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Sample records for coli cell surface

  1. Programming controlled adhesion of E. coli to target surfaces, cells, and tumors with synthetic adhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Bodelón, Gustavo; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Cuesta, Angel M; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-04-17

    In this work we report synthetic adhesins (SAs) enabling the rational design of the adhesion properties of E. coli. SAs have a modular structure comprising a stable β-domain for outer membrane anchoring and surface-exposed immunoglobulin domains with high affinity and specificity that can be selected from large repertoires. SAs are constitutively and stably expressed in an E. coli strain lacking a conserved set of natural adhesins, directing a robust, fast, and specific adhesion of bacteria to target antigenic surfaces and cells. We demonstrate the functionality of SAs in vivo, showing that, compared to wild type E. coli, lower doses of engineered E. coli are sufficient to colonize solid tumors expressing an antigen recognized by the SA. In addition, lower levels of engineered bacteria were found in non-target tissues. Therefore, SAs provide stable and specific adhesion capabilities to E. coli against target surfaces of interest for diverse applications using live bacteria.

  2. Enhancing the stability of xylanase from Cellulomonas fimi by cell-surface display on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-P; Hwang, I-E; Lin, C-J; Wang, H-J; Tseng, C-P

    2012-03-01

    The cell-surface display of Cex, which encodes xylanase and exoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi, was constructed on Escherichia coli using PgsA as the anchor protein. Characterization of the cell-surface display of Cex was performed. PgsA was fused to the N-terminus of Cex and six histidines were utilized as spacers between the targeting and anchor proteins. Successful cell-surface display of Cex was demonstrated by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses on E. coli C41 (DE3). According to the time-course analysis, the xylanase activity of Cex was achieved at 49Ug(-1) dry cell weight after 12 h culture at 37°C. The optimal temperature and pH ranges of the cell-surface displayed protein with whole-cell were broader than the corresponding ranges of the purified form. Further determination of thermostability indicated that the half-life of cell-surface displayed Cex was 1·6 times longer than that of purified Cex at 60°C. We have successfully developed the cell-surface display of xylanase on E. coli. The cell-surface display can enhance the stability of xylanase against changes in temperature and has the potential of becoming a whole-cell biocatalyst for industrial applications, such as biobleaching of paper and production of renewable energy. The results demonstrated that the cell-surface display of xylanase embedded in the cell membrane is more stable than that of the purified enzyme. Thus, to improve the stability of heterologous proteins production, cell-surface display using the PgsA anchor protein as a tool can be considered in E. coli. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Stack, Andrew G; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-02-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) and corundum (α-Al(2)O(3)) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3±0.7nN to 0.8±0.4nN as hematite NPs increased from 26nm to 98nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recovery and Behaviour of Stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Rocket Leaf Surfaces Inoculated by Different Methods

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    ANAS A. AL-NABULSI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available E. coli O157:H7 is an emerging public health concern worldwide because of its low infectious dose and ability to survive under adverse conditions. Tests were conducted to determine the abilityof unstressed E. coli O157:H7 cells or those stressed by acid, cold, salt exposure or starvation to survive on the surfaces of rocket leaves after contamination by three methods (dip, spray or spot inoculation and following storage at 10 or 25ºC. E. coli O157:H7 numbers recovered from rocket leaves contaminated by the different techniques were in the order of dip > spot > spray inoculation.Numbers of stressed E. coli O157:H7 recovered after inoculation by all three methods increased significantly over 7d storage at 10 or 25ºC, while unstressed E. coli O157:H7 only grew following dip inoculation. Exposure to adverse environmental conditions may increase the risk of E. coli O157:H7 survival and spread on leafy green vegetables.

  5. Link between chemotactic response to Ni2+ and its adsorption onto the Escherichia coli cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, David; Borrok, M Jack; Fein, Jeremy B; Kiessling, Laura L

    2005-07-15

    Bacterial chemotaxis is of medical, biological, and geological significance. Despite its importance, current chemotaxis measurements fail to account for the speciation of the chemical effector and the protonation state of the bacterial surface. We hypothesize that adsorption of Ni2+ onto the surface of Escherichia coli can influence its effective concentration and therefore influence its ability to induce a repellent response. By measuring repellent response at different pH values, the influence of Ni2+ adsorption on chemotaxis was assessed. In addition, we tested the effect of different Ni2+ chelating agents. Our data indicate that adsorption reactions influence the chemotactic response to Ni2+. We use potentiometric titration and Ni2+ adsorption experiments to develop and constrain a thermodynamic model capable of quantifying the concentration of Ni2+ at the bacteria/solution interface. Results from this model predict that the concentration of adsorbed Ni2+ is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the chemotactic response in E. coli. If adsorption is linked to chemotaxis in other cases, then chemotactic responses in realistic settings depend on a number of environmental factors such as pH, competing binding agents (e.g., aqueous organic acids, natural organic matter, mineral surfaces, etc.), and ionic strength. Our modeling approach quantifies adsorbed species on bacterial surfaces and may be used to predict the responses of different species to a variety of chemoeffectors. Our data suggest that specified changes in environmental conditions can be used to tune chemotactic responses in natural biological and geological settings.

  6. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

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    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  7. Selection of single domain antibodies from immune libraries displayed on the surface of E. coli cells with two β-domains of opposite topologies.

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    Valencio Salema

    Full Text Available Screening of antibody (Ab libraries by direct display on the surface of E. coli cells is hampered by the presence of the outer membrane (OM. In this work we demonstrate that the native β-domains of EhaA autotransporter and intimin, two proteins from enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC with opposite topologies in the OM, are effective systems for the display of immune libraries of single domain Abs (sdAbs from camelids (nanobodies or VHH on the surface of E. coli K-12 cells and for the selection of high affinity sdAbs using magnetic cell sorting (MACS. We analyzed the capacity of EhaA and intimin β-domains to display individual sdAbs and sdAb libraries obtained after immunization with the extracellular domain of the translocated intimin receptor from EHEC (TirM(EHEC. We demonstrated that both systems displayed functional sdAbs on the surface of E. coli cells with little proteolysis and cellular toxicity, although E. coli cells displaying sdAbs with the β-domain of intimin showed higher antigen-binding capacity. Both E. coli display libraries were screened for TirM(EHEC binding clones by MACS. High affinity binders were selected by both display systems, although more efficiently with the intimin β-domain. The specificity of the selected clones against TirM(EHEC was demonstrated by flow cytometry of E. coli cells, along with ELISA and surface plasmon resonance with purified sdAbs. Finally, we employed the E. coli cell display systems to provide an estimation of the affinity of the selected sdAb by flow cytometry analysis under equilibrium conditions.

  8. Bacterial surface appendages strongly impact nanomechanical and electrokinetic properties of Escherichia coli cells subjected to osmotic stress.

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    Grégory Francius

    Full Text Available The physicochemical properties and dynamics of bacterial envelope, play a major role in bacterial activity. In this study, the morphological, nanomechanical and electrohydrodynamic properties of Escherichia coli K-12 mutant cells were thoroughly investigated as a function of bulk medium ionic strength using atomic force microscopy (AFM and electrokinetics (electrophoresis. Bacteria were differing according to genetic alterations controlling the production of different surface appendages (short and rigid Ag43 adhesins, longer and more flexible type 1 fimbriae and F pilus. From the analysis of the spatially resolved force curves, it is shown that cells elasticity and turgor pressure are not only depending on bulk salt concentration but also on the presence/absence and nature of surface appendage. In 1 mM KNO(3, cells without appendages or cells surrounded by Ag43 exhibit large Young moduli and turgor pressures (∼700-900 kPa and ∼100-300 kPa respectively. Under similar ionic strength condition, a dramatic ∼50% to ∼70% decrease of these nanomechanical parameters was evidenced for cells with appendages. Qualitatively, such dependence of nanomechanical behavior on surface organization remains when increasing medium salt content to 100 mM, even though, quantitatively, differences are marked to a much smaller extent. Additionally, for a given surface appendage, the magnitude of the nanomechanical parameters decreases significantly when increasing bulk salt concentration. This effect is ascribed to a bacterial exoosmotic water loss resulting in a combined contraction of bacterial cytoplasm together with an electrostatically-driven shrinkage of the surface appendages. The former process is demonstrated upon AFM analysis, while the latter, inaccessible upon AFM imaging, is inferred from electrophoretic data interpreted according to advanced soft particle electrokinetic theory. Altogether, AFM and electrokinetic results clearly demonstrate the

  9. Export of functional Streptomyces coelicolor alditol oxidase to the periplasm or cell surface of Escherichia coli and its application in whole-cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bloois, Edwin; Winter, Remko T; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2009-06-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) alditol oxidase (AldO) is a soluble monomeric flavoprotein in which the flavin cofactor is covalently linked to the polypeptide chain. AldO displays high reactivity towards different polyols such as xylitol and sorbitol. These characteristics make AldO industrially relevant, but full biotechnological exploitation of this enzyme is at present restricted by laborious and costly purification steps. To eliminate the need for enzyme purification, this study describes a whole-cell AldO biocatalyst system. To this end, we have directed AldO to the periplasm or cell surface of Escherichia coli. For periplasmic export, AldO was fused to endogenous E. coli signal sequences known to direct their passenger proteins into the SecB, signal recognition particle (SRP), or Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. In addition, AldO was fused to an ice nucleation protein (INP)-based anchoring motif for surface display. The results show that Tat-exported AldO and INP-surface-displayed AldO are active. The Tat-based system was successfully employed in converting xylitol by whole cells, whereas the use of the INP-based system was most likely restricted by lipopolysaccharide LPS in wild-type cells. It is anticipated that these whole-cell systems will be a valuable tool for further biological and industrial exploitation of AldO and other cofactor-containing enzymes.

  10. Exposure to Sub-lethal 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Arrests Cell Division and Alters Cell Surface Properties in Escherichia coli

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    Bhat, Supriya V.; Kamencic, Belma; Körnig, André; Shahina, Zinnat; Dahms, Tanya E. S.

    2018-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a robust, easily adaptable and culturable bacterium in vitro, and a model bacterium for studying the impact of xenobiotics in the environment. We have used correlative atomic force – laser scanning confocal microscopy (AFM-LSCM) to characterize the mechanisms of cellular response to the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). One of the most extensively used herbicides world-wide, 2,4-D is known to cause hazardous effects in diverse non-target organisms. Sub-lethal concentrations of 2,4-D caused DNA damage in E. coli WM1074 during short exposure periods which increased significantly over time. In response to 2,4-D, FtsZ and FtsA relocalized within seconds, coinciding with the complete inhibition of cell septation and cell elongation. Exposure to 2,4-D also resulted in increased activation of the SOS response. Changes to cell division were accompanied by concomitant changes to surface roughness, elasticity and adhesion in a time-dependent manner. This is the first study describing the mechanistic details of 2,4-D at sub-lethal levels in bacteria. Our study suggests that 2,4-D arrests E. coli cell division within seconds after exposure by disrupting the divisome complex, facilitated by dissipation of membrane potential. Over longer exposures, 2,4-D causes filamentation as a result of an SOS response to oxidative stress induced DNA damage. PMID:29472899

  11. A kit for the investigation of live Escherichia coli cell adhesion to glycosylated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, M.; Horst, A. K.; Klemm, Per

    2010-01-01

    A combination of microtiter plate functionalization techniques and two facile bacterial adhesion inhibition assays form a flexible toolbox for the investigation of bacterial adhesion mechanisms on glycosylated surfaces.......A combination of microtiter plate functionalization techniques and two facile bacterial adhesion inhibition assays form a flexible toolbox for the investigation of bacterial adhesion mechanisms on glycosylated surfaces....

  12. Real-time sensing of enteropathogenic E. coli-induced effects on epithelial host cell height, cell-substrate interactions, and endocytic processes by infrared surface plasmon spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Yashunsky

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC is an important, generally non-invasive, bacterial pathogen that causes diarrhea in humans. The microbe infects mainly the enterocytes of the small intestine. Here we have applied our newly developed infrared surface plasmon resonance (IR-SPR spectroscopy approach to study how EPEC infection affects epithelial host cells. The IR-SPR experiments showed that EPEC infection results in a robust reduction in the refractive index of the infected cells. Assisted by confocal and total internal reflection microscopy, we discovered that the microbe dilates the intercellular gaps and induces the appearance of fluid-phase-filled pinocytic vesicles in the lower basolateral regions of the host epithelial cells. Partial cell detachment from the underlying substratum was also observed. Finally, the waveguide mode observed by our IR-SPR analyses showed that EPEC infection decreases the host cell's height to some extent. Together, these observations reveal novel impacts of the pathogen on the host cell architecture and endocytic functions. We suggest that these changes may induce the infiltration of a watery environment into the host cell, and potentially lead to failure of the epithelium barrier functions. Our findings also indicate the great potential of the label-free IR-SPR approach to study the dynamics of host-pathogen interactions with high spatiotemporal sensitivity.

  13. Plasmid DNA binds to the core oligosaccharide domain of LPS molecules of E. coli cell surface in the CaCl2-mediated transformation process.

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    Panja, Subrata; Aich, Pulakesh; Jana, Bimal; Basu, Tarakdas

    2008-09-01

    In the standard procedure for artificial transformation of E. coli by plasmid DNA, cellular competence for DNA uptake is developed by suspending the cells in ice-cold CaCl2 (50-100 mM). It is believed that CaCl2 helps DNA adsorption to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules on E. coli cell surface; however, the binding mechanism is mostly obscure. In this report, we present our findings of an in-depth study on in vitro interaction between plasmid DNA and E. coli LPS, using different techniques like absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, electron and atomic force microscopy, and so on. The results suggest that the Ca(II) ions, forming coordination complexes with the phosphates of DNA and LPS, facilitate the binding between them. The binding interaction appears to be cooperative, reversible, exothermic, and enthalpy-driven in nature. Binding of LPS causes a partial transition of DNA from B- to A-form. Finer study with the hydrolyzed products of LPS shows that only the core oligosaccharide domain of LPS is responsible for the interaction with DNA. Moreover, the biological significance of this interaction becomes evident from the observation that E. coli cells, from which the LPS have been leached out considerably, show higher efficiency of transformation, when transformed with plasmid-LPS complex rather than plasmid DNA alone.

  14. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC.

  15. Cell surface acid-base properties of Escherichia coli and Bacillus brevis and variation as a function of growth phase, nitrogen source and C:N ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2006-07-01

    Potentiometric titration has been conducted to systematically examine the acid-base properties of the cell surfaces of Escherichia coli K-12 and Bacillus brevis as a function of growth phase, nitrogen source (ammonium or nitrate), and carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio of the growth substrate. The two bacterial species revealed four distinct proton binding sites, with pK(a) values in the range of 3.08-4.05 (pK(1)), 4.62-5.57 (pK(2)), 6.47-7.30 (pK(3)), and 9.68-10.89 (pK(4)) corresponding to phosphoric/carboxylic, carboxylic, phosphoric, and hydroxyl/amine groups, respectively. Two general observations in the data are that for B. brevis the first site concentration (N(1)), corresponding to phosphoric/carboxylic groups (pK(1)), varied as a function of nitrogen source, while for E. coli the fourth site concentration (N(4)), corresponding to hydroxyl/amine groups (pK(4)), varied as a function of C:N ratio. Correspondingly, it was found that N(1) was the highest of the four site concentrations for B. brevis and N(4) was the highest for E. coli. The concentrations of the remaining sites showed little variation. Finally, comparison between the titration data and a number of cell surface compositional studies in the literature indicates one distinct difference between the two bacteria is that pK(4) of the Gram-negative E. coli can be attributed to hydroxyl groups while that of the Gram-positive B. brevis can be attributed to amine groups.

  16. Single cell imprinting on the surface of Ag-ZnO bimetallic nanoparticle modified graphene oxide sheets for targeted detection, removal and photothermal killing of E. Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ekta; Patra, Santanu; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2017-03-15

    A very cost-effective, fast, sensitive and specific imprinted polymer modified electrochemical sensor for the targeted detection, removal and destruction of Escherichia coli bacteria was developed onto the surface of Ag-ZnO bimetallic nanoparticle and graphene oxide nanocomposite. The nanocomposite played a dual role in this work, as a platform for imprinting of bacteria as well as a participated in their laser-light induced photo killing. In terms of sensing, our proposed sensor can detect E. Coli as few as 10CFUmL -1 and capture 98% of bacterial cells from their very high concentrated solution (10 5 CFUmL -1 ). Similarly to the quantitative detection, we have also investigated the quantitative destruction of E. Coli and found that 16.0cm 2 area of polymer modified glass plate is sufficient enough to kill 10 5 CFUmL -1 in the small time span of 5 minutes. The obtained results suggest that our proposed sensor have potential to serve as a promising candidate for specific and quantitative detection, removal as well as the destruction of a variety of bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane stabilization while

  18. A bioluminescence ATP assay for estimating surface hydrophobicity and membrane damage of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatments, a non-thermal process have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (AJ, pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale ...

  19. Escherichia coli Surface Characters of Ettawah Cross Breed Goats Milk on the Adhession Ability of Mammary Epithelial Cells

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    Lalita Prasiddhanti

    2015-11-01

    thin polysaccharide capsule, positive hemagglutination , and hydrophobic, which had the ability to stick more on the udder epithelial cells after birth. Meanwhile, those with mucoid surface characters, had a thick polysaccharide capsule, negative hemagglutination, and hydrophilic which had a lower adhesion ability.

  20. Validation of inhibitors of an ABC transporter required to transport lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David J.; Okuda, Suguru; Denny, William A.; Kahne, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria creates a permeability barrier that prevents the entry of most currently available antibiotics. The seven lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) proteins involved in transporting and assembling this glycolipid are essential for growth and division in Escherichia coli; therefore, inhibiting their functions leads to cell death. LptB, the ATPase that provides energy for LPS transport and assembly, forms a complex with three other inner membrane (IM) components, LptC, F, and G. We demonstrate that inhibitors of pure LptB can also inhibit the full IM complex, LptBFGC, purified in detergent. We also compare inhibition of LptB and the LptBFGC complex with the antibiotic activity of these compounds. Our long-term goal is to develop tools to study inhibitors of LPS biogenesis that could serve as potentiators by disrupting the OM permeability barrier, facilitating entry of clinically used antibiotics not normally used to treat Gram-negative infections, or that can serve as antibiotics themselves. PMID:23665139

  1. In vitro and in vivo uptake study of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts: cell-based delivery system to target ocular surface diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Elisabeth; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Belij, Sandra; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Stojanovic, Marijana; Najdenski, Hristo; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2013-09-24

    For the successful topical administration of drugs or vaccines to treat ocular surface diseases, efficient and well-tolerated delivery systems/carriers for conjunctival delivery are crucial in the development of new treatment strategies. The present study investigated the efficiency of internalization of bacterial ghosts (BGs) produced from probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) by human conjunctival epithelial (HCjE) cell line, the EcN BGs cytotoxicity for HCjE cells, and in vivo uptake of EcN BGs by conjunctival guinea pig epithelial cells. The uptake of EcN BGs by HCjE cells was analyzed by laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize the EcN BGs in the guinea pig conjunctival tissue. Cytotoxicity of EcN BGs on HCjE cells was evaluated by measurement of LDH. Laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that EcN BGs internalization by HCjE cells was time- and dose dependent. No cytotoxic effect on HCjE cells was observed after EcN BGs inoculation for 30 and 120 minutes, as well as 24 hours. In addition, the uptake of EcN BGs was detected in the conjunctival cells after in vivo administration of EcN BGs into the eye of the guinea pig. The findings that EcN BGs are nontoxic and effectively internalized in vitro by human and in vivo by guinea pig conjunctival cells comprise an important contribution to the future use of BGs as a system for conjunctival delivery of drugs and vaccines, either to treat or prevent ocular surface diseases.

  2. The oxygen effect in E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasnik, M.N.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Sokolov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    In experiments on E. coli strains deficient in some stages of DNA repair from radiation damages, it was demonstrated that the value of the oxygen effect, under optimal conditions for manifestation thereof, decreases in the following order: E. coli WP2 (the wild type) → E. coli WP2 exr - and E. coli B → E. coli WP2 uvr A6 → E. coli WP2 rec Al and E. coli WP2 hcr - exr - . It was detected that 0.14 M NaCl solution sensitizes the anoxic cells of some E. coli strains to the effect of γ-radiation. It was established that mutation of the uvr A-gene increases sharply the sensitivity of cells to iradiation under the anoxic conditions in the presence of NaCl, the reverse'' oxygen effect being observed

  3. High-sensitivity detection of newly induced LamB protein on the Escherichia coli cell surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Vos-Scheperkeuter, G H; Hofnung, M; Witholt, B

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of the appearance at the cell surface of the outer membrane LamB protein after induction were determined by using specific antibodies and radioiodinated protein A as a probe. This was done in two different induction systems. First, LamB protein was induced in a wild-type strain by the simultaneous addition of cyclic AMP and maltose. Second, an operon fusion strain in which the lamB gene is expressed under lac promoter control was used; in this system, LamB protein can be induced ...

  4. Impact of cranberry on Escherichia coli cellular surface characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Brandy J.; Lin Baochuan; Dinderman, Michael A.; Rubin, Robert A.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-adhesive effects of cranberry have been attributed to both interactions of its components with the surface of bacterial cells and to inhibition of p-fimbriae expression. Previous reports also suggested that the presence of cranberry juice changed the Gram stain characteristics of Escherichia coli. Here, we show that the morphology of E. coli is changed when grown in the presence of juice or extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry). Gene expression analysis indicates the down regulation of flagellar basal body rod and motor proteins. Consistent with this finding and previous reports, the SEM images indicate a decrease in the visible p-fimbriae. The iodine used in Gram-staining protocols was found to interact differently with the bacterial membrane when cells were cultured in spiked media. Slight alterations in the Gram stain protocol demonstrated that culturing in the presence of cranberry juice does not change the Gram stain characteristics contradicting other reports.

  5. The upper surface of an Escherichia coli swarm is stationary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongjing; Turner, Linda; Berg, Howard C

    2010-01-05

    When grown in a rich medium on agar, many bacteria elongate, produce more flagella, and swim in a thin film of fluid over the agar surface in swirling packs. Cells that spread in this way are said to swarm. The agar is a solid gel, with pores smaller than the bacteria, so the swarm/agar interface is fixed. Here we show, in experiments with Escherichia coli, that the swarm/air interface also is fixed. We deposited MgO smoke particles on the top surface of an E. coli swarm near its advancing edge, where cells move in a single layer, and then followed the motion of the particles by dark-field microscopy and the motion of the underlying cells by phase-contrast microscopy. Remarkably, the smoke particles remained fixed (diffusing only a few micrometers) while the swarming cells streamed past underneath. The diffusion coefficients of the smoke particles were smaller over the virgin agar ahead of the swarm than over the swarm itself. Changes between these two modes of behavior were evident within 10-20 microm of the swarm edge, indicating an increase in depth of the fluid in advance of the swarm. The only plausible way that the swarm/air interface can be fixed is that it is covered by a surfactant monolayer pinned at its edges. When a swarm is exposed to air, such a monolayer can markedly reduce water loss. When cells invade tissue, the ability to move rapidly between closely opposed fixed surfaces is a useful trait.

  6. Autodisplay of an archaeal γ-lactamase on the cell surface of Escherichia coli using Xcc_Est as an anchoring scaffold and its application for preparation of the enantiopure antiviral drug intermediate (-) vince lactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Zhao, Guogang; Zhang, Zhiwei; Liang, Qiulin; Min, Cong; Wu, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    At present, autotransporter protein mediated surface display has opened a new dimension in the development of whole-cell biocatalysts. Here, we report the identification of a novel autotransporter Xcc_Est from Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris 8004 by bioinformatic analysis and application of Xcc_Est as an anchoring motif for surface display of γ-lactamase (Gla) from thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 in Escherichia coli. The localization of γ-lactamase in the cell envelope was monitored by Western blot, activity assay and flow cytometry analysis. Either the full-length or truncated Xcc_Est could efficiently transport γ-lactamase to the cell surface. Compared with the free enzyme, the displayed γ-lactamase exhibited optimum temperature of 30 °C other than 90 °C, with a substantial decrease of 60 °C. Under the preparation system, the engineered E. coli with autodisplayed γ-lactamase converted 100 g racemic vince lactam to produce 49.2 g (-) vince lactam at 30 °C within 4 h. By using chiral HPLC, the ee value of the produced (-) vince lactam was determined to be 99.5 %. The whole-cell biocatalyst exhibited excellent stability under the operational conditions. Our results indicate that the E. coli with surface displayed γ-lactamase is an efficient and economical whole cell biocatalyst for preparing the antiviral drug intermediate (-) vince lactam at mild temperature, eliminating expensive energy cost performed at high temperature.

  7. E. coli Surface Properties Differ between Stream Water and Sediment Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism in fresh water has led to numerous studies focusing on cell properties and transport behavior. However, previous studies have been unable to assess if differences in E. coli cell surface properties and genomic variation are associated with different environmental habitats. In this study, we investigated the variation in characteristics of E. coli obtained from stream water and stream bottom sediments. Cell properties were measured for 77 genomically different E. coli strains (44 strains isolated from sediments and 33 strains isolated from water under common stream conditions in the Upper Midwestern United States: pH 8.0, ionic strength 10mM and 22˚C. Measured cell properties include hydrophobicity, zeta potential, net charge, total acidity and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS composition. Our results indicate that stream sediment E. coli had significantly greater hydrophobicity, greater EPS protein content and EPS sugar content, less negative net charge, and higher point of zero charge than stream water E. coli. A significant positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and EPS protein for stream sediment E. coli but not for stream water E. coli. Additionally, E. coli surviving in the same habitat tended to have significantly larger (GTG5 genome similarity. After accounting for the intrinsic impact from the genome, environmental habitat was determined to be a factor influencing some cell surface properties, such as hydrophobicity. The diversity of cell properties and its resulting impact on particle interactions should be considered for environmental fate and transport modeling of aquatic indicator organisms such as E. coli.

  8. E. coli Surface Properties Differ between Stream Water and Sediment Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Liao, Chunyu; Thompson, Michael L; Soupir, Michelle L; Jarboe, Laura R; Dixon, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism in fresh water has led to numerous studies focusing on cell properties and transport behavior. However, previous studies have been unable to assess if differences in E. coli cell surface properties and genomic variation are associated with different environmental habitats. In this study, we investigated the variation in characteristics of E. coli obtained from stream water and stream bottom sediments. Cell properties were measured for 77 genomically different E. coli strains (44 strains isolated from sediments and 33 strains isolated from water) under common stream conditions in the Upper Midwestern United States: pH 8.0, ionic strength 10 mM and 22°C. Measured cell properties include hydrophobicity, zeta potential, net charge, total acidity, and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition. Our results indicate that stream sediment E. coli had significantly greater hydrophobicity, greater EPS protein content and EPS sugar content, less negative net charge, and higher point of zero charge than stream water E. coli . A significant positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and EPS protein for stream sediment E. coli but not for stream water E. coli . Additionally, E. coli surviving in the same habitat tended to have significantly larger (GTG) 5 genome similarity. After accounting for the intrinsic impact from the genome, environmental habitat was determined to be a factor influencing some cell surface properties, such as hydrophobicity. The diversity of cell properties and its resulting impact on particle interactions should be considered for environmental fate and transport modeling of aquatic indicator organisms such as E. coli .

  9. A Whole-Cell Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on a Leucine Auxotroph of Escherichia coli Displaying a Gold-Binding Protein: Usefulness for Diagnosis of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Min-Ah; Park, Jung Hun; Cho, Daeyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2016-03-01

    We developed a whole-cell surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a leucine auxotroph of Escherichia coli displaying a gold-binding protein (GBP) in response to cell growth and applied this sensor to the diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease, which is represented by the elevated leucine level in blood. The leucine auxotroph was genetically engineered to grow displaying GBP in a proportion to the concentration of target amino acid leucine. The GBP expressed on the surface of the auxotrophs directly bound to the golden surface of an SPR chip without the need for any additional treatment or reagents, which consequently produced SPR signals used to determine leucine levels in a test sample. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were further applied to the SPR system, which significantly enhanced the signal intensity up to 10-fold by specifically binding to GBP expressed on the cell surface. Finally, the diagnostic utility of our system was demonstrated by its employment in reliably determining different statuses of maple syrup urine disease based on a known cutoff level of leucine. This new approach based on an amino acid-auxotrophic E. coli strain expressing a GBP that binds to an SPR sensor holds great promise for detection of other metabolic diseases of newborn babies including homocystinuria and phenylketonuria, which are also associated with abnormal levels of amino acids.

  10. Visible light responsive photocatalyst induces progressive and apical-terminus preferential damages on Escherichia coli surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Wen Liou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent research shows that visible-light responsive photocatalysts have potential usage in antimicrobial applications. However, the dynamic changes in the damage to photocatalyzed bacteria remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Facilitated by atomic force microscopy, this study analyzes the visible-light driven photocatalyst-mediated damage of Escherichia coli. Results show that antibacterial properties are associated with the appearance of hole-like structures on the bacteria surfaces. Unexpectedly, these hole-like structures were preferentially induced at the apical terminus of rod shaped E. coli cells. Differentiating the damages into various levels and analyzing the percentage of damage to the cells showed that photocatalysis was likely to elicit sequential damages in E. coli cells. The process began with changing the surface properties on bacterial cells, as indicated in surface roughness measurements using atomic force microscopy, and holes then formed at the apical terminus of the cells. The holes were then subsequently enlarged until the cells were totally transformed into a flattened shape. Parallel experiments indicated that photocatalysis-induced bacterial protein leakage is associated with the progression of hole-like damages, further suggesting pore formation. Control experiments using ultraviolet light responsive titanium-dioxide substrates also obtained similar observations, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon of E. coli in response to photocatalysis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The photocatalysis-mediated localization-preferential damage to E. coli cells reveals the weak points of the bacteria. This might facilitate the investigation of antibacterial mechanism of the photocatalysis.

  11. Visible Light Responsive Photocatalyst Induces Progressive and Apical-Terminus Preferential Damages on Escherichia coli Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Je-Wen; Gu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yen-Kai; Chen, Wen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Hung, Yu-Jiun; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent research shows that visible-light responsive photocatalysts have potential usage in antimicrobial applications. However, the dynamic changes in the damage to photocatalyzed bacteria remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Facilitated by atomic force microscopy, this study analyzes the visible-light driven photocatalyst-mediated damage of Escherichia coli. Results show that antibacterial properties are associated with the appearance of hole-like structures on the bacteria surfaces. Unexpectedly, these hole-like structures were preferentially induced at the apical terminus of rod shaped E. coli cells. Differentiating the damages into various levels and analyzing the percentage of damage to the cells showed that photocatalysis was likely to elicit sequential damages in E. coli cells. The process began with changing the surface properties on bacterial cells, as indicated in surface roughness measurements using atomic force microscopy, and holes then formed at the apical terminus of the cells. The holes were then subsequently enlarged until the cells were totally transformed into a flattened shape. Parallel experiments indicated that photocatalysis-induced bacterial protein leakage is associated with the progression of hole-like damages, further suggesting pore formation. Control experiments using ultraviolet light responsive titanium-dioxide substrates also obtained similar observations, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon of E. coli in response to photocatalysis. Conclusion/Significance The photocatalysis-mediated localization-preferential damage to E. coli cells reveals the weak points of the bacteria. This might facilitate the investigation of antibacterial mechanism of the photocatalysis. PMID:21589873

  12. Biofouling on polymeric heat exchanger surfaces with E. coli and native biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, S; Madzgalla, M; Manz, W; Bart, H J

    2015-01-01

    The biofouling affinity of different polymeric surfaces (polypropylene, polysulfone, polyethylene terephthalate, and polyether ether ketone) in comparison to stainless steel (SS) was studied for the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12 DSM 498 and native biofilms originating from Rhine water. The biofilm mass deposited on the polymer surfaces was minimized by several magnitudes compared to SS. The cell count and the accumulated biomass of E. coli on the polymer surfaces showed an opposing linear trend. The promising low biofilm formation on the polymers is attributed to the combination of inherent surface properties (roughness, surface energy and hydrophobicity) when compared to SS. The fouling characteristics of E. coli biofilms show good conformity with the more complex native biofilms investigated. The results can be utilized for the development of new polymer heat exchangers when using untreated river water as coolant or for other processes needing antifouling materials.

  13. Immunogenicity of a fusion protein comprising coli surface antigen 3 and labile B subunit of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alerasol, Masoome; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Nazarian, Shahram; Bagheri, Samane

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the major causes of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Colonization factors and enterotoxins are the major virulence factors in ETEC pathogenesis. For the broad-spectrum protection against ETEC, one could focus on colonization factors and non-toxic heat labile as a vaccine candidate. A fusion protein is composed of a major fimbrial subunit of coli surface antigen 3, and the heat-labile B subunit (LTB) was constructed as a chimeric immunogen. For optimum level expression of protein, the gene was synthesized with codon bias of E. coli. Also, recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21DE3. ELISA and Western tests were carried out for determination of antigen and specificity of antibody raised against recombinant protein in animals. The anti-toxicity and anti-adherence properties of the immune sera against ETEC were also evaluated. Immunological analyses showed the production of high titer of specific antibody in immunized mice. The built-in LTB retains native toxin properties which were approved by GM1 binding assay. Pre-treatment of the ETEC cells with anti-sera significantly decreased their adhesion to Caco-2 cells. The results indicated the efficacy of the recombinant chimeric protein as an effective immunogen inducing strong humoral response. The designated chimer would be an interesting prototype for a vaccine and worthy of further investigation.

  14. Effectiveness of sanitizing agents in inactivating Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922 in food cutting board surfaces. Removal E. coli using different sanitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CEZAR AUGUSTO BELTRAME

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate Escherichia coli adhesion on new and used polyethylene cutting board surface and evaluate it’s removal using different sanitizer (peracetic acid,chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite and organic acids. Results indicated that the number of adherent cells increased with time in both surfaces evaluated. Evaluating the sanitizer action, 0.5%peracetic acid was more effective in removal E. coli than chlorhexidine and organic acids at same concentration in both surfaces. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite also showed effectiveness at concentrations of 0.2% and 0.5% on new surfaces, respectively. 0.8% of chlorhexidine and 2.0% of organic acids showed similar effectiveness in the removal E. coli on new and used surfaces, respectively.These results suggest that peracetic acid is considerable promise sanitizer for application in surfaces of the food processing industry.

  15. Drift and Behavior of E. coli Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Gabriele; Colin, Rémy; Sourjik, Victor; Endres, Robert G.

    2017-12-01

    Chemotaxis of the bacterium Escherichia coli is well understood in shallow chemical gradients, but its swimming behavior remains difficult to interpret in steep gradients. By focusing on single-cell trajectories from simulations, we investigated the dependence of the chemotactic drift velocity on attractant concentration in an exponential gradient. While maxima of the average drift velocity can be interpreted within analytical linear-response theory of chemotaxis in shallow gradients, limits in drift due to steep gradients and finite number of receptor-methylation sites for adaptation go beyond perturbation theory. For instance, we found a surprising pinning of the cells to the concentration in the gradient at which cells run out of methylation sites. To validate the positions of maximal drift, we recorded single-cell trajectories in carefully designed chemical gradients using microfluidics.

  16. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/205435599; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919481; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky

  17. Response surface methodology of nitrilase production by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Sachin; Singh, Amit; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2011-07-01

    Growth and nitrilase production by recombinant Escherichia coli cells harbouring pET 21 (b) plasmid, for the expression of Pseudomonas putida nitrilase were improved using response surface methodology. Central composite design was used for obtaining ideal concentration of critical medium components which include fructose, tryptone, yeast extract and lactose. The optimal values for the concentration of fructose, tryptone, yeast extract and lactose were found to be 1.13, 2.26, 3.25 and 0.9 % (w/v), respectively. Here, fructose served as carbon source for the growth while lactose was preferably used as inducer for the expression of foreign protein. Yeast extract in the medium was used as a growth promoter while tryptone was added as a major nitrogen source. Using this optimized medium, an experimental growth of 6.67 (OD at 600 nm) and nitrilase activity of 27.13 U/ml was achieved. This approach for medium development led to an enhancement of the growth and enzyme activity by 1.4 and 2.2 times, respectively, as compared to the un-optimized medium.

  18. Response surface methodology of nitrilase production by recombinant Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Dubey

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth and nitrilase production by recombinant Escherichia coli cells harbouring pET 21 (b plasmid, for the expression of Pseudomonas putida nitrilase were improved using response surface methodology. Central composite design was used for obtaining ideal concentration of critical medium components which include fructose, tryptone, yeast extract and lactose. The optimal values for the concentration of fructose, tryptone, yeast extract and lactose were found to be 1.13, 2.26, 3.25 and 0.9 % (w/v, respectively. Here, fructose served as carbon source for the growth while lactose was preferably used as inducer for the expression of foreign protein. Yeast extract in the medium was used as a growth promoter while tryptone was added as a major nitrogen source. Using this optimized medium, an experimental growth of 6.67 (OD at 600 nm and nitrilase activity of 27.13 U/ml was achieved. This approach for medium development led to an enhancement of the growth and enzyme activity by 1.4 and 2.2 times, respectively, as compared to the un-optimized medium.

  19. Subtractive Inhibition Assay for the Detection of E. coli O157:H7 Using Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyan Si

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor was developed for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 by means of a new subtractive inhibition assay. In the subtractive inhibition assay, E. coli O157:H7 cells and goat polyclonal antibodies for E. coli O157:H7 were incubated for a short of time, and then the E. coli O157:H7 cells which bound antibodies were removed by a stepwise centrifugation process. The remaining free unbound antibodies were detected through interaction with rabbit anti-goat IgG polyclonal antibodies immobilized on the sensor chip using a BIAcore 3000 biosensor. The results showed that the signal was inversely correlated with the concentration of E. coli O157:H7 cells in a range from 3.0 × 104 to 3.0 × 108 cfu/mL with a detection limit of 3.0 × 104 cfu/mL. Compared with direct SPR by immobilizing antibodies on the chip surface to capture the bacterial cells and ELISA for E. coli O157:H7 (detection limit: both 3.0 × 105 cfu/mL in this paper, the detection limit of subtractive inhibition assay method was reduced by one order of magnitude. The method simplifies bacterial cell detection to protein-protein interaction, which has the potential for providing a practical alternative for the monitoring of E. coli O157:H7 and other pathogens.

  20. Antigen 43 from Escherichia coli induces inter- and intraspecies cell aggregation and changes in colony morphology of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Hasman, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    with a distinct frizzy colony morphology in E. coli. Here we show that Ag43 can be expressed in a functional form on the surface of the environmentally important Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SBW25 with ensuing cell aggregation and frizzy colony types. Using green fluorescence protein-tagged cells, we......Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein of Escherichia coli. By virtue of its self-association characteristics, this protein is able to mediate autoaggregation and flocculation off. coli cells in static cultures. Additionally, surface display of Ag43 is associated...... demonstrate that Ag43 can be used as a tool to provide interspecies cell aggregation between E. coli and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Ag43 expression enhances biofilm formation in P. fluorescens to glass surfaces. The versatility of this protein was also reflected in Ag43 surface display in a variety of other...

  1. Potential of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 to persist and form viable but non-culturable cells on a food-contact surface subjected to cycles of soiling and chemical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marouani-Gadri, Nesrine; Firmesse, Olivier; Chassaing, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    no longer detectable after the first week. However, on 66-hour biofilms with 6.7 log CFU/cm², after initially decreasing, E. coli numbers reached 6.6 log CFU/cm² and 8.3 log viable cells/cm² on the 11th day. When E. coli was cultured with a Comamonas testosteroni previously shown to increase E. coli biofilm...... only, a further increase in this proportion occurred 24 h after the CT, suggesting that some of the surviving viable but non-culturable cells finally died. This study shows that conditions leading to E. coli O157:H7 persistence are not likely to arise when good refrigeration and hygiene practices......Our aim was to assess the potential of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to persist in a processing environment. We studied E. coli behaviour under conditions modelling those of meat plants to establish one initial bacterial load that allows persistence and another that does not. Polyurethane coupons (3...

  2. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. © FEMS 2015.

  3. Glycoprotein on cell surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, T.

    1975-01-01

    There are conjugated polysaccharides in cell membranes and outside of animal cells, and they play important role in the control of cell behavior. In this paper, the studies on the glycoprotein on cell surfaces are reported. It was found that the glycoprotein on cell surfaces have both N-glycoside type and O-glycoside type saccharic chains. Therefore it can be concluded that the basic structure of the saccharic chains in the glycoprotein on cell surfaces is similar to that of blood serum and body fluid. The main glycoprotein in the membranes of red blood corpuscles has been studied most in detail, and it also has both types of saccharic chains. The glycoprotein in liver cell membranes was found to have only the saccharic chains of acid type and to be in different pattern from that in endoplasmic reticula and nuclear membranes, which also has the saccharic chains of neutral type. The structure of the saccharic chains of H-2 antigen, i.e. the peculiar glycoprotein on the surfaces of lymph system cells, has been studied, and it is similar to the saccharic chains of glycoprotein in blood serum. The saccharic chain structures of H-2 antigen and TL antigen are different. TL, H-2 (D), Lna and H-2 (K) are the glycoprotein on cell surfaces, and are independent molecules. The analysis of the saccharic chain patterns on cell surfaces was carried out, and it was shown that the acid type saccharic chains were similar to those of ordinary glycoprotein, because the enzyme of pneumococci hydrolyzed most of the acid type saccharic chains. The change of the saccharic chain patterns of glycoprotein on cell surfaces owing to canceration and multiplication is complex matter. (Kako, I.)

  4. Iodo-gen-catalysed iodination for identification of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.C.S.; Almeida, D.F. de

    1987-01-01

    Surface proteins of Escherichia coli K12 were identified by radiolabelling using 1,3,4,6 - tatrachloro, 3-alpha, 6-alpha - diphenylgycoluryl (Iodo-Gen) and 131 I. Labelled proteins were localized in the outer membrane of the cells. Using this technique it has been possible to observe technique it has been possible to observe that the eletrophoretic pattern of surface proteins changes according to the growth phases in culture. Radiolabelling of E.coli cells inculbated at 42 0 C showed that the syntheses of two surface proteins were temperature-inducible. At least one such protein may be involved in the process of cell division in E.coli K12. (author) [pt

  5. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Toxic effect of CdS NPs on the growth and cell division in E. coli was studied. • CdS NPs affected cell surface topology and cell division. • Downregulation of both FtsZ and FtsQ was observed due to NPs exposure. • CdS NPs affected HeLa cell morphology with fragmented nuclei. • All such effects might be due to elevated oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC 50 value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells

  6. Alterations induced in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappke, J.; Schelin, H.R.; Paschuk, S.A.; Denyak, V.; Silva, E.R. da; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Lopes, R.T.; Carlin, N.; Toledo, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    Modifications occurred in Escherichia coli cells exposed to gamma radiation ( 60 Co source) were investigated. The irradiations were done at the LIN-COPPE laboratory of the UFRJ and the analysis at the Biology Department of the UTFPR. The E. coli cells were irradiated with 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, 480, 600 e 750 Gy doses. The samples were analyzed with Gram-stain, biochemical tests in EPM, MIO and Lysine Broth, Simmons Cytrate Medium and Rhamnose Broth, antibiogram and isolation of auxotrophic mutants. It was observed that for the received doses the E. coli did not show morphological alterations in the tests. Some E. Coli cells showed to be able to deaminade the L-tryptophan or they changed their sensibility for amoxillin and cephaloonine after the irradiation. The existence of aauxotrophic mutants after irradiation was also verified. (author)

  7. Bacteria hold their breath upon surface contact as shown in a strain of Escherichia coli, using dispersed surfaces and flow cytometry analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Geng

    Full Text Available Bacteria are ubiquitously distributed throughout our planet, mainly in the form of adherent communities in which cells exhibit specific traits. The mechanisms underpinning the physiological shift in surface-attached bacteria are complex, multifactorial and still partially unclear. Here we address the question of the existence of early surface sensing through implementation of a functional response to initial surface contact. For this purpose, we developed a new experimental approach enabling simultaneous monitoring of free-floating, aggregated and adherent cells via the use of dispersed surfaces as adhesive substrates and flow cytometry analysis. With this system, we analyzed, in parallel, the constitutively expressed GFP content of the cells and production of a respiration probe--a fluorescent reduced tetrazolium ion. In an Escherichia coli strain constitutively expressing curli, a major E. coli adhesin, we found that single cell surface contact induced a decrease in the cell respiration level compared to free-floating single cells present in the same sample. Moreover, we show here that cell surface contact with an artificial surface and with another cell caused reduction in respiration. We confirm the existence of a bacterial cell "sense of touch" ensuring early signalling of surface contact formation through respiration down modulation.

  8. A surface accumulator of Escherichia coli in water flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeed, M S; Al-Mekhnaqi, A M; Auner, G W; Newaz, G M

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this research is to design and optimise a mini/micro-channel based surface accumulator of Escherichia coli to be detected by acoustic wave biosensors. A computational research has been carried out using the state of the art software, CFD-ACE with water as bacteria bearing fluid. E. coli bacteria have been modelled as random discrete particles tracked by solving the Lagrangian equations. The design challenges are to achieve low shear force (pico-N), high concentration at accumulation and high enough Reynolds number to avoid bacteria swimming. A range of low Reynolds number (Re) from 28.2 to 58.3 has been considered along with the effects of particle-boundary interactions, gravity, Saffman lift and Magnus lift. About four orders of magnitude higher concentration at accumulation than the inlet concentration and lower shear force in the order of less than pico-N have been achieved in the optimised design with particles accumulating at a specific location under random particle-boundary interactions.

  9. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  10. ENTRAPMENT OF FLUORESCENT E. COLI CELLS IN ALGINATE GEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. IGNA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available By this experiment we will demonstrate the possibility to obtain genetically modifiedmicrobial strains that can be used as markers in different studies. The traittransferred in this study is the fluorescence in UV light expressed by a gene isolatedfrom jellyfish. This gene was insered into a plasmid carrying ampiciline resistanceand in the operon for arabinose fermentation. The plasmid was called pGLO. E coliHB101 K-12, ampicillin resistant colonies has been obtained. The colonies on theLB/amp/ara plate fluoresce green under UV light and the transformed colonies cangrow on ampicillin. Transformation efficiency = 362 transformed colonies/ μg DNA.The cells where immobilized by entrapment in alginate gel to study the phenomenoninvolved in cells immobilization. After immobilization in alginate gel, 5x104 cells ofE. coli pGLO / capsule and 1,4 x 105 cells of E. coli HB101/capsule has been found.Fluorescent microscopy revealed the presence of pGLO carrying cells into thecapsules. After cultivation of alginate capsules containing E. coli in LB broth, andfluorescent microscopy of the capsule sections, several observations of thephenomenon involved in continuous fermentation using biocatalysts in has beenmade. These cells grow and migrate to the cortical part of the matrix where they areimmobilized.

  11. ENTRAPMENT OF FLUORESCENT E. COLI CELLS IN ALGINATE GEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. VINTILA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available By this experiment we will demonstrate the possibility to obtain genetically modified microbial strains that can be used as markers in different studies. The trait transferred in this study is the fluorescence in UV light expressed by a gene isolated from jellyfish. This gene was insered into a plasmid carrying ampiciline resistance and in the operon for arabinose fermentation. The plasmid was called pGLO. E coli HB101 K-12, ampicillin resistant colonies has been obtained. The colonies on the LB/amp/ara plate fluoresce green under UV light and the transformed colonies can grow on ampicillin. Transformation efficiency = 362 transformed colonies/ μg DNA. The cells where immobilized by entrapment in alginate gel to study the phenomenon involved in cells immobilization. After immobilization in alginate gel, 5x104 cells of E. coli pGLO / capsule and 1,4 x 105 cells of E. coli HB101/capsule has been found. Fluorescent microscopy revealed the presence of pGLO carrying cells into the capsules. After cultivation of alginate capsules containing E. coli in LB broth, and fluorescent microscopy of the capsule sections, several observations of the phenomenon involved in continuous fermentation using biocatalysts in has been made. These cells grow and migrate to the cortical part of the matrix where they are immobilized.

  12. How much territory can a single E. coli cell control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad W. El-Hajj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have been traditionally classified in terms of size and shape and are best known for their very small size. E. coli cells in particular are small rods, each 1-2 microns. However the size varies with the medium, and faster growing cells are larger because they must have more ribosomes to make more protoplasm per unit time, and ribosomes take up space. Indeed, Maaloe's experiments on how E. coli establishes its size began with shifts between rich and poor media.Recently much larger bacteria have been described, including Epulopiscium fishelsoni at 700 μm and Thiomargarita namibiensisis at 750 μm. These are not only much longer than E. coli cells but also much wider, necessitating considerable intracellular organization. Epulopiscium cells for instance, at 80 μm wide, enclose a large enough volume of cytoplasm to present it with major transport problems.This review surveys E. coli cells much longer than those which grow in nature and in usual lab cultures. These include cells mutated in a single gene (metK which are 2-4x longer than their nonmutated parent. This metK mutant stops dividing when slowly starved of S-adenosylmethionine but continues to elongate to 50 μm and more. FtsZ mutants have been routinely isolated as long cells which form during growth at 42°C. The SOS response is a well-characterized regulatory network that is activated in response to DNA damage and also results in cell elongation. Our champion elongated E. coli is a metK strain with a further, as yet unidentified mutation, which reaches 750 μm with no internal divisions and no increase in width.

  13. Bacillus Cellulase Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Surface Display on the Outer Membrane of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges of using recombinant enzymes is that they are derived from genetically-modified microorganisms commonly located in the intracellular region. The use of these recombinant enzymes for commercial purposes requires the additional processes of cell disruption and purification, which may result in enzyme loss, denaturation, and increased total production cost. In this study, the cellulase gene of Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580 was cloned, over-expressed, and surface displayed in recombinant Escherichia coli using an ice-nucleation protein (INP. INP, an outer membrane-bound protein from Pseudomonas syringae, was utilized as an anchor linker, which was cloned with a foreign cellulase gene into the pET21a vector to develop a surface display system on the outer membrane of E. coli. The resulting strain successfully revealed cellulase on the host cell surface. The over-expressed INP-cellulase fusion protein was confirmed via staining assay for determining the extracellular cellulase and Western blotting method for the molecular weight (MW of cellulase, which was estimated to be around 61.7 kDa. Cell fractionation and localization tests demonstrated that the INP-cellulase fusion protein was mostly present in the supernatant (47.5% and outer membrane (19.4%, while the wild-type strain intracellularly retained enzymes within cytosol (>61%, indicating that the INP gene directed the cellulase expression on the bacteria cell surface. Further studies of the optimal enzyme activity were observed at 60 °C and pH 7.0, and at least 75% of maximal enzyme activity was preserved at 70 °C.

  14. Modeling base excision repair in Escherichia coli bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the key processes in Escherichia coli bacterial cells during base excision repair is developed. The mechanism is modeled of damaged base elimination involving formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (the Fpg protein), which possesses several types of activities. The modeling of the transitions between DNA states is based on a stochastic approach to the chemical reaction description

  15. Action of peracetic acid on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in suspension or settled on stainless steel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunigk Leo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a commercial peracetic acid sanitizer on destruction of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was evaluated using two distinct methods. The first method is the AOAC suspension test and the second is a method proposed by one of the authors in which the microbial cells are settled on a stainless steel surface and then treated with the sanitizer. The results showed that when in suspension S. aureus was more resistant to the sanitizer than E. coli. When S. aureus was settled on the stainless steel surface, the contact time between the sanitizer and the microorganisms to attain a 6.5 log reduction in the number of viable cells was three times greater than when the cells were in suspension.

  16. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture

  17. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential

    OpenAIRE

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M.; Pi?ero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Summers, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3?5?mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological proces...

  18. Comparison of temperature effects on E. coli, Salmonella, and Enterococcus survival in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the dependencies of survival rates on temperature for indicator organisms E. coli and Enterococcus and the pathogen Salmonella in surface waters. A database consisting of 86 survival datasets from peer-reviewed papers on inactivation of E. coli, Salmonella...

  19. Comparing Temperature Effects on E. Coli, Salmonella, and Enterococcus Survival in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare dependency of survival rates on temperature for indicator organisms E. coli and Enterococcus and the pathogen Salmonella in surface waters. A database of 86 survival datasets from peer-reviewed papers on inactivation of E. coli, Salmonel...

  20. Reassessing Escherichia coli as a cell factory for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Pfleger, Brian F; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-06-01

    Via metabolic engineering, industrial microorganisms have the potential to convert renewable substrates into a wide range of biofuels that can address energy security and environmental challenges associated with current fossil fuels. The user-friendly bacterium, Escherichia coli, remains one of the most frequently used hosts for demonstrating production of biofuel candidates including alcohol-, fatty acid- and terpenoid-based biofuels. In this review, we summarize the metabolic pathways for synthesis of these biofuels and assess enabling technologies that assist in regulating biofuel synthesis pathways and rapidly assembling novel E. coli strains. These advances maintain E. coli's position as a prominent host for developing cell factories for biofuel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M.; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Summers, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3–5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological process. Our findings have implications for our understanding of membrane biology, bacterial cell cycle control and potentially for the design of antibiotics that target the cell membrane. PMID:22387460

  2. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Express Type 1 Fimbriae Only in Surface Adherent Populations Under Physiological Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stærk, Kristian; Khandige, Surabhi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Andersen, Thomas Emil

    2016-02-01

    Most uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains harbor genes encoding adhesive type 1 fimbria (T1F). T1F is a key factor for successful establishment of urinary tract infection. However, UPEC strains typically do not express T1F in the bladder urine, and little is understood about its induction in vivo. A flow chamber infection model was used to grow UPEC under conditions simulating distinct infection niches in the bladder. Type 1 fimbriation on isolated UPEC was subsequently determined by yeast cell agglutination and immunofluorescence microscopy, and the results were correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade cultured human bladder cells. Although inactive during planktonic growth in urine, T1F expression occurs when UPEC settles on and infects bladder epithelial cells or colonizes catheters. As a result, UPEC in these sessile populations enhances bladder cell adhesion and invasion potential. Only T1F-negative UPEC are subsequently released to the urine, thus limiting T1F expression to surface-associated UPEC alone. Our results demonstrate that T1F expression is strictly regulated under physiological growth conditions with increased expression during surface growth adaptation and infection of uroepithelial cells. This leads to separation of UPEC into low-expression planktonic populations and high-expression sessile populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Transesterification of plant oils using Staphylococcus haemolyticus L62 lipase displayed on Escherichia coli cell surface using the OmpA signal peptide and EstAβ8 anchoring motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jin Chul; Kim, Soon-Ja; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus L62 (SHL62) lipase was displayed on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli using the OmpA signal peptide and the autotransporter EstAβ8 protein. Localization of SHL62 lipase on the outer membrane of E. coli was confirmed using immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. Lipase activity of the displayed SHL62 lipase was also measured using spectrophotometry and pH titration. SHL62 lipase activity of whole cells reached 2.0U/ml culture (OD600nm of 10) when it was measured by the p-nitrophenyl caprylate assay after being induced with 1mM IPTG for 24h. The optimum temperature and pH for the lipase was 45°C and 10, respectively. Furthermore, it maintained more than 90% of maximum lipase activity at up to 50°C and in a pH range of 5-9. The hydrolytic activity assay conduted with various substrates confirmed that p-nitrophenyl caprylate and corn oil were preferred substrates among various synthetic and natural substrates, respectively. The displayed SHL62 lipase produced fatty acid esters from various alcohols and plant oils through transesterification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  5. Overexpression and surface localization of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koehler, JF; Birkelund, Svend; Stephens, RS

    1992-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP) is the quantitatively predominant surface protein which has important functional, structural and antigenic properties. We have cloned and overexpressed the MOMP in Escherichia coli. The MOMP is surface exposed in C. trachomatis....... The induction of MOMP expression had a rapidly lethal effect on the L2rMOMP E. coli clone. Although no genetic system exists for Chlamydia, development of a stable, inducible E. coli clone which overexpresses the chlamydial MOMP permits a study of the biological properties of the MOMP, including...

  6. pH changes during in vitro adherence of Escherichia coli to HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, K; Mann, M D; Bowie, M D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli-induced acidic pH conditions were observed during the in vitro adherence of E. coli to HeLa cells. No pH changes occurred in the absence of adherence. This suggests that adherence affects the function or interaction of HeLa cells and E. coli.

  7. A dual tag system for facilitated detection of surface expressed proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmander Johan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of the autotransporter family has provided a mechanism for surface expression of proteins in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli. We have previously reported the use of the AIDA-I autotransport system to express the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis proteins SefA and H:gm. The SefA protein was successfully exposed to the medium, but the orientation of H:gm in the outer membrane could not be determined due to proteolytic cleavage of the N-terminal detection-tag. The goal of the present work was therefore to construct a vector containing elements that facilitates analysis of surface expression, especially for proteins that are sensitive to proteolysis or otherwise difficult to express. Results The surface expression system pAIDA1 was created with two detection tags flanking the passenger protein. Successful expression of SefA and H:gm on the surface of E. coli was confirmed with fluorescently labeled antibodies specific for the N-terminal His6-tag and the C-terminal Myc-tag. While both tags were detected during SefA expression, only the Myc-tag could be detected for H:gm. The negative signal indicates a proteolytic cleavage of this protein that removes the His6-tag facing the medium. Conclusions Expression levels from pAIDA1 were comparable to or higher than those achieved with the formerly used vector. The presence of the Myc- but not of the His6-tag on the cell surface during H:gm expression allowed us to confirm the hypothesis that this fusion protein was present on the surface and oriented towards the cell exterior. Western blot analysis revealed degradation products of the same molecular weight for SefA and H:gm. The size of these fragments suggests that both fusion proteins have been cleaved at a specific site close to the C-terminal end of the passenger. This proteolysis was concluded to take place either in the outer membrane or in the periplasm. Since H:gm was cleaved to a much greater extent

  8. Biofilm of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cantaloupe surface is resistant to lauroyl arginate ethyl and sodium hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yezhi; Deering, Amanda J; Bhunia, Arun K; Yao, Yuan

    2017-11-02

    Biofilms formed by Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cantaloupe rind were characterized in this study. Cantaloupe rind pieces inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 B6-914 was sampled after 2, 12, and 24h incubation for imaging with cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) or treating with lauroyl arginate ethyl (LAE) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC). Cryo-SEM images showed that E. coli O157:H7 formed a biofilm within 12h on the rind surface. For rind samples treated with LAE or SHC, the residual cell counts were significantly different (p5-log reduction) after treatment with 2000μg/mL of LAE or SHC. In contrast, for 12h incubation samples, 2000μg/mL of LAE or SHC could only achieve 1.74 or 1.86-log reduction, respectively. The study showed the low efficacy of LAE and SHC on cantaloupe rind surface to reduce the E. coli biofilm, suggesting the needs for cantaloupe cleaning methods beyond washing with conventional antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of DNA uptake locations in single E. coli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C. Shan; Meadow Anderson, L.; Yang, Haw

    2006-03-01

    Artificial gene transfer of bacteria, such as E. coli, has become the main stream technique in genetic engineering and molecular cell biology studies. In spite of the great improvements in transformation efficiency, some fundamental questions remained to be answered. For instance, what are the DNA uptake channels and how do they form and function under external stimuli? Furthermore, where are these channels located on the cell membrane? Here we report a study aimed at DNA uptake locations in the two widely used gene transformation techniques: electroporation and heat shock. A direct visualization of the settling location of single DNA molecules inside individual E. coli cells was obtained by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. Electroporation and heat shock exhibit two distinct characteristics of DNA uptake locations. A preferential distribution toward cell poles during electroporation is consistent with earlier experiments and previously proposed models. However, the result from heat shock is unanticipated in which the majority of DNA enters the cell near the center. Such observation suggests that uptake channels form preferentially where newly-synthesized membrane is located under cation and low temperature treatment

  10. [EFFECT OF PULSE-PERIODIC CORONA DISCHARGE ON VIABILITY OF ESCHERICHIA COLI M17 CELLS IN BIOFILMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybalchenko, O V; Stepanova, O M; Orlova, O G; Astafiev, A M; Kudryavtsev, A A; Kapustina, V V

    2015-01-01

    Detection of bactericidal effect of pulse-periodic corona discharge (PPCD) on cells and biofilms of Escherichia coli M17. A gas-discharge device was created based on PPCD in air with power supply parameters: amplitude values of voltage of 30 - 60 kV, pulse repetition rate of 250 - 400 kHz. Ultrastructure changes in cells and biofilms of E. coli M17, affected by PPCD, generated in air, were studied by typical methods of transmission electron microscopy. Disturbances of integrity of surface and abyssal structures of biofilms, as well as changes of morphological properties of E. coli M17 cells, characteristic for sub-lethal heat impact, were detected. Destructive changes of bacterial cells were developed by formation of focal disturbance of cytoplasmic membrane, extension of periplasmic space, formation of globular structures, characteristic for heat effect, and destruction of cytoplasm. Bactericidal effect of PPCD on E. coli M17 cells as part of biofilms was shown. Destructive morphological changes in cells and biofilms of E. coli M17 after the effect of PPCD were detected for the first time on electron-microscopic level.

  11. Internalization of a polysialic acid-binding Escherichia coli bacteriophage into eukaryotic neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Timo A; Pajunen, Maria I; Skog, Maria S; Finne, Jukka

    2017-12-04

    Eukaryotic organisms are continuously exposed to bacteriophages, which are efficient gene transfer agents in bacteria. However, bacteriophages are considered not to pass the eukaryotic cell membrane and enter nonphagocytic cells. Here we report the binding and penetration of Escherichia coli PK1A2 bacteriophage into live eukaryotic neuroblastoma cells in vitro. The phage interacts with cell surface polysialic acid, which shares structural similarity with the bacterial phage receptor. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy, we show that phages are internalized via the endolysosomal route and persist inside the human cells up to one day without affecting cell viability. Phage capsid integrity is lost in lysosomes, and the phage DNA is eventually degraded. We did not detect the entry of phage DNA into the nucleus; however, we speculate that this might occur as a rare event, and propose that this potential mechanism could explain prokaryote-eukaryote gene flow.

  12. Surface ligand controls silver ion release of nanosilver and its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Min Long,1,2 Li-Gang Hu,1,3 Xue-Ting Yan,1,3 Xing-Chen Zhao,1,3 Qun-Fang Zhou,1,3 Yong Cai,2,4 Gui-Bin Jiang1,3 1State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Beijing, China; 2Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China; 3College of Resources and Environment, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Understanding the mechanism of nanosilver-dependent antibacterial activity against microorganisms helps optimize the design and usage of the related nanomaterials. In this study, we prepared four kinds of 10 nm-sized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with dictated surface chemistry by capping different ligands, including citrate, mercaptopropionic acid, mercaptohexanoic acid, and mercaptopropionic sulfonic acid. Their surface-dependent chemistry and antibacterial activities were investigated. Owing to the weak bond to surface Ag, short carbon chain, and low silver ion attraction, citrate-coated AgNPs caused the highest silver ion release and the strongest antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, when compared to the other tested AgNPs. The study on the underlying antibacterial mechanisms indicated that cellular membrane uptake of Ag, NAD+/NADH ratio increase, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation were significantly induced in both AgNP and silver ion exposure groups. The released silver ions from AgNPs inside cells through a Trojan-horse-type mechanism were suggested to interact with respiratory chain proteins on the membrane, interrupt intracellular O2 reduction, and induce ROS production. The further oxidative damages of lipid peroxidation and membrane breakdown caused the lethal effect on E. coli. Altogether, this study demonstrated that AgNPs exerted

  13. Exploring codon optimization and response surface methodology to express biologically active transmembrane RANKL in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Sushila; Singh, Bijay; Bok, Jin-Duck; Kim, Jeong-In; Jiang, Tao; Cho, Chong-Su; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2014-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL), a master cytokine that drives osteoclast differentiation, activation and survival, exists in both transmembrane and extracellular forms. To date, studies on physiological role of RANKL have been mainly carried out with extracellular RANKL probably due to difficulties in achieving high level expression of functional transmembrane RANKL (mRANKL). In the present study, we took advantage of codon optimization and response surface methodology to optimize the soluble expression of mRANKL in E. coli. We optimized the codon usage of mRANKL sequence to a preferred set of codons for E. coli changing its codon adaptation index from 0.64 to 0.76, tending to increase its expression level in E. coli. Further, we utilized central composite design to predict the optimum combination of variables (cell density before induction, lactose concentration, post-induction temperature and post-induction time) for the expression of mRANKL. Finally, we investigated the effects of various experimental parameters using response surface methodology. The best combination of response variables was 0.6 OD600, 7.5 mM lactose, 26°C post-induction temperature and 5 h post-induction time that produced 52.4 mg/L of fusion mRANKL. Prior to functional analysis of the protein, we purified mRANKL to homogeneity and confirmed the existence of trimeric form of mRANKL by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography. Further, the biological activity of mRANKL to induce osteoclast formation on RAW264.7 cells was confirmed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. Importantly, a new finding from this study was that the biological activity of mRANKL is higher than its extracellular counterpart. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to report heterologous expression of mRANKL in soluble form and to perform a comparative study of functional properties of both

  14. Exploring codon optimization and response surface methodology to express biologically active transmembrane RANKL in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Maharjan

    Full Text Available Receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF-κB ligand (RANKL, a master cytokine that drives osteoclast differentiation, activation and survival, exists in both transmembrane and extracellular forms. To date, studies on physiological role of RANKL have been mainly carried out with extracellular RANKL probably due to difficulties in achieving high level expression of functional transmembrane RANKL (mRANKL. In the present study, we took advantage of codon optimization and response surface methodology to optimize the soluble expression of mRANKL in E. coli. We optimized the codon usage of mRANKL sequence to a preferred set of codons for E. coli changing its codon adaptation index from 0.64 to 0.76, tending to increase its expression level in E. coli. Further, we utilized central composite design to predict the optimum combination of variables (cell density before induction, lactose concentration, post-induction temperature and post-induction time for the expression of mRANKL. Finally, we investigated the effects of various experimental parameters using response surface methodology. The best combination of response variables was 0.6 OD600, 7.5 mM lactose, 26°C post-induction temperature and 5 h post-induction time that produced 52.4 mg/L of fusion mRANKL. Prior to functional analysis of the protein, we purified mRANKL to homogeneity and confirmed the existence of trimeric form of mRANKL by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography. Further, the biological activity of mRANKL to induce osteoclast formation on RAW264.7 cells was confirmed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. Importantly, a new finding from this study was that the biological activity of mRANKL is higher than its extracellular counterpart. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to report heterologous expression of mRANKL in soluble form and to perform a comparative study of functional

  15. Autodisplay for the co-expression of lipase and foldase on the surface of E. coli: washing with designer bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipases including the lipase from Burkholderia cepacia are in a main focus in biotechnology research since many years because of their manifold possibilities for application in industrial processes. The application of Burkholderia cepacia lipase for these processes appears complicated because of the need for support by a chaperone, the lipase specific foldase. Purification and reconstitution protocols therefore interfere with an economic implementation of such enzymes in industry. Autodisplay is a convenient method to express a variety of passenger proteins on the surface of E. coli. This method makes subsequent purification steps to obtain the protein of interest unnecessary. If enzymes are used as passengers, the corresponding cells can simply be applied as whole cell biocatalysts. Furthermore, enzymes surface displayed in this manner often acquire stabilization by anchoring within the outer membrane of E. coli. Results The lipase and its chaperone foldase from B. cepacia were co-expressed on the surface of E. coli via autodisplay. The whole cell biocatalyst obtained thereby exhibited an enzymatic activity of 2.73 mU mL-1 towards the substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate when applied in an OD578 =1. Outer membrane fractions prepared from the same culture volume showed a lipase activity of 4.01 mU mL-1. The lipase-whole cell biocatalyst as well as outer membrane preparations thereof were used in a standardized laundry test, usually adopted to determine the power of washing agents. In this test, the lipase whole cell biocatalyst and the membrane preparation derived thereof exhibited the same lipolytic activity as the purified lipase from B. cepacia and a lipase preparation which is already applied in commercial washing agents. Conclusions Co-expression of both the lipase and its chaperone foldase on the surface of E. coli yields a lipid degrading whole cell biocatalyst. Therefore the chaperone supported folding process, absolutely required for the lipolytic

  16. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome....... The absence of the initiation cascade in Dam- cells is proposed to account for this observation of apparent incompatibility between plasmid and chromosomal copies of oriC. Studies using oriC-pBR322 chimeric plasmids and their deletion derivatives indicated that the incompatibility determinant is an intact...... in the oriC region of the chromosome, led to the conclusion that initiation of DNA replication commences at a fixed cell mass, irrespective of the number of origins contained on the chromosome....

  17. Damage-induced DNA repair processes in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slezarikova, V.

    1986-01-01

    The existing knowledge is summed up of the response of Escherichia coli cells to DNA damage due to various factors including ultraviolet radiation. So far, three inducible mechanisms caused by DNA damage are known, viz., SOS induction, adaptation and thermal shock induction. Greatest attention is devoted to SOS induction. Its mechanism is described and the importance of the lexA recA proteins is shown. In addition, direct or indirect role is played by other proteins, such as the ssb protein binding the single-strand DNA sections. The results are reported of a study of induced repair processes in Escherichia coli cells repeatedly irradiated with UV radiation. A model of induction by repeated cell irradiation discovered a new role of induced proteins, i.e., the elimination of alkali-labile points in the daughter DNA synthetized on a damaged model. The nature of the alkali-labile points has so far been unclear. In the adaptation process, regulation proteins are synthetized whose production is induced by the presence of alkylation agents. In the thermal shock induction, new proteins synthetize in cells, whose function has not yet been clarified. (E.S.)

  18. Fusion of small unilamellar vesicles with viable EDTA-treated Escherichia coli cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Marvin, H J; ter Beest, M B; Hoekstra, D; Witholt, B

    1989-01-01

    Fusion characteristics of EDTA-treated Escherichia coli cells with small unilamellar vesicles were investigated, using a membrane fusion assay based on resonance energy transfer. Ca2+-EDTA treatments of Escherichia coli O111:B4 (wild type), E. coli C600 (rough), and E. coli D21f2 (deep rough) which permeabilize the outer membrane by inducing the release of lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane proteins resulted in fusion activity of the intact and viable bacteria with small unilamellar vesicl...

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilm on food-contact surfaces by sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Hong, Ayoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Rhee, Min Suk; Kim, Younghoon; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the efficacy of sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide and drying in killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilms formed on stainless steel, glass, plastic, and wooden surfaces. Cells attached to and formed a biofilm on wooden surfaces at significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher levels compared with other surface types. The lethal activities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on various food-contact surfaces were compared. Chlorine dioxide generally showed greater lethal activity than NaOCl against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on the same type of surface. The resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to both sanitizers increased in the order of wood>plastic>glass>stainless steel. The synergistic lethal effects of sequential ClO₂ and drying treatments on E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on wooden surfaces were evaluated. When wooden surfaces harboring E. coli O157:H7 biofilm were treated with ClO₂ (200 μg/ml, 10 min), rinsed with water, and subsequently dried at 43% relative humidity and 22 °C, the number of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface decreased by an additional 6.4 CFU/coupon within 6 h of drying. However, when the wooden surface was treated with water or NaOCl and dried under the same conditions, the pathogen decreased by only 0.4 or 1.0 log CFU/coupon, respectively, after 12 h of drying. This indicates that ClO₂ treatment of food-contact surfaces results in residual lethality to E. coli O157:H7 during the drying process. These observations will be useful when selecting an appropriate type of food-contact surfaces, determining a proper sanitizer for decontamination, and designing an effective sanitization program to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 on food-contact surfaces in food processing, distribution, and preparation environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The study of preparation for immobilized cells membranes of E. Coli. by radiation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jin; Chen Pin; Yu Yi

    1991-01-01

    The paper described the preparation of immobilized cells membranes with E. Coli by radiation technique. The nylon 6 was grafted with HEMA, which as a matrix to prepare immobilized cells membranes with E. Coli. by radiation entrapment at low temperature. The results showed that the retentive activity possessed a maximum value for membranes with E. Coli. when the irradiation dose was at 10-12 kGy, the entrapped cells has 2.3 g/ml at 50% HEMA concentration, the optimum pH and optimum temperature for membranes with E. Coli. are as same the original cells

  1. Natural Escherichia coli strains undergo cell-to-cell plasmid transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Sekoguchi, Ayuka; Imai, Junko; Kondo, Kumiko; Shibata, Yuka; Maeda, Sumio

    2016-12-02

    Horizontal gene transfer is a strong tool that allows bacteria to adapt to various environments. Although three conventional mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer (transformation, transduction, and conjugation) are well known, new variations of these mechanisms have also been observed. We recently reported that DNase-sensitive cell-to-cell transfer of nonconjugative plasmids occurs between laboratory strains of Escherichia coli in co-culture. We termed this phenomenon "cell-to-cell transformation." In this report, we found that several combinations of Escherichia coli collection of reference (ECOR) strains, which were co-cultured in liquid media, resulted in DNase-sensitive cell-to-cell transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmid isolation of these new transformants demonstrated cell-to-cell plasmid transfer between the ECOR strains. Natural transformation experiments, using a combination of purified plasmid DNA and the same ECOR strains, revealed that cell-to-cell transformation occurs much more frequently than natural transformation under the same culture conditions. Thus, cell-to-cell transformation is both unique and effective. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate cell-to-cell plasmid transformation in natural E. coli strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli ( E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3), followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM). Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml). Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies.

  3. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shafiee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Materials and Methods: Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3, followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM. Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Results: Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml. Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. Conclusion: In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies.

  4. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle A.; Mysorekar, Indira U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs. PMID:27002654

  5. ADHESION ABILITY OF HAEMAGLUTINATED Escherichia coli AND POSITIVE SMAC OF ISOLATED BEEF CATTLE ON BUKALIS EPITHELIAL CELLS IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Prihtiyantoro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion of bacteria on the host of epithelial cells surface is the prelimenary of infection process. Bacteria which has virulence and adhesin factors do more easily attach to epithelial cells. This study aimed to determine the adhesion ability of haemaglutinated and VTEC strains of Escherichia coli isolates. In conclusion, the isolates that have haemaglutinin and VTEC strains have more adhesion than have both non hemagglutinin and non VTEC strains.

  6. DamX Controls Reversible Cell Morphology Switching in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandige, Surabhi; Antoinette Asferg, Cecilie; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The ability to change cell morphology is an advantageous characteristic adopted by multiple pathogenic bacteria in order to evade host immune detection and assault during infection. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) exhibits such cellular dynamics and has been shown to transition....... While deletion of damX abrogated UPEC filamentation and secondary surface colonization in tissue culture and in mouse infections, transient overexpression of damX resulted in reversible UPEC filamentation. In this study, we identify a hitherto-unknown damX-mediated mechanism underlying UPEC...

  7. Transcriptome of E. coli K1 bound to human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yi; Parthasarathy, Geetha; Di Cello, Francescopaolo; Teng, Ching-Hao; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 is the most common Gram-negative organism causing neonatal meningitis. Binding to human brain microvascdular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is an essential step for E. coli K1 traversal of the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we examined expression profiles of E. coli K1 strain RS218 during its binding to HBMEC. Comparison of HBMEC-bound E. coli K1 with collagen-bound E. coli revealed more than one hundred genes whose expression patterns were significantly changed in HBMEC-b...

  8. Optimization of recombinant β-NGF expression in Escherichia coli using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami Tilko, Pouria; Hajihassan, Zahra; Moghimi, Hamid

    2017-04-21

    Human nerve growth factor a member of the neurotrophin family can be used to treat neurodegenerative diseases. As it has disulfide bonds in its structure, periplasmic expression of it using appropriate signal sequence is beneficial. Therefore, in this work β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF) was expressed in Escherichia coli using pET39b expression vector containing DsbA signal sequence. In an initial step, the effect of isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and lactose concentration as inducer on protein production was investigated using response surface methodology. Then the effect of different postinduction time and temperature on protein production was studied. Our results indicated that the highest β-NGF production was achieved with 1 mM IPTG and low concentrations of lactose (0-2% w/v), low cultivation temperature of 25°C and postinduction time of 2 hr. Also following β-NGF purification, bioassay test using PC12 cell line was done. The biological activity of the purified β-NGF showed a similar cell proliferation activity with the standard recombinant human β-NGF. In conclusion, the results indicated an optimized upstream process to obtain high yields of biologically active β-NGF.

  9. Covalent and Oriented Surface Immobilization of Antibody Using Photoactivatable Antibody Fc-Binding Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeolin; Jeong, Jiyun; Lee, Gabi; Moon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Myung Kyu

    2016-10-04

    Fc-specific antibody binding proteins (FcBPs) with the minimal domain of protein G are widely used for immobilization of well-oriented antibodies onto solid surfaces, but the noncovalently bound antibodies to FcBPs are unstable in sera containing large amounts of antibodies. Here we report novel photoactivatable FcBPs with photomethionine (pMet) expressed in E. coli, which induce Fc-specific photo-cross-linking with antibodies upon UV irradiation. Unfortunately, pMet did not support protein expression in the native E. coli system, and therefore we also developed an engineered methionyl tRNA synthetase (MRS5m). Coexpression of MRS5m proteins successfully induced photoactivatable FcBP overexpression in methionine-auxotroph E. coli cells. The photoactivatable FcBPs could be easily immobilized on beads and slides via their N-terminal cysteine residues and 6xHis tag. The antibodies photo-cross-linked onto the photoactivatable FcBP-beads were resistant from serum-antibody mediated dissociation and efficiently captured antigens in human sera. Furthermore, photo-cross-linked antibody arrays prepared using this system allowed sensitive detection of antigens in human sera by sandwich immunoassay. The photoactivatable FcBPs will be widely applicable for well-oriented antibody immobilization on various surfaces of microfluidic chips, glass slides, and nanobeads, which are required for development of sensitive immunosensors.

  10. Specificity for field enumeration of Escherichia coli in tropical surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Kjær Mackie; Aalbaek, B; Aslam, R

    2001-01-01

    In remote rural areas in developing countries, bacteriological monitoring often depends on the use of commercial field media. This paper evaluates a commercial field medium used for the enumeration of Escherichia coli in different surface waters under primitive field conditions in rural Pakistan....... In order to verify the field kit, 117 presumptive E. coli isolates have been tested, finding a specificity of only 40%. By excluding some strains based on colony colours, the calculated specificity could be increased to 65%. Thus, it is suggested that prior to use in a tropical environment, the specificity...... of any commercial medium used should be tested with representative tropical isolates, in order to increase the specificity....

  11. Specificity for field enumeration of Escherichia coli in tropical surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Kjær Mackie; Aalbaek, B; Aslam, R

    2001-01-01

    In remote rural areas in developing countries, bacteriological monitoring often depends on the use of commercial field media. This paper evaluates a commercial field medium used for the enumeration of Escherichia coli in different surface waters under primitive field conditions in rural Pakistan....... In order to verify the field kit, 117 presumptive E. coli isolates have been tested, finding a specificity of only 40%. By excluding some strains based on colony colours, the calculated specificity could be increased to 65%. Thus, it is suggested that prior to use in a tropical environment, the specificity...

  12. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  13. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  14. Mutagenic action of heavy ions on Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarova, B.; Amirtayev, K.G.; Kozubek, S.; Krasavin, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction of direct mutations in the lactose operon of E.coli cells by γ radiation and accelerated heavy ions with different LET was studied. The experiments were performed with the wide type polA and lexA strains. The quadratic dependence of the mutation rate on the dose of different radiation for the wild type strain and the polA mutant was observed. However different radiations showed different relative genetic effectiveness. The dependence of RGE on LET for the wild type and polA strain has a maximum. In the experiments with the lexA strain low mutation rates and linear dose-response dependences N m /N(D) were observed. The RGE falls down with increasing LET of ionizing radiation. 22 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Transfer coefficient models for escherichia coli O157:H7 on contacts between beef tissue and high-density polyethylene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rolando A; Tamplin, Mark L; Marmer, Benne S; Phillips, John G; Cooke, Peter H

    2006-06-01

    Risk studies have identified cross-contamination during beef fabrication as a knowledge gap, particularly as to how and at what levels Escherichia coli O157:H7 transfers among meat and cutting board (or equipment) surfaces. The objectives of this study were to determine and model transfer coefficients (TCs) between E. coli O157:H7 on beef tissue and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cutting board surfaces. Four different transfer scenarios were evaluated: (i) HDPE board to agar, (ii) beef tissue to agar, (iii) HDPE board to beef tissue to agar, and (iv) beef tissue to HDPE board to agar. Also, the following factors were studied for each transfer scenario: two HDPE surface roughness levels (rough and smooth), two beef tissues (fat and fascia), and two conditions of the initial beef tissue inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (wet and dry surfaces), for a total of 24 treatments. The TCs were calculated as a function of the plated inoculum and of the cells recovered from the first contact. When the treatments were compared, all of the variables evaluated interacted significantly in determining the TC. An overall TC-per-treatment model did not adequately represent the reduction of the cells on the original surface after each contact and the interaction of the factors studied. However, an exponential model was developed that explained the experimental data for all treatments and represented the recontamination of the surfaces with E. coli O157:H7. The parameters for the exponential model for cross-contamination with E. coli O157:H7 between beef tissue and HDPE surfaces were determined, allowing for the use of the resulting model in quantitative microbial risk assessment.

  16. Surface topological differences of phage infected uropathogenicEscherichia coli(UPEC) strains, revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Bassamah; Jamil, Nusrat; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an advance microscopic technique that provides three dimensional structures of cell surfaces with high resolution. In the present study AFM was used for comparative analysis of surface topology of phage infected and uninfected Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cells. Two UPEC strains NE and HN were isolated from urine samples of Urinary tract infection patients and their specific narrow host range lytic phages 3S and HNΦ were isolated from the sewage of different areas. On the basis of one step growth curve both phages characterized as short latent period phages with latency period of about 30 min. On AFM analysis significant difference in topology of healthy and infected cells were observed. It was hypothesized that progeny of both lytic phages released out from their respective host cells in different manner. The image of 3S infected UPEC host cells (NE) revealed multiple internal projections which showed progeny phages released out from host cells through these multiple sites. Whereas images of HNΦ infected HN host cells showed central depression which illustrated that new phages released out through single exit point from the middle of cell. These results are significant to extend future studies on isolated phages as an effective tool for phage therapy.

  17. Electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated bacterial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2008-05-06

    The electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated surfaces of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus brevis was studied using numerical modeling in conjunction with potentiometric titration and electrophoretic mobility data as a function of solution pH and electrolyte composition. Assuming a polyelectrolytic polymeric bacterial cell surface, these experimental and numerical analyses were used to determine the effective site numbers of cell surface acid-base functional groups and Ca(2+) sorption coefficients. Using effective site concentrations determined from 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl) experimental data, the charge-regulation model was able to replicate the effects of 2:1 electrolyte (CaCl(2)), both alone and as a mixture with NaCl, on the measured zeta potential using a single Ca(2+) surface binding constant for each of the bacterial species. This knowledge is vital for understanding how cells respond to changes in solution pH and electrolyte composition as well as how they interact with other surfaces. The latter is especially important due to the widespread use of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in the interpretation of bacterial adhesion. As surface charge and surface potential both vary on a charge-regulated surface, accurate modeling of bacterial interactions with surfaces ultimately requires use of an electrostatic model that accounts for the charge-regulated nature of the cell surface.

  18. Cell surface engineering to control cellular interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Custódio, Catarina A.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface composition determines all interactions of the cell with its environment, thus cell functions such as adhesion, migration and cell–cell interactions can potentially be controlled by engineering and manipulating the cell membrane. Cell membranes present a rich repertoire of molecules, therefore a versatile ground for modification. However the complex and dynamic nature of the cell surface is also a major challenge for cell surface engineering that should also involve strategies co...

  19. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  20. Equilibrium Isotherm, Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Characterization Studies of Cadmium Adsorption by Surface-Engineered Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafakori, Vida; Zadmard, Reza; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2017-11-01

    Amongst the methods that remove heavy metals from environment, biosorption approaches have received increased attention because of their environmentally friendly and cost-effective feature, as well as their superior performances. In the present study, we investigated the ability of a surface-engineered Escherichia coli, carrying the cyanobacterial metallothionein on the cell surface, in the removal of Ca (II) from solution under different experimental conditions. The biosorption process was optimized using central composite design. In parallel, the kinetics of metal biosorption was studied, and the rate constants of different kinetic models were calculated. Cadmium biosorption is followed by the second-order kinetics. Freundlich and Langmuir equations were used to analyze sorption data; characteristic parameters were determined for each adsorption isotherm. The biosorption process was optimized using the central composite design. The optimal cadmium sorption capacity (284.69 nmol/mg biomass) was obtained at 40°C (pH 8) and a biomass dosage of 10 mg. The influence of two elutants, EDTA and CaCl2, was also assessed on metal recovery. Approximately, 68.58% and 56.54% of the adsorbed cadmium were removed by EDTA and CaCl2 during desorption, respectively. The Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR) analysis indicated that carboxyl, amino, phosphoryl, thiol, and hydroxyl are the main chemical groups involved in the cadmium bioadsorption process. Results from this study implied that chemical adsorption on the heterogeneous surface of E. coli E and optimization of adsorption parameters provides a highly efficient bioadsorbent.

  1. Effects of Saponins against Clinical E. coli Strains and Eukaryotic Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Arabski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of saponins against CHO-K1 cells were measured by the MTT test, hemolysis assay and flow cytometry. Saponin from Quillaja saponaria has a cytotoxic effect at concentrations higher than 25 μg/mL and in the range of 12–50 μg/mL significantly increases the level of early apoptotic cells. Saponin at dose of 12 μg/mL enhances the six E. coli strains growth. We postulate that saponins increase the influx of nutrients from the medium into E. coli cells. Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics. In contrary, in the presence of saponins and antibiotics, more CFU/mL E. coli cells were observed. This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells. In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed.

  2. Effects of saponins against clinical E. coli strains and eukaryotic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabski, Michał; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Lankoff, Anna; Kaca, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of saponins against CHO-K1 cells were measured by the MTT test, hemolysis assay and flow cytometry. Saponin from Quillaja saponaria has a cytotoxic effect at concentrations higher than 25 μg/mL and in the range of 12-50 μg/mL significantly increases the level of early apoptotic cells. Saponin at dose of 12 μg/mL enhances the six E. coli strains growth. We postulate that saponins increase the influx of nutrients from the medium into E. coli cells. Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics. In contrary, in the presence of saponins and antibiotics, more CFU/mL E. coli cells were observed. This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells. In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed.

  3. Phenotypic assay of adherent E. coli strains using hep-2 cells on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paired case-control study of children with diarrhea in Rivers state, the association between HEp-2–adherent Escherichia coli strains and diarrhea was examined. Escherichia coli isolates from stool specimens of children with diarrhea were matched with controls and tested in HEp-2 cell adherence assay. A total of 266 ...

  4. Multidrug-Resistant and Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Dutch Surface Water and Wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, Hetty; Lynch, Gretta; Italiaander, Ronald; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Schets, Franciska M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/139498281

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the current study was to gain insight into the prevalence and concentrations of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Escherichia coli in Dutch surface water, and to explore the role of wastewater as AMR contamination source. METHODS: The prevalence of AMR E. coli was determined in

  5. Cell division in Escherichia coli cultures monitored at single cell resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luidalepp Hannes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental characteristic of cells is the ability to divide. To date, most parameters of bacterial cultures, including cell division, have been measured as cell population averages, assuming that all bacteria divide at a uniform rate. Results We monitored the division of individual cells in Escherichia coli cultures during different growth phases. Our experiments are based on the dilution of green fluorescent protein (GFP upon cell division, monitored by flow cytometry. The results show that the vast majority of E. coli cells in exponentially growing cultures divided uniformly. In cultures that had been in stationary phase up to four days, no cell division was observed. However, upon dilution of stationary phase culture into fresh medium, two subpopulations of cells emerged: one that started dividing and another that did not. These populations were detectable by GFP dilution and displayed different side scatter parameters in flow cytometry. Further analysis showed that bacteria in the non-growing subpopulation were not dead, neither was the difference in growth capacity reducible to differences in stationary phase-specific gene expression since we observed uniform expression of several stress-related promoters. The presence of non-growing persisters, temporarily dormant bacteria that are tolerant to antibiotics, has previously been described within growing bacterial populations. Using the GFP dilution method combined with cell sorting, we showed that ampicillin lyses growing bacteria while non-growing bacteria retain viability and that some of them restart growth after the ampicillin is removed. Thus, our method enables persisters to be monitored even in liquid cultures of wild type strains in which persister formation has low frequency. Conclusion In principle, the approaches developed here could be used to detect differences in cell division in response to different environmental conditions and in cultures of unicellular

  6. Characterization of E coli biofim formations on baby spinach leaf surfaces using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjeong; Baek, Insuck; Oh, Mirae; Kim, Sungyoun; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilm formed by pathogens on fresh produce surfaces is a food safety concern because the complex extracellular matrix in the biofilm structure reduces the reduction and removal efficacies of washing and sanitizing processes such as chemical or irradiation treatments. Therefore, a rapid and nondestructive method to identify pathogenic biofilm on produce surfaces is needed to ensure safe consumption of fresh, raw produce. This research aimed to evaluate the feasibility of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging for detecting Escherichia.coli (ATCC 25922) biofilms on baby spinach leaf surfaces. Samples of baby spinach leaves were immersed and inoculated with five different levels (from 2.6x104 to 2.6x108 CFU/mL) of E.coli and stored at 4°C for 24 h and 48 h to induce biofilm formation. Following the two treatment days, individual leaves were gently washed to remove excess liquid inoculums from the leaf surfaces and imaged with a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system equipped with UV-A (365 nm) and violet (405 nm) excitation sources to evaluate a spectral-image-based method for biofilm detection. The imaging results with the UV-A excitation showed that leaves even at early stages of biofilm formations could be differentiated from the control leaf surfaces. This preliminary investigation demonstrated the potential of fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of biofilms on leafy green surfaces.

  7. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation protein (INP is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1. Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1 by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg to L-Ornithine (L-Orn in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells.

  8. Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation...

  9. Fate of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Cells Artificially Internalized into Vegetable Seeds during Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Cui, Yue; Walcott, Ronald; Chen, Jinru

    2018-01-01

    Vegetable seeds contaminated with bacterial pathogens have been linked to fresh-produce-associated outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections. This study was undertaken to observe the physiological behavior of Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cells artificially internalized into vegetable seeds during the germination process. Surface-decontaminated seeds of alfalfa, fenugreek, lettuce, and tomato were vacuum-infiltrated with four individual strains of Salmonella or EHEC. Contaminated seeds were germinated at 25°C for 9 days, and different sprout/seedling tissues were microbiologically analyzed every other day. The internalization of Salmonella and EHEC cells into vegetable seeds was confirmed by the absence of pathogens in seed-rinsing water and the presence of pathogens in seed homogenates after postinternalization seed surface decontamination. Results show that 317 (62%) and 343 (67%) of the 512 collected sprout/seedling tissue samples were positive for Salmonella and EHEC, respectively. The average Salmonella populations were significantly larger ( P vegetable seeds and sprout/seedling tissues and emphasized the importance of using pathogen-free seeds for sprout production. IMPORTANCE The internalization of microorganisms into vegetable seeds could occur naturally and represents a possible pathway of vegetable seed contamination by human pathogens. The present study investigated the ability of two important bacterial pathogens, Salmonella and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), when artificially internalized into vegetable seeds, to grow and disseminate along vegetable sprouts/seedlings during germination. The data from the study revealed that the pathogen cells artificially internalized into vegetable seeds caused the contamination of different tissues of sprouts/seedlings and that pathogen growth on germinating seeds is bacterial species and vegetable seed-type dependent. These results further stress the necessity of

  10. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on

  11. Prevention of Escherichia coli K1 Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier by Counteracting the Host Cell Receptor and Signaling Molecule Involved in E. coli Invasion of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Longkun; Pearce, Donna; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity, and a key contributing factor is our incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of E. coli meningitis. We have shown that E. coli penetration into the brain requires E. coli invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of HBMEC involves its interaction with HBMEC receptors, such as E. coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) interacti...

  12. Cloning and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa flagellin in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K; Montie, T C

    1989-01-01

    The flagellin gene was isolated from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genomic bank by conjugation into a PA103 Fla- strain. Flagellin DNA was transferred from motile recipient PA103 Fla+ cells by transformation into Escherichia coli. We show that transformed E. coli expresses flagellin protein. Export of flagellin to the E. coli cell surface was suggested by positive colony blots of unlysed cells and by isolation of flagellin protein from E. coli supernatants.

  13. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection stimulates Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanenko, Valeriy; Malyukova, Irina; Hubbard, Ann; Delannoy, Michael; Boedeker, Edgar; Zhu, Chengru; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Kovbasnjuk, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal infection with Shiga toxins producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli causes the spectrum of gastrointestinal and systemic complications, including hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is fatal in ∼10% of patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of Stx endocytosis by enterocytes and the toxins cross the intestinal epithelium are largely uncharacterized. We have studied Shiga toxin 1 entry into enterohemorrhagic E. coli-infected intestinal epithelial cells and found that bacteria stimulate Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis through actin remodeling. This enterohemorrhagic E. coli-caused macropinocytosis occurs through a nonmuscle myosin II and cell division control 42 (Cdc42)-dependent mechanism. Macropinocytosis of Shiga toxin 1 is followed by its transcytosis to the basolateral environment, a step that is necessary for its systemic spread. Inhibition of Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis significantly decreases toxin uptake by intestinal epithelial cells and in this way provides an attractive, antibiotic-independent strategy for prevention of the harmful consequences of enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection.

  14. Effect of surface roughness on performance of magnetoelastic biosensors for the detection of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Possan, A.L. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Menti, C. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Beltrami, M. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Santos, A.D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Roesch-Ely, M. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Missell, F.P., E-mail: fmissell@yahoo.com [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli are bacteria that must be controlled in the food industry and the hospital sector. Magnetoelastic biosensors offer the promise of rapid identification of these and other harmful antigens. In this work, strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3 were cut to size (5 mm × 1 mm) with a microdicing saw and were then coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Several sensor surfaces were studied: 1) as-cast strip, wheel side; 2) as-cast strip, free surface; and 3) thinned and polished surface. A layer of cystamine was applied to the Au-covered magnetoelastic substrate, forming a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), followed by antibodies, using a modified Hermanson protocol. The cystamine layer growth was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biosensors were exposed to solutions of bacteria and the resonant frequency of the sensors was measured with an impedance analyzer for times up to 100 min. Reductions in the resonant frequency, corresponding to bacteria capture, were measured after optimizing the signal amplitude. For times up to 40 min, high capture rates were observed and thereafter saturation occurred. Saturation values of the frequency shifts were compared with the number of bacteria observed on the sensor using fluorescence microscopy. Parameters associated with capture kinetics were studied for different sensor surfaces. The rough surfaces were found to show a faster response, while the thinned and polished sensors showed the largest frequency shift. - Highlights: • Magnetoelastic biosensors to capture Escherichia coli were produced. • Surface roughness of biosensors was varied in the range R{sub a} = 0.3–0.52 μm. • Rough surfaces show faster response, polished surfaces have larger frequency shift.

  15. Following Drug Uptake and Reactions inside Escherichia coli Cells by Raman Microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with Raman difference spectroscopy reveals the details of chemical reactions within bacterial cells. The method provides direct quantitative data on penetration of druglike molecules into Escherichia coli cells in situ along with the details of drug–target reactions. With this label-free technique, clavulanic acid and tazobactam can be observed as they penetrate into E. coli cells and subsequently inhibit β-lactamase enzymes produced within these cells. When E. coli cells contain a β-lactamase that forms a stable complex with an inhibitor, the Raman signature of the known enamine acyl–enzyme complex is detected. From Raman intensities it is facile to measure semiquantitatively the number of clavulanic acid molecules taken up by the lactamase-free cells during growth. PMID:24901294

  16. A Structural Study of Escherichia coli Cells Using an In Situ Liquid Chamber TEM Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying cell microstructures and their behaviors under living conditions has been a challenging subject in microbiology. In this work, in situ liquid chamber TEM was used to study structures of Escherichia coli cells in aqueous solutions at a nanometer-scale resolution. Most of the cells remained intact under electron beam irradiation, and nanoscale structures were observed during the TEM imaging. The analysis revealed structures of pili surrounding the E. coli cells; the movements of the pili in the liquid were also observed during the in situ tests. This technology also allowed the observation of features of the nucleoid in the E. coli cells. Overall, in situ TEM can be applied as a valuable tool to study real-time microscopic structures and processes in microbial cells residing in native aqueous solutions.

  17. DamX Controls Reversible Cell Morphology Switching in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandige, Surabhi; Asferg, Cecilie Antoinette; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Overgaard, Martin; Andersen, Thomas Emil; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-08-02

    The ability to change cell morphology is an advantageous characteristic adopted by multiple pathogenic bacteria in order to evade host immune detection and assault during infection. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) exhibits such cellular dynamics and has been shown to transition through a series of distinct morphological phenotypes during a urinary tract infection. Here, we report the first systematic spatio-temporal gene expression analysis of the UPEC transition through these phenotypes by using a flow chamber-based in vitro infection model that simulates conditions in the bladder. This analysis revealed a novel association between the cell division gene damX and reversible UPEC filamentation. We demonstrate a lack of reversible bacterial filamentation in a damX deletion mutant in vitro and absence of a filamentous response by this mutant in a murine model of cystitis. While deletion of damX abrogated UPEC filamentation and secondary surface colonization in tissue culture and in mouse infections, transient overexpression of damX resulted in reversible UPEC filamentation. In this study, we identify a hitherto-unknown damX-mediated mechanism underlying UPEC morphotypical switching. Murine infection studies showed that DamX is essential for establishment of a robust urinary tract infection, thus emphasizing its role as a mediator of virulence. Our study demonstrates the value of an in vitro methodology, in which uroepithelium infection is closely simulated, when undertaking targeted investigations that are challenging to perform in animal infection models. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most often caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and account for a considerable health care burden. UPEC exhibits a dynamic lifestyle in the course of infection, in which the bacterium transiently adopts alternative morphologies ranging from rod shaped to coccoid and filamentous, rendering it better at immune evasion and host epithelium adhesion. This penchant for

  18. Autolysis of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells in low gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacena, M. A.; Smith, E. E.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    The role of gravity in the autolysis of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli was studied by growing cells on Earth and in microgravity on Space Station Mir. Autolysis analysis was completed by examining the death phase or exponential decay of cells for approximately 4 months following the stationary phase. Consistent with published findings, the stationary-phase cell population was 170% and 90% higher in flight B. subtilis and E. coli cultures, respectively, than in ground cultures. Although both flight autolysis curves began at higher cell densities than control curves, the rate of autolysis in flight cultures was identical to that of their respective ground control rates.

  19. Effect of radiation doses rate on SOS response induction in irradiated Escherichia coli Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuetara Lugo, Elizabeth B.; Fuentes Lorenzo, Jorge L.; Almeida Varela, Eliseo; Prieto Miranda, Enrique F.; Sanchez Lamar, Angel; Llagostera Casal, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to study the effect of radiation dose rate on the induction of SOS response in Escherichia coli cells. We measured the induction of sul A reporter gene in PQ-37 (SOS Chromotest) cells. Lead devises were built with different diameter and these were used for diminishing the dose rate of PX- -30M irradiator. Our results show that radiation doses rate significantly modifies the induction of SOS response. Induction factor increases proportionally to doses rate in Escherichia coli cells defective to nucleotide excision repair (uvrA), but not in wild type cells. We conclude that the dose rate affects the level of induction of SOS response

  20. Metastasis-associated cell surface oncoproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piia-Riitta eKarhemo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoproteomics aims to the discovery of molecular markers, drug targets and pathways by studying cancer specific protein expression, localization, modification and interaction. Cell surface proteins play a central role in several pathological conditions, including cancer and its metastatic spread. However, cell surface proteins are underrepresented in proteomics analyses performed from the whole cell extracts due to their hydrophobicity and low abundance. Different methods have been developed to enrich and isolate the cell surface proteins to reduce sample complexity. Despite the method selected, the primary difficulty encountered is the solubilization of the hydrophobic transmembrane proteins from the lipid bilayer. This review focuses on proteomic analyses of metastasis-associated proteins identified using the cell surface biotinylation method. Interestingly, also certain intracellular proteins were identified from the cell surface samples. The function of these proteins at the cell surface might well differ from their function inside the cell.

  1. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, N.; Yang, M.K.; Bi, S.X.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Gao, Y.T.; Du, Z.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell–cell and cell–matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Different cells behaviors on microstructure surfaces were discussed in this paper. • The expression of cell protein of Vinculin was studied in this research. • Cellular micronuclei test was applied to evaluate cells' genotoxicity. • Cell genotoxicity was first studied in the research field of topological surfaces

  2. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-04-01

    Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  3. Mapping the surface of Escherichia coli peptide deformylase by NMR with organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Douglas W; McElroy, Craig A; Foster, Mark P

    2002-07-01

    Identifying potential ligand binding sites on a protein surface is an important first step for targeted structure-based drug discovery. While performing control experiments with Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF), we noted that the organic solvents used to solubilize some ligands perturbed many of the same resonances in PDF as the small molecule inhibitors. To further explore this observation, we recorded (15)N HSQC spectra of E. coli peptide deformylase (PDF) in the presence of trace quantities of several simple organic solvents (acetone, DMSO, ethanol, isopropanol) and identified their sites of interaction from local perturbation of amide chemical shifts. Analysis of the protein surface structure revealed that the ligand-induced shift perturbations map to the active site and one additional surface pocket. The correlation between sites of solvent and inhibitor binding highlights the utility of organic solvents to rapidly and effectively validate and characterize binding sites on proteins prior to designing a drug discovery screen. Further, the solvent-induced perturbations have implications for the use of organic solvents to dissolve candidate ligands in NMR-based screens.

  4. Photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgavy, P.

    1976-01-01

    The photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in Escherichia coli Bsub(s-1), Escherichia coli B/r Hcr - and Escherichia coli B/r Hcr + cells after ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm is 0.823 +- 0.004, 0.70 +- 0.01 and 0.53 +- 0.06, respectively, at 99% confidence limits. For the low values of the photoreactivable sector in the B/r Hcr - and B/r Hcr + strains are likely to be responsible dark repair processes which eliminate lethal damage, brought about by pyrimidine dimers, preferably in comparison with lethal damage caused by photoproducts of another type. (author)

  5. [Molecular cloning of threonine biosynthesis genes from Propionibacterium shermanii in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, S V; Abilev, S K

    1993-03-01

    Cloning the genes for threonine biosynthesis from Propionibacterium shermanii was performed in Escherichia coli cells using the plasmid vector pVZ361. The cloned genes were identified via complementation of thrB, thrC, thrA1 and thrA2 mutations of E. coli. The gene complementing thrB of E. coli was located within a 5.1 kb fragment of P. shermanii chromosomal DNA. The cloned DNA fragment hybridized with a chromosomal fragment of P. shermanii of the same size. The plasmid pSPt4 (with the thrB gene) was digested with Sau3A and ligated with the BamHI-restricted pUC19 vector. The 1.8 kb DNA fragment of P. shermanii was shown to complement the thrB gene function in E. coli cells.

  6. Functional display of triphenylmethane reductase for dye removal on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal domain of ice nucleation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fen; Ding, Haitao; Feng, Zhuo; Liu, Danfeng; Zhao, Yuhua

    2014-10-01

    Traditional biological treatment for triphenylmethane dye effluent is stuck with the inaccessibility of dye molecules to intracellular dye-degrading enzyme, thus a high-efficiency and low-cost method for dye decolorization is highly desirable. Here we established a bioremediation approach to display triphenylmethane reductase (TMR) on the surface of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using N-terminal of ice nucleation protein as anchoring motif for triphenylmethane dye decolorization for the first time. Approximately 85% of recombinant protein positioning on the surface of E. coil cells exhibited high activity and stability. The optimal temperature and pH of the surface-displayed TMR are 50 °C and 8.5, respectively. Comparing with other reported microorganisms, the decolorization rate for malachite green of this engineered strain is the highest so far, reaching 640 μmol min(-1) g(-1) dry weight cells. These results indicate that this engineered E. coli strain is a very promising candidate for synthetic dye removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidrug-Resistant and Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Dutch Surface Water and Wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetty Blaak

    Full Text Available The goal of the current study was to gain insight into the prevalence and concentrations of antimicrobial resistant (AMR Escherichia coli in Dutch surface water, and to explore the role of wastewater as AMR contamination source.The prevalence of AMR E. coli was determined in 113 surface water samples obtained from 30 different water bodies, and in 33 wastewater samples obtained at five health care institutions (HCIs, seven municipal wastewater treatment plants (mWWTPs, and an airport WWTP. Overall, 846 surface water and 313 wastewater E. coli isolates were analysed with respect to susceptibility to eight antimicrobials (representing seven different classes: ampicillin, cefotaxime, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol.Among surface water isolates, 26% were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobials, and 11% were multidrug-resistant (MDR. In wastewater, the proportions of AMR/MDR E. coli were 76%/62% at HCIs, 69%/19% at the airport WWTP, and 37%/27% and 31%/20% in mWWTP influents and effluents, respectively. Median concentrations of MDR E. coli were 2.2×10(2, 4.0×10(4, 1.8×10(7, and 4.1×10(7 cfu/l in surface water, WWTP effluents, WWTP influents and HCI wastewater, respectively. The different resistance types occurred with similar frequencies among E. coli from surface water and E. coli from municipal wastewater. By contrast, among E. coli from HCI wastewater, resistance to cefotaxime and resistance to ciprofloxacin were significantly overrepresented compared to E. coli from municipal wastewater and surface water. Most cefotaxime-resistant E. coliisolates produced ESBL. In two of the mWWTP, ESBL-producing variants were detected that were identical with respect to phylogenetic group, sequence type, AMR-profile, and ESBL-genotype to variants from HCI wastewater discharged onto the same sewer and sampled on the same day (A1/ST23/CTX-M-1, B23/ST131/CTX-M-15, D2/ST405/CTX-M-15.In

  8. Multidrug-Resistant and Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Dutch Surface Water and Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaak, Hetty; Lynch, Gretta; Italiaander, Ronald; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A.; Schets, Franciska M.; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of the current study was to gain insight into the prevalence and concentrations of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Escherichia coli in Dutch surface water, and to explore the role of wastewater as AMR contamination source. Methods The prevalence of AMR E. coli was determined in 113 surface water samples obtained from 30 different water bodies, and in 33 wastewater samples obtained at five health care institutions (HCIs), seven municipal wastewater treatment plants (mWWTPs), and an airport WWTP. Overall, 846 surface water and 313 wastewater E. coli isolates were analysed with respect to susceptibility to eight antimicrobials (representing seven different classes): ampicillin, cefotaxime, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol. Results Among surface water isolates, 26% were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobials, and 11% were multidrug-resistant (MDR). In wastewater, the proportions of AMR/MDR E. coli were 76%/62% at HCIs, 69%/19% at the airport WWTP, and 37%/27% and 31%/20% in mWWTP influents and effluents, respectively. Median concentrations of MDR E. coli were 2.2×102, 4.0×104, 1.8×107, and 4.1×107 cfu/l in surface water, WWTP effluents, WWTP influents and HCI wastewater, respectively. The different resistance types occurred with similar frequencies among E. coli from surface water and E. coli from municipal wastewater. By contrast, among E. coli from HCI wastewater, resistance to cefotaxime and resistance to ciprofloxacin were significantly overrepresented compared to E. coli from municipal wastewater and surface water. Most cefotaxime-resistant E. coliisolates produced ESBL. In two of the mWWTP, ESBL-producing variants were detected that were identical with respect to phylogenetic group, sequence type, AMR-profile, and ESBL-genotype to variants from HCI wastewater discharged onto the same sewer and sampled on the same day (A1/ST23/CTX-M-1, B23/ST131/CTX-M-15, D2/ST405/CTX

  9. Differential Actions of Chlorhexidine on the Cell Wall of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Hon-Yeung; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Cheung, Sau-Ha; Liang, Longman Yimin; Lam, Yun-Wah; Chiu, Sung-Kay

    2012-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is a chlorinated phenolic disinfectant used commonly in mouthwash for its action against bacteria. However, a comparative study of the action of chlorhexidine on the cell morphology of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is lacking. In this study, the actions of chlorhexidine on the cell morphology were identified with the aids of electron microscopy. After exposure to chlorhexidine, numerous spots of indentation on the cell wall were found in both Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. The number of indentation spots increased with time of incubation and increasing chlorhexidine concentration. Interestingly, the dented spots found in B. subtilis appeared mainly at the hemispherical caps of the cells, while in E. coli the dented spots were found all over the cells. After being exposed to chlorhexidine for a prolonged period, leakage of cellular contents and subsequent ghost cells were observed, especially from B subtilis. By using 2-D gel/MS-MS analysis, five proteins related to purine nucleoside interconversion and metabolism were preferentially induced in the cell wall of E. coli, while three proteins related to stress response and four others in amino acid biosynthesis were up-regulated in the cell wall materials of B. subtilis. The localized morphological damages together with the biochemical and protein analysis of the chlorhexidine-treated cells suggest that chlorhexidine may act on the differentially distributed lipids in the cell membranes/wall of B. subtilis and E. coli. PMID:22606280

  10. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  11. Candida krusei isolated from fruit juices ultrafiltration membranes promotes colonization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarifa, María Clara; Lozano, Jorge Enrique; Brugnoni, Lorena Inés

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the interactions between a common food spoilage yeast and two pathogenic bacteria involved in outbreaks associated with fruit juices, the present paper studies the effect of the interplay of Candida krusei, collected from UF membranes, with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in the overall process of adhesion and colonization of abiotic surfaces. Two different cases were tested: a) co-adhesion by pathogenic bacteria and yeasts, and b) incorporation of bacteria to pre-adhered C. krusei cells. Cultures were made on stainless steel at 25°C using apple juice as culture medium. After 24 h of co-adhesion with C. krusei, both E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica increased their counts 1.05 and 1.11 log CFU cm 2 , respectively. Similar increases were obtained when incorporating bacteria to pre-adhered cells of Candida. Nevertheless C. krusei counts decreased in both experimental conditions, in a) 0.40 log CFU cm 2 and 0.55 log CFU cm 2 when exposed to E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica and in b) 0.18 and 0.68 log CFU cm 2 , respectively. This suggests that C. krusei, E. coli O157:H7, and S. enterica have a complex relationship involving physical and chemical interactions on food contact surfaces. This study supports the possibility that pathogen interactions with members of spoilage microbiota, such as C. krusei, might play an important role for the survival and dissemination of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in food-processing environments. Based on the data obtained from the present study, much more attention should be given to prevent the contamination of these pathogens in acidic drinks.

  12. Quantitative detection of residual E. coli host cell DNA by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hyuck; Bae, Jung Eun; Lee, Jung Hee; Shin, Jeong Sup; Kim, In Seop

    2010-10-01

    E. coli has been widely used as a host system to manufacture recombinant proteins for human therapeutic use. Among impurities to be eliminated during the downstream process, residual host cell DNA is a major interest for safety. Residual E. coli host cell DNA in the final products are usually determined using conventional slot blot hybridization assay or total DNA Threshold assay, although these methods are time consuming, expensive, and relatively insensitive. Therefore a sensitive real-time PCR assay for specific detection of residual E. coli DNA was developed and compared with slot blot hybridization assay and Threshold assay to validate the overall capability of these methods. Specific primer pair for amplification of the E. coli 16S rRNA gene was selected to improve the sensitivity, and E. coli host cell DNA was quantified by use of SYBR Green 1. The detection limit of real-time PCR assay in the optimized condition was calculated to be 0.042 pg genomic DNA, which is much higher than those of slot blot hybridization assay and Threshold assay of which detection limit were 2.42 and 3.73 pg genomic DNA, respectively. The real-time PCR assay was validated to be more reproducible, accurate, and precise than slot blot hybridization assay and Threshold assay. The real-time PCR assay may be a useful tool for quantitative detection and clearance validation of residual E. coli DNA during the manufacturing process for recombinant therapeutics.

  13. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence

  14. Amaranthus caudatus extract inhibits the invasion of E. coli into uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Zambrana, Silvia; Dieulouard, Soizic; Kamolvit, Witchuda; Nilsén, Vera; Gonzales, Eduardo; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Brauner, Annelie

    2018-04-03

    Amaranthus caudatus is traditionally used to treat infections. Based on its traditional usage, we investigated the effect of A. caudatus on the bladder epithelial cells in the protection of E. coli infection. The direct antimicrobial effects of A. caudatus on uropathogenic bacteria were investigated using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. Bladder epithelial cell lines T24 and 5637 and uropathogenic E. coli strain #12 were used to investigate the effect of A. caudatus. Bacterial adhesion and invasion into bladder cells treated with A. caudatus was analyzed. Expression of uroplakin-1a (UPK1A), β1 integrin (ITGB1), caveolin-1 (CAV1) and the antimicrobial peptides human β defensin-2 (DEFB4A) and LL-37 (CAMP) was evaluated using RT-PCR. No direct antibacterial effect on E. coli or any of the tested uropathogenic strains was observed by A. caudatus. However, we demonstrated reduced mRNA expression of uroplakin-1a and caveolin-1, but not β1 integrin after treatment of uroepithelial cells, mirrored by the decreased adhesion and invasion of E. coli. A. caudatus treatment did not induce increased gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides, LL-37 and human β-defensin-2. Our results showed that A. caudatus has a protective role on bladder epithelial cells against uropathogenic E. coli infection by decreasing the bacterial adhesion and invasion, thereby preventing infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Beumer, R.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and

  16. Induction of sos response in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Lorenzo, J.L.; Padron Soler, E.; Martin Hernandez, G.; Perez Tamayo, N.; del Sol Abascal, E.R.; Almeida Varela, E.

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of sos response induction in Escherichia Coli cells was studied by means of the gene fusion SfiA:LacZ. In these cells, the specific beta galactosidase activity and the cellular growth rate showed an exponential behaviour. The sensitivity of the GC 2181 starin to gamma irradiation is equal to Do -1= 0.00088/Gy. The beta galactosidase activity

  17. Enhancement of invasiveness of Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli in HEp-2 cells by centrifugation.

    OpenAIRE

    Vesikari, T; Bromirska, J; Mäki, M

    1982-01-01

    Centrifugation enhanced the infectivity of invasive Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica for HEp-2 cells. Noninvasive bacteria were not endocytosed after centrifugation. The centrifugation procedure may increase the sensitivity of testing for bacterial invasiveness in cell culture without causing false-positive results.

  18. Bioadsorption of cadmium ion by cell surface-engineered yeasts displaying metallothionein and hexa-His

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, K.; Ueda, M. [Lab. of Applied Biological Chemistry, Kyoto Univ., Yoshida, Kyoto (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The Cd{sup 2+}-chelating abilities of yeast metallothionein (YMT) and hexa-His displayed on the yeast-cell surface were compared. Display of YMT and hexa-His by {alpha}-agglutinin-based cell-surface engineering was confirmed by immunofluorescent labeling. Surface-engineered yeast cells with YMT and hexa-His fused in tandem showed superior cell-surface adsorption and recovery of Cd{sup 2+} under EDTA treatment on the cell surface than hexa-His-displaying cells. YMT was demonstrated to be more effective than hexa-His for the adsorption of Cd{sup 2+}. Yeast cells displaying YMT and/or hexa-His exhibited a higher potential for the adsorption of Cd{sup 2+} than Escherichia coli cells displaying these molecules. In order to investigate the effect of the displayed YMT and hexa-His on sensitivity to toxic Cd{sup 2+}, growth in Cd{sup 2+}-containing liquid medium was monitored. Unlike hexa-His-displaying cells, cells displaying YMT and hexa-His fused in tandem induced resistance to Cd{sup 2+} through active and enhanced adsorption of toxic Cd{sup 2+}. These results indicate that YMT-displaying yeast cells are a unique bioadsorbent with a functional chelating ability superior to that of E. coli. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of a new medium for the enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in Japanese surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, H; Mizuochi, S; Saito, M; Matsuoka, H

    2008-04-01

    A new medium, EC-Blue-10, containing chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates, KNO(3) and sodium pyruvate has been developed for the rapid simultaneous detection and enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in water. Two evaluations of EC-Blue-10 were carried out. Firstly, EC-Blue-10 was compared with Colilert-MPN for 96 water samples using MPN for total coliforms and E. coli. Secondly, the detection of coliforms and E. coli were compared using 2400 tubes of EC-Blue-10 and Colilert-MPN. The regression coefficients between EC-Blue-10 and Colilert-MPN for total coliforms and E. coli were 0.91 and 0.89, respectively. For the detection results, the Cohen's kappa values between the two media were 0.79 for coliforms and 0.72 for E. coli. EC-Blue-10 is almost same as Colilert-MPN for the detection of coliforms and E. coli in surface waters. Further evaluation for EC-Blue-10 is needed to verify in different geographical areas. EC-Blue-10 is useful method for the rapid and simultaneous detection of total coliforms and E. coli in water sample.

  20. Role of UV-inducible proteins in repair of various wild-type Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedliakova, M.; Slezarikova, V.; Brozmanova, J.; Masek, F.; Bayerova, V.

    1980-01-01

    3 wild-type strains of E. coli, namely K12 AB2497, B/r WP2 and 15 555-7, proficient in excision and post-replication repair, differ markedly in their UV resistance. To elucidate this difference, the influence was investigated of induction by application of inducing fluence (IF) before lethal fluence (LF) on repair processes after LF. In cells distinguished by low UV resistance (E. coli 15 555-7; E. coli B/r WP2), dimer excision was less complete in cultures irradiated with IF + LF than in cultures irradiated with LF only. The highly resistant E. coli K12 AB2497 performed complete excision both after IF + LF or after LF alone. All 3 types of cell survived better after IF + LF than after LF only. Because, in most strains so far investigated, the application of IF reduced dimer excision and increased survival, dimer excision per se does not appear important for survival. We conclude that the rate and completeness of dimer excision can serve as a measure of efficiency of the excision system whose action is necessary for repair of another lesion. Cells of all investigated strains could not resume DNA replication and died progressively when irradiated with LF and post-incubated with chloramphenicol (LF CAP + ). Thus, it appears that inducible proteins are necessary for repair in all wild-type E. coli cells given with potentially lethal doses of UV irradiation. (orig.)

  1. Integration of AI-2 Based Cell-Cell Signaling with Metabolic Cues in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Mitra

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2 is generated as a byproduct of activated methyl cycle by the action of LuxS in Escherichia coli. AI-2 is synthesized, released and later internalized in a cell-density dependent manner. Here, by mutational analysis of the genes, uvrY and csrA, we describe a regulatory circuit of accumulation and uptake of AI-2. We constructed a single-copy chromosomal luxS-lacZ fusion in a luxS + merodiploid strain and evaluated its relative expression in uvrY and csrA mutants. At the entry of stationary phase, the expression of the fusion and AI-2 accumulation was positively regulated by uvrY and negatively regulated by csrA respectively. A deletion of csrA altered message stability of the luxS transcript and CsrA protein exhibited weak binding to 5' luxS regulatory region. DNA protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed direct interaction of UvrY with the luxS promoter. Additionally, reduced expression of the fusion in hfq deletion mutant suggested involvement of small RNA interactions in luxS regulation. In contrast, the expression of lsrA operon involved in AI-2 uptake, is negatively regulated by uvrY and positively by csrA in a cell-density dependent manner. The dual role of csrA in AI-2 synthesis and uptake suggested a regulatory crosstalk of cell signaling with carbon regulation in Escherichia coli. We found that the cAMP-CRP mediated catabolite repression of luxS expression was uvrY dependent. This study suggests that luxS expression is complex and regulated at the level of transcription and translation. The multifactorial regulation supports the notion that cell-cell communication requires interaction and integration of multiple metabolic signals.

  2. Evolution of the Min Protein Oscillation in E. coli Bacteria During Cell Growth and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Benjamin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    Cell division is a key step in the life of a bacterium. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that the cellular machinery is equally partitioned into two daughter cells of equal size. In E. coli, this is accomplished, in part, by the Min protein system, in which Min proteins oscillate along the long axis of the rod-shaped cells. We have used high magnification, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy to characterize in detail the oscillation in E. coli cells in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have used a microfluidic device to confine the bacteria into microchannels that allows us to track the evolution of the oscillation in cells as they grow and divide in LB growth media. In particular, we have tracked the loss of synchrony between the oscillations in the daughter cells following cell division.

  3. Vanillin production using Escherichia coli cells over-expressing isoeugenol monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mamoru; Okada, Yukiyoshi; Yoshida, Toyokazu; Nagasawa, Toru

    2008-04-01

    The isoeugenol monooxygenase gene of Pseudomonas putida IE27 was inserted into an expression vector, pET21a, under the control of the T7 promoter. The recombinant plasmid was introduced into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells, containing no vanillin-degrading activity. The transformed E. coli BL21(DE3) cells produced 28.3 g vanillin/l from 230 mM isoeugenol, with a molar conversion yield of 81% at 20 degrees C after 6 h. In the reaction system, no accumulation of undesired by-products, such as vanillic acid or acetaldehyde, was observed.

  4. Expression of Escherichia coli uvr genes in mammalian cells. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The E. coli uvrA, uvrB and uvrC gene products are required to carry out the incision step in excision repair of damaged DNA. The range of sensitivity to DNA damage in E. coli uvrA uvrB, and uvrC mutants is similar to that of cells derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Our goal is to introduce the E. coli uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes into SV40-transformed XP cells and to examine whether these genes are able to genetically complement the repair deficiency in XP cells. Ecogpt was used as a selection marker for uvr gene transfection into XP cells. The uvr genes were cloned into composite pBR322-SV40 and Ecogpt vectors in which each E. coli gene is flanked by individual SV40 regulatory elements. We have also constructed vectors in which the uvr gene and the gpt are in tandem and flanked by one set of SV40 regulatory elements. SV40-transformed XP cells of complementation group A (XP12BE) were transfected with pSV2uvrASV2gpt, a vector of the former configuration. Southern gel analysis of the resulting gpt + cells has revealed one colony in which the uvrA gene with its SV40 elements has been integrated into the chromosomal DNA intact

  5. Functions of proteoglycans at the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höök, M; Woods, A; Johansson, S

    1986-01-01

    Proteoglycans (primarily heparan sulphate proteoglycans) are found at the surface of most adherent eukaryotic cells. Earlier studies suggest that these molecules can be associated with the cell surface principally by two different mechanisms. Proteoglycans may occur as membrane......-intercalated glycoproteins, where the core protein of the proteoglycan is anchored in the lipid interior of the plasma membrane, or they may be bound via the polysaccharide components of the molecule to specific anchoring proteins present at the cell surface. A number of functions have been proposed for cell surface......-associated proteoglycans, including: regulation of cell-substrate adhesion; regulation of cell proliferation; participation in the binding and uptake of extracellular components; and participation in the regulation of extracellular matrix formation. Evidence is discussed suggesting that the cell-associated heparan...

  6. Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Penny, Christian; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Schets, Franciska M; Blaak, Hetty; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A; de Boer, Albert; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Mossong, Joel; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2016-09-15

    Campylobacter is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is frequently found in surface water, where it indicates recent contamination with animal faeces, sewage effluent, and agricultural run-off. The contribution of different animal reservoirs to surface water contamination with Campylobacter is largely unknown. In the Netherlands, the massive poultry culling to control the 2003 avian influenza epidemic coincided with a 44-50% reduction in human campylobacteriosis cases in the culling areas, suggesting substantial environment-mediated spread of poultry-borne Campylobacter. We inferred the origin of surface water Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains in Luxembourg and the Netherlands, as defined by multilocus sequence typing, by comparison to strains from poultry, pigs, ruminants, and wild birds, using the asymmetric island model for source attribution. Most Luxembourgish water strains were attributed to wild birds (61.0%), followed by poultry (18.8%), ruminants (15.9%), and pigs (4.3%); whereas the Dutch water strains were mainly attributed to poultry (51.7%), wild birds (37.3%), ruminants (9.8%), and pigs (1.2%). Attributions varied over seasons and surface water types, and geographical variation in the relative contribution of poultry correlated with the magnitude of poultry production at either the national or provincial level, suggesting that environmental dissemination of Campylobacter from poultry farms and slaughterhouses can be substantial in poultry-rich regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery.

  8. Transport and viability of Escherichia coli cells in clean and iron oxide coated sand following coating with silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenya, Bryne T; Curry, Philip; Kapetas, Leon

    2015-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of processes controlling the transport and viability of bacteria in porous media is critical for designing in situ bioremediation and microbiological water decontamination programs. We investigated the combined influence of coating sand with iron oxide and silver nanoparticles on the transport and viability of Escherichia coli cells under saturated conditions. Results showed that iron oxide coatings increase cell deposition which was generally reversed by silver nanoparticle coatings in the early stages of injection. These observations are consistent with short-term, particle surface charge controls on bacteria transport, where a negatively charged surface induced by silver nanoparticles reverses the positive charge due to iron oxide coatings, but columns eventually recovered irreversible cell deposition. Silver nanoparticle coatings significantly increased cell inactivation during transit through the columns. However, when viability data is normalised to volume throughput, only a small improvement in cell inactivation is observed for silver nanoparticle coated sands relative to iron oxide coating alone. This counterintuitive result underscores the importance of net surface charge in controlling cell transport and inactivation and implies that the extra cost for implementing silver nanoparticle coatings on porous beds coated with iron oxides may not be justified in designing point of use water filters in low income countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishman, E.C.; Jewell, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/10 6 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/10 6 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG [pt

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Solution by Atmospheric-Pressure N2, He, Air, and O2 Microplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhang, Xianhui; Bi, Zhenhua; Zong, Zichao; Niu, Jinhai; Song, Ying; Liu, Dongping; Yang, Size

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure N2, He, air, and O2 microplasma arrays have been used to inactivate Escherichia coli cells suspended in aqueous solution. Measurements show that the efficiency of inactivation of E. coli cells is strongly dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2 and He microplasma arrays, air and O2 microplasma arrays may be utilized to more efficiently kill E. coli cells in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of inactivation of E. coli cells in water can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model, where reactive oxygen species play a crucial role in the inactivation process. Analysis indicates that plasma-generated reactive species can react with E. coli cells in water by direct or indirect interactions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Bacterial Ghosts of Escherichia coli Drive Efficient Maturation of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Ahmed Hajam

    Full Text Available Bacterial ghosts (BGs are empty cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. They not only represent a potential platform for development of novel vaccines but also provide a tool for efficient adjuvant and antigen delivery system. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between BGs of Escherichia coli (E. coli and bovine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs. MoDCs are highly potent antigen-presenting cells and have the potential to act as a powerful tool for manipulating the immune system. We generated bovine MoDCs in vitro from blood monocytes using E. coli expressed bovine GM-CSF and IL-4 cytokines. These MoDCs displayed typical morphology and functions similar to DCs. We further investigated the E. coli BGs to induce maturation of bovine MoDCs in comparison to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We observed the maturation marker molecules such as MHC-II, CD80 and CD86 were induced early and at higher levels in BG stimulated MoDCs as compared to the LPS stimulated MoDCs. BG mediated stimulation induced significantly higher levels of cytokine expression in bovine MoDCs than LPS. Both pro-inflammatory (IL-12 and TNF-α and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 cytokines were induced in MoDCs after BGs stimulation. We further analysed the effects of BGs on the bovine MoDCs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. We found the BG-treated bovine MoDCs had significantly (p<0.05 higher capacity to stimulate allogenic T cell proliferation in MLR as compared to the LPS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the E. coli BGs induce a strong activation and maturation of bovine MoDCs.

  12. A novel putrescine importer required for type 1 pili-driven surface motility induced by extracellular putrescine in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Oshida, Mayu; Benno, Yoshimi

    2011-03-25

    Recently, many studies have reported that polyamines play a role in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling processes. The present study describes a novel putrescine importer required for induction of type 1 pili-driven surface motility. The surface motility of the Escherichia coli ΔspeAB ΔspeC ΔpotABCD strain, which cannot produce putrescine and cannot import spermidine from the medium, was induced by extracellular putrescine. Introduction of the gene deletions for known polyamine importers (ΔpotE, ΔpotFGHI, and ΔpuuP) or a putative polyamine importer (ΔydcSTUV) into the ΔspeAB ΔspeC ΔpotABCD strain did not affect putrescine-induced surface motility. The deletion of yeeF, an annotated putative putrescine importer, in the ΔspeAB ΔspeC ΔpotABCD ΔydcSTUV strain abolished surface motility in putrescine-supplemented medium. Complementation of yeeF by a plasmid vector restored surface motility. The surface motility observed in the present study was abolished by the deletion of fimA, suggesting that the surface motility is type 1 pili-driven. A transport assay using the yeeF(+) or ΔyeeF strains revealed that YeeF is a novel putrescine importer. The K(m) of YeeF (155 μM) is 40 to 300 times higher than that of other importers reported previously. On the other hand, the V(max) of YeeF (9.3 nmol/min/mg) is comparable to that of PotABCD, PotFGHI, and PuuP. The low affinity of YeeF for putrescine may allow E. coli to sense the cell density depending on the concentration of extracellular putrescine.

  13. A Novel Putrescine Importer Required for Type 1 Pili-driven Surface Motility Induced by Extracellular Putrescine in Escherichia coli K-12*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Oshida, Mayu; Benno, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many studies have reported that polyamines play a role in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling processes. The present study describes a novel putrescine importer required for induction of type 1 pili-driven surface motility. The surface motility of the Escherichia coli ΔspeAB ΔspeC ΔpotABCD strain, which cannot produce putrescine and cannot import spermidine from the medium, was induced by extracellular putrescine. Introduction of the gene deletions for known polyamine importers (ΔpotE, ΔpotFGHI, and ΔpuuP) or a putative polyamine importer (ΔydcSTUV) into the ΔspeAB ΔspeC ΔpotABCD strain did not affect putrescine-induced surface motility. The deletion of yeeF, an annotated putative putrescine importer, in the ΔspeAB ΔspeC ΔpotABCD ΔydcSTUV strain abolished surface motility in putrescine-supplemented medium. Complementation of yeeF by a plasmid vector restored surface motility. The surface motility observed in the present study was abolished by the deletion of fimA, suggesting that the surface motility is type 1 pili-driven. A transport assay using the yeeF+ or ΔyeeF strains revealed that YeeF is a novel putrescine importer. The Km of YeeF (155 μm) is 40 to 300 times higher than that of other importers reported previously. On the other hand, the Vmax of YeeF (9.3 nmol/min/mg) is comparable to that of PotABCD, PotFGHI, and PuuP. The low affinity of YeeF for putrescine may allow E. coli to sense the cell density depending on the concentration of extracellular putrescine. PMID:21266585

  14. Escherichia coli producing colibactin triggers premature and transmissible senescence in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Secher

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is an irreversible state of proliferation arrest evoked by a myriad of stresses including oncogene activation, telomere shortening/dysfunction and genotoxic insults. It has been associated with tumor activation, immune suppression and aging, owing to the secretion of proinflammatory mediators. The bacterial genotoxin colibactin, encoded by the pks genomic island is frequently harboured by Escherichia coli strains of the B2 phylogenetic group. Mammalian cells exposed to live pks+ bacteria exhibit DNA-double strand breaks (DSB and undergo cell-cycle arrest and death. Here we show that cells that survive the acute bacterial infection with pks+ E. coli display hallmarks of cellular senescence: chronic DSB, prolonged cell-cycle arrest, enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal activity, expansion of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear foci and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. This was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and proteases secretion. These mediators were able to trigger DSB and enhanced SA-β-Gal activity in bystander recipient cells treated with conditioned medium from senescent cells. Furthermore, these senescent cells promoted the growth of human tumor cells. In conclusion, the present data demonstrated that the E. coli genotoxin colibactin induces cellular senescence and subsequently propel bystander genotoxic and oncogenic effects.

  15. Cell engineering of Escherichia coli allows high cell density accumulation without fed-batch process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcklund, Emma; Markland, Katrin; Larsson, Gen

    2008-01-01

    A set of mutations in the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) was used to create Escherichia coli strains with a reduced uptake rate of glucose. This allows a growth restriction, which is controlled on cellular rather than reactor level, which is typical of the fed-batch cultivation concept. Batch growth of the engineered strains resulted in cell accumulation profiles corresponding to a growth rate of 0.78, 0.38 and 0.25 h(-1), respectively. The performance of the mutants in batch cultivation was compared to fed-batch cultivation of the wild type cell using restricted glucose feed to arrive at the corresponding growth profiles. Results show that the acetate production, oxygen consumption and product formation were similar, when a recombinant product was induced from the lacUV5 promoter. Ten times more cells could be produced in batch cultivation using the mutants without the growth detrimental production of acetic acid. This allows high cell density production without the establishment of elaborate fed-batch control equipment. The technique is suggested as a versatile tool in high throughput multiparallel protein production but also for increasing the number of experiments performed during process development while keeping conditions similar to the large-scale fed-batch performance.

  16. Beta-glucanase productivity improvement via cell immobilization of recombinant Escherichia coli cells in different matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshay, Usama; El-Enshasy, Hesham; Ismail, I M K; Moawad, Hassan; Abd-El-Ghany, Sawsan

    2011-01-01

    The studies have been performed to analyze the production of beta-glucanase by a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli immobilized in different matrices. Porous sintered glass SIRAN, Ceramic supporting matrices and Broken Pumice stone as well as SIRAN Raschig-rings were examined for the immobilization of whole bacterial cells. The beta-glucanase activity of bacteria immobilized in CeramTec PST 5 (4-5 mm) was very low. CeramTec PST 5 (1.5-2.5 mm) was found to be the best carrier compared to all other matrices regarding glucanase production (630 U/ml) and compared to enzyme activity produced by free cells (500 U/ml). Different doses of matrices were applied (2, 5, 7, 10 g/lask) in the form of "matrix weight". Using 2 g/flask of CeramTec PST 5 (1.5-2.5 mm) yielded enzyme activity of 630 U/ml). CeramTec gives highest operational stability of beta-glucanase by repeated batch fermentation to 5 cycles, and activity reached 660 U/ml. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed a high number of vegetative cells that continued growth inside the matrices, indicating that beta-glucanase activity improvement was due to the immobilization of the cells.

  17. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  18. Induction of genetic recombination in the lambda bacteriophage by ultraviolet radiation of the Escherichia Coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara D, D.

    1986-12-01

    In this work there are reported the results that show that although the stimulation of the recombination of the Lambda bacteriophage, by UV irradiation of the cells of Escherichia Coli, it looks to be the result of the high expression of the functions of the SOS system, doesn't keep some relationship with the high concentration of protein reached RecA. (Author)

  19. Regioselective production of sulfated polyphenols using human cytosolic sulfotransferase-expressing Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohira, Takehiko; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Hashiguchi, Takuyu; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Suiko, Masahito; Sakakibara, Yoichi

    2017-07-01

    Dietary polyphenols present in fruits and vegetables have been reported to manifest beneficial health effects on humans. Polyphenol metabolites including their sulfated derivatives have been shown to be biologically active. Primarily due to the difficulty in preparing regiospecific sulfated polyphenols for detailed investigations, the exact functions of sulfated polyphenols, however, remain unclear. The current study aimed to develop a procedure for the regioselective production of sulfated polyphenols using Escherichia coli cells expressing human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs). Two regioisomers of sulfated genistein were produced by E. coli cells expressing human SULT1A3, SULT1C4, or SULT1E1, and purified using Diaion HP20 resin, followed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Structural analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that E. coli cells expressing SULT1A3 preferentially produced genistein 4'-sulfate, whereas E. coli cells expressing SULT1C4 preferentially produced genistein 7-sulfate. To improve the bioproductivity, the effects of several factors including the concentrations of glucose and SO 4 2- , and growth temperature were investigated. The bioproduction procedure established in this study will be valuable for the production of regioselective sulfated polyphenols for use in future studies on their biological functions. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Restriction alleviation of phage λ in Escherichia Coli K-12 cells after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinkova, E.V.; Torosyan, M.V.; Fradkin, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In γ-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli K-12 restriction allevation of an unmodified phage λ is only observed in AB1157 strain. No restriction allevation by γ-rays is registered in AB1157 mutants (rec A and ssb-1)

  1. Ingestion of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli by human peritoneal mesothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C. E.; Brouwer-Steenbergen, J. J.; Schadee-Eestermans, I. L.; Meijer, S.; Krediet, R. T.; Beelen, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we examined whether mesothelial cells can ingest and digest bacteria. The results showed that all strains were ingested. Ingested staphylococci proliferated abundantly, and only a few were digested. Escherichia coli, however, was digested during the first 8 h, whereafter the

  2. Genome-wide analysis of E. coli cell-gene interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardinale, S.; Cambray, G.

    2017-01-01

    modulate expression indirectly through an effect on cell size, putting forward the existence of a generic Size-Expression interaction in the model prokaryote Escherichia coli. Results: The Size-Expression interaction was quantified by inserting a dual fluorescent reporter gene construct into each...

  3. Attachment behaviour of Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella Typhimurium P6on food contact surfaces for food transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abban, Stephen; Jakobsen, Mogens; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    material sections of the same surfaces. We report these observations for the first time for aluminium and the FRP material and in part for stainless steel. The S. Typhimurium P6 strain also had significantly higher level of attachment than the E. coli K12 strain. Our findings show that food residue...

  4. Modified Vero cell induced by Bifidobacterium bifidum inhibits enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cytopathic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahamtan, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, such as E. coli O157:H7, are emerging food-borne pathogens worldwide. This micro-organism can damage the epithelial tissue of the large intestine. The cytotoxic effects can be neutralized by probiotics such as Bifidobacterium bifidum. Probiotics are viable cells that have beneficial effects on the health of the host. The preventing activity of B. bifidum against E. coli O157 was studied using a Vero cell model. Vero cell was pretreated with viable B. bifidum and incubated for either 3 h to 24 h and then collected from the cell to make modified Vero cell (MVC. Indirect antibacterial effects of B. bifidum were demonstrated by reduction of attachment of E. coli O157:H7 to MVC. The maximum reduction was resulted in pretreatment of Vero cell with B. bifidum for 24 h before infection. B. bifidum attenuated E. coli O157:H7 attachment to MVC up to 10 days of incubation. To our knowledge, MCV prevented Vero cell line injury induced by E. coli O157:H7. Therefore, B. bifidum can be used for inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 cytopathic effect (CPE in Vero cell model, even as pretreatment of the cell line.

  5. Functions of proteoglycans at the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höök, M; Woods, A; Johansson, S

    1986-01-01

    sulphate helps to connect the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix in focal adhesions. This evidence includes: the co-localization of actin and heparan sulphate proteoglycan during the process of cell spreading, and in isolated focal adhesions; biochemical analyses of a hydrophobic......Proteoglycans (primarily heparan sulphate proteoglycans) are found at the surface of most adherent eukaryotic cells. Earlier studies suggest that these molecules can be associated with the cell surface principally by two different mechanisms. Proteoglycans may occur as membrane......-intercalated glycoproteins, where the core protein of the proteoglycan is anchored in the lipid interior of the plasma membrane, or they may be bound via the polysaccharide components of the molecule to specific anchoring proteins present at the cell surface. A number of functions have been proposed for cell surface...

  6. Biofilm Formation on Biotic and Abiotic Surfaces in the Presence of Antimicrobials by Escherichia coli Isolates from Cases of Bovine Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vitor O.; Soares, Larissa O.; Silva Júnior, Abelardo; Mantovani, Hilário C.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a highly adaptive microorganism, and its ability to form biofilms under certain conditions can be critical for antimicrobial resistance. The adhesion of four E. coli isolates from bovine mastitis to bovine mammary alveolar (MAC-T) cells, biofilm production on a polystyrene surface, and the expression profiles of the genes fliC, csgA, fimA, and luxS in the presence of enrofloxacin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, and ampicillin at half of the MIC were investigated. Increased adhesion of E. coli isolates in the presence of antimicrobials was not observed; however, increased internalization of some isolates was observed by confocal microscopy. All of the antimicrobials induced the formation of biofilms by at least one isolate, whereas enrofloxacin and co-trimoxazole decreased biofilm formation by at least one isolate. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that all four genes were differentially expressed when bacteria were exposed to subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials, with expression altered on the order of 1.5- to 22-fold. However, it was not possible to associate gene expression with induction or reduction of biofilm formation in the presence of the antimicrobials. Taken together, the results demonstrate that antimicrobials could induce biofilm formation by some isolates, in addition to inducing MAC-T cell invasion, a situation that might occur in vivo, potentially resulting in a bacterial reservoir in the udder, which might explain some cases of persistent mastitis in herds. PMID:25063668

  7. A nucleation theory of cell surface capping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Wester, M.J.; Perelson, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new theory of cell surface capping based on the principles of nucleation. When antibody interacts with cell surface molecules, the molecules initially form small aggregates called patches that later coalesce into a large aggregate called a cap. While a cap can form by patches being pulled together by action of the cell''s cytoskeleton, in the case of some molecules, disruption of the cytoskeleton does not prevent cap formation. Diffusion of large aggregates on a cell surface is slow, and thus we propose that a cap can form solely through the diffusion of small aggregates containing just one or a few cell surface molecules. Here we consider the extreme case in which single molecules are mobile, but aggregates of all larger sizes are immobile. We show that a set of patches in equilibrium with a open-quotes seaclose quotes of free cell surface molecules can undergo a nucleation-type phase transition in which the largest patch will bind free cell surface molecules, deplete the concentration of such molecules in the open-quotes seaclose quotes and thus cause the other patches to shrink in size. We therefore show that a cap can form without patches having to move, collide with each other, and aggregate

  8. Data in support of Gallium (Ga3+ antibacterial activities to counteract E. coli and S. epidermidis biofilm formation onto pro-osteointegrative titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cochis

    2016-03-01

    In this article we included an indirect cytocompatibility evaluation towards Saos2 human osteoblasts and extended the microbial evaluation of the Ga3+ enriched titanium surfaces against the biofilm former Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Cell viability was assayed by the Alamar Blue test, while bacterial viability was evaluated by the metabolic colorimetric 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Finally biofilm morphology was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Data regarding Ga3+ activity were compared to Silver.

  9. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  10. A moonlighting enzyme links Escherichia coli cell size with central metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available Growth rate and nutrient availability are the primary determinants of size in single-celled organisms: rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells are more than twice as large as their slow growing counterparts. Here we report the identification of the glucosyltransferase OpgH as a nutrient-dependent regulator of E. coli cell size. During growth under nutrient-rich conditions, OpgH localizes to the nascent septal site, where it antagonizes assembly of the tubulin-like cell division protein FtsZ, delaying division and increasing cell size. Biochemical analysis is consistent with OpgH sequestering FtsZ from growing polymers. OpgH is functionally analogous to UgtP, a Bacillus subtilis glucosyltransferase that inhibits cell division in a growth rate-dependent fashion. In a striking example of convergent evolution, OpgH and UgtP share no homology, have distinct enzymatic activities, and appear to inhibit FtsZ assembly through different mechanisms. Comparative analysis of E. coli and B. subtilis reveals conserved aspects of growth rate regulation and cell size control that are likely to be broadly applicable. These include the conservation of uridine diphosphate glucose as a proxy for nutrient status and the use of moonlighting enzymes to couple growth rate-dependent phenomena to central metabolism.

  11. Oxidative stress in E. coli cells upon exposure to heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, María; Ruiz, Virginia; Serrano, Mª Jesús; Condón, Santiago; Mañas, Pilar

    2017-01-16

    Heat treatments are widely used by the food industry to inactivate microorganisms, however their mode of action on microbial cells is not fully known. In the last years, it has been proposed that the generation of oxidative species could be an important factor contributing to cell death by heat and by other stresses; however, investigations in this field are scarce. The present work studies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon heat treatment in E. coli, through the use of cell staining with specific fluorochromes. Results obtained demonstrate that ROS are detected in E. coli cells when they are subjected to heat exposure, and the amount of fluorescence increases with temperature and time, as does the cellular inactivation. The addition of glutathione or tiron, a potent antioxidant and a superoxide quencher, respectively, to the heating medium protected E. coli against heat inactivation and concurrently reduced the detection of ROS, especially in the case of glutathione. Finally, recovery of heated cells under conditions that relief oxidative stress produced an increase in cell survival. Data presented in this work support the view that ROS generation and subsequent control in bacterial cells could be an essential factor determining inactivation and survival upon exposure to heat, and it could be a potential target to increase the efficacy of current treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA repair and replication in cells of Escherichia coli made permeable with hypotonic buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, E.

    1980-10-01

    Hypotonic buffers (20 mM phosphate or 40 mM Tris) were found to make cells of Escherichia coli permeable to low-molecular-weight compounds without significantly affecting cell viability. When cells of E. coli were suspended in hypotonic buffers during irradiation no repair of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks occurred. Addition of the four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and Mg/sup 2/+ after irradiation brings about a recovery of the rejoining ability. NAD stimulated repair in the presence of the four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and Mg/sup 2/+, while the presence of ATP had no significant effect. The initial yield of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks was increased in cells treated with hypotonic buffers. This is explained by an efflux of a large fraction of the intracellular compounds containing sulfhydryl groups. Cells of E. coli in 40 mM Tris buffer incorporated exogenous deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates at half the rate observed in cells made permeable by toluene. This DNA synthesis occurred in polAl cells and was ATP dependent and thus probably represents semiconservative replication.

  13. Escherichia coli from retail meats carry genes associated with uropathogenic Escherichia coli, but are weakly invasive in human bladder cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, X; Meng, J; McDermott, P F; Zhao, S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the uropathogenic potential of Escherichia coli isolated from retail meats. Two hundred E. coli isolates recovered from retail meats, which were previously identified molecularly as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were investigated for the presence of 21 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) virulence-associated genes. Twenty-three E. coli isolates were selected based on their serogroups and the number of virulence genes they contained, and further characterized using multilocus sequence typing, and by tissue culture assays for adherence to and invasion of T-24 human bladder cells and for their induction of interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. All virulence genes tested, except afa/dra and hlyD, were detected among the E. coli isolates. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 23 selected isolates revealed that 17 isolates belonged to STs associated with human UPEC. Nearly all 23 isolates exhibited lower level of adherence and invasion compared to a clinical strain, UPEC CFT073. These observations suggested that a small proportion of E. coli isolates from retail meats carry uropathogenic associated virulence genes and thus may serve as a reservoir of these genes to UPEC in the human intestine. Their virulence potential seemed limited as they were only weakly invasive in human bladder cell culture. These findings support the hypothesis that retail meat E. coli may play a role in relation to urinary tract infection (UTI) and may be considered in development of a UTI prevention strategy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Localization microscopy study of FtsZ structures in E. coli cells during SOS-response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedyaykin, A. D.; Sabantsev, A. V.; Vishnyakov, I. E.; Borchsenius, S. N.; Fedorova, Y. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Serdobintsev, P. Yu; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Localization microscopy allows visualization of biological structures with resolution well below the diffraction limit. This is achieved by temporal separation of single fluorophore molecules emission and subsequent localization of them with the precision of few tens of nanometers. This method was previously successfully used to obtain images of FtsZ structures in Escherichia coli cells using FtsZ fusion with fluorescent protein mEos2. In this work we obtained superresolution images of FtsZ structures in fixed E. coli cells using immunocytochemical labeling. Comparison of superresolution FtsZ structures in cells undergoing SOS-response and "healthy" cells shows that FtsZ structures are partially disassembled during SOS-response, but still retain some periodicity.

  15. Whole-cell Escherichia coli lactate biosensor for monitoring mammalian cell cultures during biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Lisa; Ainsworth, Catherine; Goey, Cher Hui; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Freemont, Paul S; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-06-01

    Many high-value added recombinant proteins, such as therapeutic glycoproteins, are produced using mammalian cell cultures. In order to optimize the productivity of these cultures it is important to monitor cellular metabolism, for example the utilization of nutrients and the accumulation of metabolic waste products. One metabolic waste product of interest is lactic acid (lactate), overaccumulation of which can decrease cellular growth and protein production. Current methods for the detection of lactate are limited in terms of cost, sensitivity, and robustness. Therefore, we developed a whole-cell Escherichia coli lactate biosensor based on the lldPRD operon and successfully used it to monitor lactate concentration in mammalian cell cultures. Using real samples and analytical validation we demonstrate that our biosensor can be used for absolute quantification of metabolites in complex samples with high accuracy, sensitivity, and robustness. Importantly, our whole-cell biosensor was able to detect lactate at concentrations more than two orders of magnitude lower than the industry standard method, making it useful for monitoring lactate concentrations in early phase culture. Given the importance of lactate in a variety of both industrial and clinical contexts we anticipate that our whole-cell biosensor can be used to address a range of interesting biological questions. It also serves as a blueprint for how to capitalize on the wealth of genetic operons for metabolite sensing available in nature for the development of other whole-cell biosensors. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1290-1300. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Defective lysis of streptomycin-resistant escherichia coli cells infected with bacteriophage f2.

    OpenAIRE

    De Mars Cody, J; Conway, T W

    1981-01-01

    A lysis defect was found to account for the failure of a streptomycin-resistant strain of Escherichia coli to form plaques when infected with the male-specific bacteriophage f2. The lysis defect was associated with the mutation to streptomycin resistance. Large amounts of apparently normal bacteriophage accumulated in these cells. Cell-free extracts from both the parental and mutant strains synthesized a potential lysis protein in considerable amounts in response to formaldehyde-treated f2 RN...

  17. Production of isotopically labeled heterologous proteins in non-E. coli prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of stable isotope-labeled proteins is necessary for the application of a wide variety of NMR methods, to study the structures and dynamics of proteins and protein complexes. The E. coli expression system is generally used for the production of isotope-labeled proteins, because of the advantages of ease of handling, rapid growth, high-level protein production, and low cost for isotope-labeling. However, many eukaryotic proteins are not functionally expressed in E. coli, due to problems related to disulfide bond formation, post-translational modifications, and folding. In such cases, other expression systems are required for producing proteins for biomolecular NMR analyses. In this paper, we review the recent advances in expression systems for isotopically labeled heterologous proteins, utilizing non-E. coli prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum genes for amino acid synthesis in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskrovnaya, O.Yu.; Fonshtein, M.Yu.; Kolibaba, L.G.; Yankovskii, N.K.; Debabov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular cloning of Corynebacterium glutamicum genes for threonine and lysine synthesis has been done in Escherichia coli cells. The clonal library of EcoRI fragments of chromosomal DNA of C. glutamicum was constructed on the plasmid vector λpSL5. The genes for threonine and lysine synthesis were identified by complementation of E. coli mutations in thrB and lysA genes, respectively. Recombinant plasmids, isolated from independent ThrB + clone have a common 4.1-kb long EcoRI DNA fragment. Hybrid plasmids isolated from LysA + transductants of E. coli have common 2.2 and 3.3 kb long EcoRI fragments of C. glutamicum DNA. The hybrid plasmids consistently transduced the markers thrB + and lysA + . The Southern hybridization analysis showed that the cloned DNA fragments hybridized with the fragments of identical length in C. glutamicum chromosomes

  19. Production of isotopically labeled heterologous proteins in non-E. coli prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of stable isotope-labeled proteins is necessary for the application of a wide variety of NMR methods, to study the structures and dynamics of proteins and protein complexes. The E. coli expression system is generally used for the production of isotope-labeled proteins, because of the advantages of ease of handling, rapid growth, high-level protein production, and low cost for isotope-labeling. However, many eukaryotic proteins are not functionally expressed in E. coli, due to problems related to disulfide bond formation, post-translational modifications, and folding. In such cases, other expression systems are required for producing proteins for biomolecular NMR analyses. In this paper, we review the recent advances in expression systems for isotopically labeled heterologous proteins, utilizing non-E. coli prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  20. Stress response of Escherichia coli induced by surface streamer discharge in humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležalová, Eva; Prukner, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šimek, Milan

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli by means of surface streamer discharge has been investigated to obtain new insights into the key mechanisms involved, with a particular emphasis placed on the microbial response to plasma-induced stress. The surface streamer discharge was produced in coplanar dielectric barrier discharge electrode geometry, and was driven by an amplitude-modulated ac high voltage in humid synthetic air at atmospheric pressure. The response to plasma-induced stress was evaluated by using conventional cultivation, sublethal injury and resazurin assay and the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability kit. Compared to conventional cultivation, the LIVE/DEAD® test labels bacteria with damaged membranes, while resazurin assay tracks their metabolic activity. Our results clearly demonstrate that the treated bacteria partly lost their ability to grow properly, i.e. they became injured and culturable, or even viable but nonculturable (VBNC). The ability to develop colonies could have been lost due to damage of the bacterial membrane. Damage of the membranes was mainly caused by the lipid peroxidation, evidencing the key role of oxygen reactive species, in particular ozone. We conclude that the conventional cultivation method overestimates the decontamination efficiency of various plasma sources, and must therefore be complemented by alternative techniques capable of resolving viable but nonculturable bacteria.

  1. Tetracycline rapidly reaches all the constituent cells of uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, G.; Wood, P.; Dixon, L.; Keyhan, M.; Matin, A.; Demain, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a method for visualizing Escherichia coli cells that are exposed to tetracycline in a biofilm, based on a previous report that liposomes containing the E. coli TetR(B) protein fluoresce when exposed to this antibiotic. By our method, cells devoid of TetR(B) also exhibited tetracycline-dependent fluorescence. At 50 microg of tetracycline ml(-1), planktonic cells of a uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain developed maximal fluorescence after 7.5 to 10 min of exposure. A similar behavior was exhibited by cells in a 24- or 48-h UPEC biofilm, as examined by confocal laser microscopy, regardless of whether they lined empty spaces or occupied densely packed regions. Further, a comparison of phase-contrast and fluorescent images of corresponding biofilm zones showed that all the cells fluoresced. Thus, all the biofilm cells were exposed to tetracycline and there were no pockets within the biofilm where the antibiotic failed to reach. It also appeared unlikely that niches of reduced exposure to the antibiotic existed within the biofilms.

  2. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...... texturing of different Si solar cells. Theoretically the nanostructure topology may be described as a graded refractive index in a mean-field approximation between air and Si. The optical properties of the developed black Si were simulated and experimentally measured. Total AM1.5G-weighted average...

  3. Intracellular processing and presentation of T cell epitopes, expressed by recombinant Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, to human T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); C.M. Janssen (Riny); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); C.E.M. van Doornik (C. E M); J. Tommassen (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractVaccines based on recombinant attenuated bacteria represent a potentially safe and effective immunization strategy. A carrier system was developed to analyze in vitro whether foreign T cell epitopes, inserted in the outer membrane protein PhoE of Escherichia coli and expressed by

  4. Salmonella flagellin acted as an effective fusion partner for expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface protein 25 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Lin; Xu, Huji

    2016-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum surface protein 25 (Pfs25) is a hard-to-express and hard-to-solubilize protein in Escherichia coli. To overcome this problem, the phase 1 flagellin of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (FliC) was used as a fusion partner for Pfs25. The fusion expression of Pfs25 with FliC greatly enhanced the expression level and solubility of Pfs25 in E. coli BL21(DE3). The Ni-purified fusion protein of FliC-Pfs25 was recognized by two anti-Pfs25 monoclonal antibodies. By comparison, it was shown that the Pfs25 within FliC-Pfs25 contained epitopes similar or identical to those on Pichia pastoris-produced Pfs25. The data obtained from this study demonstrated that the fusion with Salmonella flagellin greatly improved the expression of Pfs25 in E. coli.

  5. Biofouling prevention using silver nanoparticle impregnated polyethersulfone (PES) membrane: E. coli cell-killing in a continuous cross-flow membrane module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Pritam; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2017-04-01

    Biofouling significantly decreases membrane performance. So silver nanoparticle (Ag-NP) was impregnated selectively on a sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) membrane and its efficacy was tested in a continuous, cross-flow membrane module. The main challenges are: (i) to prevent biofouling on the membrane surface, (ii) achieve zero bacterial cell (E. coli) count in the permeate water, (iii) maintain Ag concentration in the permeate stream within the permissible limit of drinking water and (iv) maintain a high tensile strength of the membrane to prevent mechanical failure. Addressing these factors would ensure a long and productive service-life of the membrane. To this end, 10 4 CFU/ml of E. coli cell-suspension was passed through the Ag-SPES membrane of 150μm total thickness, which has a narrow (1.74μm thickness), upper surface of Ag-NPs. We achieved zero E. coli cell-count and a minimum (10μg/L) Ag concentration in the permeate stream; simultaneously increasing the tensile strength from 2.78MPa to 3.92MPa due to Ag-NP impregnation. Thus, for a continuous inlet flow of E. coli contaminated water, the membrane module could deliver an almost constant permeate flow rate of 3.45L per hour, due to complete E. coli cell-killing. Simultaneously, Ag concentration in permeate stream is well-below the WHO's recommended limit of 100μg/L, for potable quality water. Therefore, the Ag-SPES membrane can be used as an anti-biofouling membrane in a continuous operational mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of bolA and rpoS genes in biofilm formation and adherence pattern by Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 on polypropylene, stainless steel, and silicone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Mohd; Sousa, Ana Margarida; Machado, Idalina; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Khan, Saif; Morton, Glyn; Hadi, Sibte

    2017-06-01

    Escherichia coli has developed sophisticated means to sense, respond, and adapt in stressed environment. It has served as a model organism for studies in molecular genetics and physiology since the 1960s. Stress response genes are induced whenever a cell needs to adapt and survive under unfavorable growth conditions. Two of the possible important genes are rpoS and bolA. The rpoS gene has been known as the alternative sigma (σ) factor, which controls the expression of a large number of genes, which are involved in responses to various stress factors as well as transition to stationary phase from exponential form of growth. Morphogene bolA response to stressed environment leads to round morphology of E. coli cells, but little is known about its involvement in biofilms and its development or maintenance. This study has been undertaken to address the adherence pattern and formation of biofilms by E. coli on stainless steel, polypropylene, and silicone surfaces after 24 h of growth at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy was used for direct examination of the cell attachment and biofilm formation on various surfaces and it was found that, in the presence of bolA, E. coli cells were able to attach to the stainless steel and silicone very well. By contrast, polypropylene surface was not found to be attractive for E. coli cells. This indicates that bolA responded and can play a major role in the presence and absence of rpoS in cell attachment.

  7. Quantitative risk analysis for potentially resistant E. coli in surface waters caused by antibiotic use in agricultural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limayem, Alya; Martin, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently used in agricultural systems to promote livestock health and to control bacterial contaminants. Given the upsurge of the resistant fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in the surface waters, a novel statistical method namely, microbial risk assessment (MRA) was performed, to evaluate the probability of infection by resistant FIB on populations exposed to recreational waters. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, except E. coli O157:H7, were selected for their prevalence in aquatic ecosystem. A comparative study between a typical E. coli pathway and a case scenario aggravated by antibiotic use has been performed via Crystal Ball® software in an effort to analyze a set of available inputs provided by the US institutions including E. coli concentrations in US Great Lakes through using random sampling and probability distributions. Results from forecasting a possible worst-case scenario dose-response, accounted for an approximate 50% chance for 20% of the exposed human populations to be infected by recreational water in the U.S. However, in a typical scenario, there is a 50% chance of infection for only 1% of the exposed human populations. The uncertain variable, E. coli concentration accounted for approximately 92.1% in a typical scenario as the major contributing factor of the dose-response model. Resistant FIB in recreational waters that are exacerbated by a low dose of antibiotic pollutants would increase the adverse health effects in exposed human populations by 10 fold.

  8. The 4.5 S RNA gene of Escherichia coli is essential for cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Fournier, M J

    1984-01-01

    in 4.5 S RNA, a dramatic loss in protein synthesis activity, and eventual cell death. Tagging of the chromosomal ffs region with a kanamycin-resistance gene allowed mapping of the 4.5 S RNA gene. Results from this analysis place ffs near lon at approximately ten minutes on the E. coli linkage map.......The Escherichia coli gene coding for the metabolically stable 4.5 S RNA (ffs) has been shown to be required for cell viability. Essentiality was demonstrated by examining the recombination behavior of substitution mutations of ffs generated in vitro. Substitution mutants of ffs are able to replace...... the chromosomal allele only in the presence of a second, intact copy of ffs. Independent evidence of essentiality and the finding that 4.5 S RNA is important for protein synthetic activity came from characterization of cells dependent on the lac operon inducer isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside for ffs gene...

  9. Isolating E.Coli Bacteriophage from Raw Sewage and Determining its Selectivity to the Host Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Imeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and destroy prokaryote cells, specifically the bacteria. They act too selective, so as each bacteriophage affects only on specific type of bacteria. Due to their specific features, bacteriophages can be used as an appropriate substitute for antibiotics in infectious diseases treatment. Therefore, this study aimed to isolate E. coli-specific bacteriophage from raw sewage. Methods: Eight samples of raw sewage, each containing approximately 50 ml of raw sewage with 10 minute gap, were prepared from Zargandeh wastewater treatment plant, Tehran, Iran. The sewages were mixed with Brain-heart infusion medium (BHI as a liquid culture medium in order to let the microorganisms grow. Incubation, purification and determination of bacteria were followed repeatedly to isolate the bacteriophage. Then it was tested on E.coli (ATCC 25922, Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 19433, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 2392, and Yersinia enterocolitica (ATCC 9610 in order to determine the bacteriophage selectivity. Results: The E.coli bacteriophages were successfully isolated from all the eight samples, that were completely able to lyse and destroy E.coli bacterial cells, though no effect was observed on other types of bacteria. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that bacteriophages act selectively. Considering the raise of antibiotic resistance in the world, bacteriophages can serve as a good substitute for antibiotics in treating infectious diseases.

  10. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montanaro J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Montanaro,1 Aleksandra Inic-Kanada,1 Angela Ladurner,1 Elisabeth Stein,1 Sandra Belij,1 Nora Bintner,1 Simone Schlacher,1 Nadine Schuerer,1 Ulrike Beate Mayr,2 Werner Lubitz,2 Nikolaus Leisch,3 Talin Barisani-Asenbauer11Laura Bassi Centres of Expertise, OCUVAC – Centre of Ocular Inflammation and Infection, Centre for Pathophysiology, Infectiology, and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2BIRD-C GmbH & Co KG, Kritzendorf, Austria; 3Department of Ecogenomics and Systems Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN, whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results

  11. Bacterial Ghosts of Escherichia coli Drive Efficient Maturation of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Dar, Pervaiz Ahmad; Appavoo, Elamurugan; Kishore, Subodh; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Ganesh, Kondabattula

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. They not only represent a potential platform for development of novel vaccines but also provide a tool for efficient adjuvant and antigen delivery system. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between BGs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and bovine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). MoDCs are highly potent antigen-presenting cells and have the potential to act as a powerful tool for manipulating the immune system. We generated bovine MoDCs in vitro from blood monocytes using E. coli expressed bovine GM-CSF and IL-4 cytokines. These MoDCs displayed typical morphology and functions similar to DCs. We further investigated the E. coli BGs to induce maturation of bovine MoDCs in comparison to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed the maturation marker molecules such as MHC-II, CD80 and CD86 were induced early and at higher levels in BG stimulated MoDCs as compared to the LPS stimulated MoDCs. BG mediated stimulation induced significantly higher levels of cytokine expression in bovine MoDCs than LPS. Both pro-inflammatory (IL-12 and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were induced in MoDCs after BGs stimulation. We further analysed the effects of BGs on the bovine MoDCs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). We found the BG-treated bovine MoDCs had significantly (pBGs induce a strong activation and maturation of bovine MoDCs.

  12. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  13. Nanotomography of Cell Surfaces with Evanescent Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM and its application to nanotomography of cell surfaces are described. Present applications include (1 3D imaging of chromosomes in their metaphase to demonstrate axial resolution in the nanometre range, (2 measurements of cell-substrate topology, which upon cholesterol depletion shows some loosening of cell-substrate contacts, and (3 measurements of cell topology upon photodynamic therapy (PDT, which demonstrate cell swelling and maintenance of focal contacts. The potential of the method for in vitro diagnostics, but also some requirements and limitations are discussed.

  14. Osteoblastic cell behaviour on modified titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszewska-Kuska, Magdalena; Wirstlein, Przemysław; Majchrowski, Radomir; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    The surfaces of endoosseous dental implants have been subjected to numerous modifications in order to create a surface which can provide rapid bone healing and fast implant loading. Each modification has involved changes to the chemical composition and topography of the surfaces which have resulted in various biological reactions to the implanted material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface topography and chemistry of various modified titanium surfaces: (1) machined surface (MA), (2) alumina-blasted (Al2O3), (3) alumina-blasted and acid-etched (Al2O3 DE), (4) hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate grit-blasted (HA/TCP) and (5) hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate grit-blasted and acid-etched (HA/TCP DE) and to analyse the effects of surface roughness, and chemical composition on human osteoblast vitality, differentiation, morphology and orientation. The modified surfaces were subjected to topographic analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), optical profilometry, roughness analysis and chemical composition evaluation using Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The biological effects of the titanium modifications was analysed using human osteoblasts cell culture where the cell morphology, vitality (MTS assay) and differentiation (ALP activity) was analysed. The machined surfaces were classified as anisotropic, smooth and composed of titanium and oxygen. The blasted surface samples along with the blasted and etched samples were found to be isotropic and rough. The grit-blasting procedure resulted in the incorporation of components from the blasting material. In the case of the blasted and etched samples, etching decreased the surface development as indicated by the Sdr and also reduced the amount of chemical compounds incorporated into the surfaces during the blasting procedure. The attached NHOst cells, proliferated the surfaces. With regard to the MA samples, the cells spread close to the titanium surface, with expanded cytoplasmic

  15. RelE-mediated dormancy is enhanced at high cell density in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Kawata, Koji; Taniuchi, Asami; Kakinuma, Kenji; May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria show remarkable adaptability under several stressful conditions by shifting themselves into a dormant state. Less is known, however, about the mechanism underlying the cell transition to dormancy. Here, we report that the transition to dormant states is mediated by one of the major toxin-antitoxin systems, RelEB, in a cell density-dependent manner in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. We constructed a strain, IKA121, which expresses the toxin RelE in the presence of rhamnose and lacks chromosomal relBE and rhaBAD. With this strain, we demonstrated that RelE-mediated dormancy is enhanced at high cell densities compared to that at low cell densities. The initiation of expression of the antitoxin RelB from a plasmid, pCA24N, reversed RelE-mediated dormancy in bacterial cultures. The activation of RelE increased the appearance of persister cells against β-lactams, quinolones, and aminoglycosides, and more persister cells appeared at high cell densities than at low cell densities. Further analysis indicated that amino acid starvation and an uncharacterized extracellular heat-labile substance promote RelE-mediated dormancy. This is a first report on the induction of RelE-mediated dormancy by high cell density. This work establishes a population-based dormancy mechanism to help explain E. coli survival in stressful environments.

  16. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering for Quantification of p-Coumaric Acid Produced by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Lidia; Zor, Kinga; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2017-01-01

    -liquid extraction (LLE) for quantification of p-coumaric acid (pHCA) in the supernatant of genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultures. pHCA was measured in a dynamic range from 1 μM up to 50 μM on highly uniform SERS substrates based on leaning gold-capped nanopillars, which showed an in...

  17. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolates in surface water of Taihu Lake Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song He; Lv, Xiaoyang; Han, Bing; Gu, Xiucong; Wang, Pei Fang; Wang, Chao; He, Zhenli

    2015-08-01

    The rapid development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) has been of concern worldwide. In this study, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were investigated in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water samples (rivers, n = 17; Taihu Lake, n = 16) and from human, chicken, swine, and Egretta garzetta sources in the Taihu Basin. E. coli showing resistance to at least five drugs occurred in 31, 67, 58, 27, and 18% of the isolates from surface water (n = 665), chicken (n = 27), swine (n = 29), human (n = 45), and E. garzetta (n = 15) sources, respectively. The mean multi-antibiotic resistance (MAR) index of surface water samples (0.44) was lower than that of chicken (0.64) and swine (0.57) sources but higher than that of human (0.30) and E. garzetta sources (0.15). Ten tetracycline, four sulfonamide, four quinolone, five β-lactamase, and two streptomycin resistance genes were detected in the corresponding antibiotic-resistant isolates. Most antibiotic-resistant E. coli harbored at least two similar functional ARGs. Int-I was detected in at least 57% of MAR E. coli isolates. The results of multiple correspondence analysis and Spearman correlation analysis suggest that antibiotic-resistant E. coli in water samples were mainly originated from swine, chicken, and/or human sources. Most of the ARGs detected in E. garzetta sources were prevalent in other sources. These data indicated that human activities may have contributed to the spread of ARB in the aquatic environment.

  18. A CMI (cell metabolic indicator)-based controller for achieving high growth rate Escherichia coli cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Matthew E; Wang, Li; Padmakumar, Ajay; Burg, Timothy C; Harcum, Sarah W; Groff, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of biopharmaceuticals are produced in Escherichia coli, where each new product and strain currently requires a high degree of growth characterization in benchtop and industrial bioreactors to achieve economical production protocols. The capability to use a standard set of sensors to characterize a system quickly without the need to conduct numerous experiments to determine stable growth rate for the strain would significantly decrease development time. This paper presents a cell metabolic indicator (CMI) which provides better insight into the E. coli metabolism than a growth rate value. The CMI is the ratio of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of the culture and the base addition rate (BAR) required to keep pH at a desired setpoint. The OUR and BAR are measured using a off-gas sensor and pH probe, respectively, and thus the CMI can be computed online. Experimental results demonstrate the relationship between CMI and the different cell metabolic states. A previously published model is augmented with acid production dynamics, allowing for comparison of the CMI-based controller with an open-loop controller in simulation. The CMI-based controller required little a priori knowledge about the E. coli strain in order to achieve a high growth rate. Since many different types of cells exhibit similar behaviors, the CMI concept can be extended to mammalian and stem cells.

  19. Direct injection of functional single-domain antibodies from E. coli into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Muyldermans, Serge; Frankel, Gad; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2010-12-08

    Intracellular proteins have a great potential as targets for therapeutic antibodies (Abs) but the plasma membrane prevents access to these antigens. Ab fragments and IgGs are selected and engineered in E. coli and this microorganism may be also an ideal vector for their intracellular delivery. In this work we demonstrate that single-domain Ab (sdAbs) can be engineered to be injected into human cells by E. coli bacteria carrying molecular syringes assembled by a type III protein secretion system (T3SS). The injected sdAbs accumulate in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells at levels ca. 10⁵-10⁶ molecules per cell and their functionality is shown by the isolation of sdAb-antigen complexes. Injection of sdAbs does not require bacterial invasion or the transfer of genetic material. These results are proof-of-principle for the capacity of E. coli bacteria to directly deliver intracellular sdAbs (intrabodies) into human cells for analytical and therapeutic purposes.

  20. Direct injection of functional single-domain antibodies from E. coli into human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Blanco-Toribio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular proteins have a great potential as targets for therapeutic antibodies (Abs but the plasma membrane prevents access to these antigens. Ab fragments and IgGs are selected and engineered in E. coli and this microorganism may be also an ideal vector for their intracellular delivery. In this work we demonstrate that single-domain Ab (sdAbs can be engineered to be injected into human cells by E. coli bacteria carrying molecular syringes assembled by a type III protein secretion system (T3SS. The injected sdAbs accumulate in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells at levels ca. 10⁵-10⁶ molecules per cell and their functionality is shown by the isolation of sdAb-antigen complexes. Injection of sdAbs does not require bacterial invasion or the transfer of genetic material. These results are proof-of-principle for the capacity of E. coli bacteria to directly deliver intracellular sdAbs (intrabodies into human cells for analytical and therapeutic purposes.

  1. Reducing Escherichia coli growth on a composite biomaterial by a surface immobilized antimicrobial peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckholtz, Gavin A.; Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Anderton, William D.; Schimoler, Patrick J. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Roudebush, Shana L.; Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Miller, Mark C. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A new composite bioceramic consisting of calcium aluminum oxide (CaAlO) and hydroxyapatite (HA) was functionalized with the synthetic antimicrobial peptide Inverso-CysHHC10. CaAlO is a bioceramic that can be mold cast easily and quickly at room temperature. Improved functionality was previously achieved through surface reactions. Here, composites containing 0–5% HA (by mass) were prepared and the elastic modulus and modulus of rupture were mechanically similar to non-load bearing bone. The addition of hydroxyapatite resulted in increased osteoblast attachment (> 180%) and proliferation (> 140%) on all composites compared to 100% CaAlO. Antimicrobial peptide (AMP) immobilization was achieved using an interfacial alkene-thiol click reaction. The linked AMP persisted on the composite (> 99.6% after 24 h) and retained its activity against Escherichia coli based on N-phenylnaphthylamine uptake and bacterial turbidity tests. Overall, this simple scaffold system improves osteoblast activity and reduces bacterial activity. - Highlights: • Calcium aluminum oxide and hydroxyapatite were cast into a composite material. • Osteoblast attachment and proliferation were significantly increased on composites. • An active antimicrobial peptide was linked to and remained stable on the composite. • Bacterial turbidity and NPN uptake tests showed modified composites had an effect equal to a 10 μM Inverso-CysHHC10 solution. • Antimicrobial peptide linkage did not affect the increased osteoblast performance.

  2. Cranberry Products Inhibit Adherence of P-Fimbriated Escherichia Coli to Primary Cultured Bladder and Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K.; Chou, M. Y.; Howell, A.; Wobbe, C.; Grady, R.; Stapleton, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cranberry proanthocyanidins have been identified as possible inhibitors of Escherichia coli adherence to uroepithelial cells. However, little is known about the dose range of this effect. Furthermore, it has not been studied directly in the urogenital system. To address these issues we tested the effect of a cranberry powder and proanthocyanidin extract on adherence of a P-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli isolate to 2 new urogenital model systems, namely primary cultured bladder epithelial cells and vaginal epithelial cells. Materials and Methods E. coli IA2 was pre-incubated with a commercially available cranberry powder (9 mg proanthocyanidin per gm) or with increasing concentrations of proanthocyanidin extract. Adherence of E. coli IA2 to primary cultured bladder epithelial cells or vaginal epithelial cells was measured before and after exposure to these products. Results Cranberry powder decreased mean adherence of E. coli IA2 to vaginal epithelial cells from 18.6 to 1.8 bacteria per cell (p Cranberry products can inhibit E. coli adherence to biologically relevant model systems of primary cultured bladder and vaginal epithelial cells. This effect occurs in a dose dependent relationship. These findings provide further mechanistic evidence and biological plausibility for the role of cranberry products for preventing urinary tract infection. PMID:17509358

  3. Relevance of DNA repair pathways on ascorbic acid effects on Echerichia Coli K-12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slyus, M.A. van; Oliveira, R.L.B. da C.; Felzenszwalb, I.; Gomes, R.A.; Menck, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    Inactivation kinetics were performed with repair proficient and deficient Escherichia coli K-12 cells treated with oxidized solutions of ascorbic acid. The repair pathways controlled by the recA and uvrA gene products are essential for cell survival to the treatment. However, SOS chromotest result indicates that the SOS functions are only induced at high and toxic concentrations of the drug. Moreover, single strand breaks in DNA from treated cells are detected, demonstrating genome damage promoted by oxidized solutions of ascorbate. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Hyperthermia studies using inductive and ultrasound methods on E. coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Prieto, A.; López-Callejas, R.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; Santos-Cuevas, C. L.; Celis-Almazán, J.; Olea-Mejía, O.; Gómez-Morales, J. L.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; García-Santibañez, F.

    2017-11-01

    The survival of Escherichia coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells were studied under different temperatures using direct heating in water, ultrasound, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. The survival of these microorganisms depended on whether the heating mode was continuous or discontinuous, surviving more in the former than in the discontinuous heating mode. Whereas Escherichia coli bacteria did not survive at temperatures ≥50∘C, the mouse glioma cells did not survive at temperatures ≥48∘C. The survival of both these microorganisms was independent of the presence or absence of the magnetic nanoparticles of magnetite, suggesting that these, having mean particle sizes of 9.5, 8.5 and 5, did not show any apparent cytotoxicity effect. Present results also showed that the inductive heating system which used a radiofrequency of 13.56 MHz, providing a maximum magnetic field strength of 160 A/m, the electric rather than magnetic heating predominated.

  5. Hyperthermia studies using inductive and ultrasound methods on E. coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral–Prieto, A., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.mx; López-Callejas, R., E-mail: regulo.lopez@inin.gob.mx; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G., E-mail: benjamin.rodriguez@inin.gob.mx; Santos-Cuevas, C. L., E-mail: clara.cuevas@inin.gob.mx [Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Celis-Almazán, J., E-mail: jony-jac-5@hotmail.com; Olea-Mejía, O., E-mail: oleaoscar@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable (Mexico); Gómez-Morales, J. L. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Campus El Cerrillo, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico); Peña-Eguiluz, R., E-mail: rosendo.eguiluz@inin.gob.mx; Valencia-Alvarado, R., E-mail: raul.valencia@inin.gob.mx; Mercado-Cabrera, A., E-mail: antonio.mercado@inin.gob.mx; Muñoz-Castro, A. E., E-mail: arturo.munoz@inin.gob.mx [Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); García-Santibañez, F., E-mail: fegasa2@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Campus El Cerrillo, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico)

    2017-11-15

    The survival of Escherichia coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells were studied under different temperatures using direct heating in water, ultrasound, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. The survival of these microorganisms depended on whether the heating mode was continuous or discontinuous, surviving more in the former than in the discontinuous heating mode. Whereas Escherichia coli bacteria did not survive at temperatures ≥50{sup ∘}C, the mouse glioma cells did not survive at temperatures ≥48{sup ∘}C. The survival of both these microorganisms was independent of the presence or absence of the magnetic nanoparticles of magnetite, suggesting that these, having mean particle sizes of 9.5, 8.5 and 5, did not show any apparent cytotoxicity effect. Present results also showed that the inductive heating system which used a radiofrequency of 13.56 MHz, providing a maximum magnetic field strength of 160 A/m, the electric rather than magnetic heating predominated.

  6. A Model Linked to E. Coli Related to Electrostrictive Energy in Cancer Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. BASAK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper has focused on a new concept in respect of the status of oxidant/antioxidant in cancer cell following radiation therapy. And in this respect a model has been developed linked with an environment of E.Coli in which TrpRS II is induced after radiation damage. It is interesting to note that Electrostrictive energy is the input to the model the output of which is the oxidant/antioxidant ratio. This ratio is related to the status of Electrostrictive energy derived from capacitance relaxation phenomenon (US patent No. US Patent No. TK Basak 5691178, 1997 in cancer cell. The oxidant/antioxidant ratio is linked to Electrostrictive energy with increasing pH. This paper discusses about the status of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation after radiation therapy linked to E.Coli environment against the pH gradient is indicative for the treatment of cancer.

  7. Effect of micro- and nanoscale topography on the adhesion of bacterial cells to solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lillian C; Fang, Jean; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana A; Worobo, Randy W; Moraru, Carmen I

    2013-04-01

    Attachment and biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens on surfaces in natural, industrial, and hospital settings lead to infections and illnesses and even death. Minimizing bacterial attachment to surfaces using controlled topography could reduce the spreading of pathogens and, thus, the incidence of illnesses and subsequent human and financial losses. In this context, the attachment of key microorganisms, including Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, to silica and alumina surfaces with micron and nanoscale topography was investigated. The results suggest that orientation of the attached cells occurs preferentially such as to maximize their contact area with the surface. Moreover, the bacterial cells exhibited different morphologies, including different number and size of cellular appendages, depending on the topographical details of the surface to which they attached. This suggests that bacteria may utilize different mechanisms of attachment in response to surface topography. These results are important for the design of novel microbe-repellant materials.

  8. Surface acoustic wave actuated cell sorting (SAWACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, T; Braunmüller, S; Schmid, L; Wixforth, A; Weitz, D A

    2010-03-21

    We describe a novel microfluidic cell sorter which operates in continuous flow at high sorting rates. The device is based on a surface acoustic wave cell-sorting scheme and combines many advantages of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence activated droplet sorting (FADS) in microfluidic channels. It is fully integrated on a PDMS device, and allows fast electronic control of cell diversion. We direct cells by acoustic streaming excited by a surface acoustic wave which deflects the fluid independently of the contrast in material properties of deflected objects and the continuous phase; thus the device underlying principle works without additional enhancement of the sorting by prior labelling of the cells with responsive markers such as magnetic or polarizable beads. Single cells are sorted directly from bulk media at rates as fast as several kHz without prior encapsulation into liquid droplet compartments as in traditional FACS. We have successfully directed HaCaT cells (human keratinocytes), fibroblasts from mice and MV3 melanoma cells. The low shear forces of this sorting method ensure that cells survive after sorting.

  9. Location and folding of bacterio-opsin as expressed in E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, T.; Karnik, S.

    1987-01-01

    Bacterio-opsin (bO), the integral membrane protein from H. halobium, has been expressed in E. coli in 3 forms. I, native sequence (bO) with additional N-terminal methionine; II, bO with N-terminal E. coli OmpA signal sequence that is not cleaved by signal peptidase on expression; III, bO fused with the following 35 amino acids sequence at the N-terminus: the E. coli lipoprotein signal sequence followed by N-terminal 8 amino acids of the lipoprotein and 5 amino acids from a linker sequence. The lipoprotein signal sequence in III is partially cleaved by signal peptidase II to give IIIA (processed) and IIIB (unprocessed). Studies on the location of the above proteins in E. coli cells and their folding to functional three-dimensional structure have given the following results: 1, the proteins are largely present in the total membrane fraction; 2, proteins I, II and IIIB are present in both the cytoplasmic and the outer membranes, while IIIA is exclusively in the cytoplasmic membrane; 3, the three proteins bind [ 3 H]-all-trans-retinal to different extents. Retinal is attached at Lys-216 as in native bO, as shown by BrCN cleavage after reducing the Schiff's base with NaBH 4 , However, the extents of folding of the proteins to the correct three-dimensional structure vary, the protein IIIA binds retinal most efficiently (20-40%

  10. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  11. Characterization of substances that restore impaired cell division of UV-irradiated E. coli B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Y.; Shimoii, H.; Tamura, G.

    1981-01-01

    Substances which restore impaired cell division in UV-irradiated E. coli B were surveyed among various bacteria. The active substance was found only in several genera of Gram-negative bacteria, i.e., Escherichia, Enterobacter, Salmonella and some species of Pseudomonas. The activity in the dialyzed cell extract of E. coli B/r was observed in the presence of β-NAD and was enhanced by Mg 2+ and Mn 2+ . The active substance was very labile, but the activity was protected by 1 mM dithiothreitol in the process of purification. The activity of a fraction recovered through DEAE-cellulose column chromatography was stimulated by the presence of membrane fraction. Upon treatment with lipid-degrading enzymes and proteases, the division-stimulating activity was lost or reduced. It appears that the inactivation by lipase and phospholipase A2 was due to the formation of lysophospholipids and that a proteinous substance participated in the recovery of impaired cell division of UV-irradiated E. coli B

  12. Putrescine controls the formation of Escherichia coli persister cells tolerant to aminoglycoside netilmicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Alexander G; Kashevarova, Natalya M; Karavaeva, Elena A; Shumkov, Mikhail S

    2014-12-01

    Persisters are suggested to be the products of a phenotypic variability that are quasi-dormant forms of regular bacterial cells highly tolerant to antibiotics. Our previous investigations revealed that a decrease in antibiotic tolerance of Escherichia coli cells could be reached through the inhibition of key enzymes of polyamine synthesis (putrescine, spermidine). We therefore assumed that polyamines could be involved in persister cell formation. Data obtained in our experiments with the polyamine-deficient E. coli strain demonstrate that the formation of persisters tolerant to netilmicin is highly upregulated by putrescine in a concentration-dependent manner when cells enter the stationary phase. This period is also accompanied by dissociation of initially homogenous subpopulation of persister cells to some fractions differing in their levels of tolerance to netilmicin. With three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrate that putrescine-dependent upregulation of persister cell formation is mediated by stimulation of rpoS expression. Complementary activity of putrescine and RpoS results in ~ 1000-fold positive effect on persister cell formation. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  13. The Optimisation of the Expression of Recombinant Surface Immunogenic Protein of Group B Streptococcus in Escherichia coli by Response Surface Methodology Improves Humoral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Dinamarca, Diego A; Jerias, José I; Soto, Daniel A; Soto, Jorge A; Díaz, Natalia V; Leyton, Yessica Y; Villegas, Rodrigo A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Vásquez, Abel E

    2018-03-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis and a common pathogen in livestock and aquaculture industries around the world. Conjugate polysaccharide and protein-based vaccines are under development. The surface immunogenic protein (SIP) is a conserved protein in all GBS serotypes and has been shown to be a good target for vaccine development. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells has been shown to be useful in the development of vaccines, and the protein purification is a factor affecting their immunogenicity. The response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design can optimise the performance in the expression of recombinant proteins. However, the biological effect in mice immunised with an immunogenic protein that is optimised by RSM and purified by low-affinity chromatography is unknown. In this study, we used RSM for the optimisation of the expression of the rSIP, and we evaluated the SIP-specific humoral response and the property to decrease the GBS colonisation in the vaginal tract in female mice. It was observed by NI-NTA chromatography that the RSM increases the yield in the expression of rSIP, generating a better purification process. This improvement in rSIP purification suggests a better induction of IgG anti-SIP immune response and a positive effect in the decreased GBS intravaginal colonisation. The RSM applied to optimise the expression of recombinant proteins with immunogenic capacity is an interesting alternative in the evaluation of vaccines in preclinical phase, which could improve their immune response.

  14. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, K.S.; Guimaraes, O.R.; Geller, M.; Sergio, L.P.S.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. (author)

  15. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canuto, K.S.; Guimaraes, O.R.; Geller, M. [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Sergio, L.P.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. (author)

  16. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Canuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC. Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out.

  17. Issues in determining factors influencing bacterial attachment: a review using the attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulter, R M; Gentle, I R; Dykes, G A

    2009-07-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms which facilitate the attachment of Escherichia coli and other bacterial species to abiotic surfaces is desired by numerous industries including the food and medical industries. Numerous studies have attempted to explain bacterial attachment as a function of bacterial properties such as cellular surface charge, hydrophobicity and outer membrane proteins amongst others. Conflicting evidence in the literature both for and against a positive relationship may arise from the nature of the test methods used to measure them. A handful of recent studies utilizing technologies such as atomic force microscopy have begun to look at bacterial attachment at a single cell and molecular level. These studies may provide the information required to fully understand the underlying factors which influence bacterial cell attachment to abiotic surfaces. A number of issues in determining the influential factors of bacterial attachment have been identified from the literature: a lack of standardization and sensitivity of methods, as well as the value of measuring bulk properties of a number of cells rather than the behaviour of single cells which may overlook key interactions at a molecular level. These issues will need to be addressed in future studies in this area.

  18. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 bares the characteristics of both enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga...

  19. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  20. Antimicrobial copper alloy surfaces are effective against vegetative but not sporulated cells of gram-positive Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Kaungmyat; Long, Janet; Michels, Corinne A; Gadura, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the role of membrane phospholipid peroxidation in the copper alloy mediated contact killing of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterial species. We found that B. subtilis endospores exhibited significant resistance to copper alloy surface killing but vegetative cells were highly sensitive to copper surface exposure. Cell death and lipid peroxidation occurred in B. subtilis upon copper alloy surface exposure. In a sporulation-defective strain carrying a deletion of almost the entire SpoIIA operon, lipid peroxidation directly correlated with cell death. Moreover, killing and lipid peroxidation initiated immediately and at a constant rate upon exposure to the copper surface without the delay observed previously in E. coli. These findings support the hypothesis that membrane lipid peroxidation is the initiating event causing copper surface induced cell death of B. subtilis vegetative cells. The findings suggest that the observed differences in the kinetics of copper-induced killing compared to E. coli result from differences in cell envelop structure. As demonstrated in E. coli, DNA degradation was shown to be a secondary effect of copper exposure in a B. subtilis sporulation-defective strain. PMID:26185055

  1. Effect of Lauric Acid on Cell Division, Macromolecular Synthesis and Membrane Lipid Organization in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Hakobu, Nakamura; Atsushi, Hase; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Konan University; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Konan University:(Present)Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences

    1984-01-01

    Lauric acid (1mg/ml) sharply suppressed the cell division of an acrA mutant strain of Escherichia coli K12. However, the wild type acrA+ strain was resistant to the fatty acid. Capric acid and myristic acid were not so toxic. Lauric acid inhibited both DNA and protein synthesis of the acrA mutant strain, with the former being more sensitive than the latter. On the other hand, DNA polymerase activity of toluene-treated cells was stimulated rather than inhibited by the presence of 1mg/ml of lau...

  2. RelE-Mediated Dormancy Is Enhanced at High Cell Density in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Kawata, Koji; Taniuchi, Asami; Kakinuma, Kenji; May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria show remarkable adaptability under several stressful conditions by shifting themselves into a dormant state. Less is known, however, about the mechanism underlying the cell transition to dormancy. Here, we report that the transition to dormant states is mediated by one of the major toxin-antitoxin systems, RelEB, in a cell density-dependent manner in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. We constructed a strain, IKA121, which expresses the toxin RelE in the presence of rhamnose and lacks chr...

  3. Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to Human Epithelial Cells: The Role of Intimin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-28

    LAlFAS, but a few bacteria were aligned along the edges of some of the HEp-2 cells (data not Shown). An occasional OHSa bacterium was seen associated...strains with a K-12 strain. OHSa , and the positive control, EPEC E2348/69. Geometric mean values from quadruplicate samples are shown + 2 SO. 63 10...kinetics of EHEC strain 87-23 and E. coli K-12, OHSa , adherence toHEp-2 cells. Geometric mean values are shown + 2 SO for each time point. The initial

  4. A comparative proteome analysis of Escherichia coli DeltarelA mutant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Carneiro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial RelA-dependent stringent response exerts a strong influence over a wide variety of processes. In this work, the impact of the relA gene mutation in E. coli cells was evaluated by a quantitative proteomics analysis, employing stable-isotope labelling and high resolution mass spectrometry. Chemostat cultures of E. coli W3110 and ∆relA mutant strains were performed at two dilution rates (0.1 and 0.2 h-1 to assess the influence of the relA gene mutation in steady-state protein levels. A total of 121 proteins showed significant alterations in their abundance when comparing the proteome of mutant to wild-type cells. The relA gene mutation induced changes on key cellular processes, including the amino acids and nucleotide biosynthesis, the lipid metabolism, transport activities, transcription and translation processes and responses to stress. Furthermore, some of those changes were more pronounced under specific growth conditions, as the most significant differences in protein ratios were observed at one of the dilution rates. An effect of the relA gene mutation in the acetate overflow was also observed, which confers interesting characteristics to this mutant strain that could be useful in the production of recombinant proteins. Overall, these results provide a valuable insight into the E. coli stringent response under defined steady-state conditions, suggesting that this stress response might influence multiple metabolic processes like the acetate overflow or the catabolite repression.

  5. Reversal of negative charges on the surface of Escherichia coli thioredoxin: pockets versus protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancusso, Romina; Cruz, Eduardo; Cataldi, Marcela; Mendoza, Carla; Fuchs, James; Wang, Hsin; Yang, Xiaomin; Tasayco, María Luisa

    2004-04-06

    Recent studies of proteins with reversed charged residues have demonstrated that electrostatic interactions on the surface can contribute significantly to protein stability. We have used the approach of reversing negatively charged residues using Arg to evaluate the effect of the electrostatics context on the transition temperature (T(m)), the unfolding Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG), and the unfolding enthalpy change (DeltaH). We have reversed negatively charged residues at a pocket (Asp9) and protrusions (Asp10, Asp20, Glu85), all located in interconnecting segments between elements of secondary structure on the surface of Arg73Ala Escherichia coli thioredoxin. DSC measurements indicate that reversal of Asp in a pocket (Asp9Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -7.3 degrees C) produces a larger effect in thermal stability than reversal at protrusions: Asp10Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.1 degrees C, Asp20Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 2.0 degrees C, Glu85Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 3.9 degrees ). The 3D structure of thioredoxin indicates that Asp20 and Glu85 have no nearby charges within 8 A, while Asp9 does not only have Asp10 as sequential neighbor, but it also forms a 5-A long-range ion pair with the solvent-exposed Lys69. Further DSC measurements indicate that neutralization of the individual charges of the ion pair Asp9-Lys69 with nonpolar residues produces a significant decrease in stability in both cases: Asp9Ala/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.7 degrees C, Asp9Met/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.5 degrees C, Lys69Leu/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.1 degrees C. However, thermodynamic analysis shows that reversal or neutralization of Asp9 produces a 9-15% decrease in DeltaH, while both reversal of Asp at protrusions and neutralization of Lys69 produce negligible changes. These results correlate well with the NMR analysis, which demonstrates that only the substitution of Asp9 produces extensive conformational changes and these changes occur in the surroundings of Lys69. Our results led us to

  6. Co-ordinate single-cell expression of LEE4- and LEE5-encoded proteins of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Andrew J; Naylor, Stuart W; Spears, Kevin J; Yull, Helen M; Dransfield, Tracy A; Oxford, Matthew; McKendrick, Iain J; Porter, Megan; Woodward, Martin J; Smith, David G E; Gally, David L

    2004-10-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a zoonotic pathogen that can express a type III secretion system (TTSS) considered important for colonization and persistence in ruminants. E. coli O157:H7 strains have been shown to vary markedly in levels of protein secreted using the TTSS and this study has confirmed that a high secretion phenotype is more prevalent among isolates associated with human disease than isolates shed by healthy cattle. The variation in secretion levels is a consequence of heterogeneous expression, being dependent on the proportion of bacteria in a population that are actively engaged in protein secretion. This was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and eGFP fusions that examined the expression of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-encoded factors in individual bacteria. In liquid media, the expression of EspA, tir::egfp, intimin, but not map::egfp were co-ordinated in a subpopulation of bacteria. In contrast to E. coli O157:H7, expression of tir::egfp in EPEC E2348/69 was equivalent in all bacteria although the same fusion exhibited variable expression when transformed into an E. coli O157:H7 background. An E. coli O157:H7 strain deleted for the LEE demonstrated weak but variable expression of tir::egfp indicating that the elements controlling the heterogeneous expression lie outside the LEE. The research also demonstrated the rapid induction of tir::egfp and map::egfp on contact with bovine epithelial cells. This control in E. coli O157:H7 may be required to limit exposure of key surface antigens, EspA, Tir and intimin during colonization of cattle but allow their rapid production on contact with bovine gastrointestinal epithelium at the terminal rectum.

  7. Replicative bypass of abasic site in Escherichia coli and human cells: similarities and differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithri Weerasooriya

    Full Text Available Abasic [apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP] sites are the most common DNA damages, opposite which dAMP is frequently inserted ('A-rule' in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide insertion opposite the AP-site in eukaryotic cells depends on the assay system and the type of cells. Accordingly, a 'C-rule', 'A-rule', or the lack of specificity has been reported. DNA sequence context also modulates nucleotide insertion opposite AP-site. Herein, we have compared replication of tetrahydrofuran (Z, a stable analog of AP-site, in E. coli and human embryonic kidney 293T cells in two different sequences. The efficiency of translesion synthesis or viability of the AP-site construct in E. coli was less than 1%, but it was 7- to 8-fold higher in the GZGTC sequence than in the GTGZC sequence. The difference in viability increased even more in pol V-deficient strains. Targeted one-base deletions occurred in 63% frequency in the GZG and 68% frequency in GZC sequence, which dropped to 49% and 21%, respectively, upon induction of SOS. The full-length products with SOS primarily involved dAMP insertion opposite the AP-site, which occurred in 49% and 71% frequency, respectively, in the GZG and GZC sequence. dAMP insertion, largely carried out by pol V, was more efficient when the AP-site was a stronger replication block. In contrast to these results in E. coli, viability was 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher in human cells, and the 'A-rule' was more rigidly followed. The AP-site in the GZG and GZC sequences gave 76% and 89%, respectively, Z → T substitutions. In human cells, targeted one-base deletion was undetectable, and dTMP>dCMP were the next preferred nucleotides inserted opposite Z. siRNA knockdown of Rev1 or pol ζ established that both these polymerases are vital for AP-site bypass, as demonstrated by 36-67% reduction in bypass efficiency. However, neither polymerase was indispensable, suggesting roles of additional DNA polymerases in AP-site bypass in human cells.

  8. Cell-to-cell transformation in Escherichia coli: a novel type of natural transformation involving cell-derived DNA and a putative promoting pheromone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Etchuuya

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is not assumed to be naturally transformable. However, several recent reports have shown that E. coli can express modest genetic competence in certain conditions that may arise in its environment. We have shown previously that spontaneous lateral transfer of non-conjugative plasmids occurs in a colony biofilm of mixed E. coli strains (a set of a donor strain harbouring a plasmid and a plasmid-free recipient strain. In this study, with high-frequency combinations of strains and a plasmid, we constructed the same lateral plasmid transfer system in liquid culture. Using this system, we demonstrated that this lateral plasmid transfer was DNase-sensitive, indicating that it is a kind of transformation in which DNase-accessible extracellular naked DNA is essential. However, this transformation did not occur with purified plasmid DNA and required a direct supply of plasmid from co-existing donor cells. Based on this feature, we have termed this transformation type as 'cell-to-cell transformation'. Analyses using medium conditioned with the high-frequency strain revealed that this strain released a certain factor(s that promoted cell-to-cell transformation and arrested growth of the other strains. This factor is heat-labile and protease-sensitive, and its roughly estimated molecular mass was between ∼9 kDa and ∼30 kDa, indicating that it is a polypeptide factor. Interestingly, this factor was effective even when the conditioned medium was diluted 10(-5-10(-6, suggesting that it acts like a pheromone with high bioactivity. Based on these results, we propose that cell-to-cell transformation is a novel natural transformation mechanism in E. coli that requires cell-derived DNA and is promoted by a peptide pheromone. This is the first evidence that suggests the existence of a peptide pheromone-regulated transformation mechanism in E. coli and in Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Cell-to-cell transformation in Escherichia coli: a novel type of natural transformation involving cell-derived DNA and a putative promoting pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchuuya, Rika; Ito, Miki; Kitano, Seiko; Shigi, Fukiko; Sobue, Rina; Maeda, Sumio

    2011-01-20

    Escherichia coli is not assumed to be naturally transformable. However, several recent reports have shown that E. coli can express modest genetic competence in certain conditions that may arise in its environment. We have shown previously that spontaneous lateral transfer of non-conjugative plasmids occurs in a colony biofilm of mixed E. coli strains (a set of a donor strain harbouring a plasmid and a plasmid-free recipient strain). In this study, with high-frequency combinations of strains and a plasmid, we constructed the same lateral plasmid transfer system in liquid culture. Using this system, we demonstrated that this lateral plasmid transfer was DNase-sensitive, indicating that it is a kind of transformation in which DNase-accessible extracellular naked DNA is essential. However, this transformation did not occur with purified plasmid DNA and required a direct supply of plasmid from co-existing donor cells. Based on this feature, we have termed this transformation type as 'cell-to-cell transformation'. Analyses using medium conditioned with the high-frequency strain revealed that this strain released a certain factor(s) that promoted cell-to-cell transformation and arrested growth of the other strains. This factor is heat-labile and protease-sensitive, and its roughly estimated molecular mass was between ∼9 kDa and ∼30 kDa, indicating that it is a polypeptide factor. Interestingly, this factor was effective even when the conditioned medium was diluted 10(-5)-10(-6), suggesting that it acts like a pheromone with high bioactivity. Based on these results, we propose that cell-to-cell transformation is a novel natural transformation mechanism in E. coli that requires cell-derived DNA and is promoted by a peptide pheromone. This is the first evidence that suggests the existence of a peptide pheromone-regulated transformation mechanism in E. coli and in Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Enhanced expression of rabies virus surface G-protein in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankit; Yadav, Dinesh; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Srivastava, Meenal; Verma, Praveen C; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Tuli, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion systems are known to increase the expression of difficult to express recombinant proteins in soluble form to facilitate their purification. Rabies glycoprotein was also tough to express at sufficient level in soluble form in both E. coli and plant. The present work was aimed to over-express and purify this membrane protein from soluble extract of E. coli. Fusion of Small Ubiqutin like Modifier (SUMO) with rabies glycoprotein increased ~1.5 fold higher expression and ~3.0 fold solubility in comparison to non-fused in E. coli. The SUMO fusion also simplified the purification process. Previously engineered rabies glycoprotein gene in tobacco plants provides complete protection to mice, but the expression was very low for purification. Our finding demonstrated that the SUMO-fusion was useful for enhancing expression and solubility of the membrane protein and again proves to be a good alternative technology for applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical research.

  11. Nucleic acid and protein extraction from electropermeabilized E. coli cells on a microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matos, T.; Senkbeil, Silja; Mendonça, A.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the extensive use of nucleic acid and protein analysis of bacterial samples, there is a need for simple and rapid extraction protocols for both plasmid DNA and RNA molecules as well as reporter proteins like the green fluorescent protein (GFP). In this report, an electropermeability...... technique has been developed which is based on exposing E. coli cells to low voltages to allow extraction of nucleic acids and proteins. The flow-through electropermeability chip used consists of a microfluidic channel with integrated gold electrodes that promote cell envelope channel formation at low...... can be avoided and the transiently formed pores can be closed again and the cells survive. This method has been used to extract RNA and GFP molecules under conditions of electropermeability. Plasmid DNA could be recovered when the applied voltage was increased to 2 V, thus causing complete cell lysis....

  12. Cloning and expression of the HIV protein in Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiqin; Xu, Zhinan; Yin, Xiufei; Cen, Peilin

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen kinds of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) target genes were cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, and specific plasmids were constructed as the templates for the expression of these genes in the cell-free system. Similarly, the linear PCR templates of these genes for cell-free protein expression were also constructed by using two PCR amplification process. These different templates can be employed to biosynthesize HIV proteins in the cell-free system simultaneously and can be adapted for some high-throughput processes. HIV protease (P10) was performed as a target protein, and two different templates (plasmid and PCR product) were prepared and used for P10 expression in the Escherichia coli cell-free system. The target protein P10 was detected in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels either by using a plasmid template or by a PCR template. These results are promising and helpful to develop a high throughput process for drug discovery.

  13. Clathrin-independent entry of baculovirus triggers uptake of E. coli in non-phagocytic human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna P Laakkonen

    Full Text Available The prototype baculovirus, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus, an insect pathogen, holds great potential as a gene therapy vector. To develop transductional targeting and gene delivery by baculovirus, we focused on characterizing the nature and regulation of its uptake in human cancer cells. Baculovirus entered the cells along fluid-phase markers from the raft areas into smooth-surfaced vesicles devoid of clathrin. Notably, regulators associated with macropinocytosis, namely EIPA, Pak1, Rab34, and Rac1, had no significant effect on viral transduction, and the virus did not induce fluid-phase uptake. The internalization and nuclear uptake was, however, affected by mutants of RhoA, and of Arf6, a regulator of clathrin-independent entry. Furthermore, the entry of baculovirus induced ruffle formation and triggered the uptake of fluorescent E. coli bioparticles. To conclude, baculovirus enters human cells via a clathrin-independent pathway, which is able to trigger bacterial uptake. This study increases our understanding of virus entry strategies and gives new insight into baculovirus-mediated gene delivery in human cells.

  14. Sensibilization of escherichia coli cells by cholesterol incorporated into their membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslev, S.E.; Rozenberg, O.A.; Noskin, L.A.; Stepanova, I.M.; Beketova, A.G.; Loshakova, L.V.; Kovaleva, I.G.

    1984-01-01

    It has been established earlier that a level of cell radiosensitivity is defined by membrane viscosity changing in a wide temperature range. Therefore in epsilon coli cells of a natural type lethal doses of gamma rays are increased approximately a 3.5 times at 45 deg C, as compared to 4 deg C. Cholesterol changing a phase state of membrane lipids was used as a modifying factor. Liposomes were used with the goal of effective bacteria transfer to a membrane. It is established that liposomes without cholesterol do not affect their radioresistance and an increase of its content leads to resistance decrease. The effect is attained only at a sufficient long time of incubation of cells with liposomes (10-16 h). At 4 deg C lipids of E. coli membrane are in a solid-crystalline state independently on pholesterol presence, because of this, radiosensitivity does not change. Temperature increase up to 45 deg C transfer a part of lipids to a liquid-crystalline state, thus decreasing membrane viscosity. In this case cholesterol manifests itself. The authors explain viscosity increase with a violation in functioning of those enzyme systems, which activity is connected with membrane structural state, including enzymes of DNA repair. The authors assume that the radiosensibilization effect of cholesterol introduction into a bacterial membrane in high-temperature cell irradiation is explained by this phenomenon

  15. Comparative analysis of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli surface proteome by tandem mass-spectrometry of artificially induced outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurpel, Daniël J; Moriel, Danilo G; Totsika, Makrina; Easton, Donna M; Schembri, Mark A

    2015-02-06

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the major cause of urinary tract infections. For successful colonisation of the urinary tract, UPEC employ multiple surface-exposed or secreted virulence factors, including adhesins and iron uptake systems. Whilst individual UPEC strains and their virulence factors have been the focus of extensive research, there have been no outer membrane (OM) proteomic studies based on large clinical UPEC collections, primarily due to limitations of traditional methods. In this study, a high-throughput method based on tandem mass-spectrometry of EDTA heat-induced outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) was developed for the characterisation of the UPEC surface-associated proteome. The method was applied to compare the OM proteome of fifty-four UPEC isolates, resulting in the identification of 8789 proteins, consisting of 619 unique proteins, which were subsequently interrogated for their subcellular origin, prevalence and homology to characterised virulence factors. Multiple distinct virulence-associated proteins were identified, including two novel putative iron uptake proteins, an uncharacterised type of chaperone-usher fimbriae and various highly prevalent hypothetical proteins. Our results give fundamental insight into the physiology of UPEC and provide a framework for understanding the composition of the UPEC OM proteome. In this study a high-throughput method based on tandem mass-spectrometry of EDTA heat-induced outer membrane vesicles was used to define the outer membrane proteome of a large uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) collection. Our results provide an inventory of proteins expressed on the surface of UPEC, and provide a framework for understanding the composition of the UPEC OM proteome. The method enables the rapid characterisation of the E. coli surface proteome and could easily be applied to the large-scale outer membrane protein profiling of other Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic behavior of cell surface biotinylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, J.F.; Lee, E.

    1989-01-01

    The turnover of proteins on the surface of cultured mammalian cells was measured by a new approach. Reactive free amino or sulfhydryl groups on surface-accessible proteins were derivatized with biotinyl reagents and the proteins solubilized from culture dishes with detergent. Solubilized, biotinylated proteins were then adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose, released with sodium dodecyl sulfate and mercaptoethanol, and separated on polyacrylamide gels. Biotin-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (BNHS) or N-biotinoyl-N'-(maleimidohexanoyl)hydrazine (BM) were the derivatizing agents. Only 10-12 bands were adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose from undervatized cells or from derivatized cells treated with free avidin at 4 degrees C. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis resolved greater than 100 BNHS-derivatized proteins and greater than 40 BM-derivatized proteins. There appeared to be little overlap between the two groups of derivatized proteins. Short-term pulse-chase studies showed an accumulation of label into both groups of biotinylated proteins up until 1-2 h of chase and a rapid decrease over the next 1-5 h. Delayed appearance of labeled protein at the cell surface was attributed to transit time from site of synthesis. The unexpected and unexplained rapid disappearance of pulse-labeled proteins from the cell surface was invariant for all two-dimensionally resolved proteins and was sensitive to temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Long-term pulse-chase experiments beginning 4-8 h after the initiation of chase showed the disappearance of derivatized proteins to be a simple first-order process having a half-life of 115 h in the case of BNHS-derivatized proteins and 30 h in the case of BM-derivatized proteins

  17. Effect of visible light on progressive dormancy of Escherichia coli cells during the survival process in natural fresh water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcina, I.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Iriberri, J.; Egea, L.

    1989-01-01

    Some effects of visible light on the survival of Escherichia coli in waters of the Butron river were studied by comparing illuminated and nonilluminated systems. The following count methods were used: CFU on a selective medium (eosin-methylene blue agar), CFU on a medium of recuperation (Trypticase soy agar with yeast extract and glucose), number of metabolically active cells by reduction of 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan, and total number of E. coli cells as determined by the acridine orange direct-count method. In the illuminated systems, decreases in CFU of E. coli and in the number of metabolically active cells were observed. However, no decline of the total number of E. coli cells was observed. By count methods, different stages of progressive dormancy of E. coli cells were determined to exist in illuminated systems. Culturable and recoverable cells were defined as viable cells, and metabolically active cells and morphologically intact cells were defined as somnicells. Indirect activity measurements were also done by using (14C)glucose. In illuminated systems, a decrease of glucose uptake by E. coli cells was observed throughout the experiments. The assimilated fraction of (14C)glucose decreased faster than the respired fraction in illuminated systems. The percentage of respired (14C)glucose (14CO2 production) with respect to the total glucose uptake increased throughout the experiments, and the percentage of assimilated glucose decreased. Therefore, the visible light was also responsible for an additional inhibition of biosynthetic processes.

  18. Effect of visible light on progressive dormancy of Escherichia coli cells during the survival process in natural fresh water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcina, I.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Iriberri, J.; Egea, L.

    1989-01-01

    Some effects of visible light on the survival of Escherichia coli in waters of the Butron river were studied by comparing illuminated and nonilluminated systems. The following count methods were used: CFU on a selective medium (eosin-methylene blue agar), CFU on a medium of recuperation (Trypticase soy agar with yeast extract and glucose), number of metabolically active cells by reduction of 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan, and total number of E. coli cells as determined by the acridine orange direct-count method. In the illuminated systems, decreases in CFU of E. coli and in the number of metabolically active cells were observed. However, no decline of the total number of E. coli cells was observed. By count methods, different stages of progressive dormancy of E. coli cells were determined to exist in illuminated systems. Culturable and recoverable cells were defined as viable cells, and metabolically active cells and morphologically intact cells were defined as somnicells. Indirect activity measurements were also done by using [14C]glucose. In illuminated systems, a decrease of glucose uptake by E. coli cells was observed throughout the experiments. The assimilated fraction of [14C]glucose decreased faster than the respired fraction in illuminated systems. The percentage of respired [14C]glucose (14CO2 production) with respect to the total glucose uptake increased throughout the experiments, and the percentage of assimilated glucose decreased. Therefore, the visible light was also responsible for an additional inhibition of biosynthetic processes

  19. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of O4-alkylthymidine lesions in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Amato, Nicholas J; Zhai, Qianqian; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-12-15

    Due to the abundant presence of alkylating agents in living cells and the environment, DNA alkylation is generally unavoidable. Among the alkylated DNA lesions, O(4)-alkylthymidine (O(4)-alkyldT) are known to be highly mutagenic and persistent in mammalian tissues. Not much is known about how the structures of the alkyl group affect the repair and replicative bypass of the O(4)-alkyldT lesions, or how the latter process is modulated by translesion synthesis polymerases. Herein, we synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides harboring eight site-specifically inserted O(4)-alkyldT lesions and examined their impact on DNA replication in Escherichia coli cells. We showed that the replication past all the O(4)-alkyldT lesions except (S)- and (R)-sBudT was highly efficient, and these lesions directed very high frequencies of dGMP misincorporation in E. coli cells. While SOS-induced DNA polymerases play redundant roles in bypassing most of the O(4)-alkyldT lesions, the bypass of (S)- and (R)-sBudT necessitated Pol V. Moreover, Ada was not involved in the repair of any O(4)-alkyldT lesions, Ogt was able to repair O(4)-MedT and, to a lesser extent, O(4)-EtdT and O(4)-nPrdT, but not other O(4)-alkyldT lesions. Together, our study provided important new knowledge about the repair of the O(4)-alkyldT lesions and their recognition by the E. coli replication machinery. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Surfactant Protein D Inhibits Adherence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli to the Bladder Epithelial Cells and the Bacterium-induced Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimura, Yuichiro; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Saito, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    The adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the host urothelial surface is the first step for establishing UPEC infection. Uroplakin Ia (UPIa), a glycoprotein expressed on bladder urothelium, serves as a receptor for FimH, a lectin located at bacterial pili, and their interaction initiates UPEC infection. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is known to be expressed on mucosal surfaces in various tissues besides the lung. However, the functions of SP-D in the non-pulmonary tissues are poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible function of SP-D expressed in the bladder urothelium and the mechanisms by which SP-D functions. SP-D was expressed in human bladder mucosa, and its mRNA was increased in the bladder of the UPEC infection model in mice. SP-D directly bound to UPEC and strongly agglutinated them in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Co-incubation of SP-D with UPEC decreased the bacterial adherence to 5637 cells, the human bladder cell line, and the UPEC-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, preincubation of SP-D with 5637 cells resulted in the decreased adherence of UPEC to the cells and in a reduced number of cells injured by UPEC. SP-D directly bound to UPIa and competed with FimH for UPIa binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, the exogenous administration of SP-D inhibited UPEC adherence to the bladder and dampened UPEC-induced inflammation in mice. These results support the conclusion that SP-D can protect the bladder urothelium against UPEC infection and suggest a possible function of SP-D in urinary tract. PMID:23012359

  1. Development of production and purification processes of recombinant fragment of pneumococcal surface protein A in Escherichia coli using different carbon sources and chromatography sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rimenys Junior; Cabrera-Crespo, Joaquin; Tanizaki, Martha Massako; Gonçalves, Viviane Maimoni

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is essential for Streptococcus pneumoniae virulence and its use either as a novel pneumococcal vaccine or as carrier in a conjugate vaccine would improve the protection and the coverage of the vaccine. Within this context, the development of scalable production and purification processes of His-tagged recombinant fragment of PspA from clade 3 (rfPspA3) in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was proposed. Fed-batch production was performed using chemically defined medium with glucose or glycerol as carbon source. Although the use of glycerol led to lower acetate production, the concentration of cells were similar at the end of both fed-batches, reaching high cell density of E. coli (62 g dry cell weight/L), and the rfPspA3 production was higher with glucose (3.48 g/L) than with glycerol (2.97 g/L). A study of downstream process was also carried out, including cell disruption and clarification steps. Normally, the first chromatography step for purification of His-tagged proteins is metal affinity. However, the purification design using anion exchange followed by metal affinity gave better results for rfPspA3 than the opposite sequence. Performing this new design of chromatography steps, rfPspA3 was obtained with 95.5% and 75.9% purity, respectively, from glucose and glycerol culture. Finally, after cation exchange chromatography, rfPspA3 purity reached 96.5% and 90.6%, respectively, from glucose and glycerol culture, and the protein was shown to have the expected alpha-helix secondary structure.

  2. Effect of antibiotics influencing membrane function on the potassium transport of E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoegyi, M.; Tarjan, I.; Tamas, Gy.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of polymixin, nigericin, gramicidin on the 42 K-efflux of E. coli cells was studied. The 42 K-efflux of the bacteria decreases in time according to an exponential function. The slopes of the linearized functions characterizing the efflux increase with increasing concentration of antibiotics. The frequency of events of the 42 K-release as a parameter of antibiotics membrane interaction was determined on the basis of a theoretical model developed for the evaluation of the authors' experimental data. In this way a quantitative comparison of the effectiveness of antibiotics was possible. The most effective antibiotic was polymixin, followed by nigericin and gramicidin. (author)

  3. Bacterial cell surface properties: role of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Yang, Shanshan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) on the comprehensive surface properties of four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus suis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida). The removal of LB-EPS from bacterial surfaces by high-speed centrifugation (12,000×g) was confirmed by SEM images. Viability tests showed that the percentages of viable cells ranged from 95.9% to 98.0%, and no significant difference was found after treatment (P>0.05). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of phosphodiester, carboxylic, phosphate, and amino functional groups on bacteria surfaces, and the removal of LB-EPS did not alter the types of cell surface functional groups. Potentiometric titration results suggested the total site concentrations on the intact bacteria were higher than those on LB-EPS free bacteria. Most of the acidity constants (pKa) were almost identical, except the increased pKa values of phosphodiester groups on LB-EPS free S. suis and E. coli surfaces. The electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic diameters of the intact and LB-EPS free bacteria were statistically unchanged (P>0.05), indicating LB-EPS had no influence on the net surface charges and size distribution of bacteria. However, LB-ESP could enhance cell aggregation processes. The four LB-EPS free bacteria all exhibited fewer hydrophobicity values (26.1-65.0%) as compared to the intact cells (47.4-69.3%), suggesting the removal of uncharged nonpolar compounds (e.g., carbohydrates) in LB-EPS. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in cell surface characterizations induced by LB-EPS, and have important implications for assessing the role of LB-EPS in bacterial adhesion and transport behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of a recombinant chitin deacetylase in the culture medium of Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyasu, K; Kaneko, S; Hayashi, K; Mori, Y

    1999-09-10

    With the aid of a signal sequence of a chitinase from Streptomyces lividans, a recombinant chitin deacetylase, whose gene originated from a Deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, was produced in the culture medium of Escherichia coli cells, existing as a highly active form without the signal peptide. During the production of the recombinant chitin deacetylase, both a slight increase in the value of OD600 nm in the culture medium and a drastic decrease in viable cell number were observed. When penta-N-acetyl-chitopentaose was used as the substrate, the recombinant chitin deacetylase had comparable kinetic parameters to those of the original enzyme from the fungus. The addition of a C-terminal six histidine sequence to the recombinant enzyme caused a slight decrease in the kcat value, and the further addition of a 12 amino acid sequence at its N-terminus caused a further decrease in the value. This production system allowed us to easily produce in the culture media the recombinant chitin deacetylases possessing as good properties as the original enzyme, without any disruption steps of the E. coli cells.

  5. Deformation of filamentous Escherichia coli cells in a microfluidic device: a new technique to study cell mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Caspi

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of bacterial cells are determined by their stress-bearing elements. The size of typical bacterial cells, and the fact that different time and length scales govern their behavior, necessitate special experimental techniques in order to probe their mechanical properties under various spatiotemporal conditions. Here, we present such an experimental technique to study cell mechanics using hydrodynamic forces in a microfluidic device. We demonstrate the application of this technique by calculating the flexural rigidity of non-growing Escherichia coli cells. In addition, we compare the deformation of filamentous cells under growing and non-growing conditions during the deformation process. We show that, at low forces, the force needed to deform growing cells to the same extent as non-growing cells is approximately two times smaller. Following previous works, we interpret these results as the outcome of the difference between the elastic response of non-growing cells and the plastic-elastic response of growing cells. Finally, we observe some heterogeneity in the response of individual cells to the applied force. We suggest that this results from the individuality of different bacterial cells.

  6. The comparative investigation of gene mutation induction in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli cells after irradiation by different LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borejko, A.V.; Bulah, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    The data of mutagenetic action of ionizing radiation with different physical characteristics on bacterial cells with various genotypes are presented. It was shown that regularities of inducible mutagenesis in Bacillus subtilis and E. coli are consimilar. The dose-response dependence for both types of cells is described by the linear-quadratic function. The RBE on LET relationship has a local maximum at 20 keV/μm. The crucial role in inducible mutagenesis in E. coli and Bacillus subtilis cells is played by the error-prone SOS-repair

  7. Timing the start of division in E. coli: a single-cell study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshes, G.; Vanounou, S.; Fishov, I.; Feingold, M.

    2008-12-01

    We monitor the shape dynamics of individual E. coli cells using time-lapse microscopy together with accurate image analysis. This allows measuring the dynamics of single-cell parameters throughout the cell cycle. In previous work, we have used this approach to characterize the main features of single-cell morphogenesis between successive divisions. Here, we focus on the behavior of the parameters that are related to cell division and study their variation over a population of 30 cells. In particular, we show that the single-cell data for the constriction width dynamics collapse onto a unique curve following appropriate rescaling of the corresponding variables. This suggests the presence of an underlying time scale that determines the rate at which the cell cycle advances in each individual cell. For the case of cell length dynamics a similar rescaling of variables emphasizes the presence of a breakpoint in the growth rate at the time when division starts, τc. We also find that the τc of individual cells is correlated with their generation time, τg, and inversely correlated with the corresponding length at birth, L0. Moreover, the extent of the T-period, τg - τc, is apparently independent of τg. The relations between τc, τg and L0 indicate possible compensation mechanisms that maintain cell length variability at about 10%. Similar behavior was observed for both fast-growing cells in a rich medium (LB) and for slower growth in a minimal medium (M9-glucose). To reveal the molecular mechanisms that lead to the observed organization of the cell cycle, we should further extend our approach to monitor the formation of the divisome.

  8. Differential expression of the Escherichia coli autoaggregation factor antigen 43

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Hjerrild, Louise; Gjermansen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a self-recognizing surface adhesin found in most Escherichia coli strains. Due to its excellent cell-to-cell aggregation characteristics, Ag43 expression confers clumping and fluffing of cells and promotes biofilm formation. Ag43 expression is repressed by the cellular redox......-forming potential of E. coli. Finally, we demonstrated that Ag43-mediated cell aggregation confers significant protection against hydrogen peroxide killing....

  9. Synergy between type 1 fimbriae expression and C3 opsonisation increases internalisation of E. coli by human tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Wuding; Hong, Yuzhi; Sacks, Steven H; Sheerin, Neil S

    2009-03-31

    Bacterial infection of the urinary tract is a common clinical problem with E. coli being the most common urinary pathogen. Bacterial uptake into epithelial cells is increasingly recognised as an important feature of infection. Bacterial virulence factors, especially fimbrial adhesins, have been conclusively shown to promote host cell invasion. Our recent study reported that C3 opsonisation markedly increases the ability of E. coli strain J96 to internalise into human proximal tubular epithelial cells via CD46, a complement regulatory protein expressed on host cell membrane. In this study, we further assessed whether C3-dependent internalisation by human tubular epithelial cells is a general feature of uropathogenic E. coli and investigated features of the bacterial phenotype that may account for any heterogeneity. In 31 clinical isolates of E. coli tested, C3-dependent internalisation was evident in 10 isolates. Type 1 fimbriae mediated-binding is essential for C3-dependent internalisation as shown by phenotypic association, type 1 fimbrial blockade with soluble ligand (mannose) and by assessment of a type 1 fimbrial mutant. we propose that efficient internalisation of uropathogenic E. coli by the human urinary tract depends on co-operation between type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion and C3 receptor -ligand interaction.

  10. Surface structures involved in plant stomata and leaf colonization by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeus eSaldaña

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC O157:H7 uses a myriad of surface adhesive appendages including pili, flagella, and the type 3 secretion system (T3SS to adhere to and inflict damage to the human gut mucosa. Consumption of contaminated ground beef, milk, juices, water or leafy greens has been associated with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in humans due to STEC. The aim of this study was to investigate which of the known STEC O157:H7 adherence factors mediate colonization of baby spinach leaves and where the bacteria reside within tainted leaves. We found that STEC O157:H7 colonizes baby spinach leaves through the coordinated production of curli, the E. coli common pilus (ECP, hemorrhagic coli type 4 pilus (HCP, flagella, and T3SS. Electron microscopy analysis of tainted leaves revealed STEC bacteria in the internal cavity of the stomata, in intercellular spaces, and within vascular tissue (xylem and phloem, where the bacteria were protected from the bactericidal effect of gentamicin, sodium hypochlorite or ozonated water treatments. We confirmed that the T3S escN mutant showed a reduced number of bacteria within the stomata suggesting that T3S is required for the successful colonization of leaves. In agreement, non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain DH5α transformed with a plasmid carrying the LEE pathogenicity island, harboring the T3SS and effector genes, internalized into stomata more efficiently than without the LEE. This study highlights a role for pili, flagella, and T3SS in the interaction of STEC with spinach leaves. Colonization of plant stomata and internal tissues may constitute a strategy by which STEC survives in a nutrient-rich microenvironment protected from external foes and may be a potential source for human infection.

  11. Surface structures involved in plant stomata and leaf colonization by shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli o157:h7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Zeus; Sánchez, Ethel; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Puente, Jose Luis; Girón, Jorge A

    2011-01-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 uses a myriad of surface adhesive appendages including pili, flagella, and the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to adhere to and inflict damage to the human gut mucosa. Consumption of contaminated ground beef, milk, juices, water, or leafy greens has been associated with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in humans due to STEC. The aim of this study was to investigate which of the known STEC O157:H7 adherence factors mediate colonization of baby spinach leaves and where the bacteria reside within tainted leaves. We found that STEC O157:H7 colonizes baby spinach leaves through the coordinated production of curli, the E. coli common pilus, hemorrhagic coli type 4 pilus, flagella, and T3SS. Electron microscopy analysis of tainted leaves revealed STEC bacteria in the internal cavity of the stomata, in intercellular spaces, and within vascular tissue (xylem and phloem), where the bacteria were protected from the bactericidal effect of gentamicin, sodium hypochlorite or ozonated water treatments. We confirmed that the T3S escN mutant showed a reduced number of bacteria within the stomata suggesting that T3S is required for the successful colonization of leaves. In agreement, non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain DH5α transformed with a plasmid carrying the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, harboring the T3SS and effector genes, internalized into stomata more efficiently than without the LEE. This study highlights a role for pili, flagella, and T3SS in the interaction of STEC with spinach leaves. Colonization of plant stomata and internal tissues may constitute a strategy by which STEC survives in a nutrient-rich microenvironment protected from external foes and may be a potential source for human infection.

  12. Development of a rapid capture-cum-detection method for Escherichia coli O157 from apple juice comprising nano-immunomagnetic separation in tandem with surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Roya; Mukherjee, Shubhasish; Hudson, Jim; Sharma, Anup; Banerjee, Pratik

    2014-10-17

    A combined capture and detection method comprising of nano-immunomagnetic separation (NIMS) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed to detect Escherichia coli O157 from liquid media including apple juice. The capture antibodies (cAbs) were immobilized on magnetite-gold (Fe3O4/Au) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) which were used for separation and concentration of the E. coli O157 cells from model liquid food matrix. The capture efficiency (CE) for E. coli O157 using MNP was found to be approximately 84-94%. No cross reactivity was observed with background non-target organisms. There was a significant difference in the mean CE of bacteria captured by MNP and commercially sourced immunomagnetic microbeads (ptarget pathogen, SERS labels were prepared by conjugating gold nanoparticles with Raman reporter molecules and the detector antibody (dAb). Au-Raman label-dAb was interacted with gold coated MNP-cAb-E. coli O157 complex. The ability of this immunoassay to detect E. coli O157 in apple juice was investigated. We have successfully applied the synthesized Fe3O4/Au nanoclusters to E. coli O157 detection in apple juice using the SERS method. The lowest detectable bacterial cell concentration in apple juice was 10(2)CFU/mL with a total analysis time of less than an hour. This method presents a convenient way of preconcentration, separation, and detection of low levels of target pathogen from liquid food matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Surface and internalized Escherichia coli O157:H7 on field-grown spinach and lettuce treated with spray-contaminated irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Webb, Cathy C; Diaz-Perez, Juan Carlos; Phatak, Sharad C; Silvoy, John J; Davey, Lindsey; Payton, Alison S; Liao, Jean; Ma, Li; Doyle, Michael P

    2010-06-01

    Numerous field studies have revealed that irrigation water can contaminate the surface of plants; however, the occurrence of pathogen internalization is unclear. This study was conducted to determine the sites of Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination and its survival when the bacteria were applied through spray irrigation water to either field-grown spinach or lettuce. To differentiate internalized and surface populations, leaves were treated with a surface disinfectant wash before the tissue was ground for analysis of E. coli O157:H7 by direct plate count or enrichment culture. Irrigation water containing E. coli O157:H7 at 10(2), 10(4), or 10(6) CFU/ml was applied to spinach 48 and 69 days after transplantation of seedlings into fields. E. coli O157:H7 was initially detected after application on the surface of plants dosed at 10(4) CFU/ml (4 of 20 samples) and both on the surface (17 of 20 samples) and internally (5 of 20 samples) of plants dosed at 10(6) CFU/ml. Seven days postspraying, all spinach leaves tested negative for surface or internal contamination. In a subsequent study, irrigation water containing E. coli O157:H7 at 10(8) CFU/ml was sprayed onto either the abaxial (lower) or adaxial (upper) side of leaves of field-grown lettuce under sunny or shaded conditions. E. coli O157:H7 was detectable on the leaf surface 27 days postspraying, but survival was higher on leaves sprayed on the abaxial side than on leaves sprayed on the adaxial side. Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into lettuce leaves also occurred with greater persistence in leaves sprayed on the abaxial side (up to 14 days) than in leaves sprayed on the adaxial side (2 days).

  15. Human Milk Oligosaccharides Protect Bladder Epithelial Cells Against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Invasion and Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ann E.; Autran, Chloe A.; Espanola, Sophia D.; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants. PMID:23990566

  16. Bovine natural killer cells are present in Escherichia coli infected mammary gland tissue and show antimicrobial activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipka, Anja; Pomeroy, Brianna; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075051907

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are early responders in bacterial infections but their role in bovine mastitis has not been characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of NK cells (NKp46+/CD3−) in bovine mammary gland tissue after an intramammary challenge with Escherichia (E.) coli. A small

  17. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle W Clark

    Full Text Available Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH, no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5 the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  18. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J; Rochford, Edward T J

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of toll-like-receptors (TLRs). Presence of heat-sacrificed Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced dose and cell-type dependent responses. Stem-cells were most sensitive to bacterial presence, demonstrating decreased adhesion number yet increased adhesion effort with a relatively large focal adhesion contact area. Blocking TLRs had no effect on stem-cell adhesion in presence of S. aureus, but blocking both TLR2 and TLR4 induced an increased adhesion effort in presence of E. coli. Neither lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, nor bacterial DNA provoked the same cell response as did whole bacteria. Herewith we suggest a new mechanism as to how biomaterials are integrated by cells despite the unavoidable presence of bacterial contamination. Stimulation of host cell integration of implant surfaces may open a new window to design new biomaterials with enhanced healing, thereby reducing the risk of biomaterial-associated infection of both "hardware-based" implants as well as of tissue-engineered constructs, known to suffer from similarly high infection risks as currently prevailing in "hardware-based" implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  20. Phenotypic plasticity and effects of selection on cell division symmetry in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttara N Lele

    Full Text Available Aging has been demonstrated in unicellular organisms and is presumably due to asymmetric distribution of damaged proteins and other components during cell division. Whether the asymmetry-induced aging is inevitable or an adaptive and adaptable response is debated. Although asymmetric division leads to aging and death of some cells, it increases the effective growth rate of the population as shown by theoretical and empirical studies. Mathematical models predict on the other hand, that if the cells divide symmetrically, cellular aging may be delayed or absent, growth rate will be reduced but growth yield will increase at optimum repair rates. Therefore in nutritionally dilute (oligotrophic environments, where growth yield may be more critical for survival, symmetric division may get selected. These predictions have not been empirically tested so far. We report here that Escherichia coli grown in oligotrophic environments had greater morphological and functional symmetry in cell division. Both phenotypic plasticity and genetic selection appeared to shape cell division time asymmetry but plasticity was lost on prolonged selection. Lineages selected on high nutrient concentration showed greater frequency of presumably old or dead cells. Further, there was a negative correlation between cell division time asymmetry and growth yield but there was no significant correlation between asymmetry and growth rate. The results suggest that cellular aging driven by asymmetric division may not be hardwired but shows substantial plasticity as well as evolvability in response to the nutritional environment.

  1. Organization of ribosomes and nucleoids in Escherichia coli cells during growth and in quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Qian; Singh, Bhupender; Peisker, Kristin; Metzendorf, Nicole; Ge, Xueliang; Dasgupta, Santanu; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-04-18

    We have examined the distribution of ribosomes and nucleoids in live Escherichia coli cells under conditions of growth, division, and in quiescence. In exponentially growing cells translating ribosomes are interspersed among and around the nucleoid lobes, appearing as alternative bands under a fluorescence microscope. In contrast, inactive ribosomes either in stationary phase or after treatment with translation inhibitors such as chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and streptomycin gather predominantly at the cell poles and boundaries with concomitant compaction of the nucleoid. However, under all conditions, spatial segregation of the ribosomes and the nucleoids is well maintained. In dividing cells, ribosomes accumulate on both sides of the FtsZ ring at the mid cell. However, the distribution of the ribosomes among the new daughter cells is often unequal. Both the shape of the nucleoid and the pattern of ribosome distribution are also modified when the cells are exposed to rifampicin (transcription inhibitor), nalidixic acid (gyrase inhibitor), or A22 (MreB-cytoskeleton disruptor). Thus we conclude that the intracellular organization of the ribosomes and the nucleoids in bacteria are dynamic and critically dependent on cellular growth processes (replication, transcription, and translation) as well as on the integrity of the MreB cytoskeleton.

  2. Organization of Ribosomes and Nucleoids in Escherichia coli Cells during Growth and in Quiescence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Qian; Singh, Bhupender; Peisker, Kristin; Metzendorf, Nicole; Ge, Xueliang; Dasgupta, Santanu; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of ribosomes and nucleoids in live Escherichia coli cells under conditions of growth, division, and in quiescence. In exponentially growing cells translating ribosomes are interspersed among and around the nucleoid lobes, appearing as alternative bands under a fluorescence microscope. In contrast, inactive ribosomes either in stationary phase or after treatment with translation inhibitors such as chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and streptomycin gather predominantly at the cell poles and boundaries with concomitant compaction of the nucleoid. However, under all conditions, spatial segregation of the ribosomes and the nucleoids is well maintained. In dividing cells, ribosomes accumulate on both sides of the FtsZ ring at the mid cell. However, the distribution of the ribosomes among the new daughter cells is often unequal. Both the shape of the nucleoid and the pattern of ribosome distribution are also modified when the cells are exposed to rifampicin (transcription inhibitor), nalidixic acid (gyrase inhibitor), or A22 (MreB-cytoskeleton disruptor). Thus we conclude that the intracellular organization of the ribosomes and the nucleoids in bacteria are dynamic and critically dependent on cellular growth processes (replication, transcription, and translation) as well as on the integrity of the MreB cytoskeleton. PMID:24599955

  3. Biocatalytic Production of Trehalose from Maltose by Using Whole Cells of Permeabilized Recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojuan Zheng

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide, which can protect proteins, lipid membranes, and cells from desiccation, refrigeration, dehydration, and other harsh environments. Trehalose can be produced by different pathways and trehalose synthase pathway is a convenient, practical, and low-cost pathway for the industrial production of trehalose. In this study, 3 candidate treS genes were screened from genomic databases of Pseudomonas and expressed in Escherichia coli. One of them from P. stutzeri A1501 exhibited the best transformation ability from maltose into trehalose and the least byproduct. Thus, whole cells of this recombinant E. coli were used as biocatalyst for trehalose production. In order to improve the conversion rate of maltose to trehalose, optimization of the permeabilization and biotransformation were carried out. Under optimal conditions, 92.2 g/l trehalose was produced with a high productivity of 23.1 g/(l h. No increase of glucose was detected during the whole course. The biocatalytic process developed in this study might serve as a candidate for the large scale production of trehalose.

  4. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Express Type 1 Fimbriae Only in Surface Adherent Populations Under Physiological Growth Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Kristian; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Khandige, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Most uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains harbor genes encoding adhesive type 1 fimbria (T1F). T1F is a key factor for successful establishment of urinary tract infection. However, UPEC strains typically do not express T1F in the bladder urine, and little is understood about...... its induction in vivo. METHODS:  A flow chamber infection model was used to grow UPEC under conditions simulating distinct infection niches in the bladder. Type 1 fimbriation on isolated UPEC was subsequently determined by yeast cell agglutination and immunofluorescence microscopy, and the results...... were correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade cultured human bladder cells. RESULTS:  Although inactive during planktonic growth in urine, T1F expression occurs when UPEC settles on and infects bladder epithelial cells or colonizes catheters. As a result, UPEC in these sessile populations...

  5. Injury and recovery of salmonella, Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Listeria Monocytogenes on cantaloupe rind surfaces after hyrdogren peroxide and minimal thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Produce surface structures vary and complicate decontamination treatments for reducing attached bacteria. Purpose: The objective of this study on survival and recovery of injured population of Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes on cantaloupe rind surfaces...

  6. The location of redox-sensitive groups in the carrier protein of proline at the outer and inner surface of the membrane in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.; Robillard, George T.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence is presented in this report for the presence of two sets of dithiols associated with proline transport activity in Escherichia coli. One set is located at the outer surface, the other at the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. Treatment of right-side-out membrane vesicles from E.

  7. Metabolic Regulation of a Bacterial Cell System with Emphasis on Escherichia coli Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    It is quite important to understand the overall metabolic regulation mechanism of bacterial cells such as Escherichia coli from both science (such as biochemistry) and engineering (such as metabolic engineering) points of view. Here, an attempt was made to clarify the overall metabolic regulation mechanism by focusing on the roles of global regulators which detect the culture or growth condition and manipulate a set of metabolic pathways by modulating the related gene expressions. For this, it was considered how the cell responds to a variety of culture environments such as carbon (catabolite regulation), nitrogen, and phosphate limitations, as well as the effects of oxygen level, pH (acid shock), temperature (heat shock), and nutrient starvation. PMID:25937963

  8. Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium and prototrophic (minimal medium culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens and an important target.

  9. Thermal degradation products of saccharides: effect study over Escherichia coli K12S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.L.B.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    The heat sterilization of reducing sugars, in the presence of phosphates, in alkaline pH, promotes caramelization reactions, yielding a serie of degradation products. Among them, aldehyde-like compounds seem to be responsible for the decrease in viability of DNA repair-proficient E.coli cells. A positive interaction between toxic solutions and UV-radiation effects is observed in these cells. The sinergism UV-toxic solutions varies in function of post-irradiation time and is dependent on UV dose, indicating the interference of repair processes in toxicity. The effect of non-reducing sugars on cellular viability is negligible, suggesting that toxic substances generation is linked to the presence of at least a free carbonyl group in sugar structure. All tested reducing sugars, when experimental conditions remained constant, have similarly shaped inactivation kinetics and their effects are equally inhibited by catalase activity, during incubation. (author)

  10. The 4.5 S RNA gene of Escherichia coli is essential for cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Fournier, M J

    1984-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene coding for the metabolically stable 4.5 S RNA (ffs) has been shown to be required for cell viability. Essentiality was demonstrated by examining the recombination behavior of substitution mutations of ffs generated in vitro. Substitution mutants of ffs are able to replace...... the chromosomal allele only in the presence of a second, intact copy of ffs. Independent evidence of essentiality and the finding that 4.5 S RNA is important for protein synthetic activity came from characterization of cells dependent on the lac operon inducer isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside for ffs gene...... expression. Here, a strain dependent on isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside for 4.5 S RNA synthesis was developed by inactivation of the chromosomal ffs allele and lysogenization by a lambda phage containing 4.5 S DNA fused to a hybrid trp-lac promoter. Withdrawal of the thiogalactoside leads to a deficiency...

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 enhances NF-kappaB activation in Escherichia coli-stimulated urinary bladder cells through TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial cells of the urinary tract recognize pathogenic bacteria through pattern recognition receptors on their surface, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs, and mount an immune response through the activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Some uropathogenic bacteria can subvert these cellular responses, creating problems with how the host eliminates pathogens. Lactobacillus is a genus of lactic acid bacteria that are part of the microbiota and consist of many probiotic strains, some specifically for urogenital infections. Immunomodulation has emerged as an important mode of action of probiotic and commensal lactobacilli and given the importance of epithelial cells, we evaluated the effect of the urogenital probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 on epithelial immune activation. Results Immune activation through the NF-kappaB pathway was initiated by stimulation of T24 urothelial cells with heat-killed Escherichia coli and this was further potentiated when cells were co-cultured with live L. rhamnosus GR-1. Heat-killed lactobacilli were poor activators of NF-kappaB. Concomitant stimulation of bladder cells with E. coli and L. rhamnosus GR-1 increased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF, whereas IL-6 and CXCL8 levels were reduced. Another probiotic, L. rhamnosus GG, was also able to potentiate NF-kappaB in these cells although at a significantly reduced level compared to the GR-1 strain. The transcript numbers and protein levels of the lipopolysaccharide receptor TLR4 were significantly increased after co-stimulation with E. coli and lactobacilli compared to controls. Furthermore, inhibition of TLR4 activation by polymixin B completely blocked the lactobacilli potentiation of NF-kappaB. Conclusions The immunological outcome of E. coli challenge of bladder cells was influenced by probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1, by enhancing the activation of NF-kappaB and TNF release. Thus the urogenital probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1

  12. Co-ordinate regulation of distinct host cell signalling pathways by multifunctional enteropathogenic Escherichia coli effector molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Brendan; Ellis, Sarah; Leard, Alan D; Warawa, Jonathan; Mellor, Harry; Jepson, Mark A

    2002-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of paediatric diarrhoea and a model for the family of attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. A/E pathogens encode a type III secretion system to transfer effector proteins into host cells. The EPEC Tir effector protein acts as a receptor for the bacterial surface protein intimin and is involved in the formation of Cdc42-independent, actin-rich pedestal structures beneath the adhered bacteria. In this paper, we demonstrate that EPEC binding to HeLa cells also induces Tir-independent, cytoskeletal rearrangement evidenced by the early, transient formation of filopodia-like structures at sites of infection. Filopodia formation is dependent on expression of the EPEC Map effector molecule - a protein that targets mitochondria and induces their dysfunction. We show that Map-induced filopodia formation is independent of mitochondrial targeting and is abolished by cellular expression of the Cdc42 inhibitory WASP-CRIB domain, demonstrating that Map has at least two distinct functions in host cells. The transient nature of the filopodia is related to an ability of EPEC to downregulate Map-induced cell signalling that, like pedestal formation, was dependent on both Tir and intimin proteins. The ability of Tir to downregulate filopodia was impaired by disrupting a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) motif, suggesting that Tir may possess such a function, with its interaction with intimin triggering this activity. Furthermore, we also found that Map-induced cell signalling inhibits pedestal formation, revealing that the cellular effects of Tir and Map must be co-ordinately regulated during infection. Possible implications of the multifunctional nature of EPEC effector molecules in pathogenesis are discussed.

  13. In-cell thermodynamics and a new role for protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Gorensek, Annelise H; Senske, Michael; Pielak, Gary J

    2016-02-16

    There is abundant, physiologically relevant knowledge about protein cores; they are hydrophobic, exquisitely well packed, and nearly all hydrogen bonds are satisfied. An equivalent understanding of protein surfaces has remained elusive because proteins are almost exclusively studied in vitro in simple aqueous solutions. Here, we establish the essential physiological roles played by protein surfaces by measuring the equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding in the complex environment of living Escherichia coli cells, and under physiologically relevant in vitro conditions. Fluorine NMR data on the 7-kDa globular N-terminal SH3 domain of Drosophila signal transduction protein drk (SH3) show that charge-charge interactions are fundamental to protein stability and folding kinetics in cells. Our results contradict predictions from accepted theories of macromolecular crowding and show that cosolutes commonly used to mimic the cellular interior do not yield physiologically relevant information. As such, we provide the foundation for a complete picture of protein chemistry in cells.

  14. Escherichia coli common pilus (ECP) targets arabinosyl residues in plant cell walls to mediate adhesion to fresh produce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G T; Toth, Ian K; Holden, Nicola J

    2014-12-05

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR-GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin concentrations on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Trevino-Dopatka, Sonia [ORNL; Maggart, Michael J [ORNL; Boisen, Nadia [University of Virginia School of Medicine; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Nataro, James [University of Virginia School of Medicine; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  16. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Allison, David Post [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhoea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  17. Lactose inhibits the growth of Rhizobium meliloti cells that contain an actively expressed Escherichia coli lactose operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Timblin, C R; Kahn, M L

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 made the cells sensitive to the addition of the beta-galactosides lactose, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and lactobionic acid. Growth stopped when the beta-galactoside was added and viability decreased modestly during the next few hours, but little cell lysis was observed and the cells appeared normal. Protein synthesis was not inhibited. Growth was inhibited only when beta-galactosidase expression was greater than 16...

  18. Subversion of autophagy in adherent invasive Escherichia coli-infected neutrophils induces inflammation and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahman Chargui

    Full Text Available Invading bacteria are recognized, captured and killed by a specialized form of autophagy, called xenophagy. Recently, defects in xenophagy in Crohn's disease (CD have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human chronic inflammatory diseases of uncertain etiology of the gastrointestinal tract. We show here that pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC isolated from CD patients are able to adhere and invade neutrophils, which represent the first line of defense against bacteria. Of particular interest, AIEC infection of neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells blocked autophagy at the autolysosomal step, which allowed intracellular survival of bacteria and exacerbated interleukin-8 (IL-8 production. Interestingly, this block in autophagy correlated with the induction of autophagic cell death. Likewise, stimulation of autophagy by nutrient starvation or rapamycin treatment reduced intracellular AIEC survival and IL-8 production. Finally, treatment with an inhibitor of autophagy decreased cell death of AIEC-infected neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells. In conclusion, excessive autophagy in AIEC infection triggered cell death of neutrophils.

  19. Metabolism of HeLa cells revealed through autofluorescence lifetime upon infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakina, Tatyana Yu.; Su, Pin-Tzu; Syu, Wan-Jr; Allen Chang, C.; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a sensitive technique in monitoring functional and conformational states of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD),main compounds participating in oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this study, we have applied FLIM to characterize the metabolic changes in HeLa cells upon bacterial infection and made comparison with the results from the cells treated with staurosporine (STS), a well-known apoptosis inducer. The evolving of NADH's average autofluorescence lifetime during the 3 h after infection with enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or STS treatment has been observed. The ratio of the short and the long lifetime components' relative contributions of NADH increases with time, a fact indicating cellular metabolic activity, such as a decrease of oxidative phosphorylation over the course of infection, while opposite dynamics is observed in FAD. Being associated with mitochondria, FAD lifetimes and redox ratio could indicate heterogeneous mitochondrial function, microenvironment with bacterial infection, and further pathway to cell death. The redox ratios for both EHEC-infected and STS-treated HeLa cells have been observed and these observations also indicate possible apoptosis induced by bacterial infection.

  20. Human xanthine oxidase recombinant in E. coli: A whole cell catalyst for preparative drug metabolite synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Antunes, Márcia; Eggimann, Fabian Kurt; Kittelmann, Matthias; Lütz, Stephan; Hanlon, Steven P; Wirz, Beat; Bachler, Thorsten; Winkler, Margit

    2016-10-10

    Human xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), which is responsible for the final steps of the purine metabolism pathway and involved in oxidative drug metabolism, was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Gold. Recombinant human (rh) XOR yielded higher productivity with the gene sequence optimized for expression in E.coli than with the native gene sequence. Induction of XOR expression with lactose or IPTG resulted in complete loss of activity whereas shake flasks cultures using media rather poor in nutrients resulted in functional XOR expression in the stationary phase. LB medium was used for a 25L fermentation in fed-batch mode, which led to a 5 fold increase of the enzyme productivity when compared to cultivation in shake flasks. Quinazoline was used as a substrate on the semi-preparative scale using an optimized whole cell biotransformation protocol, yielding 73mg of the isolated product, 4-quinazolinone, from 104mg of starting material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Injuries in exponential phase cells of escherichia coli suspended in physiological phosphate buffered saline by far-infrared irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, J.; Sagara, K.; Miyagawa, M.; Kokugan, T.; Shimizu, M. [Tokyo Univ of Agriculture & Technology Tokyo (Japan). Department of Chemical Engineering, Division of Applied Chemistry; Igarashi, H. [Tokyo Metropolitan Research Laboratory of Public (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The pasteurization effect of far-infrared (FIR) radiation on Escherichia coli suspended in physiological phosphate buffered saline in the exponential growth phase (exponential phase) was studied. FIR irradiation decreased the number of viable cells in their exponential phase more rapidly than that in their stationary growth phase (stationary phase). By using four kinds of antibiotics as selective reagents to examine the injuries of bacteria, the damaged parts induced by FIR irradiation were specified on the basis of the changes in sensitivities to selective reagents. FIR irradiation damaged mainly RNA polymerize of E. coli in the exponential phase. Under the condition that the transient behavior of the bulk temperature of bacterial suspension irradiated by FIR was the same as that heated by thermal conduction, the pasteurization effect by FIR irradiation on the exponential phase cells was much greater than that by thermal conduction. However, both FIR irradiation and thermal conductive heating induced similar changes in the sensitivities to selective reagents for the exponential phase cells of E. coli. Under the same irradiation conditions, the changes in sensitivities to the selective reagents for the exponential phase cells were different from those for the stationary phase cells. The injuries of ribosome in the exponential phase cells were not as serious as those in the stationary phase cells. It was suggested that the mechanisms of death of the exponential phase cells and the stationary phase cells were different from each other. 29 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Engineering NAD+ availability for Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalysis: a case study for dihydroxyacetone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongjin J; Yang, Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Sufang; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2013-11-09

    Whole-cell redox biocatalysis has been intensively explored for the production of valuable compounds because excellent selectivity is routinely achieved. Although the cellular cofactor level, redox state and the corresponding enzymatic activity are expected to have major effects on the performance of the biocatalysts, our ability remains limited to predict the outcome upon variation of those factors as well as the relationship among them. In order to investigate the effects of cofactor availability on whole-cell redox biocatalysis, we devised recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) catalyzed by the NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GldA). In this model system, a water-forming NAD+ oxidase (NOX) and a NAD+ transporter (NTT4) were also co-expressed for cofactor regeneration and extracellular NAD+ uptake, respectively. We found that cellular cofactor level, NAD+/NADH ratio and NOX activity were not only strain-dependent, but also growth condition-dependent, leading to significant differences in specific DHA titer among different whole-cell biocatalysts. The host E. coli DH5α had the highest DHA specific titer of 0.81 g/gDCW with the highest NAD+/NADH ratio of 6.7 and NOX activity of 3900 U. The biocatalyst had a higher activity when induced with IPTG at 37°C for 8 h compared with those at 30°C for 8 h and 18 h. When cells were transformed with the ntt4 gene, feeding NAD+ during the cell culture stage increased cellular NAD(H) level by 1.44 fold and DHA specific titer by 1.58 fold to 2.13 g/gDCW. Supplementing NAD+ during the biotransformation stage was also beneficial to cellular NAD(H) level and DHA production, and the highest DHA productivity reached 0.76 g/gDCW/h. Cellular NAD(H) level, NAD+/NADH ratio, and NOX and GldA activity dropped over time during the biotransformation process. High NAD+/NADH ratio driving by NOX was very important for DHA production. Once cofactor was efficiently cycled, high cellular

  3. Reactivation of Escherichia coli cells, inactivated by ultraviolet rays, with cell extracts of propionic acid bacteria: Fractionation of the extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorob`eva, L.I.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.; Ambrosov, I.V. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-01-01

    Separation of Propionibacterium shermanii extract into fractions and testing them for their reactivating effect on UV-inactivated Escherichia coli AB-1157 cells showed that the activity was associated with the fraction of soluble proteins. The activity was not demonstrated in the fractions of RNA, DNA, ribosomes, or cell walls. Fractional salting out and subsequent testing of the fractions showed two active protein fractions: fraction I (20-40% of ammonium sulfate saturating concentration) and fraction II (60-80%). These fractions were separated by HPLC into seven and eight subfractions, respectively. Reactivating activity was showed in subfraction 4 (fraction I) and subfractions 5 and 6 (fraction II). Electrophoresis showed five and four polypeptides in subfractions 4 and 5, respectively. Subfraction 6 (fraction II) contained one protein with a molecular mass of about 30 kDa. This protein, apparently, was responsible for the protective properties of fraction II. 9 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. [Cloning of the recA gene of the propionic acid bacterium Propionibacterium shermanii in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, S V; Avilev, S K; Tarasov, V A; Ogarkova, O A

    1993-05-01

    Propionibacterium are producers of vitamin B-12 and organic acids and are of importance in national economy. Genetics of this organism was studied insufficiently. We constructed the genomic library of Propionibacterium shermanii in cells of Escherichia coli using the plasmid vector pVZ361 and identified recA gene. The vector gives a chance for direct selection of Str-resistant clones containing an insert in BamHI site. The recombinant plasmid carrying the recA gene of P. shermanii was isolated from the genomic library using complementation in E. coli. Strains E. coli C600 and HB101 were transformed by hybrid plasmids, and UV-light-resistant clones were identified. The clones were purified and subjected to treatment with 4-NQO and MMS. Diagrams reflecting survival dependence of the bacteria carrying recombinant plasmids and lacking them on the mutagen concentration and UV-light dose clearly confirmed functioning of P. shermanii recA gene in E. coli cells. The insert with recA gene underwent restriction analysis. The 1.7 kb fragment with recA gene was then transferred to pBI101 plasmid and the resultant recombinant plasmid was used in the SOS test. The mutagens (MMS, 4-NHQ) and UV-light induced the SOS response in E. coli HB101 (recA) carrying the recombinant plasmid.

  5. Cancer cell proliferation controlled by surface chemistry in its microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Lin; He, Jin; Wang, Juan; Chen, Shuang-Feng; Lee, In-Seop; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2011-12-01

    Hepatoma cells (Hepg2s) as typical cancer cells cultured on hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) group surfaces were shown to exhibit different proliferation and morphological changes. Hepg2s cells on -OH surfaces grew much more rapidly than those on -CH3 surfaces. Hepg2s cells on -OH surfaces had the larger contact area and the more flattened morphology, while those on -CH3 surfaces exhibited the smaller contact area and the more rounded morphology. After 7 days of culture, the migration of Hepg2s cells into clusters on the -CH3 surfaces behaved significantly slower than that on the -OH surfaces. These chemically modified surfaces exhibited regulation of Hepg2s cells on proliferation, adhesion, and migration, providing a potential treatment of liver cancer.

  6. Bet-hedging in bacteriocin producing Escherichia coli populations: the single cell perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Bihter; Toubiana, David; van Vliet, Simon; Inglis, R. Fredrik; Shnerb, Nadav; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-02-01

    Production of public goods in biological systems is often a collaborative effort that may be detrimental to the producers. It is therefore sustainable only if a small fraction of the population shoulders the cost while the majority reap the benefits. We modelled this scenario using Escherichia coli populations producing colicins, an antibiotic that kills producer cells’ close relatives. Colicin expression is a costly trait, and it has been proposed that only a small fraction of the population actively expresses the antibiotic. Colicinogenic populations were followed at the single-cell level using time-lapse microscopy, and showed two distinct, albeit dynamic, subpopulations: the majority silenced colicin expression, while a small fraction of elongated, slow-growing cells formed colicin-expressing hotspots, placing a significant burden on expressers. Moreover, monitoring lineages of individual colicinogenic cells showed stochastic switching between expressers and non-expressers. Hence, colicin expressers may be engaged in risk-reducing strategies—or bet-hedging—as they balance the cost of colicin production with the need to repel competitors. To test the bet-hedging strategy in colicin-mediated interactions, competitions between colicin-sensitive and producer cells were simulated using a numerical model, demonstrating a finely balanced expression range that is essential to sustaining the colicinogenic population.

  7. Reactivation in UV inactivated Escherichia coli by cell-free extracts of propionic acid bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Nikitenko, G.V.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    For the first time reactivation of cell extraction of three strains of Propionibacterium shermanii in UV inactivated not filament-forming strain Escherichia colli AB 1157 is shown. Reactivation was demonstrated in prencubated and postincubated test-culture and increased as survival of E.coli decreased in a range 1,8-0,006%. The factor (factores) of defense in dialysable, thermolable and is present as in a fraction of nucleoproteins and nucleic acids so in a fraction of soluble proteins. The extracts were inactivated by incubation with proteinase K and trypsin, partly decreased activity by incubation with alpha-amylase and selected nuclease but not with lipase. Polypeltide nature of reactivative factor is supposed

  8. Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  9. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of Haemophilus influenzae fimbrial genes establishes adherence to oropharyngeal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, S. M.; Mooi, F. R.; Sindhunata, M. G.; Maris, W. R.; van Alphen, L.

    1989-01-01

    In this report the first example of functional expression of a fimbrial gene cluster of a non-enteric human pathogen in Escherichia coli is described. This is shown for Haemophilus influenzae fimbriae which mediate adherence to oropharyngeal epithelial cells. A genomic library of H.influenzae type

  10. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  11. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vischer, N.O.; Verheul, J.; Postma, M.; van den Berg van Saparoea, H.B.; Galli, E.; Natale, P.; Gerdes, K.; Luirink, J.; Vollmer, W.; Vicente, M.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the

  12. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vischer, N.O.E.; Verheul, J.; Postma, M.; van den Berg van Saparoea, B.; Galli, E.; Natale, P.; Gerdes, K.; Luirink, J.; Vollmer, W.; Vicente, M; den Blaauwen, T.

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the

  13. Cytotoxic and Mutagenic Properties of C3'-Epimeric Lesions of 2'-Deoxyribonucleosides in Escherichia coli Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Yinsheng

    2017-07-25

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting from endogenous metabolism and/or environmental exposure, can induce damage to the 2-deoxyribose moiety in DNA. Specifically, a hydrogen atom from each of the five carbon atoms in 2-deoxyribose can be abstracted by hydroxyl radical, and improper chemical repair of the ensuing radicals formed at the C1', C3', and C4' positions can lead to the stereochemical inversion at these sites to yield epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions. Although ROS-induced single-nucleobase lesions have been well studied, the biological consequences of the C3'-epimeric lesions of 2'-deoxynucleosides, i.e., 2'-deoxyxylonucleosides (dxN), have not been comprehensively investigated. Herein, we assessed the impact of dxN lesions on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA replication in Escherichia coli cells by conducting a competitive replication and adduct bypass assay with single-stranded M13 phage containing a site-specifically incorporated dxN. Our results revealed that, of the four dxN lesions, only dxG constituted a strong impediment to DNA replication, and intriguingly, dxT and dxC conferred replication bypass efficiencies higher than those of the unmodified counterparts. In addition, the three SOS-induced DNA polymerases (Pol II, Pol IV, and Pol V) did not play any appreciable role in bypassing these lesions. Among the four dxNs, only dxA directed a moderate frequency of dCMP misincorporation. These results provided important insights into the impact of the C3'-epimeric lesions on DNA replication in E. coli cells.

  14. Phage annealing proteins promote oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis in Escherichia coli and mouse ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyrers Joep PP

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phage protein pairs, RecE/RecT from Rac or Redα/Redβ from λ, initiate efficient double strand break repair (DSBR in Escherichia coli that has proven very useful for DNA engineering. These phage pairs initiate DSBR either by annealing or by another mechanism that is not defined. Results Here we report that these proteins also mediate single strand oligonucleotide repair (ssOR at high efficiencies. The ssOR activity, unlike DSBR, does not require a phage exonuclease (RecE or Redα but only requires a phage annealing protein (RecT or Redβ. Notably, the P22 phage annealing protein Erf, which does not mediate the same DSBR reactions, also delivers ssOR activity. By altering aspects of the oligonucleotides, we document length and design parameters that affect ssOR efficiency to show a simple relationship to homologies either side of the repair site. Notably, ssOR shows strand bias. Oligonucleotides that can prime lagging strand replication deliver more ssOR than their leading complements. This suggests a model in which the annealing proteins hybridize the oligonucleotides to single stranded regions near the replication fork. We also show that ssOR is a highly efficient way to engineer BACs and can be detected in a eukaryotic cell upon expression of a phage annealing protein. Conclusion Phage annealing proteins can initiate the recombination of single stranded oligonucleotides into endogenous targets in Escherichia coli at very high efficiencies. This expands the repertoire of useful DNA engineering strategies, shows promise for applications in eukaryotic cells, and has implications for the unanswered questions regarding DSBR mediated by RecE/RecT and Redα/Redβ.

  15. Cell surface control of differentiation in Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Villemez, C

    1994-12-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii (Neff) is a free-living soil amoeba with close relatives that are opportunistic pathogens. Trophozoites differentiate into cysts when deprived of nutrients; cysts convert into trophozoites, leaving the wall behind, in the presence of nutrients. The data presented here, which includes immunoaffinity purification of the receptor, indicate that cell surface molecular signals also control Acanthamoeba differentiation in both directions. Monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to a 40 kD trophozoite protein initiate the encystment of trophozoites. When bound to cysts the same monoclonal antibodies prevent excystment. Washing away the antibody allows both trophozoites and cysts to resume normal activity. One of these monoclonal antibodies inhibits pinocytosis, while another has no effect on pinocytosis.

  16. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Reduces Mucus and Intermicrovillar Bridges in Human Stem Cell-Derived ColonoidsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie In

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC causes over 70,000 episodes of foodborne diarrhea annually in the United States. The early sequence of events that precede life-threatening hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome is not fully understood due to the initial asymptomatic phase of the disease and the lack of a suitable animal model. We determined the initial molecular events in the interaction between EHEC and human colonic epithelium. Methods: Human colonoids derived from adult proximal colonic stem cells were developed into monolayers to study EHEC-epithelial interactions. Monolayer confluency and differentiation were monitored by transepithelial electrical resistance measurements. The monolayers were apically infected with EHEC, and the progression of epithelial damage over time was assessed using biochemical and imaging approaches. Results: Human colonoid cultures recapitulate the differential protein expression patterns characteristic of the crypt and surface colonocytes. Mucus-producing differentiated colonoid monolayers are preferentially colonized by EHEC. Upon colonization, EHEC forms characteristic attaching and effacing lesions on the apical surface of colonoid monolayers. Mucin 2, a main component of colonic mucus, and protocadherin 24 (PCDH24, a microvillar resident protein, are targeted by EHEC at early stages of infection. The EHEC-secreted serine protease EspP initiates brush border damage through PCDH24 reduction. Conclusions: Human colonoid monolayers are a relevant pathophysiologic model that allow the study of early molecular events during enteric infections. Colonoid monolayers provide access to both apical and basolateral surfaces, thus providing an advantage over three-dimensional cultures to study host–pathogen interactions in a controllable and tractable manner. EHEC reduces colonic mucus and affects the brush border cytoskeleton in the absence of commensal bacteria. Keywords

  17. The unrelated surface proteins ActA of Listeria monocytogenes and IcsA of Shigella flexneri are sufficient to confer actin-based motility on Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocks, C; Marchand, J B; Gouin, E; d'Hauteville, H; Sansonetti, P J; Carlier, M F; Cossart, P

    1995-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri are two unrelated facultative intracellular pathogens which spread from cell to cell by using a similar mode of intracellular movement based on continuous actin assembly at one pole of the bacterium. This process requires the asymmetrical expression of the ActA surface protein in L. monocytogenes and the IcsA (VirG) surface protein in S. flexneri. ActA and IcsA share no sequence homology. To assess the role of the two proteins in the generation of actin-based movement, we expressed them in the genetic context of two non-actin polymerizing, non-pathogenic bacterial species, Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli. In the absence of any additional bacterial pathogenicity determinants, both proteins induced actin assembly and propulsion of the bacteria in cytoplasmic extracts from Xenopus eggs, as visualized by the formation of characteristic actin comet tails. E. coli expressing IcsA moved about two times faster than Listeria and displayed longer actin tails. However, actin dynamics (actin filament distribution and filament half-lives) were similar in IcsA- and ActA-induced actin tails suggesting that by using unrelated surface molecules, L. monocytogenes and S. flexneri move intracellularly by interacting with the same host cytoskeleton components or by interfering with the same host cell signal transduction pathway.

  18. Plasma surface modification as a new approach to protect urinary catheter against Escherichia coli biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Taheran, Leila; Zarrini, Gholamreza; Khorram, Sirous; Zakerhamidi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Biomaterials are widely used in medical devices such as urinary catheters. One of the main problems associated with long term using of the urinary catheters is biofilm formation on their surfaces. Many techniques have been presented to reduce the biofilm formation. One of the most revolutionary techniques allowing such surface fictionalization is plasma surface modification. Materials and Methods: In this study, a glow discharge plasma (GDP) effect on Escherichia co...

  19. The Response Surface Methodology speeds up the search for optimal parameters in the photoinactivation of E. coli by Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Larissa S; Azevedo, Eduardo B; Perussi, Janice R

    2018-02-27

    Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation (a-PDI) is based on the oxidative destruction of biological molecules by reactive oxygen species generated by the photo-excitation of a photosensitive molecule. When the a-PDT is performed along with the use of mathematical models, the optimal conditions for maximum inactivation are easily found. Experimental designs allow a multivariate analysis of the experimental parameters. This is usually made using a univariate approach, which demands a large number of experiments, being time and money consuming. This paper presents the use of the response surface methodology for improving the search for the best conditions to reduce E. coli survival levels by a-PDT using methylene blue (MB) and toluidine blue (TB) as photosensitizers and white light. The goal was achieved by analyzing the effects and interactions of the three main parameters involved in the process: incubation time (IT), photosensitizer concentration (C PS ), and light dose (LD). The optimization procedure began with a full 2 3 factorial design, followed by a central composite one, in which the optimal conditions were estimated. For MB, C PS was the most important parameter followed by LD and IT whereas, for TB, the main parameter was LD followed by C PS and IT. Using the estimated optimal conditions for inactivation, MB was able to inactivate 99.999999% CFU mL -1 of E. coli with IT of 28 min, LD of 31 J cm -2 , and C PS of 32 μmol L -1 , while TB required 18 min, 39 J cm -2 , and 37 μmol L -1 . The feasibility of using the response surface methodology with a-PDT was demonstrated, enabling enhanced photoinactivation efficiency and fast results with a minimal number of experiments. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Segregation of chromosome arms in growing and non-growing Escherichia coli cells

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    Conrad L. Woldringh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In slow-growing Escherichia coli cells the chromosome is organized with its left (L and right (R arms lying separated in opposite halves of the nucleoid and with the origin (O in-between, giving the pattern L-O-R. During replication one of the arms has to pass the other to obtain the same organization in the daughter cells: L-O-R L-O-R. To determine the movement of arms during segregation six strains were constructed carrying three coloured loci: the left and right arms were labeled with red and cyan fluorescent-proteins, respectively, on loci symmetrically positioned at different distances from the central origin, which was labeled with green-fluorescent protein. In non-replicating cells with the predominant spot pattern L-O-R, initiation of replication first resulted in a L-O-O-R pattern, soon changing to O-L-R-O. After replication of the arms the predominant spot patterns were, L-O-R L-O-R, O-R-L R-O-L or O-L-R L-O-R indicating that one or both arms passed an origin and the other arm. To study the driving force for these movements cell growth was inhibited with rifampicin allowing run-off DNA synthesis. Similar spot patterns were obtained in growing and non-growing cells, indicating that the movement of arms is not a growth-sustained process, but may result from DNA synthesis itself. The distances between loci on different arms (LR-distances and between duplicated loci (LL- or RR-distances as a function of their distance from the origin, indicate that in slow-growing cells DNA is organized according to the so-called sausage model and not accordingto the doughnut model.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of E. coli cell-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, S; Cambray, G

    2017-11-23

    The pursuit of standardization and reliability in synthetic biology has achieved, in recent years, a number of advances in the design of more predictable genetic parts for biological circuits. However, even with the development of high-throughput screening methods and whole-cell models, it is still not possible to predict reliably how a synthetic genetic construct interacts with all cellular endogenous systems. This study presents a genome-wide analysis of how the expression of synthetic genes is affected by systematic perturbations of cellular functions. We found that most perturbations modulate expression indirectly through an effect on cell size, putting forward the existence of a generic Size-Expression interaction in the model prokaryote Escherichia coli. The Size-Expression interaction was quantified by inserting a dual fluorescent reporter gene construct into each of the 3822 single-gene deletion strains comprised in the KEIO collection. Cellular size was measured for single cells via flow cytometry. Regression analyses were used to discriminate between expression-specific and gene-specific effects. Functions of the deleted genes broadly mapped onto three systems with distinct primary influence on the Size-Expression map. Perturbations in the Division and Biosynthesis (DB) system led to a large-cell and high-expression phenotype. In contrast, disruptions of the Membrane and Motility (MM) system caused small-cell and low-expression phenotypes. The Energy, Protein synthesis and Ribosome (EPR) system was predominantly associated with smaller cells and positive feedback on ribosome function. Feedback between cell growth and gene expression is widespread across cell systems. Even though most gene disruptions proximally affect one component of the Size-Expression interaction, the effect therefore ultimately propagates to both. More specifically, we describe the dual impact of growth on cell size and gene expression through cell division and ribosomal content

  2. Cheese whey-induced high-cell-density production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

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    Neubauer Peter

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of lactose-rich concentrates from dairy processes for the induction of recombinant gene's expression has not received much attention although they are interesting low cost substrates for production of recombinant enzymes. Applicability of dairy waste for induction of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli was studied. Clones expressing Lactobacillus phage muramidase and Lactobacillus alcohol dehydrogenase were used for the experiments. Results Shake flask cultivations in mineral salt medium showed that cheese whey or deproteinised whey induced gene expression as efficiently as IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside or pure lactose. Addition of yeast extract or proteolytically degraded whey proteins did not improve the recombinant protein yield. In contrast, addition of yeast extract to the well-balanced mineral salt medium decreased the product yield. Feeding with glycerol provided sufficient amount of easily assimilable carbon source during the induction period without preventing lactose intake and induction by lactose. High-cell-density fed-batch cultivations showed that product yields comparable to IPTG-induction can be achieved by feeding bacteria with a mixture of glycerol and concentrated whey permeate during the induction. Conclusion Whey and concentrated whey permeate can be applied as an alternative inducer in recombinant high-cell-density fed-batch fermentations. The yield of the recombinant product was comparable to fermentations induced by IPTG. In low-cell-density shake flask experiments the yield was higher with whey or whey permeate than with IPTG.

  3. Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Penny, Christian; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Schets, Franciska M.; Blaak, Hetty; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Boer, de Albert; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Mossong, Joel; Pelt, Van Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is frequently found in surface water, where it indicates recent contamination with animal faeces, sewage effluent, and agricultural run-off. The contribution of different animal reservoirs to surface water

  4. Survival Kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on a Plastic Surface at Low Relative Humidity and on Low-Water Activity Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokunan, Hidekazu; Koyama, Kento; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the survival kinetics of Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli under various water activity (a w ) conditions to elucidate the net effect of a w on pathogen survival kinetics and to pursue the development of a predictive model of pathogen survival as a function of a w . Four serotypes of S. enterica (Stanley, Typhimurium, Chester, and Oranienburg) and three serotypes of enterohemorrhagic E. coli ( E. coli O26, E. coli O111, and E. coli O157:H7) were examined. These bacterial strains were inoculated on a plastic plate surface at a constant relative humidity (RH) (22, 43, 58, 68, or 93% RH, corresponding to the a w ) or on a surface of almond kernels (a w 0.58), chocolate (a w 0.43), radish sprout seeds (a w 0.58), or Cheddar cheese (a w 0.93) at 5, 15, or 25°C for up to 11 months. Under most conditions, the survival kinetics were nonlinear with tailing regardless of the storage a w , temperature, and bacterial strain. For all bacterial serotypes, there were no apparent differences in pathogen survival kinetics on the plastic surface at a given storage temperature among the tested RH conditions, except for the 93% RH condition. Most bacterial serotypes were rapidly inactivated on Cheddar cheese when stored at 5°C compared with their inactivation on chocolate, almonds, and radish sprout seeds. Distinct trends in bacterial survival kinetics were also observed between almond kernels and radish sprout seeds, even though the a w s of these two foods were not significantly different. The survival kinetics of bacteria inoculated on the plastic plate surface showed little correspondence to those of bacteria inoculated on food matrices at an identical a w . Thus, these results demonstrated that, for low-a w foods and/or environments, a w alone is insufficient to account for the survival kinetics of S. enterica and enterohemorrhagic E. coli .

  5. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  6. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in broth and sausage by combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract (CE) on Escherichia coli O157 strains with variation in pressure resistance in broth and sausage. Pressure-resistant (O157:H7 and O157:H12) and -sensitive (O157-M1 and O157-M2) E. coli strains were used. Pressure treatment at 350 MPa for 20 min in broth caused 1.1-1.2 logs reduction in O157:H12 and O157:H7 and 4.1-5.5 logs reduction in the O157-M1 and O157-M2. When high pressure was treated in the presence of CE (32 CEAU/mL), the combination treatment caused a significant inactivation in the pressure-resistant O157:H7 strains resulting in the viability loss of 4.3-4.6 logs and the synergistic effect increased with increase in treatment time (p casei CE may cause considerable damage to cellular components of E. coli during the high pressure treatment. The synergy between high pressure processing and Lb. casei OSY-LB6A CE against pressure-resistant E. coli O157 strains suggests the feasibility of using this combination to minimize the risk of transmission of E. coli O157 by food.

  7. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters.

  8. Correlation between E. coli levels and the presence of foodborne pathogens in surface irrigation water: Establishment of a sampling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchado, Pilar; Hernandez, Natalia; Gil, Maria I; Ivanek, Renata; Allende, Ana

    2018-01-01

    To establish the association between microbial indicators and the presence of foodborne pathogens in irrigation water, Escherichia coli was enumerated using two quantification methods (plate counts and PMA-qPCR) and presence/absence of pathogenic microorganisms, including five strains from the Shiga toxigenic E. coli (O157:H7, O26, O103, O111 and O145) and Salmonella spp. were evaluated. The results confirmed that surface water can be considered a microbial hazard when used for irrigation. The levels of viable E. coli were very similar to those of cultivable E. coli, except for irrigation water obtained from water reservoirs. Comparison between the E. coli counts in samples positive and negative for the presence of pathogenic bacteria for the evaluated water sources identified E. coli level of 2.35 log cfu/100 mL as a cut-off able to correctly predict positive and negative samples with 93% sensitivity and 66% specificity, respectively. Thus, for the samples with levels of E. coli under 2.35 log cfu/100 mL (e.g., 2.24 log cfu/100 mL) there was a 90% probability that the samples were not contaminated with pathogenic microorganism in locations with similar prevalence. E. coli levels in irrigation water were affected by the ambient temperature confirming that water source and climate conditions should be taken into account by growers when designing a sampling program and the frequency of the monitoring to make a better and more efficient use of their resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecium and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in a Pig and Human Epithelial Intestinal Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lodemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study has been to elucidate the effect of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on epithelial integrity in intestinal epithelial cells and whether pre- and coincubation with this strain can reproducibly prevent damage induced by enterotoxigenic (ETEC and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with bacterial strains and epithelial integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and mannitol flux rates. E. faecium alone increased TEER of Caco-2 cells without affecting mannitol fluxes whereas the E. coli strains decreased TEER and concomitantly increased mannitol flux rates in both cell lines. Preincubation with E. faecium had no effect on the TEER decrease induced by E. coli in preliminary experiments. However, in a second set of experiments using a slightly different protocol, E. faecium ameliorated the TEER decrease induced by ETEC at 4 h in IPEC-J2 and at 2, 4, and 6 h in Caco-2 cells. We conclude that E. faecium positively affected epithelial integrity in monoinfected Caco-2 cells and could ameliorate the damage on TEER induced by an ETEC strain. Reproducibility of the results is, however, limited when experiments are performed with living bacteria over longer periods.

  10. Effect of gold nanoparticles on thermal gradient generation and thermotaxis of E. coli cells in microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Nithya; Panda, Tapobrata; Das, Sarit K

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria responds to changing chemical and thermal environment by moving towards or away from a particular location. In this report, we looked into thermal gradient generation and response of E. coli DH5α cells to thermal gradient in the presence and in the absence of spherical gold nanoparticles (size: 15 to 22 nm) in a static microfluidic environment using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) made microfluidic device. A PDMS-agarose based microfluidic device for generating thermal gradient has been developed and the thermal gradient generation in the device has been validated with the numerical simulation. Our studies revealed that the presence of gold nanoparticles, AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL) has no effect on the thermal gradient generation. The E. coli DH5α cells have been treated with AuNPs of two different concentrations (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL). The thermotaxis behavior of cells in the presence of AuNPs has been studied and compared to the thermotaxis of E.coli DH5α cells in the absence of AuNPs. In case of thermotaxis, in the absence of the AuNPs, the E. coli DH5α cells showed better thermotaxis towards lower temperature range, whereas in the presence of AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL) thermotaxis of the E. coli DH5α cells has been inhibited. The results show that the spherical AuNPs intervenes in the themotaxis of E. coli DH5α cells and inhibits the cell migration. The reason for the failure in thermotaxis response mechanism may be due to decreased F-type ATP synthase activity and collapse of membrane potential by AuNPs, which, in turn, leads to decreased ATP levels. This has been hypothesized since both thermotaxis and chemotaxis follows the same response mechanism for migration in which ATP plays critical role.

  11. Engineered cell surfaces: fertile ground for molecular landscaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahal, L K; Bertozzi, C R

    1997-06-01

    The cell surface contains a wealth of information that determines how cells interact with their environment. Methods for directing the cell surface expression of novel protein-based and oligosaccharide-based epitopes are stimulating new directions in biotechnology and biomedical research.

  12. Internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by bovine rectal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing eSheng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157 causes human diarrheal disease and healthy cattle are its primary reservoir. O157 colonize the bovine epithelial mucosa at the recto-anal junction (RAJ. Previous studies show that O157 at this site are not eliminated by aggressive interventions including applications of O157-specific lytic bacteriophages and other bactericidal agents. We hypothesize that some O157 at the RAJ mucosa are protected from these killing agents by host cell internalization. To test this hypothesis, rectal biopsies from O157 culture positive and negative cattle were analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and subjected to gentamicin protection assays. GFP-labeled bacteria were found located deep within the tissue crypts and a small number O157 were recovered from rectal biopsies after gentamicin treatment. Primary bovine rectal epithelial (PBRE cell cultures were incubated with O157 and subjected to gentamin protection assays. Strains ATCC 43895, 43894, Sakai and WSU180 entered the PBRE cells with different levels of efficiency ranging from 0.18% to 25% of the inocula. Intracellular bacteria were confirmed to be within membrane-bounded vacuoles by electron microscopy. Cytocalasin B curtailed internalization of O157 indicating internalization was dependent on eukaryotic microfilament assembly. Strain ATCC 43895 exhibited the highest efficiency of internalization and survived for at least 24 h within PBEC cells. Deletion mutation of intimin, its receptor, or Shiga toxin in ATCC 43895 did not reduced bacterial internalization. This strain produced more biofilm than the others tested. Retrospective analysis of cattle challenged with two O157 strains, showed ATCC 43895, the most efficient at host cell internalization, was most persistent.

  13. Degradation of RNA during lysis of Escherichia coli cells in agarose plugs breaks the chromosome.

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    Sharik R Khan

    Full Text Available The nucleoid of Escherichia coli comprises DNA, nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs and RNA, whose role is unclear. We found that lysing bacterial cells embedded in agarose plugs in the presence of RNases caused massive fragmentation of the chromosomal DNA. This RNase-induced chromosomal fragmentation (RiCF was completely dependent on the presence of RNase around lysing cells, while the maximal chromosomal breakage required fast cell lysis. Cell lysis in plugs without RNAse made the chromosomal DNA resistant to subsequent RNAse treatment. RiCF was not influenced by changes in the DNA supercoiling, but was influenced by growth temperature or age of the culture. RiCF was partially dependent on H-NS, histone-like nucleoid structuring- and global transcription regulator protein. The hupAB deletion of heat-unstable nucleoid protein (HU caused increase in spontaneous fragmentation that was further increased when combined with deletions in two non-coding RNAs, nc1 and nc5. RiCF was completely dependent upon endonuclease I, a periplasmic deoxyribonuclease that is normally found inhibited by cellular RNA. Unlike RiCF, the spontaneous fragmentation in hupAB nc1 nc5 quadruple mutant was resistant to deletion of endonuclease I. RiCF-like phenomenon was observed without addition of RNase to agarose plugs if EDTA was significantly reduced during cell lysis. Addition of RNase under this condition was synergistic, breaking chromosomes into pieces too small to be retained by the pulsed field gels. RNase-independent fragmentation was qualitatively and quantitatively comparable to RiCF and was partially mediated by endonuclease I.

  14. The effects of diode laser on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide adherent to titanium oxide surface of dental implants. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Marco; Landini, Giulia; Materassi, Fabrizio; Chellini, Flaminia; Antonelli, Alberto; Tani, Alessia; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bani, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Effective decontamination of biofilm and bacterial toxins from the surface of dental implants is a yet unresolved issue. This in vitro study aims at providing the experimental basis for possible use of diode laser (λ 808 nm) in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was grown for 48 h on titanium discs with porous surface corresponding to the bone-implant interface and then irradiated with a diode laser (λ 808 nm) in noncontact mode with airflow cooling for 1 min using a Ø 600-μm fiber. Setting parameters were 2 W (400 J/cm 2 ) for continuous wave mode; 22 μJ, 20 kHz, 7 μs (88 J/cm 2 ) for pulsed wave mode. Bactericidal effect was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and counting the residual colony-forming units. Biofilm and titanium surface morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In parallel experiments, the titanium discs were coated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), laser-irradiated and seeded with RAW 264.7 macrophages to quantify LPS-driven inflammatory cell activation by measuring the enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). Diode laser irradiation in both continuous and pulsed modes induced a statistically significant reduction of viable bacteria and nitrite levels. These results indicate that in addition to its bactericidal effect laser irradiation can also inhibit LPS-induced macrophage activation and thus blunt the inflammatory response. The λ 808-nm diode laser emerges as a valuable tool for decontamination/detoxification of the titanium implant surface and may be used in the treatment of peri-implantitis.

  15. Occurrence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cattle feces and contamination of carcass and various contact surfaces in abattoir and butcher shops of Hawassa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnafie, Biruhtesfa; Paulos, Degmawi; Abera, Mesele; Tefera, Genene; Hailu, Dereje; Kasaye, Surafel; Amenu, Kebede

    2017-01-25

    Despite of the sanitation measures in municipal abattoirs to reduce contamination, Escherichia coli continues to be a health hazard. The present study was conducted on 150 apparently healthy slaughtered cattle at municipal abattoir and in 50 different butcher shops in Hawassa town, Ethiopia. The objectives of the study were investigating the occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of E. coli O157:H7 isolated from fecal samples, carcasses swab, contacts surfaces (swabs of meat handlers hands, knife and clothes of meat transporters) as well as from butcher shops (meat samples, swabs from cutting board swab, butcher men hand and knife surface). E. coli O157:H7 was isolated and identified using bacteriological culture, biochemical tests and Biolog identification system. All E. coli O157:H7 isolates were then checked for their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern using eleven selected antimicrobial discs. Of the entire set of 630 samples, 2.4% (15/630) (95% CI = 1.3-3.9%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7. When disaggregated by the sources of the samples, E. coli O157:H7 were prevalent in 2.8% (11 of 390) of the abattoir samples, of which 4.7% of the fecal sample and 2.7% of the carcass swabs. And E. coli O157:H7 were positive in 1.7% (4 of 240) of butcher shop specimens of which 2% of meat sample and 3.3% of Cutting board swabs. No statistically significant difference in the prevalence of E. coli 0157: H7 between sex, origin, and breed of cattle. The isolated E. coli O157:H7 were found to be100% susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, gentamycin, kanamycin and nalidixic acid. This study concludes the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 and the presence of multiple antibiotic resistance profiles in cattle slaughtered at Hawassa municipal abattoir and retail meat sold at butcher shops. This indicates high risk to public health especially in Ethiopia where many people consume raw or under cooked meat. Regulatory control of antibiotics usage in livestock production and

  16. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy about

  17. Fate of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli from Faecal Sources in Surface Water and Probability of Human Exposure through Swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Jack F; Blaak, Hetty; Schets, Franciska M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the fate of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) emitted from faecal sources in surface water, and the probability of human exposure through swimming. Concentrations of ESBL-EC were measured in recreational waters and in source waters, being water in

  18. Mathematical modeling the cross-contamination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of ready-to-eat meat product while slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial cross-contamination either at home or production site is one of the major factors of causing contamination of foods and leading to the foodborne illness. The knowledge regarding Escherichia coli O157:H7 surface transfer on ready-to-eat (RTE) deli meat and the slicer used for slicing diffe...

  19. Fate of surface inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium on kippered beef during extended storage at refrigeration and abusive temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated on kippered beef. Individual pieces of the product were separately inoculated on the top and bottom surfaces with each 3- to 5-strain pathogen cocktail at ca. 6.0 log10 CFU/piece and stored at...

  20. Nanofabrication of Nonfouling Surfaces for Micropatterning of Cell and Microtissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otsuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering techniques for cellular micropatterning are emerging as important tools to clarify the effects of the microenvironment on cellular behavior, as cells usually integrate and respond the microscale environment, such as chemical and mechanical properties of the surrounding fluid and extracellular matrix, soluble protein factors, small signal molecules, and contacts with neighboring cells. Furthermore, recent progress in cellular micropatterning has contributed to the development of cell-based biosensors for the functional characterization and detection of drugs, pathogens, toxicants, and odorants. In this regards, the ability to control shape and spreading of attached cells and cell-cell contacts through the form and dimension of the cell-adhesive patches with high precision is important. Commitment of stem cells to different specific lineages depends strongly on cell shape, implying that controlled microenvironments through engineered surfaces may not only be a valuable approach towards fundamental cell-biological studies, but also of great importance for the design of cell culture substrates for tissue engineering. To develop this kind of cellular microarray composed of a cell-resistant surface and cell attachment region, micropatterning a protein-repellent surface is important because cellular adhesion and proliferation are regulated by protein adsorption. The focus of this review is on the surface engineering aspects of biologically motivated micropatterning of two-dimensional surfaces with the aim to provide an introductory overview described in the literature. In particular, the importance of non-fouling surface chemistries is discussed.

  1. Adjustment of surface chemical and physical properties with functionalized polymers to control cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaoli

    -negative bacteria (E. coli) and marine bacteria (C. marina ) species demonstrated that, unlike biopassive surfaces, the dual functionality polymer coated surfaces can significantly reduce both live and dead cells, without killing the cells in the culture media. The knowledge gained from those studies offers opportunities for further modification and potential applications of those types of polymers in the future.

  2. Osteoblast cell response to surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Faming; Weidmann, Arne; Nebe, J. Barbara; Burkel, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the interaction of cells with modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential biomedical applications, the MWCNTs were chemically modified with carboxylic acid groups (–COOH), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer and biomimetic apatite on their surfaces. Additionally, human osteoblast MG-63 cells were cultured in the presence of the surface-modified MWCNTs. The metabolic activities of osteoblastic cells, cell proliferation properties, as well as cell morphology were studied. The surface modification of MWCNTs with biomimetic apatite exhibited a significant increase in the cell viability of osteoblasts, up to 67.23%. In the proliferation phases, there were many more cells in the biomimetic apatite-modified MWCNT samples than in the MWCNTs–COOH. There were no obvious changes in cell morphology in osteoblastic MG-63 cells cultured in the presence of these chemically-modified MWCNTs. The surface modification of MWCNTs with apatite achieves an effective enhancement of their biocompatibility.

  3. Lactose inhibits the growth of Rhizobium meliloti cells that contain an actively expressed Escherichia coli lactose operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timblin, C R; Kahn, M L

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 made the cells sensitive to the addition of the beta-galactosides lactose, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and lactobionic acid. Growth stopped when the beta-galactoside was added and viability decreased modestly during the next few hours, but little cell lysis was observed and the cells appeared normal. Protein synthesis was not inhibited. Growth was inhibited only when beta-galactosidase expression was greater than 160 U. Lactose-resistant mutants had defects in the plasmid-carried E. coli beta-galactosidase or beta-galactoside permease and in the R. meliloti genome. We speculate that uncontrolled production of galactose by the action of the lactose operon proteins was responsible for growth inhibition. PMID:6427192

  4. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert O.E. Vischer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in thousands of labeled cells, we developed 'Coli-Inspector', which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin 'ObjectJ'. ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed.

  5. Growth of fibroblasts and endothelial cells on wettability gradient surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The growth, spreading, and shape of human skin fibroblasts (PK 84) and human umbilical cord endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) and dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DOGS) gradient surfaces were investigated in the presence of serum proteins. Gradient surfaces were prepared on glass using

  6. Common phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance patterns found in a case study of multiresistant E. coli from cohabitant pets, humans, and household surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Liliana Raquel Leite; Pina, Susana Maria Rocha; Simões, Romeo Luís Rocha; de Matos, Augusto José Ferreira; Rodrigues, Pedro; da Costa, Paulo Martins Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles among E. coli strains isolated from cohabitant pets and humans, evaluating the concurrent colonization of pets, owners, and home surfaces by bacteria carrying the same antimicrobial-resistant genes. The authors also intended to assess whether household surfaces and objects could contribute to the within-household antimicrobial-resistant gene diffusion between human and animal cohabitants. A total of 124 E. coli strains were isolated displaying 24 different phenotypic patterns with a remarkable percentage of multiresistant ones. The same resistance patterns were isolated from the dog's urine, mouth, the laundry floor, the refrigerator door, and the dog's food bowl. Some other multiresistant phenotypes, as long as resistant genes, were found repeatedly in different inhabitants and surfaces of the house. Direct, close contact between all the cohabitants and the touch of contaminated household surfaces and objects could be an explanation for these observations.

  7. Behavior of pulsed electric field injured Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in apple juice amended with pyruvate and catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatment has been used to inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, information on the behavior of PEF injured Escherichia coli bacteria in media during storage at 5 and 23C are limited. In this study, we investigated the fate of E. coli O157:H7 cells at 6.8 log CFU/m...

  8. Defective lysis of streptomycin-resistant escherichia coli cells infected with bacteriophage f2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mars Cody, J; Conway, T W

    1981-01-01

    A lysis defect was found to account for the failure of a streptomycin-resistant strain of Escherichia coli to form plaques when infected with the male-specific bacteriophage f2. The lysis defect was associated with the mutation to streptomycin resistance. Large amounts of apparently normal bacteriophage accumulated in these cells. Cell-free extracts from both the parental and mutant strains synthesized a potential lysis protein in considerable amounts in response to formaldehyde-treated f2 RNA but not in response to untreated RNA. As predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the analogous MS2 phage, the protein synthesized in vitro had the expected molecular weight and lacked glycine. The cistron for the lysis protein overlapped portions of the coat and replicase cistrons and was translated in the +1 reading frame. Initiation at the lysis protein cistron may be favored by translation errors that expose the normally masked initiation site, and streptomycin-resistant ribosomes, known to have more faithful translation properties, may be unable to efficiently synthesize the lysis protein. Images PMID:6783768

  9. Chlorhexidine-induced elastic and adhesive changes of Escherichia coli cells within a biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Nicole; Murdaugh, Anne

    2016-09-07

    Chlorhexidine is a widely used, commercially available cationic antiseptic. Although its mechanism of action on planktonic bacteria has been well explored, far fewer studies have examined its interaction with an established biofilm. The physical effects of chlorhexidine on a biofilm are particularly unknown. Here, the authors report the first observations of chlorhexidine-induced elastic and adhesive changes to single cells within a biofilm. The elastic changes are consistent with the proposed mechanism of action of chlorhexidine. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy techniques were used to determine spring constants and adhesion energy of the individual bacteria within an Escherichia coli biofilm. Medically relevant concentrations of chlorhexidine were tested, and cells exposed to 1% (w/v) and 0.1% more than doubled in stiffness, while those exposed to 0.01% showed no change in elasticity. Adhesion to the biofilm also increased with exposure to 1% chlorhexidine, but not for the lower concentrations tested. Given the prevalence of chlorhexidine in clinical and commercial applications, these results have important ramifications on biofilm removal techniques.

  10. Effect of Spermidine Analogues on Cell Growth of Escherichia coli Polyamine Requiring Mutant MA261.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketo Yoshida

    Full Text Available The effects of spermidine analogues [norspermidine (NSPD, 33, spermidine (SPD, 34, homospermidine (HSPD, 44 and aminopropylcadaverine (APCAD, 35] on cell growth were studied using Escherichia coli polyamine-requiring mutant MA261. Cell growth was compared at 32°C, 37°C, and 42°C. All four analogues were taken up mainly by the PotABCD spermidine-preferential uptake system. The degree of stimulation of cell growth at 32°C and 37°C was NSPD ≥ SPD ≥ HSPD > APCAD, and SPD ≥ HSPD ≥ NSPD > APCAD, respectively. However, at 42°C, it was HSPD » SPD > NSPD > APCAD. One reason for this is HSPD was taken up effectively compared with other triamines. In addition, since natural polyamines (triamines and teteraamines interact mainly with RNA, and the structure of RNA is more flexible at higher temperatures, HSPD probably stabilized RNA more tightly at 42°C. We have thus far found that 20 kinds of protein syntheses are stimulated by polyamines at the translational level. Among them, synthesis of OppA, RpoE and StpA was more strongly stimulated by HSPD at 42°C than at 37°C. Stabilization of the initiation region of oppA and rpoE mRNA was tighter by HSPD at 42°C than 37°C determined by circular dichroism (CD. The degree of polyamine stimulation of OppA, RpoE and StpA synthesis by NSPD, SPD and APCAD was smaller than that by HSPD at 42°C. Thus, the degree of stimulation of cell growth by spermidine analogues at the different temperatures is dependent on the stimulation of protein synthesis by some components of the polyamine modulon.

  11. Characterization of the variable region in the class 1 integron of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Canal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fecal bacteria are considered to be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes in the aquatic environment and could horizontally transfer these genes to autochthonous bacteria when carried on transferable and/or mobile genetic elements. Such circulation of resistance genes constitutes a latent public health hazard. The aim of this study was to characterize the variable region of the class 1 integron and relate its genetic content to resistance patterns observed in antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from the surface waters of Patos Lagoon, Southern Brazil. Genetic diversity of the isolates and presence of the qacEΔ1 gene, which confers resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds, were also investigated. A total of 27 isolates were analyzed. The variable region harbored dfrA17, dfrA1 and dfrA12 genes, which confer resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA1, aadA5 and aadA22 genes that encode resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin. Most of the isolates were considered resistant to quaternary ammonium compounds and all of them carried the qacE Δ1 gene at the 3′ conserved segment of the integron. ERIC-PCR analyses of E. coli isolates that presented the integrons showed great genetic diversity, indicating diverse sources of contamination in this environment. These results suggest that fecal bacteria with class 1 integrons in aquatic environments are potentially important reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance genes and may transfer these elements to other bacteria that are capable of infecting humans.

  12. Epithelial cells detect functional type III secretion system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli through a novel NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Litvak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, a common cause of infant diarrhea, is associated with high risk of mortality in developing countries. The primary niche of infecting EPEC is the apical surface of intestinal epithelial cells. EPEC employs a type three secretion system (TTSS to inject the host cells with dozens of effector proteins, which facilitate attachment to these cells and successful colonization. Here we show that EPEC elicit strong NF-κB activation in infected host cells. Furthermore, the data indicate that active, pore-forming TTSS per se is necessary and sufficient for this NF-κB activation, regardless of any specific effector or protein translocation. Importantly, upon infection with wild type EPEC this NF-κB activation is antagonized by anti-NF-κB effectors, including NleB, NleC and NleE. Accordingly, this NF-κB activation is evident only in cells infected with EPEC mutants deleted of nleB, nleC, and nleE. The TTSS-dependent NF-κB activation involves a unique pathway, which is independent of TLRs and Nod1/2 and converges with other pathways at the level of TAK1 activation. Taken together, our results imply that epithelial cells have the capacity to sense the EPEC TTSS and activate NF-κB in response. Notably, EPEC antagonizes this capacity by delivering anti-NF-κB effectors into the infected cells.

  13. Mode of Action Temu Kunci (Kaempferia pandurata Essential Oil on E. coli K1.1 Cell Determined by Leakage of Material Cell and Salt Tolerance Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIKSUSANTI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Kaempferia pandurata consist of terpen and oxygenated terpen that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. It's mode of action against the gram-negative bacterium E. coli K1.1 has been investigated using a range of treatments. The mode action of the essential oil were analyzed by it's ability to leakage E. coli K1.1 cell, to change permeability of the cell, and to alter salt tolerance of the cell. Ion leakage from the cell were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Salt tolerance assays was conducted by investigating the ability of E. coli K1.1 treated with temu kunci essential oil to grow on NA supplemented with NaCl. Protein and acid nucleic leakage were analyzed by UV spectrophotometer. There were inorganic compound leakage (potassium, calcium ion and organic compound leakage (nucleic acid, protein from cytoplasmic membrane, after exposing this organism to essential oil of Kaempferia pandurata. The more concentration of oil added, the more leakage was observed due to the loss of absorbing material such as nucleic acid (260 nm and protein (280 nm, the loss of potassium and calcium ion, and loss of the salt tolerance of E. coli K1.1.

  14. Ultrasensitive detection and quantification of E. coli O157:H7 using a giant magneto impedance sensor in an open-surface micro fluidic cavity covered with an antibody-modified gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhen; Liu, Yan; Lei, Chong; Sun, Xue-cheng; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method for ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the pathogen Escherichia coli (E. coli), type O157:H7. It is using a tortuous-shaped giant magneto impedance (GMI) sensor in combination with an open-surface micro fluidic system coated with a gold film for performing the sandwich immuno binding on its surface. Streptavidin-coated super magnetic Dynabeads were loaded with biotinylated polyclonal antibody to capture E. coli O157:H7. The E. coli-loaded Dynabeads are then injected into the microfluidics system where it comes into contact with the surface of gold nanofilm carrying the monoclonal antibody to form the immuno complex. As a result, the GMI ratio is strongly reduced at high frequencies if E. coli O157:H7 is present. The sensor has a linear response in the 50 to 500 cfu·mL −1 concentration range, and the detection limit is 50 cfu·mL −1 at a working frequency of 2.2 MHz. In our perception, this method provides a valuable tool for developing GMI-based micro fluidic sensors systems for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of pathogenic bacteria. The method may also be extended to other sensing applications by employing respective immuno reagents. (author)

  15. Modelling and characterisation of surface plasmon based sensors for the detection of E. coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajarajan, M.; Dar, T.; Themistos, Ch.; Rahman, A.; Grattan, K.; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2009), s. 564-571 ISSN 0950-0340 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : SPR sensor * long-range surface plasmon * bacterium Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.942, year: 2009

  16. Toxic and radiosensitizina effect of reduced nitroimidazoles on E.COLI B/r cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Semin, Yu.A.; Petrova, K.M.; Kutmin, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrophotometric method was used to study the rate of chemical reduction of misonidazole and metronidazole by NH 4 Cl and Zn in the atmosphere of argon and oxygen. Reduction of drugs increased their toxicity for hypoxic and oxygenated E. coli B/r. The reduced metronidazole is a more effective radiosensitizer of hypoxic E. coli B/r than the original compound

  17. Prevalence of Veterinary Antibiotics and Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in the Surface Water of a Livestock Production Region in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L−1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  18. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  19. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Zhang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  20. DNA sequence changes in mutation induced by ultraviolet light in the gpt gene on the chromosome of Escherichia coli uvr+ und uvrA cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sockett, H.; Romac, S.; Hutchinson, F.

    1991-01-01

    Sequence changes in mutations induced by ultraviolet light are reported for the chromosomal Escherichia coli gpt gene in almost isogenic E. coli uvr + and excision-deficient uvrA cells. Differences between the mutagenic spectra are ascribed to preferential removal of photoproducts in the transcribed strand by excision repair in uvr + cells. This conclusion is confirmed by analysis of published results for genes in both uvr + and uvr − cells, showing a similar selective removal of mutagenic products from the transcribed strand of the E. coli lacI gene and of the lambda phage cl repressor gene. Comparison of these data with published results for ultraviolet mutagenesis of gpt on a chromosome in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that a mutagenic hot spot in mammalian cells is not present in E. coli; the possibility is suggested that the hot spot might arise from localized lack of excision repair. Otherwise, mutagenesis in hamster cells appeared similar to that in E. coli uvr + cells, except there appears to be a smaller fraction of single-base additions and deletions (frameshifts) in mammalian than in bacterial cells. Phenotypes of 6-thioguanine-resistant E. coli showed there is a gene (or genes) other than gpt involved in the utilization of thioguanine by bacteria

  1. Expression of Inflammatory and Cell Death Program Genes and Comet DNA Damage Assay Induced by Escherichia coli in Layer Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaisen, Gamal M. K.; Eshak, Mariam G.; El Sabry, M. I.; Abass, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of industrial poultry and egg production systems involve stressful practices that stimulate Escherichia coli (E. coli) activity causing endotoxic shock. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death program genes and DNA damage induced by E. coli in the brain and liver tissues of laying hens. A total of two hundred and ten H&N brown layer hens with 20 week age, were used in this research. First, preliminary experiments were designed (60 hens in total) to establish the optimal exposure dose of E. coli and to determine the nearest time of notable response to be used in the remainder studies of this research. At 35-wk of age, 150 hens were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 3 replicates of 25 birds each; the first group was injected in the brachial wing vein with 107 E. coli colony/hen, while the second group was injected with saline and served as a control. The body temperature and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured 3 hr after injection. Specimens of liver and brain were obtained from each group and the gene expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, interlukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bax, and caspase-3 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. DNA damage in the brain and liver tissues were also measured by comet assay. Hens treated with E. coli showed significant (P<0.05) increase of body temperature and plasma corticosterone (42.6°C and 14.5 ng/ml, respectively) compared to the control group (41.1°C and 5.5 ng/ml, respectively). Additional remarkable over-inflammation gene expression of p38, IL-1β and TNF-α.genes were also detected in the brain (2.2-fold, 2.0-fold and 3.3-fold, respectively) and the liver (2.1-fold, 1.9-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively) tissues of the infected chickens. It is also important to note that hens injected with E. coli showed an increase in DNA damage in the brain and liver cells (P<0.05). These

  2. Cell behavior on microparticles with different surface morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Wound Healing and Cell Biology Laboratory, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Fu Xiaobing, E-mail: fuxiaobing@vip.sina.co [Wound Healing and Cell Biology Laboratory, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Burns Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, General Hospital of PLA, Trauma Center of Postgraduate Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China)

    2010-03-18

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the cell aggregation to the site of the defect for tissue regeneration. To develop favorable microparticles for cell delivery application, we fabricated and evaluated three types of microparticles that differ in surface properties. The microparticles with varied surface morphology (smooth, pitted and multicavity) were created from chemically crosslinked gelatin particles that underwent various drying treatments. Three types of microparticles were characterized and assessed in terms of the cell behavior of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts seeded on them. The cells could attach, spread and proliferate on all types of microparticles but spread and populated more slowly on the microparticles with smooth surfaces than on those with pitted or multicavity surfaces. Microparticles with a multicavity surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment and growth rate. Furthermore, cells tested on microparticles with a multicavity surface exhibited better morphology and induced the earlier formation of extracellular-based cell-microparticle aggregation than those on microparticles with other surface morphology (smooth and pitted). Thus, microparticles with a multicavity surface show promise for attachment and proliferation of cells in tissue engineering.

  3. Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide impairs the calcium signaling pathway in mesangial cells: role of angiotensin II receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquigussa, Edgar; Arnoni, Carine P; Cristovam, Priscila C; de Oliveira, Andrea S; Higa, Elisa M S; Boim, Mirian A

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis causes impaired vascular reactivity, hypotension and acute renal failure. The ability of the Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) to impair agonist-induced contractility in mesangial cells, which contributes to LPS-induced renal dysfunction, was evaluated. Agonist-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) mobilization was analyzed using angiotensin II (AngII). The effect of LPS on the levels of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components and the roles of vasodilatation-inducing molecules including AT2 receptor (AT2R) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cell reactivity were also evaluated. Confluent human mesangial cells (HMCs) were stimulated with LPS (0111-B4, 100 microg/mL). AngII-induced [Ca(2+)]i mobilization was measured by fluorometric analysis using Fura-2AM in the absence and presence of an AT2R antagonist (PD123319). The mRNA and protein levels for angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, AT1R and AT2R were analyzed by realtime reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. NO production was measured by the chemiluminescence method in the culture media after 24, 48 and 72 h of LPS incubation. After 24 h, LPS-stimulated HMCs displayed lower basal [Ca(2+)]i and an impaired response to AngII-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. LPS significantly increased AT2R levels, but did not cause significant alterations of RAS components. PD123319 restored both basal and AngII-induced [Ca(2+)]i peak, suggesting an involvement of AT2R in these responses. The expected increase in NO production was significant only after 72 h of LPS incubation and it was unaffected by PD123319. Results showed that LPS reduced the reactivity of HMCs to AngII and suggest that the vasodilatation induced by AT2R is a potential mediator of this response through a pathway independent of NO.

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Orange Fruit Surfaces and in Juice Using Photocatalysis and High Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sungyul; Ghafoor, Kashif; Kim, Jeong Un; Kim, Sanghun; Jung, Bora; Lee, Dong-Un; Park, Jiyong

    2015-06-01

    Nonpasteurized orange juice is manufactured by squeezing juice from fruit without peel removal. Fruit surfaces may carry pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate squeezed juice. Titanium dioxide-UVC photocatalysis (TUVP), a nonthermal technique capable of microbial inactivation via generation of hydroxyl radicals, was used to decontaminate orange surfaces. Levels of spot-inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 (initial level of 7.0 log CFU/cm(2)) on oranges (12 cm(2)) were reduced by 4.3 log CFU/ml when treated with TUVP (17.2 mW/cm(2)). Reductions of 1.5, 3.9, and 3.6 log CFU/ml were achieved using tap water, chlorine (200 ppm), and UVC alone (23.7 mW/cm(2)), respectively. E. coli O157:H7 in juice from TUVP (17.2 mW/cm(2))-treated oranges was reduced by 1.7 log CFU/ml. After orange juice was treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at 400 MPa for 1 min without any prior fruit surface disinfection, the level of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 2.4 log CFU/ml. However, the E. coli O157:H7 level in juice was reduced by 4.7 log CFU/ml (to lower than the detection limit) when TUVP treatment of oranges was followed by HHP treatment of juice, indicating a synergistic inactivation effect. The inactivation kinetics of E. coli O157:H7 on orange surfaces followed a biphasic model. HHP treatment did not affect the pH, °Brix, or color of juice. However, the ascorbic acid concentration and pectinmethylesterase activity were reduced by 35.1 and 34.7%, respectively.

  5. Effect of chlorine treatment on inhibition of E. coli serogroup O2 incorporation into 7-day-old biofilm on polyvinylchloride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, P; Dey, S; Huff, G; Zhang, W; Phillips, G K; Watkins, S

    2017-08-01

    Poultry waterlines are constructed using polyvinylchloride (PVC) material on which bacterial biofilm can easily form. Biofilm can harbor pathogens including avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains. An in vitro evaluation was performed to determine if E. coli sero group O2 (avian pathogenic) could attach on a PVC surface that had pre-formed biofilm and if this phenomenon could be affected when water was treated with chlorine. Initially, biofilm growth was induced in PVC test coupons (15.16 cm2) for a 7-day period mimicking the waterline scenario in the first wk of poultry brooding; and then this biofilm was challenged with E. coli O2 seeded water in presence/absence of chlorine treatment. After rinsing, test coupons were sampled for bacterial (APC) and E. coli O2 enumeration at various occasions post seeding the pathogen and chlorine treatment. Day 7 APC recovered from coupons was 4.35 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 1 and 3.66 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 2. E. coli O2 was not recovered from chlorine treated test coupons (P  3 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 1 and > 2 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 2). This study suggests that E. coli O2 can incorporate into pre-formed biofilm on a PVC surface within 24 h if water sanitation is not present, and the attachment time of the pathogen can prolong in the absence of already formed biofilm. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. A flow chamber assay for quantitative evaluation of bacterial surface colonization used to investigate the influence of temperature and surface hydrophilicity on the biofilm forming capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Emil; Kingshott, Peter; Palarasah, Yaseelan

    2010-01-01

    very differently. In addition, the temperature was found to have a considerable influence upon the adhesion and biofilm forming capacity of some of the isolates, and that the influence of surface chemistry depended on temperature. Our results suggest that the step from using E. coli laboratory strains...... to clinical isolates entails a significant rise in complexity and yields results that cannot be generalized. The results should be valuable information for researchers working with pre-clinical evaluation of device-associated E. coli infections....... to those found on an implanted device. We have used the method to evaluate the biofilm forming capacity of clinically isolated Escherichia coli on silicone rubber and on silicone rubber containing a hydrophilic coating. It was found that the surface chemistry influenced the colonization of the isolates...

  7. Optimization of high cell density fermentation process for recombinant nitrilase production in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohoni, Sujata Vijay; Nelapati, Dhanaraj; Sathe, Sneha; Javadekar-Subhedar, Vaishali; Gaikaiwari, Raghavendra P; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrilases constitute an important class of biocatalysts for chiral synthesis. This work was undertaken with the aim to optimize nitrilase production in a host that is well-studied for protein production. Process parameters were optimized for high cell density fermentation, in batch and fed-batch modes, of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) expressing Pseudomonas fluorescens nitrilase with a T7 promoter based expression system. Effects of different substrates, temperature and isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction on nitrilase production were studied. Super optimal broth containing glycerol but without an inducer gave best results in batch mode with 32 °C as the optimal temperature. Use of IPTG led to insoluble protein and lower enzyme activity. Optimized fed-batch strategy resulted in significant improvement in specific activity as well as volumetric productivity of the enzyme. On a volumetric basis, the activity improved 40-fold compared to the unoptimized batch process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Serine integrase chimeras with activity in E. coli and HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso P. Farruggio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, application of serine integrases for genomic engineering has increased in popularity. The factor-independence and unidirectionality of these large serine recombinases makes them well suited for reactions such as site-directed vector integration and cassette exchange in a wide variety of organisms. In order to generate information that might be useful for altering the specificity of serine integrases and to improve their efficiency, we tested a hybridization strategy that has been successful with several small serine recombinases. We created chimeras derived from three characterized members of the serine integrase family, phiC31, phiBT1, and TG1 integrases, by joining their amino- and carboxy-terminal portions. We found that several phiBT1-phiC31 (BC and phiC31-TG1 (CT hybrid integrases are active in E. coli. BC chimeras function on native att-sites and on att-sites that are hybrids between those of the two donor enzymes, while CT chimeras only act on the latter att-sites. A BC hybrid, BC{−1}, was also active in human HeLa cells. Our work is the first to demonstrate chimeric serine integrase activity. This analysis sheds light on integrase structure and function, and establishes a potentially tractable means to probe the specificity of the thousands of putative large serine recombinases that have been revealed by bioinformatics studies.

  9. Surface Passivation for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deligiannis, D.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) are currently one of the most promising solar cell technologies in the world. The SHJ solar cell is based on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer, passivated on both sides with a thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. Subsequently, p-type

  10. Pectocin M1 (PcaM1 Inhibits Escherichia coli Cell Growth and Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis through Periplasmic Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Chérier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Colicins are bacterial toxins produced by some Escherichia coli strains. They exhibit either enzymatic or pore-forming activity towards a very limited number of bacterial species, due to the high specificity of their reception and translocation systems. Yet, we succeeded in making the colicin M homologue from Pectobacterium carotovorum, pectocin M1 (PcaM1, capable of inhibiting E. coli cell growth by bypassing these reception and translocation steps. This goal was achieved through periplasmic expression of this pectocin. Indeed, when appropriately addressed to the periplasm of E. coli, this pectocin could exert its deleterious effects, i.e., the enzymatic degradation of the peptidoglycan lipid II precursor, which resulted in the arrest of the biosynthesis of this essential cell wall polymer, dramatic morphological changes and, ultimately, cell lysis. This result leads to the conclusion that colicin M and its various orthologues constitute powerful antibacterial molecules able to kill any kind of bacterium, once they can reach their lipid II target. They thus have to be seriously considered as promising alternatives to antibiotics.

  11. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  12. Nitrilase-catalyzed conversion of (R,S)-mandelonitrile by immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli cells harboring nitrilase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-07-01

    (R)-(-)-Mandelic acid (R-MA) is widely used both as a versatile intermediate for pharmaceuticals and a resolving agent in chiral resolution processes. In the current study, to improve the stability of operation, recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis were immobilized for the enantioselective hydrolysis of (R,S)-mandelonitrile to R-MA. Different immobilization methods including entrapment matrices, entrapment matrices cross-linked by cross-linking and polymerization agents, and direct cross-linking cells using glutaraldehyde (GA) or bionic silicon were investigated. To facilitate industrial solid-liquid separation, the direct cross-linking recombinant E. coli cells using diatomite/GA/polyethyleneimine with 135.95% relative activity compared with free cells was chosen using water as the reaction medium. The operational stability of the immobilized cells was obviously superior to that of free cells, without significant activity loss after 28 cycles of batch reaction and the successive production of R-MA could reach 1.88 M. Moreover, the immobilized cells showed good storage stability with about 52% relative activity after storing for 30 days at 4 °C. Therefore, the immobilized biocatalyst is very promising for upscale production of optically pure R-MA with high performance and low cost. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Antimutagenic action of aminoacids on UV-irradiated E. Coli cells: evidence of the existence of metabolic regulation of antimutagenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    The yield of mutations in Escherichia Coli cells placed after UV irradiation in a glucose-free salt medium enriched with casamino acids was determined. It is shown that in the absence of glucose casamino acids and certain individual amino acids produce a strong antimutagenetic effect. The acquired data allow to assume the existence of fine metabolic regulation of mutation reparation processes and occurrence of mutations in E. Coli cells exposed to UV-radiation

  14. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Produces Tir, Which Is Translocated to the Host Cell Membrane but Is Not Tyrosine Phosphorylated

    OpenAIRE

    DeVinney, Rebekah; Stein, Markus; Reinscheid, Dieter; Abe, Akio; Ruschkowski, Sharon; Finlay, B. Brett

    1999-01-01

    Intimate attachment to the host cell leading to the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions is an essential feature of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 pathogenesis. In a related pathogen, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), this activity is dependent upon translocation of the intimin receptor, Tir, which becomes tyrosine phosphorylated within the host cell membrane. In contrast, the accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins beneath adherent EHEC bacteria does n...

  15. Sociality in Escherichia coli: Enterochelin Is a Private Good at Low Cell Density and Can Be Shared at High Cell Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Rebecca L; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-07-01

    Many bacteria produce secreted iron chelators called siderophores, which can be shared among cells with specific siderophore uptake systems regardless of whether the cell produces siderophores. Sharing secreted products allows freeloading, where individuals use resources without bearing the cost of production. Here we show that the Escherichia coli siderophore enterochelin is not evenly shared between producers and nonproducers. Wild-type Escherichia coli grows well in low-iron minimal medium, and an isogenic enterochelin synthesis mutant (ΔentF) grows very poorly. The enterochelin mutant grows well in low-iron medium supplemented with enterochelin. At high cell densities the ΔentF mutant can compete equally with the wild type in low-iron medium. At low cell densities the ΔentF mutant cannot compete. Furthermore, the growth rate of the wild type is unaffected by cell density. The wild type grows well in low-iron medium even at very low starting densities. Our experiments support a model where at least some enterochelin remains associated with the cells that produce it, and the cell-associated enterochelin enables iron acquisition even at very low cell density. Enterochelin that is not retained by producing cells at low density is lost to dilution. At high cell densities, cell-free enterochelin can accumulate and be shared by all cells in the group. Partial privatization is a solution to the problem of iron acquisition in low-iron, low-cell-density habitats. Cell-free enterochelin allows for iron scavenging at a distance at higher population densities. Our findings shed light on the conditions under which freeloaders might benefit from enterochelin uptake systems. Sociality in microbes has become a topic of great interest. One facet of sociality is the sharing of secreted products, such as the iron-scavenging siderophores. We present evidence that the Escherichia coli siderophore enterochelin is relatively inexpensive to produce and is partially privatized such

  16. An engineered autotransporter-based surface expression vector enables efficient display of Affibody molecules on OmpT-negative E. coli as well as protease-mediated secretion in OmpT-positive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Andersson, Ken G; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-12-30

    Cell display technologies (e.g. bacterial display) are attractive in directed evolution as they provide the option to use flow-cytometric cell sorting for selection from combinatorial libraries. The aim of this study was to engineer and investigate an expression vector system with dual functionalities: i) recombinant display of Affibody libraries on Escherichia coli for directed evolution and ii) small scale secreted production of candidate affinity proteins, allowing initial downstream characterizations prior to subcloning. Autotransporters form a class of surface proteins in Gram-negative bacteria that have potential for efficient translocation and tethering of recombinant passenger proteins to the outer membrane. We engineered a bacterial display vector based on the E. coli AIDA-I autotransporter for anchoring to the bacterial surface. Potential advantages of employing autotransporters combined with E. coli as host include: high surface expression level, high transformation frequency, alternative promoter systems available, efficient translocation to the outer membrane and tolerance for large multi-domain passenger proteins. The new vector was designed to comprise an expression cassette encoding for an Affibody molecule, three albumin binding domains for monitoring of surface expression levels, an Outer membrane Protease T (OmpT) recognition site for potential protease-mediated secretion of displayed affinity proteins and a histidine-tag for purification. A panel of vectors with different promoters were generated and evaluated, and suitable cultivation conditions were investigated. The results demonstrated a high surface expression level of the different evaluated Affibody molecules, high correlation between target binding and surface expression level, high signal-to-background ratio, efficient secretion and purification of binders in OmpT-positive hosts as well as tight regulation of surface expression for the titratable promoters. Importantly, a mock selection

  17. Plant-synthesized E. coli CFA/I fimbrial protein protects Caco-2 cells from bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Yu, Jie; Henderson, David; Langridge, William H R

    2004-11-25

    A DNA fragment encoding the cholera toxin A2 subunit (CTA2) linked to the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colony forming fimbrial antigen CFA/I was inserted into a plant expression vector containing the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) fused to the rotavirus enterotoxin 22 amino acid epitope NSP422. Anti-CFA/I antibodies recognized a single band of approximately 72-kDa in transformed potato tuber tissue consistent with CFA/I-CTA2 and CTB-NSP4 fusion protein assembly into a cholera holotoxin-like structure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1 ELISA) indicated that the CFA/I-CTA2 fusion protein bound specific GM1 ganglioside membrane receptors and made up approximately 0.002% of the total soluble tuber protein. Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with transformed tuber tissues generated anti-CFA/I serum and intestinal IgG and IgA secretory antibodies. Attachment of ETEC H10407 to enterocyte-like Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells incubated with antiserum from immunized mice was reduced by 15% in comparison with Caco-2 cells incubated with serum from unimmunized mice. Immunogold staining of bacterial preparations revealed deposition of gold particles on E. coli H10407 fimbria incubated with immune serum but not on fimbria treated with sera from unimmunized mice demonstrating the specificity of antibodies in the immune serum for binding to CFA/I protein containing fimbria. The protection against toxic E. coli binding to Caco-2 cells generated by antisera from mice immunized with plant-synthesized CFA/I antigen demonstrates the feasibility of plant-based multi-component vaccine protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli, rotavirus and cholera, three enteric diseases that together exert the highest levels of child morbidity and mortality in economically emerging countries.

  18. Touching Textured Surfaces: Cells in Somatosensory Cortex Respond Both to Finger Movement and to Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darian-Smith, Ian; Sugitani, Michio; Heywood, John; Karita, Keishiro; Goodwin, Antony

    1982-11-01

    Single neurons in Brodmann's areas 3b and 1 of the macaque postcentral gyrus discharge when the monkey rubs the contralateral finger pads across a textured surface. Both the finger movement and the spatial pattern of the surface determine this discharge in each cell. The spatial features of the surface are represented unambiguously only in the responses of populations of these neurons, and not in the responses of the constituent cells.

  19. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niehage

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2% or high (10% serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention.

  20. Pheochromocytoma (PC12 Cell Response on Mechanobactericidal Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason V. Wandiyanto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is a biocompatible material that is frequently used for making implantable medical devices. Nanoengineering of the surface is the common method for increasing material biocompatibility, and while the nanostructured materials are well-known to represent attractive substrata for eukaryotic cells, very little information has been documented about the interaction between mammalian cells and bactericidal nanostructured surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effect of bactericidal titanium nanostructures on PC12 cell attachment and differentiation—a cell line which has become a widely used in vitro model to study neuronal differentiation. The effects of the nanostructures on the cells were then compared to effects observed when the cells were placed in contact with non-structured titanium. It was found that bactericidal nanostructured surfaces enhanced the attachment of neuron-like cells. In addition, the PC12 cells were able to differentiate on nanostructured surfaces, while the cells on non-structured surfaces were not able to do so. These promising results demonstrate the potential application of bactericidal nanostructured surfaces in biomedical applications such as cochlear and neuronal implants.

  1. Production of R-Mandelic Acid Using Nitrilase from Recombinant E. coli Cells Immobilized with Tris(Hydroxymethyl)Phosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Ya-Ping; Wang, Yuan-Shan; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli cells harboring nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis were immobilized using tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine (THP) as the coupling agent. The optimal pH and temperature of the THP-immobilized cells were determined at pH 8.0 and 55 °C. The half-lives of THP-immobilized cells measured at 35, 40, and 50 °C were 1800, 965, and 163 h, respectively. The concentration of R-mandelic acid (R-MA) reached 358 mM after merely 1-h conversion by the immobilized cells with 500 mM R,S-mandelonitrile (R,S-MN), affording the highest productivity of 1307 g L -1  day -1 and the space-time productivity of 143.2 mmol L -1  h -1  g -1 . The immobilized cells with granular shape were successfully recycled for 60 batches using 100 mM R,S-MN as substrate at 40 °C with 64% of relative activity, suggesting that the immobilized E. coli cells obtained in this study are promising for the production of R-MA.

  2. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-05-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices. Failure of most biomaterials originates from the inability to predict and control the influence of their surface properties on biological phenomena, particularly protein adsorption, and cellular behaviour, which subsequently results in unfavourable host response. Here, we introduce a surface-proteomic screening approach using a label-free mass spectrometry technique to decipher the adsorption profile of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on different biomaterials, and correlate it with cellular behaviour. We demonstrated that the way a biomaterial selectively interacts with specific ECM proteins of a given tissue seems to determine the interactions between the cells of that tissue and biomaterials. Accordingly, this approach can

  3. Effect of laser modified surface microtopochemistry on endothelial cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, A C; Rouais, F; Lazare, S; Bordenave, L; Baquey, Ch

    2007-02-15

    The introduction of microelectronics technology in the area of biological sciences has brought forth previously unforeseeable applications such as DNA or protein biochips, miniaturized, multiparametric biosensors for high performance multianalyte assays, DNA sequencing, biocomputers, and substrates for controlled cell growth (i.e. tissue engineering). We developed and investigated a new method using "cold" excimer laser beam technology combined with microlithographical techniques to create surfaces with well defined 3D microdomains in order to delineate critical microscopic surface features governing cell-material interactions. Microfabricated surfaces with microgrooves 30-3 microm deep, 10 - 1 microm wide spaced 30 microm apart were obtained with micron resolution, by "microsculpturing" polymer model surfaces using a computer controlled laser KrF excimer beam coupled with a microlithographic projection technique. The laser beam after exiting a mask was focused onto the polymer target surface via an optical setup allowing for a 10-fold reduction of the mask pattern. Various 3D micropatterned features were obtained at the micron level. Reproducible submicron features could also be obtained using this method. Subsequently, model human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured on the laser microfabricated surfaces in order to study the effects of specific microscopic surface features on cell deposition and orientation. Cell deposition patterns were found to be microstructure dependant, and showed cell orientation dependency for features in the cell range dimension, a behaviour significantly different from that of a previously studied cell model (osteoprogenitor cell). This model may be a promising in so far as it is very rapid (a time frame less than a second per square centimeter of micropatterned surface) and provides further insights into the effects of surface microtopography on cell response with possible applications in the field of biosensors

  4. Study of messenger RNA inactivation and protein degradation in an Escherichia coli cell-free expression system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large amount of recombinant proteins can be synthesized in a few hours with Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems based on bacteriophage transcription. These cytoplasmic extracts are used in many applications that require large-scale protein production such as proteomics and high throughput techniques. In recent years, cell-free systems have also been used to engineer complex informational processes. These works, however, have been limited by the current available cell-free systems, which are not well adapted to these types of studies. In particular, no method has been proposed to increase the mRNA inactivation rate and the protein degradation rate in cell-free reactions. The construction of in vitro informational processes with interesting dynamics requires a balance between mRNA and protein synthesis (the source, and mRNA inactivation and protein degradation (the sink. Results Two quantitative studies are presented to characterize and to increase the global mRNA inactivation rate, and to accelerate the degradation of the synthesized proteins in an E. coli cell-free expression system driven by the endogenous RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70. The E. coli mRNA interferase MazF was used to increase and to adjust the mRNA inactivation rate of the Firefly luciferase (Luc and of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. Peptide tags specific to the endogenous E. coli AAA + proteases were used to induce and to adjust the protein degradation rate of eGFP. Messenger RNA inactivation rate, protein degradation rate, maturation time of Luc and eGFP were measured. Conclusions The global mRNA turnover and the protein degradation rate can be accelerated and tuned in a biologically relevant range in a cell-free reaction with quantitative procedures easy to implement. These features broaden the capabilities of cell-free systems with a better control of gene expression. This cell-free extract could find some applications in

  5. Stable co-existence of separate replicons in Escherichia coli is dependent on once-per-cell-cycle initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarstad, K.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2003-01-01

    DNA replication in most organisms is regulated such that all chromosomes are replicated once, and only once, per cell cycle. In rapidly growing Escherichia coli, replication of eight identical chromosomes is initiated essentially simultanously, each from the same origin, oriC. Plasmid-borne ori......C sequences (mini-chromosomes) are also initiated in synchrony with the eight chromosomal origins. We demonstrate that specific inactivation of newly formed, hemimethylated origins (sequestration) was required for the stable coexistence of oriC-dependent replicons. Cells in which initiations were not confined...

  6. Interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Thomas; Schnell, Anne; Walter, Christian; Kämmerer, Peer W; Pabst, Andreas; Lehmann, Karl M; Ziebart, Johanna; Klein, Marc O; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important role in peri-implant angiogenesis during early bone formation. Therefore, interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and titanium dental implant surfaces are of crucial interest. The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate the reactions of EPCs in contact with different commercially available implant surfaces. EPCs from buffy coats were isolated by Ficoll density gradient separation. After cell differentiation, EPC were cultured for a period of 7 days on different titanium surfaces. The test surfaces varied in roughness and hydrophilicity: acid-etched (A), sand-blasted-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Plastic and fibronectin-coated plastic surfaces served as controls. Cell numbers and morphology were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressions of iNOS and eNOS were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell numbers were higher in the control groups compared to the cells of titanium surfaces. Initially, hydrophilic titanium surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed lower cell numbers than hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). After 7 days smoother surfaces (A and modA) showed increased cell numbers compared to rougher surfaces (SLA and modSLA). Cell morphology of A, modA, and control surfaces was characterized by a multitude of pseudopodia and planar cell soma architecture. SLA and modSLA promoted small and plump cell soma with little quantity of pseudopodia. The lowest VEGF level was measured on A, the highest on modSLA. The highest eNOS and iNOS expressions were found on modA surfaces. The results of this study demonstrate that biological behaviors of EPCs can be influenced by different surfaces. The modSLA surface promotes an undifferentiated phenotype of EPCs that has the ability to secrete growth factors in great quantities. In

  7. Cell response to hydroxyapatite surface topography modulated by sintering temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealy, Jacob; O'Kelly, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Increased mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) activity on hydroxyapatite (HA) bone tissue engineering scaffolds will improve their viability in diffusion-based in vivo environments and is therefore highly desirable. This work focused on modulating the sintered HA surface topography with a view to increasing cell activity; this was achieved by varying the sintering temperature of the HA substrates. Cells were cultured on the substrates for periods of up to 19 days and displayed a huge variation in viability. MSC metabolic activity was measured using a resazurin sodium salt assay and revealed that surfaces sintered from 1250 to 1350°C significantly outperformed their lower temperature counterparts from day one (p ≤ 0.05). Surfaces sintered at 1300°C induced 57% more cell activity than the control at day 16. No significant activity was observed on surfaces sintered below 1200°C. It is suggested that this is due to the granular morphology produced at these temperatures providing insufficient contact area for cell attachment. In addition, we propose the average surface wavelength as a more quantitative surface descriptor than those readily found in the literature. The wavelengths of the substrates presented here were highly correlated with cell activity (R(2)  = 0.9019); with a wavelength of 2.675 µm on the 1300°C surface inducing the highest cell response. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Low intensity 70.6 and 73 GHz electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) strongly suppressed Escherichia coli growth at 73 GHz and pH 7.3. → Reducer DL-dithiothreitol had bactericidal effect and disturbed the SH-groups number. → EMI enhanced E. coli sensitivity toward dithiothreitol. → EMI decreased the SH-groups number of membrane disturbed by ATP and N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide. → The changed membrane oxidation-reduction state could be the primary mechanisms in EMI effects. -- Abstract: Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm -2 ) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1 h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12(λ). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  9. Real-time PCR methodology for selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells by targeting Z3276 as a genetic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoguang; Chen, Jin-Qiang

    2012-08-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in foods. A unique open reading frame (ORF), Z3276, was identified as a specific genetic marker for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. We developed a real-time PCR assay with primers and probe targeting ORF Z3276 and confirmed that this assay was sensitive and specific for E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 298). Using this assay, we can detect amounts of genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7 as low as a few CFU equivalents. Moreover, we have developed a new propidium monoazide (PMA)-real-time PCR protocol that allows for the clear differentiation of viable from dead cells. In addition, the protocol was adapted to a 96-well plate format for easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited, in contrast to the virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated viable cells. With beef spiked simultaneously with 8 × 10(7) dead cells/g and 80 CFU viable cells/g, we were able to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells with an 8-h enrichment. In conclusion, this PMA-real-time PCR assay offers a sensitive and specific means to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in spiked beef. It also has the potential for high-throughput selective detection of viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in other food matrices and, thus, will have an impact on the accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental sources.

  10. Real-Time PCR Methodology for Selective Detection of Viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells by Targeting Z3276 as a Genetic Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in foods. A unique open reading frame (ORF), Z3276, was identified as a specific genetic marker for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. We developed a real-time PCR assay with primers and probe targeting ORF Z3276 and confirmed that this assay was sensitive and specific for E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 298). Using this assay, we can detect amounts of genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7 as low as a few CFU equivalents. Moreover, we have developed a new propidium monoazide (PMA)–real-time PCR protocol that allows for the clear differentiation of viable from dead cells. In addition, the protocol was adapted to a 96-well plate format for easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited, in contrast to the virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated viable cells. With beef spiked simultaneously with 8 × 107 dead cells/g and 80 CFU viable cells/g, we were able to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells with an 8-h enrichment. In conclusion, this PMA–real-time PCR assay offers a sensitive and specific means to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in spiked beef. It also has the potential for high-throughput selective detection of viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in other food matrices and, thus, will have an impact on the accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental sources. PMID:22635992

  11. Surface deformation during an action potential in pearled cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussel, Matan; Fillafer, Christian; Ben-Porath, Gal; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2017-11-01

    Electric pulses in biological cells (action potentials) have been reported to be accompanied by a propagating cell-surface deformation with a nanoscale amplitude. Typically, this cell surface is covered by external layers of polymer material (extracellular matrix, cell wall material, etc.). It was recently demonstrated in excitable plant cells (Chara braunii) that the rigid external layer (cell wall) hinders the underlying deformation. When the cell membrane was separated from the cell wall by osmosis, a mechanical deformation, in the micrometer range, was observed upon excitation of the cell. The underlying mechanism of this mechanical pulse has, to date, remained elusive. Herein we report that Chara cells can undergo a pearling instability, and when the pearled fragments were excited even larger and more regular cell shape changes were observed (˜10 -100 μ m in amplitude). These transient cellular deformations were captured by a curvature model that is based on three parameters: surface tension, bending rigidity, and pressure difference across the surface. In this paper these parameters are extracted by curve-fitting to the experimental cellular shapes at rest and during excitation. This is a necessary step to identify the mechanical parameters that change during an action potential.

  12. Protocols for Implementing an Escherichia coli Based TX-TL Cell-Free Expression System for Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jonghyeon; Caschera, Filippo; Murray, Richard M.; Noireaux, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Ideal cell-free expression systems can theoretically emulate an in vivo cellular environment in a controlled in vitro platform.1 This is useful for expressing proteins and genetic circuits in a controlled manner as well as for providing a prototyping environment for synthetic biology.2,3 To achieve the latter goal, cell-free expression systems that preserve endogenous Escherichia coli transcription-translation mechanisms are able to more accurately reflect in vivo cellular dynamics than those based on T7 RNA polymerase transcription. We describe the preparation and execution of an efficient endogenous E. coli based transcription-translation (TX-TL) cell-free expression system that can produce equivalent amounts of protein as T7-based systems at a 98% cost reduction to similar commercial systems.4,5 The preparation of buffers and crude cell extract are described, as well as the execution of a three tube TX-TL reaction. The entire protocol takes five days to prepare and yields enough material for up to 3000 single reactions in one preparation. Once prepared, each reaction takes under 8 hr from setup to data collection and analysis. Mechanisms of regulation and transcription exogenous to E. coli, such as lac/tet repressors and T7 RNA polymerase, can be supplemented.6 Endogenous properties, such as mRNA and DNA degradation rates, can also be adjusted.7 The TX-TL cell-free expression system has been demonstrated for large-scale circuit assembly, exploring biological phenomena, and expression of proteins under both T7- and endogenous promoters.6,8 Accompanying mathematical models are available.9,10 The resulting system has unique applications in synthetic biology as a prototyping environment, or "TX-TL biomolecular breadboard." PMID:24084388

  13. Theoretical evidence of maximum intracellular currents versus frequency in an Escherichia coli cell submitted to AC voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Pascal; Rauly, Dominique; Chamberod, Eric; Martins, Jean M F

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the problem of intracellular currents in longilinear bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, suspended in a physiological medium and submitted to a harmonic voltage (AC), is analyzed using the Finite-Element-based software COMSOL Multiphysics. Bacterium was modeled as a cylindrical capsule, ended by semi-spheres and surrounded by a dielectric cell wall. An equivalent single-layer cell wall was defined, starting from the well-recognized three-shell modeling approach. The bacterium was considered immersed in a physiological medium, which was also taken into account in the modeling. A new complex transconductance was thus introduced, relating the complex ratio between current inside the bacterium and voltage applied between two parallel equipotential planes, separated by a realistic distance. When voltage was applied longitudinally relative to the bacterium main axis, numerical results in terms of frequency response in the 1-20 MHz range for E. coli cells revealed that transconductance magnitude exhibited a maximum at a frequency depending on the cell wall capacitance. This occurred in spite of the purely passive character of the model and could be explained by an equivalent electrical network giving very similar results and showing special conditions for lateral paths of the currents through the cell wall. It is shown that the main contribution to this behavior is due to the conductive part of the current. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:213-219, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluating the toxicity of TiO2-based nanoparticles to Chinese hamster ovary cells and Escherichia coli: a complementary experimental and computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Mikolajczyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titania-supported palladium, gold and bimetallic nanoparticles (second-generation nanoparticles demonstrate promising photocatalytic properties. However, due to unusual reactivity, second-generation nanoparticles can be hazardous for living organisms. Considering the ever-growing number of new types of nanoparticles that can potentially contaminate the environment, a determination of their toxicity is extremely important. The main aim of presented study was to investigate the cytotoxic effect of surface modified TiO2-based nanoparticles, to model their quantitative nanostructure–toxicity relationships and to reveal the toxicity mechanism. In this context, toxicity tests for surface-modified TiO2-based nanoparticles were performed in vitro, using Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells. The obtained cytotoxicity data were analyzed by means of computational methods (quantitative structure–activity relationships, QSAR approach. Based on a combined experimental and computational approach, predictive models were developed, and relationships between cytotoxicity, size, and specific surface area (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface, BET of nanoparticles were discussed.

  15. Adhesive threads of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antão Esther-Maria

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to adhere to host surfaces is by far the most vital step in the successful colonization by microbial pathogens. Colonization begins with the attachment of the bacterium to receptors expressed by cells forming the lining of the mucosa. Long hair like extracellular appendages called fimbriae, produced by most Gram-negative pathogens, mediate specific attachment to the epithelial cell surface. Associated with the fimbriae is a protein called an adhesin, which directs high-affinity binding to specific cell surface components. In the last couple of years, an enormous amount of research has been undertaken that deals with understanding how bacterial pathogens adhere to host cells. E. coli in all probability is one of the best studied free-living organisms. A group of E. coli called Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC including both human and animal pathogens like Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, Newborn meningitic E. coli (NMEC and Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, have been found to harbour many fimbriae including Type 1 fimbriae, P fimbriae, curli fibres, S fimbriae, F1C fimbriae, Dr fimbriae, afimbrial adhesins, temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin and many novel adhesin gene clusters that have not yet been characterized. Each of these adhesins is unique due to the recognition of an adhesin-specific receptor, though as a group these adhesins share common genomic organization. A newly identified putative adhesin temporarily termed ExPEC Adhesin I, encoded by gene yqi, has been recently found to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of APEC infection, thus making it an interesting candidate for future research. The aim of this review is to describe the role of ExPEC adhesins during extraintestinal infections known till date, and to suggest the idea of investigating their potential role in the colonization of the host gut which is said to be a reservoir for ExPEC.

  16. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  17. E. Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E. coli is used to irrigate the crops. What Foods Can Cause E. Coli Infections? E. coli can ... for: Kids Being Safe in the Kitchen Botulism Food Poisoning What Are Germs? View more Partner Message About Us ...

  18. Variant innate immune responses of mammary epithelial cells to challenge by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and the regulating effect of taurine on these bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liuhai; Xu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Jinye; Liu, Ming; Bin Dai; Miao, Jinfeng; Yin, Yulong

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are important pathogens causing subclinical and clinical bovine mastitis, respectively. Taurine, an organic acid found in animal tissues, has been used for the treatment of various superficial infections and chronic inflammations. We challenged a bovine mammary epithelial cell (MEC) line (MAC-T) or a mouse mammary epithelial cell line (EpH4-Ev) with either E. coli or S. aureus and compared the responses of MECs to these 2 pathogens. We also examined the regulatory effects of taurine on these responses. Receptor analyses showed that both TLR2 and TLR4 are upregulated upon exposure to either E. coli or S. aureus. Taurine pre-treatment dampened upregulation to some extent. E. coli and S. aureus stimulated comparable levels of ROS, which could be inhibited by taurine pre-treatment. E. coli infection elicited a dramatic change in iNOS expression. Taurine significantly decreased iNOS expression in the S. aureus challenged group. Protein microarray demonstrated that 32/40 and 8/40 inflammatory molecules/mediators were increased after E. coli or S. aureus challenge, respectively. The fold changes of most molecules were higher in the E. coli infection group than that in the S. aureus infection group. Taurine negatively regulated the inflammatory profile in both bacterial infections. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α) connected with TLR activation were down-regulated by taurine pre-treatment. The influence of TAK-242 and OxPAPC on cytokine/molecule expression profiles to E. coli challenge are different than to S. aureus. Some important factors (MyD88, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and IL-6) mediated by TLR activation were suppressed either in protein microarray or special assay (PCR/kits) or both. TAK-242 restrained ROS production and NAGase activity similar to the effect of taurine in E. coli challenge groups. The detection of 3 indices (T-AOC, SOD and MDA) reflecting oxidative stress in vivo, showed that

  19. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, B D; Cheng, A; Olivares-Navarrete, R; Schwartz, Z

    2016-03-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  20. Robotic Patterning a Superhydrophobic Surface for Collective Cell Migration Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yonggang; Yang, Jing; Hui, Zhixin; Grottkau, Brian E

    2018-04-01

    Collective cell migration, in which cells migrate as a group, is fundamental in many biological and pathological processes. There is increasing interest in studying the collective cell migration in high throughput. Cell scratching, insertion blocker, and gel-dissolving techniques are some methodologies used previously. However, these methods have the drawbacks of cell damage, substrate surface alteration, limitation in medium exchange, and solvent interference. The superhydrophobic surface, on which the water contact angle is greater than 150 degrees, has been recently utilized to generate patterned arrays. Independent cell culture areas can be generated on a substrate that functions the same as a conventional multiple well plate. However, so far there has been no report on superhydrophobic patterning for the study of cell migration. In this study, we report on the successful development of a robotically patterned superhydrophobic array for studying collective cell migration in high throughput. The array was developed on a rectangular single-well cell culture plate consisting of hydrophilic flat microwells separated by the superhydrophobic surface. The manufacturing process is robotic and includes patterning discrete protective masks to the substrate using 3D printing, robotic spray coating of silica nanoparticles, robotic mask removal, robotic mini silicone blocker patterning, automatic cell seeding, and liquid handling. Compared with a standard 96-well plate, our system increases the throughput by 2.25-fold and generates a cell-free area in each well non-destructively. Our system also demonstrates higher efficiency than conventional way of liquid handling using microwell plates, and shorter processing time than manual operating in migration assays. The superhydrophobic surface had no negative impact on cell viability. Using our system, we studied the collective migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and cancer cells using assays of endpoint

  1. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans control adhesion and invasion of breast carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Hooi Ching; Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Couchman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cell surface proteoglycans interact with numerous regulators of cell behavior through their glycosaminoglycan chains. The syndecan family of transmembrane proteoglycans are virtually ubiquitous cell surface receptors that are implicated in the progression of some tumors, including bre...... syndecan-2, may be important regulators of breast carcinoma progression through regulation of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and invasion.......Background: Cell surface proteoglycans interact with numerous regulators of cell behavior through their glycosaminoglycan chains. The syndecan family of transmembrane proteoglycans are virtually ubiquitous cell surface receptors that are implicated in the progression of some tumors, including...... breast carcinoma. This may derive from their regulation of cell adhesion, but roles for specific syndecans are unresolved. Methods: The MDA-MB231 human breast carcinoma cell line was exposed to exogenous glycosaminoglycans and changes in cell behavior monitored by western blotting, immunocytochemistry...

  2. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  3. Quantification of filamentation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli during experimental bladder cell infection by using semi-automated image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Kasper; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    of bacterial pathogens and study the advantages of bacterial morphological plasticity, methods are needed to accurately quantify changes in bacterial cell shape. In this study, we present a method for quantification of bacterial filamentation based on automatic detection and measurement of bacterial units......Several rod-shaped pathogens including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Klebsiella pneumonia are capable of adopting highly filamentous cell shapes under certain circumstances. This phenomenon occurs as a result of continued cell elongation during growth without the usual septation into single...... rod-shaped cells. Evidence has emerged over the past decade suggesting that this morphological transformation is controlled and reversible and provides selective advantages under certain growth conditions, such as during infection in humans. In order to identify the factors which induce filamentation...

  4. Cell surface carbohydrates as prognostic markers in human carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Tumour development is usually associated with changes in cell surface carbohydrates. These are often divided into changes related to terminal carbohydrate structures, which include incomplete synthesis and modification of normally existing carbohydrates, and changes in the carbohydrate core struc...

  5. Expression and purification of bioactive soluble murine stem cell factor from recombinant Escherichia coli using thioredoxin as fusion partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Carola; Schambach, Axel; Meyer, Johann; Scheper, Thomas; Rinas, Ursula

    2011-03-10

    Stem cell factor (SCF) known as the c-kit ligand, plays important roles in spermatogenesis, melanogenesis and early stages of hematopoiesis. As for the latter, SCF is essential for growth and expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We herein describe the production of recombinant murine SCF from Escherichia coli as soluble thioredoxin-fusion protein. The formation of insoluble and inactive inclusion bodies, usually observed when SCF is expressed in E. coli, was almost entirely prevented. After purification based on membrane adsorber technology, the fusion protein was subsequently cleaved by TEV protease in order to release mature mSCF. Following dialysis and a final purification step, the target protein was isolated in high purity. Bioactivity of mSCF was proven by different tests (MTT analogous assay, long-term proliferation assay) applying a human megakaryocytic cell line. Furthermore, the biological activity of the uncleaved fusion protein was tested as well. We observed a significant activity, even though it was less than the activity displayed by the purified mSCF. In summary, avoiding inclusion body formation we present an efficient production procedure for mSCF, one of the most important stem cell cytokines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell/surface interactions on laser micro-textured titanium-coated silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwenifumbo, Steven; Li, Mingwei; Chen, Jianbo; Beye, Aboubaker; Soboyejo, Wolé

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of nano-scale titanium coatings, and micro-groove/micro-grid patterns on cell/surface interactions on silicon surfaces. The nature of the cellular attachment and adhesion to the coated/uncoated micro-textured surfaces was elucidated by the visualization of the cells and relevant cytoskeletal & focal adhesion proteins through scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. Increased cell spreading and proliferation rates are observed on surfaces with 50 nm thick Ti coatings. The micro-groove geometries have been shown to promote contact guidance, which leads to reduced scar tissue formation. In contrast, smooth surfaces result in random cell orientations and the increased possibility of scar tissue formation. Immunofluorescence cell staining experiments also reveal that the actin stress fibers are aligned along the groove dimensions, with discrete focal adhesions occurring along the ridges, within the grooves and at the ends of the cell extensions. The implications of the observed cell/surface interactions are discussed for possible applications of silicon in implantable biomedical systems.

  7. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    OpenAIRE

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-01-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different me...

  8. The mecillinam resistome reveals a role for peptidoglycan endopeptidases in stimulating cell wall synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghee Chuan Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells are typically surrounded by an net-like macromolecule called the cell wall constructed from the heteropolymer peptidoglycan (PG. Biogenesis of this matrix is the target of penicillin and related beta-lactams. These drugs inhibit the transpeptidase activity of PG synthases called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, preventing the crosslinking of nascent wall material into the existing network. The beta-lactam mecillinam specifically targets the PBP2 enzyme in the cell elongation machinery of Escherichia coli. Low-throughput selections for mecillinam resistance have historically been useful in defining mechanisms involved in cell wall biogenesis and the killing activity of beta-lactam antibiotics. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-Seq as a high-throughput method to identify nearly all mecillinam resistance loci in the E. coli genome, providing a comprehensive resource for uncovering new mechanisms underlying PG assembly and drug resistance. Induction of the stringent response or the Rcs envelope stress response has been previously implicated in mecillinam resistance. We therefore also performed the Tn-Seq analysis in mutants defective for these responses in addition to wild-type cells. Thus, the utility of the dataset was greatly enhanced by determining the stress response dependence of each resistance locus in the resistome. Reasoning that stress response-independent resistance loci are those most likely to identify direct modulators of cell wall biogenesis, we focused our downstream analysis on this subset of the resistome. Characterization of one of these alleles led to the surprising discovery that the overproduction of endopeptidase enzymes that cleave crosslinks in the cell wall promotes mecillinam resistance by stimulating PG synthesis by a subset of PBPs. Our analysis of this activation mechanism suggests that, contrary to the prevailing view in the field, PG synthases and PG cleaving enzymes need not function in multi

  9. Electrochemical characterization of the bacterial cell surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der A.

    1996-01-01


    Bacterial cells are ubiquitous in natural environments and also play important roles in domestic and industrial processes. They are found either suspended in the aqueous phase or attached to solid particles. The adhesion behaviour of bacteria is influenced by the physico-chemical

  10. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal...... and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell...... behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole...

  11. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  12. Molecular clutch drives cell response to surface viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mark; Cantini, Marco; Reboud, Julien; Cooper, Jonathan M; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-02-06

    Cell response to matrix rigidity has been explained by the mechanical properties of the actin-talin-integrin-fibronectin clutch. Here the molecular clutch model is extended to account for cell interactions with purely viscous surfaces (i.e., without an elastic component). Supported lipid bilayers present an idealized and controllable system through which to study this concept. Using lipids of different diffusion coefficients, the mobility (i.e., surface viscosity) of the presented ligands (in this case RGD) was altered by an order of magnitude. Cell size and cytoskeletal organization were proportional to viscosity. Furthermore, there was a higher number of focal adhesions and a higher phosphorylation of FAK on less-mobile (more-viscous) surfaces. Actin retrograde flow, an indicator of the force exerted on surfaces, was also seen to be faster on more mobile surfaces. This has consequential effects on downstream molecules; the mechanosensitive YAP protein localized to the nucleus more on less-mobile (more-viscous) surfaces and differentiation of myoblast cells was enhanced on higher viscosity. This behavior was explained within the framework of the molecular clutch model, with lower viscosity leading to a low force loading rate, preventing the exposure of mechanosensitive proteins, and with a higher viscosity causing a higher force loading rate exposing these sites, activating downstream pathways. Consequently, the understanding of how viscosity (regardless of matrix stiffness) influences cell response adds a further tool to engineer materials that control cell behavior. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  13. Multitalented EspB of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) enters cells autonomously and induces programmed cell death in human monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Doreen; Salia, Helen; Greune, Lilo; Norkowski, Stephanie; Körner, Britta; Uckeley, Zina M; Frankel, Gad; Guenot, Marianne; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2018-03-12

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) subvert host cell signaling pathways by injecting effector proteins via a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS). The T3SS-dependent EspB protein is a multi-functional effector protein, which contributes to adherence and translocator pore formation and after injection exhibits several intracellular activities. In addition, EspB is also secreted into the environment. Effects of secreted EspB have not been reported thus far. As a surrogate for secreted EspB we employed recombinant EspB (rEspB) derived from the prototype EPEC strain E2348/69 and investigated the interactions of the purified protein with different human epithelial and immune cells including monocytic THP-1 cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, U-937, epithelial T84, Caco-2, and HeLa cells. To assess whether these proteins might exert a cytotoxic effect we monitored the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as propidium iodide (PI) uptake. For comparison, we also investigated several homologs of EspB such as IpaD of Shigella, and SipC, SipD, SseB, and SseD of Salmonella as purified recombinant proteins. Interestingly, cytotoxicity was only observed in THP-1 cells and macrophages, whereas epithelial cells remained unaffected. Cell fractionation and immune fluorescence experiments showed that rEspB enters cells autonomously, which suggests that EspB might qualify as a novel cell-penetrating effector protein (CPE). Using specific organelle tracers and inhibitors of signaling pathways we found that rEspB destroys the mitochondrial membrane potential - an indication of programmed cell death induction in THP-1 cells. Here we show that EspB not only constitutes an essential part of the T3SS-nanomachine and contributes to the arsenal of injected effector proteins but, furthermore, that secreted (recombinant) EspB autonomously enters host cells and selectively induces cell death in immune cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Sperm cell surface dynamics during activation and fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822922

    2013-01-01

    Before the sperm cell can reach the oocyte it needs to be activated and to undergo a series of preparative steps. The sperm surface dynamics was studied in relation to this activation process and the modifications and removal of sperm surface components havebeen investigated. Bicarbonate-induced

  15. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  16. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  17. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  18. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, C P; Sevcencu, C; Yoshida, K [Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark); Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Foss, M; Larsen, A Nylandsted; Besenbacher, F [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Hansen, J Lundsgaard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Zachar, V, E-mail: cpennisi@hst.aau.d [Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Aalborg University (Denmark)

    2009-09-23

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  19. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  20. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel roles for the AIDA adhesin from diarrheagenic Escherichia coli:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherlock, Orla; Schembri, Mark; Reisner, A.

    2004-01-01

    Diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli strains are responsible for numerous cases of gastrointestinal disease and constitute a serious health problem throughout the world. The ability to recognize and attach to host intestinal surfaces is an essential step in the pathogenesis of such strains. AIDA...... is a potent bacterial adhesin associated with some diarrheagenic E. coli strains. AIDA mediates bacterial attachment to a broad variety of human and other mammalian cells. It is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein and belongs to the selected group of bacterial glycoproteins; only the glycosylated form...... binds to mammalian cells. Here, we show that AIDA possesses self-association characteristics and can mediate autoaggregation of E. coli cells. We demonstrate that intercellular AIDA-AIDA interaction is responsible for bacterial autoaggregation. Interestingly, AIDA-expressing cells can interact...

  3. The influence of enrofloxacin, florfenicol, ceftiofur and E. coli LPS interaction on T and B cells subset in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaudia, Chrząstek; Alina, Wieliczko

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of enrofloxacin, florfenicol, ceftiofur and E. coli LPS interaction on T and B subsets in thymus and spleen of newly-hatched chicks. A 126, 1-day-old chicks were administered enrofloxacin, florfenicol or ceftiofur in recommended doses according to the currently treatment schedule advises. E .coli LPS was given intravenously once at the dose of 200 μg kg(-1) BW on the 2nd day of experiment (d. e.). On the 6th and the 14th d. e. thymus and spleens were subjected to flow cytometry investigation.The most significant changes were demonstrated in spleen. The antibiotics administration decreased the percentage of B and T cells subset. Moreover, this suppressive effect was enhanced by E. coli LPS administration. On the 6th d. e. the percentage of CD3(+)TCRγδ(-), CD3(+)TCRγδ(+), CD4(+)CD8(-), CD4(-)CD8(+) decreased significantly after ceftiofur and LPS treatment. A lower percentage of CD3(+)TCRγδ(-), CD4(-)CD8(+) and CD3(+)TCRγδ(+) was observed in enrofloxacine and LPS treated group. The decrease percentage of CD3(+)TCRγδ(+)cells and Bu-1(+) was found after florfenicol and LPS treatment. On the 14th d. e. a decreased percentage of CD4(+)CD8(-) and increased percentage of CD4(-)CD8(+) cells was shown in ceftiofur or enrofloxacine and LPS treated groups. In addition decreased percentage of CD3(+)TCRγδ(+) was found in all antibiotic and LPS treated groups.In this study, it was shown that enrofloxacine, florfenicol, ceftiofur treatment may change the proportions among lymphocytes subset and might have an impact on the immune response to bacterial endotoxins in chicks.

  4. Glycomacropeptide Reduces Intestinal Epithelial Cell Barrier Dysfunction and Adhesion of Entero-Hemorrhagic and Entero-Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Feeney

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the potential of glycosylated food components to positively influence health has received considerable attention. Milk is a rich source of biologically active glycoconjugates which are associated with antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anti-adhesion, anti-inflammatory and prebiotic properties. Glycomacropeptide (GMP is the C-terminal portion of kappa-casein that is released from whey during cheese-making by the action of chymosin. Many of the biological properties associated with GMP, such as anti-adhesion, have been linked with the carbohydrate portion of the protein. In this study, we investigated the ability of GMP to inhibit the adhesion of a variety of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to HT-29 and Caco-2 intestinal cell lines, given the importance of E. coli in causing bacterial gastroenteritis. GMP significantly reduced pathogen adhesion, albeit with a high degree of species specificity toward enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC strains O125:H32 and O111:H2 and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC strain 12900 O157:H7. The anti-adhesive effect resulted from the interaction of GMP with the E. coli cells and was also dependent on GMP concentration. Pre-incubation of intestinal Caco-2 cells with GMP reduced pathogen translocation as represented by a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER. Thus, GMP is an effective in-vitro inhibitor of adhesion and epithelial injury caused by E. coli and may have potential as a biofunctional ingredient in foods to improve gastrointestinal health.

  5. Surfactant protein D inhibits adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to the bladder epithelial cells and the bacterium-induced cytotoxicity: a possible function in urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimura, Yuichiro; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Saito, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2012-11-16

    The adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the host urothelial surface is the first step for establishing UPEC infection. Uroplakin Ia (UPIa), a glycoprotein expressed on bladder urothelium, serves as a receptor for FimH, a lectin located at bacterial pili, and their interaction initiates UPEC infection. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is known to be expressed on mucosal surfaces in various tissues besides the lung. However, the functions of SP-D in the non-pulmonary tissues are poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible function of SP-D expressed in the bladder urothelium and the mechanisms by which SP-D functions. SP-D was expressed in human bladder mucosa, and its mRNA was increased in the bladder of the UPEC infection model in mice. SP-D directly bound to UPEC and strongly agglutinated them in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Co-incubation of SP-D with UPEC decreased the bacterial adherence to 5637 cells, the human bladder cell line, and the UPEC-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, preincubation of SP-D with 5637 cells resulted in the decreased adherence of UPEC to the cells and in a reduced number of cells injured by UPEC. SP-D directly bound to UPIa and competed with FimH for UPIa binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, the exogenous administration of SP-D inhibited UPEC adherence to the bladder and dampened UPEC-induced inflammation in mice. These results support the conclusion that SP-D can protect the bladder urothelium against UPEC infection and suggest a possible function of SP-D in urinary tract.

  6. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  7. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Released by Heparanase Promotes Melanoma Cell Migration and Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuchhanda; Marchetti, Dario

    2009-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are essential components of the cell-surface and extracellular matrix which provide structural integrity and act as storage depots for growth factors and chemokines, through their heparan sulfate (HS) side chains. Heparanase is the only mammalian endoglycosidase known that cleaves HS, thus contributing to matrix degradation and cell invasion. The enzyme acts as an endo-β-D-glucuronidase resulting in HS fragments of discrete molecular weight size. Cell-surface HS is known to inhibit or stimulate tumorigenesis depending upon size and composition. We hypothesized that heparanase contributes to melanoma metastasis by generating bioactive HS from the cell-surface to facilitate biological activities of tumor cells as well as tumor microenvironment. We removed cell-surface HS from melanoma (B16B15b) by HPSE treatment and resulting fragments were isolated. Purified cell-surface HS stimulated in vitro B16B15b cell migration but not proliferation, and importantly, enhanced in vivo angiogenesis. Furthermore, melanoma cell-surface HS did not affect in vitro endothelioma cell (b.End3) migration. Our results provide direct evidence that, in addition to remodeling extracellular matrix and releasing growth factors and chemokines, HPSE contributes to aggressive phenotype of melanoma by releasing bioactive cell-surface HS fragments which can stimulate melanoma cell migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:19115257

  9. Phylogenetic Backgrounds and Virulence-Associated Traits of Escherichia coli Isolates from Surface Waters and Diverse Animals in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian D; Delavari, Parissa; Thuras, Paul; Clabots, Connie; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2017-12-15

    Possible external reservoirs for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains that cause infections in humans are poorly defined. Because of the tremendous human health importance of ExPEC infections, we assessed surface waters and domesticated and wild animals in Minnesota and Wisconsin as potential reservoirs of ExPEC of human health relevance. We characterized 595 E. coli isolates (obtained from 1999 to 2002; 280 from seven surface water sites, 315 from feces of 13 wild and domesticated animal species) for phylogroup and virulence genotype, including inferred ExPEC status, by using multiplex PCR-based methods. We also compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles of the isolates with a large private PFGE profile library. We found a predominance of non-ExPEC strains (95% and 93% among water and animal isolates, respectively), which were mainly from phylogroups A and B1, plus a minority of ExPEC strains (5% and 7% among water isolates and animal isolates, respectively), predominantly from phylogroup B2. The ExPEC strains, although significantly associated with cats, dogs, and turkeys, occurred in several additional animal species (goat, horse, chicken, pig) and were distributed broadly across all surface water sites. Virulence gene content among the animal source ExPEC isolates segregated significantly in relation to host species, following established patterns. PFGE analysis indicated that 11 study isolates closely matched (94% to 100% profile similarity) reference human clinical and fecal isolates. These findings imply what probably is a low but non-zero risk to humans from environmental and animal source E. coli isolates, especially those from specific human-associated animal species. IMPORTANCE Our detection of potentially pathogenic strains that may pose a health threat to humans among E. coli isolates from surface waters and wild and domesticated animals suggests a need for heightened attention to these reservoirs as possible

  10. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) based multichannel cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Li, Sixing; Guo, Xiang; Chan, Chung Yu; Chiang, I-Kao; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J Philip; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-11-07

    We introduce a novel microfluidic device for cell sorting in continuous flow using tunable standing surface acoustic waves. This method allows individual cells to be precisely directed into five different outlet channels in a single step. It is versatile, simple, label-free, non-invasive, and highly controllable.

  11. Biomimetic surface modification of titanium surfaces for early cell capture by advanced electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Raghunath, Michael; Chan, Casey K; Ng, Clarisse CH; Liao, Susan; Pliszka, Damian; Ramakrishna, S

    2012-01-01

    The time required for osseointegration with a metal implant having a smooth surface ranges from three to six months. We hypothesized that biomimetic coating surfaces with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/collagen fibers and nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) on the implant would enhance the adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, this surface modification of dental and bone implants might enhance the process of osseointegration. In this study, we coated PLGA or PLGA/collagen (50:50 w/w ratio) fiber on Ti disks by modified electrospinning for 5 s to 2 min; after that, we further deposited n-HA on the fibers. PLGA fibers of fiber diameter 0.957 ± 0.357 µm had a contact angle of 9.9 ± 0.3° and PLGA/collagen fibers of fiber diameter 0.378 ± 0.068 µm had a contact angle of 0°. Upon n-HA incorporation, all the fibers had a contact angle of 0° owing to the hydrophilic nature of n-HA biomolecule. The cell attachment efficiency was tested on all the scaffolds for different intervals of time (10, 20, 30 and 60 min). The alkaline phosphatase activity, cell proliferation and mineralization were analyzed on all the implant surfaces on days 7, 14 and 21. Results of the cell adhesion study indicated that the cell adhesion was maximum on the implant surface coated with PLGA/collagen fibers deposited with n-HA compared to the other scaffolds. Within a short span of 60 min, 75% of the cells adhered onto the mineralized PLGA/collagen fibers. Similarly by day 21, the rate of cell proliferation was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) on the mineralized PLGA/collagen fibers owing to enhanced cell adhesion on these fibers. This enhanced initial cell adhesion favored higher cell proliferation, differentiation and mineralization on the implant surface coated with mineralized PLGA/collagen fibers.

  12. The effects of exogenous catalase on broad-spectrum near-UV (300-400nm) treated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammartano, L.J.; Tuveson, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Catalase incorporated into plating medium protects against inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum near-ultraviolet wavelength (300-400nm) (NUV) radiation in strains of Escherichia coli. Plating medium containing catalase does not provide protection against inactivation by wavelengths in the FUV region. Catalase added to the cell suspension during or added immediately after NUV exposure also protects against inactivation. The protection provided by catalase suggests a possible role for hydrogen peroxide in the processes of inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum NUV. (author)

  13. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33......, fundamental differences were observed between the pathogenic and probiotic treatments in the Toll-like receptor pathway, especially for adapter molecules with a lowered level of transcriptional activation of MyD88, TRIF, IRAK1 and TRAF6 by probiotics compared to EHEC. The results in this study provide...

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of bacteria on microarrays at single cell levels using silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Haibo; Yang, Danting; Mircescu, Nicoleta E.; Ivleva, Natalia P.; Schwarzmeier, Kathrin; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph; Wieser, Andreas; Schubert, Sören

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for the synthesis of SERS-active silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) directly on the surface of bacteria (bacteria-AgNPs), specifically of E. coli cells. This straightforward strategy allows for the sensitive determination of bacteria on a microarray platform. Antibodies were used as selective receptors on the microarray surface. The Raman signal of bacteria-AgNPs is about 10 times higher than that obtained previously with microarrays based on mixing bacteria and AgNPs (bacteria+AgNPs). The optimum SERS enhancement of bacteria-AgNPs is obtained under 633-nm laser excitation, and this most likely is due to the plasmonic interaction of aggregated AgNPs. The method allows for an identification and quantification even of single E. coli bacteria. In our perception, this straightforward approach represents a most valuable tool for the detection of E. coli and, conceivably, of other bacteria, and thus has a large potential in environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, and in food safety and quality control. (author)

  15. Lactoferrin and lactoferrin chimera inhibit damage caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in HEp-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores-Villaseñor, H.; Canizalez-Román, A.; de la Garza, M.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Leon-Sicairos, N.

    2012-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is an important cause of infant diarrhea in developing countries. It produces a characteristic intestinal histopathological lesion on enterocytes known as ‘attaching and effacing’ (A/E), and these two steps are mediated by a type-III secretory system. In the

  16. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and rectoanal junction cell interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction. Cattle are the primary E. coli O157 (O157) reservoir and principal source of human infection. The anatomical site of O157 persistence is the bovine recto-anal (RAJ) junction; hence, an in-depth understanding of O157-RAJ interactions will help develop novel modalities to limit O157 in c...

  17. On-Line Monitoring the Growth of E. coli or HeLa Cells Using an Annular Microelectrode Piezoelectric Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Feifei; Lian, Yan; Han, Junliang

    2016-12-18

    Biological information is obtained from the interaction between the series detection electrode and the organism or the physical field of biological cultures in the non-mass responsive piezoelectric biosensor. Therefore, electric parameter of the electrode will affect the biosensor signal. The electric field distribution of the microelectrode used in this study was simulated using the COMSOL Multiphysics analytical tool. This process showed that the electric field spatial distribution is affected by the width of the electrode finger or the space between the electrodes. In addition, the characteristic response of the piezoelectric sensor constructed serially with an annular microelectrode was tested and applied for the continuous detection of Escherichia coli culture or HeLa cell culture. Results indicated that the piezoelectric biosensor with an annular microelectrode meets the requirements for the real-time detection of E. coli or HeLa cells in culture. Moreover, this kind of piezoelectric biosensor is more sensitive than the sensor with an interdigital microelectrode. Thus, the piezoelectric biosensor acts as an effective analysis tool for acquiring online cell or microbial culture information.

  18. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  19. The Comparative Investigation of Gene Mutation Induction in {\\it Bacillus subtilis} and {\\it Escherichia coli} Cells after Irradiation by Different LET Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, A V

    2005-01-01

    The data of mutagenic action of ionizing radiation with different physical characteristics on bacterial cells with various genotypes are presented. It was shown that regularities of inducible mutagenesis in {\\it Bacillus subtilis} and {\\it E.coli} are consimilar. The dose-response dependence for both types of cells is described by the linear-quadratic function. The RBE on LET relationship has a local maximum at 20 keV/$\\mu $m. The crucial role in inducible mutagenesis in {\\it E.coli} and {\\it Bacillus subtilis} cells is played by the error-prone $SOS$-repair.

  20. Shape Changes and Interaction Mechanism of Escherichia coli Cells Treated with Sericin and Use of a Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui; Liu, Yalong; Zhang, Qingsong; Liang, Congcong; Qin, Huazhen; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Li; Wei, Yen

    2016-08-01

    To verify the interaction mechanism between sericin and Escherichia coli, especially the morphological and structural changes in the bacterial cells, the antimicrobial activity of sericin against E. coli as a model for Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. The antibacterial activity of sericin on E. coli and the interaction mechanism were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, integrity, and morphology of the bacterial cells following treatment with sericin. The changes in morphology and cellular compositions of bacterial cells treated with sericin were observed by an inverted fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Changes in electrical conductivity, total sugar concentration of the broth for the bacteria, and protein expression of the bacteria were determined to investigate the permeability of the cell membrane. A sericin-based hydrogel was prepared for an in vivo study of wound dressing. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of the hydrogel increased with the increase in the concentration of sericin from 10 g/liter to 40 g/liter. The introduction of sericin induces membrane blebbing of E. coli cells caused by antibiotic action on the cell membrane. The cytoplasm shrinkage phenomenon was accompanied by blurring of the membrane wall boundaries. When E. coli cells were treated with sericin, release of intracellular components quickly increased. The electrical conductivity assay indicated that the charged ions are reduced after exposure to sericin so that the integrity of the cell membrane is weakened and metabolism is blocked. In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that sericin hinders the expression of bacterial protein. Sericin may damage the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane, thereby eventually inhibiting the growth and reproduction of E. coli Compared to sterile gauze, the sericin-based hydrogel promoted fibroblast cell

  1. Escherichia coli NemA is an efficient chromate reductase that can be biologically immobilized to provide a cell free system for remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Robins

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is a serious and widespread environmental pollutant. Although many bacteria have been identified that can transform highly water-soluble and toxic Cr(VI to insoluble and relatively non-toxic Cr(III, bacterial bioremediation of Cr(VI pollution is limited by a number of issues, in particular chromium toxicity to the remediating cells. To address this we sought to develop an immobilized enzymatic system for Cr(VI remediation. To identify novel Cr(VI reductase enzymes we first screened cell extracts from an Escherichia coli library of soluble oxidoreductases derived from a range of bacteria, but found that a number of these enzymes can reduce Cr(VI indirectly, via redox intermediates present in the crude extracts. Instead, activity assays for 15 candidate enzymes purified as His6-tagged proteins identified E. coli NemA as a highly efficient Cr(VI reductase (k(cat/K(M= 1.1×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 with NADH as cofactor. Fusion of nemA to the polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene phaC from Ralstonia eutropha enabled high-level biosynthesis of functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate granules displaying stable and active NemA on their surface. When these granules were combined with either Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase or Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase as a cofactor regenerating partner, high levels of chromate transformation were observed with only low initial concentrations of expensive NADH cofactor being required, the overall reaction being powered by consumption of the cheap sacrificial substrates glucose or formic acid, respectively. This system therefore offers promise as an economic solution for ex situ Cr(VI remediation.

  2. Tannins from barks of Pinus caribaea protect Escherichia coli cells against DNA damage induced by gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, J L; Vernhe, M; Cuetara, E B; Sánchez-Lamar, A; Santana, J L; Llagostera, M

    2006-02-01

    This work was aimed to evaluate genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity activity against gamma-rays of a tannin fraction obtained from barks of Pinus caribaea, as well as to elucidate the antigenotoxic mechanisms involved in radioprotection by using different approaches as pre-, co- and post-irradiation cell treatments with plant extract. The tannin fraction was not genotoxic to Escherichia coli cells in experiments using different exposure times. This extract was antigenotoxic against gamma-rays when the cells were pre- or co-treated with this extracts, but not during post-irradiation treatments, suggesting a possibly antigenotoxic action through free radical scavenging mechanisms. The results are discussed in relation to the chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of the studied plant species.

  3. TGATG vector: a new expression system for cloned foreign genes in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashko, S V; Veiko, V P; Lapidus, A L; Lebedeva, M I; Mochulsky, A V; Shechter, I I; Trukhan, M E; Ratmanova, K I; Rebentish, B A; Kaluzhsky, V E

    1990-03-30

    A TGATG vector system was developed that allows for the construction of hybrid operons with partially overlapping genes, employing the effects of translational coupling to optimize expression of cloned cistrons in Escherichia coli. In this vector system (plasmid pPR-TGATG-1), the coding region of a foreign gene is attached to the ATG codon situated on the vector, to form the hybrid operon transcribed from the phage lambda PR promoter. The cloned gene is the distal cistron of this hybrid operon ('overlappon'). The efficiently translated cro'-cat'-'trpE hybrid cistron is proximal to the promoter. The coding region of this artificial fused cistron [the length of the corresponding open reading frame is about 120 amino acids (aa)] includes the following: the N-terminal portions of phage lambda Cro protein (20 aa), the CAT protein of E. coli (72 aa) and 3' C-terminal codons of the E. coli trpE gene product. At the 3'-end of the cro'-cat'-'trpE fused cistron there is a region for efficient translation reinitiation: a Shine-Dalgarno sequence of the E. coli trpD gene and the overlapping stop and start codons (TGATG). In this sequence, the last G is the first nucleotide of the unique SacI-recognition site (GAGCT decreases C) and so integration of the structural part of the foreign gene into the vector plasmid may be performed using blunt-end DNA linking after the treatment of pPR-TGATG-1 with SacI and E. coli DNA polymerase I or its Klenow fragment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Influence of engineered surface on cell directionality and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Qing Yuan; Pang, Stella W; Tong, Wing Yin; Shi, Peng; Lam, Yun Wah; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Control of cell migration is important in numerous key biological processes, and is implicated in pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. Many previous studies indicated that cell migration could be guided by micropatterns fabricated on cell culture surfaces. In this study, we designed a polydimethylsiloxane cell culture substrate with gratings punctuated by corners and ends, and studied its effects on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. MC3T3-E1 cells elongated and aligned with the gratings, and the migration paths of the cells appeared to be guided by the grating pattern. Interestingly, more than 88% of the cells cultured on these patterns were observed to reverse their migration directions at least once during the 16 h examination period. Most of the reversal events occurred at the corners and the ends of the pattern, suggesting these localized topographical features induce an abrupt loss in directional persistence. Moreover, the cell speed was observed to increase temporarily right after each directional reversal. Focal adhesion complexes were more well-established in cells on the angular gratings than on flat surfaces, but the formation of filipodia appeared to be imbalanced at the corners and the ends, possibly leading to the loss of directional persistence. This study describes the first engineered cell culture surface that consistently induces changes in the directional persistence of adherent cells. This will provide an experimental model for the study of this phenomenon and a valuable platform to control the cell motility and directionality, which can be used for cell screening and selection. (paper)

  5. Cell surface topology creates high Ca2+ signalling microdomains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Olsen, Lars Folke; Hallett, Maurice B

    2010-01-01

    20 microM Ca2+ to be activated. In this paper, we have resolved this apparent paradox by showing that the surface topology of cells represents an important and hitherto unrecognized feature for generating microdomains of high Ca2+ in cells. We show that whereas the standard modeling assumption...... of a smooth cell surface predicts only moderate localized effects, the more realistic "wrinkled" surface topology predicts that Ca2+ concentrations up to 80 microM can persist within the folds of membranes for significant times. This intra-wrinkle location may account for 5% of the total cell volume. Using......-wrinkle location is also a strategic location at which Ca2+ acts as a regulator of the cortical cytoskeleton and plasma membrane expansion....

  6. Cell adhesion and growth on ion-implanted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Suk; Kaibara, M.; Iwaki, M.; Sasabe, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Kusakabe, M.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion and growth of endothelial cells on ion-implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane surface were investigated. Ions of Na + , N 2 + , O 2 + , Ar + and Kr + were implanted to the polymer surface with ion fluences between 1 x 10 15 and 3 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at energy of 150 KeV at room temperature. Ion-implanted polymers were characterized by FT-IR-ATR an Raman spectroscopies. The adhesion and proliferation of bovine aorta endothelial cells on ion-implanted polymer surface were observed by an optical microscope. The rate of growth of BAECs on ion-implanted PSt was faster than that on non-implanted PSt. Complete cell adhesion and growth were observed on ion-implanted SPU, whereas the adhesion and growth of BAECs on the non-implanted SPU was not observed. It was attempted to control the cell culture on the ion-implanted domain fabricated using a mask. (author)

  7. Asymmetric constriction of dividing Escherichia coli cells induced by expression of a fusion between two min proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells; Margolin, William

    2014-06-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion.

  8. Full Length Amelogenin Binds to Cell Surface LAMP-1 on Tooth Root/Periodontium Associated Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Tompkins, Kevin; Garrigues, Jacques; Snead, Malcolm L.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) has been suggested to be a cell surface receptor for a specific amelogenin isoform, leucine-rich amelogenin peptide or LRAP. However, it is unclear if LAMP-1 is an amelogenin receptor for dental mesenchymal cells. The goal of this study was to determine if LAMP-1 serves as a cell surface binding site for full length amelogenin on tooth root/periodontium associated mesenchymal cells. Design Murine dental follicle cells and cementoblasts (OCCM-30) were cultured for 2 days followed by addition of full length recombinant mouse amelogenin, rp(H)M180. Dose-response (0 to 100 μg/ml) and time course (0 to 120 minutes) assays were performed to determine the optimal conditions for live cell surface binding using immuno-fluorescent microscopy. A competitive binding assay was performed to determine binding specificity by adding Emdogain (1 mg/ml) to the media. An antibody against LAMP-1 was used to detect the location of LAMP-1 on the cell surface and the pattern was compared to cell surface bound amelogenin. Both amelogenin and cell surface LAMP-1 were immuno-co-localized to compare the amount and distribution pattern. Results Maximum surface binding was achieved with 50 μg/ml of rp(H)M180 for 120 minutes. This binding was specific as demonstrated by competitive inhibition (79% lower) with the addition of Emdogain. The binding pattern for rp(H)M180 was similar to the distribution of surface LAMP-1 on dental follicle cells and cementoblasts. The high co-localization coefficient (0.92) for rp(H)M180 and LAMP-1 supports rp(H)M180 binding to cell surface LAMP-1. Conclusions The data from this study suggest that LAMP-1 can serve as a cell surface binding site for amelogenin on dental follicle cells and cementoblasts. PMID:20382373

  9. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-10-13

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis , permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218's effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  10. Surface Passivation Studies on n+pp+ Bifacial Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaila Sepeai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bifacial solar cell is a specially designed solar cell for the production of electricity from both sides of the solar cell. It is an active field of research to make photovoltaics (PV more competitive by increasing its efficiency and lowering its costs. We developed an n+pp+ structure for the bifacial solar cell. The fabrication used phosphorus-oxy-trichloride (POCl3 diffusion to form the emitter and Al diffusion using conventional screen printing to produce the back surface field (BSF. The n+pp+ bifacial solar cell was a sandwiched structure of antireflective coatings on both sides, Argentum (Ag as a front contact and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al as a back contact. This paper reports the solar cell performance with different surface passivation or antireflecting coatings (ARC. Silicon nitride (SiN deposited by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD, thermally grown silicon dioxide (SiO2, PECVD-SiO2, and SiO2/SiN stack were used as ARC. The efficiency obtained for the best bifacial solar cell having SiN as the ARC is 8.32% for front surface illumination and 3.21% for back surface illumination.

  11. Cell-Surface Proteomics Identifies Lineage-Specific Markers of Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rugg-Gunn, Peter J.; Cox, Brian J.; Lanner, Fredrik; Sharma, Parveen; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; McDonald, Angela C.H.; Garner, Jodi; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Rossant, Janet; Kislinger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary The advent of reprogramming and its impact on stem cell biology has renewed interest in lineage restriction in mammalian embryos, the source of embryonic (ES), epiblast (EpiSC), trophoblast (TS), and extraembryonic endoderm (XEN) stem cell lineages. Isolation of specific cell types during stem cell differentiation and reprogramming, and also directly from embryos, is a major technical challenge because few cell-surface proteins are known that can distinguish each cell type. We provide...

  12. Anisotropic cell growth-regulated surface micropatterns in flower petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flower petals have not only diverse macroscopic morphologies but are rich in microscopic surface patterns, which are crucial to their biological functions. Both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis are conducted to reveal the physical mechanisms underlying the formation of minute wrinkles on flower petals. Three representative flowers, daisy, kalanchoe blossfeldiana, and Eustoma grandiflorum, are investigated as examples. A surface wrinkling model, incorporating the measured mechanical properties and growth ratio, is used to elucidate the difference in their surface morphologies. The mismatch between the anisotropic epidermal cell growth and the isotropic secretion of surficial wax is found to dictate the surface patterns.

  13. Global transcriptional response of Escherichia coli MG1655 cells exposed to the oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pérez-Sáez, Elisa; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2017-09-18

    DNA microarrays were used to study the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by carvacrol and citral. After 10-min treatments of Escherichia coli MG1655 cells with 100 and 50ppm of carvacrol and citral, 76 and 156 genes demonstrated significant transcriptional differences (p≤0.05), respectively. Among the up-regulated genes after carvacrol treatment, we found gene coding for multidrug efflux pumps (acrA, mdtM), genes related to phage shock response (pspA, pspB, pspC, pspD, pspF and pspG), biosynthesis of arginine (argC, argG, artJ), and purine nucleotides (purC, purM). In citral-treated cells, transcription of purH and pyrB and pyrI was 2 times higher. Deletion of several differentially expressed genes confirmed the role of ygaV, yjbO, pspC, sdhA, yejG and ygaV in the mechanisms of E. coli inactivation by carvacrol and citral. These results would indicate that citral and carvacrol treatments cause membrane damage and activate metabolism through the production of nucleotides required for DNA and RNA synthesis and metabolic processes. Comparative transcriptomics of the response of E. coli to a heat treatment, which caused a significant change of the transcription of 1422 genes, revealed a much weaker response to both individual constituents of essential oils (ICs).·Thus, inactivation by citral or carvacrol was not multitarget in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Taurolidine antiadhesive properties on interaction with E. coli; its transformation in biological environment and interaction with bacteria cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Francesco; Darnowski, James W; Opazo, Cristian; Goldberg, Alexander; Kishore, Nina; Agoston, Elin S; Rossi, Miriam

    2010-01-28

    The taurine amino-acid derivative, taurolidine, bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiabiazinyl-4)methane, shows broad antibacterial action against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria and some clinically relevant fungi. It inhibits, in vitro, the adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. Taurolidine is unstable in aqueous solution and breaks down into derivatives which are thought to be responsible for the biological activity. To understand the taurolidine antibacterial mechanism of action, we provide the experimental single crystal X-ray diffraction results together with theoretical methods to characterize the hydrolysis/decomposition reactions of taurolidine. The crystal structure features two independent molecules linked through intermolecular H-bonds with one of them somewhat positively charged. Taurolidine in a biological environment exists in equilibrium with taurultam derivatives and this is described theoretically as a 2-step process without an energy barrier: formation of cationic taurolidine followed by a nucleophilic attack of O(hydroxyl) on the exocyclic C(methylene). A concerted mechanism describes the further hydrolysis of the taurolidine derivative methylol-taurultam. The interaction of methylol-taurultam with the diaminopimelic NH(2) group in the E. coli bacteria cell wall (peptidoglycan) has a negative DeltaG value (-38.2 kcal/mol) but a high energy barrier (45.8 kcal/mol) suggesting no reactivity. On the contrary, taurolidine docking into E. coli fimbriae protein, responsible for bacteria adhesion to the bladder epithelium, shows it has higher affinity than mannose (the natural substrate), whereas methylol-taurultam and taurultam are less tightly bound. Since taurolidine is readily available because it is administered in high doses after peritonitis surgery, it may successfully compete with mannose explaining its effectiveness against bacterial infections at laparoscopic lesions.

  15. Taurolidine antiadhesive properties on interaction with E. coli; its transformation in biological environment and interaction with bacteria cell wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caruso

    Full Text Available The taurine amino-acid derivative, taurolidine, bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiabiazinyl-4methane, shows broad antibacterial action against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria and some clinically relevant fungi. It inhibits, in vitro, the adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. Taurolidine is unstable in aqueous solution and breaks down into derivatives which are thought to be responsible for the biological activity. To understand the taurolidine antibacterial mechanism of action, we provide the experimental single crystal X-ray diffraction results together with theoretical methods to characterize the hydrolysis/decomposition reactions of taurolidine. The crystal structure features two independent molecules linked through intermolecular H-bonds with one of them somewhat positively charged. Taurolidine in a biological environment exists in equilibrium with taurultam derivatives and this is described theoretically as a 2-step process without an energy barrier: formation of cationic taurolidine followed by a nucleophilic attack of O(hydroxyl on the exocyclic C(methylene. A concerted mechanism describes the further hydrolysis of the taurolidine derivative methylol-taurultam. The interaction of methylol-taurultam with the diaminopimelic NH(2 group in the E. coli bacteria cell wall (peptidoglycan has a negative DeltaG value (-38.2 kcal/mol but a high energy barrier (45.8 kcal/mol suggesting no reactivity. On the contrary, taurolidine docking into E. coli fimbriae protein, responsible for bacteria adhesion to the bladder epithelium, shows it has higher affinity than mannose (the natural substrate, whereas methylol-taurultam and taurultam are less tightly bound. Since taurolidine is readily available because it is administered in high doses after peritonitis surgery, it may successfully compete with mannose explaining its effectiveness against bacterial infections at

  16. Molecular Characterization, Antimicrobial Resistance and Caco-2 Cell Invasion Potential of Campylobacter jejuni/coli from Young Children with Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haijian; Ge, Yanling; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Jianmin; Kuang, Dai; Yang, Xiaowei; Su, Xudong; Huang, Zheng; Shi, Xianming; Xu, Xuebin; Meng, Jianghong

    2016-03-01

    Campylobacter is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Young children represent a particular age group affected by Campylobacter infection because of their limited diets and weak immune systems. In this study, a total of 110 Campylobacter (80 Campylobacter jejuni and 30 Campylobacter coli) isolated from children younger than 5 years of age with diarrhea in Shanghai, China in 2011 were examined for their genetic relationship and antimicrobial susceptibility. The presence of virulence genes and its association with invasion potential in Caco-2 cell were also determined. Multilocus sequence typing revealed 62 sequence types (STs) under 14 clonal complexes from C. jejuni and 15 STs under 2 clonal complexes from C. coli. High resistance rates among the 110 isolates were observed to nalidixic acid (88.2%), ciprofloxacin (87.3%) and tetracycline (87.3%), followed by ampicillin (30.9%), gentamicin (28.2%), clindamycin (21.8%), erythromycin (21.8%) and chloramphenicol (8.2%). Compared with that of C. jejuni (32.5%), a larger proportion of C. coli (83.3%) were resistant to multiple antimicrobials, including 16 isolates of ST-828 complex resistant to 6 antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Furthermore, 57 Campylobacter isolates were selected based on their distinct STs and the presence of virulence genes to determine their abilities to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. The level of invasion varied widely among isolates and had relatively weak correlation with the genotype data. Our findings provided baseline data on Campylobacter among young children. Active surveillance of Campylobacter is needed to better understand the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance trends of this significant pathogen to help control and protect young children from such infections.

  17. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  18. Enhanced anti-proliferative efficacy of epothilone B loaded with Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts on the HeLa cells by mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenxing; Hao, Lujiang; Liu, Xinli; Orlando, Borrás-Hidalgo; Zhang, Yuyu

    2018-03-20

    Epothilones constitute a new class of microtubule-stabilizing anti-cancer agents with promising preclinical and clinical activity. However, its systemic application still causes some toxic side effects. To reduce these undesired effects, advanced drug delivery systems based on cell targeting carriers are needed currently. In this study, the high quality bacterial ghosts of the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were prepared in a large scale and retained fully intact surface structures for specific attachment to mammalian cells. The EcN ghosts could be efficiently loaded with the low hydrophilic drug Epothilone B (Epo B) and the maximal load efficiency was approximately 2.5% (w/w). Cytotoxicity assays revealed that Epo B-ghosts exhibited enhanced anti-proliferative properties on the HeLa cells. The Epo B associated with EcN ghosts was more cytotoxic at least 10 times than the free Epo B at the same concentrations. Apoptosis assays showed that both Epo B-ghosts and free Epo B induced time course-dependent apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells, respectively. While the former induced more apoptosis and necrosis than the latter. Furthermore, the cytochrome C release and the activation of caspase-3 were more remarkable after treatment with the Epo B-ghosts compared to the free Epo B, which implied that Epo B-ghosts might more effectively induce the apoptosis mediated by mitochondrial pathway in HeLa cells. Therefore, the higher anti-proliferative effects of the Epo B-ghosts on the HeLa cells were mediated by mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. The EcN ghosts may provide a useful drug delivery carrier for drug candidates in cancer therapy.

  19. Synthesis of a Bacillus subtilis small, acid-soluble spore protein in Escherichia coli causes cell DNA to assume some characteristics of spore DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, B.; Hand, A.R.; Setlow, P.

    1991-01-01

    Small, acid-soluble proteins (SASP) of the alpha/beta-type are associated with DNA in spores of Bacillus subtilis. Induction of synthesis of alpha/beta-type SASP in Escherichia coli resulted in rapid cessation of DNA synthesis, followed by a halt in RNA and then protein accumulation, although significant mRNA and protein synthesis continued. There was a significant loss in viability associated with SASP synthesis in E. coli: recA+ cells became extremely long filaments, whereas recA mutant cells became less filamentous. The nucleoids of cells with alpha/beta-type SASP were extremely condensed, as viewed in both light and electron microscopes, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that the alpha/beta-type SASP were associated with the cell DNA. Induction of alpha/beta-type SASP synthesis in E. coli increased the negative superhelical density of plasmid DNA by approximately 20%; UV irradiation of E. coli with alpha/beta-type SASP gave reduced yields of thymine dimers but significant amounts of the spore photoproduct. These changes in E. coli DNA topology and photochemistry due to alpha/beta-type SASP are similar to the effects of alpha/beta-type SASP on the DNA in Bacillus spores, further suggesting that alpha/beta-type SASP are a major factor determining DNA properties in bacterial spores

  20. [Binding of the antileukemia drug Escherichia coli L-asparaginase to the plasma membrane of normal human mononuclear cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Vianco, L; Arenas-Díaz, G

    1999-06-01

    To demonstrate that the enzyme L-asparaginase from Escherichia coli (EcA) binds to the plasma membranes of normal human lymphocytes and monocytes. Lymphocytes and monocytes were isolated from heparinized blood samples which came from healthy volunteer donors. The cells were incubated with EcA to detect a possible binding of the enzyme to the mononuclear cells by indirect immunofluorescence using confocal microscopy. Meanwhile, ultracentrifugation was used to obtain the erythrocyte ghost microsomal fraction (P100) which was then analyzed by Western blotting to determine if EcA binds the lipid bilayer unspecifically. For the immunoassays, monospecific polyclonal antibodies were obtained from ascitic tumors developed in mice immunized with commercial L-asparaginase. EcA bins the lymphocyte and monocyte plasma membranes. In monocytes, there occurs a capping phenomenon, that is, the accumulation of fluorescent marker in one region. The image analyzer highlights it clearly at a depth of 3.8 microns. This binding would be unspecific, that is, there is no mediation of a specific receptor that binds EcA. This arises from the ability of the enzyme to bind to the membranes of erythrocyte ghost, as evidenced by the ability of the molecule to associate with a hydrophobic medium. The antibodies against EcA obtained from ascitic tumours developed in mice do not show cross reactivity with Na+/K+ ATPase, aspartate aminotransferase, nor with extracts of blood cells, which would make it a specific tool for the detection of EcA in whole cells and in homogenates electrotransfered to nitrocellulose membranes. L-asparaginase from E. coli behaves as a lipoprotein due to its ability to insert itself into hydrophobic environments, in which it resembles an isozyme present in T. pyriformis. The binding of this enzyme to lymphocytes and monocytes, demonstrated in this work, would permit the modification of the antileukemic treatment injecting doses of EcA bound to patient's own isolated immune

  1. Micropatterned Azopolymer Surfaces Modulate Cell Mechanics and Cytoskeleton Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Radmacher, Manfred; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-30

    Physical and chemical characteristics of materials are important regulators of cell behavior. In particular, cell elasticity is a fundamental parameter that reflects the state of a cell. Surface topography finely modulates cell fate and function via adhesion mediated signaling and cytoskeleton generated forces. However, how topographies alter cell mechanics is still unclear. In this work we have analyzed the mechanical properties of peripheral and nuclear regions of NIH-3T3 cells on azopolymer substrates with different topographic patterns. Micrometer scale patterns in the form of parallel ridges or square lattices of surface elevations were encoded on light responsive azopolymer films by means of contactless optical methods. Cell mechanics was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells and consequently the cell cytoskeleton were oriented along the linear patterns affecting cytoskeletal structures, e.g., formation of actin stress fibers. Our data demonstrate that topographic substrate patterns are recognized by cells and mechanical information is transferred by the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, cytoskeleton generated forces deform the nucleus, changing its morphology that appears to be related to different mechanical properties in the nuclear region.

  2. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli translocate Tir and form an intimin-Tir intimate attachment to red blood cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Robert K; Daniell, Sarah; Frankel, Gad; Knutton, Stuart

    2002-05-01

    Type III secretion allows bacteria to inject effector proteins into host cells. In enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) the type III secreted protein, Tir, is translocated to the host-cell plasma membrane where it functions as a receptor for the bacterial adhesin intimin, leading to intimate bacterial attachment and "attaching and effacing" (A/E) lesion formation. To study EPEC type III secretion the interaction of EPEC with monolayers of red blood cells (RBCs) has been exploited and in a recent study [Shaw, R. K., Daniell, S., Ebel, F., Frankel, G. & Knutton, S. (2001 ). Cell Microbiol 3, 213-222] it was shown that EPEC induced haemolysis of RBCs and translocation of EspD, a putative pore-forming type III secreted protein in the RBC membrane. Here it is demonstrated that EPEC are able to translocate and correctly insert Tir into the RBC membrane and produce an intimin-Tir intimate bacterial attachment, identical to that seen in A/E lesions. Following translocation Tir did not undergo any change in apparent molecular mass or become tyrosine-phosphorylated and there was no focusing of RBC cytoskeletal actin beneath intimately adherent bacteria, and no pedestal formation. This study, employing an RBC model of infection, has demonstrated that Tir translocation can be separated from host-cell-mediated Tir modifications; the data show that the EPEC type III protein translocation apparatus is sufficient to deliver and correctly insert Tir into host-cell membranes independent of eukaryotic cell functions.

  3. Forces due to surface water measured by force microscopy. Consequences for anchoring biological cells to surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilcher, K.

    1997-05-01

    Interaction forces in 'Scanning Force Microscopy' (SFM). Force curves revealed exponentially decaying, attractive forces between silicon tip and silicon sample in aqueous media. Replacing the silicon sample by a sheet of mica, the interaction forces had both, an attractive and a repulsive component. Addition of salts generally reduced the forces. At 500 mM salt concentration, the attractive force became quantized with a residual force value of 23 pN. The attractive force is attributed to the gain in energy of water molecules which are released from surface water into free water during tip-sample approach. This conclusion is supported by a statistical model. The repulsive force contribution in the case of mica, is caused by hydration forces due to the spatial organization of crystalline water on the mica surface. Anchoring of biological cells. Molecular resolution of cell surfaces by SFM requires cell anchoring without interference with cell physiology. For this a novel strategy, 'hydrophobic anchoring' was designed. It avoids strong attractive forces between cell and by using a flexible spacer molecule. It establishes anchoring by a lipid (bound to the spacer), which weakly interacts with the hydrophobic core of the cell membrane. The method was subjected to tests using RBL-2H3, CH0 αβ and HEK-293 cells. The strength of cell anchoring was assayed by shear forces. In all cases 'hydrophobic anchoring' via a spacer caused elective anchoring much beyond controls. Such cell anchoring was employed for the imaging of RBL-2H3 cells by SFM. Images showed considerable finer details than images of loosely adsorbed cells. With about 50 rim resolution, SFM succeeded in imaging microvilli, filopodia, single cytoskeletal fibers (microtubules, microfilaments) and vesicles. In addition, as a consequence of cell stimulation upon ionomycin treatment, lamellae formation and the appearance of secretory granules on top of them were observed which indicates the viability of anchored

  4. De novo designed proteins from a library of artificial sequences function in Escherichia coli and enable cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Fisher

    Full Text Available A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >10(6 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains--ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes--were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions can be sustained by sequences designed de novo.

  5. Application of various surface passivation layers in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Soo Hong

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have used different techniques for surface passivation: conventional thermal oxidation (CTO), rapid thermal oxidation (RTO), and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The surface passivation qualities of eight different single and combined double layers have been investigated both on phosphorus non-diffused p-type Float Zone (FZ) silicon wafers and on diffused emitters (100 Ω/□ and 40 Ω/□). CTO/SiN 1 passivates very well not only on a non-diffused surface (τ eff = 1361 μs) but also on an emitter (τ eff = 414 μs). However, we concluded that RTO/SiN 1 and RTO/SiN 2 stacks were more suitable than CTO/SiN stacks for surface passivation in solar cells since those stacks had relatively good passivation qualities and suitable optical reflections. RTO/SiN 1 for rear-surface passivation and RTO/SiN 2 for front-surface passivation were applied to the fabrication of solar cells. We achieved efficiencies of 18.5 % and 18.8 % on 0.5 Ω-cm (FZ) silicon with planar and textured front surfaces, respectively. An excellent open circuit voltage (V oc ) of 675.6 mV was obtained for the planar cell.

  6. Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinton Jay CD

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aging process of bacteria in stationary phase is halted if cells are subcultured and enter lag phase and it is then followed by cellular division. Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells and 16 days (old cells. Results A genome scale network was constructed for E. coli K-12 by connecting genes with operons, transcription and sigma factors, metabolic pathways and cell functional categories. Most of the transcriptional changes were detected immediately upon entering lag phase and were maintained throughout this period. The lag period was longer for older cells and the analysis of the transcriptome revealed different intracellular activity in young and old cells. The number of genes differentially expressed was smaller in old cells (186 than in young cells (467. Relatively, few genes (62 were up- or down-regulated in both cultures. Transcription of genes related to osmotolerance, acid resistance, oxidative stress and adaptation to other stresses was down-regulated in both young and old cells. Regarding carbohydrate metabolism, genes related to the citrate cycle were up-regulated in young cells while old cells up-regulated the Entner Doudoroff and gluconate pathways and down-regulated the pentose phosphate pathway. In both old and young cells, anaerobic respiration and fermentation pathways were down-regulated, but only young cells up-regulated aerobic respiration while there was no evidence of aerobic respiration in old cells. Numerous genes related to DNA maintenance and replication, translation, ribosomal biosynthesis and RNA processing as well as biosynthesis of the cell envelope and flagellum and several components of the chemotaxis signal transduction complex were up-regulated only in young cells. The genes for several transport proteins for iron compounds were up-regulated in both young

  7. Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pin, Carmen

    2009-11-16

    Abstract Background The aging process of bacteria in stationary phase is halted if cells are subcultured and enter lag phase and it is then followed by cellular division. Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells) and 16 days (old cells). Results A genome scale network was constructed for E. coli K-12 by connecting genes with operons, transcription and sigma factors, metabolic pathways and cell functional categories. Most of the transcriptional changes were detected immediately upon entering lag phase and were maintained throughout this period. The lag period was longer for older cells and the analysis of the transcriptome revealed different intracellular activity in young and old cells. The number of genes differentially expressed was smaller in old cells (186) than in young cells (467). Relatively, few genes (62) were up- or down-regulated in both cultures. Transcription of genes related to osmotolerance, acid resistance, oxidative stress and adaptation to other stresses was down-regulated in both young and old cells. Regarding carbohydrate metabolism, genes related to the citrate cycle were up-regulated in young cells while old cells up-regulated the Entner Doudoroff and gluconate pathways and down-regulated the pentose phosphate pathway. In both old and young cells, anaerobic respiration and fermentation pathways were down-regulated, but only young cells up-regulated aerobic respiration while there was no evidence of aerobic respiration in old cells. Numerous genes related to DNA maintenance and replication, translation, ribosomal biosynthesis and RNA processing as well as biosynthesis of the cell envelope and flagellum and several components of the chemotaxis signal transduction complex were up-regulated only in young cells. The genes for several transport proteins for iron compounds were up-regulated in both young and old cells

  8. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in vitro and on the surface of spinach leaves by biobased surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of biosurfactants on the populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in suspension and on spinach leaves. Eight surfactants including four soybean oil-based biosurfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), sopho...

  9. [Expression of the genes for lysine biosynthesis of Bacillus subtilis in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, T N; Okunev, O V; Aleksieva, Z M; Maliuta, S S

    1984-01-01

    Hybrid plasmids pLRS33 and pLRB4 containing Bac. subtilis genes coding lysin biosynthesis were subjected to genetical analysis. It is shown that after pLRS33- and pLRB4- transformation of E. coli strains, auxotrophic relative to lysin and diaminopimelic acid, there occurs complementation of dapA, dapB, dapC, dapD, dapE, lysA mutations by plasmid pLRS33 and of dapC, dapB, lysA mutations by plasmid pLRB4. The plasmids are studied for their influence on the level of lysin and its precurror synthesis in E. coli strains.

  10. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Zachary, E-mail: zstickney@scu.edu; Losacco, Joseph, E-mail: jlosacco@scu.edu; McDevitt, Sophie, E-mail: smmcdevitt@scu.edu; Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zzhang@scu.edu; Lu, Biao, E-mail: blu2@scu.edu

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  11. Clinical manufacturing of recombinant human interleukin 15. I. Production cell line development and protein expression in E. coli with stop codon optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Vinay V; Esposito, Dominic; Sumpter, Terry L; Broadt, Trevor L; Hartley, James; Knapp, George C; Cheng, Wei; Jiang, Man-Shiow; Roach, John M; Yang, Xiaoyi; Giardina, Steven L; Mitra, George; Yovandich, Jason L; Creekmore, Stephen P; Waldmann, Thomas A; Zhu, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) has shown remarkable biological properties of promoting NK- and T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as enhancing antitumor immunity of CD8(+) T cells in preclinical models. Here, we report the development of an E. coli cell line to express recombinant human Interleukin-15 (rhIL-15) for clinical manufacturing. Human IL-15 cDNA sequence was inserted into a pET28b plasmid and expressed in several E. coli BL21 strains. Through product quality comparisons among several E. coli strains, including E. coli BL21(DE3), BL21(DE3)pLysS, BLR(DE3)pLysS, and BL21-AI, E. coli BL21-AI was selected for clinical manufacturing. Expression optimization was carried out at shake flask and 20-L fermenter scales, and the product was expressed as inclusion bodies that were solubilized, refolded, and purified to yield active rhIL-15. Stop codons of the expression construct were further investigated after 15-20% of the purified rhIL-15 showed an extraneous peak corresponding to an extra tryptophan residue based on peptide mapping and mass spectrometry analysis. It was determined that the presence of an extra tryptophan was due to a stop codon wobble effect, which could be eliminated by replacing TGA (opal) stop codon with TAA (ochre). As a novel strategy, a simple method of demonstrating lack of tRNA suppressors in the production host cells was developed to validate the cells in this study. The E. coli BL21-AI cells containing the rhIL-15 coding sequence with a triplet stop codon TAATAATGA were banked for further clinical manufacturing. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  12. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Zilm, Peter S; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark; Gronthos, Stan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein "spots" were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population.

  13. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population.

  14. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...... sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from...

  15. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigeno, Yuta [Division of Applied Biology, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan); Uchiumi, Toshio [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Nomura, Takaomi, E-mail: nomurat@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biology, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan)

    2016-04-22

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  16. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Nomura, Takaomi

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  17. Relationships between cell surface insulin binding and endocytosis in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochen, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Chymotrypsin substrate analogues, such as N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester, have recently been demonstrated to inhibit the endocytic uptake of insulin in isolated rat adipocytes. In this study, the effect of N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester on cell surface insulin binding and dissociation were examined. Surface-bound 125 I-insulin was distinguished from intracellular 125 I-insulin by the sensitivity of the former to rapid dissociation with an acidic buffer. Plateau levels of surface-bound insulin at 37 degree C were increased 70% by inhibiting the internalization pathway. This increase was temperature and insulin concentration dependent. Thus differences in surface binding were small at 12 degree C and also at high insulin concentrations. Inhibition of internalization with N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester markedly slowed the loss of surface-bound insulin observed during dissociation the loss of surface-bound insulin observed during dissociation studies. After 20-30 min of dissociation, the remaining levels of surface-bound insulin were three- to fourfold higher in treated adipocytes compared with control adipocytes. Added unlabeled insulin retained its ability to accelerate the dissociation of insulin in N-acetyl-Tyr ethyl ester-treated cells. These observations indicate that the internalization pathway is a quantitatively important factor in determining levels of surface binding at 37 degree C and in determining the rat of deactivation of insulin binding

  18. Effects of glutaraldehyde-didecyldimethylammonium bromide combined disinfectant on the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W; Yi, J; Zhang, Y; Deng, Z; Chen, Q; Niu, B

    2018-01-18

    The effects of a new glutaraldehyde-didecyldimethylammonium bromide combination disinfectant (GD) on the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus, a representative Gram-positive bacterium, were investigated in this study. Results of bacterial surface structural analysis showed that GD significantly changed the bacterial morphology. The membrane fluidity decreased and outer membrane permeabilization increased after contact with GD. Furthermore, the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane was destroyed by over 99% after exposure to GD for a short time. Bacterial ATPase activity correlated negatively with the treatment of GD over time, and proteins were degraded. Assays of intracellular component leakage indicated that GD caused the rapid leakage of K + , Mg 2+ , ATP molecules, and proteins into the extracellular environment. The effects of GD against S. aureus are probably attributable to the removal of the permeability barrier, changes in the S. aureus morphology, changes in the structures and functions of the cell membrane, leakage of intracellular substances and disturbance of the intracellular homeostasis. As a result, this irreversible damage accelerated the death of S. aureus. In an earlier study, the bactericidal mechanism of GD against Escherichia coli was investigated. Hence, this study focused on the action of mechanism of GD against S. aureus. It is important to clarify the disinfectant bactericidal mechanisms of GD against bacterium, in general, and this study provides theoretical support to the prevention of bacterial resistance. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Role of lactobacillus cell surface hydrophobicity as probed by AFM in adhesion to surfaces at low and high ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo Rodriguez, Virginia; Busscher, Hendrik; van der Mei, Henderina; Norde, Willem; de Vries, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    The S-layer present at the outermost cell surface of some lactobacillus species is known to convey hydrophobicity to the lactobacillus cell surface. Yet, it is commonly found that adhesion of lactobacilli to solid substrata does not proceed according to expectations based on cell surface

  20. Role of lactobacillus cell surface hydrophobicity as probed by AMF in adhesion to surfaces at low and high ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, V.; Busscher, H.J.; Meij, van der H.C.; Vries, de J.; Norde, W.

    2005-01-01

    The S-layer present at the outermost cell surface of some lactobacillus species is known to convey hydrophobicity to the lactobacillus cell surface. Yet, it is commonly found that adhesion of lactobacilli to solid substrata does not proceed according to expectations based on cell surface

  1. The prototypical proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR from Escherichia coli facilitates chloramphenicol uptake into bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Sharma, Neha

    2018-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (Cam) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used to combat bacterial infections in humans and animals. Cam export from bacterial cells is one of the mechanisms by which pathogens resist Cam's antibacterial effects, and several different proteins are known to facilitate this process....... However, to date no report exists on any specific transport protein that facilitates Cam uptake. The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) YdgR from Escherichia coli is a prototypical member of the POT family, functioning in proton-coupled uptake of di- and tripeptides. By following bacterial...... suggested a binding mode that resembles that of Cam binding to the multidrug resistance transporter MdfA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Cam uptake into bacterial cells mediated by a specific transporter protein. Our findings suggest a specific bacterial transporter for drug uptake that might...

  2. Metal uptake of recombinant cambialistic superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii is affected by growth conditions of host Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbianelli, R; Battistoni, A; Polizio, F; Carrì, M T; De Martino, A; Meier, B; Desideri, A; Rotilio, G

    1995-11-22

    We constructed the complete nucleotide sequence coding for the cambialistic superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii by ligation of a synthetic linker to a polymerase chain reaction amplification product obtained using degenerate primers. We set up an expression system yielding large amounts of recombinant superoxide dismutase in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and purified the enzyme from cells grown in a complex medium. The physicochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme were identical to those of the natural protein. Under anaerobic conditions the enzyme produced in an iron-supplemented medium incorporated iron as metal cofactor, while the enzyme purified from cells grown under aerobic conditions contained a variable amount of iron and manganese depending on metal availability. Functional equivalence of the two metals in this superoxide dismutase variant was indicated by independence of enzyme activity from Fe/Mn ratio.