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Sample records for cold molecule formation

  1. Formation of cold molecules through the photo-association of cold atoms of Cesium. Existence of long range forces between between cold excited atoms of Cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparat, D.

    1999-09-01

    This thesis deals with the experimental study and the theoretical interpretation of the processes involved in photo-association and the formation of cold caesium molecules. It also presents a study of the dipolar forces between a pair of cold excited caesium atoms. We present here the first photo-association experiment on cold caesium atoms: two cold atoms absorb a photon to form an excited electronically excited molecules in a rotation-vibration level. The first production of cold molecules which was realised experimentally, after the spontaneous deexcitation of the photo-associated molecules, is described, stressing the role of the potential well of the molecular states O g - (6s+6p 3/2 ) or 1 u (6s+6p 3/2 ) of caesium. The detection of the formed caesium molecules is based on a two-photons resonant ionisation that creates Cs 2 + ions, afterwards selectively detected. Temperatures around 20-200 μK have been measured. The photo-associative spectroscopy is described on the theoretical point of view: a detailed theoretical study allows to calculate precisely the asymptotic parts of the potential curves. On the experimental point of view, we present the spectroscopy of the extern potential well of the caesium state O g - (6s+6p 3/2 ) and the construction of an effective potential curve of the RKR type. A unified theory of photo-association in weak field, considered as a collision assisted by laser, is developed. The cold atoms experiments allow to study and control the collision between two atoms whose mutual interaction is of the dipole-dipole type. Two different physical systems are studied: a sample of Rydberg atoms, and the photo-association process which is a laser-assisted collision. A modification of the motion of one pair of atoms makes it possible to control the bipolar forces and to choose the atoms relative speeds. (author)

  2. The formation and interactions of cold and ultracold molecules: new challenges for interdisciplinary physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulieu, O [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Bat. 505, Univ Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gabbanini, C [Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici del C.N.R., Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: olivier.dulieu@lac.u-psud.fr, E-mail: carlo@ipcf.cnr.it

    2009-08-15

    Progress on research in the field of molecules at cold and ultracold temperatures is reported in this review. It covers extensively the experimental methods to produce, detect and characterize cold and ultracold molecules including association of ultracold atoms, deceleration by external fields and kinematic cooling. Confinement of molecules in different kinds of traps is also discussed. The basic theoretical issues related to the knowledge of the molecular structure, the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule mutual interactions, and to their possible manipulation and control with external fields, are reviewed. A short discussion on the broad area of applications completes the review.

  3. Coherent control of the formation of cold heteronuclear molecules by photoassociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Emanuel F.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the formation of cold diatomic molecules in the electronic ground state by photoassociation of atoms of dissimilar species. A combination of two transition pathways from the free colliding pair of atoms to a bound vibrational level of the electronic molecular ground state is envisioned. The first pathway consists of a pump-dump scheme with two time-delayed laser pulses in the near-infrared frequency domain. The pump pulse drives the transition to a bound vibrational level of an excited electronic state, while the dump pulse transfers the population to a bound vibrational level of the electronic ground state. The second pathway takes advantage of the existing permanent dipole moment and employs a single pulse in the far-infrared domain to drive the transition from the unbound atoms directly to a bound vibrational level in the electronic ground state. We show that this scheme offers the possibility to coherently control the photoassociation yield by manipulating the relative phase and timing of the pulses. The photoassociation mechanism is illustrated for the formation of cold LiCs molecules.

  4. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  5. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  6. Formation of cold molecules through the photo-association of cold atoms of Cesium. Existence of long range forces between between cold excited atoms of Cesium; Formation de molecules froides par photoassociation d'atomes froids de cesium. Mise en evidence de forces a longue portee entre atomes froids excites de cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comparat, D

    1999-09-01

    This thesis deals with the experimental study and the theoretical interpretation of the processes involved in photo-association and the formation of cold caesium molecules. It also presents a study of the dipolar forces between a pair of cold excited caesium atoms. We present here the first photo-association experiment on cold caesium atoms: two cold atoms absorb a photon to form an excited electronically excited molecules in a rotation-vibration level. The first production of cold molecules which was realised experimentally, after the spontaneous deexcitation of the photo-associated molecules, is described, stressing the role of the potential well of the molecular states O{sub g}{sup -}(6s+6p{sub 3/2}) or 1{sub u} (6s+6p{sub 3/2}) of caesium. The detection of the formed caesium molecules is based on a two-photons resonant ionisation that creates Cs{sub 2}{sup +} ions, afterwards selectively detected. Temperatures around 20-200 {mu}K have been measured. The photo-associative spectroscopy is described on the theoretical point of view: a detailed theoretical study allows to calculate precisely the asymptotic parts of the potential curves. On the experimental point of view, we present the spectroscopy of the extern potential well of the caesium state O{sub g}{sup -}(6s+6p{sub 3/2}) and the construction of an effective potential curve of the RKR type. A unified theory of photo-association in weak field, considered as a collision assisted by laser, is developed. The cold atoms experiments allow to study and control the collision between two atoms whose mutual interaction is of the dipole-dipole type. Two different physical systems are studied: a sample of Rydberg atoms, and the photo-association process which is a laser-assisted collision. A modification of the motion of one pair of atoms makes it possible to control the bipolar forces and to choose the atoms relative speeds. (author)

  7. Preparation of translationally cold neutral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenicantonio, Giulia; Bertsche, Benjamin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Efforts at EPFL to obtain translationally cold neutral molecules are described. Active deceleration of polar molecules is performed by confining the molecules in moving three-dimensional electrostatic traps, and by appropriately choosing the velocity of those traps. Alternatively, cold molecules can be obtained by velocity filtering. Here, the velocity of the molecules is not changed, but instead the cold molecules are extracted from a thermal sample by using the competition between the electrostatic force and the centrifugal force inside a bent electrostatic guide for polar molecules.

  8. Engineering and control of cold molecules. Making manipulating and exploiting ultra-cold polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, N.P.; Haimberger, C.; Kleinert, J.; Tscherneck, M.; Holmes, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 12 months several groups have demonstrated the use of photo association to create cold heteronuclear (polar) molecules. We report on the formation of translationally cold NaCs molecules starting from a laser-cooled atomic vapor of Na and Cs atoms. Colliding atoms are transferred into bound molecular states in a two-step photoactivated process. We find a translational temperature of T ≅ 260 mK. To increase the density and number of trapped atoms, dark-spot techniques are used on the MOT and a Zeeman slowed sodium beam is used to load the sodium atoms into the trap. Spectroscopy of these molecules is underway using time-of-flight ion detection and trap-loss. Initial REMPI measurements indicate that both singlet and triplet states are being populated by the spontaneous-decay driven process. We measure a rate constant for molecule formation of K NaCs = 7.43 · 10 15 cm 3 s -1 . (author)

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    Robin Côté Single-photon molecular cooling Edvardas Narevicius, S Travis Bannerman and Mark G Raizen Quantum simulations of extended Hubbard models with dipolar crystals M Ortner, A Micheli, G Pupillo and P Zoller Collisional and molecular spectroscopy in an ultracold Bose-Bose mixture G Thalhammer, G Barontini, J Catani, F Rabatti, C Weber, A Simoni, F Minardi and M Inguscio Multi-channel modelling of the formation of vibrationally cold polar KRb molecules Svetlana Kotochigova, Eite Tiesinga and Paul S Julienne Formation of ultracold, highly polar X1Σ+ NaCs molecules C Haimberger, J Kleinert, P Zabawa, A Wakim and N P Bigelow Quantum polarization spectroscopy of correlations in attractive fermionic gases T Roscilde, M Rodríguez, K Eckert, O Romero-Isart, M Lewenstein, E Polzik and A Sanpera Inelastic semiclassical collisions in cold dipolar gases Michael Cavagnero and Catherine Newell Quasi-universal dipolar scattering in cold and ultracold gases J L Bohn, M Cavagnero and C Ticknor Stark deceleration of lithium hydride molecules S K Tokunaga, J M Dyne, E A Hinds and M R Tarbutt Molecular vibrational cooling by optical pumping with shaped femtosecond pulses D Sofikitis, S Weber, A Fioretti, R Horchani, M Allegrini, B Chatel, D Comparat and P Pillet Deeply bound ultracold molecules in an optical lattice Johann G Danzl, Manfred J Mark, Elmar Haller, Mattias Gustavsson, Russell Hart, Andreas Liem, Holger Zellmer and Hanns-Christoph Nägerl Toward the production of quantum degenerate bosonic polar molecules, 41K87Rb K Aikawa, D Akamatsu, J Kobayashi, M Ueda, T Kishimoto and S Inouye Influence of a Feshbach resonance on the photoassociation of LiCs J Deiglmayr, P Pellegrini, A Grochola, M Repp, R Côté, O Dulieu, R Wester and M Weidemüller The kinematic cooling of molecules with laser-cooled atoms Ken Takase, Larry A Rahn, David W Chandler and Kevin E Strecker Coherent collapses of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates for different trap geometries J Metz, T Lahaye, B Fr

  10. Spectroscopy and Chemistry of Cold Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Takamasa

    2012-06-01

    Molecules at low temperatures are expected to behave quite differently from those at high temperatures because pronounced quantum effects emerge from thermal averages. Even at 10 K, a significant enhancement of reaction cross section is expected due to tunneling and resonance effects. Chemistry at this temperature is very important in order to understand chemical reactions in interstellar molecular clouds. At temperatures lower than 1 K, collisions and intermolecular interactions become qualitatively different from those at high temperatures because of the large thermal de Broglie wavelength of molecules. Collisions at these temperatures must be treated as the interference of molecular matter waves, but not as hard sphere collisions. A Bose-Einstein condensate is a significant state of matter as a result of coherent matter wave interaction. Especially, dense para-H_2 molecules are predicted to become a condensate even around 1 K. A convenient method to investigate molecules around 1 K is to dope molecules in cold matrices. Among various matrices, quantum hosts such as solid para-H_2 and superfluid He nano-droplets have been proven to be an excellent host for high-resolution spectroscopy. Rovibrational motion of molecules in these quantum hosts is well quantized on account of the weak interactions and the softness of quantum environment. The linewidths of infrared spectra of molecules in the quantum hosts are extremely narrow compared with those in other matrices. The sharp linewidths allow us to resolve fine spectral structures originated in subtle interactions between guest and host molecules. In this talk, I will describe how the splitting and lineshape of high-resolution spectra of molecules in quantum hosts give us new information on the static and dynamical interactions of molecules in quantum medium. The topics include dynamical response of superfluid environment upon rotational excitation, and possible superfluid phase of para-H_2 clusters. I will also

  11. Cold molecules: formation, trapping and spectroscopy. - Piling up of cesium dimers in a quadrupolar magnetic trap. - Spectroscopy by lack of photo-association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhaecke, N.

    2003-10-01

    This thesis deals with the study of cold molecules obtained through the cold atom photo-association technique. Our study is focused both on manipulating external degrees of freedom of these Cs 2 molecules and on studying their internal interactions. A quadrupolar magnetic trap of about 2.10 5 cold Cs 2 molecules is demonstrated. The trap lifetime is on the order of 600 ms, mainly limited by the background gas pressure. The trapped molecules are identified, which allows the determination of the trapped molecule cloud temperature, which is about 35 μK. A dipolar trap is set up by the use of a focused CO 2 laser beam. Moreover, this thesis describes a two-photon photo-association spectroscopy. We report the first study of two-photon photo-association line shapes, which exhibit typical Fano profiles. Taking advantage of the detailed understanding of these line shapes, we measure over one hundred high-lying level energies with an accuracy on the order of 10 MHz. Then we interpret theoretically these energies. The huge hyperfine structure of the Cesium atom binds us to solve a coupled channel Schroedinger equation for internuclear distances above 15 a 0 . Hence we use an asymptotic theory to fit the potential parameters of the Cs 2 dimer. We adjust those parameters by the mean of both evolutionary strategies and deterministic optimum seeking. This is followed by a careful statistics study, which leads to a very accurate determination of the Vander Waals coefficient. Moreover we report the first experimental determination of the exchange interaction amplitude. (author)

  12. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  13. Cold guided beams of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motsch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experiments characterizing cold guided beams of polar molecules which are produced by electrostatic velocity filtering. This filtering method exploits the interaction between the polar molecules and the electric field provided by an electrostatic quadrupole guide to extract efficiently the slow molecules from a thermal reservoir. For molecules with large and linear Stark shifts such as deuterated ammonia (ND 3 ) or formaldehyde (H 2 CO), fluxes of guided molecules of 10 10 -10 11 molecules/s are produced. The velocities of the molecules in these beams are in the range of 10-200 m/s and correspond to typical translational temperatures of a few Kelvin. The maximum velocity of the guided molecules depends on the Stark shift, the molecular mass, the geometry of the guide, and the applied electrode voltage. Although the source is operated in the near-effusive regime, the number density of the slowest molecules is sensitive to collisions. A theoretical model, taking into account this velocity-dependent collisional loss of molecules in the vicinity of the nozzle, reproduces the density of the guided molecules over a wide pressure range. A careful adjustment of pressure allows an increase in the total number of molecules, whilst yet minimizing losses due to collisions of the sought-for slow molecules. This is an important issue for future applications. Electrostatic velocity filtering is suited for different molecular species. This is demonstrated by producing cold guided beams of the water isotopologs H 2 O, D 2 O, and HDO. Although these are chemically similar, they show linear and quadratic Stark shifts, respectively, when exposed to external electric fields. As a result, the flux of HDO is larger by one order of magnitude, and the flux of the individual isotopologs shows a characteristic dependence on the guiding electric field. The internal-state distribution of guided molecules is studied with a newly developed diagnostic method: depletion

  14. Cold and ultracold molecules: science, technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Lincoln D; DeMille, David; Krems, Roman V; Ye Jun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in the research field of cold and ultracold molecules. It serves as an introduction to the focus issue of New Journal of Physics on Cold and Ultracold Molecules and describes new prospects for fundamental research and technological development. Cold and ultracold molecules may revolutionize physical chemistry and few-body physics, provide techniques for probing new states of quantum matter, allow for precision measurements of both fundamental and applied interest, and enable quantum simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. Ultracold molecules offer promising applications such as new platforms for quantum computing, precise control of molecular dynamics, nanolithography and Bose-enhanced chemistry. The discussion is based on recent experimental and theoretical work and concludes with a summary of anticipated future directions and open questions in this rapidly expanding research field.

  15. Cold molecules: formation, trapping and spectroscopy. - Piling up of cesium dimers in a quadrupolar magnetic trap. - Spectroscopy by lack of photo-association; Molecules froides: formation, piegeage et spectroscopie. - Accumulation de dimeres de cesium dans un piege quadrupolaire magnetique. - Spectroscopie par frustration de photoassociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhaecke, N

    2003-10-15

    This thesis deals with the study of cold molecules obtained through the cold atom photo-association technique. Our study is focused both on manipulating external degrees of freedom of these Cs{sub 2} molecules and on studying their internal interactions. A quadrupolar magnetic trap of about 2.10{sup 5} cold Cs{sub 2} molecules is demonstrated. The trap lifetime is on the order of 600 ms, mainly limited by the background gas pressure. The trapped molecules are identified, which allows the determination of the trapped molecule cloud temperature, which is about 35 {mu}K. A dipolar trap is set up by the use of a focused CO{sub 2} laser beam. Moreover, this thesis describes a two-photon photo-association spectroscopy. We report the first study of two-photon photo-association line shapes, which exhibit typical Fano profiles. Taking advantage of the detailed understanding of these line shapes, we measure over one hundred high-lying level energies with an accuracy on the order of 10 MHz. Then we interpret theoretically these energies. The huge hyperfine structure of the Cesium atom binds us to solve a coupled channel Schroedinger equation for internuclear distances above 15 a{sub 0}. Hence we use an asymptotic theory to fit the potential parameters of the Cs{sub 2} dimer. We adjust those parameters by the mean of both evolutionary strategies and deterministic optimum seeking. This is followed by a careful statistics study, which leads to a very accurate determination of the Vander Waals coefficient. Moreover we report the first experimental determination of the exchange interaction amplitude. (author)

  16. Layers of Cold Dipolar Molecules in the Harmonic Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Armstrong, J.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; V. Fedorov, D.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the N-body problem in a layered geometry containing cold polar molecules with dipole moments that are polarized perpendicular to the layers. A harmonic approximation is used to simplify the hamiltonian and bound state properties of the two-body inter-layer dipolar potential are used...... to adjust this effective interaction. To model the intra-layer repulsion of the polar molecules, we introduce a repulsive inter-molecule potential that can be parametrically varied. Single chains containing one molecule in each layer, as well as multi-chain structures in many layers are discussed...... and their energies and radii determined. We extract the normal modes of the various systems as measures of their volatility and eventually of instability, and compare our findings to the excitations in crystals. We find modes that can be classified as either chains vibrating in phase or as layers vibrating against...

  17. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  18. Chip-based microtrap arrays for cold polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-12-01

    Compared to the atomic chip, which has been a powerful platform to perform an astonishing range of applications from rapid Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) production to the atomic clock, the molecular chip is only in its infant stages. Recently a one-dimensional electric lattice was demonstrated to trap polar molecules on a chip. This excellent work opens up the way to building a molecular chip laboratory. Here we propose a two-dimensional (2D) electric lattice on a chip with concise and robust structure, which is formed by arrays of squared gold wires. Arrays of microtraps that originate in the microsize electrodes offer a steep gradient and thus allow for confining both light and heavy polar molecules. Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations are performed using two types of sample molecules, N D3 and SrF, to justify the possibility of our proposal. The height of the minima of the potential wells is about 10 μm above the surface of the chip and can be easily adjusted in a wide range by changing the voltages applied on the electrodes. These microtraps offer intriguing perspectives for investigating cold molecules in periodic potentials, such as quantum computing science, low-dimensional physics, and some other possible applications amenable to magnetic or optical lattice. The 2D adjustable electric lattice is expected to act as a building block for a future gas-phase molecular chip laboratory.

  19. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, Peter L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  20. The formation of molecules in protostellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassgold, A.E.; Mamon, G.A.; Huggins, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The production and destruction processes for molecules in very fast protostellar winds are analyzed and modeled with a one-dimensional chemical kinetics code. Radial density and temperature distributions suggested by protostellar theory are explored as are a range of mass-loss rates. The efficiency of in situ formation of heavy molecules is found to be high if the wind temperature falls sufficiently rapidly, as indicated by theory. The degree of molecular conversion is a strong function of the mass-loss rate and of density gradients associated with the acceleration and collimation of the wind. Even in cases where essentially all of the heavy atoms are processed into molecules, a significant fraction of atomic hydrogen remains so that hghly molecular, protostellar winds are able to emit the 21-cm line. Although CO has a substantial abundance in most models relevant to very young protostars, high abundances of other molecules such as SiO and H2O signify more complete association characteristic of winds containing regions of very high density. Although the models apply only to regions close to the protostar, they are in qualitative accord with recent observations at much larger distances of both atomic and molecular emission from extremely high-velocity flow. 57 refs

  1. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets, are described. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member

  2. Spatial distribution of cold antihydrogen formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, N.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Bowe, P.D.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D.P. van der; Cesar, C.L.

    2005-01-01

    Antihydrogen is formed when antiprotons are mixed with cold positrons in a nested Penning trap. We present experimental evidence, obtained using our antihydrogen annihilation detector, that the spatial distribution of the emerging antihydrogen atoms is independent of the positron temperature and axially enhanced. This indicates that antihydrogen is formed before the antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium with the positron plasma. This result has important implications for the trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen

  3. Synthesis of molecules in interstellar clouds and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, K.K.; Ghosh, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    Study of the formation and destruction processes of interstellar molecules may throw certain light on interstellar medium. Formation and destruction processes of some interstellar molecules are proposed on the basis of laboratory data. The abundances of these molecules are calculated under steady-state condition. The calculated values are then compared with the observed values, obtained by different investigators. It appears that gas phase ion-neutral reactions are capable of synthesizing most interstellar molecules. The role of ion-neutral reactions to star formation has also been discussed. (author)

  4. Theoretical model for ultracold molecule formation via adaptive feedback control

    OpenAIRE

    Poschinger, Ulrich; Salzmann, Wenzel; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    We investigate pump-dump photoassociation of ultracold molecules with amplitude- and phase-modulated femtosecond laser pulses. For this purpose a perturbative model for the light-matter interaction is developed and combined with a genetic algorithm for adaptive feedback control of the laser pulse shapes. The model is applied to the formation of 85Rb2 molecules in a magneto-optical trap. We find for optimized pulse shapes an improvement for the formation of ground state molecules by more than ...

  5. Validation of OMA formation in cold brackish and sea waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Hill, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    This study addressed the challenge of cleaning oil spilled in cold, ice-infested waters in the St. Lawrence estuary in the winter. The main objective was to develop an environmentally safe and efficient cleansing method. The use of an oil-mineral agglomeration (OMA) process has been proposed to improve dispersion and biodegradation of the spilled oil. This bench-scale study was conducted to validate this proposed remedial method. The theory for this natural attenuation process for oil spills on shores is that oil droplets and suspended sediments disperse in the water column and aggregate into OMAs. OMA formation involves floc break and aggregation by differential settling. This study examined the formation time and the concentration of OMA in a typical turbulent estuarine environment and determined the effect of sediment size and concentration on OMA formation. It also verified if OMA forms in cold brackish water considering 2 types of oils which are commonly transported along the St. Lawrence estuary to Quebec City. OMA formation was validated with Heidrun and IF30 crude oils and 2 types of engineered sediments to determine the best sediment to form OMA and to determine the minimum sediment concentration needed to maximize OMA formation. The minimum agitation time to reach this maximizing condition of OMA formation was also determined. It was concluded that OMAs form readily in cold brackish and seawater when Heidrun or IF30 crude oils are mixed with chalk or bentonite sediment. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  6. Regularities in positronium formation for atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machacek, J R; Buckman, S J; Sullivan, J P; Blanco, F; Garcia, G

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to aid the modelling of positron and positronium (Ps) transport in biological media we have compiled recent experimental results for the total Ps formation in positron scattering from atoms and molecules. A simple function was found to adequately describe the total Ps formation cross section for both atoms and molecules. The parameters of this function describe the magnitude and shape of the Ps formation cross section and are compared to physical characteristics of the target atoms and molecules. A general trend in the magnitude of the total Ps formation cross section is observed as a function of the target atom/molecule dipole polarisability. The functional form may enable quick estimation of the Ps cross section for molecules for which experimental measurements or theoretical estimates do not exist. (paper)

  7. Formation and decomposition of astatine molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Naruto; Ishikuro, Mituhiro; Baba Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A method determining the boiling points of elementary astatine and astatine iodide has been developed (K. Otozai and N. Takahashi, Radio. Chim. Acta 31, (1982) 201). Further, it was concluded from the simple rule among the boiling point of elementary halogens and interhalogen compounds that elementary astatine might exist in diatomic molecules as the other halogens. In the present work the reaction mechanisms of elementary astatine with radioactive iodine and organic solvents were studied by means of radiogaschromatography in order to obtain further experimental evidences for diatomic astaine molecules. The following conclusions were obtained by the analysis of reaction kinetics. Two astatine atoms are lost from the elementary astatine fraction per each radioactive decay of astatine. The astatine radical or hot atom liberated by the decay of the complementary astatine atom immediately reacts with iodine or organic solvents. Thus formed astatine compounds decompose in turn due to the decay of astatine

  8. Single molecule image formation, reconstruction and processing: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Amit; Piestun, Rafael; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    The ability to image at the single molecule scale has revolutionized research in molecular biology. This feature issue presents a collection of articles that provides new insights into the fundamental limits of single molecule imaging and reports novel techniques for image formation and analysis.

  9. Formation and dissociation of dust molecules in dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jia; Feng Fan; Liu Fucheng; Dong Lifang; He Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    Dust molecules are observed in a dusty plasma experiment. By using measurements with high spatial resolution, the formation and dissociation of the dust molecules are studied. The ion cloud in the wake of an upper dust grain attracts the lower dust grain nearby. When the interparticle distance between the upper dust grain and the lower one is less than a critical value, the two dust grains would form a dust molecule. The upper dust grain always leads the lower one as they travel. When the interparticle distance between them is larger than the critical value, the dust molecule would dissociate. (paper)

  10. Theoretical model for ultracold molecule formation via adaptive feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschinger, Ulrich; Salzmann, Wenzel; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Koch, Christiane P; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate pump-dump photoassociation of ultracold molecules with amplitude- and phase-modulated femtosecond laser pulses. For this purpose, a perturbative model for light-matter interaction is developed and combined with a genetic algorithm for adaptive feedback control of the laser pulse shapes. The model is applied to the formation of 85 Rb 2 molecules in a magneto-optical trap. We find that optimized pulse shapes may maximize the formation of ground state molecules in a specific vibrational state at a pump-dump delay time for which unshaped pulses lead to a minimum of the formation rate. Compared to the maximum formation rate obtained for unshaped pulses at the optimum pump-dump delay, the optimized pulses lead to a significant improvement of about 40% for the target level population. Since our model yields the spectral amplitudes and phases of the optimized pulses, the results are directly applicable in pulse shaping experiments

  11. The formation of carbon chain molecules in IRC + 10216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, D.A.; Millar, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers the formation of carbon-chain molecules, including C 2n H, C n S, HC 2n+1 N (n = 1-3) and SiC n (n = 1-4), in the outflowing envelope of the late-type carbon star IRC + 10216. The results suggest that the organo-sulphur species C 2 S and C 3 S can be formed in ion-molecule reactions involving acetylene ions and parent CS and SiS molecules. In addition to ion-molecule processes, neutral-neutral reactions can play a significant role in the formation of hydrocarbons and cyanopolyynes with up to six heavy atoms and in the formation of SiC 4 , and suggest that SiC 3 might be observable. However, the short time-scales available in the outflow are such that the observed abundances of the cyanopolyynes larger than HC 5 N cannot be reproduced using the parent molecules and abundances adopted here. (author)

  12. Formation and dissociation of dust molecules in dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia; Feng, Fan; Liu, Fucheng; Dong, Lifang; He, Yafeng

    2016-09-01

    Dust molecules are observed in a dusty plasma experiment. By using measurements with high spatial resolution, the formation and dissociation of the dust molecules are studied. The ion cloud in the wake of an upper dust grain attracts the lower dust grain nearby. When the interparticle distance between the upper dust grain and the lower one is less than a critical value, the two dust grains would form a dust molecule. The upper dust grain always leads the lower one as they travel. When the interparticle distance between them is larger than the critical value, the dust molecule would dissociate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2011201006 and A2012201015), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. Y2012009), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project, China.

  13. A cryofuge for cold-collision experiments with slow polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Koller, Manuel; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Ultracold molecules represent a fascinating research frontier in physics and chemistry, but it has proven challenging to prepare dense samples at low velocities. Here, we present a solution to this goal by means of a nonconventional approach dubbed cryofuge. It uses centrifugal force to bring cryogenically cooled molecules to kinetic energies below 1 K × kB in the laboratory frame, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, with corresponding fluxes exceeding 1010 per second at velocities below 20 meters per second. By attaining densities higher than 109 per cubic centimeter and interaction times longer than 25 milliseconds in samples of fluoromethane as well as deuterated ammonia, we observed cold dipolar collisions between molecules and determined their collision cross sections.

  14. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  15. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms for sympathetic cooling of molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    We trap cold, ground-state, argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a build-up cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of co-trapped metastable argon atoms using a new type of parametric loss spectroscopy. Using this technique we als...

  16. Pregalactic formation of globular clusters in cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, S.M.; Blumenthal, G.R.; Rosenblatt, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The pregalactic hypothesis for the formation of globular clusters is reconsidered in the light of Zinn's (1985) discovery of a two-component globular population in the Milky Way. For a cold dark matter spectrum, high-sigma fluctuations of 10 to the 5th - 10 to the 6th solar masses are assumed to be the progenitors of the spheroidal population of globular clusters. The mass fraction of globular clusters in galaxies then requires that perturbations above roughly 2.8 sigma survive as globulars, and their observed radii require baryonic collapse factors of order 10. Such an absolute density threshold for globular cluster formation achieves adequate fits to observed cluster radii and densities, the mass fraction of globulars versus Hubble type, the radial density profile of globulars within galaxies, and the globular luminosity function. However, a fixed density threshold criterion for cluster survival lacks convincing physical justification and does not by itself explain the homogeneous metallicities within clusters or the large metallicity variations from cluster to cluster and from galaxy to galaxy. 33 references

  17. Cluster Formation of Polyphilic Molecules Solvated in a DPPC Bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yang Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the initial stages of cluster formation of polyphilic additive molecules which are solvated in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC lipid bilayer. Our polyphilic molecules comprise an aromatic (trans-bilayer core domain with (out-of-bilayer glycerol terminations, complemented with a fluorophilic and an alkyl side chain, both of which are confined within the aliphatic segment of the bilayer. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (1 μ s total duration of a set of six of such polyphilic additives reveal the initial steps towards supramolecular aggregation induced by the specific philicity properties of the molecules. For our intermediate system size of six polyphiles, the transient but recurrent formation of a trimer is observed on a characteristic timescale of about 100 ns. The alkane/perfluoroalkane side chains show a very distinct conformational distribution inside the bilayer thanks to their different philicity, despite their identical anchoring in the trans-bilayer segment of the polyphile. The diffusive mobility of the polyphilic additives is about the same as that of the surrounding lipids, although it crosses both bilayer leaflets and tends to self-associate.

  18. Spectroscopy of Cold LiCa Molecules Formed on Helium Nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We report on the formation of mixed alkali–alkaline earth molecules (LiCa) on helium nanodroplets and present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the ground and excited states of LiCa. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight (REMPI-TOF) spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were used for the experimental investigation of LiCa from 15000 to 25500 cm–1. The 42Σ+ and 32Π states show a vibrational structure accompanied by distinct phonon wings, which allows us to determine molecular parameters as well as to study the interaction of the molecule with the helium droplet. Higher excited states (42Π, 52Σ+, 52Π, and 62Σ+) are not vibrationally resolved and vibronic transitions start to overlap. The experimental spectrum is well reproduced by high-level ab initio calculations. By using a multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach, we calculated the 19 lowest lying potential energy curves (PECs) of the LiCa molecule. On the basis of these calculations, we could identify previously unobserved transitions. Our results demonstrate that the helium droplet isolation approach is a powerful method for the characterization of tailor-made alkali–alkaline earth molecules. In this way, important contributions can be made to the search for optimal pathways toward the creation of ultracold alkali–alkaline earth ground state molecules from the corresponding atomic species. Furthermore, a test for PECs calculated by ab initio methods is provided. PMID:24028555

  19. Some considerations of ''cold fusion'' including the calculation of fusion rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1989-11-01

    We calculate the fusion reaction rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes. The rates are calculated analytically (for the first time) as an asymptotic expansion in the ratio of the electron mass to the reduced mass of the nucleii. The fusion rates of the P-D, D-D, and D-T reactions are given for a variable electron mass by a simple analytic formula. However, we do not know any mechanism by which a sufficiently localized electron in solid can have an 'effective mass' large enough to explain the result of Fleischman and Pons (FP). This calculation indicates that P-D rates should exceed D-D rates for D-D fusion rates less than approximately 10 -23 per molecule per second. The D-D fusion rate is enhanced by a factor of 10 5 at 10,000 degree K if the excited vibrational states are populated with a Boltzmann distribution and the rotational excitations suppressed. The suggestion that experimental results could be explained by bombardment of cold deuterons by kilovolt deuterons is shown to be an unlikely from an energetic point of view. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Ugo; Bianchi, Federico; Klein, Felix; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Rossi, Michel J.; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs), such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and ethylbenzene), as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl). We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  1. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Molteni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs, such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene, as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl. We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  2. Quenching of cold antiprotonic helium atoms by collisions with H/sub 2/ molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Sauge, S

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the collisional quenching of cold metastable antiprotonic atomcules pHe/sup +/u/sub n, l/ by H/sub 2/ molecules in view of the recent state-resolved measurements at CERN. Firstly, we determine ab initio the 6-D intermolecular interaction between the four (anti)nuclei at the CCSD(T)/CP level. After averaging the interaction over the fast p orbits, we exhibit reactive channels and activation barriers below few 100 mu E/sub h/. Hence, we account qualitatively for the order of magnitude and (n, l) dependence of the quenching cross-sections measured at 30 K, after estimating tunneling probabilities. We also account for the lower quenching efficiency by deuterium. However improving this overall agreement would require the determination of numerous finer contributions. We monitor the saturation of electronic correlation with larger basis sets; we estimate the importance of dynamical relaxation effects; and we stress the role of quantum vibrational and rotational delocalization for the light (p, p) nuc...

  3. Formation of ultracold NaRb Feshbach molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fudong; He, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoke; Zhu, Bing; Chen, Jun; Wang, Dajun

    2015-01-01

    We report the creation of ultracold bosonic 23 Na 87 Rb Feshbach molecules via magneto-association. By ramping the magnetic field across an interspecies Feshbach resonance (FR), at least 4000 molecules can be produced out of the near degenerate ultracold mixture. Fast loss due to inelastic atom–molecule collisions is observed, which limits the pure molecule number, after residual atoms removal, to 1700. The pure molecule sample can live for 21.8(8) ms in the optical trap, long enough for future molecular spectroscopy studies toward coherently transferring to the singlet ro-vibrational ground state, where these molecules are stable against chemical reaction and have a permanent electric dipole moment of 3.3 Debye. We have also measured the Feshbach molecule’s binding energy near the FR by the oscillating magnetic field method and found these molecules have a large closed-channel fraction. (paper)

  4. Many-body dynamics with cold atoms and molecules in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachenmayer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Systems of cold atoms or molecules, trapped in a periodic potential formed from standing waves of laser light, provide an experimental possibility to study strongly correlated many-body lattice models, which are traditionally used in condensed matter physics. Due to the relatively weak energy scales in these ''optical lattices'' (next-neighbor tunneling energies are typically on the order of tens of Hertz), the time-scales of the dynamics in these systems is relatively slow and can be observed in experiments. Furthermore, the microscopic parameters of the models can be very well controlled by lattice laser intensities and external fields. Thus, optical lattices provide an excellent framework to study many-body quantum non-equilibrium dynamics, which on the theoretical level is the topic of this thesis. This thesis contains a study of many-body dynamics in optical lattices for both idealized isolated models and realistic models with imperfections. It is centered around four main topics: The first two topics are studies of coherent many-body dynamics. This contains explicitly: (i) an analysis of the possibility to dynamically prepare crystalline states of Rydberg atoms or polar molecules by adiabatically tuning laser parameters; and (ii) a study of the collapses and revivals of the momentum-distribution of a Bose-Einstein condensate with a fixed number of atoms, which is suddenly loaded into a deep optical lattice. The third main topic is entanglement and specifically the dynamical growth of entanglement between portions of an optical lattice in quench experiments. A method to create and measure large-scale entanglement is presented in this thesis. The fourth main topic addresses classical noise. Specifically, a system of atoms in an optical lattice, which is created from lasers with intensity fluctuations, is analyzed in this work. The noisy evolution of many-body correlation functions is studied and a method to cancel this noise in a realistic experimental setup is

  5. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  6. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Benedic, F.; Pegourie, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  7. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Bénédic, F.; Pégourié, B.

    2009-06-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  8. The effect of slurry rheology on cold cap formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, D.D.; Hrma, P.

    1991-01-01

    Yield stress, viscosity, and flow distance were measured on three simulated nuclear waste feeds at different temperatures and oxide loadings. Hydroxide, formate, and frit feeds, to produce glass of identical composition, were tested. Application of the results to a slurry fed waste glass melter is discussed

  9. Cold dark matter. 1: The formation of dark halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, James M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We use numerical simulations of critically closed cold dark matter (CDM) models to study the effects of numerical resolution on observable quantities. We study simulations with up to 256(exp 3) particles using the particle-mesh (PM) method and with up to 144(exp 3) particles using the adaptive particle-particle-mesh (P3M) method. Comparisons of galaxy halo distributions are made among the various simulations. We also compare distributions with observations, and we explore methods for identifying halos, including a new algorithm that finds all particles within closed contours of the smoothed density field surrounding a peak. The simulated halos show more substructure than predicted by the Press-Schechter theory. We are able to rule out all omega = 1 CDM models for linear amplitude sigma(sub 8) greater than or approximately = 0.5 because the simulations produce too many massive halos compared with the observations. The simulations also produce too many low-mass halos. The distribution of halos characterized by their circular velocities for the P3M simulations is in reasonable agreement with the observations for 150 km/s less than or = V(sub circ) less than or = 350 km/s.

  10. The formation of molecules in contracting interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroko; Miki, Satoshi; Sato, Katsuhiko; Kiguchi, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshitsugu

    1976-01-01

    The abundances of atoms, molecules and ions in contracting interstellar clouds are investigated in the wide ranges of density (from 10 cm -3 to 10 7 cm -3 ) and optical depth. Abundances of molecules are not in a steady state in optically thick stages because their reaction time scales are very long (10sup(12.5)-10sup(13.5) sec) compared with the contraction time scales. At some stage of contraction the abundances of neutral molecules become frozen, and the frozen abundances are considerably different from the steady-state abundances. The frozen abundances are mainly determined by the contraction time scale of the cloud. Especially, molecules containing carbon except for CO are less abundant for the cloud contracting more slowly. (auth.)

  11. Single-molecule dataset (SMD): a generalized storage format for raw and processed single-molecule data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo; Wiggins, Chris H; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-16

    Single-molecule techniques have emerged as incisive approaches for addressing a wide range of questions arising in contemporary biological research [Trends Biochem Sci 38:30-37, 2013; Nat Rev Genet 14:9-22, 2013; Curr Opin Struct Biol 2014, 28C:112-121; Annu Rev Biophys 43:19-39, 2014]. The analysis and interpretation of raw single-molecule data benefits greatly from the ongoing development of sophisticated statistical analysis tools that enable accurate inference at the low signal-to-noise ratios frequently associated with these measurements. While a number of groups have released analysis toolkits as open source software [J Phys Chem B 114:5386-5403, 2010; Biophys J 79:1915-1927, 2000; Biophys J 91:1941-1951, 2006; Biophys J 79:1928-1944, 2000; Biophys J 86:4015-4029, 2004; Biophys J 97:3196-3205, 2009; PLoS One 7:e30024, 2012; BMC Bioinformatics 288 11(8):S2, 2010; Biophys J 106:1327-1337, 2014; Proc Int Conf Mach Learn 28:361-369, 2013], it remains difficult to compare analysis for experiments performed in different labs due to a lack of standardization. Here we propose a standardized single-molecule dataset (SMD) file format. SMD is designed to accommodate a wide variety of computer programming languages, single-molecule techniques, and analysis strategies. To facilitate adoption of this format we have made two existing data analysis packages that are used for single-molecule analysis compatible with this format. Adoption of a common, standard data file format for sharing raw single-molecule data and analysis outcomes is a critical step for the emerging and powerful single-molecule field, which will benefit both sophisticated users and non-specialists by allowing standardized, transparent, and reproducible analysis practices.

  12. Hydrogen blister formation on cold-worked tungsten with layered structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Dai; Sugimoto, Takanori; Takamura, Shuichi; Ye, Minyou; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2005-01-01

    Low-energy ( 10 21 m -2 s -1 ) hydrogen plasma exposures were performed on cold-worked powder metallurgy tungsten (PM-W), recrystallized cold-worked PM-W and hot-worked PM-W. Large blisters with a diameter of approximately 100-200 μm were observed only on the surface of cold-worked PM-W. The blister formation mechanism has not been clarified thus far. PM-W has a consisting of 1-μm-thick layers, which is formed by press-roll processing. A detailed observation of the cross section of those blisters shows for the first time that the blisters are formed by cleaving the upper layer along the stratified layer. These experimental results indicate that the manufacturing process of tungsten material is one of the key factors for blister formation on the tungsten surface. (author)

  13. Cold experiments on ligament formation for blast furnace slag granulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junxiang; Yu Qingbo; Li Peng; Du Wenya

    2012-01-01

    Rotary cup atomization for molten slag granulation is an attractive alternative to water quenching. However, the mechanism of disintegration of molten slag must be assessed. In the present study, a glycerol/water mixture was substituted for molten slag, and the mechanism of ligament formation in a rotary cup was investigated using photos taken by a high-speed camera. The effects of the angular speed and inner depth of the rotary cup on ligament disintegration was investigated. The results showed that one state of disintegration may transform into another state as the angular speed of the rotary cup increases at a given liquid flow rate. During ligament formation, the number of ligaments increased with an increase in the angular speed of the rotary cup, and a decrease in the diameter of ligament and liquid drop was observed. Moreover, the initial point of disintegration of the ligament moved to the lip of the rotary cup as the angular speed increased. An equation describing the relationship between the diameter of the liquid drop and various factors was used to predict the diameter of the liquid drop. A rotary cup with an inner depth of 30 mm was the best choice for granulation. The results of the present study will be useful for designing devices used in molten slag granulation. - Highlights: ►The results can be used in the granulation of molten blast furnace slag. ► The three different states of disintegration occur as the angular speed of rotary cup increases. ► The mechanism of ligament disintegration is analyzed. ► Eq. can be used to predict the diameter of liquid drop. ► A rotary cup with an inner depth of 30 mm is optimal for granulation.

  14. Nanospiral Formation by Droplet Drying: One Molecule at a Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have created nanospirals by self-assembly during droplet evaporation. The nanospirals, 60–70 nm in diameter, formed when solvent mixtures of methanol and m-cresol were used. In contrast, spin coating using only methanol as the solvent produced epitaxial films of stripe nanopatterns and using only m-cresol disordered structure. Due to the disparity in vapor pressure between the two solvents, droplets of m-cresol solution remaining on the substrate serve as templates for the self-assembly of carboxylic acid molecules, which in turn allows the visualization of solution droplet evaporation one molecule at a time.

  15. The formation of ethane from carbon dioxide under cold plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuling; Zhang Lin; Dai Bin; Gong Weimin; Liu Changhou

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed-corona plasma has been used as a new method for ethane dehydrogenation at low temperature and normal pressure using carbon dioxide as an oxidant. The effect of carbon dioxide content in the feed, power input, and flow rate of the reactants on the ethane dehydrogenation has been investigated. The experimental results show that the conversion of ethane increases with the increasing in the amount of carbon dioxide in the feed. The yield of ethylene and acetylene decreases with the increasing in the yield of carbon monoxide, indicating that the increased carbon dioxide leads to the part of ethylene and acetylene being oxidized to carbon monoxide. Power input is primarily an electrical parameter in pulsed-corona plasma, which plays an important role in reactant conversion and product formation. When the power input reaches 16 W, ethane conversion is 41.0% and carbon dioxide conversion is 26.3%. The total yield of ethylene and acetylene is 15.6%. The reduced flow rate of feed improves the conversion of ethane, carbon dioxide and the yield of acetylene, and induces carbon deposit as well

  16. Linker-dependent Junction Formation Probability in Single-Molecule Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Pil Sun; Kim, Taekyeong [HankukUniversity of Foreign Studies, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We compare the junction formation probabilities of single-molecule junctions with different linker molecules by using a scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We found that the junction formation probability varies as SH > SMe > NH2 for the benzene backbone molecule with different types of anchoring groups, through quantitative statistical analysis. These results are attributed to different bonding forces according to the linker groups formed with Au atoms in the electrodes, which is consistent with previous works. Our work allows a better understanding of the contact chemistry in the metal.molecule junction for future molecular electronic devices.

  17. Effect of cold water injection on operation of and oil production from formations of Romashkino field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingareev, R Sh; Vakhitov, G G; Sultanov, S A

    1968-11-01

    Each year about 130 million cu m of cold water are injected into this field. Since cold water can lower reservoir temperature, increase oil viscosity, deposit paraffin in the formation, and reduce oil recovery, a thermal survey of this field was conducted. The survey showed that the average reservoir temperature was not reduced by cold-water injection for 15 yr. However, local cooling was observed at distances less than 400 m from the water injection well. Through these wells more than 4 PV of water have passed. The thermal front lags 1,500 m behind the advancing water front. For this reason, cold-water injection does not reduce oil recovery where there is uniform advance of the floodwater. When the formation is heterogeneous so that water advances more rapidly in high-permeability sand than in adjoining low-permeability sand, then the cooling effect can reduce oil recovery. For this reason, it is advisable to force water into the entire interval of the oil formation. An isotherm map of the Romashkino field is shown.

  18. Gas-phase spectra of MgO molecules: a possible connection from gas-phase molecules to planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloska, Katherine A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2018-02-01

    A more fine-tuned method for probing planet-forming regions, such as protoplanetary discs, could be rovibrational molecular spectroscopy observation of particular premineral molecules instead of more common but ultimately less related volatile organic compounds. Planets are created when grains aggregate, but how molecules form grains is an ongoing topic of discussion in astrophysics and planetary science. Using the spectroscopic data of molecules specifically involved in mineral formation could help to map regions where planet formation is believed to be occurring in order to examine the interplay between gas and dust. Four atoms are frequently associated with planetary formation: Fe, Si, Mg and O. Magnesium, in particular, has been shown to be in higher relative abundance in planet-hosting stars. Magnesium oxide crystals comprise the mineral periclase making it the chemically simplest magnesium-bearing mineral and a natural choice for analysis. The monomer, dimer and trimer forms of (MgO)n with n = 1-3 are analysed in this work using high-level quantum chemical computations known to produce accurate results. Strong vibrational transitions at 12.5, 15.0 and 16.5 μm are indicative of magnesium oxide monomer, dimer and trimer making these wavelengths of particular interest for the observation of protoplanetary discs and even potentially planet-forming regions around stars. If such transitions are observed in emission from the accretion discs or absorptions from stellar spectra, the beginning stages of mineral and, subsequently, rocky body formation could be indicated.

  19. Resonance reactions and enhancement of weak interactions in collisions of cold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    With the creation of ultracold atoms and molecules, a new type of chemistry - 'resonance' chemistry - emerges: chemical reactions can occur when the energy of colliding atoms and molecules matches a bound state of the combined molecule (Feshbach resonance). This chemistry is rather similar to reactions that take place in nuclei at low energies. In this paper we suggest some problems for future experimental and theoretical work related to the resonance chemistry of ultracold molecules. Molecular Bose-Einstein condensates are particularly interesting because in this system collisions and chemical reactions are extremely sensitive to weak fields; also, a preferred reaction channel may be enhanced due to a finite number of final states. The sensitivity to weak fields arises due to the high density of narrow compound resonances and the macroscopic number of molecules with kinetic energy E=0 (in the ground state of a mean-field potential). The high sensitivity to the magnetic field may be used to measure the distribution of energy intervals, widths, and magnetic moments of compound resonances and study the onset of quantum chaos. A difference in the production rate of right-handed and left-handed chiral molecules may be produced by external electric E and magnetic B fields and the finite width Γ of the resonance (correlation ΓE·B). The same effect may be produced by the parity-violating energy difference in chiral molecules

  20. Theory of Feshbach molecule formation in a dilute gas during a magnetic field ramp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, J. E.; Nygaard, Nicolai; Clark, C. W.

    2006-01-01

    Starting with coupled atom-molecule Boltzmann equations, we develop a simplified model to understand molecule formation observed in recent experiments. Our theory predicts several key features: (1) the effective adiabatic rate constant is proportional to density; (2) in an adiabatic ramp...... show qualitative agreement with the data from [Hodby et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 120402 (2005)] without the use of adjustable parameters....

  1. Formation of nuclear molecules in cluster radioactivity. On interpretation of the cluster radioactivity mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.V.; Cherepanov, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The basis for cluster radioactivity is the property of nuclei of light isotopes of elements heavier than lead to spontaneously form clusters - nuclei of light elements - from valence nucleons, which gives rise to asymmetric nuclear molecules. The cluster formation proceeds through successive excitation-free transfer of valence nucleons to the particle and to subsequent light nuclei. Nuclear molecule formation is accompanied by a considerable amount of released energy, which allows quantum-mechanical penetration of the cluster through the exit Coulomb barrier

  2. Formation of self-assembled monolayer of curcuminoid molecules on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlanga, Isadora; Etcheverry-Berríos, Álvaro; Mella, Andy; Jullian, Domingo; Gómez, Victoria Alejandra; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Fuenzalida, Victor; Flores, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thiophene curcuminoid molecules deposited on a gold surface by immersion. • Molecular dynamic studies of the molecular arrangement approaching the surface. • XPS and STM studies showing different arrangement of the molecules on the surface. • Molecular Interaction with surface depends on the sulfur position in thiophene rings. • Temporal evolution of the molecular arrangement on the surface. - Abstract: We investigated the formation of self-assembled monolayers of two thiophene curcuminoid molecules, 2-thphCCM (1) and 3-thphCCM (2), on polycrystalline gold substrates prepared by immersion of the surfaces in a solution of the molecules during 24 h. The functionalized surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Despite the fact that both molecules have the same composition and almost the same structure, these molecules exhibit different behavior on the gold surface, which can be explained by the different positions of the sulfur atoms in the terminal aromatic rings. In the case of molecule 1, the complete formation of a SAM can be observed after 24 h of immersion. In the case of molecule 2, the transition from flat-lying to upright configuration on the surface is still in process after 24 h of immersion. This is attributed to the fact that molecule 2 have the sulfur atoms more exposed than molecule 1.

  3. Formation of self-assembled monolayer of curcuminoid molecules on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlanga, Isadora [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Etcheverry-Berríos, Álvaro; Mella, Andy; Jullian, Domingo [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beaucheff 851, Santiago (Chile); Gómez, Victoria Alejandra [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria [ICREA (Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08018, Barcelona (Spain); CSIC-ICMAB (Institut de Ciència dels Materials de Barcelona), Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Fuenzalida, Victor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Flores, Marcos, E-mail: mflorescarra@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Thiophene curcuminoid molecules deposited on a gold surface by immersion. • Molecular dynamic studies of the molecular arrangement approaching the surface. • XPS and STM studies showing different arrangement of the molecules on the surface. • Molecular Interaction with surface depends on the sulfur position in thiophene rings. • Temporal evolution of the molecular arrangement on the surface. - Abstract: We investigated the formation of self-assembled monolayers of two thiophene curcuminoid molecules, 2-thphCCM (1) and 3-thphCCM (2), on polycrystalline gold substrates prepared by immersion of the surfaces in a solution of the molecules during 24 h. The functionalized surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Despite the fact that both molecules have the same composition and almost the same structure, these molecules exhibit different behavior on the gold surface, which can be explained by the different positions of the sulfur atoms in the terminal aromatic rings. In the case of molecule 1, the complete formation of a SAM can be observed after 24 h of immersion. In the case of molecule 2, the transition from flat-lying to upright configuration on the surface is still in process after 24 h of immersion. This is attributed to the fact that molecule 2 have the sulfur atoms more exposed than molecule 1.

  4. Cold molecules: Progress in quantum engineering of chemistry and quantum matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, John L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Cooling atoms to ultralow temperatures has produced a wealth of opportunities in fundamental physics, precision metrology, and quantum science. The more recent application of sophisticated cooling techniques to molecules, which has been more challenging to implement owing to the complexity of molecular structures, has now opened the door to the longstanding goal of precisely controlling molecular internal and external degrees of freedom and the resulting interaction processes. This line of research can leverage fundamental insights into how molecules interact and evolve to enable the control of reaction chemistry and the design and realization of a range of advanced quantum materials.

  5. The Formation of Charon's Red Poles from Seasonally Cold-Trapped Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Gladstone, D. R.; Howett, C. J. A.; Lauer, T. R.; Spencer, J. R.; Summers, M. E.; Buie, M. W.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of Plutos large satellite Charon is its dark red northern polar cap. Similar colours on Plutos surface have been attributed to tholin-like organic macromolecules produced by energetic radiation processing of hydrocarbons. The polar location on Charon implicates the temperature extremes that result from Charons high obliquity and long seasons in the production of this material. The escape of Pluto's atmosphere provides a potential feedstock for a complex chemistry. Gas from Pluto that is transiently cold-trapped and processed at Charon's winter pole was proposed as an explanation for the dark coloration on the basis of an image of Charon's northern hemisphere, but not modelled quantitatively. Here we report images of the southern hemisphere illuminated by Pluto-shine and also images taken during the approach phase that show the northern polar cap over a range of longitudes. We model the surface thermal environment on Charon and the supply and temporary cold-trapping of material escaping from Pluto, as well as the photolytic processing of this material into more complex and less volatile molecules while cold-trapped. The model results are consistent with the proposed mechanism for producing the observed colour pattern on Charon.

  6. FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Adamkovics, Mate; Glassgold, Alfred E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

  7. FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najita, Joan R.; Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    2011-01-01

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

  8. SEEDING THE FORMATION OF COLD GASEOUS CLOUDS IN MILKY WAY-SIZE HALOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keres, Dusan; Hernquist, Lars

    2009-01-01

    We use one of the highest resolution cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to date to demonstrate that cold gaseous clouds form around Milky Way-size galaxies. We further explore mechanisms responsible for their formation and show that a large fraction of clouds originate as a consequence of late-time filamentary 'cold mode' accretion. Here, filaments that are still colder and denser than the surrounding halo gas are not able to connect directly to galaxies, as they do at high redshift, but are instead susceptible to the combined action of cooling and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at intermediate radii within the halo leading to the production of cold, dense pressure-confined clouds, without an associated dark matter component. This process is aided through the compression of the incoming filaments by the hot halo gas and expanding shocks during the halo buildup. Our mechanism directly seeds clouds from gas with substantial local overdensity, unlike in previous models, and provides a channel for the origin of cloud complexes. These clouds can later 'rain' onto galaxies, delivering fuel for star formation. Owing to the relatively large cross-section of filaments and the net angular momentum carried by the gas, the clouds will be distributed in a modestly flattened region around a galaxy.

  9. Fusion rates for hydrogen isotopic molecules of relevance for ''cold fusion''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalewicz, K.; Morgan, J.D. III; Monkhorst, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    In response to the recent announcements of evidence for room-temperature fusion in the electrolysis of D 2 O, we have analyzed how the fusion rate depends on the reduced mass of the fusing nuclei, the effective mass of a ''heavy'' electron, and the degree of vibrational excitation. Our results have been obtained both by accurately solving the Schroedinger equation for the hydrogen molecule and by using the WKB approximation. We find that in light of the reported d-d fusion rate, the excess heat in the experiment by Fleischmann, Pons, and Hawkins [J. Electroanal. Chem. 261, 301 (1989)] is difficult to explain in terms of conventional nuclear processes

  10. The formation of galaxies and quasars in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooding, A.K.; Turok, N.; Spergel, D.N.

    1991-01-01

    The nonGaussian perturbations produced by global texture lead to the early formation of stars, quasars, and galaxies. Growth of the density fluctuation in cold dark matter induced by the unwinding of a texture 'knot' is calculated and the evolution of the mass multiplicity function in this galaxy formation model is determined. By z of about 50, about 3 percent of the mass of the universe has formed nonlinear objects of mass greater than 10 to the 6th solar masses - these objects may have reionized the universe. Most objects larger than 10 to the 12th solar masses form by z about 2-3, consistent with the observed epoch of QSO formation. Today, about 35 percent of the mass of the universe is in bound objects of mass greater than 10 to the 12th solar masses. It is found that the slope and the amplitude of the multiplicity function is consistent with the observed galaxy luminosity function. 24 refs

  11. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  12. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Michinaga

    Full Text Available Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice. Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist, IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist, or FR139317 (ETA antagonist prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  13. Manganese(III) Formate: A Three-Dimensional Framework That Traps Carbon Dioxide Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornia, Andrea; Caneschi, Andrea; Dapporto, Paolo; Fabretti, Antonio C; Gatteschi, Dante; Malavasi, Wanda; Sangregorio, Claudio; Sessoli, Roberta

    1999-06-14

    Carbon dioxide, formic acid, and water molecules are trapped in the crystal lattice of manganese(III) formate (see 1), which was obtained by reducing permanganate with formic acid. Each CO 2 guest molecule exhibits four C-H⋅⋅⋅O-C-O interactions with the three-dimensional host framework of Mn(HCOO) 3 units. Compound 1 undergoes an antiferromagnetic phase transition at 27 K. © 1999 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  14. Pump-probe study of the formation of rubidium molecules by ultrafast photoassociation of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, David J.; England, Duncan G.; Martay, Hugo E. L.; Friedman, Melissa E.; Petrovic, Jovana; Dimova, Emiliya; Chatel, Béatrice; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2009-09-01

    An experimental pump-probe study of the photoassociative creation of translationally ultracold rubidium molecules is presented together with numerical simulations of the process. The formation of loosely bound excited-state dimers is observed as a first step toward a fully coherent pump-dump approach to the stabilization of Rb2 into its lowest ground vibrational states. The population that contributes to the pump-probe process is characterized and found to be distinct from a background population of preassociated molecules.

  15. Ultra-cold molecules in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynar, Roahn Helden

    2000-08-01

    This thesis is about photoassociation of Bose-condensed 87Rb. Most importantly we report that state selected 87Rb2 molecules were created at rest in a condensate of 87Rb using two-photon photoassociation. Additionally, we have identified three weakly bound states of the 87Rb2 S+u3 , potential for the |1, -1> + |1, - 1> collisional channel. The binding energies of these states are 529.4 +/- .07, 636.0094 +/- .0012, and 24.24 +/- .01 MHz respectively. We have also carried out a detailed study of the density dependence of the shift and width of the two-photon lineshape. This shift and width is modeled using the theory of Bohn and Julienne [34] and in addition to the precise measurement of binding energy we also report the first measurement of an atom molecule scattering length, aam, which we conclude is -180 +/- 150 a0, and the inelastic collision rate, Kinel dependent coherent coupling between atoms and molecules. This theory yields two coupled equations, one for the evolution of atomic condensate amplitude and one for the evolution of molecular condensate amplitude. The nature of the atomic-molecular condensate evolution is shown to depend on six, model parameters including the coherent coupling, given by cn . The other five parameters can be interpreted as light-shifts and incoherent loss rates. We present a calculation intended to estimate the values of these six parameters for the 87Rb - 87Rb 2 system. Based on the results of this calculation we identify two locations in the 87Rb2 spectrum where coherent transfer of population from atomic condensate to molecular condensate is plausible. Finally, we examine the credibility of the theoretical model used to estimate the six parameters used by the mean field theory. By comparing the measured Stark shifts of two-color resonances with predictions based on our theoretical model we conclude that the model is satisfactory for the v = 37 level of the S+u3 potential. This work also describes the experimental details of

  16. THE CHEMISTRY OF POPULATION III SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. FORMATION OF MOLECULES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherchneff, Isabelle; Dwek, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We study the formation and destruction of molecules in the ejecta of Population III supernovae (SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach to follow the evolution of molecular abundances from day 100 to day 1000 after explosion. The chemical species included in the study range from simple diatomic molecules to more complex dust precursor species. All relevant molecule formation and destruction processes that are unique to the SN environment are considered. Our work focuses on zero-metallicity progenitors with masses of 20, 170, and 270 M sun , and we study the effect of different levels of heavy element mixing and the inward diffusion of hydrogen and helium on the ejecta chemistry. We show that the ejecta chemistry does not reach a steady state within the relevant timespan (∼3 yr) for molecule formation, thus invalidating previous results relying on this assumption. The primary species formed in the harsh SN environment are O 2 , CO, SiS, and SO. The SiO, formed as early as 200 days after explosion, is rapidly depleted by the formation of silica molecular precursors in the ejecta. The rapid conversion of CO to C 2 and its thermal fractionation at temperatures above 5000 K allow for the formation of carbon chains in the oxygen-rich zone of the unmixed models, providing an important pathway for the formation of carbon dust in hot environments where the C/O ratio is less than 1. We show that the fully mixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor synthesizes 11.3 M sun of molecules, whereas 20 M sun and 270 M sun progenitors produce 0.78 M sun and 3.2 M sun of molecules, respectively. The admixing of 10% of hydrogen into the fully mixed ejecta of the 170 M sun progenitor increases its molecular yield to ∼47 M sun . The unmixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor SN without hydrogen penetration synthesizes ∼37 M sun of molecules, whereas its 20 M sun counterpart produces ∼1.2 M sun . This smaller efficiency at forming molecules is due to the large fraction of He + in the

  17. THE FORMATION OF SHELL GALAXIES SIMILAR TO NGC 7600 IN THE COLD DARK MATTER COSMOGONY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Andrew P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Helly, John; Frenk, Carlos; Cole, Shaun; Crawford, Ken; Zibetti, Stefano; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Jay GaBany, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present new deep observations of 'shell' structures in the halo of the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 7600, alongside a movie of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe. The movie, based on an ab initio cosmological simulation, shows how continuous accretion of clumps of dark matter and stars creates a swath of diffuse circumgalactic structures. The disruption of a massive clump on a near-radial orbit creates a complex system of transient concentric shells which bare a striking resemblance to those of NGC 7600. With the aid of the simulation we interpret NGC 7600 in the context of the CDM model.

  18. The Formation of Shell Galaxies Similar to NGC 7600 in the Cold Dark Matter Cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Helly, John; Frenk, Carlos; Cole, Shaun; Crawford, Ken; Zibetti, Stefano; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; GaBany, R. Jay

    2011-12-01

    We present new deep observations of "shell" structures in the halo of the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 7600, alongside a movie of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe. The movie, based on an ab initio cosmological simulation, shows how continuous accretion of clumps of dark matter and stars creates a swath of diffuse circumgalactic structures. The disruption of a massive clump on a near-radial orbit creates a complex system of transient concentric shells which bare a striking resemblance to those of NGC 7600. With the aid of the simulation we interpret NGC 7600 in the context of the CDM model.

  19. Galaxy and cluster formation in a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primack, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    The dark matter (DM) that appears to be gravitationally dominant on all astronomical scales larger than the cores of galaxies can be classified, on the basis of its characteristic free-streaming damping mass M/sub D/, as hot (M/sub D/ approx. 10 15 M/sub mass/), warm (M/sub D/ approx. 10 11 M/sub mass/), or cold (M/sub D 8 M/sub mass/). For the case of cold DM, the shape of the DM fluctuation spectrum is determined by (a) the primordial spectrum (on scales larger than the horizon), and (b) stagspansion, the stagnation of the growth of DM fluctuations that enter the horizon while the universe is still radiation-dominated. An attractive feature of the cold dark matter hypothesis is its considerable predictive power: the post-recombination fluctuation spectrum is calculable, and it in turn governs the formation of galaxies and clusters. Good agreement with the data is obtained for a Zeldovich spectrum of primordial fluctuations

  20. Galaxy and cluster formation in a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primack, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    The dark matter (DM) that appears to be gravitationally dominant on all astronomical scales larger than the cores of galaxies can be classified, on the basis of its characteristic free-streaming damping mass M/sub D/, as hot (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 15/ M/sub mass/), warm (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 11/ M/sub mass/), or cold (M/sub D < 10/sup 8/ M/sub mass/). For the case of cold DM, the shape of the DM fluctuation spectrum is determined by (a) the primordial spectrum (on scales larger than the horizon), and (b) stagspansion, the stagnation of the growth of DM fluctuations that enter the horizon while the universe is still radiation-dominated. An attractive feature of the cold dark matter hypothesis is its considerable predictive power: the post-recombination fluctuation spectrum is calculable, and it in turn governs the formation of galaxies and clusters. Good agreement with the data is obtained for a Zeldovich spectrum of primordial fluctuations.

  1. Muon cycling rate in D/T mixture including doubly muonic molecule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Eskandari

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available   In the present work, the fundamental behavior of four body molecule formations of pt μμ , pd μμ , dt μμ , tt μμ , and pp μμ in a D/T fusion are considered. Their higher fusion rate, specially the available data for dt μμ , encouraged us to study the muon cycling rate in D/T fusion in the temperature range of (100-1400 K, density and deuterium-tritium concentration ratio. For this purpose, various values for the doubly muonic molecule formation are chosen and with the comparison to the experimental results, the doubly muonic formation rate of 109 s-1 is predicted theoretically. Our calculated cycling rate has shown that having not considered the doubly muonic formation in previous calculations had made no serious changes in the previously calculated values.

  2. Sheath formation of a plasma containing multiply charged ions, cold and hot electrons, and emitted electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    It is quite well known that ion confinement is an important factor in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) as it is closely related to the plasma potential. A model of sheath formation was extended to a plasma containing multiply charged ions (MCIs), cold and hot electrons, and secondary electrons emitted either by MCIs or hot electrons. In the model, a modification of the 'Bohm criterion' was given, the sheath potential drop and the critical emission condition were also analyzed. It appears that the presence of hot electrons and emitted electrons strongly affects the sheath formation so that smaller hot electrons and larger emission current result in reduced sheath potential (or floating potential). However the sheath potential was found to become independent of the emission current J when J > J c , (where J c is the critical emission current. The paper is followed by the associated poster

  3. Laboratory Anion Chemistry: Implications for the DIBs, and a Potential Formation Mechanism for a Known Interstellar Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, B.; Barckholtz, C.; Stepanovic, M.; Bierbaum, V.; Snow, T.

    2002-01-01

    Due to recent interest in molecular anions as possible interstellar species, we have carried out several laboratory studies of anion chemistry. The reactions of the series C(sub n)(sup -); and C(sub n)H(sup -) with H and H2 were studied to address the viability of such species in the diffuse interstellar medium and to address their ability to be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). These same molecules were also reacted with N and O to show possible heteroatomic products. C(sub m)N(sup - was a particularly stable product from the reaction of C(sub n)(sup -) + N. C3N(sup -) was further reacted with H to study chemistry that could produce HC3N, a known interstellar species. The reactions were done in a flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube apparatus (FA-SIFT). The anions were generated in an electron impact or cold cathode discharge source and the anion of interest was then selected by a quadrupole mass filter. The selected ion was then reacted with the atomic or molecular species in the flow tube and products were detected by another quadrupole. While the C(sub n)(sup -) species do not appear to be viable DIB carriers, their possible presence could provide a mechanism for the formation of known heteroatomic neutral molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM).

  4. Controlling formation of single-molecule junctions by electrochemical reduction of diazonium terminal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Thomas; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Nakamura, Hisao; Shimazaki, Tomomi; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tao, Nongjian

    2013-03-06

    We report controlling the formation of single-molecule junctions by means of electrochemically reducing two axialdiazonium terminal groups on a molecule, thereby producing direct Au-C covalent bonds in situ between the molecule and gold electrodes. We report a yield enhancement in molecular junction formation as the electrochemical potential of both junction electrodes approach the reduction potential of the diazonium terminal groups. Step length analysis shows that the molecular junction is significantly more stable, and can be pulled over a longer distance than a comparable junction created with amine anchoring bonds. The stability of the junction is explained by the calculated lower binding energy associated with the direct Au-C bond compared with the Au-N bond.

  5. Strain-induced formation of fourfold symmetric SiGe quantum dot molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovyev, V A; Dvurechenskii, A V; Kuchinskaya, P A; Armbrister, V A

    2013-12-27

    The strain field distribution at the surface of a multilayer structure with disklike SiGe nanomounds formed by heteroepitaxy is exploited to arrange the symmetric quantum dot molecules typically consisting of four elongated quantum dots ordered along the [010] and [100] directions. The morphological transition from fourfold quantum dot molecules to continuous fortresslike quantum rings with an increasing amount of deposited Ge is revealed. We examine key mechanisms underlying the formation of lateral quantum dot molecules by using scanning tunneling microscopy and numerical calculations of the strain energy distribution on the top of disklike SiGe nanomounds. Experimental data are well described by a simple thermodynamic model based on the accurate evaluation of the strain dependent part of the surface chemical potential. The spatial arrangement of quantum dots inside molecules is attributed to the effect of elastic property anisotropy.

  6. Void formation in cold-worked type 316 stainless steel irradiated with 1-MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefer, D.W.; Pard, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    Cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel was irradiated at 500 and 600 0 C with 1-MeV protons. The dependence of void formation on displacement damage, irradiation temperature, and microstructure was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Cold working delays the onset of swelling and reduces it, via a reduction in void size, at both irradiation temperatures. Inhomogeneity in the cold-worked microstructure leads to inhomogeneity in the disposition of voids. Swelling at 600 is greater than at 500 0 C; the voids are less numerous but larger at the higher temperature. No change in the cold-worked microstructure can be detected by transmission electron microscopy after 500 0 C irradiation to 23 displacements per atom. Irradiation to a comparable damage level at 600 0 C results in almost complete elimination of the cold-worked microstructure. Comparison of the results is made with data from reactor irradiation experiments

  7. Molecules in the cold environment of a supersonic free-jet beam: from spectroscopy of neutral-neutral interactions to a test of Bell's inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperski, J; Fry, E S

    2006-01-01

    The supersonic free-jet expansion technique has been used in different fields of research in physics, physical chemistry and chemistry to study vibrational and rotational molecular structures in ground and excited electronic energy states as well as in cold chemistry to study chemical reactions in a unique environment. The supersonic beam technique, as a widely used method in laser spectroscopy of molecules, exploits a source of monokinetic, rotationally and vibrationally cold molecules, that are very weakly bound in their ground electronic states (van der Waals molecules). In experiments at Jagiellonian University the supersonic free-jet beam serves as a source of ground-state van der Waals objects in studies of neutral-neutral interactions between group 12 metal (M = Zn, Cd, Hg) and noble gas (NG) atoms. Recently, the method has been applied as a source of entangled 199 Hg atom pairs in order to test Bell's inequality in an experiment at Texas A and M University

  8. The formation of a cold-core eddy in the East Australian Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H. S.; Roughan, M.; Baird, M. E.; Wilkin, J.

    2016-02-01

    Cold-core eddies (CCEs) frequently form in western boundary currents and can affect continental shelf processes. It is not always clear, however, if baroclinic or barotropic instabilities contribute more to their formation. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) is used to investigate the ocean state during the formation of a CCE in the East Australian Current (EAC) during October 2009. The observed eddy initially appeared as a small billow (approx. 50 km in length) that perturbed the landward edge of the EAC. The billow grew into a mesoscale CCE (approx. 100 km in diameter), diverting the EAC around it. A ROMS simulation with a realistic wind field reproduced a similar eddy. This eddy formed from negative vorticity waters found on the continental shelf south of the EAC separation point. A sensitivity analysis is performed whereby the impact of 3 different wind forcing scenarios, upwelling, downwelling, and no winds, are investigated. A CCE formed in all wind scenarios despite the wind induced changes in hydrographic conditions in the continental shelf and slope waters. As such, the source of energy for eddy formation did not come from the interactions of wind with the continental shelf waters. Analysis of strain and energy transformation confirms this by showing that the prevailing source of CCE energy was kinetic energy of the offshore EAC. These results clearly link the formation of the CCE to the swift flowing EAC and barotropic instabilities.

  9. FORMATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT: COLD STREAMS, CLUMPY DISKS, AND COMPACT SPHEROIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Sari, Re'em; Ceverino, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple theoretical framework for massive galaxies at high redshift, where the main assembly and star formation occurred, and report on the first cosmological simulations that reveal clumpy disks consistent with our analysis. The evolution is governed by the interplay between smooth and clumpy cold streams, disk instability, and bulge formation. Intense, relatively smooth streams maintain an unstable dense gas-rich disk. Instability with high turbulence and giant clumps, each a few percent of the disk mass, is self-regulated by gravitational interactions within the disk. The clumps migrate into a bulge in ∼ sun yr -1 , and each clump converts into stars in ∼0.5 Gyr. While the clumps coalesce dissipatively to a compact bulge, the star-forming disk is extended because the incoming streams keep the outer disk dense and susceptible to instability and because of angular momentum transport. Passive spheroid-dominated galaxies form when the streams are more clumpy: the external clumps merge into a massive bulge and stir up disk turbulence that stabilize the disk and suppress in situ clump and star formation. We predict a bimodality in galaxy type by z ∼ 3, involving giant-clump star-forming disks and spheroid-dominated galaxies of suppressed star formation. After z ∼ 1, the disks tend to be stabilized by the dominant stellar disks and bulges. Most of the high-z massive disks are likely to end up as today's early-type galaxies.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  11. Adsorption of organic molecules may explain growth of newly nucleated clusters and new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2013-05-01

    New particle formation consists of formation of thermodynamically stable clusters from trace gas molecules (homogeneous nucleation) followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size. Because of the large coagulation rate of clusters smaller than 3 nm with the preexisting aerosol population, for new particle formation to take place, these clusters need to grow sufficiently fast to escape removal by coagulation. Previous studies have indicated that condensation of low-volatility organic vapor may play an important role in the initial growth of the clusters. However, due to the relatively high vapor pressure and partial molar volume of even highly oxidized organic compounds, the strong Kelvin effect may prevent typical ambient organics from condensing on these small clusters. Earlier studies did not consider that adsorption of organic molecules on the cluster surface, due to the intermolecular forces between the organic molecule and cluster, may occur and substantially alter the growth process under sub-saturated conditions. Using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm, we show that the adsorption of organic molecules onto the surface of clusters may significantly reduce the saturation ratio required for condensation of organics to occur, and therefore may provide a physico-chemical explanation for the enhanced initial growth by condensation of organics despite the strong Kelvin effect.

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H 2 O, NH 3 , CO 2 , H 2 CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites

  13. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Ciampi, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform. (fast track communication)

  14. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Neal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation.

  15. GALAXY FORMATION WITH COLD GAS ACCRETION AND EVOLVING STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Xi; Lin, W. P.; Skibba, Ramin; Chen, D. N.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function is especially useful to test the current model of galaxy formation. Observational data have revealed a few inconsistencies with predictions from the ΛCDM model. For example, most massive galaxies have already been observed at very high redshifts, and they have experienced only mild evolution since then. In conflict with this, semi-analytical models (SAMs) of galaxy formation predict an insufficient number of massive galaxies at high redshift and a rapid evolution between redshift 1 and 0. In addition, there is a strong correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass for star-forming galaxies, which can be roughly reproduced with the model, but with a normalization that is too low at high redshift. Furthermore, the stellar mass density obtained from the integral of the cosmic star formation history is higher than the measured one by a factor of 2. In this paper, we study these issues using an SAM that includes (1) cold gas accretion in massive halos at high redshift; (2) tidal stripping of stellar mass from satellite galaxies; and (3) an evolving stellar initial mass function (IMF; bottom-light) with a higher gas recycle fraction. Our results show that the combined effects from (1) and (2) can predict sufficiently massive galaxies at high redshifts and reproduce their mild evolution at low redshift, while the combined effects of (1) and (3) can reproduce the correlation between SFR and stellar mass for star-forming galaxies across a wide range of redshifts. A bottom-light/top-heavy stellar IMF could partly resolve the conflict between the stellar mass density and cosmic star formation history.

  16. Quasiresonant formation of dtμ mesic molecules in triple collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men'shikov, L.I.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    A quasiresonant mechanism of mesic molecules formation, in triple collisions of the type tμ+D 2 +D 2 → [(dtμ)d2e] * +D ν is considered. It is shown that at small resonance defects and big D 2 +T 2 mixture densities φ the rate of this process λ qr ∼ φ 2 and it is comparable with the rate λ r ∼ φ of the mesic molecules resonant formation in the reactions of the type tμ+D 2 → [(dtμ)d2e] ν *. The observable manifestations of the process considered and its role in the muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium-tritium mixture are discussed

  17. SURVIVAL OF INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES TO PRESTELLAR DENSE CORE COLLAPSE AND EARLY PHASES OF DISK FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hincelin, U.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Commerçon, B.

    2013-01-01

    An outstanding question of astrobiology is the link between the chemical composition of planets, comets, and other solar system bodies and the molecules formed in the interstellar medium. Understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the matter leading to the formation of protoplanetary disks is an important step for this. We provide some new clues to this long-standing problem using three-dimensional chemical simulations of the early phases of disk formation: we interfaced the full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic model RAMSES, for different configurations and intensities of the magnetic field. Our results show that the chemical content (gas and ices) is globally conserved during the collapsing process, from the parent molecular cloud to the young disk surrounding the first Larson core. A qualitative comparison with cometary composition suggests that comets are constituted of different phases, some molecules being direct tracers of interstellar chemistry, while others, including complex molecules, seem to have been formed in disks, where higher densities and temperatures allow for an active grain surface chemistry. The latter phase, and its connection with the formation of the first Larson core, remains to be modeled

  18. Proton transfer and complex formation of angiotensin I ions with gaseous molecules at various temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonose, Shinji; Yamashita, Kazuki; Sudo, Ayako; Kawashima, Minami

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proton transfer from angiotensin I ions (z = 2, 3) to gaseous molecules was studied. • Temperature dependence of absolute reaction rate constants was measured. • Remarkable changes were obtained for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. • Proton transfer reaction was enhanced and reduced by complex formation. • Conformation changes are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. - Abstract: Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +2 charge state, [M + 2H] 2+ , to primary, secondary and aromatic amines were examined in the gas phase. Absolute reaction rate constants for proton transfer were determined from intensities of parent and product ions in the mass spectra. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants was measured. Remarkable change was observed for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. Proton transfer reaction was enhanced or reduced by complex formation of [M + 2H] 2+ with gaseous molecules. The results relate to conformation changes of [M + 2H] 2+ with change of temperature, which are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +3 charge state, [M + 3H] 3+ , were also studied. The reaction rates did not depend on temperature so definitely

  19. Quadrupole corrections to matrix elements of transitions in resonant reactions of muonic molecule formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M.P.; Strizh, T.A.; Armour, E.A.G.; Harston, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The calculated resonant formation rates of the muonic molecules DDμ and DTμ are presented. The approach developed earlier for calculating the transition matrix elements in the dipole approximation has been extended to include the quadrupole terms in the multipole expansion of the interaction operator. The calculated dependence of the DTμ formation rates on the energies of the incident Tμ muonic atoms shows that the effect of including the quadrupole correction is to reduce the magnitude of the peak rates by about 20-30% at the different temperatures, compared to those calculated in the dipole approximation. The dependence on temperature for the DDμ formation rates is obtained with the differences between the presented and previous calculations being less than 5%. (orig.)

  20. Theory of muonic molecule formation: survey of progress and open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Auger mechanism of muonic molecule formation is operative for all the isotopic reactions channels, and the agreement between theory and experiment is quite good for all the observable reactions. For ddμ and dtμ formation, however, the resonance mechanism of Vesman is dominant and produces some dramatic effects. For ddμ, the temperature dependences for the different hyperfine states provide a striking confirmation of the theory. For dtμ, the comparison with experimental is much more difficult, and furthermore the appearance of an evident three-body contribution to the formation cross section presents a formidable challenge to theory. A completely convincing and practical method of calculating this term has yet to be achieved, but a classical trajectory model which provides some insight into the underlying physics is presented. (orig.)

  1. FORMATION AND RECONDENSATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES DURING PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY OUTBURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude

  2. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules during Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  3. FORMATION AND RECONDENSATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES DURING PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY OUTBURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taquet, Vianney [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wirström, Eva S. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Charnley, Steven B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Mailstop 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  4. The formation of cosmic structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Andrew K.; Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Neil; Gott, Richard, III

    1992-01-01

    The growth of density fluctuations induced by global texture in an Omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) cosmogony is calculated. The resulting power spectra are in good agreement with each other, with more power on large scales than in the standard inflation plus CDM model. Calculation of related statistics (two-point correlation functions, mass variances, cosmic Mach number) indicates that the texture plus CDM model compares more favorably than standard CDM with observations of large-scale structure. Texture produces coherent velocity fields on large scales, as observed. Excessive small-scale velocity dispersions, and voids less empty than those observed may be remedied by including baryonic physics. The topology of the cosmic structure agrees well with observation. The non-Gaussian texture induced density fluctuations lead to earlier nonlinear object formation than in Gaussian models and may also be more compatible with recent evidence that the galaxy density field is non-Gaussian on large scales. On smaller scales the density field is strongly non-Gaussian, but this appears to be primarily due to nonlinear gravitational clustering. The velocity field on smaller scales is surprisingly Gaussian.

  5. The giant Mauritanian cold-water coral mound province: Oxygen control on coral mound formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienberg, Claudia; Titschack, Jürgen; Freiwald, André; Frank, Norbert; Lundälv, Tomas; Taviani, Marco; Beuck, Lydia; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Krengel, Thomas; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2018-04-01

    The largest coherent cold-water coral (CWC) mound province in the Atlantic Ocean exists along the Mauritanian margin, where up to 100 m high mounds extend over a distance of ∼400 km, arranged in two slope-parallel chains in 400-550 m water depth. Additionally, CWCs are present in the numerous submarine canyons with isolated coral mounds being developed on some canyon flanks. Seventy-seven Uranium-series coral ages were assessed to elucidate the timing of CWC colonisation and coral mound development along the Mauritanian margin for the last ∼120,000 years. Our results show that CWCs were present on the mounds during the Last Interglacial, though in low numbers corresponding to coral mound aggradation rates of 16 cm kyr-1. Most prolific periods for CWC growth are identified for the last glacial and deglaciation, resulting in enhanced mound aggradation (>1000 cm kyr-1), before mound formation stagnated along the entire margin with the onset of the Holocene. Until today, the Mauritanian mounds are in a dormant state with only scarce CWC growth. In the canyons, live CWCs are abundant since the Late Holocene at least. Thus, the canyons may serve as a refuge to CWCs potentially enabling the observed modest re-colonisation pulse on the mounds along the open slope. The timing and rate of the pre-Holocene coral mound aggradation, and the cessation of mound formation varied between the individual mounds, which was likely the consequence of vertical/lateral changes in water mass structure that placed the mounds near or out of oxygen-depleted waters, respectively.

  6. Duration and severity of symptoms and levels of plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor, and adhesion molecules in patients with common cold treated with zinc acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ananda S; Beck, Frances W J; Bao, Bin; Snell, Diane; Fitzgerald, James T

    2008-03-15

    Zinc lozenges have been used for treatment of the common cold; however, the results remain controversial. Fifty ambulatory volunteers were recruited within 24 h of developing symptoms of the common cold for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of zinc. Participants took 1 lozenge containing 13.3 mg of zinc (as zinc acetate) or placebo every 2-3 h while awake. The subjective scores for common cold symptoms were recorded daily. Plasma zinc, soluble interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1ra), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, soluble vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecule, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 were assayed on days 1 and 5. Compared with the placebo group, the zinc group had a shorter mean overall duration of cold (4.0 vs. 7.1 days; P cold symptoms. We related the improvement in cold symptoms to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of zinc.

  7. Synergism of Saturn, Enceladus and Titan and Formation of HCNO Prebiotic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn as a system has two very exotic moons Titan and Enceladus. Titan, taking in energy from Saturn's magnetosphere, solar UV irradiation, and cosmic rays, can make HCN based molecules as discussed in earlier paper by Raulin and Owen. Space radiation effects at both moons, and as coupled by the Saturn magnetosphere, could cause an unexpected series of events potentially leading to prebiotic chemical evolution at Titan with HCNO from magnetospheric oxygen as the new ingredient. The "Old Faithful" model suggests that Enceladus, highly irradiated by Saturn magnetospheric electrons and thus having a source of chemical energy from radiolytic gas production, has episodic ejections of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and various hydrocarbons into Saturn's magnetosphere. The hydrocarbons do not survive transport through the plasma environment, but oxygen ions from Enceladus water molecules become the dominant ion species in the outer magnetosphere. At Titan, Cassini discovered that 1) keV oxygen ions, evidently from Enceladus, are bombarding Titan's upper atmosphere and 2) heavy positive and negative ions exist in significant abundances within Titan's upper atmosphere. Initial models of heavy ion formation in Titan's upper atmosphere invoked polymerization of aromatics such as benzenes and their radicals to make polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) , while a more recent model by Sittler et al., has raised the possibility of carbon chains forming from the polymerization of acetylene and its radicals to make fullerenes. Laboratory measurements indicate that fullerenes, which are hollow carbon shells, can trap keV oxygen ions. Clustering of the fullerenes with aerosol mixtures from PAHs and the dominant nitrogen molecules could form larger aerosols enriched in trapped oxygen. Aerosol precipitation could then convey these chemically complex structures deeper into the atmosphere and to the moon surface. Ionizing solar UV, magnetospheric electron, and galactic cosmic ray

  8. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  9. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I; Imholz, Nicole C E; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J M; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections.

  10. Cold stress increases reactive oxygen species formation via TRPA1 activation in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Cui, Haiyang; Ma, Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for lung damage during inhalation of cold air. However, the mechanism of the ROS production induced by cold stress in the lung is still unclear. In this work, we measured the changes of ROS and the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 to 5 °C) exposure of A549 cell resulted in an increase of ROS and [Ca(2+)]c, which was completely attenuated by removing Ca(2+) from medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of ROS and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Moreover, HC-030031, a TRPA1 selective antagonist, significantly inhibited the enhanced ROS and [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TRPA1 activation played an important role in the enhanced production of ROS induced by cold stress in A549 cell.

  11. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  12. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine; Guerra, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1–5 Torr and discharge currents ∼40–120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O 3 * , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O 3 * is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established. (paper)

  13. Caffeine suppresses homologous recombination through interference with RAD51-mediated joint molecule formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex N.; Sanchez, Humberto; Ristic, Dejan; Vidic, Iztok; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Essers, Jeroen; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely used inhibitor of the protein kinases that play a central role in the DNA damage response. We used chemical inhibitors and genetically deficient mouse embryonic stem cell lines to study the role of DNA damage response in stable integration of the transfected DNA and found that caffeine rapidly, efficiently and reversibly inhibited homologous integration of the transfected DNA as measured by several homologous recombination-mediated gene-targeting assays. Biochemical and structural biology experiments revealed that caffeine interfered with a pivotal step in homologous recombination, homologous joint molecule formation, through increasing interactions of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament with non-homologous DNA. Our results suggest that recombination pathways dependent on extensive homology search are caffeine-sensitive and stress the importance of considering direct checkpoint-independent mechanisms in the interpretation of the effects of caffeine on DNA repair. PMID:23666627

  14. Theoretical calculation of enthalpy of formation of multiconformational molecules: 1,2-ethanediol, propanediols, and glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeeva, Olga V.; Suchkova, Taisiya A.

    2018-04-01

    The gas-phase enthalpies of formation of four molecules with high flexibility, which leads to the existence of a large number of low-energy conformers, were calculated with the G4 method to see whether the lowest energy conformer is sufficient to achieve high accuracy in the computed values. The calculated values were in good agreement with the experiment, whereas adding the correction for conformer distribution makes the agreement worse. The reason for this effect is a large anharmonicity of low-frequency torsional motions, which is ignored in the calculation of ZPVE and thermal enthalpy. It was shown that the approximate correction for anharmonicity estimated using a free rotor model is of very similar magnitude compared with the conformer correction but has the opposite sign, and thus almost fully compensates for it. Therefore, the common practice of adding only the conformer correction is not without problems.

  15. Time-dependent analysis of tunneling effect in the formation of ultracold molecules via photo-association of laser-cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatasescu, M.; Masnou-Seeuws, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper contains a time-dependent investigation of the tunneling effect observed in the photo-association spectrum of Cs 2 and attributed to the 0 g - (6s,6p 3/2 ) double well. When by photo-association of two cold cesium atoms a vibrational level of the outer well is populated, tunneling is an efficient mechanism for transferring the population to the inner well (R 0 ), where spontaneous emission may lead to formation of cold molecules in low vibrational levels of the a 3 Σ u + (6s,6s) electronic state. This tunneling effect is analyzed by wave packets propagation, first considering the double well potential alone, and following a packet made by a superposition of states initially located at large distances. Characteristic times for the vibration dynamics, corresponding to a beating phenomenon between the two wells, to partial 'revival' at large distances, and to maxima in the population localized in the inner well are reported and discussed. Second, we simulate the two-channels a 3 Σ u + (6s,6s) → 0 g - (6s,6p 3/2 ) photo-association at detuning around 2.9 cm -1 : the inner well can be populated either by the excitation of a vibrational level of the external well (resonant excitation), or by tuning the photo-association laser at the energy of the inner well level which displays tunneling (''off-resonance excitation''). In the first case the photo-association is efficient, while the tunneling probability is small; in the second, the tunneling probability is large, so that despite the poor efficiency of the photo-association process, more population can be transferred to the inner well. This second choice is shown to be very sensitive to the laser intensity, which could be used to control the population of the inner well and hence the formation of ultracold molecules in low vibrational levels. (authors)

  16. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S; Nichols, Kim E

    2013-04-25

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase-mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell-mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA-mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS.

  17. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo López Mateos No. 1801 Ote. C.P, Aguascalientes, Ags, 20256 (Mexico); Hernández-Montoya, Virginia, E-mail: virginia.hernandez@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo López Mateos No. 1801 Ote. C.P, Aguascalientes, Ags, 20256 (Mexico); Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080, Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite was observed on the carbon surface. • Occurrence of CaCO{sub 3} on the carbons surface plays a crucial role in the formation. • The carbons were prepared by carbonization and oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. • Oxidation with cold oxygen plasma increases the formation of these compounds. - Abstract: A new procedure of elimination of Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N{sub 2} at −196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb{sup 2+} removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO{sub 3} on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb{sup 2+}. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb{sup 2+} per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  18. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S.; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite was observed on the carbon surface. • Occurrence of CaCO_3 on the carbons surface plays a crucial role in the formation. • The carbons were prepared by carbonization and oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. • Oxidation with cold oxygen plasma increases the formation of these compounds. - Abstract: A new procedure of elimination of Pb"2"+ from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N_2 at −196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb"2"+ was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb"2"+ removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO_3 on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb"2"+. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb"2"+ per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  19. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-08-15

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  20. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-01-01

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  1. Formation and Atmosphere of Complex Organic Molecules of the HH 212 Protostellar Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hirano, Naomi; Shang, Hsien [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zhang, Qizhou, E-mail: cflee@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system recently found to host a “hamburger”-shaped dusty disk with a radius of ∼60 au, deeply embedded in an infalling-rotating flattened envelope. We have spatially resolved this envelope-disk system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at up to ∼16 au (0.″04) resolution. The envelope is detected in HCO{sup +} J = 4–3 down to the dusty disk. Complex organic molecules (COMs) and doubly deuterated formaldehyde (D{sub 2}CO) are detected above and below the dusty disk within ∼40 au of the central protostar. The COMs are methanol (CH{sub 3}OH), deuterated methanol (CH{sub 2}DOH), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), and formamide (NH{sub 2}CHO, a prebiotic precursor). We have modeled the gas kinematics in HCO{sup +} and COMs and found a centrifugal barrier (CB) at a radius of ∼44 au, within which a Keplerian rotating disk is formed. This indicates that HCO{sup +} traces the infalling-rotating envelope down to the CB and COMs trace the atmosphere of a Keplerian rotating disk within the CB. The COMs are spatially resolved for the first time, both radially and vertically, in the atmosphere of a disk in the earliest, Class 0 phase of star formation. Our spatially resolved observations of COMs favor their formation in the disk rather than a rapidly infalling (warm) inner envelope. The abundances and spatial distributions of the COMs provide strong constraints on models of their formation and transport in low-mass star formation.

  2. The formation of urea in space. I. Ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and radical gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigiano, Flavio Siro; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Largo, Antonio; Spezia, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    Context. Many organic molecules have been observed in the interstellar medium thanks to advances in radioastronomy, and very recently the presence of urea was also suggested. While those molecules were observed, it is not clear what the mechanisms responsible to their formation are. In fact, if gas-phase reactions are responsible, they should occur through barrierless mechanisms (or with very low barriers). In the past, mechanisms for the formation of different organic molecules were studied, providing only in a few cases energetic conditions favorable to a synthesis at very low temperature. A particularly intriguing class of such molecules are those containing one N-C-O peptide bond, which could be a building block for the formation of biological molecules. Urea is a particular case because two nitrogen atoms are linked to the C-O moiety. Thus, motivated also by the recent tentative observation of urea, we have considered the synthetic pathways responsible to its formation. Aims: We have studied the possibility of forming urea in the gas phase via different kinds of bi-molecular reactions: ion-molecule, neutral, and radical. In particular we have focused on the activation energy of these reactions in order to find possible reactants that could be responsible for to barrierless (or very low energy) pathways. Methods: We have used very accurate, highly correlated quantum chemistry calculations to locate and characterize the reaction pathways in terms of minima and transition states connecting reactants to products. Results: Most of the reactions considered have an activation energy that is too high; but the ion-molecule reaction between NH2OHNH2OH2+ and formamide is not too high. These reactants could be responsible not only for the formation of urea but also of isocyanic acid, which is an organic molecule also observed in the interstellar medium.

  3. Chiral domain formation from the mixture of achiral rod-like liquid crystal and tri boomerang-shaped molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous formation of chiral domains such as a helical filament and a bent-broom texture was observed from the mixture of a rod-like liquid crystal octylcyano-biphenyl (8CB) and a tri boomerang-shaped 2,4,6-triphenoxy-1,3,5-triazine (triphenoxy) molecule. Although the constituent molecules were achiral, their mixture showed the chiral domains with the equal fraction of the opposite handedness. No tilt of 8CB molecules in the smectic layer was observed, implying the chirality is not due to the polar packing and tilt of the molecules. In addition, the splay and bend elastic constant of 8CB was decreased after doping triphenoxy. A structural conformation of triphenoxy and an orientational coupling between 8CB and triphenoxy are considered to be related to the chiral domain formation.

  4. Formation of Valley Networks in a Cold and Icy Early Mars Climate: Predictions for Erosion Rates and Channel Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, J.

    2017-12-01

    Mars is host to a diverse array of valley networks, systems of linear-to-sinuous depressions which are widely distributed across the surface and which exhibit branching patterns similar to the dendritic drainage patterns of terrestrial fluvial systems. Characteristics of the valley networks are indicative of an origin by fluvial activity, providing among the most compelling evidence for the past presence of flowing liquid water on the surface of Mars. Stratigraphic and crater age dating techniques suggest that the formation of the valley networks occurred predominantly during the early geologic history of Mars ( 3.7 Ga). However, whether the valley networks formed predominantly by rainfall in a relatively warm and wet early Mars climate, or by snowmelt and episodic rainfall in an ambient cold and icy climate, remains disputed. Understanding the formative environment of the valley networks will help distinguish between these warm and cold end-member early Mars climate models. Here we test a conceptual model for channel incision and evolution under cold and icy conditions with a substrate characterized by the presence of an ice-free dry active layer and subjacent ice-cemented regolith, similar to that found in the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys. We implement numerical thermal models, quantitative erosion and transport estimates, and morphometric analyses in order to outline predictions for (1) the precise nature and structure of the substrate, (2) fluvial erosion/incision rates, and (3) channel morphology. Model predictions are compared against morphologic and morphometric observational data to evaluate consistency with the assumed cold climate scenario. In the cold climate scenario, the substrate is predicted to be characterized by a kilometers-thick globally-continuous cryosphere below a 50-100 meter thick desiccated ice-free zone. Initial results suggest that, with the predicted substrate structure, fluvial channel erosion and morphology in a cold early Mars

  5. Laser mass spectrometry with circularly polarized light: circular dichroism of cold molecules in a supersonic gas beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Katharina; Zollitsch, Tilo; Heiz, Ulrich; Boesl, Ulrich

    2014-09-15

    An experiment on chiral molecules that combines circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, mass-selective detection by laser mass spectrometry (MS), and cooling of molecules by using a supersonic beam is presented. The combination of the former two techniques (CD-laser-MS) is a new method to investigate chiral molecules and is now used by several research groups. Cooling in a supersonic beam supplies a substantial increase in spectroscopic resolution, a feature that has not yet been used in CD spectroscopy. In the experiments reported herein, a large variation in the electronic CD of carbonyl 3-methylcyclopentanone was observed depending on the excited vibrational modes in the n → π* transition. This finding should be of interest for the detection of chiral molecules and for the theoretical understanding of the CD of vibronic bands. It is expected that this effect will show up in other chiral carbonyls because the n → π* transition is typical for the carbonyl group. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cold Dark Matter Cosmogony with Hydrodynamics and Galaxy Formation: Galaxy Properties at Redshift Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1993-11-01

    We have supplemented our code, which computes the evolution of the physical state of a representative piece of the universe, to include not only the dynamics of dark matter (with a standard PM code) and the hydrodynamics of the gaseous component (including detailed collisional and radiative processes), but also galaxy formation on a heuristic but plausible basis. If, within a cell, the gas is Jeans-unstable, collapsing and cooling rapidly, it is transformed to galaxy subunits, which are then followed with a collisionless code. We study two representative boxes with sizes L = (80, 8) h-1 Mpc, in both cases utilizing a mesh of 2003 cells containing 2003 dark matter particles and having nominal resolutions of (400, 40) h-1 kpc, respectively, with true resolution approximately 2.5 times worse. We adopt the standard cold dark matter (CDM) perturbation spectrum with an amplitude of σ8 ≡ = (δM/M)rms,8 = 0.77, a compromise between the COBE normalization σ8 = 1.05 and that indicated by the small-scale velocity dispersion (perhaps σ8 = 0.45). We find a mass function which is similar to that observed. There is a strong correlation between galactic age and environment. Identifying the oldest fraction with elliptical and 50 galaxies, we find a density morphology relation of the same type as is observed as well as a correlation between gas mass/total mass ratio and morphology that is similar to observations. In addition, we find that low-mass galaxies contain relatively more dark matter than giants. We present analytic fits to our derived results for "bias," the dependence of ρgal/ on ρtot/. Spatial structures resemble quantitatively those seen in redshift surveys, with galaxies concentrated in clusters and on filaments (or sheets) which surround quite empty voids. The void probability statistics indicate that this model is consistent with magnitude-limited real data. The small-scale velocity field is too large compared with the observed velocity correlation function

  7. Correlation between the Inhibition of Positronium Formation by Scavenger Molecules, and Chemical Reaction Rate of Electrons with these Molecules in Nonpolar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (VOo)f electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found...... for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of Vo had a maximum for C2HsBr, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V, for CC14. The inhibition coefficient for C2H5Br in a 1:l molar tetramethylsilane......-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation...

  8. On the formation of molecules and solid-state compounds from the AGB to the PN phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Manchado, A.

    2016-07-01

    During the asymptoyic giant branch (AGB) phase, different elements are dredge- up to the stellar surface depending on progenitor mass and metallicity. When the mass loss increases at the end of the AGB, a circumstellar dust shell is formed, where different (C-rich or O-rich) molecules and solid-state compounds are formed. These are further processed in the transition phase between AGB stars and planetary nebulae (PNe) to create more complex organic molecules and inorganic solid-state compounds (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and graphene precursors in C-rich environments and oxides and crystalline silicates in O-rich ones). We present an observational review of the different molecules and solid-state materials that are formed from the AGB to the PN phases. We focus on the formation routes of complex fullerene (and fullerene-based) molecules as well as on the level of dust processing depending on metallicity.

  9. Photon-HDF5: An Open File Format for Timestamp-Based Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Laurence, Ted; Boutelle, Robert; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Photon-HDF5, an open and efficient file format to simplify exchange and long-term accessibility of data from single-molecule fluorescence experiments based on photon-counting detectors such as single-photon avalanche diode, photomultiplier tube, or arrays of such detectors. The format is based on HDF5, a widely used platform- and language-independent hierarchical file format for which user-friendly viewers are available. Photon-HDF5 can store raw photon data (timestamp, channel n...

  10. Collective molecule formation in a degenerate Fermi gas via a Feshbach resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javanainen, Juha; Kostrun, Marijan; Zheng Yi; Carmichael, Andrew; Shrestha, Uttam; Meinel, Patrick J.; Mackie, Matt; Dannenberg, Olavi; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2004-01-01

    We model collisionless collective conversion of a degenerate Fermi gas of atoms into bosonic molecules via a Feshbach resonance, treating the bosonic molecules as a classical field and seeding the pairing amplitudes with random phases. A dynamical instability of the Fermi sea against association with molecules drives the conversion. The model qualitatively reproduces several experimental observations [Regal et al., Nature (London) 424, 47 (2003)]. We predict that the initial temperature of the Fermi gas sets the limit for the efficiency of atom-molecule conversion

  11. Photon-HDF5: Open Data Format and Computational Tools for Timestamp-based Single-Molecule Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Laurence, Ted; Boutelle, Robert; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-02-13

    Archival of experimental data in public databases has increasingly become a requirement for most funding agencies and journals. These data-sharing policies have the potential to maximize data reuse, and to enable confirmatory as well as novel studies. However, the lack of standard data formats can severely hinder data reuse. In photon-counting-based single-molecule fluorescence experiments, data is stored in a variety of vendor-specific or even setup-specific (custom) file formats, making data interchange prohibitively laborious, unless the same hardware-software combination is used. Moreover, the number of available techniques and setup configurations make it difficult to find a common standard. To address this problem, we developed Photon-HDF5 (www.photon-hdf5.org), an open data format for timestamp-based single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Building on the solid foundation of HDF5, Photon-HDF5 provides a platform- and language-independent, easy-to-use file format that is self-describing and supports rich metadata. Photon-HDF5 supports different types of measurements by separating raw data (e.g. photon-timestamps, detectors, etc) from measurement metadata. This approach allows representing several measurement types and setup configurations within the same core structure and makes possible extending the format in backward-compatible way. Complementing the format specifications, we provide open source software to create and convert Photon-HDF5 files, together with code examples in multiple languages showing how to read Photon-HDF5 files. Photon-HDF5 allows sharing data in a format suitable for long term archival, avoiding the effort to document custom binary formats and increasing interoperability with different analysis software. We encourage participation of the single-molecule community to extend interoperability and to help defining future versions of Photon-HDF5.

  12. Accretion of clumpy cold gas onto massive black hole binaries: the challenging formation of extended circumbinary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Goicovic, Felipe G.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Sesana, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    Massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) represent an unavoidable outcome of hierarchical galaxy formation, but their dynamical evolution at sub-parsec scales is poorly understood. In gas rich environments, an extended, steady circumbinary gaseous disc could play an important role in the MBHB evolution, facilitating its coalescence. However, how gas on galactic scales is transported to the nuclear region to form and maintain such a stable structure is unclear. In the aftermath of a galaxy merger, cold turbulent gas condenses into clumps and filaments that can be randomly scattered towards the nucleus. This provides a natural way of feeding the binary with intermittent pockets of gas. The aim of this work is to investigate the gaseous structures arising from this interaction. We employ a suite of smoothed-particle-hydrodynamic simulations to study the influence of the infall rate and angular momentum distribution of the incoming clouds on the formation and evolution of structures around the MBHB. We find that the continuous supply of discrete clouds is a double-edge sword, resulting in intermittent formation and disruption of circumbinary structures. Anisotropic cloud distributions featuring an excess of co-rotating events generate more prominent co-rotating circumbinary discs. Similar structures are seen when mostly counter-rotating clouds are fed to the binary, even though they are more compact and less stable. In general, our simulations do not show the formation of extended smooth and stable circumbinary discs, typically assumed in analytical and numerical investigations of the the long term evolution of MBHBs.

  13. Mass-Discrepancy Acceleration Relation: A Natural Outcome of Galaxy Formation in Cold Dark Matter Halos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Aaron D; Benítez-Llambay, Alejandro; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; Frenk, Carlos S; Bower, Richard; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A; Navarro, Julio F; Fattahi, Azadeh; Oman, Kyle A

    2017-04-21

    We analyze the total and baryonic acceleration profiles of a set of well-resolved galaxies identified in the eagle suite of hydrodynamic simulations. Our runs start from the same initial conditions but adopt different prescriptions for unresolved stellar and active galactic nuclei feedback, resulting in diverse populations of galaxies by the present day. Some of them reproduce observed galaxy scaling relations, while others do not. However, regardless of the feedback implementation, all of our galaxies follow closely a simple relationship between the total and baryonic acceleration profiles, consistent with recent observations of rotationally supported galaxies. The relation has small scatter: Different feedback implementations-which produce different galaxy populations-mainly shift galaxies along the relation rather than perpendicular to it. Furthermore, galaxies exhibit a characteristic acceleration g_{†}, above which baryons dominate the mass budget, as observed. These observations, consistent with simple modified Newtonian dynamics, can be accommodated within the standard cold dark matter paradigm.

  14. The mechanism of hot crack formation in Ti-6A1-4V during cold crucible continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng DING

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot crack is one of common defects in castings, which often results in failure of castings. This work studies the formation of hot cracks during cold crucible continous casting by means of experiments and thoretical analysis. The results show that the hot crack occurs on the surface and in the circumference of ingots, where the solidified shell and solidification front meet each other. The tendency of hot cracking decreases with the increase of withdrawal velocities in some extent. The hot crack is caused mainly by friction force between the shell and the crucible inner wall, and it takes place when the stress resulting from friction exceeds the tensile strength of the shell. The factors affecting the hot cracks are analyzed and verified. In order to decrease the tendency of hot cracks, technical parameters should be optimized.

  15. On contribution of horizontal and intra-layer convection to the formation of the Baltic Sea cold intermediate layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Chubarenko

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal cascades down the coastal slopes and intra-layer convection are considered as the two additional mechanisms contributing to the Baltic Sea cold intermediate layer (CIL formation along with conventional seasonal vertical mixing. Field measurements are presented, reporting for the first time the possibility of denser water formation and cascading from the Baltic Sea underwater slopes, which take place under fall and winter cooling conditions and deliver waters into intermediate layer of salinity stratified deep-sea area. The presence in spring within the CIL of water with temperature below that of maximum density (Tmd and that at the local surface in winter time allows tracing its formation: it is argued that the source of the coldest waters of the Baltic CIL is early spring (March–April cascading, arising due to heating of water before reaching the Tmd. Fast increase of the open water heat content during further spring heating indicates that horizontal exchange rather than direct solar heating is responsible for that. When the surface is covered with water, heated above the Tmd, the conditions within the CIL become favorable for intralayer convection due to the presence of waters of Tmd in intermediate layer, which can explain its well-known features – the observed increase of its salinity and deepening with time.

  16. The Effect of Ultrafast Heating on Cold-Rolled Low Carbon Steel: Formation and Decomposition of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Manuel Castro Cerda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heating rate on the formation and decomposition of austenite was investigated on cold-rolled low carbon steel. Experiments were performed at two heating rates, 150 °C/s and 1500 °C/s, respectively. The microstructures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD. Experimental evidence of nucleation of austenite in α/θ, as well as in α/α boundaries is analyzed from the thermodynamic point of view. The increase in the heating rates from 150 °C/s to 1500 °C/s has an impact on the morphology of austenite in the intercritical range. The effect of heating rate on the austenite formation mechanism is analyzed combining thermodynamic calculations and experimental data. The results provide indirect evidence of a transition in the mechanism of austenite formation, from carbon diffusion control to interface control mode. The resulting microstructure after the application of ultrafast heating rates is complex and consists of a mixture of ferrite with different morphologies, undissolved cementite, martensite, and retained austenite.

  17. Controlling the formation process and atomic structures of single pyrazine molecular junction by tuning the strength of the metal-molecule interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ryoji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-04-12

    The formation process and atomic structures were investigated for single pyrazine molecular junctions sandwiched by three different Au, Ag, and Cu electrodes using a mechanically controllable break junction technique in ultrahigh vacuum conditions at 300 K. We demonstrated that the formation process of the single-molecule junction crucially depended on the choice of the metal electrodes. While single-molecule junction showing two distinct conductance states were found for the Au electrodes, only the single conductance state was evident for the Ag electrodes, and there was no junction formation for the Cu electrodes. These results suggested that metal-molecule interaction dominates the formation process and probability of the single-molecule junction. In addition to the metal-molecule interaction, temperature affected the formation process of the single-molecule junction. The single pyrazine molecular junction formed between Au electrodes exhibited significant temperature dependence where the junction-formation probability was about 8% at 300 K, while there was no junction-formation at 100 K. Instead of the junction formation, an Au atomic wire was formed at the low temperature. This study provides insight into the tuning of the junction-forming process for single-molecule junctions, which is needed to construct device structures on a single molecule scale.

  18. Formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, W.D.; and NASA, Institute for Space Studies, Goddard Space Flight Center, New York)

    1978-01-01

    Soft X-ray and cosmic rays produce multiply ionized atoms which may initiate molecule production in interstellar clouds. This molecule production can occur via ion-molecule reactions with H 2 , either directly from the multiply ionized atom (e.g.,C ++ + H 2 →CH + + H + ), or indirectly from the singly ionized atoms (e.g., N + + H 2 →NH + + H) that are formed from the recombination or charge transfer of the highly ionized atom (e.g., N ++ + e→N + + hv). We investigate the contribution of these reactions to the abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing molecules in isobaric models of diffuse clouds. In the presence of the average flux estimated for the diffuse soft X-ray background, multiply ionized atoms contribute only minimally (a few percent) to carbon-bearing molecules such as CH. In the neighborhood of diffuse structures or discrete sources, however, where the X-ray flux is enhanced, multiple ionization is considerably more important for molecule production

  19. The CO-H2 van der Waals complex and complex organic molecules in cold molecular clouds: A TMC-1C survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Schilke, P.; Graf, U. U.; Möller, Th.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Almost 200 different species have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) during the last decades, revealing not only simple species but complex molecules with more than six atoms. Other exotic compounds, like the weakly-bound dimer (H2)2, have also been detected in astronomical sources like Jupiter. Aims: We aim to detect, for the first time, the CO-H2 van der Waals complex in the ISM, which could be a sensitive indicator for low temperatures if detected. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m telescope, located in Pico Veleta (Spain), to search for the CO-H2 complex in a cold, dense core in TMC-1C (with a temperature of ~10 K). All the brightest CO-H2 transitions in the 3 mm (80-110 GHz) band were observed with a spectral resolution of 0.5-0.7 km s-1, reaching a rms noise level of ~2 mK. The simultaneous observation of a broad frequency band, 16 GHz, allowed us to conduct a serendipitous spectral line survey. Results: We did not detected any lines belonging to the CO-H2 complex. We set up a new, more stringent upper limit for its abundance to be [CO-H2]/[CO] ~ 5 × 10-6, while we expect the abundance of the complex to be in the range ~10-8-10-3. The spectral line survey has allowed us to detect 75 lines associated with 41 different species (including isotopologues). We detect a number of complex organic species, for example methyl cyanide (CH3CN), methanol (CH3OH), propyne (CH3CCH), and ketene (CH2CO), associated with cold gas (excitation temperatures ~7 K), confirming the presence of these complex species not only in warm objects but also in cold regimes. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A117

  20. H2 molecules and the intercloud medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.K.; Hollenbach, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    We discuss expected column of densities of H 2 in the intercloud medium and the possible use of molecules as indicators of intercloud physical conditions. We treat molecule formation by the H - process and on graphite grains and show that the Barlow-Silk hypothesis of a 1 eV semichemical hydrogen-graphite bond leads to a large enhancement of the intercloud molecule formation rate. Rotational excitation calculations are presented for both cloud and intercloud conditions which show, in agreement with Jura, that the presently observed optically thin H 2 absorption components are more likely to originate in cold clouds than in the intercloud medium

  1. The Cold Side of Galaxy Formation: Dense Gas Through Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; ngVLA Galaxy Assembly through Cosmic Time Science Working Group, ngVLA Galaxy Ecosystems Science Working Group

    2018-01-01

    The processes that lead to the formation and evolution of galaxies throughout the history of the Universe involve the complex interplay between hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, accretion of primordial and recycled gas, transport of gas within galaxy disks, accretion onto central super-massive black holes, and the formation of molecular clouds which subsequently collapse and fragment. The resulting star formation and black hole accretion provide large sources of energy and momentum that light up galaxies and lead to feedback. The ngVLA will be key to further understand how gas is accreted onto galaxies, and the processes that regulate the growth of galaxies through cosmic history. It will reveal how and on which timescales star formation and black hole accretion impact the gas in galaxies, and how the physical properties and chemical state of the gas change as gas cycles between different phases for different galaxy populations over a broad range in redshifts. The ngVLA will have the capability to carry out unbiased, large cosmic volume surveys at virtually any redshift down to an order of magnitude lower gas masses than currently possible in the critical low-level CO lines, thus exposing the evolution of gaseous reservoirs from the earliest epochs to the peak of the cosmic history of star formation. It will also image routinely and systematically the sub-kiloparsec scale distribution and kinematic structure of molecular gas in both normal main-sequence galaxies and large starbursts. The ngVLA thus is poised to revolutionize our understanding of galaxy evolution through cosmic time.

  2. Enrichment of methylated molecules using enhanced-ice-co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (E-ice-COLD-PCR) for the sensitive detection of disease-related hypermethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Florence; Kernaleguen, Magali; Lallemand, Céline; Kristensen, Vessela N; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tost, Jörg

    2018-05-01

    The detection of specific DNA methylation patterns bears great promise as biomarker for personalized management of cancer patients. Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR) assays are sensitive methods, but have previously only been able to analyze loss of DNA methylation. Enhanced (E)-ice-COLD-PCR reactions starting from 2 ng of bisulfite-converted DNA were developed to analyze methylation patterns in two promoters with locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes blocking amplification of unmethylated CpGs. The enrichment of methylated molecules was compared to quantitative (q)PCR and quantified using serial dilutions. E-ice-COLD-PCR allowed the multiplexed enrichment and quantification of methylated DNA. Assays were validated in primary breast cancer specimens and circulating cell-free DNA from cancer patients. E-ice-COLD-PCR could prove a useful tool in the context of DNA methylation analysis for personalized medicine.

  3. Disentangling formation of multiple-core holes in aminophenol molecules exposed to bright X-FEL radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhaunerchyk, V; Squibb, R J; Eland, J H D; Kamińska, M; Mucke, M; Piancastelli, M N; Frasinski, L J; Grilj, J; Koch, M; McFarland, B K; Sistrunk, E; Gühr, M; Coffee, R N; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Salén, P; Meulen, P v d; Linusson, P; Thomas, R D; Larsson, M

    2015-01-01

    Competing multi-photon ionization processes, some leading to the formation of double core hole states, have been examined in 4-aminophenol. The experiments used the linac coherent light source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser, in combination with a time-of-flight magnetic bottle electron spectrometer and the correlation analysis method of covariance mapping. The results imply that 4-aminophenol molecules exposed to the focused x-ray pulses of the LCLS sequentially absorb more than two x-ray photons, resulting in the formation of multiple core holes as well as in the sequential removal of photoelectrons and Auger electrons (so-called PAPA sequences). (paper)

  4. Formation of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Testera, G; Bonomi, G; Boscolo, I; Brambilla, N; Brusa, R S; Byakov, V M; Cabaret, L; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Castelli, F; Cialdi, S; de Combarieu, M; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Djourelov, N; Doser, M; Drobychev, G; Dupasquier, A; Fabris, D; Ferragut, R; Ferrari, G; Fischer, A; Fontana, A; Forget, P; Formaro, L; Lunardon, M; Gervasini, A; Giammarchi, M G; Gninenko, S N; Gribakin, G; Heyne, R; Hogan, S D; Kellerbauer, A G; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Manuzio, G; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Merkt, F; Moretto, S; Morhard, C; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pari, P; Petracek, V; Prevedelli, M; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Quasso, F; Rohne, O; Pesente, S; Rotondi, A; Stapnes, S; Sillou, D; Stepanov, S V; Stroke, Hinko Henry; Tino, G; Vairo, Antonio; Viesti, G; Walters, H; Warring, U; Zavatarelli, S; Zenoni, A; Zvezhinskij, D S

    2008-01-01

    The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

  5. High-resolution simulations of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kates, R.E.; Klypin, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of our numerical simulations of galaxy clustering in a two-dimensional model. Our simulations allowed better resolution than could be obtained in three-dimensional simulations. We used a spectrum of initial perturbations corresponding to a cold dark matter (CDM) model and followed the history of each particle by modelling the shocking and subsequent cooling of matter. We took into account cooling processes in a hot plasma with primeval cosmic abundances of H and He as well as Compton cooling. (However, the influence of these processes on the trajectories of ordinary matter particles was not simulated in the present code.) As a result of the high resolution, we were able to observe a network of chains on all scales down to the limits of resolution. This network extends out from dense clusters and superclusters and penetrates into voids (with decreasing density). In addition to the dark matter network structure, a definite prediction of our simulations is the existence of a connected filamentary structure consisting of hot gas with a temperature of 10 6 K and extending over 100-150 Mpc. (Throughout this paper, we assume the Hubble constant H 0 =50 km/sec/Mpc.) These structures trace high-density filaments of the dark matter distribution and should be searched for in soft X-ray observations. In contrast to common assumptions, we found that peaks of the linearized density distribution were not reliable tracers of the eventual galaxy distribution. We were also able to demonstrate that the influence of small-scale fluctuations on the structure at larger scales is always small, even at the late nonlinear stage. (orig.)

  6. Surface clay formation during short-term warmer and wetter conditions on a largely cold ancient Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Michalski, Joseph R.; Gago-Duport, Luis; Baker, Leslie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; Gross, Christoph; Rampe, Elizabeth B.

    2018-03-01

    The ancient rock record for Mars has long been at odds with climate modelling. The presence of valley networks, dendritic channels and deltas on ancient terrains points towards running water and fluvial erosion on early Mars1, but climate modelling indicates that long-term warm conditions were not sustainable2. Widespread phyllosilicates and other aqueous minerals on the Martian surface3-6 provide additional evidence that an early wet Martian climate resulted in surface weathering. Some of these phyllosilicates formed in subsurface crustal environments5, with no association with the Martian climate, while other phyllosilicate-rich outcrops exhibit layered morphologies and broad stratigraphies7 consistent with surface formation. Here, we develop a new geochemical model for early Mars to explain the formation of these clay-bearing rocks in warm and wet surface locations. We propose that sporadic, short-term warm and wet environments during a generally cold early Mars enabled phyllosilicate formation without requiring long-term warm and wet conditions. We conclude that Mg-rich clay-bearing rocks with lateral variations in mixed Fe/Mg smectite, chlorite, talc, serpentine and zeolite occurrences formed in subsurface hydrothermal environments, whereas dioctahedral (Al/Fe3+-rich) smectite and widespread vertical horizonation of Fe/Mg smectites, clay assemblages and sulphates formed in variable aqueous environments on the surface of Mars. Our model for aluminosilicate formation on Mars is consistent with the observed geological features, diversity of aqueous mineralogies in ancient surface rocks and state-of-the-art palaeoclimate scenarios.

  7. Effect of cold rolling on the formation and distribution of nanoclusters during pre-aging in an Al–Mg–Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, A.; Sato, T.; Miller, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of high densities of dislocations on the formation behavior of two types of nano-scale clusters (nanoclusters), which are formed at room temperature or during pre-aging at ∼373 K in an Al–Mg–Si alloy, was investigated by atom probe tomography. Cold rolling was applied to modify the formation behavior and/or the characteristics of the nanoclusters and also the precipitation sequence, which involve both nanoclusters and a strengthening phase to improve the bake-hardening response. Nanoclusters formed during pre-aging tended to form along the dislocations. Cold rolling accelerated the preferential formation of the nanoclusters, whereas the number density of the nanoclusters decreased by cold rolling before pre-aging. However, the number density of the nanoclusters was considerably higher than that of the β″ phase. Cold rolling before pre-aging enhanced the age-hardenability the most compared with other processes such as the contemporary pre-aging process. It is considered that the nanoclusters along dislocations lead to the preferential transformation to the β″ phase and then the rapid growth of the β″ phase. The nanoclusters formed on dislocations are effective in improving the bake-hardening response for the duration of the bake-hardening process. The kinetics and the distribution of the nanoclusters were found to be affected by the dislocations which were induced by cold rolling.

  8. Statistics of work and orthogonality catastrophe in discrete level systems: an application to fullerene molecules and ultra-cold trapped Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Sindona

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The sudden introduction of a local impurity in a Fermi sea leads to an anomalous disturbance of its quantum state that represents a local quench, leaving the system out of equilibrium and giving rise to the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. The statistics of the work done describe the energy fluctuations produced by the quench, providing an accurate and detailed insight into the fundamental physics of the process. We present here a numerical approach to the non-equilibrium work distribution, supported by applications to phenomena occurring at very diverse energy ranges. One of them is the valence electron shake-up induced by photo-ionization of a core state in a fullerene molecule. The other is the response of an ultra-cold gas of trapped fermions to an embedded two-level atom excited by a fast pulse. Working at low thermal energies, we detect the primary role played by many-particle states of the perturbed system with one or two excited fermions. We validate our approach through the comparison with some photoemission data on fullerene films and previous analytical calculations on harmonically trapped Fermi gases.

  9. Conifers in cold environments synchronize maximum growth rate of tree-ring formation with day length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio; Deslauriers, Annie; Anfodillo, Tommaso; Morin, Hubert; Saracino, Antonio; Motta, Renzo; Borghetti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Intra-annual radial growth rates and durations in trees are reported to differ greatly in relation to species, site and environmental conditions. However, very similar dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation are observed in temperate and boreal zones. Here, we compared weekly xylem cell production and variation in stem circumference in the main northern hemisphere conifer species (genera Picea, Pinus, Abies and Larix) from 1996 to 2003. Dynamics of radial growth were modeled with a Gompertz function, defining the upper asymptote (A), x-axis placement (beta) and rate of change (kappa). A strong linear relationship was found between the constants beta and kappa for both types of analysis. The slope of the linear regression, which corresponds to the time at which maximum growth rate occurred, appeared to converge towards the summer solstice. The maximum growth rate occurred around the time of maximum day length, and not during the warmest period of the year as previously suggested. The achievements of photoperiod could act as a growth constraint or a limit after which the rate of tree-ring formation tends to decrease, thus allowing plants to safely complete secondary cell wall lignification before winter.

  10. Review of thermal recovery technologies for the Clearwater and lower Grand Rapids formations in the Cold Lake area in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Q.; Thornton, B.; Houston, J.R.; Spence, S. [OSUM Oil Sands Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper described a performance review conducted to assess steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) and cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) projects in the Cold Lake region. Commercial and pilot plant projects in the region were discussed. The aim of the study was to design a development plan for achieving bitumen production rates of 35,000 barrels per day in the Taiga region. While relatively high pressure drawdowns are created between the wellbore and formation during CSS production phases, the CSS process has limited applications in fine grain sands reservoirs, or in reservoirs with thick bottom water. SAGD processes require a minimum pressure drawdown to drive reservoir fluids to the wellbore, making them ideal for reservoirs with top gas, or in formations with fine grain sands and bottom water. Selection criteria for CSS and SAGD technologies were reviewed. Simulations were conducted to assess the impacts of well placement, reservoir heterogeneity, and operating parameters on SAGD and CSS performance. Well configurations for optimal SAGD performance were also presented. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 20 figs.

  11. High-affinity small molecule-phospholipid complex formation: binding of siramesine to phosphatidicacid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu

    2008-01-01

    , comparable to the affinities for the binding of small molecule ligands to proteins, was measured for phosphatidic acid (PA, mole fraction of XPA ) 0.2 in phosphatidylcholine vesicles), yielding a molecular partition coefficient of 240 ( 80 × 106. An MD simulation on the siramesine:PA interaction...

  12. Formation of clusters composed of C60 molecules via self-assembly in critical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Takahiro; Ishii, Koji; Kurosu, Shunji; Whitby, Raymond; Maekawa, Toru

    2007-01-01

    Fullerenes are promising candidates for intelligent, functional nanomaterials because of their unique mechanical, electronic and chemical properties. However, it is necessary to invent some efficient but relatively simple methods of producing structures composed of fullerenes for the development of nanomechatronic, nanoelectronic and biochemical devices and sensors. In this paper, we show that various structures such as straight fibres, networks formed by fibres, wide sheets and helical structures, which are composed of C 60 molecules, are created by placing C 60 -crystals in critical ethane, carbon dioxide and xenon even though C 60 molecules do not dissolve or disperse in the above fluids. It is supposed, judging by the intermolecular potentials between C 60 and C 60 , between C 60 and ethane, and between ethane and ethane, that C 60 -clusters grow with the assistance of solvent molecules, which are trapped between C 60 molecules under critical conditions. This room-temperature self-assembly cluster growth process in critical fluids may open up a new methodology of forming structures built up with fullerenes without the need for any ultra-fine processing technologies

  13. Formation of tilted smectic-C liquid crystal phase in polar Gay-Berne molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, J.; Bose, T.R.; Ghosh, D.; Saha, M.

    2005-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation for a system of Gay-Berne molecules having two terminal dipole moments to generate tilted smectic-C liquid crystal phase. We investigate the effect of dipolar orientation with respect to the long molecular axis on phase behaviour. The study indicates that larger dipolar angle can give rise to greater tilt in molecular organization within a layer

  14. Routes to formation of highly excited neutral atoms in the break-up of strongly driven hydrogen molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, Agapi

    2012-06-01

    We present a theoretical quasiclassical treatment of the formation, during Coulomb explosion, of highly excited neutral H atoms for strongly-driven hydrogen molecule. This process, where after the laser field is turned off, one electron escapes to the continuum while the other occupies a Rydberg state, was recently reported in an experimental study in Phys. Rev. Lett 102, 113002 (2009). We find that two-electron effects are important in order to correctly account for all pathways leading to highly excited neutral hydrogen formation [1]. We identify two pathways where the electron that escapes to the continuum does so either very quickly or after remaining bound for a few periods of the laser field. These two pathways of highly excited neutral H formation have distinct traces in the probability distribution of the escaping electron momentum components. [4pt] [1] A. Emmanouilidou, C. Lazarou, A. Staudte and U. Eichmann, Phys. Rev. A (Rapid) 85 011402 (2012).

  15. Condensed-phase biogenic-anthropogenic interactions with implications for cold cloud formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnawskas, Joseph C; Alpert, Peter A; Lambe, Andrew T; Berkemeier, Thomas; O'Brien, Rachel E; Massoli, Paola; Onasch, Timothy B; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Moffet, Ryan C; Gilles, Mary K; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas R; Knopf, Daniel A

    2017-08-24

    Anthropogenic and biogenic gas emissions contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). When present, soot particles from fossil fuel combustion can acquire a coating of SOA. We investigate SOA-soot biogenic-anthropogenic interactions and their impact on ice nucleation in relation to the particles' organic phase state. SOA particles were generated from the OH oxidation of naphthalene, α-pinene, longifolene, or isoprene, with or without the presence of sulfate or soot particles. Corresponding particle glass transition (T g ) and full deliquescence relative humidity (FDRH) were estimated using a numerical diffusion model. Longifolene SOA particles are solid-like and all biogenic SOA sulfate mixtures exhibit a core-shell configuration (i.e. a sulfate-rich core coated with SOA). Biogenic SOA with or without sulfate formed ice at conditions expected for homogeneous ice nucleation, in agreement with respective T g and FDRH. α-pinene SOA coated soot particles nucleated ice above the homogeneous freezing temperature with soot acting as ice nuclei (IN). At lower temperatures the α-pinene SOA coating can be semisolid, inducing ice nucleation. Naphthalene SOA coated soot particles acted as ice nuclei above and below the homogeneous freezing limit, which can be explained by the presence of a highly viscous SOA phase. Our results suggest that biogenic SOA does not play a significant role in mixed-phase cloud formation and the presence of sulfate renders this even less likely. However, anthropogenic SOA may have an enhancing effect on cloud glaciation under mixed-phase and cirrus cloud conditions compared to biogenic SOA that dominate during pre-industrial times or in pristine areas.

  16. Reionization in a cold dark matter universe: The feedback of galaxy formation on the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Giroux, Mark L.; Babul, Arif

    1994-01-01

    We study the coupled evolution of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the emerging structure in the universe in the context of the cold dark matter (CDM) model, with a special focus on the consequences of imposing reionization and the Gunn-Peterson constraint as a boundary condition on the model. We have calculated the time-varying density of the IGM by coupling our detailed, numerical calculations of the thermal and ionization balance and radiative transfer in a uniform, spatially averaged IGM of H and He, including the mean opacity of an evolving distribution of gas clumps which correspond to quasar absorption line clouds, to the linearized equations for the growth of density fluctuations in both the gaseous and dark matter components in a CDM universe. We use the linear growth equations to identify the fraction of the gas which must have collapsed out at each epoch, an approach similar in spirit to the so-called Press-Schechter formalism. We identify the IGM density with the uncollapsed baryon fraction. The collapsed fraction is postulated to be a source of energy injection into the IGM, by radiation or bulk hydrodynamical heating (e.g., via shocks) or both, at a rate which is marginally enough to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson constraint at z less than 5. Our results include the following: (1) We find that the IGM in a CDM model must have contained a substantial fraction of the total baryon density of the universe both during and after its reionization epoch. (2) As a result, our previous conclusion that the observed Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) at high redshift are not sufficient to ionize the IGM enough to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson constraint is confirmed. (3) We predict a detectable He II Gunn-Peterson effect at 304(1 + z) A in the spectra of quasars at a range of redshift z greater than or approx. 3, depending on the nature of the sources of IGM reionization. (4) We find, moreover, that a CDM model with high bias parameter b (i.e., b greater than or approx. 2

  17. Proinflammatory Adhesion Molecules Facilitate Polychlorinated Biphenyl–Mediated Enhancement of Brain Metastasis Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Sipos, Eszter; Chen, Lei; András, Ibolya E.; Wrobel, Jagoda; Zhang, Bei; Pu, Hong; Park, Minseon; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental toxicants that cause vascular inflammation and facilitate the development of brain metastases. The crucial event in metastasis formation is adhesion of blood-borne tumor cells to the vascular endothelium, followed by their transcapillary migration. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanisms of PCB118-induced brain metastasis formation at the blood-brain barrier level with the focus on tumor cell adhesion to the brain endotheli...

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Arndt

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  19. Photon-HDF5: An Open File Format for Timestamp-Based Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Laurence, Ted; Boutelle, Robert; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-01-05

    We introduce Photon-HDF5, an open and efficient file format to simplify exchange and long-term accessibility of data from single-molecule fluorescence experiments based on photon-counting detectors such as single-photon avalanche diode, photomultiplier tube, or arrays of such detectors. The format is based on HDF5, a widely used platform- and language-independent hierarchical file format for which user-friendly viewers are available. Photon-HDF5 can store raw photon data (timestamp, channel number, etc.) from any acquisition hardware, but also setup and sample description, information on provenance, authorship and other metadata, and is flexible enough to include any kind of custom data. The format specifications are hosted on a public website, which is open to contributions by the biophysics community. As an initial resource, the website provides code examples to read Photon-HDF5 files in several programming languages and a reference Python library (phconvert), to create new Photon-HDF5 files and convert several existing file formats into Photon-HDF5. To encourage adoption by the academic and commercial communities, all software is released under the MIT open source license. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Origin of Fast Molecular Outflows in Quasars: Molecule Formation in AGN-Driven Galactic Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, Alexander James; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    2017-07-01

    Observations of AGN host galaxies have detected fast molecular outflows, with velocities up to 1000 km s-1. However, the origin of these molecular outflows is currently unclear. One possibility is that they are formed from molecular gas that is swept up from the host galaxy by the AGN wind. However, previous studies have suggested that molecular clouds that are swept up by an AGN wind are unlikely to survive being accelerated to such high velocities. An alternative scenario is that molecules may form within the AGN wind material itself. We present a suite of 3D hydrodynamic simulations of an idealised AGN wind that we have run to explore this scenario. These simulations are coupled to a time-dependent chemical model to follow the creation and destruction of molecules, including H2, CO, OH and HCO+. We find that molecules do form within the wind, with molecular outflow rates up to 140 M⊙ yr-1 after 1 Myr. This is sensitive to the ambient ISM density, metallicity, and AGN luminosity. We also compute observable CO emission lines from these simulations using a radiative transfer code in post-processing. The CO-derived outflow rates are comparable to those seen in observations, although the maximum line of sight velocities are a factor ≍2 lower than observed. We find a CO (1-0) to H2 conversion factor of αCO = 0.15 M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1 at solar metallicity, 5 times lower than is typically assumed in observations of such systems.

  1. Depths of formation of the CN molecule lines in the solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porfir'eva, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The depths of production of lines of weak bands of the CN molecule violet (lambda=4216A) system are calculated by the weight function method. Two models of solar atmosphere are used. Lines with the different rotational vibrational quantum numbers are produced practically in the same layer (tau approximately equal to 0.05-0.06). The difference of depths of production of the line center and the wing is small (Δtau 0 =0.005). The contribution functions for the solar disk center differ little from those for the edge. The calculations carried out are in good agreement with the results obtained from earlier observations

  2. Formation and decay of the intermediate quasistationary ion N-2 during charge exchange between fast H- ions and nitrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskii, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    The detachment of the electron from the H - ion during a collision with the nitrogen molecule at 1--6 keV occurs as a result of charge transfer to an unstable intermediate state of the molecular ion N - 2 and the subsequent decay of the ion. The formation process is described in the impulse approximation, and the motion of nuclei in the ion is treated quasiclassically. Expressions are obtained for the spectrum of emitted electrons and for the energy-loss spectrum of heavy particles. These expressions relate the spectra to the cross sections for the vibrational excitation of N 2 by electron impact. A convenient expression for the amplitude for the formation of the intermediate state is obtained in the ''boomerang'' model, and it is shown that one of the parameters, considered to be adjustable in traditional theory, can be calculated

  3. Inhibiting and Remodeling Toxic Amyloid-Beta Oligomer Formation Using a Computationally Designed Drug Molecule That Targets Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Matthew A.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Lang, Christian A.; Buratto, Steven K.; Singh, Ambuj; Bowers, Michael T.

    2018-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is rapidly reaching epidemic status among a burgeoning aging population. Much evidence suggests the toxicity of this amyloid disease is most influenced by the formation of soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid β-protein, particularly the 42-residue alloform (Aβ42). Developing potential therapeutics in a directed, streamlined approach to treating this disease is necessary. Here we utilize the joint pharmacophore space (JPS) model to design a new molecule [AC0107] incorporating structural characteristics of known Aβ inhibitors, blood-brain barrier permeability, and limited toxicity. To test the molecule's efficacy experimentally, we employed ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to discover [AC0107] inhibits the formation of the toxic Aβ42 dodecamer at both high (1:10) and equimolar concentrations of inhibitor. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments reveal that [AC0107] prevents further aggregation of Aβ42, destabilizes preformed fibrils, and reverses Aβ42 aggregation. This trend continues for long-term interaction times of 2 days until only small aggregates remain with virtually no fibrils or higher order oligomers surviving. Pairing JPS with IM-MS and AFM presents a powerful and effective first step for AD drug development.

  4. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  5. Molecule formation and the Farey tree in the one-dimensional Falicov-Kimball model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, C.; Ueltschi, D.; Jedrzejewski, J.

    1994-01-01

    The ground-state configurations of the one-dimensional Falicov-Kimball model are studied exactly with numerical calculations revealing unexpected effects for small interaction strength. In neutral systems we observe molecular formation, phase separation, and changes in the conducting properties; while in nonneutral systems the phase diagram exhibits Farey tree order (Aubry sequence) and a devil's staircase structure. Conjectures are presented for the boundary of the segregated domain and the general structure of the ground states

  6. Formation of long carbon chain molecules during laser vaporization of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, J.R.; Zhang, Q.; O'Brien, S.C.; Curl, R.F.; Kroto, H.W.; Smalley, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite is laser vaporized into a He carrier gas containing various simple molecules such as H 2 , H 2 O, NH 3 , and CH 3 CN, supersonically expanded, and skimmed into a molecular beam, and the beam is interrogated by photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Without added reactants in the He carrier gas, C/sub n/ species up to n = 130 are readily observed. Two distributions separated at about n = 40 appear to be present with the low n species the focus of this work. In the presence of added reagents, new species appear as a result of reaction. These are satisfactorily explained on the basis that a significant proportion of the C/sub n/ species initially formed are reactive radicals with linear carbon chain structures which can readily add H, N, or CN at the ends to form relatively stable polyynes or cyanopolyynes. Some of the cyanopolyynes detected have also been observed in the interstellar medium, and circumstellar carbon condensation processes in the atmospheres of carbon-rich stars similar to those studied here are suggested as possible synthetic sources

  7. Star Formation Conditions in a Planck Galactic Cold Clump, G108.84–00.81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungha; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wu, Yuefang; Tatematsu, Ken‧ichi; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” Collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    We present the results from a series of ground-based radio observations toward a Planck Galactic Cold Clump (PGCC), PGCC G108.84–00.81, which is located in one curved filamentary cloud in the vicinity of an extended H II region Sh2-152 and SNR G109.1-1.0. PGCC G108.84–00.81 is mainly composed of two clumps, “G108–N” and “G108–S”. In the 850 μm dust continuum emission map, G108–N is shown as one component while G108–S is fragmented into four components. There is no infrared source associated with G108–N, while there are two infrared sources (IRS 1 and IRS 2) associated with G108–S. The total mass of G108–N is larger than the Jeans mass, suggesting that G108–N is gravitationally unstable and a potential place for a future star formation. The clump properties of G108–N and G108–S such as the gas temperature and the column density, are not distinctly different. However, G108–S is slightly more evolved than G108–N, if considering the CO depletion factor, molecular abundances, and association with infrared sources. G108–S seems to be affected by the compression from Sh2-152, while G108–N is relatively protected from the external effect.

  8. Star Formation Conditions in a Planck Galactic Cold Clump, G108.84–00.81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jungha; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wu, Yuefang; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Liu, Sheng-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    We present the results from a series of ground-based radio observations toward a Planck Galactic Cold Clump (PGCC), PGCC G108.84–00.81, which is located in one curved filamentary cloud in the vicinity of an extended H ii region Sh2-152 and SNR G109.1-1.0. PGCC G108.84–00.81 is mainly composed of two clumps, “G108–N” and “G108–S”. In the 850 μ m dust continuum emission map, G108–N is shown as one component while G108–S is fragmented into four components. There is no infrared source associated with G108–N, while there are two infrared sources (IRS 1 and IRS 2) associated with G108–S. The total mass of G108–N is larger than the Jeans mass, suggesting that G108–N is gravitationally unstable and a potential place for a future star formation. The clump properties of G108–N and G108–S such as the gas temperature and the column density, are not distinctly different. However, G108–S is slightly more evolved than G108–N, if considering the CO depletion factor, molecular abundances, and association with infrared sources. G108–S seems to be affected by the compression from Sh2-152, while G108–N is relatively protected from the external effect.

  9. Star Formation Conditions in a Planck Galactic Cold Clump, G108.84–00.81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jungha; Lee, Jeong-Eun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, 1732, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Yuefang [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China); Tatematsu, Ken' ichi [Department of Astronomical Science, SOKENDAI - The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Liu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Collaboration: JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” Collaboration, and TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    We present the results from a series of ground-based radio observations toward a Planck Galactic Cold Clump (PGCC), PGCC G108.84–00.81, which is located in one curved filamentary cloud in the vicinity of an extended H ii region Sh2-152 and SNR G109.1-1.0. PGCC G108.84–00.81 is mainly composed of two clumps, “G108–N” and “G108–S”. In the 850 μ m dust continuum emission map, G108–N is shown as one component while G108–S is fragmented into four components. There is no infrared source associated with G108–N, while there are two infrared sources (IRS 1 and IRS 2) associated with G108–S. The total mass of G108–N is larger than the Jeans mass, suggesting that G108–N is gravitationally unstable and a potential place for a future star formation. The clump properties of G108–N and G108–S such as the gas temperature and the column density, are not distinctly different. However, G108–S is slightly more evolved than G108–N, if considering the CO depletion factor, molecular abundances, and association with infrared sources. G108–S seems to be affected by the compression from Sh2-152, while G108–N is relatively protected from the external effect.

  10. Implanting very low energy atomic ions into surface adsorbed cage molecules: the formation/emission of Cs/C60+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodney, Eli; Kaplan, Andrey; Manor, Yoni; Bekkerman, Anatoly; Tsipinyuk, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: We demonstrate the formation of an endo-complex via a collision of energetic ions with molecular overlayers on a surface. An incoming atomic ion is encapsulated inside a very large molecule or cluster by implanting the primary ion into the target species, which then recovers its original structure or rearrange itself around the implanted ion in some stable configuration. Here we describe an experiment resulting in the formation and ejection of an endo-complex, within a single collision. We study the formation and emission of endohedral fullerenes, Cs/C 60 + and Cs/C 70 + , following a single collision of Cs + ion with a sub-monolayer of C 60 (steady state coverage) on gold and silicon surfaces and with a sub-monolayer of C 70 on gold. A continuous low energy (E 0 =35-220 eV) Cs + ion beam hit the Cs + covered surface and the collisional formation and ejection of the endohedral Cs/Cs 60 + complex, within a single Cs + /C 60 collision was observed and characterized. Several experimental observations clearly demonstrate the single collision nature of the combined atom penetration endo-complex ejection event. The fullerene molecule is actually being picked up off the surface by the penetrating Cs + ion. The evidence for the trapping of the Cs + ion inside the fullerene cage is given both by the appearance of the Cs/Cs (602-2n) + (n=1-5) sequence and its termination at Cs/Cs 50 + . Kinetic Energy Distributions (KEDs) of the outgoing Cs/Cs 60 + were measured for two different Cs + impact energies under field-free conditions. The most striking observation is the near independence of the KEDs on the impact energy. Both KEDs peak around 1.2 eV with similar line shapes. A simple model for the formation/ejection/fragmentation dynamics of the endohedral complex is proposed and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results

  11. Targeted Gene Deletion Demonstrates that Cell Adhesion MoleculeICAM-4 is Critical for Erythroblastic Island Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gloria; Lo, Annie; Short, Sarah A.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Spring, Frances; Parsons, Stephen F.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2006-02-15

    Erythroid progenitors differentiate in erythroblastic islands, bone marrow niches composed of erythroblasts surrounding a central macrophage. Evidence suggests that within islands adhesive interactions regulate erythropoiesis and apoptosis. We are exploring whether erythroid intercellular adhesion molecule-4 (ICAM-4), animmunoglobulin superfamily member, participates in island formation. Earlier, we identified alpha V integrins as ICAM-4 counter receptors. Since macrophages express alpha V, ICAM-4 potentially mediates island attachments. To test this, we generated ICAM-4 knockout mice and developed quantitative, live cell techniques for harvesting intact islands and for reforming islands in vitro. We observed a 47 percent decrease in islands reconstituted from ICAM-4 null marrow compared to wild type. We also found a striking decrease in islands formed in vivo in knockout mice. Further, peptides that block ICAM-4 alpha V adhesion produced a 53-57 percent decrease in reconstituted islands, strongly suggesting that ICAM-4 binding to macrophage alpha V functions in island integrity. Importantly, we documented that alpha V integrin is expressed in macrophages isolated from erythro blastic islands. Collectively, these data provide convincing evidence that ICAM-4 is critical in erythroblastic island formation via ICAM-4/alpha V adhesion and also demonstrate that the novel experimental strategies we developed will be valuable in exploring molecular mechanisms of erythroblastic island formation and their functional role in regulating erythropoiesis.

  12. Studies on muon cycling rates in muon catalyzed D-T fusion system with possible four-body muonic molecules formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskandri, M.R.; Hosini Motlagh, N.; Hataf, A.

    2000-01-01

    In recent studies, it is shown that the fusion rate for four-body molecules of ppμμ, ddμμ, ptμμ, pdμμ, dtμμ, ttμμ, is considerably larger than that of similar three-body molecules of ppμμ, ddμμ, ptμμ, pdμμ, dtμμ, ttμμ. It is shown that for dtμμ, fusion rate is R f (dt) ≅ 3 * 10 13 - 6 * * 10 13 S -1 which is 40 times higher than fusion rate of dtμμ molecule. In this paper we have looked for the effect of these molecules formation in muon catalyzed D-T fusion. The required data for all possible branches do not exist, so the main dtμμ branch are considered here. By choosing a variable value for dtμμ molecule formation rate and comparing obtained cycling rates with existing experimental values, the order of this parameter is evaluated to be ≅ 10 9 S -1 . Using obtained data in different conditions of D-T muon cycling rate calculations have shown that considering of four-body molecule formations in existing muon injection intensities do not make considerable change in three-body muonic molecule cycling rate

  13. A theoretical model investigation of peptide bond formation involving two water molecules in ribosome supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We theoretical studied peptide bond formation reaction mechanism with two water molecules. • The first water molecule can decrease the reaction barriers by forming hydrogen bonds. • The water molecule mediated three-proton transfer mechanism is the favorable mechanism. • Our calculation supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism. - Abstract: The ribosome is the macromolecular machine that catalyzes protein synthesis. The kinetic isotope effect analysis reported by Strobel group supports the two-step mechanism. However, the destination of the proton originating from the nucleophilic amine is uncertain. A computational simulation of different mechanisms including water molecules is carried out using the same reaction model and theoretical level. Formation the tetrahedral intermediate with proton transfer from nucleophilic nitrogen, is the rate-limiting step when two water molecules participate in peptide bond formation. The first water molecule forming hydrogen bonds with O9′ and H15′ in the A site can decrease the reaction barriers. Combined with results of the solvent isotope effects analysis, we conclude that the three-proton transfer mechanism in which water molecule mediate the proton shuttle between amino and carbon oxygen in rate-limiting step is the favorable mechanism. Our results will shield light on a better understand the reaction mechanism of ribosome

  14. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  15. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  16. Auto Poisoning of the Respiratory Chain by a Quorum Sensing Regulated Molecule Favors Biofilm Formation and Antibiotic Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Ronen; Que, Yok Ai; Maura, Damien; Strobel, Benjamin; Majcherczyk, Paul Anthony; Hopper, Laura Rose; Wilbur, David J.; Hreha, Teri N.; Barquera, Blanca; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial programmed cell death and quorum sensing are direct examples of prokaryote group behaviors, wherein cells coordinate their actions to function cooperatively like one organism for the benefit of the whole culture. We demonstrate here that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing -regulated low-molecular-weight excreted molecule, and triggers autolysis by self-perturbing the electron transfer reactions of the cytochrome bc1 complex. HQNO induces specific self-poisoning by disrupting the flow of electrons through the respiratory chain at the cytochrome bc1 complex, causing a leak of reducing equivalents to O2 whereby electrons that would normally be passed to cytochrome c are donated directly to O2. The subsequent mass production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduces membrane potential and disrupts membrane integrity, causing bacterial cell autolysis and DNA release. DNA subsequently promotes biofilm formation and increases antibiotic tolerance to beta-lactams, suggesting that HQNO-dependent cell autolysis is advantageous to the bacterial populations. These data both identify a new programmed cell death system, and a novel role for HQNO as a critical-inducer of biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. This newly identified pathway suggests intriguing mechanistic similarities with the initial mitochondrial-mediated steps of eukaryotic apoptosis. PMID:26776731

  17. Single-Molecule Kinetics Reveal Cation-Promoted DNA Duplex Formation Through Ordering of Single-Stranded Helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of short, fully complementary oligonucleotides are investigated at the single-molecule level. Constructs 6–9 bp in length exhibit single exponential kinetics over 2 orders of magnitude time for both forward (kon, association) and reverse (koff, dissociation) processes. Bimolecular rate constants for association are weakly sensitive to the number of basepairs in the duplex, with a 2.5-fold increase between 9 bp (k′on = 2.1(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) and 6 bp (k′on = 5.0(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) sequences. In sharp contrast, however, dissociation rate constants prove to be exponentially sensitive to sequence length, varying by nearly 600-fold over the same 9 bp (koff = 0.024 s−1) to 6 bp (koff = 14 s−1) range. The 8 bp sequence is explored in more detail, and the NaCl dependence of kon and koff is measured. Interestingly, konincreases by >40-fold (kon = 0.10(1) s−1 to 4.0(4) s−1 between [NaCl] = 25 mM and 1 M), whereas in contrast, koffdecreases by fourfold (0.72(3) s−1 to 0.17(7) s−1) over the same range of conditions. Thus, the equilibrium constant (Keq) increases by ≈160, largely due to changes in the association rate, kon. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements reveal that increased [NaCl] reduces the overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) of duplex formation, albeit by an amount smaller than the reduction in entropic penalty (−TΔΔS° duplex formation. PMID:23931323

  18. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  19. Effects of cryopreservation on excretory function, cellular adhesion molecules and vessel lumen formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guoping; Lai, Binbin; Hong, Huaxing; Lin, Peng; Chen, Weifu; Zhu, Zhong; Chen, Haixiao

    2017-07-01

    Cryopreservation is widely used in regenerative medicine for tissue preservation. In the present study, the effects of cryopreservation on excretory function, cellular adhesion molecules and vessel lumen formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. After 0, 4, 8, 12 or 24 weeks of cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, the HUVECs were thawed. The excretory functions markers (endothelin‑1, prostaglandin E1, von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide) of HUVECs were measured by ELISA assay. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in HUVECs was analyzed using flow cytometry. An angiogenesis assay was used to determine the angiogeneic capabilities of the thawed HUVECs. The results demonstrated that cryopreserved/thawed and recultivated HUVECs were unsuitable for tissue‑engineered microvascular construction. Specifically, the excretory function of the cells was significantly decreased in the post‑cryopreserved HUVECs at 24 weeks. In addition, the level of ICAM‑1 in HUVECs was significantly upregulated from the fourth week of cryopreservation. Furthermore, the tube‑like structure‑forming potential was weakened with increasing cryopreservation duration, and the numbers of lumen and the length of the pipeline were decreased in the thawed HUVECs, in a time‑dependent manner. In conclusion, the results of the present study revealed that prolonged cryopreservation may lead to HUVEC dysfunction and did not create stable cell lines for tissue‑engineered microvascular construction.

  20. Formation of H- ions via vibrational excited molecules produced from recombinative wall desorption of H atoms in a low-pressure H/sub 2/ positive column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorim, J.; Loureiro, J.; Schram, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    Recombinative wall desorption of hydrogen atoms in a low-pressure hydrogen positive column leading to formation of H/sub 2/ (X/sup 1/ Sigma /sub g//sup +/, v) molecules in optimum levels for H/sup -/ production by dissociative attachment is investigated. We employed a kinetic model that solves the

  1. Role of cavity formation in SCC of cold worked carbon steel in high-temperature water. Part 2. Study of crack initiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Aoki, Masanori; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    To consider the role of cavity formation in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked (CW) carbon steel in high-temperature water, SCC and creep growth (part 1) and initiation (part 2) tests were performed. The part 2 crack initiation tests used blunt notched compact tension (CT) type specimens of CW carbon steel exposed under the static load condition in hydrogenated pure water and in air in the range of temperatures between 360 and 450°C. Inter-granular (IG) crack initiation was observed both in water and in air even in static load condition when steel specimens had been cold worked. 1/T type temperature dependencies of initiation times were observed for CW carbon steel, and the crack initiation times in an operating pressurized heavy water reactor, PHWR (Pt Lepreau) seemed to lie on the extrapolated line of the experimental results. Cavities were identified at the grain boundaries near the bottom of a notch (highly stressed location) before cracks initiated both in water and air. The cavities were probably formed by the condensation of vacancies and they affected the bond strength of the grain boundaries. To assess the mechanism of IGSCC initiation in high temperature water, the diffusion of vacancies driven by stress gradients was studied using a specially designed CT specimen. As a model for IGSCC in CW carbon steel in high temperature water, it was concluded that the formation of cavities from the collapse of vacancies offers the best interpretation of the present data. (author)

  2. Effect of surface shear on cube texture formation in heavy cold-rolled Cu-45 at%Ni alloy substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hui; Suo, Hongli; Liang, Yaru

    2015-01-01

    Two types of Cu-45 at%Ni alloy thin tapes with and without surface shear were obtained by different heavy cold rolling processes. The deformation and recrystallization textures of the two tapes were thoroughly investigated by electron back scattering diffraction technique. The results showed...... that a shear texture mainly covered the surface of the heavy deformed tapes because of the fraction between the surface of rolling mills and the thin tapes when the rolling force strongly reduced at high strain, which significantly reduced the fraction of rolling texture on the surface of the Cu-45at %Ni alloy...

  3. Effects of cyclopentane on CO2 hydrate formation and dissociation as a co-guest molecule for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jia-nan; Yang, Ming-jun; Liu, Yu; Wang, Da-yong; Song, Yong-chen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CP decreases CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium pressure by forming CO 2 -CP hydrates. • The increase of CP can’t decrease hydrates phase equilibrium pressure unlimitedly. • Higher CP concentration lowers CO 2 hydrate gas uptake. • The optimal CP molar ratio is 0.01 based on hydrate phase equilibrium and gas uptake. - Abstract: Cyclopentane (CP) is considered to be a potential co-guest molecule in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) hydrate-based desalination. The experimental thermodynamic data of CO 2 -CP hydrates were measured for a salt solution, where CP was chosen as a hydrate promoter. Seven experimental cases (62 cycles) were studied with different molar ratios of CP/water (0, 0.0025, 0.005, 0.0075, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03). Hydrate phase equilibrium data were generated using an isochoric method, and the hydrate saturations were calculated based on gas uptake. The results indicated that the increase in CP concentration significantly decreased the CO 2 hydrate equilibrium pressure to a certain limit; the hydrate saturation also decreased during this process. Also, it was determined that CP encouraged the formation of s-II double CO 2 -CP hydrates, which are different from s-I simple CO 2 hydrate. The CO 2 -CP guest provides a strengthened stability and moderate hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for hydrate-based desalination. The recommended optimal molar ratio of CP is 0.01 when the increase in equilibrium was more than 10 K, and the decrease in hydrate saturation was less than 2%.

  4. Muonic molecular formation under laser irradiation and in the clustered ion molecule (The effect of protonium additive on the muon catalyzed fusion cycle)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    The formation rate of the dtμ molecule is very sensitive to the differences in the vibrational rotational level between D 2 and [(dtμ)-d-2e/] molecules. The density effect of the normalized reaction rate has been studied by the resonance broadening due to collisional quenching. The surrounding molecules of the molecule forming dt/mu/ act as the third body which takes out the excess energy forming dt/mu/ from t/mu/, and the formation reaction occurs with the excitation of the vibrational state just below the threshold energy. By using the laser as the third body, the rate of resonance formation can be increased. In my last paper, the formation rate was calculated under high-intensity laser irradiation, using Vinitsky's model assuming that the laser interacts directly with the deuteron and modulates the interaction between t/mu/ and d/sub 2/ nuclei. However, the laser interacts more strongly with the electrons, because the interaction energy of the laser and the charged particle is proportional to the velocity of the particle's motion, and the velocity of the electron is a few thousand times greater than the velocity of the nuclei. This interaction with electrons was neglected in my last paper. In the present paper, the enhancement of the dt/mu/ formation rates by the strong laser irradiation is studied, taking into account the laser electron interaction; It was shown that the enhancement can be achieved by an intensity lower than the one described previously. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  6. Research on frost formation in air source heat pump at cold-moist conditions in central-south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Guangcai; Tang, Jinchen; Lv, Dongyan; Wang, Hongjin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ►A dynamic evaporator model is built up. ► The model involves the ratio of the latent heat to sensible heat of wet air. ►A correlation considering d eq is shown below to predict frost accumulation: (M fr v 3 )/(Ψd eq 2 ) =((T a )/(T w ) ) 0.1 ((vτ)/(d eq ) ) 0.7 (l/(d eq ) ) 1.378 X a 1.228 . ►The changing ratio can characterize the early development of system performance. ►The changing ratio can characterize the early development of frost accumulation. -- Abstract: A dynamic evaporator model of air source heat pump (ASHP), considering the ratio of the latent heat to sensible heat of wet air, is presented to analyze the performance of ASHP under frosting. The performance parameters, such as the heating capacity, COP and the outlet temperature of compressor, are simulated with CYCLEPAD. Then a semi-empirical correlation that predicts frost accumulation on the air-side of fin-tube heat exchanger is developed with dimensionless analysis and also modified by a test conducted under cold-moist conditions in winter. In addition, eight influence factors are considered involving the ambient conditions and structures of heat exchanger, whose effects are analyzed as well. Among them, the equivalent diameter of air flow cross-section in fin-tube d eq is especially proposed. Lastly, the relationships between the ratio, the performance parameters and the frost accumulation are discussed in this paper, followed by an evaluation of an optimal defrosting time interval to improve the ASHP’s energy efficiency and operational reliability at cold-moist conditions in central-south China.

  7. Analysis of Metal Flow Behavior and Residual Stress Formation of Complex Functional Profiles under High-Speed Cold Roll-Beating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengkui Cui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a good surface layer performance of the complex functional profile during the high-speed cold roll-beating forming process, this paper analyzed the metal plastic flow and residual stress-formed mechanism by using a theoretical model of the metal flow and residual stress generation. By using simulation software, the cold roll-beating forming process of a spline shaft was simulated and analyzed. The metal flow and residual stress formation law in the motion were researched. In a practical experiment, the changes in the grains in the spline tooth profile section and the residual stress distribution on the tooth profile were studied. A microcorrespondence relationship was established between the metal plastic flow and the residual stress generation. The conclusions indicate that the rate at which the metal flow decreases changes gradually at different metal layers. The residual stress value is directly related to the plastic flow difference. As the roll-beating speed increases, the uneven degree of plastic deformation at the workpiece surface increases, and the residual stress in the tooth profile is generally greater. At the same roll-beating speed, the rate change trend of the metal flow decreases gradually from the surface to the inner layer and from the dedendum to the addendum. The residual stress distribution on the surface of the tooth profile decreases from the dedendum to the addendum. These findings provide a basis and guidance for the controlled use of residual stress, obtaining better surface layer quality in the high-speed cold roll-beating process of the complex functional profile.

  8. Cryogenic cave carbonates from the Cold Wind Cave, Nízke Tatry Mountains, Slovakia: Extending the age range of cryogenic cave carbonate formation to the Saalian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zak K.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold Wind Cave, located at elevations ranging between 1,600 and 1,700 m a. s. l. in the main range of the Nízke Tatry Mountains(Slovakia, is linked in origin with the adjacent Dead Bats Cave. Together, these caves form a major cave system located within anarrow tectonic slice of Triassic sediments. Both caves have undergone complex multiphase development. A system of sub-horizontalcave levels characterized by large, tunnel-like corridors was formed during the Tertiary, when elevation differences surroundingthe cave were less pronounced than today. The central part of the Nízke Tatry Mountains, together with the cave systems, wasuplifted during the Neogene and Lower Pleistocene, which changed the drainage pattern of the area completely. The formation ofnumerous steep-sloped vadose channels and widespread cave roof frost shattering characterized cave development throughout theQuaternary.In the Cold Wind Cave, extensive accumulations of loose, morphologically variable crystal aggregates of secondary cave carbonateranging in size between less than 1 mm to about 35 mm was found on the surface of fallen limestone blocks. Based on the C andO stable isotope compositions of the carbonate (δ13C: 0.72 to 6.34 ‰, δ18O: –22.61 to –13.68 ‰ V-PDB and the negative relationbetween δ13C and δ18O, the carbonate crystal aggregates are interpreted as being cryogenic cave carbonate (CCC. Publishedmodels suggest the formation of CCC in slowly freezing water pools, probably on the surface of cave ice, most probably duringtransitions from stadials to interstadials. Though the formation of these carbonates is likely one of the youngest events in thesequence of formation of cave sediments of the studied caves, the 230Th/234U ages of three samples (79.7±2.3, 104.0±2.9, and180.0±6.3 ka are the oldest so far obtained for CCC in Central Europe. This is the first description of CCC formation in one caveduring two glacial periods (Saalian and Weichselian.

  9. Effect of N-Ethylmaleimide as a Blocker of Disulfide Crosslinks Formation on the Alkali-Cold Gelation of Whey Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lei

    Full Text Available N-ethylmaleimide (NEM was used to verify that no new disulfide crosslinks were formed during the fascinating rheology of the alkali cold-gelation of whey proteins, which show Sol-Gel-Sol transitions with time at pH > 11.5. These dynamic transitions involve the formation and subsequent destruction of non-covalent interactions between soluble whey aggregates. Therefore, incubation of aggregates with NEM was expected not to affect much the rheology. Experiments show that very little additions of NEM, such as 0.5 mol per mol of protein, delayed and significantly strengthened the metastable gels formed. Interactions between whey protein aggregates were surprisingly enhanced during incubation with NEM as inferred from oscillatory rheometry at different protein concentrations, dynamic swelling, Trp fluorescence and SDS-PAGE measurements.

  10. Effect of N-Ethylmaleimide as a Blocker of Disulfide Crosslinks Formation on the Alkali-Cold Gelation of Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhao; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2016-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was used to verify that no new disulfide crosslinks were formed during the fascinating rheology of the alkali cold-gelation of whey proteins, which show Sol-Gel-Sol transitions with time at pH > 11.5. These dynamic transitions involve the formation and subsequent destruction of non-covalent interactions between soluble whey aggregates. Therefore, incubation of aggregates with NEM was expected not to affect much the rheology. Experiments show that very little additions of NEM, such as 0.5 mol per mol of protein, delayed and significantly strengthened the metastable gels formed. Interactions between whey protein aggregates were surprisingly enhanced during incubation with NEM as inferred from oscillatory rheometry at different protein concentrations, dynamic swelling, Trp fluorescence and SDS-PAGE measurements. PMID:27732644

  11. A theoretical study of cold nuclear fusion using barrier penetration approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    1989-06-01

    The cold nuclear fusion process is investigated in terms of barrier penetration calculations by considering both the deuteron-molecule and colliding deuteron-deuteron atoms. Atomic collisions with strongly screened interatomic potential and the resonant state formation can bring agreement with present experimental results. Analysis of the data in terms of the reaction rates is also discussed. (author). 13 refs, 1 tab

  12. Detecting the permafrost carbon feedback: talik formation and increased cold-season respiration as precursors to sink-to-source transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Koven, Charles D.; Lawrence, David M.; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Miller, Charles E.

    2018-01-01

    Thaw and release of permafrost carbon (C) due to climate change is likely to offset increased vegetation C uptake in northern high-latitude (NHL) terrestrial ecosystems. Models project that this permafrost C feedback may act as a slow leak, in which case detection and attribution of the feedback may be difficult. The formation of talik, a subsurface layer of perennially thawed soil, can accelerate permafrost degradation and soil respiration, ultimately shifting the C balance of permafrost-affected ecosystems from long-term C sinks to long-term C sources. It is imperative to understand and characterize mechanistic links between talik, permafrost thaw, and respiration of deep soil C to detect and quantify the permafrost C feedback. Here, we use the Community Land Model (CLM) version 4.5, a permafrost and biogeochemistry model, in comparison to long-term deep borehole data along North American and Siberian transects, to investigate thaw-driven C sources in NHL ( > 55° N) from 2000 to 2300. Widespread talik at depth is projected across most of the NHL permafrost region (14 million km2) by 2300, 6.2 million km2 of which is projected to become a long-term C source, emitting 10 Pg C by 2100, 50 Pg C by 2200, and 120 Pg C by 2300, with few signs of slowing. Roughly half of the projected C source region is in predominantly warm sub-Arctic permafrost following talik onset. This region emits only 20 Pg C by 2300, but the CLM4.5 estimate may be biased low by not accounting for deep C in yedoma. Accelerated decomposition of deep soil C following talik onset shifts the ecosystem C balance away from surface dominant processes (photosynthesis and litter respiration), but sink-to-source transition dates are delayed by 20-200 years by high ecosystem productivity, such that talik peaks early ( ˜ 2050s, although borehole data suggest sooner) and C source transition peaks late ( ˜ 2150-2200). The remaining C source region in cold northern Arctic permafrost, which shifts to a net

  13. Detecting the permafrost carbon feedback: talik formation and increased cold-season respiration as precursors to sink-to-source transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Parazoo

    2018-01-01

    remaining C source region in cold northern Arctic permafrost, which shifts to a net source early (late 21st century, emits 5 times more C (95 Pg C by 2300, and prior to talik formation due to the high decomposition rates of shallow, young C in organic-rich soils coupled with low productivity. Our results provide important clues signaling imminent talik onset and C source transition, including (1 late cold-season (January–February soil warming at depth ( ∼  2 m, (2 increasing cold-season emissions (November–April, and (3 enhanced respiration of deep, old C in warm permafrost and young, shallow C in organic-rich cold permafrost soils. Our results suggest a mosaic of processes that govern carbon source-to-sink transitions at high latitudes and emphasize the urgency of monitoring soil thermal profiles, organic C age and content, cold-season CO2 emissions, and atmospheric 14CO2 as key indicators of the permafrost C feedback.

  14. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO2) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  15. Mechanisms of ultrafine-grained austenite formation under different isochronal conditions in a cold-rolled metastable stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celada-Casero, C., E-mail: c.celada@cenim.csic.es [MATERALIA group, Dpt. of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Huang, B.M. [National Taiwan University, Dpt. of Materials Science and Engineering, 1 Roosvelt Road, Section 4, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Aranda, M.M. [MATERALIA group, Dpt. of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Yang, J.-R. [National Taiwan University, Dpt. of Materials Science and Engineering, 1 Roosvelt Road, Section 4, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Martin, D. San [MATERALIA group, Dpt. of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    The primary objective of this work is to obtain fundamental insights on phase transformations, with focus on the reaustenitization process (α′→γ transformation), of a cold-rolled (CR) semi-austenitic metastable stainless steel upon different isochronal conditions (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 °C/s). For this purpose, an exhaustive microstructural characterization has been performed by using complementary experimental such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), micro-hardness Vickers and magnetization measurements. It has been detected that all microstructural changes shift to higher temperatures as the heating rate increases. The reaustenitization occurs in two-steps for all heating rates, which is attributed to the chemical banding present in the CR state. The α′→γ transformation is controlled by the migration of substitutional alloying elements across the austenite/martensite (γ/α′) interface, which finally leads to ultrafine-grained reaustenitized microstructures (440–280 nm). The morphology of the martensite phase in the CR state has been found to be the responsible for such a grain refinement, along with the presence of χ-phase and nanometric Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al) precipitates that pin the austenite grain growth, especially upon slowly heating at 0.1 °C/s. - Highlights: •Ultrafine-grained austenite structures are obtained isochronally at 0.1–100 °C/s •The α′→γ transformation occurs in two steps due to the initial chemical banding •A diffusional mechanism governs the α′→γ transformation for all heating rates •The dislocation-cell-type of martensite promotes a diffusional mechanism •Precipitates located at α′/γ interfaces hinder the austenite growth.

  16. Simulating pasta phases by molecular dynamics and cold atoms. Formation in supernovae and superfluid neutrons in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Gentaro

    2010-01-01

    In dense stars such as collapsing cores of supernovae and neutron stars, nuclear 'pasta' such as rod-like and slab-like nuclei are speculated to exist. However, whether or not they are actually formed in supernova cores is still unclear. Here we solve this problem by demonstrating that a lattice of rod-like nuclei is formed from a bcc lattice by compression. We also find that the formation process is triggered by an attractive force between nearest neighbor nuclei, which starts to act when their density profile overlaps, rather than the fission instability. We also discuss the connection between pasta phases in neutron star crusts and ultracold Fermi gases. (author)

  17. Ionization and ions pair formation in He(n1P) thermal collisions in the Rydberg + molecules low states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesnelle, A.; Ronge, C.; Perdrix, M.; Watel, G.

    1988-06-01

    The application limits of the free electron model are tested. Experiments on polar molecules and on molecules of high electronical affinity are effectuated. The experiments are carried out in a three crossed beam geometry: a He(2 1S , 2 3S ) metastable atom beam, a continuous and monomode laser UV beam (316 nm), and a gas target beam. The main results are: high cross sections are observed on NH3, SO2 and C3H6O; the σ''exp'' behavior, as a function of v r , is v r -2 ; a monotone σ''exp'' (v r ) behavior is observed for SF6 and NO2. The experimental data can not be justified by means of the free electron model [fr

  18. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian; Hummel, Helga; Bruns, Michael; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm

    2016-06-01

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  19. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Peters

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl-4,4’-diamine and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline-(4-phenylphenoxyaluminum, originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  20. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.raupp@kit.edu; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm [Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hummel, Helga [Philips Technologie GmbH Innovative Technologies, Aachen (Germany); Bruns, Michael [Institute for Applied Materials and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  1. Formation mechanism and yield of molecules ejected from ZnS, CdS, and FeS2 during ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikzad, S.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M.; Tombrello, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral species ejected from single crystals of ZnS, CdS, and FeS 2 during ion bombardment by 3 keV Ar + were detected by laser post-ionization followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. While metal atoms (Fe, Zn, Cd) and S 2 were the dominant species observed, substantial amounts of S, FeS, Zn 2 , ZnS, Cd 2 , and CdS were also detected. The experimental results demonstrate that molecules represent a larger fraction of the sputtered yield than was previously believed from secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments. In addition, the data suggest that the molecules are not necessarily formed from adjacent atoms in the solid and that a modified form of the recombination model could provide a mechanism for their formation

  2. A comparison of the performance of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for small molecule targets and antibodies in the ELISA format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska-Kempisty, Katarzyna; Guerreiro, Antonio; Canfarotta, Francesco; Cáceres, César; Whitcombe, Michael J.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    Here we show that molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles, prepared in aqueous media by solid phase synthesis with immobilised L-thyroxine, glucosamine, fumonisin B2 or biotin as template, can demonstrate comparable or better performance to commercially produced antibodies in enzyme-linked competitive assays. Imprinted nanoparticles-based assays showed detection limits in the pM range and polymer-coated microplates are stable to storage at room temperature for at least 1 month. No response to analyte was detected in control experiments with nanoparticles imprinted with an unrelated template (trypsin) but prepared with the same polymer composition. The ease of preparation, high affinity of solid-phase synthesised imprinted nanoparticles and the lack of requirement for cold chain logistics make them an attractive alternative to traditional antibodies for use in immunoassays.

  3. The first report on Listeria monocytogenes producing siderophores and responds positively to N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules by enhanced biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Milind Mohan; Bhangui, Purva; Bhat, Chinmay

    2017-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes are Gram-positive well-known emerging food-borne pathogens causing listeriosis in humans. In the present study, we have isolated biofilm-forming Listeria sp. from utensils used by a local milk collection dairy society at Usgao Goa, which collects milk for Goa dairy. Through biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the bacterium was confirmed to be L. monocytogenes and designated as strain BN3, having GenBank accession number MF095110. We report for the first time Gram-positive L. monocytogenes strain BN3 producing iron-chelating siderophores by chrome azurol S (CAS) agar test. Also, this is a first report which reveals that L. monocytogenes strain BN3 responds to N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone molecule (C 6 -HSL) by gradual increase in their biofilm-forming potential with a gradual increase in AHL (C 6 -HSL) concentration (250, 500 nM-1 μM) as compared to control revealed by crystal violet assay (CV) in microtiter plate. These results were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A significant decrease in biofilm formation was observed when L. monocytogenes strain BN3 was treated with 10 µg/ml (R)-2-(2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, but when 250 and 500 nM AHL molecules were added, biofilm formation in strain BN3 was found to be enhanced as compared to control even in the presence of antibacterial compound, (R)-2-(2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid. These results revealed that AHL molecules nullify the effect of antimicrobial compound and promote biofilm formation in L. monocytogenes strain BN3.

  4. Features of structure formation in the low modulus quasi-single crystal from Zr-25%Nb alloy at cold rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaenkova, M.; Perlovich, Yu.; Fesenko, V.; Babich, Y.; Zaripova, M.; Krapivka, N.

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of the regularities of the structure and texture formation during rolling of single crystals of Zr-25%Nb alloy differing in their initial orientations relative to the external principal directions in the rolled plate: normal (ND) and rolling directions (RD). The features of rolled single crystals with initial orientations of planes {001}, {011} or {111} parallel to the rolling plane and different crystallographic directions along RD are considered. A comparison of the peculiarities of plastic deformation in a polycrystalline alloy of the same composition is made. For the samples studied, a decrease in the lattice parameter of the β-phase has been recorded, the minimum of the parameter being observed for different degrees of deformation, varying from 20 to 50%. Observed decrease in the unit cell parameter can be connected with the precipitation of the α(α')-Zr phase from the deformed nonequilibrium β-phase of the Zr-25%Nb alloy, i.e. change in the composition of the solid solution. Distributions of the increase in the dimensions of the deformed single crystal along RD and the transverse direction (TD) with its deformation up to 30% in thickness, which indicate the anisotropy of the plasticity of single crystals during their rolling, are constructed on stereographic projection. It is shown, that the deformation of single crystals occurs practically without increasing of their dimensions in the direction with a total thickness deformation of up to 30%. Direction is characterized by maximum hardening (microhardness) with indentation along it, which causes low plasticity of deformed and annealed foils from Zr-25%Nb alloy at the stretching along and across RD, that is connected with the features of their crystallographic texture.

  5. Structure of formations on the NaCl monocrystal surface following simultaneous irradiation of it by hydrocarbon molecule flow and Ne/sup +/ ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derevyanchenko, A S; Palatnik, L S; Martynov, I S; Seryugin, A L; Gritsyna, V V; Koval' , A G; Kiyan, T S; Fogel' , Ya M [Khar' kovskii Gosudarstvennyi Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1975-07-01

    The structure of a film growing on the surface of NaCl crystal with a simultaneous irradiation of the film with molecules of hydrocarbons and Ne ions has been investigated. At the first stage of formation the film has a net structure of graphite with an abnormally large internet distance. At the subsequent stage of growing hollow spherulites are formed in the film, their walls having the structure of the third phase of carbon - carbine and dendrites - crystals with the structure of NaCl forming inside of the growing film.

  6. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  7. A high resolution ion microscope for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, Markus; Schefzyk, Hannah; Fortágh, József; Günther, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We report on an ion-optical system that serves as a microscope for ultracold ground state and Rydberg atoms. The system is designed to achieve a magnification of up to 1000 and a spatial resolution in the 100 nm range, thereby surpassing many standard imaging techniques for cold atoms. The microscope consists of four electrostatic lenses and a microchannel plate in conjunction with a delay line detector in order to achieve single particle sensitivity with high temporal and spatial resolution. We describe the design process of the microscope including ion-optical simulations of the imaging system and characterize aberrations and the resolution limit. Furthermore, we present the experimental realization of the microscope in a cold atom setup and investigate its performance by patterned ionization with a structure size down to 2.7 μ m. The microscope meets the requirements for studying various many-body effects, ranging from correlations in cold quantum gases up to Rydberg molecule formation. (paper)

  8. Exhaust emissions of volatile organic compounds of powered two-wheelers: effect of cold start and vehicle speed. Contribution to greenhouse effect and tropospheric ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, M Antonietta; Murena, Fabio; Prati, M Vittoria

    2014-01-15

    Powered two-wheeler (PTW) vehicles complying with recent European type approval standards (stages Euro 2 and Euro 3) were tested on chassis dynamometer in order to measure exhaust emissions of about 25 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the range C1-C7, including carcinogenic compounds as benzene and 1,3-butadiene. The fleet consists of a moped (engine capacity ≤ 50 cm(3)) and three fuel injection motorcycles of different engine capacities (150, 300 and 400 cm(3)). Different driving conditions were tested (US FPT cycle, constant speed). Due to the poor control of the combustion and catalyst efficiency, moped is the highest pollutant emitter. In fact, fuel injection strategy and three way catalyst with lambda sensor are able to reduce VOC motorcycles' emission of about one order of magnitude with respect to moped. Cold start effect, that is crucial for the assessment of actual emission of PTWs in urban areas, was significant: 30-51% of extra emission for methane. In the investigated speed range, moped showed a significant maximum of VOC emission factor at minimum speed (10 km/h) and a slightly decreasing trend from 20 to 60 km/h; motorcycles showed on the average a less significant peak at 10 km/h, a minimum at 30-40 km/h and then an increasing trend with a maximum emission factor at 90 km/h. Carcinogenic VOCs show the same pattern of total VOCs. Ozone Formation Potential (OFP) was estimated by using Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale. The greatest contribution to tropospheric ozone formation comes from alkenes group which account for 50-80% to the total OFP. VOC contribution effect on greenhouse effect is negligible with respect to CO2 emitted. © 2013.

  9. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Formation of Interstellar Propylene Oxide (CH3CHCH2O)—A Chiral Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantini, Alexandre; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Pokhilko, Pavel; Krylov, Anna I.; Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Herbst, Eric; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2018-06-01

    This work reveals via a combined experimental, computational, and astrochemical modeling study that racemic propylene oxide (c-C3H6O)—the first chiral molecule detected outside Earth toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(N)—can be synthesized by non-equilibrium reactions initiated by the effects of secondary electrons generated in the track of cosmic rays interacting with ice-coated interstellar grains through excited-state and spin-forbidden reaction pathways operating within low-temperature interstellar ices at 10 K. Our findings confront traditional hypotheses that thermal chemistries followed by processing of interstellar grains dictate the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in molecular clouds. Instead, we reveal a hitherto poorly quantified reaction class involving excited-state and spin-forbidden chemistry leading to racemic mixtures of COMs inside interstellar ices prior to their sublimation in star-forming regions. This fundamental production mechanism is of essential consequence in aiding our understanding of the origin and evolution of chiral molecules in the universe.

  10. AHL signaling molecules with a large acyl chain enhance biofilm formation on sulfur and metal sulfides by the bioleaching bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alex; Bellenberg, Sören; Mamani, Sigde; Ruiz, Lina; Echeverría, Alex; Soulère, Laurent; Doutheau, Alain; Demergasso, Cecilia; Sand, Wolfgang; Queneau, Yves; Vera, Mario; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Biofilm formation plays a pivotal role in bioleaching activities of bacteria in both industrial and natural environments. Here, by visualizing attached bacterial cells on energetic substrates with different microscopy techniques, we obtained the first direct evidence that it is possible to positively modulate biofilm formation of the extremophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on sulfur and pyrite surfaces by using Quorum Sensing molecules of the N-acylhomoserine lactone type (AHLs). Our results revealed that AHL-signaling molecules with a long acyl chain (12 or 14 carbons) increased the adhesion of A. ferrooxidans cells to these substrates. In addition, Card-Fish experiments demonstrated that C14-AHL improved the adhesion of indigenous A. ferrooxidans cells from a mixed bioleaching community to pyrite. Finally, we demonstrated that this improvement of cell adhesion is correlated with an increased production of extracellular polymeric substances. Our results open up a promising means to develop new strategies for the improvement of bioleaching efficiency and metal recovery, which could also be used to control environmental damage caused by acid mine/rock drainage.

  11. The possible role of bacterial signal molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones in the formation of diatom-biofilm (Cylindrotheca sp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Cuiyun; Fang, Shengtao; Chen, Dehui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Fanghua; Xia, Chuanhai

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) (C10-HSL, 3-OXO-C10-HSL and 3-OH-C10-HSL) as possible chemical cues were employed to investigate the role in the formation of fouling diatom-biofilm (Cylindrotheca sp.). Results showed that AHLs promoted Chlorophyll a (Chl.a) and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) contents in the diatom-biofilm. In the presence of AHLs-inhibitor 3, 4-Dibromo-2(5)H-furanone, which was used to avoid the possible interference of AHLs from bacteria, AHLs also increased the Chl.a and EPS contents. Scanning electron microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope analysis further demonstrated that AHLs promoted the formation of the diatom-biofilm. Non-invasive micro-test technique showed that AHLs promoted Ca 2+ efflux in Cylindrotheca sp., which implied that Ca 2+ might be correlated with AHLs-induced positive effect on the formation of diatom-biofilm. This study provides direct evidences that AHLs play an important role in developing the diatom-biofilm and AHLs-inhibitors might be promising active agents in marine antifouling. - Highlights: •AHLs effectively increase Chl.a and EPS contents in diatom-biofilm. •SEM and CLSM further demonstrate that AHLs promote the formation of diatom-biofilm. •AHLs trigger algal cellular Ca 2+ efflux. •AHLs-inhibitors might be promising active agents in marine antifouling.

  12. Laboratory Studies on the Formation of Carbon-Bearing Molecules in Extraterrestrial Environments: From the Gas Phase to the Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, C. S.; Guo, Y.; Gu, X.; Zhang, F.; Bennett, C. J.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of the formation of carbon-bearing molecules in interstellar ices and in the gas phase of the interstellar medium is of paramount interest to understand the astrochemical evolution of extraterrestrial environments (1). This research also holds strong implications to comprehend the chemical processing of Solar System environments such as icy planets and their moons together with the atmospheres of planets and their satellites (2). Since the present composition of each interstellar and Solar System environment reflects the matter from which it was formed and the processes which have changed the chemical nature since the origin (solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, cosmic ray exposure, photolysis, chemical reactions), a detailed investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms altering the pristine environment is of paramount importance to grasp the contemporary composition. Once these underlying processes have been unraveled, we can identify those molecules, which belonged to the nascent setting, distinguish molecular species synthesized in a later stage, and predict the imminent chemical evolution of, for instance, molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments under controlled physicochemical conditions (temperature, pressure, chemical composition, high energy components) present ideal tools for simulating the chemical evolution of interstellar and Solar System environments. Here, laboratory experiments can predict where and how (reaction mechanisms; chemicals necessary) in extraterrestrial environments and in the interstellar medium complex, carbon bearing molecules can be formed on interstellar grains and in the gas phase. This paper overviews the experimental setups utilized in our laboratory to mimic the chemical processing of gas phase and solid state (ices) environments. These are a crossed molecular beams machine (3) and a surface scattering setup (4). We also present typical results of each setup (formation of amino acids, aldehydes, epoxides

  13. Cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  14. Workshop on Roaming and Cold Molecule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    dynamics related to roaming. The speakers were all at the top of these fields and the graduate students and postdocs who attended were thus exposed...dynamics related to roaming. The speakers were all at the top of these fields and the graduate students and postdocs who attended were thus exposed to...mathematics, engineering or technology fields: Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating undergraduates supported by this agreement in

  15. What is the mechanism of the OSO ring formation in sulfur tetroxide (SO4(C2v)) molecule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Moein; Vahedpour, Morteza; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2012-06-01

    The mechanism of SO2 + O2 and O + SO3(D3h) reactions have been investigated at the MP2/6-31 + G(d) and CCSD(T)/cc-pV(Q + d)Z//MP2 levels on the triplet and singlet PESs. Although, no stable collision complexes have been found for the SO2 + O2(3∑g-), O(3P) + SO3(D3h) and O(1D) + SO3(D3h) reactions, 1IN(O2S-O2) has been considered on the singlet PES for the SO2 + O2(1Δg) reaction. The results show that there are no favorable paths for the OSO ring formation of SO4(C2v) in the atmospheric reactions of the SO2 + O2(3∑g-), SO2 + O2(1Δg) and O(3P) + SO3(D3h) while, the O(1D) + SO3(D3h) reaction can be suitable for the SO4(C2v) formation on the singlet PES.

  16. Our Galactic Neighbor Hosts Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the presence of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in a star-forming region outside our galaxy. This discovery has important implications for the formation and survival of complex organic compounds importantfor the formation of life in low-metallicity galaxies bothyoung and old.No Simple Picture of Complex Molecule FormationALMA, pictured here with the Magellanic Clouds above, has observed organic molecules in our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. [ESO/C. Malin]Complex organic molecules (those with at least six atoms, one or more of which must be carbon) are the precursors to the building blocks of life. Knowing how and where complex organic molecules can form is a key part of understanding how life came to be on Earth and how it might arise elsewhere in the universe. From exoplanet atmospheres to interstellar space, complex organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Milky Way.In our galaxy, complex organic molecules are often found in the intense environments of hot cores clumps of dense molecular gas surrounding the sites of star formation. However, its not yet fully understood how the complex organic molecules found in hot cores come to be. One possibility is that the compounds condense onto cold dust grains long before the young stars begin heating their natal shrouds. Alternatively, they might assemble themselves from the hot, dense gas surrounding the blazing protostars.Composite infrared and optical image of the N 113 star-forming region in the LMC. The ALMA coverage is indicated by the gray line. Click to enlarge. [Sewio et al. 2018]Detecting Complexity, a Galaxy AwayUsing ALMA, a team of researchers led by Marta Sewio (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) recently detected two complex organic molecules methyl formate and dimethyl ether for the first time in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Previous searches for organic molecules in the LMC detected

  17. TLR accessory molecule RP105 (CD180 is involved in post-interventional vascular remodeling and soluble RP105 modulates neointima formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco C Karper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RP105 (CD180 is TLR4 homologue lacking the intracellular TLR4 signaling domain and acts a TLR accessory molecule and physiological inhibitor of TLR4-signaling. The role of RP105 in vascular remodeling, in particular post-interventional remodeling is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: TLR4 and RP105 are expressed on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC as well as in the media of murine femoral artery segments as detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the response to the TLR4 ligand LPS was stronger in VSMC from RP105(-/- mice resulting in a higher proliferation rate. In RP105(-/- mice femoral artery cuff placement resulted in an increase in neointima formation as compared to WT mice (4982 ± 974 µm(2 vs.1947 ± 278 µm(2,p = 0.0014. Local LPS application augmented neointima formation in both groups, but in RP105(-/- mice this effect was more pronounced (10316±1243 µm(2 vs.4208 ± 555 µm(2,p = 0.0002, suggesting a functional role for RP105. For additional functional studies, the extracellular domain of murine RP105 was expressed with or without its adaptor protein MD1 and purified. SEC-MALSanalysis showed a functional 2∶2 homodimer formation of the RP105-MD1 complex. This protein complex was able to block the TLR4 response in whole blood ex-vivo. In vivo gene transfer of plasmid vectors encoding the extracellular part of RP105 and its adaptor protein MD1 were performed to initiate a stable endogenous soluble protein production. Expression of soluble RP105-MD1 resulted in a significant reduction in neointima formation in hypercholesterolemic mice (2500 ± 573 vs.6581 ± 1894 µm(2,p<0.05, whereas expression of the single factors RP105 or MD1 had no effect. CONCLUSION: RP105 is a potent inhibitor of post-interventional neointima formation.

  18. Conformation-related exciton localization and charge-pair formation in polythiophenes: ensemble and single-molecule study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Toshikazu; Habuchi, Satoshi; Ogino, Kenji; Vacha, Martin

    2009-09-10

    We study conformation-dependent photophysical properties of polythiophene (PT) by molecular dynamics simulations and by ensemble and single-molecule optical experiments. We use a graft copolymer consisting of a polythiophene backbone and long polystyrene branches and compare its properties with those obtained on the same polythiophene derivative without the side chains. Coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations show that in a poor solvent, the PT without the side chains (PT-R) forms a globulelike conformation in which distances between any two conjugated segments on the chain are within the Forster radius for efficient energy transfer. In the PT with the polystyrene branches (PT-PS), the polymer main PT chain retains an extended coillike conformation, even in a poor solvent, and the calculated distances between conjugated segments favor energy transfer only between a few neighboring chromophores. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by measurements of fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence blinking of the polymers' single chains. High anisotropy ratios and two-state blinking in PT-R are due to localization of the exciton on a single conjugated segment. These signatures of exciton localization are absent in single chains of PT-PS. Electric-field-induced quenching measured as a function of concentration of PT dispersed in an inert matrix showed that in well-isolated chains of PT-PS, the exciton dissociation is an intrachain process and that aggregation of the PT-R chains causes an increase in quenching due to the onset of interchain interactions. Measurements of the field-induced quenching on single chains indicate that in PT-R, the exciton dissociation is a slower process that takes place only after the exciton is localized on one conjugated segment.

  19. Authigenic carbonates from newly discovered active cold seeps on the northwestern slope of the South China Sea: Constraints on fluid sources, formation environments, and seepage dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qianyong; Hu, Yu; Feng, Dong; Peckmann, Jörn; Chen, Linying; Yang, Shengxiong; Liang, Jinqiang; Tao, Jun; Chen, Duofu

    2017-06-01

    Authigenic carbonates recovered from two newly discovered active cold seeps on the northwestern slope of the South China Sea have been studied using petrography, mineralogy, stable carbon and oxygen isotopic, as well as trace element compositions, together with AMS 14C ages of shells of seep-dwelling bivalves to unravel fluid sources, formation conditions, and seepage dynamics. The two seeps (ROV1 and ROV2), referred to as 'Haima seeps' herein, are approximately 7 kilometers apart, and are typified by abundant carbonate rocks represented bycrusts and nodules. Aragonite and high-Mg calcite are the main carbonate minerals. Based on low δ13Ccarbonate values ranging from -43.0‰ to -27.5‰ (V-PDB) methane is apparently the predominant carbon source of seep carbonates. The corresponding δ18O values, varying from 2.5‰ to 5.8‰ (V-PDB), mostly are higher than calculated values representing precipitation in equilibrium with seawater (2.5‰ to 3.8‰), which probably reflects past destabilization of locally abundant gas hydrates. In addition, we found that carbonates with bivalve shells are generally aragonite-dominated, and bear no barium enrichment but uranium enrichments, reflecting shallow formation depths close to the seafloor. In contrast, carbonate crusts without bivalve shells and nodules contain more calcite, and are characterized by major molybdenum enrichment and different degrees of barium enrichment, agreeing with precipitation at greater depth under strictly anoxic conditions. AMS 14C ages suggest that a major episode of carbonate precipitation occurred between 6.1 ka and 5.1 ka BP at the Haima seeps, followed by a possibly subordinate episode from approximately 3.9 ka to 2.9 ka BP. The common occurrence of dead bivalves at both sites indicates that chemosynthesis-based communities flourished to a greater extent in the past, probably reflecting a decline of seepage activity in recent times. Overall, these results confirm that authigenic carbonates from

  20. Etude de la formation de resonances electroniques et de leur role dans la fragmentation neutre de molecules d'interet biologique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Martin

    1998-12-01

    Cette these est presentee a la Faculte de medecine de l'Universite de Sherbrooke en vue de l'obtention du grade de Ph.D. en Radiobiologie. Elle contient des resultats experimentaux enregistres avec un spectrometre d'electrons a haute resolution. Ces resultats portent sur la formation de resonances electroniques en phase condensee et de differents canaux pour leur decroissance. En premier lieu, nous presentons des mesures d'excitations vibrationnelles de l'oxygene dilue en matrice d'argon pour des energies des electrons incidents de 1 a 20 eV. Les resultats suggerent que le temps de vie des resonances de l'oxygene est modifie par la densite d'etats d'electrons dans la bande de conduction de l'argon. Nous presentons aussi des spectres de pertes d'energie d'electrons des molecules de tetrahydrofuranne (THF) et d'acetone. Dans les deux cas, la position en energie des pertes associees aux excitations vibrationnelles est en excellent accord avec les resultats trouves dans la litterature. Les fonctions d'excitation de ces modes revelent la presence de plusieurs nouvelles resonances electroniques. Nous comparons les resonances du THF et celles de la molecule de cyclopentane en phase gazeuse. Nous proposons une origine commune aux resonances ce qui implique qu'elles ne sont pas necessairement attribuees a l'excitation des electrons non-apparies de l'oxygene du THF. Nous proposons une nouvelle methode basee sur la spectroscopie par pertes d'energie des electrons pour detecter la production de fragments neutres qui demeurent a l'interieur d'un film mince condense a basse temperature. Cette methode se base sur la detection des excitations electroniques du produit neutre. Nous presentons des resultats de la production de CO dans un film de methanol. Le taux de production de CO en fonction de l'energie incidente des electrons est calibre en termes d'une section efficace totale de diffusion des electrons. Les resultats indiquent une augmentation lineaire du taux de production de

  1. Cold Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce how often they return. Symptoms A cold sore usually passes through several stages: Tingling and itching. Many people feel an itching, burning or tingling sensation around their lips for a day or so ...

  2. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  3. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the ddμ-molecule formation rate in gaseous deuterium at the pressures 1.5 and 0.4 kbar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Dzhelepov, V.P.; Zinov, V.G.

    1990-01-01

    In the experiment with a gaseous deuterium target of high pressure on the muon beam of the JINR phasotron the temperature dependence of the ddμ-molecule formation rate (λ ddμ ) has been measured. Measurements have been performed with liquid deuterium at the temperature T=20.3 K and with gaseous deuterium at pressure 1500 and 400 bar in the temperature region T=49-300 K. It is found that the value λ ddμ does not depend on the deuterium density for each temperature. The obtained results are in fairly good agreement with theory and with the data of other experiments made with deuterium of sufficiently (one-two order) lower density. 22 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Effect of preliminary thermal treatment of EhP-56 on resistivity to cold cracks formation in the joint heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.G.; Shubin, V.I.; Belov, Yu.M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are given on the influence of the conditions of prior heat treatment on the resistance of steel EP56 to cold cracking in the joint heat affected zone /HAZ/. Other things being equal, the resistance of steel EP56 to cold cracking in the HAZ increases with reduction of hardness and increase of austenite content. Conditions for welding steel EP56, preventing cracking in the HAZ, have been determined

  5. Progress with cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Johnson, I; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-01-01

    The creation of cold antihydrogen by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations, working at CERN's unique Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility, has ushered in a new era in atomic physics. This contribution will briefly review recent results from the ATHENA experiment. These include discussions of antiproton slowing down in a cold positron gas during antihydrogen formation, information derived on the dependence of the antihydrogen formation rate upon the temperature of the stored positron plasma and, finally, upon the spatial distribution of the emitted anti-atoms. We will discuss the implications of these studies for the major outstanding goal of trapping samples of antihydrogen for precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. The physics motivations for undertaking these challenging experiments will be briefly recalled.

  6. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this contribution the author the phenomenom of so-called cold fusion, inspired by the memorable lecture of Moshe Gai on his own search for this effect. Thus much of what follows was presented by Dr. Gai; the rest is from independent reading. What is referred to as cold fusion is of course the observation of possible products of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion within deuterium-loaded (dentended) electrodes. The debate over the two vanguard cold fusion experiments has raged under far more public attention than usually accorded new scientific phenomena. The clamor commenced with the press conference of M. Fleishmann and S. Pons on March 23, 1989 and the nearly simultaneous wide circulation of a preprint of S. Jones and collaborators. The majority of work attempting to confirm these observations has at the time of this writing yet to appear in published form, but contributions to conferences and electronic mail over computer networks were certainly filled with preliminary results. To keep what follows to a reasonable length the author limit this discussion to the searches for neutron (suggested by ref. 2) or for excessive heat production (suggested by ref. 1), following a synopsis of the hypotheses of cold fusion

  7. Project COLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  8. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  9. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  10. Trapping molecules in two and three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkse, PW.H.; Junglen, T.; Rieger, T.; Rangwala, S.A.; Windpassinger, P.; Rempe, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold molecules offer a new testing ground for quantum-physical effects in nature. For example, producing slow beams of large molecules could push experiments studying the boundary between quantum interference and classical particles up towards ever heavier particles. Moreover, cold molecules, in particular YbF, seem an attractive way to narrow down the constraints on the value of the electron dipole moment and finally, quantum information processing using chains of cold polar molecules or vibrational states in molecules have been proposed. All these proposals rely on advanced production and trapping techniques, most of which are still under development. Therefore, novel production and trapping techniques for cold molecules could offer new possibilities not found in previous methods. Electric traps hold promise for deep trap potentials for neutral molecules. Recently we have demonstrated two-dimensional trapping of polar molecules in a four-wire guide using electrostatic and electrodynamic trapping techniques. Filled from a thermal effusive source, such a guide will deliver a beam of slow molecules, which is an ideal source for interferometry experiments with large molecules, for instance. Here we report about the extension of this work to three-dimensional trapping. Polar molecules with a positive Stark shift can be trapped in the minimum of an electrostatic field. We have successfully tested a large volume electrostatic trap for ND3 molecules. A special feature of this trap is that it can be loaded continuously from an electrostatic guide, at a temperature of a few hundred mK. (author)

  11. Phonon forces and cold denaturatio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing the molec......Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing...... the molecule Is a continuum. The frequencies of the vibrational modes depend on the molecular dimensionality; hence, the zero-point energies for the folded and the denatured protein are estimated to differ by several electron volts. For a biomolecule such an energy is significant and may contribute to cold...... denaturing. This is consistent with the empirical observation that cold denaturation is exothermic anti hot denaturation endothermic....

  12. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  13. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  14. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  15. A study of the region of massive star formation L379IRS1 in radio lines of methanol and other molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenskii, S. V.; Shchurov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The results of spectral observations of the region of massive star formation L379IRS1 (IRAS18265-1517) are presented. The observations were carried out with the 30-m Pico Veleta radio telescope (Spain) at seven frequencies in the 1-mm, 2-mm, and 3-mm wavelength bands. Lines of 24 molecules were detected, from simple diatomic or triatomic species to complex eight- or nine-atom compounds such as CH3OCHO or CH3OCH3. Rotation diagrams constructed from methanol andmethyl cyanide lines were used to determine the temperature of the quiescent gas in this region, which is about 40-50 K. In addition to this warm gas, there is a hot component that is revealed through high-energy lines of methanol and methyl cyanide, molecular lines arising in hot regions, and the presence of H2O masers and Class II methanol masers at 6.7 GHz, which are also related to hot gas. One of the hot regions is probably a compact hot core, which is located near the southern submillimeter peak and is related to a group of methanol masers at 6.7 GHz. High-excitation lines at other positions may be associated with other hot cores or hot post-shock gas in the lobes of bipolar outflows. The rotation diagrams can be use to determine the column densities and abundances of methanol (10-9) and methyl cyanide (about 10-11) in the quiescent gas. The column densities of A- and E-methanol in L379IRS1 are essentually the same. The column densities of other observedmolecules were calculated assuming that the ratios of the molecular level abundances correspond to a temperature of 40 K. The molecular composition of the quiescent gas is close to that in another region of massive star formation, DR21(OH). The only appreciable difference is that the column density of SO2 in L379IRS1 is at least a factor of 20 lower than the value in DR21(OH). The SO2/CS and SO2/OCS abundance ratios, which can be used as chemical clocks, are lower in L379IRS1 than in DR21(OH), suggesting that L379IRS1 is probably younger than DR21(OH).

  16. Observation of new particle formation and measurement of sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines and highly oxidized organic molecules at a rural site in central Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kürten

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms for new particle formation (NPF under different boundary layer conditions are not known yet. One important question is whether amines and sulfuric acid lead to efficient NPF in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs are involved in NPF. We conducted field measurements at a rural site in central Germany in the proximity of three larger dairy farms to investigate whether there is a connection between NPF and the presence of amines and/or ammonia due to the local emissions from the farms. Comprehensive measurements using a nitrate chemical ionization–atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF mass spectrometer, a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, particle counters and differential mobility analyzers (DMAs, as well as measurements of trace gases and meteorological parameters, were performed. We demonstrate here that the nitrate CI-APi-TOF is suitable for sensitive measurements of sulfuric acid, amines, a nitrosamine, ammonia, iodic acid and HOMs. NPF was found to correlate with sulfuric acid, while an anti-correlation with RH, amines and ammonia is observed. The anti-correlation between NPF and amines could be due to the efficient uptake of these compounds by nucleating clusters and small particles. Much higher HOM dimer (C19/C20 compounds concentrations during the night than during the day indicate that these HOMs do not efficiently self-nucleate as no nighttime NPF is observed. Observed iodic acid probably originates from an iodine-containing reservoir substance, but the iodine signals are very likely too low to have a significant effect on NPF.

  17. Newly detected molecules in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, William M.; Avery, L. W.; Friberg, P.; Matthews, H. E.; Ziurys, L. M.

    Several new interstellar molecules have been identified including C2S, C3S, C5H, C6H and (probably) HC2CHO in the cold, dark cloud TMC-1; and the discovery of the first interstellar phosphorus-containing molecule, PN, in the Orion "plateau" source. Further results include the observations of 13C3H2 and C3HD, and the first detection of HCOOH (formic acid) in a cold cloud.

  18. Comparison of Gasoline Direct-Injection (GDI) and Port Fuel Injection (PFI) Vehicle Emissions: Emission Certification Standards, Cold-Start, Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Potential, and Potential Climate Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Georges; Saleh, Rawad; Zhao, Yunliang; Presto, Albert A; Lambe, Andrew T; Frodin, Bruce; Sardar, Satya; Maldonado, Hector; Maddox, Christine; May, Andrew A; Drozd, Greg T; Goldstein, Allen H; Russell, Lynn M; Hagen, Fabian; Robinson, Allen L

    2017-06-06

    Recent increases in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards have led to widespread adoption of vehicles equipped with gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines. Changes in engine technologies can alter emissions. To quantify these effects, we measured gas- and particle-phase emissions from 82 light-duty gasoline vehicles recruited from the California in-use fleet tested on a chassis dynamometer using the cold-start unified cycle. The fleet included 15 GDI vehicles, including 8 GDIs certified to the most-stringent emissions standard, superultra-low-emission vehicles (SULEV). We quantified the effects of engine technology, emission certification standards, and cold-start on emissions. For vehicles certified to the same emissions standard, there is no statistical difference of regulated gas-phase pollutant emissions between PFIs and GDIs. However, GDIs had, on average, a factor of 2 higher particulate matter (PM) mass emissions than PFIs due to higher elemental carbon (EC) emissions. SULEV certified GDIs have a factor of 2 lower PM mass emissions than GDIs certified as ultralow-emission vehicles (3.0 ± 1.1 versus 6.3 ± 1.1 mg/mi), suggesting improvements in engine design and calibration. Comprehensive organic speciation revealed no statistically significant differences in the composition of the volatile organic compounds emissions between PFI and GDIs, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Therefore, the secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation potential of the exhaust does not depend on engine technology. Cold-start contributes a larger fraction of the total unified cycle emissions for vehicles meeting more-stringent emission standards. Organic gas emissions were the most sensitive to cold-start compared to the other pollutants tested here. There were no statistically significant differences in the effects of cold-start on GDIs and PFIs. For our test fleet, the measured 14.5% decrease in CO 2 emissions from GDIs was much greater than

  19. A source of translationally cold molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Laszlo C.

    Currently the fields studying or using molecules with low kinetic energies are experiencing an unprecedented growth. Astronomers and chemists are interested in chemical reactions taking place at temperatures below or around 20 K, spectroscopists could make very precise measurements on slow molecules and molecular physicists could chart the potential energy surfaces more accurately. And the list continues. All of these experiments need slow molecules, with kinetic energies from around 10 cm-1 down to 0. Several designs of cold sources have already been made. The most interesting ones are presented. This work describes the design and the testing of a cold source based on the collisional cooling technique: the molecules of interest are cooled well below their freezing point by a precooled buffer gas. This way condensation is avoided. The source is a copper cell cooled to 4.2 K by an external liquid helium bath. The cell is filled with cold buffer gas (helium). The molecules of choice (ammonia) are injected through a narrow tube in the middle of the cell. The cold molecules leave the cell through a 1 millimeter hole. Two versions of pulsing techniques have been employed: a shutter blade which covers the source hole and opens it only for short moments, and a chopper that modulates the beam further downstream. Both produced pulse lengths around 1 millisecond. The source is tested in an experiment in which the emerging molecules are focused and detected. Time of flight technique is used to measure the kinetic energies. Two detectors have been employed: a microwave cavity to analyze the state of the molecules in the beam, and a mass spectrometer to measure the number density of the particles. The molecules coming out of the source hole are formed into a beam by an electrostatic quadrupole state selector. The quantum mechanical aspects and the elements of electrodynamics involved in the focusing are described. A computer simulation program is presented, which helped

  20. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  1. DBP formation in hot and cold water across a simulated distribution system: effect of incubation time, heating time, pH, chlorine dose, and incubation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2013-10-15

    This paper demonstrates that disinfection byproducts (DBP) concentration profiles in heated water were quite different from the DBP concentrations in the cold tap water. Chloroform concentrations in the heated water remained constant or even decreased slightly with increasing distribution system water age. The amount of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was much higher in the heated water than in the cold water; however, the maximum levels in heated water with different distribution system water ages did not differ substantially. The levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in the heated water were similar to the TCAA levels in the tap water, and a slight reduction was observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. Regardless of water age, significant reductions of nonregulated DBPs were observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. For tap water with lower water ages, there were significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), chloropicrin (CP), and 1,1-dichloropropane (1,1-DCP) after a short period of heating. Heating of the tap water with low pH led to a more significant increase of chloroform and a more significant short-term increase of DCAN. High pH accelerated the loss of the nonregulated DBPs in the heated water. The results indicated that as the chlorine doses increased, levels of chloroform and DCAA in the heated water increased significantly. However, for TCAA, the thermally induced increase in concentration was only notable for the chlorinated water with very high chlorine dose. Finally, heating may lead to higher DBP concentrations in chlorinated water with lower distribution system temperatures.

  2. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  3. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth / For Teens / Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  4. Cold moderator scattering kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    New thermal-scattering-law files in ENDF format have been developed for solid methane, liquid methane liquid ortho- and para-hydrogen, and liquid ortho- and para-deuterium using up-to-date models that include such effects as incoherent elastic scattering in the solid, diffusion and hindered vibration and rotations in the liquids, and spin correlations for the hydrogen and deuterium. These files were generated with the new LEAPR module of the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Other modules of this system were used to produce cross sections for these moderators in the correct format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP) being used for cold-moderator-design calculations at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). 20 refs., 14 figs

  5. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The transmission resonance model (TRM) is combined with some electrochemistry of the cathode surface and found to provide a good fit to new data on excess heat. For the first time, a model for cold fusion not only fits calorimetric data but also predicts optimal trigger points. This suggests that the model is meaningful and that the excess heat phenomenon claimed by Fleischmann and Pons is genuine. A crucial role is suggested for the overpotential and, in particular, for the concentration overpotential, i.e., the hydrogen overvoltage. Self-similar geometry, or scale invariance, i.e., a fractal nature, is revealed by the relative excess power function. Heat bursts are predicted with a scale invariance in time, suggesting a possible link between the TRM and chaos theory. The model describes a near-surface phenomenon with an estimated excess power yield of ∼1 kW/cm 3 Pd, as compared to 50 W/cm 3 of reactor core for a good fission reactor. Transmission resonance-induced nuclear transmutation, a new type of nuclear reaction, is strongly suggested with two types emphasized: transmission resonance-induced neutron transfer reactions yielding essentially the same end result as Teller's hypothesized catalytic neutron transfer and a three-body reaction promoted by standing de Broglie waves. In this paper suggestions for the anomalous production of heat, particles, and radiation are given

  6. 119Sn MAS NMR Study of Probe Molecules Interaction with Sn-BEA: The Origin of Penta- and Hexacoordinated Tin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakimov, Alexander V.; G. Kolyagin, Yury; Tolborg, Søren

    2016-01-01

    and weak Lewis acidity, respectively. The adsorption of acetonitrile and methanol resulted in observation of pentacoordinated tin species, due to the formation of 1:1 adsorption complexes over both Sn-sites. Water adsorption led first to formation of pentacoordinated tin species, which were further...... by the formation of pentacoordinated Sn species in the case of weak sites and hexacoordinated Sn over sites with strong Lewis acidity, pointing to the possibility of dissociative adsorption of secondary alcohols over strong Sn-sites....

  7. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  8. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  9. Evidence for the formation of acyclic ions from the radical cations and cyclic ions from the protonated molecules of ¿,¿-diamines upon loss of ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Ana M.; Correia, A.J. Ferrer; Fokkens, R.H.; Nibbering, N.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    The structural characterization of the ions generated by the electron ionization-induced loss of ammonia from the molecular ions of α,ω-diamines, using ion/molecule reactions in combination with collision-induced dissociation (CID) studies, is described. The results of the experiments of

  10. Ab Initio Study of Chemical Reactions of Cold SrF and CaF Molecules with Alkali-Metal and Alkaline-Earth-Metal Atoms: The Implications for Sympathetic Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosicki, Maciej Bartosz; Kędziera, Dariusz; Żuchowski, Piotr Szymon

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of the atom exchange reaction in the SrF + alkali-metal atom and CaF + alkali-metal atom systems. Such reactions are possible only for collisions of SrF and CaF with the lithium atoms, while they are energetically forbidden for other alkali-metal atoms. Specifically, we focus on SrF interacting with Li, Rb, and Sr atoms and use ab initio methods to demonstrate that the SrF + Li and SrF + Sr reactions are barrierless. We present potential energy surfaces for the interaction of the SrF molecule with the Li, Rb, and Sr atoms in their energetically lowest-lying electronic spin states. The obtained potential energy surfaces are deep and exhibit profound interaction anisotropies. We predict that the collisions of SrF molecules in the rotational or Zeeman excited states most likely have a strong inelastic character. We discuss the prospects for the sympathetic cooling of SrF and CaF molecules using ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

  11. Dynamics of initial ionization events in biological molecules: Formation and fate of free radicals. Final technical report, May 1, 1994--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    Study of early time events following the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in biological systems has potentially significant impact on several areas of importance. In this context, the studies being conducted under this program provided insight into the conformational changes as well as the reactions leading to a variety of transformations that culminate from hydrogen atom and proton transfer events. These studies enabled an investigation of molecular details of structure-function relationships. In a second aspect of the program, investigations were conducted to provide basic underpinning research that contributed to a quantification of the behavior of radionuclides and pollutants associated with advanced energy activities after these materials emanate from their source and become transferred through the environment to the biota and human receptor. The approach to elucidating factors governing the difference between reactions in the gas and condensed phase was to study the initiating steps at progressively higher degrees of cluster aggregation. The author employed ultrafast laser techniques, in combination with selected molecules, carefully prepared in tailored compositions, to investigation the primary mechanisms involved in various molecular functional groups following the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. He also studied various molecules representing chromophores in such biologically important molecules as tyrosine and amines.

  12. Low-pressure supersonic gas expansions. A study of the formation of cold hydrogen- and deuterium atomic beams for polarised gas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nass, A.

    2002-04-01

    In the present thesis expansions of atomic and molecular gases were studied. Velocity distributions characterize thereby the arising beams very well and give conclusions on the processes occurring in the expansion. these can be described by continuum models until the transition to the molecular flow range occurs. By certain criteria this transition can be described. Because a description of all processes by these models is difficult, the possibility was studied to describe gas expansions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. These simulate by means of binary collisions the motion of the molecules of the expanding gas and calculate from the distribution of the particles in the phase space the beam parameter, like for instance density, flow velocities, and beam temperatures. The results of these calculations were tested by different experimental means. To this belong especially the measurements of the velocity distributions by the time-of-flight method and the intensity profiles by the beam-profile monitor. All experimentally obtained data agree with the results of the calculations within the measurement errors. By this it is possible to predict the behavior during an expansion both qualitatively and quantitatively. precise statements on density and velocity distributions are possible, by which for instance new beam-shaping geometries can be tested. From the simulated distributions also a novel start generator for sextupole Monte Carlo simulations can be generated, which contains no models, but relates directly to the obtained data. The thesis that by a H 2 carrier beam a hydrogen or deuterium atomic beam with high phase-space density can be produced, was uniquely disproved. The high diffusion of both kinds of particles leads to a fast mixing and by this to no improvement of the atomic- beam intensity. The measured data were confirmed by the performed Monte Carlo simulations. The calculations on the base of Navier-Stokes equations are in the flow range applied here

  13. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  14. Cold plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.

    1990-01-01

    This textbook discusses the following topics: Phenomenological description of a direct current glow discharge; the plasma (temperature distribution and measurement, potential variation, electron energy distribution function, charge neutralization, wall potentials, plasma oscillations); Production of charge carriers (ions, electrons, ionization in the cathode zone, negative glowing zone, Faraday dark space, positive column, anode zone, hollow cathode discharges); RF-discharges (charge carrier production, RF-Shields, scattering mechanisms); Sputtering (ion-surface interaction, kinetics, sputtering yield and energy distribution, systems and conditions, film formation and stresses, contamination, bias techniques, multicomponent film deposition, cohesion, magnetrons, triode systems, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition); Dry etching (sputter etching, reactive etching, topography, process control, quantitative investigations); Etching mechanisms (etching of Si and SiO 2 with CF 4 , of III/V-compound-semiconductors, combination of isotrope and anisotrope etching methods, surface cleaning); ion beam systems (applications, etching); Dyclotron-resonance-systems (electron cyclotron resonance systems, whistler-sources and 'resonant inductive plasma etching'); Appendix (electron energy distribution functions, Bohm's transition zone, plasma oscillations, scattering cross sections and mean free path, metastable states, Child-Langmuir-Schottky equation, loss mechanisms, charge carrier distribution in the positive column, breakdown at high frequencies, motion in a magnetic field, skin depth of an electric field for a HF-discharge, whistler waves, dispersion relations for plane wave propagation). (orig.) With 138 figs

  15. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  16. Interstellar molecules and masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Guibert, J.

    1978-01-01

    The study of dense and dark clouds, in which hydrogen is mostly in molecular form, became possible since the discovery of interstellar molecules, emitting in the centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. The molecular lines are generally not in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Their intensity can often be explained by invoking a population inversion mechanism. Maser emission lines due to OH, H 2 O and SiO molecules are among the most intense molecular lines. The H 2 CO molecule, detected in absorption in front of the cold cosmic background radiation of 2.7 K, illustrates the inverse phenomenon, the antimaser absorption. For a radio transition of frequency v, the inversion rate Δn (relative population difference between the upper and lower level) as well as the maser gain can be determined from the radio observations. In the case of the OH lines in the 2 PIsub(3/2), J=3/2 state, the inversion rates approximately 1 to 2% derived from the observations, are comparable with those obtained in the laboratory. The determination of the excitation mechanisms of the masers, through the statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations, implies the knowledge of collisional and radiative transition probabilities. A pumping model, which can satisfactorily explain the radio observations of some interstellar OH clouds, will be discussed [fr

  17. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  18. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Synergistic influence of phosphorylation and metal ions on tau oligomer formation and coaggregation with α-synuclein at the single molecule level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nübling Georg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibrillar amyloid-like deposits and co-deposits of tau and α-synuclein are found in several common neurodegenerative diseases. Recent evidence indicates that small oligomers are the most relevant toxic aggregate species. While tau fibril formation is well-characterized, factors influencing tau oligomerization and molecular interactions of tau and α-synuclein are not well understood. Results We used a novel approach applying confocal single-particle fluorescence to investigate the influence of tau phosphorylation and metal ions on tau oligomer formation and its coaggregation with α-synuclein at the level of individual oligomers. We show that Al3+ at physiologically relevant concentrations and tau phosphorylation by GSK-3β exert synergistic effects on the formation of a distinct SDS-resistant tau oligomer species even at nanomolar protein concentration. Moreover, tau phosphorylation and Al3+ as well as Fe3+ enhanced both formation of mixed oligomers and recruitment of α-synuclein in pre-formed tau oligomers. Conclusions Our findings provide a new perspective on interactions of tau phosphorylation, metal ions, and the formation of potentially toxic oligomer species, and elucidate molecular crosstalks between different aggregation pathways involved in neurodegeneration.

  20. Plasma treatment for influence of cold in different phases of formation of calcium phosphate on the surface of nanocomposite Al_2O_3/ZrO_2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, K.H.; Ferreira, J.A.; Osiro, D.; Nascimento, L.I.S.; Pallone, E.M.J.A.; Alves Junior, C.

    2016-01-01

    Among the different techniques used in surface treatment of biomaterials, the plasma has been noted for its ability to promote changes in surface roughness of the treated material. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of treatment by plasma in the formation of calcium phosphate nanocomposite on the surface of Al2O3/ZrO2 (5% by vol.). For this, samples were formed, calcined, sintered, surface treated and coated biomimeticamente plasma for 14 days. The surface characterization was performed by confocal microscopy and spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). After coating, the samples were characterized by FTIR and X-ray diffraction X-ray (XRD). It was observed that the treatments improved surface roughness. Furthermore, regardless of the surface treatment were observed only three phases of calcium phosphates: HA α -TCP and -β-TCP. It is worth noting that depending on the composition, there are variations in the amount of phosphates, as well as the percentages of the different phases. (author)

  1. Glitters of warm H2 in cold diffuse molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falgarone, Edith; Beichman, Chaz; Boulanger, Francois; Combes, Francoise; Gry, Cecile; Helou, Georges; Laureijs, Rene; Pineau Des Forets, Guillaume; Valentijn, Edwin; Verstraete, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Cold molecular hydrogen, a possibly dominant gas fraction in galaxies, does not radiate due to the symmetry and small moment of inertia of the molecule. The only tracers of cold H2, the rotational lines of CO and dust thermal emission operate only in metal-rich environments. By detecting the lowest

  2. Grooved cold moderator tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Iwasa, H.; Watanabe, N.; Ikeda, S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Ishikawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We performed some grooved cold moderator experiments for methane at 20 K by using the Hokkaido University linac to obtain information to be used in the planning of the KENS-I' project. Cold neutron gains, spatial distribution of emitted beams and time distribution of the neutrons in the grooved cold moderator were measured. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of the grooved cold moderator on the performances of the spectrometers presently installed at the KENS-I cold source. We concluded that the grooved cold moderator benefited appreciably the performances of the spectrometers

  3. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Caux, E. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (≳30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of ≳100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in ≲20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (≲30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10{sup –10}. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  4. Optimal topotactic conversion of layered octosilicate to RWR-type zeolite by separating the formation stages of interlayer condensation and elimination of organic guest molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yusuke; Osada, Shimon; Hosaka, Nami; Terasawa, Taichi; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2014-07-21

    We demonstrate that the separation of two stages of interlayer condensation under refluxing and elimination of organic guests provides the optimal conditions for the formation of RWR-type zeolite from layered octosilicate. The obtained RWR-type zeolite has higher quality than any other RWR-type zeolite reported previously.

  5. Conceptualizing Cold Disasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauta, Kristian Cedervall; Dahlberg, Rasmus; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we explore in more depth the particular circumstances and characteristics of governing what we call ‘cold disasters’, and thereby, the paper sets out to investigate how disasters in cold contexts distinguish themselves from other disasters, and what the implications hereof...... are for the conceptualization and governance of cold disasters. Hence, the paper can also be viewed as a response to Alexander’s (2012a) recent call for new theory in the field of disaster risk reduction. The article is structured in four overall parts. The first part, Cold Context, provides an overview of the specific...... conditions in a cold context, exemplified by the Arctic, and zooms in on Greenland to provide more specific background for the paper. The second part, Disasters in Cold Contexts, discusses “cold disasters” in relation to disaster theory, in order to, elucidate how cold disasters challenge existing...

  6. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.

  7. Colds and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (COPD). What medicines can I give my child? There is no cure for the cold or the flu, and antibiotics do not work against the viruses that cause colds and the flu. Pain relievers such as ...

  8. Cold knife cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References Baggish ...

  9. Cold medicines and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ingredient. Avoid giving more than one OTC cold medicine to your child. It may cause an overdose with severe side ... the dosage instructions strictly while giving an OTC medicine to your child. When giving OTC cold medicines to your child: ...

  10. Synergistic Impact of Solvent and Polymer Additives on the Film Formation of Small Molecule Blend Films for Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Caitlin

    2015-07-14

    The addition of polystyrene (PS), a typical insulator, is empirically shown to increase the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of a solution-deposited bulk heterojunction (BHJ) molecular blend film used in solar cell fabrication: p-DTS(FBTTh2)2/PC71BM. The performance is further improved by small quantities of diiodooctane (DIO), an established solvent additive. In this study, how the addition of PS and DIO affects the film formation of this bulk heterojunction blend film are probed via in situ monitoring of absorbance, thickness, and crystallinity. PS and DIO additives are shown to promote donor crystallite formation on different time scales and through different mechanisms. PS-containing films retain chlorobenzene solvent, extending evaporation time and promoting phase separation earlier in the casting process. This extended time is insufficient to attain the morphology for optimal PCE results before the film sets. Here is where the presence of DIO comes into play: its low vapor pressure further extends the time scale of film evolution and allows for crystalline rearrangement of the donor phase long after casting, ultimately leading to the best BHJ organization. In situ measurement shows that polystyrene (PS) and diiodooctane (DIO) additives promote donor crystallite formation synergistically, on different time scales, and through different mechanisms. PS-rich films retain solvent, promoting phase separation early in the casting process. Meanwhile, the low vapor pressure of DIO extends the time scale of film evolution and allows for crystalline rearrangement of the donor phase after casting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN THE INNER LAYERS OF CLUMPY CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES: FORMATION OF WATER IN C-RICH OBJECTS AND OF C-BEARING MOLECULES IN O-RICH OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agundez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, Jose; Guelin, Michel

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism based on the penetration of interstellar ultraviolet photons into the inner layers of clumpy circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around asymptotic giant branch stars is proposed to explain the non-equilibrium chemistry observed in such objects. We show through a simple modeling approach that in CSEs with a certain degree of clumpiness or with moderately low mass loss rates (a few 10 -7 M sun yr -1 ) a photochemistry can take place in the warm and dense inner layers, inducing important changes in the chemical composition. In carbon-rich objects water vapor and ammonia would be formed with abundances of 10 -8 -10 -6 relative to H 2 , while in oxygen-rich envelopes ammonia and carbon-bearing molecules such as HCN and CS would form with abundances of 10 -9 -10 -7 relative to H 2 . The proposed mechanism would explain the recent observation of warm water vapor in the carbon-rich envelope IRC+10216 with the Herschel Space Observatory and predict that H 2 O should be detectable in other carbon-rich objects.

  12. How cold is cold dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2014-01-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed

  13. Sida rhomboidea.Roxb aqueous extract down-regulates in vivo expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules in atherogenic rats and inhibits in vitro macrophage differentiation and foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Salunke, Sunita P; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluates efficacy of Sida rhomboidea.Roxb (SR) leaves extract in ameliorating experimental atherosclerosis using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Atherogenic (ATH) diet fed rats recorded significant increment in the serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very LDL (VLDL), autoantibody against oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), markers of LDL oxidation and decrement in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) along with increment in aortic TC and TG. The ex vivo LDL oxidation assay revealed an increased susceptibility of LDL isolated from ATH rats to undergo copper mediated oxidation. These set of changes were minimized by simultaneous co-supplementation of SR extract to ATH diet fed rats. Histopathology of aorta and immunolocalization studies recorded pronounced atheromatous plaque formation, vascular calcification, significant elastin derangements and higher expression of macrophage surface marker (F4/80), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and p-selectin in ATH rats. Whereas, ATH+SR rats depicted minimal evidence of atheromatous plaque formation, calcium deposition, distortion/defragmentation of elastin and accumulation of macrophages along with lowered expression of VCAM-1 and P-selectin compared to ATH rats. Further, monocyte to macrophage differentiation and in vitro foam cell formation were significantly attenuated in presence of SR extract. In conclusion, SR extract has the potency of controlling experimental atherosclerosis and can be used as promising herbal supplement in combating atherosclerosis.

  14. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  15. Carbon chain molecules in interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnewisser, G.; Walmsley, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the distribution of long carbon chain molecules in interstellar clouds shows that their abundance is correlated. The various formation schemes for these molecules are discussed. It is concluded that the ion-molecule type formation mechanisms are more promising than their competitors. They have also the advantage of allowing predictions which can be tested by observations. Acetylene C 2 H 2 and diacetylene HCCCCH, may be very abundant in interstellar clouds. (Auth.)

  16. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  17. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  18. Cold formability of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, G.; Leclerq, G.; Moliexe, F.; Namdar, R.; Roesch, L.; Sanz, G.

    1977-01-01

    This work was essentially aimed to the study of the following three questions. Is it possible to assess the cold formability of steels using simple material properties as criteria. What values of mechanical properties can one expect to reach in cold formed parts. Are there simple ways of characterizing the speroidization treatments carried out on steels before cold forming operations. The present report describes the results obtained during this investigation. It is logically divided into three separate parts. Experimental study of cold formability in wire drawing. Influence of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of high carbon cold drawn wires. Contribution to the study of characterization methods of cold forming steels subjected to a spheroidization heat treatment

  19. International cooperation in cold forging technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Lange, K

    1992-01-01

    International cooperation in the field of cold forging technology started in 1961 by formation of the OECD Group of Experts on Metal Forming. In 1967 this group was transformed into the International Cold Forging Group, ICFG, an independent body which has now been operative for 25 years. Members...... of the ICFG are personally elected by the Plenary as experts within the field, often representing national groups within cold forging. The main work within the ICFG is carried out in its subgroups which are established by the Plenary to collect, compile and evaluate data and eventually also produce data...... by cooperative activities or by instigating national research. These subgroups have produced 9 data sheets and 7 guidelines on subjects such as materials, tool design and construction, calculation methods for cold forging tools, manufacture of slugs, lubrication aspects and small quantity production. Plenary...

  20. Proposed formation mechanism and active species of hydrogen molecules generated from a novel magnesium-citric acid-hydroxypropyl cellulose coating (MgCC) material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Hirai, Tomomitsu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of acids is known to accelerate the reaction (Mg + 2H2O = Mg(OH)2 + H2). We developed a novel Mg-citric acid coating (MgCC) material produced by milling Mg powder coated with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC); because of its H2 generation, this material could be used in antioxidant therapy and antiaging applications. After milling in the presence of citric acid, this material produced H2-rich water upon addition to cooled water. Although the reaction was considered to involve a two-electron transfer from Mg to 2H2O, the role of the acid in H2 generation remains incompletely understood. To clarify the reaction mechanism, we performed studies on the deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We observed differences in the concentration ratios, such as H2/D2 > 1 and H2/(H2 + D2 + HD) > 1, involved in H2, D2, and (H2 + D2 + HD) production, and found that adducts with hydrogen atoms (Hrad) were not obtained from the spin-trapping reaction between 5-(2, 2-Dimethyl-1,3-propoxy cyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO) and the MgCC material. The H2, D2, and HD produced from MgCC were identified by using a gas chromatograph connected to a mass spectrometer. The spin-trapping techniques showed that the Hrad adducts formed by the reaction of NaBH4 with CYPMPO could not be observed from reaction of MGCC with CYPMPO in H2O. The data suggest that the rate-controlling step and proposed transition state (TS) exist in the reaction pathway of the O-H bond cleavage and H-H bond formation. A TS of a structure such as [Mg(OH2)2]∗ could be expected in the reaction pathway between Mg and 2H2O by density functional theory calculations. Also, these results show that H2 generation is accelerated in the presence of acids because the activation energy of the TS is significantly smaller than that of H2O.

  1. USAGE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES FOR DETERMINATION OF LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS AND FIBRIN POLYMERIZATION SITES WITHIN FIBRINOGEN AND FIBRIN MOLECULES AND THEIR APPLICATION IN TEST--SYSTEMS FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND THE THREAT OF THROMBUS FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lugovskoi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown by monoclonal antibodies that B?N-region of fibrin desA molecule (B?1-53 comprises the polymerization site including the peptide bond B?14-15. This site participates in the second stage of fibrin polymerization — lateral association of protofibrils. In the B?15-53 fragment was also found the site called «C», which together with the site «A» participate in the first stage of polymerization — the protofibrils formation. The model of the primary intermolecular interaction of fibrin was designed. It was found by monoclonal antibodies II-4d the site («c» in the N-terminal half of ? chain of the fibrin D-region. This site participates in the protofibrils formation and is complement to site «C» as we assume. We have discovered two neoantigenic determinants. One of these determinants exposes within the coiledcoil fragment B?126-135 of fibrin as a result of fibrinopeptide A splitting off from fibrinogen by thrombin. The structural rearrangements discovered in this site of the fibrin molecule are necessary for the following protofibrils lateral association. The second neoantigenic determinant is localized in the fragment B?134-190 of D-dimer formed after plasmin degradation of fibrin stabilized by FXIIIa. We have obtained the fibrin-specific monoclonal antibodie FnI-3C to the first determinant and D-dimer-specific mAb III-3b to the second one. Three monoclonal antibodies were obtained against the ?C-region of fibrin(ogen molecule. It has been experimentally shown by of one of them that ?C-domains is connected with the fibrinopeptides B in fibrinogen and fibrin desA molecules, but removes from the core of the molecules after fibrinopeptides B splitting off by thrombin. Two other monoclonal antibodies specifically inhibit the fibrin polymerization by blocking two unknown polymerization sites within the ?C-region. The test-systems for the soluble fibrin and D-dimer quantification in human blood plasma were designed on the basis of

  2. Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-24

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012494 TITLE: Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold...part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP012489 thru ADP012577 UNCLASSIFIED Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen G...and positrons. The antiprotons come initially from the new Antiproton Decel- erator facility at CERN. Good control of such cold antimatter plasmas is

  3. Reactor cold neutron source facility, the first in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, Masahiko; Maeda, Yutaka; Kawai, Takeshi; Tashiro, Tameyoshi; Sakakibara, Shoji; Katada, Minoru.

    1986-01-01

    In the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, the first cold neutron source facility for the reactor in Japan was installed, and various tests are carried out outside the reactor. Nippon Sanso K.K. had manufactured it. After the prescribed tests outside the reactor, this facility will be installed soon in the reactor, and its outline is described on this occasion. Cold neutrons are those having very small energy by being cooled to about-250 deg C. Since the wavelength of the material waves of cold neutrons is long, and their energy is small, they are very advantageous as an experimental means for clarifying the structure of living body molecules and polymers, the atom configuration in alloys, and atomic and molecular movements by neutron scattering and neutron diffraction. The basic principle of the cold neutron source facility is to irradiate thermal neutrons on a cold moderator kept around 20 K, and to moderate and cool the neutrons by nuclear scattering to convert to cold neutrons. The preparatory research on cold neutrons and hydrogen liquefaction, the basic design to put the cold neutron source facility in the graphite moderator facility, the safety countermeasures, the manufacture and quality control, the operation outside the reactor and the performance are reported. The cold neutron source facility comprises a cold moderator tank and other main parts, a deuterium gas tank, a helium refrigerator and instrumentation. (Kako, I.)

  4. Cloning, Expression and Characterization of NAD Kinase from Staphylococcus aureus Involved in the Formation of NADP (H: A Key Molecule in the Maintaining of Redox Status and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Venkateswara Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Staphylococcus aureus has the ability to form biofilms on any niches, a key pathogenic factor of this organism and this phenomenon is directly related to the concentration of NADPH. The formation of NADP is catalyzed by NAD kinase (NADK and this gene of S. aureus ATCC 12600 was cloned, sequenced, expressed and characterized. Materials and Methods: The NADK gene was polymerase chain reaction amplified from the chromosomal DNA of S. aureus ATCC 12600 and cloned in pQE 30 vector, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α. The pure protein was obtained by passing through nickel metal chelate agarose column. The enzyme kinetics of the enzyme and biofilm assay of the S. aureus was carried out in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The kinetics was further confirmed by the ability of the substrates to dock to the NADK structure. Results: The recombinant NADK exhibited single band with a molecular weight of 31kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the gene sequence (GenBank: JN645814 revealed presence of only one kind of NADK in all S. aureus strains. The enzyme exhibited very high affinity for NAD compared to adenosine triphosphate concurring with the docking results. A root-mean-square deviation value 14.039Š observed when NADK structure was superimposed with its human counterpart suggesting very low homology. In anaerobic conditions, higher biofilm units were found with decreased NADK activity. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest increased NADPH concentration in S. aureus plays a vital role in the biofilm formation and survival of this pathogen in any environmental conditions.

  5. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  6. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth / For Teens / Cold-Weather Sports What's in this article? What to Do? Classes ... weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports can help you burn calories, increase your cardiovascular ...

  7. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  8. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  9. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  10. Comet Dust: The Story of Planet Formation as Told by the Tiniest of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2005-01-01

    Our planetary system formed out of a gas-rich disk-shaped nebula with the early Sun at its center. Many small icy bodies were consumed by the formation of the giant planets. However, many km-size icy bodies were tossed out of the giant-planet region to the cold, distant reaches of our solar system. Comets remained in their places of cold storage until perturbed into orbits that carry them into the inner solar system where they pass relatively close to the Sun. Comets are warmed by the Sun and shed material from their outer layers. The ices and gases shed by comets reveal simple and complex organic molecules were present at the time and in the region of the formation of the giant planets. Where the Earth was forming was too hot and had too intense sunlight for many of these ices and molecules to survive. The dust shed by comets tells us that some stardust survived unaltered but much of the dust was heated and crystallized before becoming part of the comet. Therefore, comet dust grains tell of large radial migrations from the cold outer reaches near Neptune into the hot regions near the forming Sun, and then back out to the cold regions where icy comets were accreting and forming. On 2005 July 4, the NASA Deep Impact Mission hit a comet and ejected primitive materials fiom its interior. These materials were not released into the comet s coma during normal activity. Despite the many passages of this comet close to the Sun, these primitive volatile gases and dust grains survived in its interior. Comet dust grains show that cold and hot materials were mixed into the same tiny particle very early in the formation of the solar system, and these aggregate dust grains never saw high temperatures again. The survival of primitive materials in comet nuclei suggests comets could have delivered organic molecules and primitive dust grains to early Earth.

  11. Hydrothermal Cold Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu

    C, respectively. Process variables were defined and effects of individual parameters were studied systematically through control variable method with Li2MoO4-water system. Crystalline structure, fractured surface morphology and chemical bonding information of the cold sintered pellets were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, etc. Densification mechanism studies were conducted on ZnO. Through comparison experiments, it was found that the Zn2+ concentration in the solution is critical for densification, while dissolution of grains only serves as a means to the former. Through pressure dependent studies, a critical value was found, which correlated well with the hydrostatic pressure keeping liquid water from thermal expansion. These results confirmed establishment of hydrothermal condition that would be important for mass transport in densification. Densification rate variations with process time was estimated and similar time dependence to Kingery's model was found. The densification process was proposed to be consist of three consecutive stages, which are quick initial compaction, grain rearrangement and dissolution-reprecipitation events. Binary metal oxides with different acidities were subjected to cold sintering with various aqueous solutions in establishing a criteria for material selection. It was found that in general materials with high solubility at around neutral pH, high dissolution kinetics and similar free energy to their hydroxides or hydrates at ambient would be more likely for full densification with high phase purity. The anions in solution should also be wisely selected to avoid stable compound or complex formation. To extend the applicable material list for full densification, non-aqueous solvent of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) based solution was studied for cold sintering. Both improvement of pellet density and suppression of hydroxide formation were achieved for MnO by using DMSO

  12. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced

  13. A numerical model for cold welding of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    1996-01-01

    at the weld interface. Accordingly, the general model for bond strength in cold welding earlier developed by Bay has been extended and modified. The new model presented in this paper simulates the whole cold welding process including the deformation of base metals and the establishment of welds bonding......Based on experimental investigations of cold welding of different metal combinations applying various surface preparation methods, the understanding of the mechanisms of bond formation in cold welding has been improved by introducing two parameters representing the properties of surface layers...... similar as well as dissimilar metals The calculated bond strengths are verified by comparing with experimental measurements....

  14. A Self-Perpetuating Catalyst for the Production of Complex Organic Molecules in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. Many mechanisms may contribute to the total organic content in protostellar nebulae, ranging from organics formed via ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the cold dark clouds from which such nebulae collapse, to similar ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the dark regions of the nebula far from the proto star, to gas phase reactions in sub-nebulae around growing giant planets and in the nebulae themselves. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. The Haber-Bosch catalytic reduction of N2 by hydrogen was thought to produce the reduced nitrogen found in meteorites. However, the clean iron metal surfaces that catalyze these reactions are easily poisoned via reaction with any number of molecules, including the very same complex organics that they produce and both reactions work more efficiently in the hot regions of the nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Although none work as well as pure iron grains, and all produce a wide range of organic products rather than just pure methane, these materials are not truly catalysts.

  15. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Chilling Out With Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and use the time to read, listen to music, or watch a movie. In other words, chill out and you might prevent a cold! Reviewed by: Patricia ... Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice ...

  17. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  18. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  19. Hardening of Fe-Cr-Mn steels cold plastic working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinov, L.S.; Konop-Lyashko, V.I.; Nikoporets, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    The dependence is established between the level of proper-- ties obtained after cold plastic working and development of martensite transformations when loading in Fe-Cr-Mn steels containing 0.1-0.5% C, 13% Cr, 8-12% Mn, as well as in a number of complex alloyed steels. It is shown that the highest level of mechanical properties can be obtained after cold plastic working only in steels with definite austenite stability. Cold plastic working can both activize and stabilize austenite relatively to martensite formation during loading. The first thing is found when under the effect of preliminary cold working dislocation splitting takes place, as well as the formation of a small amount of E-phase and martensite. The second thing manifests itself when under the effect of cold working performed above Md (Md<20 deg C) cell dislocation structure is formed and dislocation pinning takes place

  20. Hypothermic general cold adaptation induced by local cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savourey, G; Barnavol, B; Caravel, J P; Feuerstein, C; Bittel, J H

    1996-01-01

    To study relationships between local cold adaptation of the lower limbs and general cold adaptation, eight subjects were submitted both to a cold foot test (CFT, 5 degrees C water immersion, 5 min) and to a whole-body standard cold air test (SCAT, 1 degree C, 2 h, nude at rest) before and after a local cold acclimation (LCA) of the lower limbs effected by repeated cold water immersions. The LCA induced a local cold adaptation confirmed by higher skin temperatures of the lower limbs during CFT and a hypothermic insulative general cold adaptation (decreased rectal temperature and mean skin temperature P adaptation was related to the habituation process confirmed by decreased plasma concentrations of noradrenaline (NA) during LCA (P general cold adaptation was unrelated either to local cold adaptation or to the habituation process, because an increased NA during SCAT after LCA (P syndrome" occurring during LCA.

  1. Cold moderators at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, upgrading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  2. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  3. PHOSPHORUS-BEARING MOLECULES IN MASSIVE DENSE CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Palau, A. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-10

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects; hence, its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here, we show new detections of phosphorus nitride (PN) in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact H ii regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ≃5 km s{sup −1}, and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 10{sup 11–12} cm{sup −2}, marginally lower than the values derived in the few high-mass star-forming regions detected so far. New constraints on the abundance of phosphorus monoxide, the fundamental unit of biologically relevant molecules, are also given.

  4. Large turbulent reservoirs of cold molecular gas around high-redshift starburst galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgarone, E; Zwaan, M A; Godard, B; Bergin, E; Ivison, R J; Andreani, P M; Bournaud, F; Bussmann, R S; Elbaz, D; Omont, A; Oteo, I; Walter, F

    2017-08-24

    Starburst galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation are among the most extreme star-forming engines in the Universe, producing stars over about 100 million years (ref. 2). The star-formation rates of these galaxies, which exceed 100 solar masses per year, require large reservoirs of cold molecular gas to be delivered to their cores, despite strong feedback from stars or active galactic nuclei. Consequently, starburst galaxies are ideal for studying the interplay between this feedback and the growth of a galaxy. The methylidyne cation, CH + , is a most useful molecule for such studies because it cannot form in cold gas without suprathermal energy input, so its presence indicates dissipation of mechanical energy or strong ultraviolet irradiation. Here we report the detection of CH + (J = 1-0) emission and absorption lines in the spectra of six lensed starburst galaxies at redshifts near 2.5. This line has such a high critical density for excitation that it is emitted only in very dense gas, and is absorbed in low-density gas. We find that the CH + emission lines, which are broader than 1,000 kilometres per second, originate in dense shock waves powered by hot galactic winds. The CH + absorption lines reveal highly turbulent reservoirs of cool (about 100 kelvin), low-density gas, extending far (more than 10 kiloparsecs) outside the starburst galaxies (which have radii of less than 1 kiloparsec). We show that the galactic winds sustain turbulence in the 10-kiloparsec-scale environments of the galaxies, processing these environments into multiphase, gravitationally bound reservoirs. However, the mass outflow rates are found to be insufficient to balance the star-formation rates. Another mass input is therefore required for these reservoirs, which could be provided by ongoing mergers or cold-stream accretion. Our results suggest that galactic feedback, coupled jointly to turbulence and gravity, extends the starburst phase of a galaxy instead of quenching it.

  5. Cold water injection nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kura, Masaaki; Maeda, Masamitsu; Endo, Takio.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To inject cold water in a reactor without applying heat cycles to a reactor container and to the inner wall of a feedwater nozzle by securing a perforated plate at the outlet of the cold water injection nozzle. Constitution: A disc-like cap is secured to the final end of a return nozzle of a control rod drive. The cap prevents the flow of a high temperature water flowing downward in the reactor from entering into the nozzle. The cap is perforated with a plurality of bore holes for injecting cold water into the reactor. The cap is made to about 100 mm in thickness so that the cold water passing through the bore holes is heated by the heat conduction in the cap. Accordingly, the flow of high temperature water flowing downwardly in the reactor is inhibited by the cap from backward flowing into the nozzle. Moreover, the flow of the cold water in the nozzle is controlled and rectified when passed through the bore holes in the cap and then injected into the reactor. (Yoshino, Y.)

  6. Nuclear Waste Vitrification Efficiency: Cold Cap Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.; Pokorny, R.

    2011-01-01

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 ), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter

  7. Production and spectroscopy of ultracold YbRb{sup *} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemitz, Nils

    2008-11-15

    This thesis describes the formation of electronically excited but translationally cold molecules formed from rubidium atoms and two isotopes of ytterbium ({sup 176}Yb and {sup 174}Yb) by means of photoassociation. The experiments were performed in a combined MOT with 10{sup 9} rubidium atoms and 2.10{sup 6} ytterbium atoms at temperatures of less than 1 mK. Photoassociation lines were found by trap loss spectroscopy throughout a wavelength range of 2 nm near the 795 nm D1 transition in rubidium. The majority of lines belong to two vibrational series in the excited YbRb{sup *} molecule, converging on a system of a ground state ytterbium atom and an excited rubidium atom. The strong variation of line strength between different vibrational lines is explained through the Franck-Condon principle. An improved version of the Leroy-Bernstein equation was used to extract the leading dispersion coefficient of the potential from the vibrational progression. Most of the observed lines show a resolved rotational structure as expected from a basic quantum mechanical model. The series terminates with the third or forth rotational component due to the ground state centrifugal barrier.The measured rotational constants agree very well with calculations based on the C{sub 6} coefficient. The discovery of a splitting of the rotational components into subcomponents indicates an uncommon angular momentum coupling described by Hund's case. Variations in the depth of the subcomponents indicates a similar splitting in the ground state, with the energies of the substates based on the alignment of the rubidium atom's magnetic dipole moment relative to the angular momentum carried by an approaching ytterbium atom. This creates an additional ground state barrier, partially suppressing some of the subcomponents. Using a rate equation model developed for this purpose, a maximum formation rate of 2.5.10{sup 6} molecules per second was calculated over the volume of the entire trap. The

  8. Production and spectroscopy of ultracold YbRb* molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemitz, Nils

    2008-11-01

    This thesis describes the formation of electronically excited but translationally cold molecules formed from rubidium atoms and two isotopes of ytterbium ( 176 Yb and 174 Yb) by means of photoassociation. The experiments were performed in a combined MOT with 10 9 rubidium atoms and 2.10 6 ytterbium atoms at temperatures of less than 1 mK. Photoassociation lines were found by trap loss spectroscopy throughout a wavelength range of 2 nm near the 795 nm D1 transition in rubidium. The majority of lines belong to two vibrational series in the excited YbRb * molecule, converging on a system of a ground state ytterbium atom and an excited rubidium atom. The strong variation of line strength between different vibrational lines is explained through the Franck-Condon principle. An improved version of the Leroy-Bernstein equation was used to extract the leading dispersion coefficient of the potential from the vibrational progression. Most of the observed lines show a resolved rotational structure as expected from a basic quantum mechanical model. The series terminates with the third or forth rotational component due to the ground state centrifugal barrier.The measured rotational constants agree very well with calculations based on the C 6 coefficient. The discovery of a splitting of the rotational components into subcomponents indicates an uncommon angular momentum coupling described by Hund's case. Variations in the depth of the subcomponents indicates a similar splitting in the ground state, with the energies of the substates based on the alignment of the rubidium atom's magnetic dipole moment relative to the angular momentum carried by an approaching ytterbium atom. This creates an additional ground state barrier, partially suppressing some of the subcomponents. Using a rate equation model developed for this purpose, a maximum formation rate of 2.5.10 6 molecules per second was calculated over the volume of the entire trap. The work presented here is an important step on

  9. Cold regions isotope applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids

  10. Commemoration of a cold war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farbøl, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together the fields of Cold War studies and memory studies. In Denmark, a remarkable institutionalisation of Cold War memory has taken place in the midst of a heated ideological battle over the past and whether to remember the Cold War as a ‘war’. Using Danish Cold War museums...... and heritage sites as case studies, this article sheds new light on the politics of history involved in Cold War commemoration. It suggests that the Cold War is commemorated as a war, yet this war memory is of a particular kind: it is a war memory without victims....

  11. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  12. Cold fusion - todays situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, K.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review of the history of cold fusion is given. It is noted that it is not possible to draw any definite conclusions about all the experimental and theoretical details, but that some of the results presented do not seem to be reached according to the normal scientific methods. 6 figs

  13. Recent Cold War Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  14. Expert Cold Structure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  15. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  16. Burning Cold: Involvement of TRPA1 in Noxious Cold Sensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Kelvin Y.; Corey, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Soon after its discovery ten years ago, the ion channel TRPA1 was proposed as a sensor of noxious cold. Evidence for its activation by painfully cold temperatures (below ~15° C) has been mixed, however. Some groups found that cold elicits a nonselective conductance in cells expressing TRPA1; others found no activation, or argued that activation is an indirect effect of elevated \\(Ca^{ 2+}\\) . Sensory cells from the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia that are activated by cold were sometimes c...

  17. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Research and development of ultimate atom/molecule manipulating technologies (Development of technology for formation of advanced function materials for use under power generation environment); 1998 nendo genshi bunshi kyokugen sosa gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden kankyoyo kokino sozai keisei gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The aim is to establish atom/molecule observing and manipulating technologies commonly applicable as basic technologies to industrial fields of new materials, electronics, biotechnology, chemistry, etc. The technologies to be established involve atom level observation and manipulation by mechanically probing into organic molecules such as those of solid surface DNA, microstructure formation with atoms arbitrarily arranged by use of a microfine electron beam and surface chemical properties, simulation by the first principle calculation for the theoretical prediction atom/mole surface application in a process, and new materials to replace semiconductors. The subjects of research and development selected for this fiscal year are the study of silicon nanostructure formation and physical properties, study of nanostructure formation technology based on cluster manipulation, study of nanostructure formation processes using chemical reaction control and local structure analysis, study of new properties of correlation-intensive electron based new materials, study of spin measuring technology, and the study of theoretical analysis of atom/molecule dynamic processes. (NEDO)

  18. Flu and Colds: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent colds or relieve cold symptoms. Andrographis (Andrographis paniculata) Chinese herbal medicines Green tea Guided imagery Hydrotherapy ... measurements (VAS) to assess the effectiveness of standardized Andrographis paniculata extract SHA-10 in reducing the symptoms of ...

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  20. Formation of buckminsterfullerene (C60) in interstellar space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berné, Olivier; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene (C60) was recently confirmed to be the largest molecule identified in space. However, it remains unclear how, and where this molecule is formed. It is generally believed that C60 is formed from the build up of small carbonaceous compounds, in the hot and dense envelopes of evolved stars. Analyzing infrared observations, obtained by Spitzer and Herschel, we found that C60 is efficiently formed in the tenuous and cold environment of an interstellar cloud illuminated by strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation fields. This implies that another formation pathway, efficient at low densities, must exist. Based on recent laboratory and theoretical studies, we argue that Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons are converted into graphene, and subsequently C60, under UV irradiation from massive stars. This shows that alternative - top-down - routes are key to understanding the organic inventory in space.

  1. Machinability of Al 6061 Deposited with Cold Spray Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldwell, Barry; Kelly, Elaine; Wall, Ronan; Amaldi, Andrea; O'Donnell, Garret E.; Lupoi, Rocco

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques such as cold spray are translating from research laboratories into more mainstream high-end production systems. Similar to many additive processes, finishing still depends on removal processes. This research presents the results from investigations into aspects of the machinability of aluminum 6061 tubes manufactured with cold spray. Through the analysis of cutting forces and observations on chip formation and surface morphology, the effect of cutting speed, feed rate, and heat treatment was quantified, for both cold-sprayed and bulk aluminum 6061. High-speed video of chip formation shows changes in chip form for varying material and heat treatment, which is supported by the force data and quantitative imaging of the machined surface. The results shown in this paper demonstrate that parameters involved in cold spray directly impact on machinability and therefore have implications for machining parameters and strategy.

  2. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, E.H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  3. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000?y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations...

  4. Mixtures of ultracold atoms and the quest for ultracold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidemueller, M.

    2000-08-01

    A cold atomic gas formed by two different species represents an intriguing system for a deeper understanding of atom-atom interactions at ultralow temperatures. We present experiments on a mixture of atomic lithium and cesium which are of particular interest regarding the formation of heteronuclear molecules on the one hand, and the prospects for sympathetic cooling of atomic gases through mutual thermalization on the other hand. A first series of experiments on interaction in presence of a near-resonant light field is performed in a two-species magneto-optical trap. The collisional properties of the lithium-cesium mixture are investigated through detailed analysis of trap-loss processes induced by the trap light. Photoassociation in an additional near-resonant laser field yields high-resolution spectra of the excited Cs 2 dimers, but shows no unambiguous indication of LiCs molecule formation. A second series of experiments on pure ground-state collisional properties utilizes an optical dipole trap formed by light that is detuned extremely far below atomic resonance (quasi-electrostatic trap). Storage times of many minutes are achieved in a particularly simple and versatile setup for both atomic species. Cooling of cesium through evaporation and thermalization by elastic collisions is observed. The evolution of temperature and particle number is compared with model simulations of evaporative cooling. Direct laser cooling of trapped cesium in the absolute energetic ground state is demonstrated. Homonuclear spin-changing collisions of ground-state cesium and lithium atoms are analyzed, and first evidence for pure ground-state collisions between atoms of different species is found. Based on the current achievements, prospects for future experiments are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Orientation of KRb molecules in a switched electrostatic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yun-Xia; Xu Shu-Wu; Yang Xiao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the orientation of the cold KRb molecules induced in a switched electrostatic field by numerically solving the full time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The results show that the periodic field-free molecular orientation can be realized for the KRb molecules by rapidly switching off the electrostatic field. Meanwhile, by varying the switching times of the electrostatic field, the adiabatic and nonadiabatic interactions of the molecules with the applied field can be realized. Moreover, the influences of the electrostatic field strength and the rotational temperature to the degree of the molecular orientation are studied. The investigations show that increasing the electrostatic field will increase the degree of the molecular orientation, both in the constant-field regime and in the field-free regime, while the increasing of the rotational temperature of the cold molecules will greatly decrease the degree of the molecular orientation. (atomic and molecular physics)

  6. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  7. Water and complex organic chemistry in the cold dark cloud Barnard 5: Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirström, Eva; Charnley, Steven B.; Taquet, Vianney; Persson, Carina M.

    2015-08-01

    Studies of complex organic molecule (COM) formation have traditionally been focused on hot cores in regions of massive star formation, where chemistry is driven by the elevated temperatures - evaporating ices and allowing for endothermic reactions in the gas-phase. As more sensitive instruments have become available, the types of objects known to harbour COMs like acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), methyl formate (CH3OCHO), and ketene (CH2CO) have expanded to include low mass protostars and, recently, even pre-stellar cores. We here report on the first in a new category of objects harbouring COMs: the cold dark cloud Barnard 5 where non-thermal ice desorption induce complex organic chemistry entirely unrelated to local star-formation.Methanol, which only forms efficiently on the surfaces of dust grains, provide evidence of efficient non-thermal desorption of ices in the form of prominent emission peaks offset from protostellar activity and high density tracers in cold molecular clouds. A study with Herschel targeting such methanol emission peaks resulted in the first ever detection of gas-phase water offset from protostellar activity in a dark cloud, at the so called methanol hotspot in Barnard 5.To model the effect a transient injection of ices into the gas-phase has on the chemistry of a cold, dark cloud we have included gas-grain interactions in an existing gas-phase chemical model and connected it to a chemical reaction network updated and expanded to include the formation and destruction paths of the most common COMs. Results from this model will be presented.Ground-based follow-up studies toward the methanol hotspot in B5 have resulted in the detection of a number of COMs, including CH2CO, CH3CHO, CH3OCH3, and CH3OCHO, as well as deuterated methanol (CH2DOH). Observations have also confirmed that COM emission is extended and not localised to a core structure. The implications of these observational and theoretical studies of B5 will be discussed

  8. The need to be cold : cold warriors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, L.

    2008-10-15

    This article discussed the changing climate of Ellesmere Island and the adaptation of the Inuit in response to the climate change, with particular reference to Canada's most northern community of Grise Fiord. Because of the changing climate, the vast northern landscape that the Inuit navigated for centuries by reading its subtle signs is becoming warmer, softer, and unpredictable. The geographic history and demographics of Grise Fiord were described. The community's main water supply comes from a glacier which is sinking. The negative impacts of ice shrinkage on this northern community and on the environment were presented. These included more international shipping through the Arctic, more resource exploration, a greater risk of environmental contamination, and reduced habitat for the polar bears and seals that eat, mate, and reproduce on the ice. Climate change impacts on the sea and sea ice were also discussed. Several photographs illustrating the changing climate were presented. The article noted that climate change could destroy the Inuit culture, making climate change an issue of human rights, notably the right to live connected to the land and the right to be cold. It was concluded that in one generation, Inuit were swept up by both a social and an economic upheaval. In one more generation, they will undergo an environmental shift. 13 figs.

  9. Ab initio dynamics and photoionization mass spectrometry reveal ion-molecule pathways from ionized acetylene clusters to benzene cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Tamar; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Troy, Tyler P; Fang, Yigang; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-05-23

    The growth mechanism of hydrocarbons in ionizing environments, such as the interstellar medium (ISM), and some combustion conditions remains incompletely understood. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and molecular beam vacuum-UV (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry experiments were performed to understand the ion-molecule growth mechanism of small acetylene clusters (up to hexamers). A dramatic dependence of product distribution on the ionization conditions is demonstrated experimentally and understood from simulations. The products change from reactive fragmentation products in a higher temperature, higher density gas regime toward a very cold collision-free cluster regime that is dominated by products whose empirical formula is (C 2 H 2 ) n + , just like ionized acetylene clusters. The fragmentation products result from reactive ion-molecule collisions in a comparatively higher pressure and temperature regime followed by unimolecular decomposition. The isolated ionized clusters display rich dynamics that contain bonded C 4 H 4 + and C 6 H 6 + structures solvated with one or more neutral acetylene molecules. Such species contain large amounts (>2 eV) of excess internal energy. The role of the solvent acetylene molecules is to affect the barrier crossing dynamics in the potential energy surface (PES) between (C 2 H 2 ) n + isomers and provide evaporative cooling to dissipate the excess internal energy and stabilize products including the aromatic ring of the benzene cation. Formation of the benzene cation is demonstrated in AIMD simulations of acetylene clusters with n > 3, as well as other metastable C 6 H 6 + isomers. These results suggest a path for aromatic ring formation in cold acetylene-rich environments such as parts of the ISM.

  10. Ab initio dynamics and photoionization mass spectrometry reveal ion–molecule pathways from ionized acetylene clusters to benzene cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Tamar; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Troy, Tyler P.; Fang, Yigang; Kostko, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanism of hydrocarbons in ionizing environments, such as the interstellar medium (ISM), and some combustion conditions remains incompletely understood. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and molecular beam vacuum-UV (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry experiments were performed to understand the ion–molecule growth mechanism of small acetylene clusters (up to hexamers). A dramatic dependence of product distribution on the ionization conditions is demonstrated experimentally and understood from simulations. The products change from reactive fragmentation products in a higher temperature, higher density gas regime toward a very cold collision-free cluster regime that is dominated by products whose empirical formula is (C2H2)n+, just like ionized acetylene clusters. The fragmentation products result from reactive ion–molecule collisions in a comparatively higher pressure and temperature regime followed by unimolecular decomposition. The isolated ionized clusters display rich dynamics that contain bonded C4H4+ and C6H6+ structures solvated with one or more neutral acetylene molecules. Such species contain large amounts (>2 eV) of excess internal energy. The role of the solvent acetylene molecules is to affect the barrier crossing dynamics in the potential energy surface (PES) between (C2H2)n+ isomers and provide evaporative cooling to dissipate the excess internal energy and stabilize products including the aromatic ring of the benzene cation. Formation of the benzene cation is demonstrated in AIMD simulations of acetylene clusters with n > 3, as well as other metastable C6H6+ isomers. These results suggest a path for aromatic ring formation in cold acetylene-rich environments such as parts of the ISM. PMID:28484019

  11. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  12. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  13. Cold source economic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, Serge.

    1975-01-01

    This computer code is intended for the statement of the general economic balance resulting from using a given cold source. The balance includes the investments needed for constructing the various materials, and also production balances resulting from their utilization. The case of either using an open circuit condenser on sea or river, or using air cooling systems with closed circuits or as auxiliaries can be dealt with. The program can be used to optimize the characteristics of the various parts of the cold source. The performance of the various materials can be evaluated for a given situation from using very full, precise economic balances, these materials can also be classified according to their possible uses, the outer constraints being taken into account (limits for heat disposal into rivers or seas, water temperature, air temperature). Technical choices whose economic consequences are important have been such clarified [fr

  14. Bacterial Vaginosis Bacterial and Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şayeste Demirezen

    2016-05-01

    molecules. The most important adhesion molecules of epithelium are cadherins, fibronectins, Toll like receptors and carbohydrates. In bacteria, pilis, lypopolysaccaharide and biofilm have primary importance. In this review, the adhesion molecules are discussed in detail and their roles in formation of clue cell are clarified.

  15. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  16. Engine Cold Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    matching pre- calibrated amplifier • BEI Shaft Encoder (0.2 CAD) • Wolff Instrumented Injector The high speed data was recorded and post-processed by...14. ABSTRACT These fuels were used for testing a GEP 6.5L turbocharged V-8 diesel engine operation in a cold box. This engine architecture is...Z39.18 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A fuel’s cetane number is very important for the operation of modern diesel

  17. Wind energy under cold climate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in wind energy production under different climatic conditions, among them cold climate and icing conditions. More and more wind turbines are being installed in cold climates and even adapted technology has been developed for that environment. Various national activities are going on in at least Finland, Canada, Italy, Sweden, etc. and international collaboration has been carried out within the European Union's Non-nuclear energy programme. Wind turbine operation is affected by both the cold temperatures and the formation of ice on the blades and the supporting structure. Cold temperatures can be handled by material selections known in other technical fields but to prevent icing, new techniques have to be - and have been - developed. Icing affects the reliability of anemometers, which concerns both turbine control and resource estimation, and changes the aerodynamics of the blades, which eventually stops the turbine. In addition, occasional icing events can locally affect public safety. The development of applied technology has entered some different paths and different solutions are tried out. As the applications are entering a commercial phase, these is a request to gather the experiences and monitor the reliability in a form that can be utilised by developers, manufactureres, consultants and other tenderers. The Topical Experts Meeting will focus on site classification, operational experiences, modelling and mesurements of ice induced loads and safety aspects. (EHS)

  18. Support for cold neutron utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Choi, Sungmin; Choi, Yong; Kwon, Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hee

    2012-06-01

    - Support for experiments by users of cold neutron scattering instrument - Short-term training of current and potential users of cold neutron scattering instrument for their effective use of the instrument - International collaboration for advanced utilization of cold neutron scattering instruments - Selection and training of qualified instrument scientists for vigorous research endeavors and outstanding achievements in experiments with cold neutron - Research on nano/bio materials using cold neutron scattering instruments - Bulk nano structure measurement using small angle neutron scattering and development of analysis technique

  19. Sonoluminescence: an IRaser creating cold fusion neutrons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevenslik, T.V.

    1996-01-01

    Sonoluminescence can be explained by treating the bubbles as IRasers with standing waves in resonance with the bubble dimensions. Since the IRaser resonant radiation is required to satisfy wave boundary conditions, the water molecules lining the bubble walls undergo a continuous population inversion as the bubble collapses. By stimulated processes, the Planck energy accumulates as the K b T energy of radiation photons is pumped from the surroundings through the rotational state of the water molecule. Bubble collapse occurs almost isothermally with the high IR absorptivity of the water molecule permitting the Planck energy to accumulate to 2∼6 eV only to be released by VIS-UV photon emission because of the low absorptivity of water at VIS-UV frequencies. As the IRaser cavity dimensions collapse to the spacing between water molecules at liquid density, soft x-rays at about 2 keV are predicted. But, this is less than 10 keV necessary for cold fusion so that no neutrons is directly expected yet. Therefore, it is suggested that UV laser enhancement is used to accumulate further bubble collapse energy

  20. Cold neutron production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Noboru.

    1976-01-01

    The first part gives general introduction to cold neutrons, namely the definition and the role as a probe in basic science and technology. The second part reviews various methods of cold neutron production. Some physical characteristics required for cold moderators are presented, and a list summarizes a number of cold moderators and their reactor physics constants. The definition of flux gain factor and the measured values for liquid light- and heavy-hydrogen are also given. The cold neutron spectra in methane and liquid hydrogen measured by LINAC time-of-flight method are presented to show the advantage of solid methane. The cold neutron sources using experimental reactors or linear accelerators are explained along with the examples of existing facilities. Two Japanese programs, the one is the use of a high flux reactor and the other is the use of a LINAC, are also presented. The third part of this report reviews the application areas of cold neutrons. (Aoki, K.)

  1. Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool (SMART: an integrated approach for analyzing single molecule data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Greenfeld

    Full Text Available Single molecule studies have expanded rapidly over the past decade and have the ability to provide an unprecedented level of understanding of biological systems. A common challenge upon introduction of novel, data-rich approaches is the management, processing, and analysis of the complex data sets that are generated. We provide a standardized approach for analyzing these data in the freely available software package SMART: Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool. SMART provides a format for organizing and easily accessing single molecule data, a general hidden Markov modeling algorithm for fitting an array of possible models specified by the user, a standardized data structure and graphical user interfaces to streamline the analysis and visualization of data. This approach guides experimental design, facilitating acquisition of the maximal information from single molecule experiments. SMART also provides a standardized format to allow dissemination of single molecule data and transparency in the analysis of reported data.

  2. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  3. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as ''Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed

  4. Cold fusion in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, L.

    1989-01-01

    Since early April a great deal of excitement has been created over the Fleischmann/Pons cold fusion experiment, which if it performs as advertised, could turn out to be mankind's best hope of heading off the energy crisis scheduled for early in the next century. Dozens of groups around the world are now attempting to duplicate the experiment to see if Fleischmann and Pons' discovery is an experimental mistake, an unknown electrochemical effect or a new kind of fusion reaction. This article puts the experiment into the perspective of today and looks at how it might affect the energy scene tomorrow if it should turn out to be commercially exploitable. (author)

  5. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  6. Fast pulses and slow atoms: making microKelvin molecules using femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Ian

    2008-05-01

    We discuss a general approach to the formation of ultracold ground state molecules by synthesis from pairs of cold atoms using shaped ultrashort optical pulses. This method combines an effective and widely applicable control technology to the problem of preparing molecules is the ground state of all their degrees of freedom. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond pulses provides and number of options for removing energy from a pair of colliding atoms, and binding them with little or no vibrational energy. We shall give examples of possible strategies, and report on experiments demonstrating photoassocation using coherent control, and measuring wavepacket dynamics by femtosecond pump probe molecular ionization. Prospects for stabilizing the molecules by protecting them from further collisions, and for increasing the range of internuclear separations that can be associated will be pointed out. This work is funded by the UK EPSRC, and has contributions from J. Petrovic, A. Wyatt, A. Dicks, D. McCabe, D. England, M. Friedman, H. Martay, T. Koehler, C. Foot and collaborations with F. Masnou-Seeuws and J. Mur-Petit.

  7. A mass spectrometric study of the neutral and ionic vapor components of ytterbium chlorides; formation enthalpies of YbCl2 and YbCl3 molecules, and YbCl3- and YbCl4- ions in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, F.Yh.; Kudin, L.S.; Pogrebnoj, A.M.; Butman, M.F.; Burdukovskaya, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    Ionic and neutral components of saturated vapour over the ytterbium di-and trichloride is studied through the Knudsen effusive method with mass-spectromic registration of evaporated products within the temperature range of 1000-1300 K. It is found that ytterbium trichloride is subjected to thermal decomposition with formation of ytterbium dichloride and molecular chloride. Sublimation enthalpy and enthalpy of YbCl 2 and YbCl 3 molecules formation in a gaseous phase at 298 K, comprising 356±6, 293±8, -425±6 and -667±6 kJ/mole correspondingly, are determined with application of 2 and 3 thermodynamical laws. Enthalpies of YbCl 3 - and YbCl 4 - negative ions formation in a gaseous phase at 298 K equal to -895 and -1211±30 kJ/mole correspondingly are calculated by measured equilibrium constants ion-molecular reaction. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Powder consolidation using cold spray process modeling and emerging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moridi, Atieh

    2017-01-01

    This book first presents different approaches to modeling of the cold spray process with the aim of extending current understanding of its fundamental principles and then describes emerging applications of cold spray. In the coverage of modeling, careful attention is devoted to the assessment of critical and erosion velocities. In order to reveal the phenomenological characteristics of interface bonding, severe, localized plastic deformation and material jet formation are studied. Detailed consideration is also given to the effect of macroscopic defects such as interparticle boundaries and subsequent splat boundary cracking on the mechanical behavior of cold spray coatings. The discussion of applications focuses in particular on the repair of damaged parts and additive manufacturing in various disciplines from aerospace to biomedical engineering. Key aspects include a systematic study of defect shape and the ability of cold spray to fill the defect, examination of the fatigue behavior of coatings for structur...

  9. Efficacy of zinc against common cold viruses: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulisz, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    To review the laboratory and clinical evidence of the medicinal value of zinc for the treatment of the common cold. Published articles identified through Medline (1980-2003) using the search terms zinc, rhinovirus, and other pertinent subject headings. Additional sources were identified from the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. By the author. By the author. Human rhinoviruses, by attaching to the nasal epithelium via the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) receptor, cause most colds. Ionic zinc, based on its electrical charge, also has an affinity for ICAM-1 receptor sites and may exert an antiviral effect by attaching to the ICAM-1 receptors in the rhinovirus structure and nasal epithelial cells. Clinical tests of zinc for treatment of common colds have been inconsistent, primarily because of study design, blinding, and lozenge contents. Early formulations of lozenges also were unpalatable. In three trials with similar study designs, methodologies, and efficacy assessments, zinc effectively and significantly shortened the duration of the common cold when it was administered within 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Recent reports of trials with zinc gluconate administered as a nasal gel have supported these findings; in addition, they have shown that treatment with zinc nasal gel is effective in reducing the duration and severity of common cold symptoms in patients with established illness. Clinical trial data support the value of zinc in reducing the duration and severity of symptoms of the common cold when administered within 24 hours of the onset of common cold symptoms. Additional clinical and laboratory evaluations are warranted to further define the role of ionic zinc for the prevention and treatment of the common cold and to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms through which zinc exerts its symptom-relieving effects.

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  12. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  14. Adaptation of the continuous cold trap system of fluidized-bed to the fluoride volatility process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    A continuous cold trap system consisting of fluidized condenser and stripper has been evaluated with a view to adapt it to the Fluoride Volatility Process in establishing the continuous purification process without radiation decomposition of PuF 6 . Its feasibility is shown by the test with UF 6 -air. Necessary conditions for the cold trap, and performance of the two inch-dia. fluidized bed cold trap system are presented, and also a model of mist formation in the condenser. (auth.)

  15. Covalent attachment of pyridine-type molecules to glassy carbon surfaces by electrochemical reduction of in situ generated diazonium salts. Formation of ruthenium complexes on ligand-modified surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesildag, Ali; Ekinci, Duygu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, pyridine, quinoline and phenanthroline molecules were covalently bonded to glassy carbon (GC) electrode surfaces for the first time using the diazonium modification method. Then, the complexation ability of the modified films with ruthenium metal cations was investigated. The derivatization of GC surfaces with heteroaromatic molecules was achieved by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding in situ generated diazonium salts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to confirm the attachment of heteroaromatic molecules to the GC surfaces and to determine the surface concentration of the films. The barrier properties of the modified GC electrodes were studied in the presence of redox probes such as Fe(CN) 6 3- and Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+ by cyclic voltammetry. Additionally, the presence of the resulting organometallic films on the surfaces was verified by XPS after the chemical transformation of the characterized ligand films to the ruthenium complex films. The electrochemical behavior of these films in acetonitrile solution was investigated using voltammetric methods, and the surface coverage of the organometallic films was determined from the reversible metal-based Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation waves.

  16. Covalent attachment of pyridine-type molecules to glassy carbon surfaces by electrochemical reduction of in situ generated diazonium salts. Formation of ruthenium complexes on ligand-modified surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesildag, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ekinci, Duygu, E-mail: dekin@atauni.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2010-09-30

    In this study, pyridine, quinoline and phenanthroline molecules were covalently bonded to glassy carbon (GC) electrode surfaces for the first time using the diazonium modification method. Then, the complexation ability of the modified films with ruthenium metal cations was investigated. The derivatization of GC surfaces with heteroaromatic molecules was achieved by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding in situ generated diazonium salts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to confirm the attachment of heteroaromatic molecules to the GC surfaces and to determine the surface concentration of the films. The barrier properties of the modified GC electrodes were studied in the presence of redox probes such as Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} and Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} by cyclic voltammetry. Additionally, the presence of the resulting organometallic films on the surfaces was verified by XPS after the chemical transformation of the characterized ligand films to the ruthenium complex films. The electrochemical behavior of these films in acetonitrile solution was investigated using voltammetric methods, and the surface coverage of the organometallic films was determined from the reversible metal-based Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation waves.

  17. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  18. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  19. Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbl, Daniel G.; Lee, Bernard S.; Schora, Jr., Frank C.; Lam, Henry W.

    1976-07-06

    In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

  20. Cold pressure welding - the mechanisms governing bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    1979-01-01

    Investigations of the bonding surface in scanning electron microscope after fracture confirm the mechanisms of bond formation in cold pressure welding to be: fracture of work-hardened surface layer, surface expansion increasing the area of virgin surface, extrusion of virgin material through cracks...... of the original surface layer, and establishment of real contact and bonding between virgin material. This implies that normal pressure as well as surface expansion are basic parameters governing the bond strength. Experimental investigations of pressure welding Al-Al under plane strain compression in a specially...

  1. The use of cold plasma generators in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolomiiets R.O.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cold plasma treatment of wounds is a modern area of therapeutic medicine. We describe the physical mechanisms of cold plasma, the principles of therapeutic effects and design of two common types of cold plasma generators for medical use. This work aims at disclosing the basic principles of construction of cold atmospheric plasma generators in medicine and prospects for their further improvement. The purpose of this work is to improve the existing cold atmospheric plasma generators for use in medical applications. Novelty of this work consists in the application of new principles of construction of cold atmospheric plasmas medical apparatus, namely the combination of the gas discharge chamber, electrodes complex shape forming device and plasma flow in a single package. This helps to achieve a significant reduction in the size of the device, and a discharge chamber design change increases the therapeutic effect. The design of cold atmospheric plasma generator type «pin-to-hole», which is able to control parameters using the plasma current (modulation fluctuations in the primary winding and mechanically (using optional rotary electrode. It is also possible to combine some similar generators in the set, which will increase the surface area of the plasma treatment. We consider the basic principles of generating low atmospheric plasma flow, especially the formation of the plasma jet, changing its shape and modulation stream. The features of cold plasma generator design and information about prospects for further application, and opportunities for further improvement are revealed. The recommendations for further use of cold atmospheric plasma generators in medicine are formulated.

  2. Monitoring the vaccine cold chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheriyan, E

    1993-01-01

    Maintaining the vaccine cold chain is an essential part of a successful immunisation programme. A continuous electronic temperature monitor helped to identify breaks in the cold chain in the community and the study led to the issue of proper guidelines and replacement of faulty equipment.

  3. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in

  4. Initial heating in cold cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Teunissen, L.P.J.; Hoogh, I.M. de

    2012-01-01

    During the initial minutes after entering a cold car, people feel uncomfortably cold. Six different warming systems were investigated in a small car in order to find out how to improve the feeling of comfort using 16 volunteers. The methods were: no additional warming next to a standard heating

  5. The status of cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  6. Facts about the Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different viruses. Rhinovirus is the most common cause, accounting for 10 to 40 percent of colds. Other common cold viruses include coronavirus and ... RSS | Terms Of Use | Privacy | Sitemap Our Family Of Sites ... Introduction Risk Factors Screening Symptoms Tumor Testing Summary '; var ...

  7. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  8. Acidophilus Milk Shelf-life Prolongation by the Use of Cold Sensitive Mutants of Lactobacillus acidophilus MDC 9626

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Goodarzi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available  Background and Objective: The shelf-life of Acidophilus milk fermented by probiotic culture Lactobacillus acidophilus is limited due to acidification caused by continued organic acid formation at low temperatures. Increasing of titrable acidity in turn causes reducing of the total viable count of probiotic bacteria. To overcome acidification we suggested to use coldsensitive mutants of Lactobacillus acidophilus, with limited metabolism at low temperatures. In order to facilitate the selection of cold sensitive mutants, it was decided to use Rifampicin and Streotomycin mutations affecting thermostability of the key molecules of cell metabolism the RNA polymerase and ribosome, respectively.Material and Methods: Ultra violet mutagenesis was used to enhance the yield and diversity of rifampicin and streptomycin resistant mutants of Lactobacillus acidophilus. To perform negative selection of cold sensitive mutants, antibiotic resistant colonies replica plated and incubated at 23ºC. The growth rate, milk fermenting rate, titratable acidity were measured.Results and Conclusion: Among tested resistant to either rifampicin or streptomycin clones with frequency mean of 1.0 %, ten mutants were isolated which have lost the ability to grow at minimal temperature. Fermented with cold-sensitive mutants of Lactobacillus acidophilus milks, during storage in the refrigerator, almost twice as long retained high amount of probiotic bacteria and low titratable acidity as compared to the parent strain. Thus, direct relationship between temperature sensitivity of the starter and shelf life of acidophilic milk was confirmed. Rifampicin and Streptomycin resistant mutations are powerful tools for selection of cold-sensitive dairy starters for preparing dairy fermented products with long shelf-life.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Development of cold neutron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changhee; Lee, C. H.; So, J. Y.; Park, S.; Han, Y. S.; Cho, S. J.; Moon, M. K.; Choi, Y. H.; Sun, G. M.

    2012-03-01

    Cold Neutron Triple Axsis Spectrometer (Cold-TAS) Development Ο Fabrication and Installation of the Major Cold-TAS Components Ο Performance Test of the Cold-TAS □ Cold Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectrometer(DC-TOF) Development Ο Fabrication of the Major DC-TOF Components Ο Development DC-TOF Data Reduction Software □ Expected Contribution The two world-class inelastic neutron scattering instruments measure atomic or molecular scale dynamics of meV energy range. This unprecedented measurement capability in the country will enable domestic and international scientists to observe new phenomena in their materials research to obtain world class results. Especially those who work in the fields of magnetic properties of superconductors and multiferroics, molecular dynamics, etc. will get more benefit from these two instruments

  10. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  11. Astrochemical Properties of Planck Cold Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyễn Lu’o’ng, Quang; Hirota, Tomoya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Liu, Tie; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Kim, Kee-Tae [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdaero 776, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Ohashi, Satoshi [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, AS/NTU. No.1, Section 4, Roosevelt Rd, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Thompson, Mark A. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Fuller, Gary [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Wu, Yuefang [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China); Li, Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100012 (China); Francesco, James Di [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Wang, Ke [European Southern Observatory (Germany); Ristorcelli, Isabelle [IRAP, CNRS (UMR5277), Universite Paul Sabatier, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Juvela, Mika [Department of physics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Shinnaga, Hiroko, E-mail: k.tatematsu@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35, Korimoto, Kagoshima, 890-0065 (Japan); Collaboration: JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” collaboration; and others

    2017-02-01

    We observed 13 Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC{sub 3}N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN{sup 13}C, N{sub 2}D{sup +}, and cyclic-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N{sub 2}D{sup +} is 50%. Furthermore, we observed the NH{sub 3} emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most targets are cold (≲20 K). In two of the starless clumps we observed, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N{sub 2}H{sup +} core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N{sub 2}D{sup +}. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the chemical evolution factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.

  12. Multi-Excitonic Quantum Dot Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, M.; Stinaff, E. A.; Doty, M. F.; Ware, M. E.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    With the ability to create coupled pairs of quantum dots, the next step towards the realization of semiconductor based quantum information processing devices can be taken. However, so far little knowledge has been gained on these artificial molecules. Our photoluminescence experiments on single InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules provide the systematics of coupled quantum dots by delineating the spectroscopic features of several key charge configurations in such quantum systems, including X, X^+,X^2+, XX, XX^+ (with X being the neutral exciton). We extract general rules which determine the formation of molecular states of coupled quantum dots. These include the fact that quantum dot molecules provide the possibility to realize various spin configurations and to switch the electron hole exchange interaction on and off by shifting charges inside the molecule. This knowledge will be valuable in developing implementations for quantum information processing.

  13. Gas Composition Transients in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate selected problems involving the prediction of transient gas compositions during Cold Vacuum Drying operations. The problems were evaluated to answer specific design questions. The document is formatted as a topical report with each section representing a specific problem solution. The problem solutions are reported in the calculation format specified in HNF-1613, Rev. 0, EP 7.6

  14. Cold crystallization of polytetrafluoroethylene by γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, M.; Yamagata, K.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in density and in the corresponding degree of crystallinity with radiation dose are studied experimentally for γ-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in the dose range from 1 x 10 3 to 1 x 10 9 R. The relation between the amorphous fraction and the radiation dose is derived from a quantitative analysis of cold crystallization by scission of polymer backbone chains. The characteristic radiation dose, at which one break occurs on the average per initial molecule, is estimated as about 3 x 10 4 R on the basis of a derived kinetic equation. The theoretical relation is modified by considering microvoids produced in the irradiated samples. The radii of microvoids in the form of spheres are evaluated as about 0.2 nm, and are also related to cage spheres relevant to the chain scission process. Good agreement between the modified theoretical relation and experimental data is attained over the entire range of radiation dose. 4 figures, 1 table

  15. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  16. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  17. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  18. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolved as a new line of thinking wherein a single molecule or perhaps a collection .... In photonic communication processes, laser light has to be modulated and .... The author wishes to thank G Rajaram for a critical reading of the manuscript.

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  20. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Keywords. Adamantane; diamondoid systems; plastic crystals. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  2. Formation of new halogenothiocarbonylsulfenyl halides, XC(S)SY, through photochemical matrix reactions starting from CS2 and a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Yeny A; Romano, Rosana M; Védova, Carlos O Della; Downs, Anthony J

    2007-05-28

    Isolation of a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl) with CS2 in a solid Ar matrix at about 15 K leads, by broad-band UV-vis photolysis (200molecules have also been identified as products of the various photoreactions: syn-ClC(S)SCl, anti-ClC(S)SCl, syn-BrC(S)SBr, anti-BrC(S)SBr, syn-ClC(S)SBr, anti-ClC(S)SBr, syn-BrC(S)SCl, anti-BrC(S)SCl, ClC(S)S*, BrCS*, and Br*...SCS. The IR spectra of these hitherto unknown species have been interpreted with reference to the predictions of ab initio (HF and MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results are analyzed in relation to the reaction pathways accessed by matrix photolysis.

  3. Cold fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihito.

    1994-01-01

    A Pt wire electrode is supported from the periphery relative to a Pd electrode by way of a polyethylene or teflon plate in heavy water, and electrolysis is applied while varying conditions successively in a sawteeth fashion at an initial stage, and after elapse of about one week, a pulse current is supplied to promote nuclear reaction and to generate excess heat greater than a charged electric power. That is, small amount of neutron emission is increased and electrolytic cell temperature is elevated by varying the electrolysis conditions successively in the sawteeth fashion at the initial stage. In addition, when the pulse electric current is supplied after elapse of about one week, the electrolytic cell temperature is abnormally elevated, so that the promotion of nuclear reaction phenomenon and the generation of excess heat greater than the charged electric power are recognized. Then, a way to control power level and time fluctuation of cold fusion is attained, thereby contributing to development of a further method for generating excess heat as desired. In addition, it contributes to a development for a method of obtaining such an excess heat that can be taken as a new energy. (N.H.)

  4. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  5. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J N; Gabrielse, G; Oxley, P; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e/sup +/ cooling of p in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H production rate by driving many cycles of e/sup +/ cooling in the nested trap, with more H counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H counted per incident high energy p is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H is formed via three-body recombination, as expected. (22 refs).

  6. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.N.; Bowden, N.S.; Gabrielse, G.; Oxley, P.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Wessels, M.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Walz, J.; Pittner, H.; Haensch, T.W.; Hessels, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e + cooling of p-bar in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H-bar produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H-bar, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p-bar storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H-bar states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H-bar production rate by driving many cycles of e + cooling in the nested trap, with more H-bar counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H-bar counted per incident high energy p-bar is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H-bar states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H-bar is formed via three-body recombination, as expected

  7. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  8. Design and synthesis of quasi-diastereomeric molecules with unchanging central, regenerating axial and switchable helical chirality via cleavage and formation of Ni(II–O and Ni(II–N coordination bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim A. Soloshonok

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe herein the design and synthesis of asymmetric, pentadentate ligands, which are able to coordinate to Ni(II cations leading to quasi-diastereomeric complexes displaying two new elements of chirality: stereogenic axis and helix along with configurational stabilization of the stereogenic center on the nitrogen. Due to the stereocongested structural characteristics of the corresponding Ni(II complexes, the formation of quasi-diastereomeric products is highly stereoselective providing formation of only two, (Ra*,Mh*,Rc* and (Ra*,Ph*,Rc*, out of the four possible stereochemical combinations. The reversible quasi-diastereomeric transformation between the products (Ra*,Mh*,Rc* and (Ra*,Ph*,Rc* occurs by intramolecular trans-coordination of Ni–NH and Ni–O bonds providing a basis for a chiral switch model.

  9. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  10. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 Th is winter ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac ...

  11. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  12. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  13. Fractography analysis of tool samples used for cold forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    Three fractured tool dies used for industrial cold forging have been investigated using light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Two of the specimens were produced using the traditional Böhler P/M steel grade s790, while the lastspecimen was a third generation P/M steel produced...... using new technology developed by Böhler. All three steels have the same nominal composition of alloying elements. The failure in both types of material occurs as a crack formation at a notch inside ofthe tool. Generally the cold forging dies constructed in third generation steels have a longer lifetime...

  14. Cold light dark matter in extended seesaw models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulebnane, Sami; Heeck, Julian; Nguyen, Anne; Teresi, Daniele

    2018-04-01

    We present a thorough discussion of light dark matter produced via freeze-in in two-body decays A→ B DM . If A and B are quasi-degenerate, the dark matter particle has a cold spectrum even for keV masses. We show this explicitly by calculating the transfer function that encodes the impact on structure formation. As examples for this setup we study extended seesaw mechanisms with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, such as the inverse seesaw. The keV-scale pseudo-Goldstone dark matter particle is then naturally produced cold by the decays of the quasi-degenerate right-handed neutrinos.

  15. Nonfreezing Cold-Induced Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    cold injury. ( Modi - fi ed from Jia J, Pollock M: The pathogenesis of non-freezing cold nerve injury: Observations in the rat, Brain 120:631, 1997...myelitis and sinus development ( Figures 7-17 to 7-19 ). Appearance and behavior of the neuropathic foot have many similarities to those of the diabetic ...foot. In the diabetic foot, infections tend to be polymicrobial with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Enterococcus and

  16. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  17. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  18. Dislocation structure and cold resistance of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul', Yu.P.; Karnaukh, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    In the formation of the dislocation structure of a small (10%) deformation, the determining effect on the cold brittleness temperature is exerted by the degree of uniformity in the distribution of dislocations and microvolumes. The overall density of the dislocations is of secondary importance here. By pretreatment to achieve more uniform distribution and dispersion of particles of the excess phase, the degree of uniformity of dislocation distribution in microvolumes can be increased, the cold brittleness temperature lowered and the effect of various deformation patterns on resistance to cold counterbalanced. The formation of a cell-type dislocation structure in the case of a nonuniform distribution of relatively large particles of the excess phase and in that of a large overall density of dislocations does not result in low brittleness temperatures. The formation of a cell-type dislocation structure in the case of uniform distribution of particles of the excess phase and of a comparatively small overall density of dislocations is accompanied by a very pronounced decrease in cold brittleness temperature not only by comparison with other types of dislocation structure but also with the normalized state. At the same time the formation of this kind of a cell structure leads to a substantial (factor of 2-5) increase in resistance to plastic deformation. The prerequisites for obtaining an optimum dislocation are fulfilled either by a combination of hardening from the austenitic region and prompt, small-scale (5%) deformation, or by a combination of accelerated cooling from the austenitic region, 30-40% deformation and high yield. The size of the dislocation cells observed under the electron microscope does not exhibit - within the limits investigated - any direct effect on the cold brittleness temperature. (author)

  19. Study of open systems with molecules in isotropic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yasushi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki

    2018-05-01

    We are interested in dynamics of a system in an environment, or an open system. Such phenomena as crossover from Markovian to non-Markovian relaxation and thermal equilibration are of our interest. Open systems have experimentally been studied with ultra cold atoms, ions in traps, optics, and cold electric circuits because well-isolated systems can be prepared here and thus the effects of environments can be controlled. We point out that some molecules solved in isotropic liquid are well isolated and thus they can also be employed for studying open systems in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments. First, we provide a short review on related phenomena of open systems that helps readers to understand our motivation. We, then, present two experiments as examples of our approach with molecules in isotropic liquids. Crossover from Markovian to non-Markovian relaxation was realized in one NMR experiment, while relaxation-like phenomena were observed in approximately isolated systems in the other.

  20. Cold urticaria. Dissociation of cold-evoked histamine release and urticara following cold challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keahey, T M; Greaves, M W

    1980-02-01

    Nine patients with acquired cold urticaria were studied to assess the effects of beta-adrenergic agents, xanthines, and corticosteroids on cold-evoked histamine release from skin in vivo. The patients, in all of whom an immediate urticarial response developed after cooling of the forearm, demonstrated release of histamine into the venous blood draining that forearm. Following treatment with aminophylline and albuterol in combination or prednisone alone, suppression of histamine release occurred in all but one patient. In some patients, this was accompanied by a subjective diminution in pruritus or buring, but there was no significant improvement in the ensuing edema or erythema. In one patient, total suppression of histamine release was achieved without any effect on whealing and erythema in response to cold challenge. Our results suggest that histamine is not central to the pathogenesis of vascular changes in acquired cold urticaria.

  1. Cold acclimation and cognitive performance: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Douglas M; Bailey, Stephen P; Roelands, Bart; Buono, Michael J; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-12-01

    Athletes, occupational workers, and military personnel experience cold temperatures through cold air exposure or cold water immersion, both of which impair cognitive performance. Prior work has shown that neurophysiological pathways may be sensitive to the effects of temperature acclimation and, therefore, cold acclimation may be a potential strategy to attenuate cold-induced cognitive impairments for populations that are frequently exposed to cold environments. This review provides an overview of studies that examine repeated cold stress, cold acclimation, and measurements of cognitive performance to determine whether or not cold acclimation provides beneficial protection against cold-induced cognitive performance decrements. Studies included in this review assessed cognitive measures of reaction time, attention, logical reasoning, information processing, and memory. Repeated cold stress, with or without evidence of cold acclimation, appears to offer no added benefit of improving cognitive performance. However, research in this area is greatly lacking and, therefore, it is difficult to draw any definitive conclusions regarding the use of cold acclimation to improve cognitive performance during subsequent cold exposures. Given the current state of minimal knowledge on this topic, athletes, occupational workers, and military commands looking to specifically enhance cognitive performance in cold environments would likely not be advised to spend the time and effort required to become acclimated to cold. However, as more knowledge becomes available in this area, recommendations may change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interstellar Chemistry Gets More Complex With New Charged-Molecule Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Astronomers using data from the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have found the largest negatively-charged molecule yet seen in space. The discovery of the third negatively-charged molecule, called an anion, in less than a year and the size of the latest anion will force a drastic revision of theoretical models of interstellar chemistry, the astronomers say. Molecule formation Formation Process of Large, Negatively-Charged Molecule in Interstellar Space CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and detailed information "This discovery continues to add to the diversity and complexity that is already seen in the chemistry of interstellar space," said Anthony J. Remijan of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "It also adds to the number of paths available for making the complex organic molecules and other large molecular species that may be precursors to life in the giant clouds from which stars and planets are formed," he added. Two teams of scientists found negatively-charged octatetraynyl, a chain of eight carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom, in the envelope of gas around an old, evolved star and in a cold, dark cloud of molecular gas. In both cases, the molecule had an extra electron, giving it a negative charge. About 130 neutral and about a dozen positively-charged molecules have been discovered in space, but the first negatively-charged molecule was not discovered until late last year. The largest previously-discovered negative ion found in space has six carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom. "Until recently, many theoretical models of how chemical reactions evolve in interstellar space have largely neglected the presence of anions. This can no longer be the case, and this means that there are many more ways to build large organic molecules in cosmic environments than have been explored," said Jan M. Hollis of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Ultraviolet light from stars can

  3. An algebraic model for three-cluster giant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, P.O.; Bijker, R.; Misicu, S.

    2001-01-01

    After an introduction to the algebraic U(7) model for three bodies, we present a relation of a geometrical description of three-cluster molecule to the algebraic U(7) model. Stiffness parameters of oscillations between each of two clusters are calculated and translated to the model parameter values of the algebraic model. The model is applied to the trinuclear system l32 Sn+ α + ll6 Pd which occurs in the ternary cold fission of 252 Cf. (Author)

  4. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  6. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure and properties (includingreactivt'ty) - both static (independent of time) and ... Furthermore, since the energy of H2 + in the ground state must be lower than that of .... (Figure 2b); note also that dp is positive in parts of the antibinding regions behind the two ... But, now both the sizes and shapes of molecules enter into.

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  8. OMG: Open molecule generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely, J.E.; Rojas-Chertó, M.; Fichera, D.; Reijmers, T.; Coulier, L.; Faulon, J.-L.; Hankemeier, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical

  9. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material ... synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be catego- ... maintained stably per organic molecule, stabilization of a ..... rotating freely under an applied field because it is a magne-.

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. New Molecular Detections in TMC-1 with the Green Bank Telescope: Carbon-Chain and Aromatic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew Michael

    2018-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles PA(N)Hs are believed to be widespread throughout the Universe, and are likely responsible for the unidentified infrared bands. However, the individual detection of aromatic molecules has been limited to a single weak absorption feature of an infrared bending mode of benzene (c-C6H6). The cold core TMC-1 has long been a source of new molecular detections, particularly for unsaturated carbon-rich molecules that are appealing potential precursors of PA(N)Hs. Through deep observations with the Green Bank Telescope of TMC-1, we report the first rotational detection of an aromatic molecule, benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN), along with 8 new isotopologues of HC5N and HC7N and an entirely new molecular family (HC5O, HC7O). These new detections provide crucial insights to the formation of PAHs and the underlying carbon-chain chemistry of dark clouds.

  12. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  13. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  14. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  15. A NEWLY FORMING COLD FLOW PROTOGALACTIC DISK, A SIGNATURE OF COLD ACCRETION FROM THE COSMIC WEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D.; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    How galaxies form from, and are fueled by, gas from the intergalactic medium (IGM) remains one of the major unsolved problems in galaxy formation. While the classical Cold Dark Matter paradigm posits galaxies forming from cooling virialized gas, recent theory and numerical simulations have highlighted the importance of cold accretion flows—relatively cool ( T ∼ few × 104 K) unshocked gas streaming along filaments into dark matter halos, including hot, massive, high-redshift halos. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium resulting in disk- or ring-like structures, eventually coalescing into galaxies forming at filamentary intersections. We earlier reported a bright, Ly α emitting filament near the QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z = 2.843 discovered with the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager. We now report that the bright part of this filament is an enormous ( R > 100 kpc) rotating structure of hydrogen gas with a disk-like velocity profile consistent with a 4 × 10"1"2 M _⊙ halo. The orbital time of the outer part of the what we term a “protodisk” is comparable to the virialization time and the age of the universe at this redshift. We propose that this protodisk can only have recently formed from cold gas flowing directly from the cosmic web.

  16. A NEWLY FORMING COLD FLOW PROTOGALACTIC DISK, A SIGNATURE OF COLD ACCRETION FROM THE COSMIC WEB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 278-17, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Moore, Anna [Caltech Optical Observatories, Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 11-17, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Steidel, Charles C. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 249-17, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Trainor, Ryan, E-mail: cmartin@srl.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, 501 15 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    How galaxies form from, and are fueled by, gas from the intergalactic medium (IGM) remains one of the major unsolved problems in galaxy formation. While the classical Cold Dark Matter paradigm posits galaxies forming from cooling virialized gas, recent theory and numerical simulations have highlighted the importance of cold accretion flows—relatively cool ( T ∼ few × 104 K) unshocked gas streaming along filaments into dark matter halos, including hot, massive, high-redshift halos. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium resulting in disk- or ring-like structures, eventually coalescing into galaxies forming at filamentary intersections. We earlier reported a bright, Ly α emitting filament near the QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z = 2.843 discovered with the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager. We now report that the bright part of this filament is an enormous ( R > 100 kpc) rotating structure of hydrogen gas with a disk-like velocity profile consistent with a 4 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ⊙} halo. The orbital time of the outer part of the what we term a “protodisk” is comparable to the virialization time and the age of the universe at this redshift. We propose that this protodisk can only have recently formed from cold gas flowing directly from the cosmic web.

  17. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will... National Park Service (NPS) concerning the Cold War Theme Study. DATES: The teleconference meeting will be...

  18. Warm and cold molecular gas conditions modeled in 87 galaxies observed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Glenn, Jason

    2018-01-01

    Molecular gas is the raw material for star formation, and like the interstellar medium (ISM) in general, it can exist in regions of higher and lower excitation. Rotational transitions of the CO molecule are bright and sensitive to cold molecular gas. While the majority of the molecular gas exists in the very cold component traced by CO J=1-0, the higher-J lines trace the highly excited gas that may be more indicative of star formation processes. The atmosphere is opaque to these lines, but the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory made them accessible for study of Galactic and extragalactic sources. We have conducted two-component, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) modeling of the CO lines from J=1‑0 through J=13‑12 in 87 galaxies observed by the Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). We used the nested sampling algorithm Multinest to compare the measured CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) to the ones produced by a custom version of the non-LTE code RADEX. This allowed us to fully examine the degeneracies in parameter space for kinetic temperature, molecular gas density, CO column density, and area filling factor.Here we discuss the major findings of our study, as well as the important implications of two-component molecular gas modeling. The average pressure of the warm gas is slightly correlated with galaxy LFIR, but that of the cold gas is not. A high-J (such as J=11-10) to J=1-0 line ratio is diagnostic of warm component pressure. We find a very large spread in our derived values of "alpha-CO," with no discernable trend with LFIR, and average molecular gas depletion times that decrease with LFIR. If only a few molecular lines are available in a galaxy's SLED, the limited ability to model only one component will change the results. A one-component fit often underestimates the flux of carbon monoxide (CO) J=1‑0 and the mass. If low-J lines are not included, mass is underestimated by an order of magnitude. Even when

  19. Assignment and analysis of the A3Πi-X3Σ- transition of the CCO molecule. Formation and disappearance of the CCO's X3Σ- state during flash photolysis of the carbon suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Claude

    1971-01-01

    As the C 2 O radical appeared to be the necessary intermediate compound which could lead from atomic carbon to carbon suboxide by a chain of elementary reactions for the study of the effect of radiations on CO, this research thesis, after a recall on the nature of primary compounds of carbon suboxide photolysis, presents experimental techniques aimed at the investigation of C 2 O: flash photolysis to observe it with low resolution, experimental set-up to record its spectrum with a high resolution, experimental set-up to observe it by pulse radiolysis of carbon oxide. The author reports the identification and analysis of the C 2 O spectrum, and discusses the formation and disappearance of the CCO's X 3 Σ - state with or without the presence of sensors during flash photolysis of the carbon suboxide [fr

  20. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abele Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10−4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS allows to test Newton’s gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  1. Hesitant birth of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockris, J.O.

    1992-01-01

    John O'M. Bockris, a distinguished chemistry professor at Texas A ampersand M University, finds the reaction to the announcement of the discovery of cold fusion curious. Two years earlier, he notes, there had been a comparable announcement concerning the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity; it received favorable press coverage for months. The cold-fusion announcement, on the other hand, was met with dour skepticism. When other researchers failed in efforts to duplicate the findings of Martin Fleischmann and B. Stanley Pons, Bockris says, the two scientists were held up to ridicule. Bockris says he found a deep emotional opposition to cold fusion, even within his own department and university. This opposition is fueled in large part, he believes, by big science and the hot fusion lobby. A key indicator of cold fusion is the presence of tritium, Brockis claims. At Texas A ampersand M, large amounts of tritium have been found in some experiments; this also has occurred in experiments at more than 40 laboratories in nine countries, he says. Excess heat production is more difficult to attain, he acknowledges. The cold-fusion controversy has uncovered some unflattering characteristics of the scientific community, Bockris says. Among them are: scientists are no less driven by emotion that business people or politicians; research funding decisions serve to perpetuate the goals of politically powerful interest groups; and ideas have great inertia once planted in a scientist's mind

  2. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  3. Dust-forming molecules in VY Canis Majoris (and Betelgeuse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, T.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Schmidt, M. R.; Patel, N. A.; Young, K. H.; Menten, K. M.; Brünken, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Winters, J. M.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    The formation of inorganic dust in circumstellar environments of evolved stars is poorly understood. Spectra of molecules thought to be most important for the nucleation, i.e. AlO, TiO, and TiO2, have been recently detected in the red supergiant VY CMa. These molecules are effectively formed in VY CMa and the observations suggest that non-equilibrium chemistry must be involved in their formation and nucleation into dust. In addition to exploring the recent observations of VY CMa, we briefly discuss the possibility of detecting these molecules in the "dust-poor" circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse.

  4. Cold fusion produces more tritium than neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the major cold fusion experiments performed in various laboratories of the world and attempts to explain them are reviewed in brief. Particular reference is made to the experiments carried out in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay. In BARC experiments, it is found that tritium is the primary product of cold fusion. Author has put forward two hypothetical pictures of D-D fusion. (1) When a metal like Pd or Ti is loaded with D 2 , a crack forms. Propogation of such a crack accelerates deuterons which bombard Pd D 2 /D held by Pd or Ti leading to neutron capture or tritium formation with the release of protons and energy. The released protons might transfer its energy to some other deuteron and a chain reaction is started. This chain reaction terminates when a substantial portion of D in the crack tip is transmuted. This picture explains fusion reaction bursts and the random distribution of reaction sites, but does not explain neutron emission. (2) The deuterons accelerated by a propogating crack may hit a Pd/Ti nucleus instead of a deuterium nucleus and may transmute Pd/Ti. (M.G.B.). 18 refs

  5. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Ioppolo, S.; Qasim, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, I.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH2CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  6. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Qasim, D.; Linnartz, H. [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ioppolo, S. [School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dishoeck, E. F. van, E-mail: gfedo@oact.inaf.it [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-06-10

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CH{sub 2}OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical–radical and radical–molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  7. The formation of molecular hydrogen on silicate dust analogs: The rotational distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, de l' Observatoire de Paris et de l' Université de Cergy Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, F-95000 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Vidali, G. [Visiting Professor. Permanent address: Syracuse University, Physics Department, Syracuse, NY 13244-1320, USA. (United States); Sabri, T.; Jæger, C., E-mail: lisseth.gavilan@obspm.fr [Laboratory Astrophysics and Cluster Physics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Our laboratory experiments continue to explore how the formation of molecular hydrogen is influenced by dust and how dust thereby affects hydrogen molecules adsorbed on its surface. In Sabri et al., we present the preparation of nanometer-sized silicate grain analogs via laser ablation. These analogs illustrate extremes in structure (fully crystalline or fully amorphous grains), and stoichiometry (the forsterite and fayalite end-members of the olivine family). These were inserted in FORMOLISM, an ultra-high vacuum setup where they can be cooled down to ∼5 K. Atomic beams are directed at these surfaces and the formation of new molecules is studied via REMPI(2+1) spectroscopy. We explored the rotational distribution (0 ≤ J'' ≤ 5) of v'' = 0 of the ground electronic state of H{sub 2}. The results of these measurements are reported here. Surprisingly, molecules formed and ejected from crystalline silicates have a cold (T {sub rot} ∼ 120 K) rotational energy distribution, while for molecules formed on and ejected from amorphous silicate films, the rotational temperature is ∼310 K. These results are compared to previous experiments on metallic surfaces and theoretical simulations. Solid-state surface analysis suggests that flatter grains could hinder the 'cartwheel' rotation mode. A search for hot hydrogen, predicted as a result of H{sub 2} formation, hints at its production. For the first time, the rotational distribution of hydrogen molecules formed on silicate dust is reported. These results are essential to understanding the chemistry of astrophysical media containing bare dust grains.

  8. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  9. Superexcited states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Takagi, Hidekazu.

    1990-01-01

    The report addresses the nature and major features of molecule's superexcited states, focusing on their involvement in dynamic processes. It also outlines the quantum defect theory which allows various processes involving these states to be treated in a unified way. The Rydberg state has close relation with an ionized state with a positive energy. The quantum defect theory interprets such relation. Specifically, the report first describes the quantum defect theory focusing on its basic principle. The multi-channel quantum defect theory is then outlined centering on how to describe a Rydberg-type superexcited state. Description of a dissociative double-electron excited state is also discussed. The quantum defect theory is based on the fact that the physics of the motion of a Rydberg electron vary with the region in the electron's coordinate space. Finally, various molecular processes that involve a superexcited state are addressed focusing on autoionization, photoionization, dissociative recombination and bonding ionization of diatomic molecules. (N.K.)

  10. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  11. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  12. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of methylpropargyl radical formation, C4H5, from reaction of C(3Pj) with propylene, C3H6 (X1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.I.; Stranges, D.; Bevsek, H.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between ground state carbon atoms and propylene, C 3 H 6 , was studied at average collision energies of 23.3 and 45.0 kJmol -1 using the crossed molecular beam technique. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C 4 H 5 at m/e=53 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields a maximum energy release as well as angular distributions consistent with the formation of methylpropargyl radicals. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental results suggest that the reaction proceeds on the lowest 3 A surface via an initial addition of the carbon atom to the π-orbital to form a triplet methylcyclopropylidene collision complex followed by ring opening to triplet 1,2-butadiene. Within 0.3 endash 0.6 ps, 1,2-butadiene decomposes through carbon endash hydrogen bond rupture to atomic hydrogen and methylpropargyl radicals. The explicit identification of C 4 H 5 under single collision conditions represents a further example of a carbon endash hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This versatile machine represents an alternative pathway to build up unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in combustion processes, chemical vapor deposition, and in the interstellar medium. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Communication: Fourier-transform infrared probing of remarkable quantities of gas trapped in cold homogeneously nucleated nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin; Devlin, J. Paul

    2013-07-01

    Studies of catalyzed all-vapor gas-hydrate formation on a sub-second timescale have been extended with a special focus on liquid-droplet compositions at the instant of hydrate crystallization. This focus has been enabled by inclusion of methanol in the all-vapor mixture. This slows droplet to gas-hydrate conversion near 200 K to a time scale suited for standard FTIR sampling. Such droplet data are sought as a guide to ongoing efforts to reduce the amount of guest catalyst required for instant formation of the gas hydrates. For the same reason, all-vapor sampling has also been extended to the generation of long-lived liquid droplets with reduced or no water content. Observations of single-solvent droplets show that surprising quantities of gas molecules are trapped during rapid droplet growth. For example, CO2 is trapped at levels near 50 mol. % in droplets of acetone, tetrahydrofuran, or trimethylene oxide formed under CO2 pressures of several Torr in a cold-chamber at 170 K. Less but significant amounts of gas are trapped at higher temperatures, or in methanol or water-methanol droplets. The droplet metastability appears to commonly lead to formation of bubbles larger than the original nanodroplets. Besides serving as a guide for the all-vapor gas-hydrate studies, the semiquantitative evidence of extensive trapping of gases is expected to have a role in future studies of atmospheric aerosols.

  14. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    [7,8,9]. Furthermore, in order to learn more about the chemistry in interstellar clouds, astrochemists can benefit greatly from direct measurements on cold reactions in laboratories [9]. Working with MgH+ molecular ions in a linear Paul trap, we routinely cool their translational degree of freedom...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...... results imply that, through this technique, cold molecular-ion experiments can now be carried out at cryogenic temperatures in room-temperature set-ups. References [1] Koelemeij, J. C. J., Roth, B., Wicht, A., Ernsting, I. and Schiller, S., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007). [2] Hudson, J. J., Sauer, B...

  15. Development of library preparation method able to correct gene expression levels in rice anther and isolate a trace expression gene mediated in cold-resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Koike, Setsuo

    2000-01-01

    When cDNA library is prepared by a previously developed method, genes of which expression level is high are apt to be cloned at a high frequency, whereas genes of which expression level are low, are difficult to be cloned. A low-expression gene has been cloned at very low frequency. Therefore, the gene encoding the key enzyme that is involved in growth disturbance of rice pollen has not been identified. In this study, development of a library preparing method able to correct the expression level was attempted using highly sensitive detection method with radioisotope and some genes related to cold-resistance of rice were isolated. Double strand DNAs were synthesized using mRNA extract from rice anthers and annealed following heat-denaturation. It has been known that single strand DNA molecules abundantly existing in DNA solution can easily aggregate to form double strand DNA, but single stranded DNA molecules poor in the solution are apt to still remain as single strand after annealing. Thus, the amount of single strand DNA would be balanced in the solution between abundant DNA and poor DNA species. The authors succeeded to prepare a gene library including low and high expression genes at similar proportions. Moreover, spin trap method that allows RI labeling of DNA bound to latex particle, was developed to detect with high sensitivity, especially for genes that are expressed at low level. The present method could be used for recovery, detection and quantitative analysis of radiolabeled single strand DNA. Thus, it was demonstrated that the stage from tetrad sperm to small sperm might be easily affected by cold stress. The present results suggest that the expressions of β-1 and β-3 glucanase, which are involved in the release of small sperms following meiosis in the pollen formation, might be easily affected by cold stress. (M.N.)

  16. Development of library preparation method able to correct gene expression levels in rice anther and isolate a trace expression gene mediated in cold-resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Koike, Setsuo [Tohoku National Agricultural Experiment Station, Morioka (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    When cDNA library is prepared by a previously developed method, genes of which expression level is high are apt to be cloned at a high frequency, whereas genes of which expression level are low, are difficult to be cloned. A low-expression gene has been cloned at very low frequency. Therefore, the gene encoding the key enzyme that is involved in growth disturbance of rice pollen has not been identified. In this study, development of a library preparing method able to correct the expression level was attempted using highly sensitive detection method with radioisotope and some genes related to cold-resistance of rice were isolated. Double strand DNAs were synthesized using mRNA extract from rice anthers and annealed following heat-denaturation. It has been known that single strand DNA molecules abundantly existing in DNA solution can easily aggregate to form double strand DNA, but single stranded DNA molecules poor in the solution are apt to still remain as single strand after annealing. Thus, the amount of single strand DNA would be balanced in the solution between abundant DNA and poor DNA species. The authors succeeded to prepare a gene library including low and high expression genes at similar proportions. Moreover, spin trap method that allows RI labeling of DNA bound to latex particle, was developed to detect with high sensitivity, especially for genes that are expressed at low level. The present method could be used for recovery, detection and quantitative analysis of radiolabeled single strand DNA. Thus, it was demonstrated that the stage from tetrad sperm to small sperm might be easily affected by cold stress. The present results suggest that the expressions of {beta}-1 and {beta}-3 glucanase, which are involved in the release of small sperms following meiosis in the pollen formation, might be easily affected by cold stress. (M.N.)

  17. Some applications of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations to the cold-atom physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Deltuva, A.; Lazauskas, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present some recent applications of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations in describing atomic bound and scattering problems. We consider the scattering of a charged particle X by atomic hydrogen with special interest in X = p,e ± , systems of cold bosonic molecules and the bound and scattering properties of N=3 and N=4 atomic 4 He multimers. (authors)

  18. Scientists study 'cold war' fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the epidemiological studies being carried out to determine radiation doses to the public from intentional and accidental releases of radioactive compounds during the Cold War. These studies at present are focused on Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Fernald, with studies beginning at Rocky Flats and Savannah

  19. Encyclopedia of the Cold War

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1945 and 1991, tension between the USA, its allies, and a group of nations led by the USSR, dominated world politics. This period was called the Cold War - a conflict that stopped short to a full-blown war. Benefiting from the recent research of newly open archives, the Encyclopedia of the

  20. Cold gas accretion in galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancisi, Renzo; Fraternali, Filippo; Oosterloo, Tom; van der Hulst, Thijs

    Evidence for the accretion of cold gas in galaxies has been rapidly accumulating in the past years. HI observations of galaxies and their environment have brought to light new facts and phenomena which are evidence of ongoing or recent accretion: (1) A large number of galaxies are accompanied by

  1. Cold fusion and hot history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewenstein, B.

    1996-01-01

    The history of cold fusion research following the announcement of the Pons-Fleischmann experiment is described in detail, including all the confusion, responses of scientists, personal impressions, personal quotations, reactions of the media, references to contemporary sources, etc. (P.A.). 5 figs

  2. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches

    OpenAIRE

    Micklitz, T.; Müller, C. A.; Altland, A.

    2013-01-01

    Signatures of strong Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Anderson localization leads to a formation of a coherence peak in the \\emph{forward} scattering direction (as opposed to the common weak localization backscattering peak). We present a microscopic, and fully time...

  3. Cold atoms in singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, J. P.

    1998-09-01

    We studied both theoretically and experimentally the interaction between cold Li atoms from a magnetic-optical trap (MOT) and a charged or current-carrying wire. With this system, we were able to realize 1/r 2 and 1/r potentials in two dimensions and to observe the motion of cold atoms in both potentials. For an atom in an attractive 1/r 2 potential, there exist no stable trajectories, instead there is a characteristic class of trajectories for which atoms fall into the singularity. We were able to observe this falling of atoms into the center of the potential. Moreover, by probing the singular 1/r 2 potential with atomic clouds of varying size and temperature we extracted scaling properties of the atom-wire interaction. For very cold atoms, and very thin wires the motion of the atoms must be treated quantum mechanically. Here we predict that the absorption cross section for the 1/r 2 potential should exhibit quantum steps. These quantum steps are a manifestation of the quantum mechanical decomposition of plane waves into partial waves. For the second part of this work, we realized a two dimensional 1/r potential for cold atoms. If the potential is attractive, the atoms can be bound and follow Kepler-like orbits around the wire. The motion in the third dimension along the wire is free. We were able to exploit this property and constructed a novel cold atom guide, the 'Kepler guide'. We also demonstrated another type of atom guide (the 'side guide'), by combining the magnetic field of the wire with a homogeneous offset magnetic field. In this case, the atoms are held in a potential 'tube' on the side of the wire. The versatility, simplicity, and scaling properties of this guide make it an interesting technique. (author)

  4. Ultra-cold WIMPs relics of non-standard pre-BBN cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gelmini, Graciela B

    2008-01-01

    We point out that in scenarios in which the Universe evolves in a non-standard manner during and after the kinetic decoupling of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), these relics can be much colder than in standard cosmological scenarios (i.e. can be ultra-cold), possibly leading to the formation of smaller first objects in hierarchical structure formation scenarios.

  5. Rotational laser cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard

    2010-01-01

    Stationary molecules in well-defined internal states are of broad interest for physics and chemistry. In physics, this includes metrology 1, 2, 3 , quantum computing 4, 5 and many-body quantum mechanics 6, 7 , whereas in chemistry, state-prepared molecular targets are of interest for uni......-molecular reactions with coherent light fields 8, 9 , for quantum-state-selected bi-molecular reactions 10, 11, 12 and for astrochemistry 12 . Here, we demonstrate rotational ground-state cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold MgH+ ions, using a laser-cooling scheme based on excitation of a single...

  6. Quark chemistry: charmonium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rujula, A.; Jaffe, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidence for two quark-two antiquark hadrons is reviewed. Concentration is placed on predictions for S-wave ''charmonium molecules,'' built of a c anti c charmonium pair and a light quark-antiquark pair. Their spectrum and quantum numbers are predicted and an estimate of their decay couplings and their prediction in monochromatic pion decays from charmonium resonances produced in e + e - -annihilation is given. Some S-wave charmonium resonances should be detectable in these decays, but typical branching ratios are only at the 1% level. 19 references

  7. Going Green and Cold: Biosurfactants from Low-Temperature Environments to Biotechnology Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfumo, Amedea; Banat, Ibrahim M; Marchant, Roger

    2018-03-01

    Approximately 80% of the Earth's biosphere is cold, at an average temperature of 5°C, and is populated by a diversity of microorganisms that are a precious source of molecules with high biotechnological potential. Biosurfactants from cold-adapted organisms can interact with multiple physical phases - water, ice, hydrophobic compounds, and gases - at low and freezing temperatures and be used in sustainable (green) and low-energy-impact (cold) products and processes. We review the biodiversity of microbial biosurfactants produced in cold habitats and provide a perspective on the most promising future applications in environmental and industrial technologies. Finally, we encourage exploring the cryosphere for novel types of biosurfactants via both culture screening and functional metagenomics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. On the Several Molecules and Nanostructures of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Kolb Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the water molecule from a variety of viewpoints. Water can involve different isotopes of Hydrogen and Oxygen, it can form differently shaped isomer molecules, and, when frozen, it occupies space differently than most other substances do. The tool for conducting the investigation of all this is called ‘Algebraic Chemistry’. This tool is a quantitative model for predicting the energy budget for all sorts of changes between different ionization states of atoms that are involved in chemical reactions and in changes of physical state. The model is based on consistent patterns seen in empirical data about ionization potentials, together with rational scaling laws that can interpolate and extrapolate for situations where no data are available. The results of the investigation of the water molecule include comments, both positive and negative, about technologies involving heavy water, poly water, Brown’s gas, and cold fusion.

  9. Deep superconducting magnetic traps for neutral atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.G.E.; Michniak, R.A.; Nguyen, S.V.; Campbell, W.C.; Egorov, D.; Maxwell, S.E.; Buuren, L.D. van; Doyle, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction and performance of three realizations of a high-field superconducting magnetic trap for neutral atoms and molecules. Each of these traps utilizes a pair of coaxial coils in the anti-Helmholtz geometry and achieves depths greater than 4 T, allowing it to capture magnetic atoms and molecules cooled in a cryogenic buffer gas. Achieving this depth requires that the repulsive force between the coils (which can exceed 30 metric tons) be contained. We also describe additional features of the traps, including the elimination of trapped fluxes from the coils and the integration of the coils into a cryogenic vacuum environment suitable for producing cold atoms and molecules

  10. Cold acclimation increases cold tolerance independently of diapause programing in the bean bug, Riptortus pedestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsypal, J; Moos, M; Goto, S G

    2017-10-17

    The bean bug (Riptortus pedestris) is a pest of soybeans and other legumes in Japan and other Asian countries. It enters a facultative adult diapause on exposure to short days. While photoperiodism and diapause are well understood in R. pedestris, knowledge of cold tolerance is very limited, as is information on the effect of diapause on cold tolerance. We examined the effect of photoperiod, cold acclimation, and feeding status on cold tolerance in R. pedestris. We found that cold acclimation significantly increased survival at -10°C in both long- and short-day adult R. pedestris. Since the difference in cold survival between long- and short-day cold-acclimated groups was only marginal, we conclude that entering diapause is not crucial for R. pedestris to successfully pass through cold acclimation and become cold tolerant. We observed similar effects in 5th instar nymphs, with both long- and short-day cold-acclimated groups surviving longer cold exposures compared with non-acclimated groups. Starvation, which was tested only in adult bugs, had only a negligible and negative impact on cold survival. Although cold tolerance significantly increased with cold acclimation in adult bugs, supercooling capacity unexpectedly decreased. Our results suggest that changes in supercooling capacity as well as in water content are unrelated to cold tolerance in R. pedestris. An analysis of metabolites revealed differences between the treatments, and while several metabolites markedly increased with cold acclimation, their concentrations were too low to have a significant effect on cold tolerance.

  11. Induction of proliferation of basal epidermal keratinocytes by cold atmospheric-pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, S; Duong Tran, T; Hahn, O; Kindler, S; Metelmann, H-R; von Woedtke, T; Masur, K

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few decades, new cold plasma sources have been developed that have the great advantage of operating at atmospheric pressure and at temperatures tolerable by biological material. New applications for these have emerged, especially in the field of dermatology. Recently it was demonstrated that cold atmospheric-pressure plasma positively influences healing of chronic wounds. The potential of cold plasma lies in its capacity to reduce bacterial load in the wound while at the same time stimulating skin cells and therefore promoting wound closure. In recent years, there have been great advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms triggered by cold plasma involving signalling pathways and gene regulation in cell culture. To investigate cold plasma-induced effects in ex vivo treated human skin biopsies. Human skin tissue was exposed to cold plasma for different lengths of time, and analysed by immunofluorescence with respect to DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation markers. After cold plasma treatment, the epidermal integrity and keratin expression pattern remained unchanged. As expected, the results revealed an increase in apoptotic cells after 3 and 5 min of treatment. Strikingly, an induction of proliferating basal keratinocytes was detected after cold plasma exposure for 1 and 3 min. As these are the cells that regenerate the epidermis, this could indeed be beneficial for wound closure. We investigated the effect of cold plasma on human skin by detecting molecules for growth and apoptosis, and found that both processes are dependent on treatment time. Therefore, this approach offers promising results for further applications of cold plasma in clinical dermatology. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Physiological and Molecular Mechanism of Nitric Oxide (NO Involved in Bermudagrass Response to Cold Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibiao Fan

    Full Text Available Bermudagrass is widely utilized in parks, lawns, and golf courses. However, cold is a key factor limiting resource use in bermudagrass. Therefore, it is meaningful to study the mechanism of bermudagrass response to cold. Nitric oxide (NO is a crucial signal molecule with multiple biological functions. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate whether NO play roles in bermudagrass response to cold. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP was used as NO donor, while 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramentylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-xide (PTIO plus NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME were applied as NO inhibitor. Wild bermudagrass was subjected to 4 °C in a growth chamber under different treatments (Control, SNP, PTIO + L-NAME. The results indicated lower levels of malondialdehyde (MDA content and electrolyte leakage (EL, higher value for chlorophyll content, superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD activities after SNP treatment than that of PTIO plus L-NAME treatments under cold stress. Analysis of Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence transient displayed that the OJIP transient curve was higher after treatment with SNP than that of treated with PTIO plus L-NAME under cold stress. The values of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters were higher after treatment with SNP than that of treated with PTIO plus L-NAME under cold stress. Expression of cold-responsive genes was altered under cold stress after treated with SNP or PTIO plus L-NAME. In summary, our findings indicated that, as an important strategy to protect bermudagrass against cold stress, NO could maintain the stability of cell membrane, up-regulate the antioxidant enzymes activities, recover process of photosystem II (PSII and induce the expression of cold-responsive genes.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammatory response. Monarch-1 is involved in the inhibition of the inflammatory response. Mutations in the NLRP12 ... cold autoinflammatory syndrome Orphanet: Familial cold urticaria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National ...

  14. Center for Cold Spray Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the only DoD facility capable of cold spray research and development, production, and field-repair. It features three stationary cold spray systems used for...

  15. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose contains shelf-like ... white). Soft tissue, such as the eye, is gray. The maxillary sinus of adults has a volume ...

  16. IGSCC in cold worked austenitic stainless steel in BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B.; Lindblad, B.

    1989-09-01

    The survey shows that austenitic stainless steels in a cold worked condition can exhibit IGSCC in BWR environment. It is also found that IGSCC often is initiated as a transgranular crack. Local stresses and surface defects very often acts as starting points for IGSCC. IGSCC due to cold working requires a cold working magnitude of at leas 5%. During cold working a formation of mechanical martensite can take place. The transgranular corrosion occurs in the martensitic phase due to sensitation. The crack propagates integranularly due to anodic solvation of α'-martensite. Sensitation of the martensitic phase is fasten in BCC-structures than in a FCC-structures mainly due to faster diffusion of chromium and carbon which cause precipitation of chromium carbides. Experiments show that a carbon content as low as 0.008% is enough for the formation of 68% martensite and for sensitation. Hydrogen induced cracking is regarded as a mechanism which can accelerate IGSCC. Such cracking requires a hydrostatic stress near the crack tip. Since the oxide in the crack tip is relatively impermeable to hydrogen, cracks in the oxide layer are required for such embrittlement. Hydrogen induced embrittlement of the martensitic phase, at the crack tip, can cause crack propagation. Solution heat treated unstabilized stainless steels are regarded to have a good resistance to IGSCC if they have not undergone cold working. In general, though, Mo-alloyed steels have a better resistance to IGSCC in BWR environment. Regarding the causes for IGSCC, the present literature survey shows that many mechanisms are suggested. To provide a safer ground for the estimation of crack propagation rates, SA recommends SKI to finance a project with the aim to determine the crack propagation rate on proper material. (authors) (65 refs.)

  17. The early ISM and galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon D. M.

    1990-01-01

    Current ideas about galaxy formation are reviewed, with particular attention to when and how it occurred, and what it might have looked like. It is argued that galaxy formation is more recent than originally predicted. Suggestions are presented as to how current observations of distant objects may be interpreted within the cold dark matter theory for the origin of structure.

  18. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  19. The effect of cold stress on UVB injury in mouse skin and cultured keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Toshiaki; Hanada, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Isao

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cold stress on skin damage caused by UVB irradiation was investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Ear skin of mice that had been exposed to cold stress at 0 o C for 20 min and at 5 o C for 24 h was exposed to UVB radiation. Sunburn cell production was less in mice exposed to the lower temperature. In addition, the effect of cold stress on the survival rate of UVB-irradiated rat keratinocytes was examined in a cytoxicity test, with the results showing that keratinocytes exposed to cold stress of 0 o C had a higher survival rate than control cells. To pursue a promising clue for explaining the result, we examined metallothionein (MT) production in rat keratinocytes that had been exposed to cold stress at 0 o C. Microfluorometric quantification showed a positive correlation between the time course and the intensity of immunofluorescence for MT, indicating that the molecule is inducible by exposure to cold stress in our experimental system. These results suggest that epidermal cells that have been exposed to cold stress maintain a higher resistance to UV radiation than nonexposed controls in vivo and in vitro, and that MT with radical-scavenging activity might contribute, at least in part, to photoprotection against UVB-induced oxidative damage in mammalian skin. (Author)

  20. The effect of cold stress on UVB injury in mouse skin and cultured keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Toshiaki; Hanada, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Isao [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    The effect of cold stress on skin damage caused by UVB irradiation was investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Ear skin of mice that had been exposed to cold stress at 0{sup o}C for 20 min and at 5{sup o}C for 24 h was exposed to UVB radiation. Sunburn cell production was less in mice exposed to the lower temperature. In addition, the effect of cold stress on the survival rate of UVB-irradiated rat keratinocytes was examined in a cytoxicity test, with the results showing that keratinocytes exposed to cold stress of 0{sup o}C had a higher survival rate than control cells. To pursue a promising clue for explaining the result, we examined metallothionein (MT) production in rat keratinocytes that had been exposed to cold stress at 0{sup o}C. Microfluorometric quantification showed a positive correlation between the time course and the intensity of immunofluorescence for MT, indicating that the molecule is inducible by exposure to cold stress in our experimental system. These results suggest that epidermal cells that have been exposed to cold stress maintain a higher resistance to UV radiation than nonexposed controls in vivo and in vitro, and that MT with radical-scavenging activity might contribute, at least in part, to photoprotection against UVB-induced oxidative damage in mammalian skin. (Author).

  1. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of ''burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  2. A transcription factor for cold sensation!

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Susan J; Qu, Zhican; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Zhuo, Min

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The ability to feel hot and cold is critical for animals and human beings to survive in the natural environment. Unlike other sensations, the physiology of cold sensation is mostly unknown. In the present study, we use genetically modified mice that do not express nerve growth factor-inducible B (NGFIB) to investigate the possible role of NGFIB in cold sensation. We found that genetic deletion of NGFIB selectively affected behavioral responses to cold stimuli while behavioral respons...

  3. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    an excellent alternative to atomic qubits in the realization of a practical ion trap based quantum computer due to favourable internal state decoherence rates. In chemistry, state prepared molecular targets are an ideal starting point for uni-molecular reactions, including coherent control...... of photofragmentation through the application of various laser sources [5,6]. In cold bi-molecular reactions, where the effect of even tiny potential barriers becomes significant, experiments with state prepared molecules can yield important information on the details of the potential curves of the molecular complexes...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...

  4. Radio-Frequency-Controlled Cold Collisions and Universal Properties of Unitary Bose Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yijue

    This thesis investigates two topics: ultracold atomic collisions in a radio-frequency field and universal properties of a degenerate unitary Bose gas. One interesting point of the unitary Bose gas is that the system has only one length scale, that is, the average interparticle distance. This single parameter determines all properties of the gas, which is called the universality of the system. We first introduce a renormalized contact interaction to extend the validity of the zero-range interaction to large scattering lengths. Then this renormalized interaction is applied to many-body theories to determined those universal relations of the system. From the few-body perspective, we discuss the scattering between atoms in a single-color radio-frequency field. Our motivation is proposing the radio-frequency field as an effective tool to control interactions between cold atoms. Such a technique may be useful in future experiments such as creating phase transitions in spinor condensates. We also discuss the formation of ultracold molecules using radio-freqency fields from a time-dependent approach.

  5. Complex organic molecules in strongly UV-irradiated gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Fuente, A.; Pety, J.; Tercero, B.

    2017-07-01

    minor role of pure gas-phase deuteration at very high temperatures. We find a HCO/H2CO/CH3OH ≃ 1/5/3 abundance ratio. These ratios are different from those inferred in hot cores and shocks. Taking into account the elevated gas and dust temperatures at the edge of the Bar (mostly mantle-free grains), we suggest the following scenarios for the formation of COMs: (I) hot gas-phase reactions not included in current models; (II) warm grain-surface chemistry; or (III) the PDR dynamics is such that COMs or precursors formed in cold icy grains deeper inside the molecular cloud desorb and advect into the PDR. Based on observations obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  6. Cold fusion anomalies more perplexing than ever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagani, R.

    1989-01-01

    This article addresses the debate over research on cold fusion. Analysis is made of the research efforts that have taken place since cold fusion was first thought to have been discovered in Utah. Research in the Soviet Union on the cold fusion phenomenon is also discussed

  7. Catching a Cold When It's Warm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this issue Catching a Cold When It’s Warm What’s the Deal with Summertime Sniffles? En español ... more unfair than catching a cold when it’s warm? How can cold symptoms arise when it’s not ...

  8. Pseudo one-dimensional analysis of polymer electrolyte fuel cell cold-start

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yun [NON LANL; Mishlera, Jeff [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the electrochemical kinetics, oxygen transport, and solid water formation in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) during cold start. Following [Yo Wang, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) B1041-B1048], we develop a pseudo one-dimensional analysis, which enables the evaluation of the impact of ice volume fraction and temperature variations on cell performance during cold-start. The oxygen profile, starvation ice volume fraction, and relevant overpotentials are obtained. This study is valuable for studying the characteristics of PEFC cold-start.

  9. Reactions of Ground State Nitrogen Atoms N(4S) with Astrochemically-Relevant Molecules on Interstellar Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Nourry, Sendres

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, ambitious programs were launched to probe the interstellar medium always more accurately. One of the major challenges of these missions remains the detection of prebiotic compounds and the understanding of reaction pathways leading to their formation. These complex heterogeneous reactions mainly occur on icy dust grains, and their studies require the coupling of laboratory experiments mimicking the extreme conditions of extreme cold and dilute media. For that purpose, we have developed an original experimental approach that combine the study of heterogeneous reactions (by exposing neutral molecules adsorbed on ice to non-energetic radicals H, OH, N...) and a neon matrix isolation study at very low temperatures, which is of paramount importance to isolate and characterize highly reactive reaction intermediates. Such experimental approach has already provided answers to many questions raised about some astrochemically-relevant reactions occurring in the ground state on the surface of dust grain ices in dense molecular clouds. The aim of this new present work is to show the implication of ground state atomic nitrogen on hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from some astrochemically-relevant species, at very low temperatures (3K-20K), without providing any external energy. Under cryogenic temperatures and with high barrier heights, such reactions involving N(4S) nitrogen atoms should not occur spontaneously and require an initiating energy. However, the detection of some radicals species as byproducts, in our solid samples left in the dark for hours at 10K, proves that hydrogen abstraction reactions involving ground state N(4S) nitrogen atoms may occur in solid phase at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show the efficiency of radical species formation stemming from non-energetic N-atoms and astrochemically-relevant molecules. We will then discuss how such reactions, involving nitrogen atoms in their ground states, might be the first key step

  10. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  11. Cold Stowage: An ISS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Garen

    2018-01-01

    NASA's vision for humans pursuing deep space flight involves the collection of science in low earth orbit aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As a service to the science community, Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed hardware and processes to preserve collected science on the ISS and transfer it safely back to the Principal Investigators. This hardware includes an array of freezers, refrigerators, and incubators. The Cold Stowage team is part of the International Space Station (ISS) program. JSC manages the operation, support and integration tasks provided by Jacobs Technology and the University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB). Cold Stowage provides controlled environments to meet temperature requirements during ascent, on-orbit operations and return, in relation to International Space Station Payload Science.

  12. Cosmicflows-3: Cold Spot Repeller?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, Hélène M.; Graziani, Romain; Dupuy, Alexandra [University of Lyon, UCB Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, IPN, Lyon (France); Tully, R. Brent [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Hoffman, Yehuda [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Pomarède, Daniel [Institut de Recherche sur les Lois Fondamentales de l’Univers, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-09-20

    The three-dimensional gravitational velocity field within z ∼ 0.1 has been modeled with the Wiener filter methodology applied to the Cosmicflows-3 compilation of galaxy distances. The dominant features are a basin of attraction and two basins of repulsion. The major basin of attraction is an extension of the Shapley concentration of galaxies. One basin of repulsion, the Dipole Repeller, is located near the anti-apex of the cosmic microwave background dipole. The other basin of repulsion is in the proximate direction toward the “Cold Spot” irregularity in the cosmic microwave background. It has been speculated that a vast void might contribute to the amplitude of the Cold Spot from the integrated Sachs–Wolfe effect.

  13. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  14. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  15. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  16. What are nuclear molecules?: past and present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, P.O [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    A brief history of nuclear molecules, which was discovered for the first time in 1960, is presented. A couple of simple models for their description are discussed, as the Double Resonance Mechanisms and the Two-Center Shell Model. These classical nuclear molecules live only about the order of 10{sup -2}1 seconds, barely sufficient to orbit once around each other. Recently, a new type of nuclear molecules was discovered, with three clusters, which live of the order of 10{sup -1}3 seconds. We discuss shortly the experiment and the conclusions of it. At the end, we present a geometric model and apply it to {sup 9}6Sr + {sup 1}0Be + {sup 1}46Ba observed in the cold fission decay of {sup 2}52 Cf. [Spanish] Se presenta una breve historia de moleculas nucleares, que fueron identificadas por primera vez en 1960. Unos modelos sencillos, para su descripcion, son discutidos, como el Mecanismo de Doble Resonancia y Modelo de Dos Centros. Estas moleculas clasicas solo viven un orden de 10{sup -2}1 segundos, apenas suficiente para dar una vuelta. Recientemente se han descubierto moleculas nucleares de tres cumulos que viven un orden de 10{sup -1}3 segundos. Se discute un poco el experimento y las conclusiones de el. Al final se presenta un modelo geometrico que aplicamos a {sup 9}6Sr + {sup 1}0Be + {sup 1}46Ba, observado en el decaimiento frio de {sup 2}52 Cf.

  17. The status of 'cold fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The questions raised by reports of nuclear reactions at low energies, so called 'cold fusion', are not yet answered to the satisfaction of many scientists. Further experimental investigations of these and related questions seems desirable, at least for scientific if not practical reasons. Properly conducted, such investigations would be indistinguishable from normal research. They would yield information germane to accepted areas of scientific inquiry and technological utility

  18. Chemical reactivities of some interstellar molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadha, M S

    1980-01-01

    Work in the area of chemical evolution during the last 25 years has revealed the formation of a large number of biologically important molecules produced from simple starting materials under relatively simple experimental conditions. Much of this work has resulted from studies under atmospheres simulating that of the primitive earth or other planets. During the last decade, progress has also been made in the identification of chemical constituents of interstellar medium. A number of these molecules are the same as those identified in laboratory experiments. Even though the conditions of the laboratory experiments are vastly different from those of the cool, low-density interstellar medium, some of the similarities in composition are too obvious to go unnoticed. The present paper highlights some of the similarities in the composition of prebiotic molecules and those discovered in the interstellar medium. Also the chemical reactions which some of the common molecules e.g., NH3, HCN, H2CO, HC(triple bond)-C-CN etc. can undergo are surveyed.

  19. Supersonic pulsed free-jet of atoms and molecules of refractory metals: laser induced fluorescence spectroscopic studies on zirconium atoms and zirconium oxide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhale, S.G.

    2004-11-01

    The experimental setup for generating supersonic pulsed free-jet containing atoms and molecules of refractory nature has been built. The technique of laser vaporization in conjunction with supersonic cooling is used to generate these species. The cooled atoms and molecules in supersonic free-jet are probed by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, the technique has been used to perform low-resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, limited by laser linewidth, on cold Zr atoms and ZrO molecules. The translational temperatures of ∼ 26.5 K and the rotational temperatures of ∼ 81 K have been achieved. It is possible to achieve the Doppler width of few tens of MHz allowing it to perform high-resolution spectroscopy on these atomic and molecular species. Also because of low rotational temperature of molecules the spectral congestion is greatly reduced. In general, this technique can be applied to perform spectroscopy on atoms and molecules of refractory nature. (author)

  20. Cold H I clouds near the supernova remnant W44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, F.

    1986-01-01

    The cold H I clouds near the supernova remnant W44 are investigated by the use of the Maryland-Green Bank Survey (Westerhout 1973). Several clouds with a mean diameter of about 20 pc are distributed in the region. They do not seem to make a shell around W44, contrary to the suggestion by Knapp and Kerr (1974) based on the low-resolution data at coarse grids. Some of them form a chain, about 100 pc in length, extending approximately along the galactic equator. It resembles the cold H I cloud near W3 and W4. The major constituent of the clouds is probably the hydrogen molecule, and the total mass of the entire complex amounts to 25,000 81,000 solar masses. The estimated Jeans mass indicates that they will contract to dense molecular clouds. Therefore, it may safely be concluded that the cold H1 cloud complex near W44 is a giant molecular cloud at an early evolutionary stage. 14 references

  1. Organization of central synapses by adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallafuss, Alexandra; Constable, John R L; Washbourne, Philip

    2010-07-01

    Synapses are the primary means for transmitting information from one neuron to the next. They are formed during the development of the nervous system, and the formation of appropriate synapses is crucial for the establishment of neuronal circuits that underlie behavior and cognition. Understanding how synapses form and are maintained will allow us to address developmental disorders such as autism, mental retardation and possibly also psychological disorders. A number of biochemical and proteomic studies have revealed a diverse and vast assortment of molecules that are present at the synapse. It is now important to untangle this large array of proteins and determine how it assembles into a functioning unit. Here we focus on recent reports describing how synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with and organize the presynaptic and postsynaptic specializations of both excitatory and inhibitory central synapses. © The Authors (2010). Journal Compilation © Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  3. Functionalized molecules studied by STM: motion, switching and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grill, Leonhard

    2008-01-01

    Functionalized molecules represent the central issue of molecular nanotechnology. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is a powerful method to investigate such molecules, because it allows us to image them with sub-molecular resolution when adsorbed on a surface and can be used at the same time as a tool to manipulate single molecules in a controlled way. Such studies permit deep insight into the conformational, mechanical and electronic structure and thus functionalities of the molecules. In this review, recent experiments on specially designed molecules, acting as model systems for molecular nanotechnology, are reviewed. The presented studies focus on key functionalities: lateral rolling and hopping motion on a supporting surface, the switching behaviour of azobenzene derivatives by using the STM tip and the controlled reactivity of molecular side groups, which enable the formation of covalently bound molecular nanoarchitectures. (topical review)

  4. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502

  5. The Cold man. A clinical case of the cold sensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Settineri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of correlation between available knowledge and the current approach to Somatoform Disorders is highlighted.. Methods: the study, via the analysis of an unusual clinical case of an anomalous sensation of cold, examines various hypotheses on the physiopathology of somatization. Conclusions: a conceptualization would focus attention on the level of patients’ preoccupation with their symptoms, on the anomalies of the variations of perceptions and on patients’ hyperarousal. It could lead to a more harmonious position in psychiatry, between anthropologically-based understanding and interpretation of psychophysical information.

  6. Cold Fusion Has Now Come Out of the Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Edmund

    2003-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion or LENR (Low-Energy-Nuclear-Reaction) has now achieved a level of reproducibility and understanding that warrants re-examination of the claims. A summary of what is known and want is being done worldwide to obtain more knowledge will be given. Rather than disappearing as better data are obtained, the effects are becoming more reproducible and of greater magnitude. Justification for this claim can be obtained at www.LENR-CANR.org. The phenomenon is too important to ignore any longer even though it conflicts with conventional theory.

  7. Delineation of frost characteristics on cold walls by using a new formula for psychrometrics demarcation boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed Hamza H.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a direct formula that predicts either the frost formation on cold walls is correspondence to psychrometric-subsaturated or supersaturated regions is presented. The developed formula uses the data of the entering air dry-bulb temperature and absolute humidity, and the absolute humidity of the air at saturation corresponding to the coil surface temperature. Cases studies of demarcation criteria for frost formation on evaporator coil using experimental measured data, and on walls of cold storage freezer using measured data from literature are used to validate the formula and it is found that results are completely matches to the graphic plot of the data on the psychrometric chart. In case of cold storage freezers, the result clearly shows that a greater demarcation criteria value indicates frost formation under sever condition that is characterized as snow-like with low density and thermal conductivity.

  8. The interaction of low-energy electrons with fructose molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontrosh, E. E.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2017-11-01

    Using a hypocycloidal electronic spectrometer, the interactions of low energy electrons (0-8.50 eV) with fructose molecules, namely, electron scattering and dissociative attachment, are studied. The results of these studies showed that the fragmentation of fructose molecules occurs effectively even at an electron energy close to zero. In the total electron-scattering cross section by molecules, resonance features (at energies 3.10 and 5.00 eV) were first observed near the formation thresholds of light ion fragments OH- and H-. The correlation of the features observed in the cross sections of electron scattering and dissociative attachment is analyzed.

  9. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  10. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  11. Possible Imprints of Cold-mode Accretion on the Present-day Properties of Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies suggest that a significant part of the primordial gas accretes onto forming galaxies as narrow filaments of cold gas without building a shock and experiencing heating. Using a simple model of disk galaxy evolution that combines the growth of dark matter halos predicted by cosmological simulations with a hypothetical form of cold-mode accretion, we investigate how this cold-accretion mode affects the formation process of disk galaxies. It is found that the shock-heating and cold-accretion models produce compatible results for low-mass galaxies owing to the short cooling timescale in such galaxies. However, cold accretion significantly alters the evolution of disk galaxies more massive than the Milky Way and puts observable fingerprints on their present properties. For a galaxy with a virial mass {M}{vir}=2.5× {10}12 {M}ȯ , the scale length of the stellar disk is larger by 41% in the cold-accretion model than in the shock-heating model, with the former model reproducing the steep rise in the size–mass relation observed at the high-mass end. Furthermore, the stellar component of massive galaxies becomes significantly redder (0.66 in u ‑ r at {M}{vir}=2.5× {10}12 {M}ȯ ), and the observed color–mass relation in nearby galaxies is qualitatively reproduced. These results suggest that large disk galaxies with red optical colors may be the product of cold-mode accretion. The essential role of cold accretion is to promote disk formation in the intermediate-evolution phase (0.5< z< 1.5) by providing the primordial gas having large angular momentum and to terminate late-epoch accretion, quenching star formation and making massive galaxies red.

  12. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  13. GAS PHASE SYNTHESIS OF (ISO)QUINOLINE AND ITS ROLE IN THE FORMATION OF NUCLEOBASES IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Dorian S. N.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Mebel, Alexander M.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) have been proposed to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the formation mechanisms of even their simplest prototypes—quinoline and isoquinoline—remain elusive. Here, we reveal a novel concept that under high temperature conditions representing circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars, (iso)quinoline can be synthesized via the reaction of pyridyl radicals with two acetylene molecules. The facile gas phase formation of (iso)quinoline in circumstellar envelopes defines a hitherto elusive reaction class synthesizing aromatic structures with embedded nitrogen atoms that are essential building blocks in contemporary biological-structural motifs. Once ejected from circumstellar shells and incorporated into icy interstellar grains in cold molecular clouds, these NPAHs can be functionalized by photo processing forming nucleobase-type structures as sampled in the Murchison meteorite

  14. Development of a continuous cold trap of fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Eiji; Maeda, Mitsuru; Kagami, Haruo; Miyajima, Kazutoshi

    1977-05-01

    As part of the R and D program of Fluoride Volatility Process for the reprocessing of FBR fuel, a continuous cold trap system of fluidized-bed condenser/stripper has been developed which is designed for establishing a continuous flowsheet and also for reducing radiation decomposition of PuF 6 . Feasibility of this cold trap was revealed by an experiment with UF 6 of physical properties similar to those of PuF 6 .; more than 99% trapping efficiency, less than 15 min residence time, and 0.07 critical (UF 6 /Al 2 O 3 ) ratio were obtained in stable operation. The analytical results from a condensation model, such as mist yield, agreed well with those by experiment. Parametric study of the mist formation using the model was made with UF 6 concentration, feed gas temperature and axial temperature distribution. Existence of the optimum axial temperature distribution in the condenser was shown. (auth.)

  15. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  16. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  17. Dust-forming molecules in VY Canis Majoris (and Betelgeuse)

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, T.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Schmidt, M. R.; Patel, N. A.; Young, K. H.; Menten, K. M.; Brunken, S.; Muller, H. S. P.; Winters, J. M.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of inorganic dust in circumstellar environments of evolved stars is poorly understood. Spectra of molecules thought to be most important for the nucleation, i.e. AlO, TiO, and TiO2, have been recently detected in the red supergiant VY CMa. These molecules are effectively formed in VY CMa and the observations suggest that non-equilibrium chemistry must be involved in their formation and nucleation into dust. In addition to exploring the recent observations of VY CMa, we briefly d...

  18. FY 1999 achievement report on the project on the R and D of industrial science technology. R and D of the atom/molecule limit operation technology (Development of high-functional material formation technology for electric power generation environment); 1999 nendo genshi bunshi kyokugen sosa gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden kankyoyo kokino sozai keisei gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The paper described the FY 1999 results of the study of atomic technology. Using a combined system of the scanning tunnel microscope (STM) with the field ion microscope and the atom probe (AP), a few Ag atoms were identified. Si windows were formed by electron beam irradiated from a STM tip, and Ge nanocrystal array was formed at the windows by supplying GeH4 gas. Iron clusters were deposited on Si substrates. With those as nuclei and in self-formation for etching masks, Si pillar distribution nano-crystals were etching-processed. The oxidation process of clean Si surface using ultra-high vacuum electron spin resonance was observed, and the incomplete state of the Si oxidation process was observed. Perovskite oxide superlattices composed of the two kinds were fabricated using the laser ablation method. The layer type antiferromagnetic spin arrangement is artificially modulated in the superlattices along the stacking direction. To observe the magnetic nano-structure, the development was commenced of a spin-polarized STM. The paper theoretically analyzed the dynamic process of atoms and molecules. (NEDO)

  19. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  20. Growing interstellar molecules with ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of gas-phase ion-molecule reactions continue to provide important insights into the chemistry of molecular growth in interstellar environments. It is also true that the measurements are becoming more demanding as larger molecules capture our interest. While some of these measurements are motivated by current developments in chemical models of interstellar environments or by new molecular observations by astronomers, others explore novel chemistry which can lead to predictions of new interstellar molecules. Here the author views the results of some recent measurements, taken in the Ion Chemistry Laboratory at York University with the SIFT technique, which address some of the current needs of modellers and observers and which also provide some new fundamental insight into molecular growth, particularly when it occurs in the presence of large molecules such as PAH molecules which are now thought to have a major influence on the chemistry of interstellar environments in which they are present