background geometry and gives rise to thermal radiation. We demonstrate by explicit calculations that the density matrix corresponding to such radiation actually describes a pure state. While Hawking's leading order density matrix contains only the diagonal terms, we calculate the off-diagonal correlation terms. These correlations start very small, but then grow in time. The cumulative effect is that the correlations become comparable to the leading order terms and significantly modify the density matrix. While the trace of the Hawking's density matrix squared goes from unity to zero during the evolution, the trace of the total density matrix squared remains unity at all times and all frequencies. This implies that the process of radiation from a collapsing object is unitary.

  18. Kax and kol: collapse and resilience in lowland Maya civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Nicholas P; Beach, Timothy P; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2012-03-06

    Episodes of population loss and cultural change, including the famous Classic Collapse, punctuated the long course of Maya civilization. In many cases, these downturns in the fortunes of individual sites and entire regions included significant environmental components such as droughts or anthropogenic environmental degradation. Some afflicted areas remained depopulated for long periods, whereas others recovered more quickly. We examine the dynamics of growth and decline in several areas in the Maya Lowlands in terms of both environmental and cultural resilience and with a focus on downturns that occurred in the Terminal Preclassic (second century Common Era) and Terminal Classic (9th and 10th centuries CE) periods. This examination of available data indicates that the elevated interior areas of the Yucatán Peninsula were more susceptible to system collapse and less suitable for resilient recovery than adjacent lower-lying areas.

  19. Classes of Copenhagen interpretations: Mechanisms of collapse as typologically determinative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, James R.

    The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is the dominant view of the theory among working physicists, if not philosophers. There are, however, several strains of Copenhagenism extant, each largely accepting Born's assessment of the wave function as the most complete possible specification of a system and the notion of collapse as a completely random event. This paper outlines three of these sub-interpretations, typing them by what the author of each names as the trigger of quantum-mechanical collapse. Visions of the theory from von Neumann, Heisenberg, and Wheeler offer different mechanisms to break the continuous, deterministic, superposition-laden quantum chain and yield discrete, probabilistic, classical results in response to von Neumann's catastrophe of infinite regress.

  20. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  1. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fröhlich, C.; Casanova, J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 27695 (United States); Hempel, M.; Liebendörfer, M. [Departement für Physik, Universität Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Melton, C. A. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Perego, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars (M > 8-10 M{sub ⊙}) undergo core collapse at the end of their life and explode as supernova with ~ 10⁵¹ erg of kinetic energy. While the detailed supernova explosion mechanism is still under investigation, reliable nucleosynthesis calculations based on successful explosions are needed to explain the observed abundances in metal-poor stars and to predict supernova yields for galactic chemical evolution studies. To predict nucleosynthesis yields for a large number of progenitor stars, computationally efficient explosion models are required. We model the core collapse, bounce and subsequent explosion of massive stars assuming spherical symmetry and using detailed microphysics and neutrino physics combined with a novel method to artificially trigger the explosion (PUSH). We discuss the role of neutrinos, the conditions in the ejecta, and the resulting nucleosynthesis.

  2. Gravitational perfect fluid collapse in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, G.; Tahir, M. [The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Department of Mathematics, Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

    2017-08-15

    The Einstein Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravity is the low-energy limit of heterotic super-symmetric string theory. This paper deals with gravitational collapse of a perfect fluid in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity by considering the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. For this purpose, the closed form of the exact solution of the equations of motion has been determined by using the conservation of the stress-energy tensor and the condition of marginally bound shells. It has been investigated that the presence of a Gauss-Bonnet coupling term α > 0 and the pressure of the fluid modifies the structure and time formation of singularity. In this analysis a singularity forms earlier than a horizon, so the end state of the collapse is a naked singularity depending on the initial data. But this singularity is weak and timelike, which goes against the investigation of general relativity. (orig.)

  3. Short intense laser pulse collapse in near-critical plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, F; Flacco, A; Kahaly, S; Veltcheva, M; Lifschitz, A; Malka, V; d'Humières, E; Andriyash, I; Tikhonchuk, V

    2013-02-22

    It is observed that the interaction of an intense ultrashort laser pulse with a near-critical gas jet results in the pulse collapse and the deposition of a significant fraction of the energy. This deposition happens in a small and well-localized volume in the rising part of the gas jet, where the electrons are efficiently accelerated and heated. A collisionless plasma expansion over ~ 150 μm at a subrelativistic velocity (~ c/3) has been optically monitored in time and space, and attributed to the quasistatic field ionization of the gas associated with the hot electron current. Numerical simulations in good agreement with the observations suggest the acceleration in the collapse region of relativistic electrons, along with the excitation of a sizable magnetic dipole that sustains the electron current over several picoseconds.

  4. Sterile neutrino oscillations in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, MacKenzie L.; Meixner, Matthew; Mathews, Grant; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2014-11-01

    We have made core-collapse supernova simulations that allow oscillations between electron neutrinos (or their antiparticles) with right-handed sterile neutrinos. We have considered a range of mixing angles and sterile neutrino masses including those consistent with sterile neutrinos as a dark matter candidate. We examine whether such oscillations can impact the core bounce and shock reheating in supernovae. We identify the optimum ranges of mixing angles and masses that can dramatically enhance the supernova explosion by efficiently transporting electron antineutrinos from the core to behind the shock, where they provide additional heating leading to much larger explosion kinetic energies. We show that this effect can cause stars to explode that otherwise would have collapsed. We find that an interesting periodicity in the neutrino luminosity develops due to a cycle of depletion of the neutrino density by conversion to sterile neutrinos that shuts off the conversion, followed by a replenished neutrino density as neutrinos transport through the core.

  5. Quantum Mechanical Stabilization of a Collapsing Bose-Bose Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, D S

    2015-10-09

    According to the mean-field theory a condensed Bose-Bose mixture collapses when the interspecies attraction becomes stronger than the geometrical average of the intraspecies repulsions, g_{12}^{2}>g_{11}g_{22}. We show that instead of collapsing such a mixture gets into a dilute liquidlike droplet state stabilized by quantum fluctuations thus providing a direct manifestation of beyond mean-field effects. We study various properties of the droplet and find, in particular, that in a wide range of parameters its excitation spectrum lies entirely above the particle emission threshold. The droplet thus automatically evaporates itself to zero temperature, the property potentially interesting by itself and from the viewpoint of sympathetic cooling of other systems.

  6. Role of primordial black holes in the direct collapse scenario of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of accreting primordial black holes as the source of heating for the collapsing gas in the context of the direct collapse black hole scenario for the formation of super-massive black holes (SMBHs) at high redshifts, z ∼ 6 – 7 . One of the essential requirements for the direct collapse model ...

  7. Collapse arresting in an inhomogeneous two-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2001-01-01

    Collapse of (2 + 1)-dimensional beams in the inhomogeneous two-dimensional cubic nonlinear Schrodinger equation is analyzed numerically and analytically. It is shown that in the vicinity of a narrow attractive inhomogeneity, the collapse of beams that in a homogeneous medium would collapse may be...

  8. Non-adiabatic radiative collapse of a relativistic star under different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    used this space-time metric and examined various features of the evolution of the collapse of a shear-free homogeneous and isotropic configuration of matter. Pinheiro and Chan. [4,5] analysed the collapse of a matter distribution of uniform matter density with shear. We have examined the collapse of a relativistic star with ...

  9. Asymmetries in core-collapse supernovae from maps of radioactive 44Ti in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, B W; Harrison, F A; Boggs, S E

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse explosions, but the form it takes differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive (44)Ti, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing......, these observations provide strong evidence for the development of low-mode convective instabilities in core-collapse supernovae....

  10. Solar flare particle acceleration in collapsing magnetic traps

    OpenAIRE

    Grady, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is a detailed investigation of different aspects of the particle acceleration mechanisms operating in Collapsing Magnetic Traps (CMTs), which have been suggested as one possible mechanism for particle acceleration during solar flares. The acceleration processes in CMTs are investigated using guiding centre test particle calculations. Results including terms of different orders in the guiding centre approximation are compared to help identify which of the terms a...

  11. Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Recent- ly subcritical Coulomb behavior (i.e., where Z < Zc and atomic collapse resonances are absent) was observed for charged impurities in graphene...impurities. Here we report the observation of supercritical Coulomb behavior in atomically-fabricated “artificial nuclei” assembled on the surface...an STM, thus al- lowing creation of supercritical Coulomb potentials from subcritical charge elements. STM spectroscopy was used to observe the

  12. Results of Integrated Investigation of Collapse Sinkhole in Sarkayevo Village

    OpenAIRE

    O. N. Kovin; S. M. Blinov; P. A. Belkin; S. S. Vaganov; Bhavik Lodhia; Ruth Amey; Gan Yuqian

    2014-01-01

    The integrated investigations of karstic collapse sinkhole were conducted at the area of Sarkayevo village. The obtained hydrogeologic data show the local concentration of underground water flow at the investigated site, and high sulfate ion content in the water samples that suggests that a sinkhole is karstic in nature. Geophysical investigations allowed determining basic parameters of the site geological structure, to reveal the depth distribution of the disturbed ground in vicinity of the ...

  13. Collapse, conquest and Maya survival at Lamanai, Belize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Graham

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The Maya civilization of Central America prompts visions of mysterious stone temples now buried in tropical forest. It is commonly supposed to have collapsed suddenly in the ninth century AD, but some Maya settlements, such as Lamanai, survived into the colonial period. Here a new member of the Institute's academic staff gives a personal account of how working in Belize transformed her understanding of Maya civilization and its aftermath.

  14. The interest in neutrinos from core collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, M.L. [Universita dell' Aquila, I-67010 (Italy); Ianni, A. [Universita dell' Aquila, I-67010 (Italy); Vissani, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    The understanding of core collapse supernovae (SN) is an important open problem. These objects are intense sources of neutrinos, that can be observed with several types of terrestrial detectors. These two simple considerations, already, motivate close attention toward neutrino interactions in the region from few to 200 MeV. In this work, we offer a selection of results and expectations, and discuss important goals still to be reached.

  15. Thermal collapse of a granular gas under gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Volfson, Dmitri; Meerson, Baruch; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2006-01-01

    Free cooling of a gas of inelastically colliding hard spheres represents a central paradigm of kinetic theory of granular gases. At zero gravity the temperature of a freely cooling homogeneous granular gas follows a power law in time. How does gravity, which brings inhomogeneity, affect the cooling? We combine molecular dynamics simulations, a numerical solution of hydrodynamic equations and an analytic theory to show that a granular gas cooling under gravity undergoes thermal collapse: it co...

  16. Some nuclear physics aspects of core-collapse supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Yong-Zhong

    1998-01-01

    Here I review some nuclear physics aspects of core-collapse supernovae concerning neutrinos. Studies of neutrino emission and interactions in supernovae are crucial to our understanding of the explosion mechanism, the heavy element nucleosynthesis, and pulsar proper motions. I discuss the effects of reduced neutrino opacities in dense nuclear matter on supernova neutrino emission and their implications for the delayed supernova explosion mechanism and the synthesis of neutron-rich heavy eleme...

  17. A model for voltage collapse study considering load characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, L.B. [Companhia de Energia Eletrica da Bahia (COELBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a model for analysis of voltage collapse and instability problem considering the load characteristics. The model considers fundamentally the transmission lines represented by exact from through the generalized constants A, B, C, D and the loads as function of the voltage, emphasizing the cases of constant power, constant current and constant impedance. the study treats of the system behavior on steady state and presents illustrative graphics about the problem. (author) 12 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Bounds on collapse models from cold-atom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardello, Marco; Donadi, Sandro; Vinante, Andrea; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    The spontaneous localization mechanism of collapse models induces a Brownian motion in all physical systems. This effect is very weak, but experimental progress in creating ultracold atomic systems can be used to detect it. In this paper, we considered a recent experiment (Kovachy et al., 2015), where an atomic ensemble was cooled down to picokelvins. Any Brownian motion induces an extra increase of the position variance of the gas. We study this effect by solving the dynamical equations for the Continuous Spontaneous Localizations (CSL) model, as well as for its non-Markovian and dissipative extensions. The resulting bounds, with a 95 % of confidence level, are beaten only by measurements of spontaneous X-ray emission and by experiments with cantilever (in the latter case, only for rC ≥ 10-7 m, where rC is one of the two collapse parameters of the CSL model). We show that, contrary to the bounds given by X-ray measurements, non-Markovian effects do not change the bounds, for any reasonable choice of a frequency cutoff in the spectrum of the collapse noise. Therefore the bounds here considered are more robust. We also show that dissipative effects are unimportant for a large spectrum of temperatures of the noise, while for low temperatures the excluded region in the parameter space is the more reduced, the lower the temperature.

  19. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.

  20. Collapsed fat navigators for brain 3D rigid body motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Mathias; Mårtensson, Magnus; Avventi, Enrico; Norbeck, Ola; Skare, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    To acquire high-resolution 3D multi-slab echo planar imaging data without motion artifacts, using collapsed fat navigators. A fat navigator module (collapsed FatNav) was added to a diffusion-weighted 3D multi-slab echo planar imaging (DW 3D-MS EPI) sequence, comprising three orthogonal echo planar imaging readouts to track rigid body head motion in the image domain and performing prospective motion correction. The stability, resolution and accuracy of the navigator were investigated on phantoms and healthy volunteers. The experiments on phantoms and volunteers show that the navigator, depicting projections of the subcutaneous fat in of the head, is capable of correcting for head motion with insignificant bias compared to motion estimates derived from the water-signaling DWI images. Despite that this projection technique implies a non-sparse image appearance, collapsed FatNav data could be highly accelerated with parallel imaging, allowing three orthogonal 2D EPI readouts in about 6ms. By utilizing signal from the leading fat saturation RF pulse of the diffusion sequence, only the readout portion of the navigator needs to be added, resulting in a scan time penalty of only about 5%. Motion can be detected and corrected for with a 5-10Hz update frequency when combined with a sequence like the DW 3D-MS EPI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hospital response to a major freeway bridge collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hick, John L; Chipman, Jeffery; Loppnow, Gregory; Conterato, Marc; Roberts, David; Heegaard, William G; Beilman, Greg; Clark, Michael; Pohland, Jonathan; Ho, Jeffrey D; Brunette, Douglas D; Clinton, Joseph E

    2008-09-01

    We describe the hospital system response to the Interstate 35W bridge collapse in Minneapolis into the Mississippi River on August 1, 2007, which resulted in 13 deaths and 127 injuries. Comparative analysis of response activities at the 3 hospitals that received critical or serious casualties is provided. First-hand experiences of hospital physicians, issues identified in after-action reports, injury severity scores, and other relevant patient data were collected from the 3 hospitals that received seriously injured patients, including the closest hospitals to the collapse on each side of the river. Injuries were consistent with major acceleration/deceleration force injuries. The most critical patients arrived first at each hospital, suggesting appropriate prehospital triage. Capacity of the health care system was not overwhelmed and the involved hospitals generally reported an overresponse by staff. Communication and patient tracking problems occurred at all of the hospitals. Situational awareness was limited due to the scope of structural collapse and incomplete information from the scene. Hospitals were generally satisfied with their surge capacity and incident management plan activation. Issues such as communications, patient tracking, and staff overreporting that have been identified in past incidents also were problematic in this event. Hospitals will need to address deficiencies and build on successful actions to cope with future, potentially larger incidents.

  2. Plastic Collapse Localisation in Simple Shearing and Coaxial Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, B. E.; Ord, A.

    2011-12-01

    We explore, numerically, the evolution of localisation due to plastic collapse in both coaxial shortening and simple shearing deformations. These localisation features arise from plastic behaviour and hence differ from the formation of anticracks modelled by linear elastic behaviour (Fletcher and Pollard, 1990). The behaviour is close to that discussed by Rudnicki (2004) and Chemenda (2009) in that localisation consists of zones of plastic collapse separated by elastically unloaded regions. The constitutive behaviour assumed here comprises a Tresca yield with both strain-softening of the yield stress and of a cap that models plastic volumetric collapse during phase transformations, such as the olivine-spinel transition, with ΔVSudbury, Ontario, Canada, October 2003. R. Brummer (Ed), Balkema, 27-33. Fletcher, R.C., Pollard, D.D., 1990. Anticrack model for pressure solution surfaces. Geology 9, 419- 424. Green, H.W., Burnley, P.C., 1989. A new self-organizing mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes. Nature, 341, 733- 737. Issen, K.A., Rudnicki, J.W., 2000. Conditions for compaction bands in porous rocks. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 21,529-21,536. Rudnicki, J. W. 2004. Shear and compaction band formation on an elliptic yield cap. J. Geophys. Res., 109, B03402. Veveakis, E., Alevizos, S., & Vardoulakis, I. 2010. Chemical reaction capping of thermal instabilities during shear of frictional faults. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids. 58, 1175-1194.

  3. Cardiovascular collapse in infants: association with paroxysmal atrial tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikonyo, B M; Dunnigan, A; Benson, D W

    1985-12-01

    Four infants, aged 16 to 28 days (mean 23 days), were seen in the emergency room with acute cardiovascular collapse and with normal heart rate and rhythm. During evaluation for cardiovascular collapse, no infant had sepsis; cardiac assessment revealed normal intracardiac anatomy but global cardiac chamber enlargement and poor left ventricular systolic function, which resolved with supportive treatment. However, three of the four infants demonstrated ventricular preexcitation on their surface electrocardiogram and, subsequently, two infants had transient episodes of tachycardia. During a transesophageal pacing study to evaluate inducibility and electrophysiologic characteristics of tachycardia, sustained tachycardia was initiated in all four infants. Reentrant tachycardia used an accessory atrioventricular connection as evidenced by the presence of preexcitation during sinus rhythm (three infants), the ability to initiate and terminate tachycardia by programmed electrical stimulation (four infants), minimum ventriculoatrial interval recorded in the esophagus (V-Aeso) exceeded 70 ms (four infants), transient bundle branch block during tachycardia prolonged the cycle length and the V-Aeso by 30 to 50 ms (three infants). Findings in these infants suggested prior episodes of prolonged tachycardia as the probable etiology of the cardiovascular collapse.

  4. Robustness Assessment of RC Framed Structures against Progressive Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Antonio; Chiaia, Bernardino; De Biagi, Valerio

    2017-10-01

    The structural behaviour of buildings under overloading or extraordinary events like impacts, explosions or human errors is extensively admitted to be an influential feature of structural design. Structural robustness is a requirement provided by many current design codes. However, the problem is often recognized in a qualitative manner without referring to a specific process for the evaluation or the achievement of the robustness of constructions. In this paper, a novel procedure derived from dynamic and non-linear static analyses is provided for evaluating and comparing the relative robustness of reinforced concrete (RC) frame buildings against progressive collapse. The developed methodology offers a formal way to compute “robustness curves” following the sudden loss of one or more vertical load carrying member/s. This method suggests a strategy for the definition of the robustness indices, which are applied to two RC frame buildings. The first building was designed for gravity load and earthquake resistance in accordance with Eurocode 8 and the second was the same structure, modified according to the tie force (TF) method. The TF method is one of the major design quantitative procedures for enhancing resistance to progressive collapse and it is currently recommended by the codes of practice. In an attempt to demonstrate the suitability of the procedure, the structural robustness and resistance to progressive collapse of the two schemes is compared.

  5. Dynamic hydrolase activities precede hypersensitive tissue collapse in tomato seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueldo, Daniela; Ahmed, Ali; Misas-Villamil, Johana; Colby, Tom; Tameling, Wladimir; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2014-08-01

    Hydrolases such as subtilases, vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) and the proteasome play important roles during plant programmed cell death (PCD). We investigated hydrolase activities during PCD using activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), which displays the active proteome using probes that react covalently with the active site of proteins. We employed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings undergoing synchronized hypersensitive cell death by co-expressing the avirulence protein Avr4 from Cladosporium fulvum and the tomato resistance protein Cf-4. Cell death is blocked in seedlings grown at high temperature and humidity, and is synchronously induced by decreasing temperature and humidity. ABPP revealed that VPEs and the proteasome are not differentially active, but that activities of papain-like cysteine proteases and serine hydrolases, including Hsr203 and P69B, increase before hypersensitive tissue collapse, whereas the activity of a carboxypeptidase-like enzyme is reduced. Similar dynamics were observed for these enzymes in the apoplast of tomato challenged with C. fulvum. Unexpectedly, these challenged plants also displayed novel isoforms of secreted putative VPEs. In the absence of tissue collapse at high humidity, the hydrolase activity profile is already altered completely, demonstrating that changes in hydrolase activities precede hypersensitive tissue collapse. © 2014 The Authors New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Exploring the links between volcano flank collapse and magma evolution: Fogo oceanic shield volcano, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Melodie-Neige; Paris, Raphael; Doucelance, Regis; Bachelery, Patrick; Guillou, Hervé

    2017-04-01

    Mass wasting of oceanic shield volcanoes is largely documented through the recognition of collapse scars and submarine debris fans. However, it is actually difficult to infer the mechanisms controlling volcano flank failures that potentially imply tens to hundreds of km3. Studies coupling detailed petrological and geochemical analyses of eruptive products hold clues for better understanding the relationships between magma sources, the plumbing system, and flank instability. Our study aims at tracking potential variations of magma source, storage and transport beneath Fogo shield volcano (Cape Verde) before and after its major flank collapse. We also provide a geochronological framework of this magmatic evolution through new radiometric ages (K-Ar and Ar-Ar) of both pre-collapse and post-collapse lavas. The central part of Fogo volcanic edifice is truncated by an 8 km-wide caldera opened to the East, corresponding to the scar of the last flank collapse (Monte Amarelo collapse, Late Pleistocene, 150 km3). Lavas sampled at the base of the scar (the so-called Bordeira) yielded ages between 158 and 136 ka. The age of the collapse is constrained between 68 ka (youngest lava flow cut by the collapse scar) and 59 ka (oldest lava flow overlapping the scar). The collapse walls display a complex structural, intrusive and eruptive history. Undersaturated volcanism (SiO2elements analyses indicate that the pre-collapse lavas are significantly less differentiated than post-collapse lavas, with a peak of alkalis at the collapse. Rare-earth elements concentration decreases with time, with a notable positive anomaly before the collapse. The evolution of the isotopic ratios (Sr, Nd and Pb) through time displays unusual V-shaped profiles centered around the collapse. The occurrence of the Monte Amarelo collapse is thus not disconnected from the magmatic evolution, both at the crustal and mantellic levels. Our results also point out the importance and relative frequency of explosive

  7. Banking System Stability and Public Security: the Cases of the Collapse of the Commercial Banks “Snoras” and “Ūkio bankas” in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mažylis Liudas

    2014-12-01

    important argument in the fight of political parties for the power. However, taking into account the influence of these two banks’ collapses for international country ratings we note that collapse as a “frequent phenomenon” worsened Lithuania’s position. “Normatively” interpreting the collapse cases we may argue that actors of the political field (mainstream media channels included coped with the dynamic situation by appropriately minimizing negative outcomes of the collapse of the two commercial banks.

  8. Negative indefinites in Afrikaans

    OpenAIRE

    Huddlestone, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the syntactic and semantic status of negative indefinites in Afrikaans. The problem posed by negative indefinites is that their interpretation appears to differ across double negation (DN) and negative concord (NC) languages. With respect to negative indefinites, Afrikaans displays features that distinguish it from both typical NC and typical DN languages. Contrary to most NC languages, and similarly to DN languages, standard Afrikaans does not allow negati...

  9. Simple model of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, collapse, and structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. P.; Pavlov, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms and structural elements of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability whose evolution results in the occurrence of the collapse have been studied in the scope of the rotating shallow water model with horizontal density gradient. Analysis of the instability mechanism shows that two collapse scenarios are possible. One scenario implies anisotropic collapse during which the contact area of a collapsing fragment with the bottom contracts into a spinning segment. The other implies isotropic contracting of the area into a point. The rigorous integral criteria and power laws of collapses are found.

  10. Structural elements of collapses in shallow water flows with horizontally nonuniform density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. P., E-mail: v.goncharov@rambler.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics (Russian Federation); Pavlov, V. I., E-mail: Vadim.Pavlov@univ-lille1.fr [Universite de Lille 1, UFR de Mathematiques Pures et Appliquees-LML UMR 8107 (France)

    2013-10-15

    The mechanisms and structural elements of instability whose evolution results in the occurrence of the collapse are studied in the scope of the rotating shallow water model with a horizontally nonuniform density. The diagram stability based on the integral collapse criterion is suggested to explain system behavior in the space of constants of motion. Analysis of the instability shows that two collapse scenarios are possible. One scenario implies anisotropic collapse during which the contact area of a collapsing drop-like fragment with the bottom contracts into a rotating segment. The other implies isotropic contraction of the area into a point.

  11. Putting the World into World History Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews whether textbook publishers have put the "world" in world history textbooks by comparing the editions of four different world history textbooks over 25 years. Evaluates 10 current editions of world history textbooks. Offers questions to consider and discusses additional content concerns. Includes charts and references of the reviewed…

  12. Wave-Wave Coupling and Disasters: The 1985 Mexico Earthquake and the 2001 WTC Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2002-12-01

    Wave-wave coupling occurs in the presence of weak nonlinearity. It can generate quite dramatic, unexpected effects. In the 1985 earthquake disaster in Mexico City more than 400 high-rise buildings collapsed on soft ground with a loss of life of around 10,000. The emergence of a large, monochromatic, coherent ground wave was an unforeseen factor. Linear modeling failed to reproduce the main features of this signal including the prominent spectral peak close to the resonant frequency of the high-rise buildings, and an extremely long time duration (more than five minutes). The signal was apparently due to coupling of a fundamental Rayleigh mode to the quarter-wavelength shear resonance in the surface mud layer through their common frequency at 0.4 Hz. An additional unexpected feature was the low attenuation of these modes in the mud layer, and the presence of prograde particle motion. Prograde rotation, though not necessarily caused by nonlinear effects, will couple with structural modes of vibration that tend to destabilize a tall building, much like a tall ship in ocean waves. Such unanticipated features may play a critical role in earthquake disasters on soft ground. A related case is the World Trade Center disaster of 11 September 2001, which was presumed to be due to gradual heat softening of steel girders. If so, the Twin Towers should have leaned over sideways but actually the collapse occurred vertically and quite suddenly. A likely alternative is coupling between a fireball caused by a phase transition between low- and high-oxygen consumption modes in burning jet fuel: (low-oxygen) 2CnH2n+2 + (n+1)O2 = nC2 + (2n+2)H2O, (1) (high-oxygen) 2CnH2n+2 + (3n+1)O2 = 2nCO2 + (2n+2)H2O, (2) and a pressure pulse propagating vertically inside the tubular structure. The pulse would have taken out the concrete floors, thus initiating collapse by implosion of the structural shell. Linear thinking may fail to anticipate coupling, and thus appropriate preventive measures may

  13. Collapsed scrums and collision tackles: what is the injury risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon P; Trewartha, Grant; England, Mike; Stokes, Keith A

    2015-04-01

    To establish the propensity for specific contact events to cause injury in rugby union. Medical staff at participating English community-level rugby clubs reported any injury resulting in the absence for one match or more from the day of the injury during the 2009/2010 (n=46), 2010/2011 (n=67) and 2011/2012 (n=76) seasons. Injury severity was defined as the number of matches missed. Thirty community rugby matches were filmed and the number of contact events (tackles, collision tackles, rucks, mauls, lineouts and scrums) recorded. Of 370 (95% CI 364 to 378) contact events per match, 141 (137 to 145) were tackles, 115 (111 to 119) were rucks and 32 (30 to 33) were scrums. Tackles resulted in the greatest propensity for injury (2.3 (2.2 to 2.4) injuries/1000 events) and the greatest severity (16 (15 to 17) weeks missed/1000 events). Collision tackles (illegal tackles involving a shoulder charge) had a propensity for injury of 15 (12.4 to 18.3) injuries/1000 events and severity was 92 (75 to 112) weeks missed/1000 events, both of which were higher than any other event. Additional scrum analysis showed that only 5% of all scrums collapsed, but the propensity for injury was four times higher (2.9 (1.5 to 5.4) injuries/1000 events) and the severity was six times greater (22 (12 to 42) weeks missed/1000 events) than for non-collapsed scrums. Injury prevention in the tackle should focus on technique with strict enforcement of existing laws for illegal collision tackles. The scrum is a relatively controllable event and further attempts should be made to reduce the frequency of scrum collapse. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Single homopolypeptide chains collapse into mechanically rigid conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Lorna; Li, Jingyuan; Badilla, Carmen L.; Berne, B. J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease is linked to the insertion of glutamine (Q) in the protein huntingtin, resulting in polyglutamine (polyQ) expansions that self-associate to form aggregates. While polyQ aggregation has been the subject of intense study, a correspondingly thorough understanding of individual polyQ chains is lacking. Here we demonstrate a single molecule force-clamp technique that directly probes the mechanical properties of single polyQ chains. We have made polyQ constructs of varying lengths that span the length range of normal and diseased polyQ expansions. Each polyQ construct is flanked by the I27 titin module, providing a clear mechanical fingerprint of the molecule being pulled. Remarkably, under the application of force, no extension is observed for any of the polyQ constructs. This is in direct contrast with the random coil protein PEVK of titin, which readily extends under force. Our measurements suggest that polyQ chains form mechanically stable collapsed structures. We test this hypothesis by disrupting polyQ chains with insertions of proline residues and find that their mechanical extensibility is sensitive to the position of the proline interruption. These experiments demonstrate that polyQ chains collapse to form a heterogeneous ensemble of conformations that are mechanically resilient. We further use a heat-annealing molecular dynamics protocol to extensively search the conformation space and find that polyQ can exist in highly mechanically stable compact globular conformations. The mechanical rigidity of these collapsed structures may exceed the functional ability of eukaryotic proteasomes, resulting in the accumulation of undigested polyQ sequences in vivo. PMID:19549822

  15. Crawling to collapse: ecologically unsound ornamental invertebrate fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Rhyne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fishery management has historically been an inexact and reactionary discipline, often taking action only after a critical stock suffers overfishing or collapse. The invertebrate ornamental fishery in the State of Florida, with increasing catches over a more diverse array of species, is poised for collapse. Current management is static and the lack of an adaptive strategy will not allow for adequate responses associated with managing this multi-species fishery. The last decade has seen aquarium hobbyists shift their display preference from fish-only tanks to miniature reef ecosystems that include many invertebrate species, creating increased demand without proper oversight. The once small ornamental fishery has become an invertebrate-dominated major industry supplying five continents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we analyzed the Florida Marine Life Fishery (FLML landing data from 1994 to 2007 for all invertebrate species. The data were organized to reflect both ecosystem purpose (in the wild and ecosystem services (commodities for each reported species to address the following question: Are ornamental invertebrates being exploited for their fundamental ecosystem services and economic value at the expense of reef resilience? We found that 9 million individuals were collected in 2007, 6 million of which were grazers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The number of grazers now exceeds, by two-fold, the number of specimens collected for curio and ornamental purposes altogether, representing a major categorical shift. In general, landings have increased 10-fold since 1994, though the number of licenses has been dramatically reduced. Thus, despite current management strategies, the FLML Fishery appears to be crawling to collapse.

  16. Toward Realistic Progenitors of Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. David; Meakin, Casey

    2011-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical simulations of progenitor evolution of a 23 M sun star, close to core collapse (in ~1 hr in one dimension (1D)), with simultaneously active C, Ne, O, and Si burning shells, are presented and contrasted to existing 1D models (which are forced to be quasi-static). Pronounced asymmetries and strong dynamical interactions between shells are seen in 2D. Although instigated by turbulence, the dynamic behavior proceeds to sufficiently large amplitudes that it couples to the nuclear burning. Dramatic growth of low-order modes is seen as well as large deviations from spherical symmetry in the burning shells. The vigorous dynamics is more violent than that seen in earlier burning stages in the three-dimensional (3D) simulations of a single cell in the oxygen burning shell, or in 2D simulations not including an active Si shell. Linear perturbative analysis does not capture the chaotic behavior of turbulence (e.g., strange attractors such as that discovered by Lorenz), and therefore badly underestimates the vigor of the instability. The limitations of 1D and 2D models are discussed in detail. The 2D models, although flawed geometrically, represent a more realistic treatment of the relevant dynamics than existing 1D models, and present a dramatically different view of the stages of evolution prior to collapse. Implications for interpretation of SN1987A, abundances in young supernova remnants, pre-collapse outbursts, progenitor structure, neutron star kicks, and fallback are outlined. While 2D simulations provide new qualitative insight, fully 3D simulations are needed for a quantitative understanding of this stage of stellar evolution. The necessary properties of such simulations are delineated.

  17. Results of Integrated Investigation of Collapse Sinkhole in Sarkayevo Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Kovin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The integrated investigations of karstic collapse sinkhole were conducted at the area of Sarkayevo village. The obtained hydrogeologic data show the local concentration of underground water flow at the investigated site, and high sulfate ion content in the water samples that suggests that a sinkhole is karstic in nature. Geophysical investigations allowed determining basic parameters of the site geological structure, to reveal the depth distribution of the disturbed ground in vicinity of the sinkhole, and delineate zones of different soil compaction. The recommendations for detail site study, aimed to the mitigation of further karst development hazards, are presented.

  18. Collapse arrest and soliton stabilization in nonlocal nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Wyller, John

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the properties of localized waves in cubic nonlinear materials with a symmetric nonlocal nonlinear response of arbitrary shape and degree of nonlocality, described by a general nonlocal nonlinear Schrodinger type equation. We prove rigorously by bounding the Hamiltonian...... that nonlocality of the nonlinearity prevents collapse in, e.g., Bose-Einstein condensates and optical Kerr media in all physical dimensions. The nonlocal nonlinear response must be symmetric and have a positive definite Fourier spectrum, but can otherwise be of completely arbitrary shape and degree of nonlocality...

  19. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  20. Scalar field collapse in a conformally flat spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Soumya; Banerjee, Narayan [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata, Department of Physical Sciences, Mohanpur, West Bengal (India)

    2017-03-15

    The collapse scenario of a scalar field along with a perfect fluid distribution was investigated for a conformally flat spacetime. The theorem for the integrability of an anharmonic oscillator has been utilized. For a pure power-law potential of the form φ{sup n+1}, it was found that a central singularity is formed which is covered by an apparent horizon for n > 0 and n < -3. Some numerical results have also been presented for a combination of two different powers of φ in the potential. (orig.)

  1. Environmental consequences of the Retsof Salt Mine roof collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1994, the largest salt mine in North America, which had been in operation for more than 100 years, catastrophically flooded when the mine ceiling collapsed. In addition to causing the loss of the mine and the mineral resources it provided, this event formed sinkholes, caused widespread subsidence to land, caused structures to crack and subside, and changed stream flow and erosion patterns. Subsequent flooding of the mine drained overlying aquifers, changed the groundwater salinity distribution (rendering domestic wells unusable), and allowed locally present natural gas to enter dwellings through water wells. Investigations including exploratory drilling, hydrologic and water-quality monitoring, geologic and geophysical studies, and numerical simulation of groundwater flow, salinity, and subsidence have been effective tools in understanding the environmental consequences of the mine collapse and informing decisions about management of those consequences for the future. Salt mines are generally dry, but are susceptible to leaks and can become flooded if groundwater from overlying aquifers or surface water finds a way downward into the mined cavity through hundreds of feet of rock. With its potential to flood the entire mine cavity, groundwater is a constant source of concern for mine operators. The problem is compounded by the viscous nature of salt and the fact that salt mines commonly lie beneath water-bearing aquifers. Salt (for example halite or potash) deforms and “creeps” into the mined openings over time spans that range from years to centuries. This movement of salt can destabilize the overlying rock layers and lead to their eventual sagging and collapse, creating permeable pathways for leakage of water and depressions or openings at land surface, such as sinkholes. Salt is also highly soluble in water; therefore, whenever water begins to flow into a salt mine, the channels through which it flows increase in diameter as the surrounding salt dissolves

  2. Strategic Shock: The Collapse of the Soviet Union: 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    sécurité de l’avenir ; ils allaient d’événements géopolitiques à des chocs dans les secteurs scientifique et technologique, environnemental et...the Soviet Union, the actual collapse of Soviet style communism in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s was by and large unanticipated in many important...unclassified) represented as (S), (C), (R), or (U). It is not necessary to include here abstracts in both official languages unless the text is

  3. Gravitational Dust Collapse in $f(R)$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Shamir, M Farasat; Raza, Zahid

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate gravitational collapse of dust in metric $f(R)$ gravity. We take FRW metric for the interior region while the Schwarzchild spacetime is considered for the exterior region of a star. The junction conditions have been derived to match interior and exterior spacetimes. The assumption of constant scalar curvature is used to find a solution of field equations. Gravitational mass is found by using the junction conditions. It is concluded that the constant curvature term $f(R_0)$ plays the role of the cosmological constant involved in the field equations of general relativity.

  4. Asymptotics of weakly collapsing solutions of nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, Yu N

    2001-01-01

    One studied possible types of asymptotic behavior of weakly collapsing solution of the 3-rd nonlinear Schroedinger equation. It is shown that within left brace A, C sub 1 right brace parameter space there are two neighboring lines along which the amplitude of oscillation terms is exponentially small as to C sub 1 parameter. The same lines locates values of left brace A, C sub 1 right brace parameters at which the energy is equal to zero. With increase of C sub 1 parameter the accuracy of numerical determination of points with zero energy drops abruptly

  5. Gravitational Collapse and Shocks in Two-Phase Celestial Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The phenomenon of gravitational collapse (GC) is well-known in theoretical astro- and planetary physics. It occurs when the incompressibility of substances is unable to withstand the pressure due to gravitational forces in celestial bodies of sufficiently large mass. The GC never occurs in incompressible models - homogeneous or layered. This situation changes dramatically when different incompressible layers appear to be different phases of the same chemical substance and the mass exchange between the phases can occur due to phase transformation. The possibility of destabilization in such system becomes realistic, as it was first discovered in the Ramsey static analysis. We will present our generalization of the Ramsey's results using dynamic approach.

  6. Gravitational collapse of a cylindrical null shell in vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khakshournia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available   Barrabès-Israel null shell formalism is used to study the gravitational collapse of a thin cylindrical null shell in vacuum. In general the lightlike matter shell whose history coincides with a null hypersurface is characterized by a surface energy density. In addition, a gravitational impulsive wave is present on this null hypersurface whose generators admit both the shear and expansion. In the case of imposing the cylindrical flatness the surface energy-momentum tensor of the matter shell on the null hypersurface vanishes and the null hyper- surface is just the history of the gravitational wave .

  7. Negative energy; L'energie negative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, L. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States); Roman, Th. [Connecticut Univ., Farmington, CT (United States)

    2000-05-01

    We could travel at light velocity or more if we mastered a new form of energy called negative energy. This energy is predicted by the quantum theory and follows from the Heisenberg principle applied to the void. In the void the density of energy is null in average but in fact fluctuates around zero according to the quantum theory, so we can find places with negative energy. This concept has nothing to do with antimatter or with the energy introduced in the recent theories of anti-gravity. According to the theory of general relativity the presence of matter and energy distorts the space-time geometry. In the presence of negative energy strange phenomena might happen. A tunnel could bridge 2 distant points in the universe, and inside it travelling at light velocity or more would be possible. (A.C.)

  8. Acquiring negative polarity items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) are words or expressions that exhibit a restricted distribution to certain negative contexts only. For example, yet is an NPI and must appear in the scope of a negation: Mary has *(not) finished yet. The existence of NPIs such as yet gives rise to a learnability

  9. Slower recovery in space before collapse of connected populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Korolev, Kirill S; Gore, Jeff

    2013-04-18

    Slower recovery from perturbations near a tipping point and its indirect signatures in fluctuation patterns have been suggested to foreshadow catastrophes in a wide variety of systems. Recent studies of populations in the field and in the laboratory have used time-series data to confirm some of the theoretically predicted early warning indicators, such as an increase in recovery time or in the size and timescale of fluctuations. However, the predictive power of temporal warning signals is limited by the demand for long-term observations. Large-scale spatial data are more accessible, but the performance of warning signals in spatially extended systems needs to be examined empirically. Here we use spatially extended yeast populations, an experimental system with a fold bifurcation (tipping point), to evaluate early warning signals based on spatio-temporal fluctuations and to identify a novel spatial warning indicator. We found that two leading indicators based on fluctuations increased before collapse of connected populations; however, the magnitudes of the increases were smaller than those observed in isolated populations, possibly because local variation is reduced by dispersal. Furthermore, we propose a generic indicator based on deterministic spatial patterns, which we call 'recovery length'. As the spatial counterpart of recovery time, recovery length is the distance necessary for connected populations to recover from spatial perturbations. In our experiments, recovery length increased substantially before population collapse, suggesting that the spatial scale of recovery can provide a superior warning signal before tipping points in spatially extended systems.

  10. Are fast radio bursts markers of dark core collapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J. I.

    2017-07-01

    Are some neutron stars produced without a supernova, without ejecting mass in a remnant? Theoretical calculations of core collapse in massive stars often predict this. The observation of the repeating FRB 121102, whose dispersion measure has not changed over several years, suggests that dark core collapses are not just failures of computer codes, but may be real. The existence of one repeating fast radio burst (FRB) with unchanging dispersion measure is not conclusive, but within a decade hundreds or thousands of FRB are expected to be discovered, likely including scores of repeaters, permitting useful statistical inferences. A naïve supernova remnant model predicts observable decline in dispersion measure for 100 yr after its formation. If an upper limit on the decline of 2 pc cm-3 yr-1 is set for five repeating FRBs, then the naïve model with nominal parameters is rejected at the 95 per cent level of confidence. This may indicate dark neutron star formation without a supernova or supernova remnant. This hypothesis may also be tested with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) data that would show, if present, a supernova at an interferometric FRB position if it occurred within the LSST epoch.

  11. Collapsing vortex filaments and the spectrum of quantum turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andryushchenko, V. A.; Nemirovskii, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    The method of correlation functions and the method of quantum vortex configurations are used to calculate the energy spectrum of a three-dimensional velocity field that is induced by collapsing (immediately before reconnection) vortex filaments. The formulation of this problem is motivated by the idea of modeling classical turbulence by a set of chaotic quantized vortex filaments. Among the various arguments that support the idea of quasi-classical behavior for quantum turbulence, the most persuasive is probably the resulting Kolmogorov energy spectrum resembling E ( k ) ∝ k - 5 / 3 that was obtained in a number of numerical studies. Another goal is associated with an important and intensely studied theme that relates to the role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulence spectra. Calculations have demonstrated that vortex filaments create a velocity field at the moment of contact, which has a singularity. This configuration of vortex filaments generates the spectrum E(k), which bears the resemblance to the Kolmogorov law. A possible cause for this observation is discussed, as well as the likely reasons behind any deviations. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of both classical and quantum turbulence.

  12. Volcano collapse along the Aleutian Ridge (western Aleutian Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Montanaro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aleutian Ridge, in the western part of the Aleutian Arc, consists of a chain of volcanic islands perched atop the crest of a submarine ridge with most of the active Quaternary stratocones or caldera-like volcanoes being located on the northern margins of the Aleutian Islands. Integrated analysis of marine and terrestrial data resulted in the identification and characterization of 17 extensive submarine debris avalanche deposits from 11 volcanoes. Two morphological types of deposits are recognizable, elongate and lobate, with primary controls on the size and distribution of the volcanic debris being the volume and nature of material involved, proportion of fine grained material, depth of emplacement and the paleo-bathymetry. Volume calculations show the amount of material deposited in debris avalanches is as much as three times larger than the amount of material initially involved in the collapse, suggesting the incorporation of large amounts of submarine material during transport. The orientation of the collapse events is influenced by regional fault systems underling the volcanoes. The western Aleutian Arc has a significant tsunamigenic potential and communities within the Aleutian Islands and surrounding areas of the North Pacific as well as shipping and fishing fleets that cross the North Pacific may be at risk during future eruptions in this area.

  13. Quantum self-gravitating collapsing matter in a quantum geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Campiglia, Miguel; Olmedo, Javier; Pullin, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The problem of how space-time responds to gravitating quantum matter in full quantum gravity has been one of the main questions that any program of quantization of gravity should address. Here we analyze this issue by considering the quantization of a collapsing null shell coupled to spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity. We show that the constraint algebra of canonical gravity is Abelian both classically and when quantized using loop quantum gravity techniques. The Hamiltonian constraint is well defined and suitable Dirac observables characterizing the problem were identified at the quantum level. We can write the metric as a parameterized Dirac observable at the quantum level and study the physics of the collapsing shell and black hole formation. We show how the singularity inside the black hole is eliminated by loop quantum gravity and how the shell can traverse it. The construction is compatible with a scenario in which the shell tunnels into a baby universe inside the black hole or one in which it c...

  14. A study on cavity collapse for utilizing green implosion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunhee; Gojani, Ardian; Han, Tae-Hee; Yoh, Jack

    2009-06-01

    The mechanical energy generated by laser-induced implosion and the dynamics between non-condensable gas and liquid are studied experimentally and numerically. We have designed a micro implosion piston (MIP) to utilize the energy of implosion for inducing a piston motion. The MIP has the shape of a cone and is filled with liquid at room temperature and a high pressure (˜ 6 bars). Focusing of a high power laser pulse inside the MIP leads to creation of several bubbles that expand and collapse with successive rebounds. The bubble-liquid interaction develops a micro- jet that destroys the symmetry of the bubble. This bubble implosion motion, induced by the pressure gradient across the cavity wall produces high pressures wave within a few nanoseconds. These pressure waves are affected by different conditions such as the distance between the bubble and piston head, the dimension of the MIP, and the pressure at which the MIP is driven. The radius of the bubble is measured by double exposure photography, while pressure histories are measured by hydrophones. We investigate the relationship between the radius of the bubble, the overpressure of the secondary shock wave and the motion of the micro piston, and compare it to numerical simulations. The aim is to reach a state inside the MIP that would cause a sustainable and efficient motion of piston through cavity collapse induced high pressure pulses.

  15. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly.

  16. The imprints of the last jets in core collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Ealeal; Grichener, Aldana; Soker, Noam

    2017-12-01

    We analyse the morphologies of three core collapse supernova remnants (CCSNRs) and the energy of jets in other CCSNRs and in Super Luminous Supernovae (SLSNe) of type Ib/Ic/IIb, and conclude that these properties are well explained by the last jets' episode as expected in the jet feedback explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The presence of two opposite protrusions, termed ears, and our comparison of the CCSNR morphologies with morphologies of planetary nebulae strengthen the claim that jets play a major role in the explosion mechanism of CCSNe. We crudely estimate the energy that was required to inflate the ears in two CCSNRs and assume that the ears were inflated by jets. We find that the energies of the jets which inflated ears in 11 CCSNRs span a range that is similar to that of jets in some energetic CCSNe (SLSNe) and that this energy, only of the last jets' episode, is much less than the explosion energy. This finding is compatible with the jet feedback explosion mechanism of CCSNe, where only the last jets, which carry a small fraction of the total energy carried by earlier jets, are expected to influence the outer parts of the ejecta. We reiterate our call for a paradigm shift from neutrino-driven to jet-driven explosion models of CCSNe.

  17. Genetic signature of anthropogenic population collapse in orang-utans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Goossens

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Great ape populations are undergoing a dramatic decline, which is predicted to result in their extinction in the wild from entire regions in the near future. Recent findings have particularly focused on African apes, and have implicated multiple factors contributing to this decline, such as deforestation, hunting, and disease. Less well-publicised, but equally dramatic, has been the decline in orang-utans, whose distribution is limited to parts of Sumatra and Borneo. Using the largest-ever genetic sample from wild orang-utan populations, we show strong evidence for a recent demographic collapse in North Eastern Borneo and demonstrate that this signature is independent of the mutation and demographic models used. This is the first demonstration that genetic data can detect and quantify the effect of recent, human-induced deforestation and habitat fragmentation on an endangered species. Because current demographic collapses are usually confounded by ancient events, this suggests a much more dramatic decline than demographic data alone and emphasises the need for major conservation efforts.

  18. Genetic Signature of Anthropogenic Population Collapse in Orang-utans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Great ape populations are undergoing a dramatic decline, which is predicted to result in their extinction in the wild from entire regions in the near future. Recent findings have particularly focused on African apes, and have implicated multiple factors contributing to this decline, such as deforestation, hunting, and disease. Less well-publicised, but equally dramatic, has been the decline in orang-utans, whose distribution is limited to parts of Sumatra and Borneo. Using the largest-ever genetic sample from wild orang-utan populations, we show strong evidence for a recent demographic collapse in North Eastern Borneo and demonstrate that this signature is independent of the mutation and demographic models used. This is the first demonstration that genetic data can detect and quantify the effect of recent, human-induced deforestation and habitat fragmentation on an endangered species. Because current demographic collapses are usually confounded by ancient events, this suggests a much more dramatic decline than demographic data alone and emphasises the need for major conservation efforts.

  19. Collapse of sodium polyacrylate chains in calcium salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweins, R.; Huber, K.

    The sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (NaPA) precipitates in the presence of Ca^{2+}-ions. This phase behaviour can be represented by a phase diagram where the critical NaPA concentration is plotted versus the critical Ca^{2+} concentration resulting in a straight line as a phase boundary. The location of this phase boundary is influenced by the presence of an inert monovalent salt like NaCl. The present contribution focuses on the coil dimensions of NaPA chains in dilute aqueous solution corresponding to the one phase region of such a phase diagram. A variety of parameters with which the size and shape of the polyelectrolyte chains can be modulated are revealed. Approaching the phase boundary by decreasing the NaPA concentration at a constant Ca^{2+} content leads to a collapse of the NaPA chains. Combined static and dynamic light scattering suggests a compact spherical shape as the final state of this transition, both in 0.1 M NaCl and in 0.01 M NaCl. In the lower NaCl concentration, indication is presented for the existence of a cigar or pearl necklace like intermediate. Most strikingly, the collapsed chains can be reexpanded by increasing the concentration of inert NaCl at constant content of NaPA and Ca^{2+}. Clearly, excessive Na+-ions displace the Ca^{2+}-ions from the NaPA chains.

  20. Asymmetric core collapse of rapidly rotating massive star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2018-02-01

    Non-axisymmetric features are found in the core collapse of a rapidly rotating massive star, which might have important implications for magnetic field amplification and production of a bipolar outflow that can explode the star, as well as for r-process nucleosynthesis and natal kicks. The collapse of an evolved rapidly rotating MZAMS = 54 M⊙ star is followed in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code with neutrino leakage. A rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) forms with a non-zero linear velocity. This can contribute to the natal kick of the remnant compact object. The PNS is surrounded by a turbulent medium, where high shearing is likely to amplify magnetic fields, which in turn can drive a bipolar outflow. Neutron-rich material in the PNS vicinity might induce strong r-process nucleosynthesis. The rapidly rotating PNS possesses a rotational energy of E_rot ≳ 10^{52} erg. Magnetar formation proceeding in a similar fashion will be able to deposit a portion of this energy later on in the supernova ejecta through a spin-down mechanism. These processes can be important for rare supernovae generated by rapidly rotating progenitors, even though a complete explosion is not simulated in the present study.

  1. Varroa-virus interaction in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy M Francis

    Full Text Available Varroa mites and viruses are the currently the high-profile suspects in collapsing bee colonies. Therefore, seasonal variation in varroa load and viruses (Acute-Kashmir-Israeli complex (AKI and Deformed Wing Virus (DWV were monitored in a year-long study. We investigated the viral titres in honey bees and varroa mites from 23 colonies (15 apiaries under three treatment conditions: Organic acids (11 colonies, pyrethroid (9 colonies and untreated (3 colonies. Approximately 200 bees were sampled every month from April 2011 to October 2011, and April 2012. The 200 bees were split to 10 subsamples of 20 bees and analysed separately, which allows us to determine the prevalence of virus-infected bees. The treatment efficacy was often low for both treatments. In colonies where varroa treatment reduced the mite load, colonies overwintered successfully, allowing the mites and viruses to be carried over with the bees into the next season. In general, AKI and DWV titres did not show any notable response to the treatment and steadily increased over the season from April to October. In the untreated control group, titres increased most dramatically. Viral copies were correlated to number of varroa mites. Most colonies that collapsed over the winter had significantly higher AKI and DWV titres in October compared to survivors. Only treated colonies survived the winter. We discuss our results in relation to the varroa-virus model developed by Stephen Martin.

  2. Naked singularity explosion in higher-dimensional dust collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Shimano, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity, it has been argued that an effective naked singularity, called the visible border of spacetime, would be generated by high-energy particle collisions. Motivated by this interesting possibility, we investigate a particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, adopting a spherically symmetric self-similar dust collapse as the simple model of a naked singularity formation. The power and energy of the particle emission behave in two distinct ways depending on a parameter in the model. In a generic case, the emission power is proportional to the quadratic inverse of the remaining time to the Cauchy horizon, which has been known for the four-dimensional case in the literature. On the other hand, in a degenerate case the emission power is proportional to the quartic inverse of the remaining time to the Cauchy horizon, and depends on the total mass of a dust fluid in spite that the central region of the collapse is scale-free due to th...

  3. Gravitational collapse of rotating supermassive stars including nuclear burning effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Haruki; Shibata, Masaru; Yoshida, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2017-10-01

    Supermassive stars (SMSs) of mass ≳105 M⊙ are candidates for seeds of supermassive black holes found in the center of many massive galaxies. We simulate the gravitational collapse of a rigidly rotating SMS core including nuclear burning effects in axisymmetric numerical relativity. We consider SMS cores composed of primordial metallicity and of helium in this paper. We find that for our chosen initial conditions, the nuclear burning does not play an important role. After the collapse, a torus surrounding a rotating black hole is formed and a fraction of the torus material is ejected by a hydrodynamical effect. We quantitatively study the relation between the properties of these objects and rotation. We find that if a SMS core is sufficiently rapidly rotating, the rest mass of the torus and outflow are approximately 6% and 1% of the initial rest mass, respectively. The typical average velocity and the total kinetic energy of the outflow are 0.2 c and 1 054 -56 erg where c is the speed of light. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility for observing the outflow, ringdown gravitational waves associated with the formation of black holes, and gravitational waves from the torus.

  4. Hydrophobic collapse of trigger factor monomer in solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushagra Singhal

    Full Text Available Trigger factor (TF is a chaperone, found in bacterial cells and chloroplasts, that interacts with nascent polypeptide chains to suppress aggregation. While its crystal structure has been resolved, the solution structure and dynamics are largely unknown. We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations on Trigger factor in solution, and show that its tertiary domains display collective motions hinged about inter-domain linkers with minimal or no loss in secondary structure. Moreover, we find that isolated TF typically adopts a collapsed state, with the formation of domain pairs. This collapse of TF in solution is induced by hydrophobic interactions and stabilised by hydrophilic contacts. To determine the nature of the domain interactions, we analysed the hydrophobicity of the domain surfaces by using the hydrophobic probe method of Acharya et al., as the standard hydrophobicity scales predictions are limited due to the complex environment. We find that the formation of domain pairs changes the hydrophobic map of TF, making the N-terminal and arm2 domain pair more hydrophilic and the head and arm1 domain pair more hydrophobic. These insights into the dynamics and interactions of the TF domains are important to eventually understand chaperone-substrate interactions and chaperone function.

  5. The Final Stage of Gravitationally Collapsed Thick Matter Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Nicolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of a minimal length, physical objects cannot collapse to an infinite density, singular, matter point. In this paper, we consider the possible final stage of the gravitational collapse of “thick” matter layers. The energy momentum tensor we choose to model these shell-like objects is a proper modification of the source for “noncommutative geometry inspired,” regular black holes. By using higher momenta of Gaussian distribution to localize matter at finite distance from the origin, we obtain new solutions of the Einstein equation which smoothly interpolates between Minkowski’s geometry near the center of the shell and Schwarzschild’s spacetime far away from the matter layer. The metric is curvature singularity free. Black hole type solutions exist only for “heavy” shells; that is, M ≥Me, where Me is the mass of the extremal configuration. We determine the Hawking temperature and a modified area law taking into account the extended nature of the source.

  6. Experimental observation of critical slowing down before population collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Vorselen, Daan; Dudley, Carmel; Ornek, Onur; Korolev, Kirill; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Tipping points marking population collapse and other critical transitions in natural systems (e.g. ecosystems, the climate) can be described by a fold bifurcation in the dynamics of the system. Theory predicts that the approach of bifurcations will result in an increasingly slow recovery from small perturbations, a phenomenon called critical slowing down. Here we demonstrate the direct observation of critical slowing down before population collapse using replicate laboratory populations of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We mapped the bifurcation diagram experimentally and found a significant increase in both the size and timescale of the fluctuations of population density near a fold bifurcation, in agreement with the theory. We further confirmed the utility of theoretically predicted warning signals by observing them in two different slowly deteriorating environments. To extend the application of warning signals to spatially extended populations, we proposed and identified several indicators based on the emergence of spatial patterns. Our results suggest that generic temporal and spatial indicators of critical slowing down can be useful in predicting tipping points in population dynamics.

  7. Collapse of an ecological network in Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeakel, Justin D; Pires, Mathias M; Rudolf, Lars; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Koch, Paul L; Guimarães, Paulo R; Gross, Thilo

    2014-10-07

    The dynamics of ecosystem collapse are fundamental to determining how and why biological communities change through time, as well as the potential effects of extinctions on ecosystems. Here, we integrate depictions of mammals from Egyptian antiquity with direct lines of paleontological and archeological evidence to infer local extinctions and community dynamics over a 6,000-y span. The unprecedented temporal resolution of this dataset enables examination of how the tandem effects of human population growth and climate change can disrupt mammalian communities. We show that the extinctions of mammals in Egypt were nonrandom and that destabilizing changes in community composition coincided with abrupt aridification events and the attendant collapses of some complex societies. We also show that the roles of species in a community can change over time and that persistence is predicted by measures of species sensitivity, a function of local dynamic stability. To our knowledge, our study is the first high-resolution analysis of the ecological impacts of environmental change on predator-prey networks over millennial timescales and sheds light on the historical events that have shaped modern animal communities.

  8. Females lead population collapse of the endangered Hawaii creeper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard A Freed

    Full Text Available Population collapses result from drastic environmental changes, but the sexes may differ in vulnerability. Collapse of the endangered Hawaii creeper (Oreomystis mana at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge resulted from food limitation associated with increased numbers of an introduced bird (Japanese white-eye, Zosterops japonicus, which competes with the creeper for food. Both creeper sexes had stunted bill growth and the greatest change in molt of native species in the community. With a surge in numbers of white-eyes, a recent cohort of adult females had very low survival after breeding, while adult males from the same cohort, and older females and males, continued to have high survival. Lower female survival resulted in a significantly more male-biased adult sex ratio. Recent low female survival was based on a great cost of reproduction, indicated by molt-breeding overlap that was previously avoided, and lower fat during the lengthy fledgling period. The difference in female survival between cohorts was associated with stunted bills from being reared in and then breeding in an increasingly poor food environment. Trend analysis of survey data indicate that the bird is declining throughout the refuge, with males being 72-80% of adults left six years after the white-eye increased. Competition over time was consistent with that previously documented over space on the Island of Hawaii. Adaptive management to recover the bird in this protected area needs to focus on improving both adult female survival and the adult sex ratio.

  9. Nonstationary magnetosonic wave dynamics in plasmas exhibiting collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Maity, Chandan; Schamel, Hans

    2013-08-01

    In a Lagrangian fluid approach, an explicit method has been presented previously to obtain an exact nonstationary magnetosonic-type wave solution in compressible magnetized plasmas of arbitrary resistivity showing competition among hydrodynamic convection, magnetic field diffusion, and dispersion [Chakrabarti , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.145003 106, 145003 (2011)]. The purpose of the present work is twofold: it serves (i) to describe the physical and mathematical background of the involved magnetosonic wave dynamics in more detail, as proposed by our original Letter, and (ii) to present an alternative approach, which utilizes the Lagrangian mass variable as a new spatial coordinate [Schamel, Phys. Rep.PRPLCM0370-157310.1016/j.physrep.2003.12.002 392, 279 (2004)]. The obtained exact nonlinear wave solutions confirm the correctness of our previous results, indicating a collapse of the magnetic field irrespective of the presence of dispersion and resistivity. The mean plasma density, on the other hand, is less singular, showing collapse only when dispersive effects are negligible. These results may contribute to our understanding of the generation of strongly localized magnetic fields (and currents) in plasmas, and they are expected to be of special importance in the astrophysical context of magnetic star formation.

  10. The wavefunction of the collapsing Bose–Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Stavros; Hadjigeorgiou, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Bose–Einstein condensates with tunable interatomic interactions have been studied intensely in recent experiments. The investigation of the collapse of a condensate following a sudden change in the nature of the interaction from repulsive to attractive has led to the observation of a remnant condensate that did not undergo further collapse. We suggest that this high-density remnant is in fact the absolute minimum of the energy, if the attractive atomic interactions are nonlocal, and is therefore inherently stable. We show that a variational trial function consisting of a superposition of two distinct gaussians is an accurate representation of the wavefunction of the ground state of the conventional local Gross–Pitaevskii field equation for an attractive condensate and gives correctly the points of emergence of instability. We then use such a superposition of two gaussians as a variational trial function in order to calculate the minima of the energy when it includes a nonlocal interaction term. We use experimental data in order to study the long range of the nonlocal interaction, showing that they agree very well with a dimensionally derived expression for this range.

  11. COMMUNISM AND THE TRAUMA OF ITS COLLAPSE REVISITED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Löw-Beer, Catherine; Atria, Moira; Davar, Elisha

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the intertwinement of society and the psyche as a consequence of 70 years of Communist rule and the trauma of its collapse in the 90's. The trauma had profound effects on the psyche. An empirical study that was carried out in 1996/1997, which compared the personality structure of adolescents from Russia and Austria, and a research dialogue in 1999, has been re-evaluated in the light of current political events. One aim that we had was to find out whether we could discover characteristic personality features, resulting from the Communist totalitarian society in Russia, as well as from the trauma of its collapse. This led to the development of the concepts of the "impersonal self" and the "denial mode". The Russians seemed to be frozen in a protective shell with "flat" affects. They were anxious, conflict avoidant, and somewhat lost. Ideas about missing adolescence and the importance of privacy are discussed. Society was shown to not only have intruded into the individual psyche, but also into the members of the intercultural research team in the form of projective identification. The importance of the interaction between society and the individual as a basic psychoanalytic concept dating back to Freud is elaborated. Finally, considerations pertaining to mental health and democracy are presented.

  12. Where Does the Physics of Extreme Gravitational Collapse Reside?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barceló

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational collapse of massive stars serves to manifest the most severe deviations of general relativity with respect to Newtonian gravity: the formation of horizons and spacetime singularities. Both features have proven to be catalysts of deep physical developments, especially when combined with the principles of quantum mechanics. Nonetheless, it is seldom remarked that it is hardly possible to combine all these developments into a unified theoretical model, while maintaining reasonable prospects for the independent experimental corroboration of its different parts. In this paper we review the current theoretical understanding of the physics of gravitational collapse in order to highlight this tension, stating the position that the standard view on evaporating black holes stands for. This serves as the motivation for the discussion of a recent proposal that offers the opposite perspective, represented by a set of geometries that regularize the classical singular behavior and present modifications of the near-horizon Schwarzschild geometry as the result of the propagation of non-perturbative ultraviolet effects originated in regions of high curvature. We present an extensive exploration of the necessary steps on the explicit construction of these geometries, and discuss how this proposal could change our present understanding of astrophysical black holes and even offer the possibility of detecting genuine ultraviolet effects in gravitational-wave experiments.

  13. Case report: (Pre)syncopal symptoms associated with a negative internal jugular venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels D; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Fisher, James P

    2014-01-01

    MCA Vmean decreased and yet within the time of observation ScO2 was not necessarily affected. These findings support the hypothesis that a negative IJV pressure that is a prerequisite for creation of a siphon provokes venous collapse inside the dura, and thereby limits rather than supports CBF....

  14. Risk factors of severe hand, foot and mouth disease complicated with cardiopulmonary collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunlan; Yibing, Cheng; Guo, Yanjun; Jin, Zhipeng; Cui, Yajie; Gu, Xue

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) complicated with cardiopulmonary collapse in children. In total, 176 children aged 6-45 months with severe HFMD from March 2013 to May 2014 were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups, one with cardiopulmonary collapse and the other without. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the risk factors for severe HFMD complicated with cardiopulmonary collapse. The univariate analysis showed that there was no significant correlation between age, body temperature, consciousness disorders, blood glucose level and severe HFMD complicated with cardiopulmonary collapse. The multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that vomiting, circulatory disturbance, enterovirus 71 infection, dysfunction of respiratory rhythm and high level of brain natriuretic peptide were five independent risk factors for severe HFMD complicated with cardiopulmonary collapse. Children with HFMD and the above five risk factors may be at risk for cardiopulmonary collapse and poor prognosis.

  15. Quantum discord as a tool for comparing collapse models and decoherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Shreya, E-mail: shreya.banerjee@tifr.res.in; Bera, Sayantani, E-mail: sayantani.bera@tifr.res.in; Singh, Tejinder P., E-mail: tpsingh@tifr.res.in

    2016-11-25

    Highlights: • Collapse and decoherence models have been compared using quantum discord. • A macroscopic entanglement experimental set up has been used for this purpose. • Detection of the above effects with present experimental time not possible. • Bounds on the collapse parameters have been obtained from this analysis. - Abstract: The quantum to classical transition maybe caused by decoherence or by dynamical collapse of the wave-function. We propose quantum discord as a tool, (1) for comparing and contrasting the role of a collapse model (Continuous Spontaneous Localisation) and various sources of decoherence (environmental and fundamental), (2) for detecting collapse model and fundamental decoherence for an experimentally demonstrated macroscopic entanglement. We discuss the experimental times which will lead to the detection of either Continuous Spontaneous Localisation or fundamental decoherence. We further put bounds on the collapse parameters from this experiment for quantum discord.

  16. Delayed Post-traumatic Vertebral Collapse: MR Categorization and MR-Pathology Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chong Suh; Yu, Je-Wook; Chung, Sung Soo; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Ahn, Geunghwan; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2007-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To categorize the MR appearance of ischemic vertebral collapse and to correlate surgical and histologic findings. Overview of Literature X-ray and MRI findings of delayed posttraumatic vertebral collapse shows several patterns. Histopathologic signs of osteonecrosis were present only in minor portion of cases sampled for biopsy of delayed post-traumatic vertebral collapse in the literature. Methods Twenty-one patients (22 vertebral bodies), with sur...

  17. Collapse and recovery of forage fish populations prior to commercial exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchie, S.; Hendy, I. L.; Thompson, A. R.; Watson, W.

    2017-02-01

    We use a new, well-calibrated 500 year paleorecord off southern California to determine collapse frequency, cross correlation, persistence, and return times of exploited forage fish populations. The paleorecord shows that "collapse" (defined as forage. Forage populations are resilient on the 500 year time scale, but their collapse and recovery cycle (based on the paleorecord) are suited to alternating periods of high fishing mortality and periods of little or no fishing.

  18. Are there negative returns to aid?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, Robert; White, Howard

    1999-01-01

    The World Bank report Assessing Aid assumes that aid is more effective when it is given to countries where polices are sound. Moreover, it assumes that an inflow of aid, above a certain level, starts to have negative effects. In this paper we empirically test both assumptions. We do not find

  19. Implicit and explicit negation in logic programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.

    The focus of the research is the semantics of logic programming. Concepts in the currently used semantics like negation as failure, the Closed World Assumption and multivalued interpretations need to be thoroughly understood in order to develop semantics for extensions of the logic programming

  20. The Wang-Meng interacting model and the gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Miguel de [Universidade Federal de Roraima, Boa Vista (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    collapse with a vacuum energy interacting with the collapsing matter content? Resuming, we study in this work the gravitational collapse of a star fluid that interacts with a vacuum energy component, via Wang-Meng approach. (author)

  1. Visualization during Stick-Release and Plateau Responses of Collapsed DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, R.; Murayama, Y.; Sano, M.

    We have observed the elastic response of single DNA molecules and visualized it during the collapsing transition induced by trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD). A fluorescent dye, YOYO-1, was used for the visualization. While the contour length of DNA increases as the YOYO concentration increases, the contour length decreases as SPD concentration increases. This indicates that YOYO-SPD exchange occurs on the single DNA molecule. We have observed bright spots in the fluorescence intensity profile of collapsed DNA during stretching, which may correspond to the collapsed parts within the single DNA. The decrease of the intensity of the spots in stretching implies the mechanical unfolding of collapsed parts.

  2. Theoretical and experimental research on progressive collapse of RC frame buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Lupoae

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Progressive collapse of the buildings has become an important issue to be studied in recent years due to the catastrophic nature of its effects. This subject can be approached from two different perspectives: one where an ideal collapse of the structure is aimed to be achieved and corresponds to the controlled demolition of buildings and other which treats the mitigation of the potential of progressive collapse of structures. The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental research conducted by the authors regarding the progressive collapse of RC structures from the two perspectives above mentioned.

  3. Characterizing 6 August 2007 Crandall Canyon mine collapse from ALOS PALSAR InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles

    2010-01-01

    We used ALOS InSAR images to study land surface deformation over the Crandall Canyon mine in Utah, which collapsed on 6 August 2007 and killed six miners. The collapse was registered as a ML 3.9 seismic event. An InSAR image spanning the time of the collapse shows 25–30 cm surface subsidence over the mine. We used distributed dislocation sources to model the deformation field, and found that a collapse source model alone does not adequately fit the deformation

  4. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  5. Research priorities for negative emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, S.; Jones, C. D.; Kraxner, F.; Peters, G. P.; Smith, P.; Tavoni, M.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Canadell, J. G.; Jackson, R. B.; Milne, J.; Moreira, J. R.; Nakicenovic, N.; Sharifi, A.; Yamagata, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere (CDR)—also known as ‘negative emissions’—features prominently in most 2 °C scenarios and has been under increased scrutiny by scientists, citizens, and policymakers. Critics argue that ‘negative emission technologies’ (NETs) are insufficiently mature to rely on them for climate stabilization. Some even argue that 2 °C is no longer feasible or might have unacceptable social and environmental costs. Nonetheless, the Paris Agreement endorsed an aspirational goal of limiting global warming to even lower levels, arguing that climate impacts—especially for vulnerable nations such as small island states—will be unacceptably severe in a 2 °C world. While there are few pathways to 2 °C that do not rely on negative emissions, 1.5 °C scenarios are barely conceivable without them. Building on previous assessments of NETs, we identify some urgent research needs to provide a more complete picture for reaching ambitious climate targets, and the role that NETs can play in reaching them.

  6. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  7. Nuclear collapse observed during the eruption of Mt. Usu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Taka-aki [Hokkaido Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Mt. Usu which was located about 70 km southwest from Sapporo in Hokkaido (the north island of Japan) began to erupt on March 31 in 2000. A nuclear emulsion was placed on a foot of Mt. Usu to catch small atomic clusters which were expected to be emitted during the eruption. Curious atomic clusters and their reaction products were successfully observed on surfaces of the nuclear emulsion. By comparing them with similar products which were obtained in previous experiments of discharge and electrolysis, it was concluded that micro Ball Lightning was really emitted during the eruption of Mt. Usu and that explosive reactions by nuclear collapse could have been involved to contribute to energy of the eruption. (author)

  8. Nuclear collapse observed during the eruption of Mt. Usu

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T A

    2002-01-01

    Mt. Usu which was located about 70 km southwest from Sapporo in Hokkaido (the north island of Japan) began to erupt on March 31 in 2000. A nuclear emulsion was placed on a foot of Mt. Usu to catch small atomic clusters which were expected to be emitted during the eruption. Curious atomic clusters and their reaction products were successfully observed on surfaces of the nuclear emulsion. By comparing them with similar products which were obtained in previous experiments of discharge and electrolysis, it was concluded that micro Ball Lightning was really emitted during the eruption of Mt. Usu and that explosive reactions by nuclear collapse could have been involved to contribute to energy of the eruption. (author)

  9. Core-collapse supernovae - successes, problems, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H T

    2000-01-01

    Multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the post-bounce evolution of collapsed stellar iron cores have demonstrated that convective overturn between the stalled shock and the neutrinosphere can have an important effect on the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism. Whether a model yields a successful explosion or not, however, still depends on the power of neutrino energy deposition behind the stalled shock. The neutrino interaction with the stellar gas in the 'hot bubble' also determines the duration of the shock stagnation phase, the explosion energy, and the composition of the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta. More accurate models require a more precise calculation of the neutrino luminosities and spectra and of the angular distributions of the neutrinos in the heating region. Therefore it is necessary to improve the numerical treatment of the neutrino transport, to take into account convective processes inside the newly formed neutron star, and to develop a better understanding of the neutrino opacitie...

  10. Experimental approach on the collapse mechanism of CFRP composite tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. N.; Im, K. H.; Park, J. W.; Yang, I. Y.

    2001-04-01

    This study is to investigate the energy absorption characteristics of CFRP(Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastics) tubes on static and dynamic tests. Axial static compression tests have been carried out using the static testing machine(Shin-gang buckling testing machine) and dynamic compression tests have been utilized using an vertical crushing testing machine. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on the interaction between the different mechanisms that could control the crushing process. The collapse characteristics and energy absorption have been examined for various tubes. Energy absorption of the tubes are increased as changes in the lay-up which may increase the modulus of tubes. The results have been varied significantly as a function of ply orientation and interlaminar number. In general, the stacking sequence [0/90] CFRP tubes absorbed more energy than the [15/-15] CFRP tubes.

  11. Precursor Events Involving Plasmas Structures Around Collapsing Black Holes Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, M.; Coppi, B.

    2017-10-01

    The plasma structures that can exist around black hole binaries can sustain intrinsic plasma collective modes that have characteristic low frequencies related to the particle rotation frequencies around the binary system. As the collapse approaches, with the loss of angular momentum by emission of gravitational waves from the binary system we have suggested that the frequency of the fluctuating component of the gravitational potential can go through that of the intrinsic modes of the surrounding plasma structure and lead to a sharp amplification of them. Then the precursor to the event reported in Ref., tentatively identified by the Agile X- γ-ray observatory may be associated with the high energy radiation emission due to the fields produced by excitation of the proposed plasma modes. M. Tavani is thanked for bringing Ref. to our attention while Ref. was being completed. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  12. Factors Predicting Late Collapse of Distal Radius Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neritan Myderrizi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although fractures of the distal radius are a common clinical presentation, many factors affect instability of these injuries. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of age, sex, distal radial ulnar joint injury (DRUJ, ulnar styloid fracture, and dorsal displacement in late collapse of distal radius fractures. METHODS: Three hundred twenty-nine patient fractures were measured for dorsal tilt, radial inclination and ulnar variance after reduction and 2 months later. Reduction loss was analysed statistically against variables like DRUJ involvement, ulnar styloid fractures, age, sex, and AO classification. RESULTS: After two months there was loss of reduction in 171(51.9% cases. Loss of reduction was related to age, AO classification, involvement of DRUJ, ulnar styloid fractures and initial displacement. CONCLUSION: Factors such as age, associated DRUJ injury, ulnar styloid fracture are predictive of loss of reduction. Knowing these predictor factors, can aid in decision regarding treatment methods.

  13. Uncertainty in Explosive Yields of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sydney; Fryer, Chris; Even, Wesley P.; Jones, Samuel; Pignatari, Marco; NuGrid Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The chemical composition of the ejecta from the violent explosions of massive stars has been vital for probing the nature of the explosions and their effect on galactic chemical evolution and universal chemical composition. The sensitivity of numerical explosive nucleosynthetic yields in core-collapse supernovae to several key parameters is examined in one dimension. This uncertainty study is applied to 15, 20, and 25 solar mass stars with different energy prescriptions for shock revival. The effects of the resolution of the temperature and density profiles run through the NuGrid nuclear network are explored, as well as the differences between large and small isotope networks for the initial conditions of the explosion calculations.

  14. Climate Change and Market Collapse: A Model Applied to Darfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Olsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A recurring argument in the global debate is that climate deterioration is likely to make social conflicts over diminishing natural resources more common in the future. The exact mechanism behind such a development has so far not been successfully characterized in the literature. In this paper, we present a general model of a community populated by farmers and herders who can either divide up land in a market economy or in autarky. The key insight from our model is that decreasing resources can make trade between the two groups collapse, which in turn makes each group’s welfare independent of that of the other. Predictions from the model are then applied to the conflict in Darfur. Our analysis suggests that three decades of drought in the area can at least partially explain the observed disintegration of markets and the subsequent rise of social tensions.

  15. Supermassive black holes formed by direct collapse of inflationary perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanism of producing a new type of primordial perturbations which collapse to primordial black holes whose mass can be as large as necessary for them to grow to the supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts, without contradicting COBE/FIRAS upper limits on cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In our model, the observable Universe consists of two kinds of many small patches which experienced different expansion histories during inflation. Large amplitudes of primordial perturbations enough to form primordial black holes are realized on patches that experienced more Hubble expansion than the others. By making these patches the minor component, the rarity of supermassive black holes can be explained. On the other hand, most regions of the Universe experienced the standard history and hence have only standard almost scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations confirmed by observations of CMB or large-scale structures of the universe. Thus our mechanism can evade the constra...

  16. Technical note: measurement of collapse cavitation in ultrasound fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digby, M; Duck, F A; Lenz, E J; Price, G J

    1995-11-01

    This note describes a method for the measurement of hydroxyl free radical concentration due to collapse acoustic cavitation in medical ultrasound fields using aqueous terephthalic acid (TA) solution. An enclosed cylindrical chamber with acoustically transparent membranes at either end was used. Control of cavitation activity was achieved by seeding the solution with polystyrene microspheres to provide cavitation centres. Insonation experiments using unseeded TA previously exposed to air gave very variable results, sometimes detecting cavitation activity and at other times detecting nothing, under the same exposure conditions. Introduction of polystyrene microsphere seeds into the TA enabled it to detect reproducibly levels of cavitation activity at least one order of magnitude higher than in unseeded solutions. An experiment using the seeded TA in a standing wave ultrasound field, set up using a brass reflecting plate, demonstrated that the presence of a standing wave inhibited the measured cavitation yield.

  17. Prompt merger collapse and the maximum mass of neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauswein, A; Baumgarte, T W; Janka, H-T

    2013-09-27

    We perform hydrodynamical simulations of neutron-star mergers for a large sample of temperature-dependent nuclear equations of state and determine the threshold mass above which the merger remnant promptly collapses to form a black hole. We find that, depending on the equation of state, the threshold mass is larger than the maximum mass of a nonrotating star in isolation by between 30 and 70 percent. Our simulations also show that the ratio between the threshold mass and maximum mass is tightly correlated with the compactness of the nonrotating maximum-mass configuration. We speculate on how this relation can be used to derive constraints on neutron-star properties from future observations.

  18. On Unitary Evolution and Collapse in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giacosa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of an interference setup in which only two outcomes are possible (such as in the case of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, we discuss in a simple and pedagogical way the difference between a standard, unitary quantum mechanical evolution and the existence of a real collapse of the wavefunction. This is a central and not-yet resolved question of quantum mechanics and indeed of quantum field theory as well. Moreover, we also present the Elitzur–Vaidman bomb, the delayed choice experiment, and the effect of decoherence. In the end, we propose two simple experiments to visualize decoherence and to test the role of an entangled particle.Quanta 2014; 3: 156–170.

  19. The Height Distribution of Core Collapse Supernovae in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, M.; Meurs, E.; Norci, L.; Kavanagh, P.

    Core collapse (CC) supernovae are exploding massive stars and are therefore expected to occur in the disks of spiral galaxies. However, in the historical record some CC SNae can be noticed outside the disks. To investigate this further, the distribution of SNae above and below the disks of spiral galaxies is examined for the case of edge-on galaxies. The CC SNae that are observed away from their parent Population I in the galaxy planes must previously have left the disks due to dynamical encounters or SN explosions of companion stars. We develop a simple interpretative model that describes the observed height distribution of the SNae, taking into account kick velocities imparted during the explosive events. We also briefly comment on the radial distribution of SNae, utilizing face-on galaxies for this purpose.

  20. Evaluation and treatment of trauma related collapse in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammons, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    Although blunt traumatic injuries are common in athletes, life-threatening trauma is fortunately rare. Most current literature has focused on nontraumatic causes of athlete death though traumatic injuries may be more common. Although prevention of these injuries may be more difficult than nontraumatic causes, prompt recognition and treatment is paramount. Common traumatic causes of collapse athlete generally involve the head, neck, and trunk and are more frequent in collision sports. Other higher risk sports include track and field, cheerleading, snow sports, and those involving motorized vehicles. Health care providers who participate in sports coverage should be aware of the potential for these injuries as emergency treatment is required to maximize outcomes. Emergency action plans allow providers to expediently activate emergency management services while providing treatment and stabilization.

  1. Macro-ions collapse leading to hybrid bio-nanomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2009-10-01

    I used supramolecular self-assembling cyanine and the polyamine spermine binding to Escherichia coli genomic DNA as a model for DNA collapse during high throughput screening. Polyamine binding to DNA converts the normally right handed B-DNA into left handed Z-DNA conformation. Polyamine binding to DNA was inhibited by the supramolecular self-assembling cyanine. Self-assembly of cyanine upon DNA scaffold was likewise competitively inhibited by spermine as signaled by fluorescence quench from DNA-cyanine ensemble. Sequence of DNA exposure to cyanine or spermine was critical in determining the magnitude of fluorescence quench. Methanol potentiated spermine inhibition by >10-fold. The IC{sub 50} for spermine inhibition was 0.35 {+-} 0.03 {micro}M and the association constant Ka was 2.86 x 10{sup -6}M. Reversibility of the DNA-polyamine interactions was evident from quench mitigation at higher concentrations of cyanine. System flexibility was demonstrated by similar spermine interactions with {lambda}DNA. The choices and rationale regarding the polyamine, the cyanine dye as well as the remarkable effects of methanol are discussed in detail. Cyanine might be a safer alternative to the mutagenic toxin ethidium bromide for investigating DNA-drug interactions. The combined actions of polyamines and alcohols mediate DNA collapse producing hybrid bio-nanomaterials with novel signaling properties that might be useful in biosensor applications. Finally, this work will be submitted to Analytical Sciences (Japan) for publication. This journal published our earlier, related work on cyanine supramolecular self-assembly upon a variety of nucleic acid scaffolds.

  2. Rg Wave Scattering from Collapse Craters in Yucca Flat, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J. L.; Pitarka, A.

    2016-12-01

    Short-period, fundamental mode Rayleigh waves (Rg) have been used as indicators of shallow source depth and are often preferred waveform features for estimating yield and moment tensor for underground explosions recorded at local distances. However, in regions with significant topography and/or complex tectonic structure, Rg can be rapidly attenuated or scattered such that the phase may not be observed within a few kilometers of the source, thus limiting its seismological applications. A unique dataset was collected in Yucca Flat, Nevada that allows additional insight into the effect of surface topography on Rg. The source was a large weight drop (the Seismic Hammer™), which is an efficient surface wave generator. Stations were placed at similar distance ranges ( 0.5 km) in an azimuthal array centered on the hammer source. The source-to-station paths included deep alluvium with and without topography, the topography being the result of collapse craters associated with historic nuclear tests in Yucca Flat. The craters dimensions were as much 1/3 of the entire propagation paths, which were as deep as 30 m. For flat paths, we often observe large amplitude Rg waves in the 3-15 Hz frequency band that are slightly dispersed. Contrarily, paths that cross collapse craters exhibit reduced Rg amplitudes or, in one case, essentially no observed fundamental mode surface waves. We have used SW4, an elastic wave propagation code, and a 3D velocity model for Yucca Flat, with and without topography, to simulate wave propagation. The synthetic and recorded ground motion was analyzed to better understand the effects of topographic scattering. We anticipate that the results of these simulations will help improve the configuration of the seismic stations network designed for Phase II of the Source Physics Experiment.

  3. Spherical collapse of dark energy with an arbitrary sound speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basse, Tobias; Bjælde, Ole Eggers [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Wong, Yvonne Y.Y., E-mail: tb06@phys.au.dk, E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk, E-mail: yvonne.wong@physik.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2011-10-01

    We consider a generic type of dark energy fluid, characterised by a constant equation of state parameter w and sound speed c{sub s}, and investigate the impact of dark energy clustering on cosmic structure formation using the spherical collapse model. Along the way, we also discuss in detail the evolution of dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. We find that the introduction of a finite sound speed into the picture necessarily induces a scale-dependence in the dark energy clustering, which in turn affects the dynamics of the spherical collapse in a scale-dependent way. As with other, more conventional fluids, we can define a Jeans scale for the dark energy clustering, and hence a Jeans mass M{sub J} for the dark matter which feels the effect of dark energy clustering via gravitational interactions. For bound objects (halos) with masses M >> M{sub J}, the effect of dark energy clustering is maximal. For those with M << M{sub J}, the dark energy component is effectively homogeneous, and its role in the formation of these structures is reduced to its effects on the Hubble expansion rate. To compute quantitatively the virial density and the linearly extrapolated threshold density, we use a quasi-linear approach which is expected to be valid up to around the Jeans mass. We find an interesting dependence of these quantities on the halo mass M, given some w and c{sub s}. The dependence is the strongest for masses lying in the vicinity of M ∼ M{sub J}. Observing this M-dependence will be a tell-tale sign that dark energy is dynamic, and a great leap towards pinning down its clustering properties.

  4. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2017-09-01

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope. I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap

  5. Wavefunction Collapse via a Nonlocal Relativistic Variational Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Alan K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Since the origin of quantum theory in the 1920's, some of its practitioners (and founders) have been troubled by some of its features, including indeterminacy, nonlocality and entanglement. The 'collapse' process described in the Copenhagen Interpretation is suspect for several reasons, and the act of 'measurement,' which is supposed to delimit its regime of validity, has never been unambiguously defined. In recent decades, nonlocality and entanglement have been studied energetically, both theoretically and experimentally, and the theory has been reinterpreted in imaginative ways, but many mysteries remain. We propose that it is necessary to replace the theory by one that is explicitly nonlinear and nonlocal, and does not distinguish between measurement and non-measurement regimes. We have constructed such a theory, for which the phase of the wavefunction plays the role of a hidden variable via the process of zitterbewegung. To capture this effect, the theory must be relativistic, even when describing nonrelativistic phenomena. It is formulated as a variational principle, in which Nature attempts to minimize the sum of two spacetime integrals. The first integral tends to drive the solution toward a solution of the standard quantum mechanical wave equation, and also enforces the Born rule of outcome probabilities. The second integral drives the collapse process. We demonstrate that the new theory correctly predicts the possible outcomes of the electron two-slit experiment, including the infamous 'delayed-choice' variant. We observe that it appears to resolve some long-standing mysteries, but introduces new ones, including possible retrocausality (a cause later than its effect). It is not clear whether the new theory is deterministic.

  6. Collapsing Glomerulopathy: A Single Centre Clinicopathologic Study of Seven Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanodia, Kamal V; Vanikar, Aruna V; Patel, Rashmi D; Suthar, Kamlesh S; Nigam, Lovelesh K; Patel, Himanshu V; Kute, Vivek; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2016-04-01

    Collapsing Glomerulopathy (CG) is recognized as distinct pattern of proliferative parenchymal injury with poor response to empirical therapy. A single center retrospective study was carried out to find out clinicopathological features of idiopathic CG. A total of 3335 native renal biopsies were analyzed retrospectively which were performed from 2008 to 2014 with emphasis on clinicopathological correlation and histopathological presentation. Idiopathic CG constituted 0.75% incidence (25 out of 3335 biopsies) of all biopsies, adults constituting major study part with 88%. The duration of the symptoms at the time of biopsy was 34.12±26.09 days and 35±22.91 days respectively in adults and children. Hypertension was noted in 9(40.9%) and oliguria in 8(36.4%) in adults. Urinalysis revealed microscopic haematuria 12(54.5%) in adults. Nephrotic range proteinuria was reported in 10 (45.5%) adult patients. Glomerular collapse with hyperplasia/ hypertrophy of podocytes was seen in 4.54±3.11 glomeruli. Tubular microcystic dilation was seen in 16(64%) patients. Tubular atrophy involving mild (t1) in 15(60%), moderate (t2) in 4(16%) and severe (t3) in 6(24%) patients. Interstitial fibrosis was mild (i1) in 17(68%), moderate (i2) in 2(8%) and severe (i3) in 6(24%) patients. Idiopathic CG is a morphological pattern of grave podocyte injury with poor prognosis. However, there are chances of remission/ recovery if the tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis are of grades ≤ t1 i1.

  7. Origin of calderas: discriminating between collapses and explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Origins of calderas may differ according to their subsurface structure that may be characterized by high or low density deposits that may be observed as high or low gravity anomalies, respectively. In the Introduction, the pioneering work of Fouqué[1879] on Santorini caldera is referred to in relation to definition of calderas. First, our discussion is focused on four calderas that were seen forming during the period from 1815 (the Tambora eruption to 1991 (the Pinatubo eruption. Coincidently, these four calderas are all low-gravity-anomaly type. Their formation processes and subsurface structure are summarized by the existing data analyzed by various authors. These results are confirmed by results of drillings at some other calderas. Then, caldera formation of both types is discussed: High-gravity-anomaly-type calderas are expected to originate from subsidence of high-density ejecta into the summit magma reservoir. On the calderas of this type, the genetic eruptions believed to be accompanied by subsidences were not actually observed, and consequently three examples are mentioned only briefly. The low-gravity-anomaly-type calderas are discussed from standpoint of both the models of collapses and explosions. It is also emphasized that dynamic pressure ofexplosions is an important factor in the caldera formation, not only volume of the ejecta. To confirm the possibility that volcanic ejecta and edifices collapse into magma reservoirs, we discuss stress propagation from a depleted reservoir upward towards the Earth surface. Formation mechanisms of large calderas of this type are speculated; large calderas measuring about 20 km across may develop by successive merging of component calderas over a long period of times. A Kamchatka caldera under enlargement during the Holocene period is interpreted by successive merging of five component calderas.

  8. Upper airway collapsibility is associated with obesity and hyoid position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, Pedro R; Schorr, Fabiola; Eckert, Danny J; Gebrim, Eloisa; Kayamori, Fabiane; Moriya, Henrique T; Malhotra, Atul; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-10-01

    Upper airway anatomy plays a major role in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. An inferiorly displaced hyoid as measured by the mandibular plane to hyoid distance (MPH) has been consistently associated with OSA. The hyoid is also a common landmark for pharyngeal length, upper airway volume, and tongue base. Tongue dimensions, pharyngeal length, and obesity are associated with OSA severity, although the link between these anatomical variables and pharyngeal collapsibility is less well known. We hypothesized that obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI), neck and waist circumferences, and variables associated with hyoid position (pharyngeal length, upper airway volume, and tongue dimensions) would be associated with passive pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Cross-sectional. Academic hospital. 34 Japanese-Brazilian males age 21 to 70 y. N/A. We performed computed tomography scans of the upper airway, overnight polysomnography, and Pcrit measurements in all subjects. On average, subjects were overweight (BMI = 28 ± 4 kg/m(2)) and OSA was moderately severe (apnea-hypopnea index = 29 [13-51], range 1-90 events/h). Factor analysis identified two factors among the studied variables: obesity (extracted from BMI, neck and waist circumferences) and hyoid position (MPH, pharyngeal length, tongue length, tongue volume, and upper airway volume). Both obesity and hyoid position correlated with Pcrit (r = 0.470 and 0.630, respectively) (P obesity and hyoid position. Tongue dimensions, pharyngeal length, and the mandibular plane to hyoid distance are associated with obesity variables. These findings provide novel insight into the potential factors mediating upper airway collapse in obstructive sleep apnea. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Dose intensity and efficacy of the combination of everolimus and exemestane (EVE/EXE) in a real-world population of hormone receptor-positive (ER+/PgR+), HER2-negative advanced breast cancer (ABC) patients: a multicenter Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Mariangela; Fabi, Alessandra; Moscetti, Luca; Cazzaniga, Maria Elena; Petrucelli, Luciana; Forcignanò, Rosachiara; Lupo, Laura Isabella; De Matteis, Elisabetta; Chiuri, Vincenzo Emanuele; Cairo, Giuseppe; Febbraro, Antonio; Giordano, Guido; Giampaglia, Marianna; Bilancia, Domenico; La Verde, Nicla; Maiello, Evaristo; Morritti, Maria; Giotta, Francesco; Lorusso, Vito; Latorre, Agnese; Scavelli, Claudio; Romito, Sante; Cusmai, Antonio; Palmiotti, Gennaro; Surico, Giammarco

    2017-06-01

    This retrospective analysis focused on the effect of treatment with EVE/EXE in a real-world population outside of clinical trials. We examined the efficacy of this combination in terms of PFS and RR related to dose intensity (5 mg daily versus 10 mg daily) and tolerability. 163 HER2-negative ER+/PgR+ ABC patients, treated with EVE/EXE from May 2011 to March 2016, were included in the analysis. The primary endpoints were the correlation between the daily dose and RR and PFS, as well as an evaluation of the tolerability of the combination. Secondary endpoints were RR, PFS, and OS according to the line of treatment. Patients were classified into three different groups, each with a different dose intensity of everolimus (A, B, C). RR was 29.8% (A), 27.8% (B) (p = 0.953), and not evaluable (C). PFS was 9 months (95% CI 7-11) (A), 10 months (95% CI 9-11) (B), and 5 months (95% CI 2-8) (C), p = 0.956. OS was 38 months (95% CI 24-38) (A), median not reached (B), and 13 months (95% CI 10-25) (C), p = 0.002. Adverse events were stomatitis 57.7% (11.0% grade 3-4), asthenia 46.0% (6.1% grade 3-4), hypercholesterolemia 46.0% (0.6% grade 3-4), and hyperglycemia 35.6% (5.5% grade 3-4). The main reason for discontinuation/interruption was grade 2-3 stomatitis. No correlation was found between dose intensity (5 vs. 10 mg labeled dose) and efficacy in terms of RR and PFS. The tolerability of the higher dose was poor in our experience, although this had no impact on efficacy.

  10. Education, Nation-Building and Modernization after World War I: American Ideas for the Peace Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ment, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The First World War ended with the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian, Russian, German and Ottoman Empires. In planning for the peace negotiations the allied governments considered not only the European boundaries but especially the national aspirations and future development of the peoples of the Balkans, the Caucasus, the Middle East, Africa and…

  11. High female mortality resulting in herd collapse in free-ranging domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    Full Text Available Reindeer herding in Sweden is a form of pastoralism practised by the indigenous Sámi population. The economy is mainly based on meat production. Herd size is generally regulated by harvest in order not to overuse grazing ranges and keep a productive herd. Nonetheless, herd growth and room for harvest is currently small in many areas. Negative herd growth and low harvest rate were observed in one of two herds in a reindeer herding community in Central Sweden. The herds (A and B used the same ranges from April until the autumn gathering in October-December, but were separated on different ranges over winter. Analyses of capture-recapture for 723 adult female reindeer over five years (2007-2012 revealed high annual losses (7.1% and 18.4%, for herd A and B respectively. A continuing decline in the total reindeer number in herd B demonstrated an inability to maintain the herd size in spite of a very small harvest. An estimated breakpoint for when herd size cannot be kept stable confirmed that the observed female mortality rate in herd B represented a state of herd collapse. Lower calving success in herd B compared to A indicated differences in winter foraging conditions. However, we found only minor differences in animal body condition between the herds in autumn. We found no evidence that a lower autumn body mass generally increased the risk for a female of dying from one autumn to the next. We conclude that the prime driver of the on-going collapse of herd B is not high animal density or poor body condition. Accidents or disease seem unlikely as major causes of mortality. Predation, primarily by lynx and wolverine, appears to be the most plausible reason for the high female mortality and state of collapse in the studied reindeer herding community.

  12. Is the “Ecological and Economic Approach for the Restoration of Collapsed Gullies” in Southern China Really Economic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengchao Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collapsed gully erosion constantly plagues the sustainability of rural areas in China. To control collapsed gully erosion, an ecological and economic approach, which uses tree plantation to gain economic benefits and control soil erosion, has been widely applied by local governments in Southern China. However, little is known about the economic feasibility of this new method. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness and economic benefits of the new method. Based on a case study in Changting County, Southeast China, two farms were selected to represent a timber tree plantation and a fruit tree plantation, respectively. The Annual Capital Capitalization Method and Return on Investment (ROI were selected to conduct cost-benefit analysis. In contrast to previous studies, we found that the new approach was far from economic. The value of the newly-built forestland in Sanzhou Village and Tufang Village is 2738 RMB ha−1 and 5477 RMB ha−1, respectively, which are extremely lower than the costs of ecological restoration. Meanwhile, the annual ROI is −3.60% and −8.90%, respectively, which is negative and also far poorer than the average value of forestry in China. The costs of conservation were substantially over the related economic benefits, and the investors would suffer from greater loss if they invested more in the conservation. Low-cost terraces with timber trees had less economic loss compared with the costly terraces with fruit tree plantation. Moreover, the cost efficiency of the new approaches in soil conservation was also greatly poorer than the conventional method. The costs of conserving one ton soil per year for conventional method, new method for planting timber trees, and planting fruit trees were 164 RMB, 696 RMB, and 11,664 RMB, respectively. Therefore, the new collapsed gully erosion control methods are uneconomic and unsuitable to be widely carried out in China in the near future.

  13. Influence of Oil on the Magnitude and Rate of Collapsible Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collapsible soils particularly cover arid and semi arid regions where sometimes petroleum industry is well developed. The hydrocarbon is transported by pipelines towards refineries located in coastal areas. In case of a leak, these soils may collapse. The experimental work, carried out in oedometer illustrates the influence ...

  14. Non-adiabatic radiative collapse of a relativistic star under different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examine the role of space-time geometry in the non-adiabatic collapse of a star dissipating energy in the form of radial heat flow, studying its evolution under different initial conditions. The collapse of a star filled with a homogeneous perfect fluid is compared with that of a star filled with inhomogeneous imperfect fluid ...

  15. Micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke [Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface is needed to be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcool condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcooling condition. In high subcooling condition, instability of the vapor film dominates the vapor film collapse on the particle surface. On the other hand, micro-mechanism at the interface between vapor and liquid such as micro-jet is dominant in low subcool condition in case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse. (author)

  16. Lessons learned from stock collapse and recovery of North Sea herring: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickey-Collas, M.; Nash, R.D.M.; Brunel, T.P.A.; Damme, van C.J.G.; Marshall, C.T.; Payne, M.R.; Corton, A.; Geffen, A.J.; Peck, M.A.; Hatfield, E.M.C.; Hintzen, N.T.; Enberg, K.; Kell, L.T.; Simmonds, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    The collapse and recovery of North Sea herring in the latter half of the 20th century had both ecological and economic consequences. We review the effect of the collapse and investigate whether the increased understanding about the biology, ecology, and stock dynamics gained in the past three

  17. Research on Collapse Process of Cable-Stayed Bridges under Strong Seismic Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the collapse process and failure mechanism of long-span cable-stayed bridges under strong seismic excitations, a rail-cum-road steel truss cable-stayed bridge was selected as engineering background, the collapse failure numerical model of the cable-stayed bridge was established based on the explicit dynamic finite element method (FEM, and the whole collapse process of the cable-stayed bridge was analyzed and studied with three different seismic waves acted in the horizontal longitudinal direction, respectively. It can be found from the numerical simulation analysis that the whole collapse failure process and failure modes of the cable-stayed bridge under three different seismic waves are similar. Furthermore, the piers and the main pylons are critical components contributing to the collapse of the cable-stayed bridge structure. However, the cables and the main girder are damaged owing to the failure of piers and main pylons during the whole structure collapse process, so the failure of cable and main girder components is not the main reason for the collapse of cable-stayed bridge. The analysis results can provide theoretical basis for collapse resistance design and the determination of critical damage components of long-span highway and railway cable-stayed bridges in the research of seismic vulnerability analysis.

  18. Multidimensional simulations of the accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs to neutron stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessart, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304846074; Burrows, A.; Ott, C.D.; Livne, E.; Yoon, S.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266576753; Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498

    2006-01-01

    We present 2.5-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of white dwarfs, starting from two-dimensional rotational equilibrium configurations, thereby accounting consistently for the effects of rotation prior to and after core collapse.We focus our study

  19. Periodic Anderson model with Holstein phonons for the description of the Cerium volume collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enzhi; Tam, Ka-Ming; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    The volume collapse transition of Cerium has intrigued physicists since its discovery several decades ago. Various models and mechanisms have been proposed, the most prominent scenarios are based on the Mott transition and the Kondo volume collapse transition. In this study, we explore the volume collapse by a dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) study of the periodic Anderson model with phonons in the conduction band. This allows us to study the effect of the electron-phonon interaction on the volume collapse. In order to faithfully account for the volume collapse, we also include the effects due to the volume and temperature dependent bulk modulus. We find that as the electron-phonon interaction strength increases, the volume collapse effect is enhanced, which is consistent with the suggestion that the phonons have an important contribution in the volume collapse transition. Although we start with the canonical model for the Kondo volume collapse scenario, our results have some of the characteristics of the Mott scenario.

  20. The USSR and total war: why didn't the Soviet economy collapse in 1942?

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The economic dimensions of the Soviet war effort are appraised. The surprising fact is that the Soviet economy did not collapse in 1942. A rational-choice model is developed to illustrate the economic conditions under which a wartime collapse of the economy is rendered more and less likely.

  1. Lessons learned from stock collapse and recovery of North Sea herring: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickey-Collas, Mark; Nash, Richard D. M.; Brunel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The collapse and recovery of North Sea herring in the latter half of the 20th century had both ecological and economic consequences. We review the effect of the collapse and investigate whether the increased understanding about the biology, ecology, and stock dynamics gained in the past three dec...

  2. Firn air depletion as a precursor of Antarctic ice-shelf collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831891; Ligtenberg, S.R.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32821177X; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; Vaughan, D.G.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the sudden, rapid collapse of 20% of ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula has led to large-scale thinning and acceleration of its tributary glaciers. The leading hypothesis for the collapse of most of these ice shelves is the process of hydrofracturing, whereby a water-filled

  3. What can we learn from the stock collapse and recovery of North Sea herring? A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickey-Collas, M.; Nash, R.D.M.; Brunel, T.

    The collapse and recovery of North Sea herring in the latter half of the twentieth century hasbeen well documented. With hindsight and the benefit of almost 40 years of extra data andstudies, we can now obtain a clear view of the impact of the collapse and the recovery onthe stock, the fishery, a...

  4. Collapse of a Public-Private Partnership in Uitenhage: A case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the collapse of a public-private partnership (PPP) in the district of Uitenhage in 1999. Talks to revive the partnership are high on the agenda. It is therefore essential to examine the reasons for the collapse to avoid the pitfalls of the past and to ensure that a more sustainable and competent partnership is ...

  5. Dynamical formation and interaction of bright solitary waves and solitons in the collapse of Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowska-Wuester, B J; Davis, M J [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Wuester, S [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.dabrowska-wuester@massey.ac.nz

    2009-05-15

    We model the dynamics of formation of multiple, long-lived, bright solitary waves (BSWs) in the collapse of Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interactions as studied in the experiment of Cornish et al (2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 170401). We use both mean-field and approximate quantum field simulation techniques. While a number of separated wave packets form as observed in the experiment, they do not have a repulsive {pi} phase difference as has been previously inferred. We observe that the inclusion of quantum fluctuations causes soliton dynamics to be predominantly repulsive in one-dimensional (1D) simulations independent of their initial relative phase. However, indicative 3D simulations do not show a similar effect. In contrast, in 3D quantum noise has a negative impact on BSW lifetimes. Finally, we show that condensate oscillations, after the collapse, may serve to deduce three-body recombination rates.

  6. Lessons from Sarajevo and the First World War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tea Sindbæk

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the developments of public memory of the First World War as it is written in to the national narratives of Bosnia, Croatia and Serbia on the way to the centennial of the war’s outbreak. The First World War constitutes both a shared and a divided memory in Serbia, Croatia...... and Bosnia. Though the war was a catastrophe everywhere, to Serbia it also became a triumph on allied side, whereas in Bosnia and Croatia it was mainly a state collapse. Yet, the First World War also provided the immediate conditions for the creation of the first Yugoslav state, and consequently the history...... of the war was narrated within a Yugoslav context, echoing the triumphant Serbian narrative. With the fall of socialist Yugoslavia, the memory of the First World War developed quite differently in the three states. Different lessons are being drawn from war history, often with the aim of situating the nation...

  7. General tube law for collapsible thin and thick-wall tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, Pavel; Zaretsky, Uri; Jaffa, Ariel J; Elad, David

    2014-07-18

    Modeling the complex deformations of cylindrical tubes under external pressure is of interest in engineering and physiological applications. The highly non-linear post-buckling behavior of cross-section of the tube during collapse attracted researchers for years. Major efforts were concentrated on studying the behavior of thin-wall tubes. Unfortunately, the knowledge on post-buckling of thick-wall tubes is still incomplete, although many experimental and several theoretical studies have been performed. In this study we systematically studied the effect of the wall thickness on post-buckling behavior of the tube. For this purpose, we utilized a computational model for evaluation of the real geometry of the deformed cross-sectional area due to negative transmural (internal minus external) pressure. We also developed an experimental method to validate the computational results. Based on the computed cross-sections of tubes with different wall thicknesses, we developed a general tube law that accounts for thin or thick wall tubes and fits the numerical data of computed cross-sectional areas versus transmural pressures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The signatures of Anthropocene defaunation: cascading effects of the seed dispersal collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Méndez, Néstor; Jordano, Pedro; García, Cristina; Valido, Alfredo

    2016-04-19

    Anthropogenic activity is driving population declines and extinctions of large-bodied, fruit-eating animals worldwide. Loss of these frugivores is expected to trigger negative cascading effects on plant populations if remnant species fail to replace the seed dispersal services provided by the extinct frugivores. A collapse of seed dispersal may not only affect plant demography (i.e., lack of recruitment), but should also supress gene flow via seed dispersal. Yet little empirical data still exist demonstrating the genetic consequences of defaunation for animal-dispersed plant species. Here, we first document a significant reduction of seed dispersal distances along a gradient of human-driven defaunation, with increasing loss of large- and medium-bodied frugivores. We then show that local plant neighbourhoods have higher genetic similarity, and smaller effective population sizes when large seed dispersers become extinct (i.e., only small frugivores remain) or are even partially downgraded (i.e., medium-sized frugivores providing less efficient seed dispersal). Our results demonstrate that preservation of large frugivores is crucial to maintain functional seed dispersal services and their associated genetic imprints, a central conservation target. Early signals of reduced dispersal distances that accompany the Anthropogenic defaunation forecast multiple, cascading effects on plant populations.

  9. Collapse of resilience patterns in generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chengyi; Grilli, Jacopo; Schuessler, Friedrich; Suweis, Samir

    2017-06-01

    Recently, a theoretical framework aimed at separating the roles of dynamics and topology in multidimensional systems has been developed [Gao et al., Nature (London) 530, 307 (2016), 10.1038/nature16948]. The validity of their method is assumed to hold depending on two main hypotheses: (i) The network determined by the the interaction between pairs of nodes has negligible degree correlations; (ii) the node activities are uniform across nodes on both the drift and the pairwise interaction functions. Moreover, the authors consider only positive (mutualistic) interactions. Here we show the conditions proposed by Gao and collaborators [Nature (London) 530, 307 (2016), 10.1038/nature16948] are neither sufficient nor necessary to guarantee that their method works in general and validity of their results are not independent of the model chosen within the class of dynamics they considered. Indeed we find that a new condition poses effective limitations to their framework and we provide quantitative predictions of the quality of the one-dimensional collapse as a function of the properties of interaction networks and stable dynamics using results from random matrix theory. We also find that multidimensional reduction may work also for an interaction matrix with a mixture of positive and negative signs, opening up an application of the framework to food webs, neuronal networks, and social and economic interactions.

  10. Habitat collapse due to overgrazing threatens turtle conservation in marine protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianen, Marjolijn J A; Herman, Peter M J; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Lamers, Leon P M; van Katwijk, Marieke M; van der Heide, Tjisse; Mumby, Peter J; Silliman, Brian R; Engelhard, Sarah L; van de Kerk, Madelon; Kiswara, Wawan; van de Koppel, Johan

    2014-02-22

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are key tools for combatting the global overexploitation of endangered species. The prevailing paradigm is that MPAs are beneficial in helping to restore ecosystems to more 'natural' conditions. However, MPAs may have unintended negative effects when increasing densities of protected species exert destructive effects on their habitat. Here, we report on severe seagrass degradation in a decade-old MPA where hyper-abundant green turtles adopted a previously undescribed below-ground foraging strategy. By digging for and consuming rhizomes and roots, turtles create abundant bare gaps, thereby enhancing erosion and reducing seagrass regrowth. A fully parametrized model reveals that the ecosystem is approaching a tipping point, where consumption overwhelms regrowth, which could potentially lead to complete collapse of the seagrass habitat. Seagrass recovery will not ensue unless turtle density is reduced to nearly zero, eliminating the MPA's value as a turtle reserve. Our results reveal an unrecognized, yet imminent threat to MPAs, as sea turtle densities are increasing at major nesting sites and the decline of seagrass habitat forces turtles to concentrate on the remaining meadows inside reserves. This emphasizes the need for policy and management approaches that consider the interactions of protected species with their habitat.

  11. The status of preschool teachers in two municipalities following the economic collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laufey Axelsdóttir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This feminist study examines the working conditions of preschool teachers, a female dominated occupation, in two municipalities in Iceland and asks, in light of government policy, if and then how the municipalities facilitate preschool teachers professionalism following the 2008 bank collapse. Weber´s (2001 theoretical framework is applied to explore the professional status of the preschools and the impact of local government on preschool teachers’ position. Qualitative methods were used and data was gathered in 2011 and 2012. Thirteen interviews were conducted with women and men in two preschools and the schools administrative environment. Preschool teachers employed in management and non-management positions as well as assistants were interviewed. The study’s results show that financial cutbacks in local government affect preschool teachers and assistants and thus the position of women in the labour market by preserving their subordination. Furthermore, preschool children seem to be affected by the cutbacks which possibly have negative consequences on their well-being. Reforms and developments of the preschool teachers education seem to be met with considerable opposition from local government and more emphasis is placed on operational costs rather than strengthening the preschool teachers in their role as professionals. The results thus point to a gap between government policy and the municipalities’ local version of that same policy.

  12. Cooperation, collapse and resilience: ecological and evolutionary consequences of heterogeneous metapopulation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limdi, Anurag; Perez-Escudero, Alfonso; Li, Aming; Gore, Jeff

    While negative frequency and density dependent selection and population structure are used to explain the evolution of cooperation separately, their combined effect remains unexplored. Here, we consider the effect of heterogeneity of metapopulations linked by migration in a yeast cooperator-defector system. We discover that asymmetric migration on star networks, coupled with density dependent selection, can double the cooperator fraction compared to isolated nodes and fully connected networks. Migration reduces population density on the side nodes which makes star networks more prone to collapse in challenging environments than isolated populations. Unexpectedly, we find that star networks have greater resilience to a temporary salt shock than isolated nodes. This can be reconciled by noting that the level of permanent stress that the network can withstand is influenced by side nodes which are the most vulnerable parts of the network. In contrast, the ability to recover from temporary shocks is defined by the central node (which has a higher density and cooperator fraction than isolated nodes), because it can reseed the side nodes and rescue the whole network. Our findings highlight that ecological communities respond differently to constantly and transiently harsh environments.

  13. Gradual caldera collapse at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, regulated by lateral magma outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew; Holohan, Eoghan P; Halldórsson, Sæmundur A; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Cesca, Simone; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Jarosch, Alexander H; Jónasson, Kristján; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Bagnardi, Marco; Parks, Michelle M; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Pálsson, Finnur; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Heimann, Sebastian; Reynolds, Hannah I; Dumont, Stéphanie; Bali, Eniko; Gudfinnsson, Gudmundur H; Dahm, Torsten; Roberts, Matthew J; Hensch, Martin; Belart, Joaquín M C; Spaans, Karsten; Jakobsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur M; Drouin, Vincent; Dürig, Tobias; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Riishuus, Morten S; Pedersen, Gro B M; van Boeckel, Tayo; Oddsson, Björn; Pfeffer, Melissa A; Barsotti, Sara; Bergsson, Baldur; Donovan, Amy; Burton, Mike R; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2016-07-15

    Large volcanic eruptions on Earth commonly occur with a collapse of the roof of a crustal magma reservoir, forming a caldera. Only a few such collapses occur per century, and the lack of detailed observations has obscured insight into the mechanical interplay between collapse and eruption. We use multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data to show that the 110-square-kilometer and 65-meter-deep collapse of Bárdarbunga caldera in 2014-2015 was initiated through withdrawal of magma, and lateral migration through a 48-kilometers-long dike, from a 12-kilometers deep reservoir. Interaction between the pressure exerted by the subsiding reservoir roof and the physical properties of the subsurface flow path explain the gradual, near-exponential decline of both collapse rate and the intensity of the 180-day-long eruption. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. A Plastic Design Method for RC Moment Frame Buildings against Progressive Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Faghihmaleki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, progressive collapse potential of generic 3-, 8- and 12-storey RC moment frame buildings designed based on IBC-2006 code was investigated by performing non-linear static and dynamic analyses. It was observed that the model structures had high potential for progressive collapse when the second floor column was suddenly removed. Then, the size of beams required to satisfy the failure criteria for progressive collapse was obtained by using the virtual work method; i.e., using the equilibrium of the external work done by gravity load due to loss of a column and the internal work done by plastic rotation of beams. According to the nonlinear dynamic analysis results, the model structures designed only for normal load turned out to have strong potential for progressive collapse whereas the structures designed by plastic design concept for progressive collapse satisfied the failure criterion recommended by the GSA code. 

  15. An Experimental Study on the Impact Collapse Characteristics of CF/Epoxy Circular Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. N.; Im, K. H.; Park, J. W.; Yang, I. Y.

    2003-03-01

    This study is to investigate the energy absorption characteristics of CF/Epoxy (Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Resin) circular tubes in static and impact tests. The experimental results varied significantly as a function of interlaminar number, orientation angle of outer and trigger. When a CFRP composite tube is crushed, static/impact energy is consumed by friction between the loading plate and the splayed fronds of the tube, by fracture of the fibers, matrix and their interface, and the response is complex and depends on the interaction among the different mechanisms, such as transverse shearing, laminar bending and local buckling. The collapse mode depended upon orientation angle of outer of CFRP tubes and loading status(static/impact). Typical collapse modes of CFRP tubes are wedge collapse mode, splaying collapse mode and fragmentation collapse mode.

  16. Research on nonlinear characteristics of strata collapse because of the multi-frequency mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fan; Hu, Zhen-qi; Yang, Lun; Ma, Feng-hai [Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin (China). School of Geomatics

    2008-06-15

    Based on the complexity of mine stratum and coupling of the multi-frequency for the damage of mine stratum, using the method of on-site inspection and mathematical statistics, the regulation and nonlinear characteristics of strata collapse in mine stratum's multi-frequency mining were put forward and systemically studied. Study result shows that the influence of multi-frequency mining in mine stratum has the feature of multi-frequency in continuity, multi-characteristic and multi-type nonlinear collapse, strata collapse activation turned worse, presenting an accumulation effect of multi-frequency mining for the strata damage. With the example of multi-frequency mining in the mine, the real characteristics of strata collapse by multi-frequency mining and nonlinear characteristics of accumulative response damage were analyzed. Research achievements about the surface recover and controlling of strata collapse by the multi-frequency mining have instruction meaning. 3 refs.

  17. Temperature considerations in non-spherical bubble collapse near a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The inertial collapse of cavitation bubbles is known to be capable of damaging its surroundings. While significant attention has been dedicated to investigating the pressures produced by this process, less is known about heating of the surrounding medium, which may be important when collapse occurs near objects whose mechanical properties strongly depend on temperature (e.g., polymers). Using a newly developed computational approach that prevents pressure and temperature errors generated by naively implemented shock- and interface-capturing schemes, we investigate the dynamics of shock-induced collapse of gas bubbles near rigid surfaces. We characterize the temperature fields based on the relevant nondimensional parameters entering the problem. In particular, we show that bubble collapse causes temperature rises in neighboring solid objects via two mechanisms: the shock produced at collapse and heat diffusion from the hot bubble close to the object.

  18. The widespread collapse of an invasive species: Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Meghan; Hartley, Stephen; Sim, Dalice A; Lester, Philip J

    2012-06-23

    Synergies between invasive species and climate change are widely considered to be a major biodiversity threat. However, invasive species are also hypothesized to be susceptible to population collapse, as we demonstrate for a globally important invasive species in New Zealand. We observed Argentine ant populations to have collapsed in 40 per cent of surveyed sites. Populations had a mean survival time of 14.1 years (95% CI = 12.9-15.3 years). Resident ant communities had recovered or partly recovered after their collapse. Our models suggest that climate change will delay colony collapse, as increasing temperature and decreasing rainfall significantly increased their longevity, but only by a few years. Economic and environmental costs of invasive species may be small if populations collapse on their own accord.

  19. The widespread collapse of an invasive species: Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Meghan; Hartley, Stephen; Sim, Dalice A.; Lester, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Synergies between invasive species and climate change are widely considered to be a major biodiversity threat. However, invasive species are also hypothesized to be susceptible to population collapse, as we demonstrate for a globally important invasive species in New Zealand. We observed Argentine ant populations to have collapsed in 40 per cent of surveyed sites. Populations had a mean survival time of 14.1 years (95% CI = 12.9–15.3 years). Resident ant communities had recovered or partly recovered after their collapse. Our models suggest that climate change will delay colony collapse, as increasing temperature and decreasing rainfall significantly increased their longevity, but only by a few years. Economic and environmental costs of invasive species may be small if populations collapse on their own accord. PMID:22130172

  20. Isotropic Single Negative Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Protiva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of simple, and therefore cheap, planar resonators for building 3D isotropic metamaterials. These resonators are: a broadside-coupled split ring resonator with a magnetic response providing negative permeability; an electric dipole terminated by a loop inductor together with a double H-shaped resonator with an electric response providing negative permittivity. Two kinds of 3D isotropic single negative metamaterials are reported. The first material consists of unit cells in the form of a cube bearing on its faces six equal planar resonators with tetrahedral symmetry. In the second material, the planar resonators boxed into spherical plastic shells and randomly distributed in a hosting material compose a real 3D volumetric metamaterial with an isotropic response. In both cases the metamaterial shows negative permittivity or permeability, according to the type of resonators that are used. The experiments prove the isotropic behavior of the cells and of the metamaterial specimens.

  1. Meningitis - gram-negative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life-threatening illness. Prevention Prompt treatment of related infections may reduce the risk of meningitis. Alternative Names Gram-negative meningitis Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous ...

  2. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing gram negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESBL)-producing Gram- negative bacteria (GNB), particularly in Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have increased all over the world. ESBLs are characterized by their ability to hydrolyze β-lactams, ...

  3. Dynamics of evanescent matter waves in negative-index media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamda, M; Bocvarski, V; Perales, F; Baudon, J; Dutier, G; Mainos, C; Boustimi, M; Ducloy, M, E-mail: jacques.baudon@univ-paris13.f [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, CNRS-UMR 7538, Universite Paris 13, 99 Av. J B Clement, 93430-Villetaneuse (France)

    2010-11-14

    Semi-evanescent and evanescent matter waves produced by an atom wave packet impinging on a repulsive barrier can be back-refracted and reconstructed by the application of negative-index 'comoving' potential pulses. One shows that those collapses and revivals generate a matter wave confined on both sides of the barrier border ('surface matter wave') and should be observable via the retardation of atom reflection from the barrier interface. This property, joined to the possibility recently demonstrated of inducing negative refraction of atom waves, makes such potentials a matter-wave counterpart of negative-index materials or 'meta materials' well known in light optics.

  4. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D

    2017-10-28

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from

  5. An organic record of terrestrial ecosystem collapse and recovery at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Grice, Kliti; Holman, Alexander; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2014-02-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem collapse at the end of the Triassic Period coincided with a major mass extinction in the marine realm and has been linked to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide, global warming, and fire activity. Extractable hydrocarbons in samples from the fluvial Triassic-Jurassic boundary section at Astartekløft, East Greenland were analyzed to investigate the molecular and isotopic organic record of biotic and environmental change during this event. Carbon isotopic compositions of individual plant wax lipids show a >4‰ negative excursion coinciding with peak extinction and a further decrease of 2‰ coinciding with peak pCO2 as estimated from the stomatal indices of fossil Gingkoales. An increase of ˜30‰ in the hydrogen isotopic compositions of the same plant wax lipids coincides with ecosystem collapse, suggesting that the biotic crisis was accompanied by strong hydrologic change. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons related to combustion also increase together with abrupt plant diversity loss and peak with fossil charcoal abundance and maximum plant turnover, supporting the role of fire in terrestrial extinctions. Anomalously high concentrations of a monoaromatic diterpenoid related to gymnosperm resin derivatives (and similar to dehydroabietane) occur uniquely in samples from the boundary bed, indicating that environmental stress factors leading to peak plant extinction stimulated increased resin production, and that plant resin derivatives may be effective biomarkers of terrestrial ecosystem stress.

  6. A History of Collapse Factor Modeling and Empirical Data for Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    deQuay, Laurence; Hodge, B. Keith

    2010-01-01

    One of the major technical problems associated with cryogenic liquid propellant systems used to supply rocket engines and their subassemblies and components is the phenomenon of propellant tank pressurant and ullage gas collapse. This collapse is mainly caused by heat transfer from ullage gas to tank walls and interfacing propellant, which are both at temperatures well below those of this gas. Mass transfer between ullage gas and cryogenic propellant can also occur and have minor to significant secondary effects that can increase or decrease ullage gas collapse. Pressurant gas is supplied into cryogenic propellant tanks in order to initially pressurize these tanks and then maintain required pressures as propellant is expelled from these tanks. The net effect of pressurant and ullage gas collapse is increased total mass and mass flow rate requirements of pressurant gases. For flight vehicles this leads to significant and undesirable weight penalties. For rocket engine component and subassembly ground test facilities this results in significantly increased facility hardware, construction, and operational costs. "Collapse Factor" is a parameter used to quantify the pressurant and ullage gas collapse. Accurate prediction of collapse factors, through analytical methods and modeling tools, and collection and evaluation of collapse factor data has evolved over the years since the start of space exploration programs in the 1950 s. Through the years, numerous documents have been published to preserve results of studies associated with the collapse factor phenomenon. This paper presents a summary and selected details of prior literature that document the aforementioned studies. Additionally other literature that present studies and results of heat and mass transfer processes, related to or providing important insights or analytical methods for the studies of collapse factor, are presented.

  7. Deepwater demersal fish community collapse in Lake Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, S.C.; Roseman, E.F.; Nichols, S.J.; O'Brien, T. P.; Kiley, C.S.; Schaeffer, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term fish community surveys were carried out in the Michigan waters of Lake Huron using bottom trawls from 1976 to 2006. Trends in abundance indices for common species (those caught in 10% or more of trawl tows) were estimated for two periods: early (1976-1991) and late (1994-2006). All common species significantly decreased in abundance during the late period with the exception of the johnny darter Etheostoma nigrum and spottail shiner Notropis hudsonius, which showed no significant trends, and the round goby Neogobius melanostomus, which increased in abundance. Percentage decreases in abundance indices between 1994-1995 and 2005-2006 ranged from 66.4% to 99.9%, and seven species decreased in abundance by more than 90%. The mean biomass of all common species in 2006 was the lowest observed in the time series and was less than 5% of that observed in the mid-1990s. The mean number of common species captured per trawl has also decreased since the mid-1990s. Several factors, including recent invasion of the lake by multiple exotic species, may have contributed to these declines, but insufficient published data are currently available to determine which factors are most important. Our observations suggest that significant changes have occurred in the ecology of Lake Huron since the mid-1990s. The extent of these changes indicates that the deepwater demersal fish community in Lake Huron is undergoing collapse.

  8. Gravitational collapse and entropy of Black Holes with magnetic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulacia Rey, A.

    2011-03-01

    This thesis is divided in two parts, each one addressing problems that can be relevant in the study of compact objects. The first part deals with the study of a magnetized and self-gravitating gas of degenerated fermions (electrons and neutrons) as sources of a Bianchi-I space-time. We solve numerically the Einstein-Maxwell field equations for a large set of initial conditions of the dynamical variables. The collapsing singularity is isotropic for the neutron gas and can be anisotropic for the electron gas. This result is consistent with the fact that electrons exhibit a stronger coupling with the magnetic field, which is the source of anisotropy in the dynamical variables. In the second part we calculate the entropy of extremal black holes in 4 and 5 dimensions, using the entropy function formalism of Sen and taking into account higher order derivative terms that come from the complete set of Riemann invariants. The resulting entropies show the deviations from the well know Bekenstein-Hawking area law.

  9. Protein Collapse is Encoded in the Folded State Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Himadri S; Hinczewski, Michael; Hori, Naoto; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Thirumalai, D

    2016-01-01

    Natural protein sequences that self-assemble to form globular structures are compact with high packing densities in the folded states. It is known that proteins unfold upon addition of denaturants, adopting random coil structures. The dependence of the radii of gyration on protein size in the folded and unfolded states obeys the same scaling laws as synthetic polymers. Thus, one might surmise that the mechanism of collapse in proteins and polymers ought to be similar. However, because the number of amino acids in single domain proteins is not significantly greater than about two hundred, it has not been resolved if the unfolded states of proteins are compact under conditions that favor the folded states - a problem at the heart of how proteins fold. By adopting a theory used to derive polymer-scaling laws, we find that the propensity for the unfolded state of a protein to be compact is universal and is encoded in the contact map of the folded state. Remarkably, analysis of over 2000 proteins shows that protei...

  10. The collapse of the material foundations of Westphalian International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Diniz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article corresponds to a diagnosis that affirms the collapse of the material foundations of coercive power, the hard constraints of any political direction that seeks to reform of international regulation. It takes the matter within the broad parameters associated with International Law derived from the Treaty of Westphalia, including some of its developments. The evolution of International Law is addressed through the perspective of Strategic Studies to show how the Westphalian order was consistent with then-current underlining strategic, tactical and logistical realities, and then proceeds to demonstrate how those underlining realities have changed. The contrast between current International Law and current strategic, tactical and logistical realities exposes the former as fundamentally at odds, with the latter, which is an untenable situation. Failure to directly address those inconsistencies in an intellectually sustained effort tends to perpetuate a state of affairs in which International Law will be redefined exclusively by the decisions of the powerful and the arbitrary rule of the stronger.

  11. Spontaneous collapse of the tibial plateau: radiological staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpintero, P.; Leon, F.; Zafra, M. [University Hospital ' ' Reina Sofia' ' , Orthopaedic Department, Cordoba (Spain); Montero, R.; Carreto, A. [University Hospital ' ' Reina Sofia' ' , Radiology Department, Cordoba (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    This paper proposes a radiological staging system for necrosis of the tibial plateau, similar to those already developed for the hip and the medial femoral condyle. We retrospectively studied the clinical case histories and radiographic findings of 14 patients (15 affected knees) with histologically proven osteonecrosis of the tibial plateau. Stage I was marked by normal radiograph, but increased uptake in bone scan and subchondral areas of abnormal marrow signal intensity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as reported in other osteonecrosis sites. Stage II was characterised by cystic and sclerotic changes, and stage III fracture of the medial rim of the medial tibial plateau and tibial plateau collapse were present. Stage IV was marked by joint narrowing. These changes appeared earlier and were more pronounced when there was genu varum/valgum or involvement of the lateral tibial plateau. The radiological evolution of the disease appears to follow a four-stage course over a period of roughly one year from the onset of symptoms. (orig.)

  12. Collapse of a marine mammal species driven by human impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Harkonen

    Full Text Available Understanding historical roles of species in ecosystems can be crucial for assessing long term human impacts on environments, providing context for management or restoration objectives, and making conservation evaluations of species status. In most cases limited historical abundance data impedes quantitative investigations, but harvested species may have long-term data accessible from hunting records. Here we make use of annual hunting records for Caspian seals (Pusa caspica dating back to the mid-19(th century, and current census data from aerial surveys, to reconstruct historical abundance using a hind-casting model. We estimate the minimum numbers of seals in 1867 to have been 1-1.6 million, but the population declined by at least 90% to around 100,000 individuals by 2005, primarily due to unsustainable hunting throughout the 20(th century. This collapse is part of a broader picture of catastrophic ecological change in the Caspian over the 20(th Century. Our results combined with fisheries data show that the current biomass of top predators in the Caspian is much reduced compared to historical conditions. The potential for the Caspian and other similar perturbed ecosystems to sustain natural resources of much greater biological and economic value than at present depends on the extent to which a number of anthropogenic impacts can be harnessed.

  13. Flooding Caused by the Collapse of the Zeyzoun Dam, Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    On Tuesday the Zeyzoun dam in northern Syria ruptured and collapsed, killing 20 people and leaving thousands more homeless. This false-color image taken on June 5, 2002, (bottom) by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite shows the extent of the flooding. Normally, there would be no water present in the center of the image (top, acquired on June 3, 2002). After the dam burst, 71 million cubic meters flowed onto the surrounding landscape and washed over an area of 20,000 acres. Hundreds of homes were destroyed in and around the villages of Zeyzoun, Qastoun, and Ziara, roughly 220 miles (350 kilometers) north of Damascus. Most of the residents fled to higher ground with the help of two helicopters. The Syrians originally constructed the dam to contain the Orontes River and provide a steady flow of water to the surrounding farms, many of which were lost. Rescue workers worry that more bodies may be found as the waters of the dam recede. The Japanese government issued more than $40,000 in aid for the victims, and the Syrian government is petitioning international aid agencies for further assistance. In this false-color image, the ground is sage green and rusty orange, and water is black. Clouds appear pink. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. Local collapse of gas pipelines under sleeve repairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otegui, J.L.; Urquiza, S.; Rivas, A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina). CONICET; Trunzo, A. [Transportadora de Gas del Norte (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Local collapse of the pipe wall under full encirclement sleeve reinforcements is associated with breaks and blow outs that cause large gas losses and abrupt depressurisation in gas pipelines. Although these defects do not represent an imminent risk of failure, they should be eliminated because they impede the normal passage of the instrumented pig for internal inspection. Four failed repairs were experimentally evaluated, and the effects of different geometric factors were numerically assessed via non-linear numerical modelling of fluid flow and pipe response. All possible causes of the appearance of these defects and measures to minimise their occurrence were evaluated. The position of the repaired portion with respect to the blow out, local geometry of the repair and previous defects, and the amount of gas caught in the interstice between the pipe and the reinforcement, have an important part in the event. The measures for the prevention of this problem involve the use of fillers and improved construction of repair sleeves. (author)

  15. Drought, agricultural adaptation, and sociopolitical collapse in the Maya Lowlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Peter M J; Pagani, Mark; Canuto, Marcello A; Brenner, Mark; Hodell, David A; Eglinton, Timothy I; Curtis, Jason H

    2015-05-05

    Paleoclimate records indicate a series of severe droughts was associated with societal collapse of the Classic Maya during the Terminal Classic period (∼800-950 C.E.). Evidence for drought largely derives from the drier, less populated northern Maya Lowlands but does not explain more pronounced and earlier societal disruption in the relatively humid southern Maya Lowlands. Here we apply hydrogen and carbon isotope compositions of plant wax lipids in two lake sediment cores to assess changes in water availability and land use in both the northern and southern Maya lowlands. We show that relatively more intense drying occurred in the southern lowlands than in the northern lowlands during the Terminal Classic period, consistent with earlier and more persistent societal decline in the south. Our results also indicate a period of substantial drying in the southern Maya Lowlands from ∼200 C.E. to 500 C.E., during the Terminal Preclassic and Early Classic periods. Plant wax carbon isotope records indicate a decline in C4 plants in both lake catchments during the Early Classic period, interpreted to reflect a shift from extensive agriculture to intensive, water-conservative maize cultivation that was motivated by a drying climate. Our results imply that agricultural adaptations developed in response to earlier droughts were initially successful, but failed under the more severe droughts of the Terminal Classic period.

  16. Eradicating catastrophic collapse in interdependent networks via reinforced nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xin; Hu, Yanqing; Stanley, H Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2017-03-28

    In interdependent networks, it is usually assumed, based on percolation theory, that nodes become nonfunctional if they lose connection to the network giant component. However, in reality, some nodes, equipped with alternative resources, together with their connected neighbors can still be functioning after disconnected from the giant component. Here, we propose and study a generalized percolation model that introduces a fraction of reinforced nodes in the interdependent networks that can function and support their neighborhood. We analyze, both analytically and via simulations, the order parameter-the functioning component-comprising both the giant component and smaller components that include at least one reinforced node. Remarkably, it is found that, for interdependent networks, we need to reinforce only a small fraction of nodes to prevent abrupt catastrophic collapses. Moreover, we find that the universal upper bound of this fraction is 0.1756 for two interdependent Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks: regular random (RR) networks and scale-free (SF) networks with large average degrees. We also generalize our theory to interdependent networks of networks (NONs). These findings might yield insight for designing resilient interdependent infrastructure networks.

  17. Radiative effects during the assembly of direct collapse black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Becerra, Fernando; Bromm, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2017-11-01

    We perform a post-processing radiative feedback analysis on a 3D ab initio cosmological simulation of an atomic cooling halo under the direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario. We maintain the spatial resolution of the simulation by incorporating native ray-tracing on unstructured mesh data, including Monte Carlo Lyman α (Ly α) radiative transfer. DCBHs are born in gas-rich, metal-poor environments with the possibility of Compton-thick conditions, NH ≳ 1024 cm-2. Therefore, the surrounding gas is capable of experiencing the full impact of the bottled-up radiation pressure. In particular, we find that multiple scattering of Ly α photons provides an important source of mechanical feedback after the gas in the sub-parsec region becomes partially ionized, avoiding the bottleneck of destruction via the two-photon emission mechanism. We provide detailed discussion of the simulation environment, expansion of the ionization front, emission and escape of Ly α radiation, and Compton scattering. A sink particle prescription allows us to extract approximate limits on the post-formation evolution of the radiative feedback. Fully coupled Ly α radiation hydrodynamics will be crucial to consider in future DCBH simulations.

  18. Dating Antarctic ice sheet collapse: Proposing a molecular genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugnell, Jan M.; Pedro, Joel B.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2018-01-01

    Sea levels at the end of this century are projected to be 0.26-0.98 m higher than today. The upper end of this range, and even higher estimates, cannot be ruled out because of major uncertainties in the dynamic response of polar ice sheets to a warming climate. Here, we propose an ecological genetics approach that can provide insight into the past stability and configuration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). We propose independent testing of the hypothesis that a trans-Antarctic seaway occurred at the last interglacial. Examination of the genomic signatures of bottom-dwelling marine species using the latest methods can provide an independent window into the integrity of the WAIS more than 100,000 years ago. Periods of connectivity facilitated by trans-Antarctic seaways could be revealed by dating coalescent events recorded in DNA. These methods allow alternative scenarios to be tested against a fit to genomic data. Ideal candidate taxa for this work would need to possess a circumpolar distribution, a benthic habitat, and some level of genetic structure indicated by phylogeographical investigation. The purpose of this perspective piece is to set out an ecological genetics method to help resolve when the West Antarctic Ice Shelf last collapsed.

  19. Collapsed two-dimensional polymers on a cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu Hsiao Ping

    2002-01-01

    Single partially confined collapsed polymers are studied in two dimensions. They are described by self-avoiding random walks with nearest-neighbour attractions below the THETA-point, on the surface of an infinitely long cylinder. For the simulations we employ the pruned-enriched-Rosenbluth method (PERM). The same model had previously been studied for free polymers (infinite lattice, no boundaries) and for polymers on finite lattices with periodic boundary conditions. We verify the previous estimates of bulk densities, bulk free energies and surface tensions. We find that the free energy of a polymer with fixed length N has, for N-> infinity, a minimum at a finite cylinder radius R* which diverges as T->T subtheta. Furthermore, the surface tension vanishes roughly as (T subtheta-T) supalpha for T->T subtheta with alpha approx 1.7. The density in the interior of a globule scales as (T subtheta - T) supbeta with beta approx 0.32 . (letter to the editor)

  20. A method for nanofluidic device prototyping using elastomeric collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-min; Huh, Yun Suk; Craighead, Harold G.; Erickson, David

    2009-01-01

    Nanofluidics represents a promising solution to problems in fields ranging from biomolecular analysis to optical property tuning. Recently a number of simple nanofluidic fabrication techniques have been introduced that exploit the deformability of elastomeric materials like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These techniques are limited by the complexity of the devices that can be fabricated, which can only create straight or irregular channels normal to the direction of an applied strain. Here, we report a technique for nanofluidic fabrication based on the controlled collapse of microchannel structures. As is demonstrated, this method converts the easy to control vertical dimension of a PDMS mold to the lateral dimension of a nanochannel. We demonstrate here the creation of complex nanochannel structures as small as 60 nm and provide simple design rules for determining the conditions under which nanochannel formation will occur. The applicability of the technique to biomolecular analysis is demonstrated by showing DNA elongation in a nanochannel and a technique for optofluidic surface enhanced Raman detection of nucleic acids. PMID:19717418

  1. Towards an S-matrix Description of Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, D; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Extending our previous results on trans-Planckian ($Gs \\gg \\hbar$) scattering of light particles in quantum string-gravity we present a calculation of the corresponding S-matrix from the region of large impact parameters ($b \\gg G\\sqrt{s}>\\lambda_s$) down to the regime where classical gravitational collapse is expected to occur. By solving the semiclassical equations of a previously introduced effective-action approximation, we find that the perturbative expansion around the leading eikonal result diverges at a critical value $b = b_c = O(G\\sqrt{s})$, signalling the onset of a new (black-hole related?) regime. We then discuss the main features of our explicitly unitary S-matrix -- and of the associated effective metric -- down to (and in the vicinity of) $b = b_c$, and present some ideas and results on its extension all the way to the $ b \\to 0$ region. We find that for $b

  2. Hemodynamic analysis in infants with late-onset circulatory collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Yosuke; Uchiyama, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Hidehiko; Totsu, Satsuki; Masumoto, Kenichi; Kusuda, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    Late-onset circulatory collapse (LCC) is a disorder in which blood pressure decreases and oliguria suddenly occurs in preterm infants who have survived the acute stage, leading to shock, without contributing underlying factors. In order to evaluate hemodynamic changes during LCC, the correlation between myocardial functions and organ blood flow was investigated with echography. Seven very-low-birthweight infants were given a diagnosis of LCC during the study period. Cardiovascular and organ flow parameters of the infants were recorded prospectively, once a week, and compared with eight control very-low-birthweight infants with matching gestational age. Echographic study was performed before LCC, at the onset of LCC, and after LCC among infants with LCC. A significant increase in ejection fraction and a significant decrease in end systolic wall stress were observed in infants with the LCC condition. At the same time, the mean blood flow velocity increased significantly in the superior mesenteric artery, while it decreased in the anterior cerebral artery. Systolic blood flow velocity increased and mean velocity was maintained in the renal artery during LCC. LCC is a distributive shock, characterized by a hyperdynamic state and decreased afterload. Echographic examination of organ flow during LCC is useful in understanding the pathophysiology of the disorder. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Medical image of the week: collapse of the trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruguri P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 61 year old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD requiring multiple intubations over the past 2 years as well as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA presented with acute dyspnea, cough and difficulty expectorating sputum over the last 24 hours. His physical exam was notable for expiratory and inspiratory wheezing. ABG revealed a pH of 7.24, PaCO2 of 71, PaO2 of 103, and HCO3 of 29 mMol consistent with an acute on chronic respiratory acidosis. In the Emergency Department, the patient was given multiple bronchodilators and eventually placed on BiPAP with gradual improvement. CT of the chest revealed the caliber of the trachea was narrowed greater than 50% during expiration (Figure 1B consistent with dynamic airway collapse of tracheobronchomalacia. This often overlooked condition may be related to past intubations or COPD with chronic bronchitis and is often misdiagnosed as COPD or treatment resistant asthma. Stents are often …

  4. Transition wave in the collapse of the San Saba bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eBrun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A domino wave is a well-known illustration of a transition wave, which appears to reach a stable regime of propagation. Nature also provides spectacular cases of gravity driven transition waves at large scale, observed in snow avalanches and landslides. On a different scale, the micro-structure level interaction between different constituents of the macro-system may influence critical regimes leading to instabilities in avalanche-like flow systems. Most transition waves observed in systems such as bulletproof vests, racing helmets under impact, shock-wave driven fracture in solids, are transient. For some structured waveguides a transition wave may stabilize to achieve a steady regime. Here we show that the failure of a long bridge is also driven by a transition wave that may allow for steady-state regimes. The recent observation of a failure of the San Saba Bridge in Texas provides experimental evidence supporting an elegant theory based on the notion of transition failure wave. No one would think of an analogy between a snow avalanche and a collapsing bridge. Despite an apparent controversy of such a comparison, these two phenomena can both be described in the framework of a model of the dynamic gravity driven transition fault.

  5. Idiopathic collapsing glomerulopathy: A clinicopathologic analysis of 30 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG is a distinct clinicopathologic entity associated with various infections, medications and acute ischemia. There have been few scattered reports of CG from India. This study aimed at evaluating the clinicopathologic features of idiopathic CG in Indian patients with comparison between adult-onset and childhood CG. This study included all cases of idiopathic CG diagnosed over a period of 4 years (2006-2009. Appropriate clinical details and laboratory findings were retrieved. Renal biopsies were reviewed and detailed pathologic features assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to compare various features between adult-onset and childhood CG. Over these 4 years, 30 cases of idiopathic CG were diagnosed. Of these, 11 were children. Childhood CG cases had longer duration of symptoms and lower serum urea and creatinine levels compared with adult patients. In renal histology, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis was frequent in our cases. Pediatric cases of CG showed a higher proportion of segmental glomerulosclerosis. On clinical follow-up, nine of the 30 patients progressed to end-stage renal disease and these included two pediatric patients. Idiopathic CG is a significant cause of renal dysfunction in both pediatric and adult patients. Childhood and adult-onset CG differ in few clinicopathologic features. Early and accurate diagnosis of CG is imperative for appropriate management of these patients.

  6. NEGATION AFFIXES IN ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Subandowo -

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This research entitled "Negation Affixes in English". This study is aimed to describe the various negation affixes in English, morphological process, morphophonemic and meaning. The research data were taken from various sources of English grammar book, morphology, research journal and the book which relatees to the research. English grammar books used in this study are written by Otto Jesperson, Marcella Frank, Greenbaum and Geoffrey Leech.  The method used in this research is the descriptive-qualitative method. While the data collection techniques are performed by using jot-down method. And the results of analysis are presented in tabular form and descriptive method. The result of the research shows that English has six types of negative affixes which are categorized by the intensity of its appearance, such as dis-, in-, non-, un-, anti- and -less. Based on the function, negation affixes are divided into several categories such as adjectives, nouns, verbs, and adverbs. The morphophonemic affix in- has four allomorphs, they are in-, im-, il- and ir- . While the analysis revealed that negation affixes have some basic meanings, such as ‘not’, ‘without’, and ‘anti’.

  7. REFLECTIONS ON WAGAR ' S WORLD PARTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Bergesen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Our task is to reflect upon Wagar's idea of a world party. In case such reflections are affected by the recent historical situation of the collapse of communism/existing socialism in 1989 and the implications this has for visions of progressive politics going into the 21st century. This event colors most political thinking, although for many the response has been that existing socialism was not real socialism, or that existing socialism was but the Stalinist deformation that, if avoided in the future, the 1917 project could again be resumed and human history and social relations remade anew. I don't see it that way. What existing socialism stood for in terms of the role of a vanguard party taking state power for the larger good is, now after the fall, I think off the board as a realistic program that can be sold to anyone.

  8. World coal outlook to the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of the World Coal Outlook to the Year 2000 examines the worldwide impact of lower oil prices and lower economic activity on the demand, production, and international trade in coal. The report includes detailed regional forecasts of coal demand by end-use application. Regions include the US, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Other Asia, Latin America, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, Communist Europe, and Communist Asia. In addition, regional coal production forecasts are provided with a detailed analysis of regional coal trade patterns. In all instances, the changes relative to Chase's previous forecasts are shown. Because of the current situation in the oil market, the report includes an analysis of the competitive position of coal relative to oil in the generation of electricity, and in industrial steam applications. The report concludes with an examination of the impact of an oil price collapse on the international markets for coal.

  9. Negative Ion Sources: Magnetron and Penning

    CERN Document Server

    Faircloth, D.C.

    2013-12-16

    The history of the magnetron and Penning electrode geometry is briefly outlined. Plasma generation by electrical discharge-driven electron impact ionization is described and the basic physics of plasma and electrodes relevant to magnetron and Penning discharges are explained. Negative ions and their applications are introduced, along with their production mechanisms. Caesium and surface production of negative ions are detailed. Technical details of how to build magnetron and Penning surface plasma sources are given, along with examples of specific sources from around the world. Failure modes are listed and lifetimes compared.

  10. Nedtrykt af negative nyheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Morten; Søberg, Pernille Frantz

    2016-01-01

    I adskillige år er det blevet debatteret, hvorvidt nyhedernes negative fokus har konsekvenser for borgerne, og om det i sid-ste ende får flere til at vende ryggen til nyhederne. Vores viden om effekterne af positive og negative nyheder er dog begrænset, og derfor undersøges det i denne artikel......, hvordan henholdsvis positive og negative tv-nyheder påvirker seernes humør, hukom-melse af information fra indslaget og lyst til at se yderligere tv-nyheder. Det gør vi i et survey-eksperiment (N=204), hvor tre grupper så enten et originalt indslag eller det samme indslag klippet med henholdsvis et...

  11. Challenges in fitting a hearing aid to a severely collapsed ear canal and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeding, Kristi; Valente, Michael; Chole, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Collapsed ear canals typically occur when an outside force, such as a headset for audiometric testing, is present. However, when a collapsed ear canal occurs without external pressure, this creates a challenge not only for performing audiometric testing but also for coupling a hearing aid to the ear canal. This case report highlights the challenges associated with fitting a hearing aid on a patient with a severe anterior-posterior collapsed ear canal with a mixed hearing loss. A 67-yr-old female originally presented to Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine in 1996 with a long-standing history of bilateral otosclerosis. She had chronic ear infections in the right ear and a severely collapsed ear canal in the left ear and was fit with a bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA®) on the right side in 2003. However, benefit from the BAHA started to decrease due to changes in hearing, and a different hearing solution was needed. It was proposed that a hearing aid be fit to her collapsed left ear canal; however, trying to couple a hearing aid to the collapsed ear canal required unique noncustom earmold solutions. This case study highlights some of the obstacles and potential solutions for coupling a hearing aid to a severely collapsed ear canal. American Academy of Audiology.

  12. Can agricultural groundwater economies collapse? An inquiry into the pathways of four groundwater economies under threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Olivier; Kuper, Marcel; López-Gunn, Elena; Rinaudo, Jean-Daniel; Daoudi, Ali; Lejars, Caroline

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the notion of collapse of agricultural groundwater economies using the adaptive-cycle analytical framework. This framework was applied to four case studies in southern Europe and North Africa to question and discuss the dynamics of agricultural groundwater economies. In two case studies (Saiss in Morocco and Clain basin in France), the imminent physical or socio-economic collapse was a major concern for stakeholders and the early signs of collapse led to re-organization of the groundwater economy. In the other two cases (Biskra in Algeria and Almeria in Spain), collapse was either not yet a concern or had been temporarily resolved through increased efficiency and access to additional water resources. This comparative analysis shows the importance of taking the early signs of collapse into account. These signs can be either related to resource depletion or to environmental and socio-economic impacts. Beyond these four case studies, the large number of groundwater economies under threat in (semi-)arid areas should present a warning regarding their possible collapse. Collapse can have severe and irreversible consequences in some cases, but it can also mean new opportunities and changes.

  13. Dynamic water patterns change the stability of the collapsed filter conformation of the KcsA K+ channel

    OpenAIRE

    Di Wu

    2017-01-01

    The selectivity filter of the KcsA K+ channel has two typical conformations-the conductive and the collapsed conformations, respectively. The transition from the conductive to the collapsed filter conformation can represent the process of inactivation that depends on many environmental factors. Water molecules permeating behind the filter can influence the collapsed filter stability. Here we perform the molecular dynamics simulations to study the stability of the collapsed filter of the KcsA ...

  14. The Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, John Sears

    1981-01-01

    Relates personal experiences about what constitutes the "real world." Shows how experiences from philosophy, history, literature, art, and the movies add meaning to "reality." Stresses a compromise of imagination and sensation to make the real world palatable. (RL)

  15. Schrodinger's rabbits the many worlds of quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Colin

    2004-01-01

    For the better part of a century, attempts to explain what was really going on in the quantum world seemed doomed to failure. But recent technological advances have made the question both practical and urgent. A brilliantly imaginative group of physicists at Oxford University have risen to the challenge. This is their story. At long last, there is a sensible way to think about quantum mechanics. The new view abolishes the need to believe in randomness, long-range spooky forces, or conscious observers with mysterious powers to collapse cats into a state of life or death. But the new understanding comes at a price: we must accept that we live in a multiverse wherein countless versions of reality unfold side-by-side. The philosophical and personal consequences of this are awe-inspiring. The new interpretation has allowed imaginative physicists to conceive of wonderful new technologies: measuring devices that effectively share information between worlds and computers that can borrow the power of other worlds to...

  16. Quantum paradoxes and the collapse of orthodox materialism basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Avchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Three quantum paradoxical experiments — (1 double-slit, (2 delayed choice, and (3 EPR paradox ones are considered. These experiments definitely indicate the inadequacy of the mate- rialist paradigm. The materialist doctrine can not describe, explain and predict phenomena and strangeness of quantum world, and the concept of matter is inconsistent at the quantum level. Doubtless, from the materialistic point of view, two propositions saying about that the physical properties of the system are in themselves, they are objective and independent of measurement (1\tand measurement (observation of one system does not affect the result of the measurement (observation of another system (2 are not verified by the recent experiments confirming so- called quantum non-locality or non-local realism. In relation to this, we have to doubt the truth of materialist ontology which denies the existence of transcendental objects or any extrasensory phenomena with certainty. There should be set boundaries for the materialist paradigm, beyond which it can not be accepted. The poliontichny paradigm that considers reality in potential and actual modes is proposed as an alternative world view embracing both material and quantum world. The unity of the world is not denied but it can be distinguished by two structural levels — two modes of reality evidencing the dual nature of the Universe.

  17. Political Conflicts, State Collapse and Ebola Virus Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone as case studies, this paper examines the political factors that enabled the outbreak and prevalence of Ebola virus in West Africa. The data are generated from Ibrahim Index of African Governance, Human Development Report, World Development Indicators, and Corruption ...

  18. Positive and negative emotional responses to work- related trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-10

    Oct 10, 2010 ... 1Department of Psychology,. Nelson Mandela. Metropolitan University, ... a negative impact on the quality of life and the psychological health of the nurse, as well as negative implications for patient care ... 'compassion satisfaction may be happiness with what one can do to make the world in which one ...

  19. Nation vs. region: tensions in Venezuela’s post-collapse party system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñaki SAGARZAZU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The collapse of the Venezuelan party system stirred controversy because it was considered one of the most consolidated political systems of Latin America. Several studies have analyzed the causes that contributed to this collapse. None, however, have studied the restructuring process that happened later. Through a study of all the electoral processes since 1958 this article shows the existence of tensions between forces that promote nationalization and regionalization strategies. With this analysis it’s possible to understand that partisan strategy has been essential in the nationalization/regionalization process of the different post-collapse parties.

  20. Collapse dynamics of liquid bridges investigated by time-varying magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan; Tsige; Zhang; Alexander; Taylor; Rosenblatt

    2000-01-10

    Using a novel technique that facilitates temporal control over the total body force on a liquid, an unexpected scaling relationship was discovered for the collapse time of a liquid bridge. A paramagnetic liquid was suspended between the tips of two collinear rods in a strong magnetic field gradient that was adjusted to compensate gravity. A sudden change of the magnet current, corresponding to a change of Bond number, resulted in a deformation and ultimate collapse of the liquid bridge. The collapse time was found to be independent of the bridge length when other parameters were held constant.