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Sample records for cold 85rb atoms

  1. Laser cooling of 85Rb atoms to the recoil-temperature limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the laser cooling of 85Rb atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice. We follow the two-step degenerate Raman sideband cooling scheme [Kerman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 439 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.439], where a fast cooling of atoms to an auxiliary state is followed by a slow cooling to a dark state. This method has the advantage of independent control of the heating rate and cooling rate from the optical pumping beam. We operate the lattice at a Lamb-Dicke parameter η =0.45 and show the cooling of spin-polarized 85Rb atoms to the recoil temperature in both dimensions within 2.4 ms with the aid of adiabatic cooling.

  2. Ultra-narrow EIA spectra of 85Rb atom in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-narrow EIA spectral features of thermal 85Rb atom with respect to coupling Rabi frequencies in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system have been unraveled in the cases of same (σ+ -σ+ , π ∥ π) and orthogonal (σ+ -σ- , π ⊥ π)polarization configurations. The EIA signals with subnatural linewidth of ~ 100 kHz even in the cases of same circular and linear polarizations of coupling and probe laser have been obtained for the first time theoretically and experimentally. In weak coupling power limit of orthogonal polarization configurations, time-dependent transfer of coherence plays major role in the splitting of the EIA spectra while in strong coupling power, Mollow triplet-like mechanism due to strong power bring into broad split feature. The experimental ultra-narrow EIA features using one laser combined with an AOM match well with simulated spectra obtained by using generalized time-dependent optical Bloch equations.

  3. Comparison of collimated blue-light generation in 85Rb atoms via the D1 and D2 lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Nikunj; Akulshin, Alexander M.; Novikova, Irina

    2018-05-01

    We experimentally studied the characteristics of the collimated blue light (CBL) produced in ${}^{85}$Rb vapor by two resonant laser fields exciting atoms into the $5D_{3/2}$ state, using either the $5P_{1/2}$ or the $5P_{3/2}$ intermediate state. We compared the CBL output at different values of frequency detunings, powers, and polarizations of the pump lasers in these two cases, and confirmed the observed trends using a simple theoretical model. We also demonstrated that the addition of the repump laser, preventing the accumulation of atomic population in the uncoupled hyperfine ground state, resulted in nearly an order of magnitude increase in CBL power output. Overall, we found that the $5S_{1/2} - 5P_{1/2} - 5D_{3/2}$ excitation pathway results in stronger CBL generation, as we detected up to $4.25~\\mu$W using two pumps of the same linear polarization. The optimum CBL output for the $5S_{1/2} - 5P_{3/2} - 5D_{3/2}$ excitation pathway required the two pump lasers to have the same circular polarization, but resulted only in a maximum CBL power of $450$~nW.

  4. The polarization and the fundamental sensitivity of 39K (133Cs)-85Rb-4He hybrid optical pumping spin exchange relaxation free atomic magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Hua; Jing, Dong-Yang; Wang, Liang-Liang; Li, Yang; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jian-Cheng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-07-28

    The hybrid optical pumping spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) atomic magnetometers can realize ultrahigh sensitivity measurement of magnetic field and inertia. We have studied the 85 Rb polarization of two types of hybrid optical pumping SERF magnetometers based on 39 K- 85 Rb- 4 He and 133 Cs- 85 Rb- 4 He respectively. Then we found that 85 Rb polarization varies with the number density of buffer gas 4 He and quench gas N 2 , pumping rate of pump beam and cell temperature respectively, which will provide an experimental guide for the design of the magnetometer. We obtain a general formula on the fundamental sensitivity of the hybrid optical pumping SERF magnetometer due to shot-noise. The formula describes that the fundamental sensitivity of the magnetometer varies with the number density of buffer gas and quench gas, the pumping rate of pump beam, external magnetic field, cell effective radius, measurement volume, cell temperature and measurement time. We obtain a highest fundamental sensitivity of 1.5073 aT/Hz 1/2 (1 aT = 10 -18 T) with 39 K- 85 Rb- 4 He magnetometer between above two types of magnetometers when 85 Rb polarization is 0.1116. We estimate the fundamental sensitivity limit of the hybrid optical pumping SERF magnetometer to be superior to 1.8359 × 10 -2 aT/Hz 1/2 , which is higher than the shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 1 aT/Hz 1/2 of K SERF atomic magnetometer.

  5. State-selective imaging of cold atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheludko, D.V.; Bell, S.C.; Anderson, R.; Hofmann, C.S.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Scholten, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic coherence phenomena are usually investigated using single beam techniques without spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate state-selective imaging of cold 85Rb atoms in a three-level ladder system, where the atomic refractive index is sensitive to the quantum coherence state of the atoms. We

  6. Excited-state imaging of cold atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheludko, D.V.; Bell, S.C.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Scholten, R.E.; Deshmukh, P.C.; Chakraborty, P.; Williams, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated state-selective diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) of cold 85Rb atoms in the first excited (52P3/2) state. Excited-state DCI requires knowledge of the complex refractive index of the atom cloud, which was calculated numerically using a semi-classical model. The Autler-Townes

  7. Power and polarization dependences of ultra-narrow electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) spectra of 85 Rb atoms in degenerate two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated ultra-narrow EIA spectral features with respect to variations of polarizations and powers of pump laser beam in a degenerate two-level system of the transition of 85 Rb D2 transition line. Polarizations of the probe laser beam in two separate experiments were fixed at right circular and horizontal linear polarizations, respectively while the polarizations of the pump lasers were varied from initial polarizations same as the probe laser beams to orthogonal to probe polarizations. One homemade laser combined with AOMs was used to the pump and probe laser beams instead of two different lasers to overcome broad linewidths of the homemade lasers. Theoretically, probe absorption coefficients have been calculated from optical Bloch equations of the degenerate two level system prepared by a pump laser beam. In the case of the circular polarization, EIA signal was obtained as expected theoretically although both pump and probe beams have same polarization. The EIA signal become smaller as power increases and polarizations of the pump and probe beams were same. When the polarization of the pump beam was linear polarization, maximum EIA signal was obtained theoretically and experimentally. Experimental EIA spectral shapes with respect to variations of the pump beam polarization shows similar trends as the theoretical results.

  8. A miniature magnetic waveguide for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.G.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis presents the first demonstration of a guide for cold atoms based on a miniature structure of four current-carrying wires. The four wires are embedded within a hollow silica fibre. Atoms are guided along the centre of a fifth hole on the axis of the fibre by the Stern-Gerlach force. A vapour cell Magneto Optical Trap (MOT), formed 1 cm above the mouth of the waveguide is the source of cold 85 Rb atoms. After cooling the atoms to 25 μK in optical molasses they fall under the influence of gravity through a magnetic funnel into the waveguide. After propagating for 2 cm, the atoms are reflected by the field of a small pinch coil wound around the base of the guide. The atoms then travel back up the fibre and out into the funnel, where they can be imaged either in fluorescence or by recapturing in the MOT. A video sequence of atoms falling into the guide and re-emerging after reflection from the pinch coil graphically illustrates the operation of the guide. The coupling efficiency and transverse temperature of the atoms is measured experimentally and in a Monte-Carlo simulation. We find an optimum coupling efficiency of 12% and we measure the spatial extent of the cloud within the fibre to be of order 100 μm. We find good agreement between experimental data and results from the numerical simulation. We have also been able to observe different thresholds for the reflection of different positive m F levels. In another experiment we are able to trap the atoms in an elongated Ioffe trap for up to two seconds, increasing the distance over which the atoms are guided. We are able to guide the atoms over distances of 40 cm with a loss rate indistinguishable from the free space loss rate. (author)

  9. Transformation of EIA to EIT by incoherent pumping of the 85Rb D1 line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Jung Dong; Jung, Tae Young; Kim, Jung Bog

    2012-10-01

    We have observed a transformation from electromagnetically-induced absorption (EIA) to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in open systems of the 85Rb D1 line by adding an incoherent optical pumping laser. This result raises a new question about recent theoretical work which does not address the degree of open. The pump beam only plays a role in transferring atoms by a spontaneous transition into the interacting system for EIT observation, which is an incoherent process. The dependence of the absorption spectra on the intensity and the polarization of each laser beam were observed. We have found the same tendencies in all transitions except the F = 2 ↔ F' = 3 transition of the 85Rb D1 line, which is the system that almost satisfies conventional EIA conditions.

  10. Destructive Interference in Coherent Backscattering of Light by an Ensemble of Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, D.V.; Larionov, N.V.; Sokolov, I.M.; Havey, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The coherent backscattering of light by an ensemble of cold atoms located in a magneto-optical trap is investigated theoretically. The dependence of the gain coefficient on the probe frequency is analyzed in a wide spectral range covering the entire hyperfine structure of the excited state. The calculation is performed for 85 Rb atoms. It is found that destructive interference can be observed at certain frequencies, which results in gain coefficients smaller than unity. The angular distribution of scattered light is investigated for corresponding frequencies and the dependence of the shape of the cone of destructive interference on the size of the atomic cloud and its optical thickness is analyzed

  11. Cold atoms in singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, J. P.

    1998-09-01

    We studied both theoretically and experimentally the interaction between cold Li atoms from a magnetic-optical trap (MOT) and a charged or current-carrying wire. With this system, we were able to realize 1/r 2 and 1/r potentials in two dimensions and to observe the motion of cold atoms in both potentials. For an atom in an attractive 1/r 2 potential, there exist no stable trajectories, instead there is a characteristic class of trajectories for which atoms fall into the singularity. We were able to observe this falling of atoms into the center of the potential. Moreover, by probing the singular 1/r 2 potential with atomic clouds of varying size and temperature we extracted scaling properties of the atom-wire interaction. For very cold atoms, and very thin wires the motion of the atoms must be treated quantum mechanically. Here we predict that the absorption cross section for the 1/r 2 potential should exhibit quantum steps. These quantum steps are a manifestation of the quantum mechanical decomposition of plane waves into partial waves. For the second part of this work, we realized a two dimensional 1/r potential for cold atoms. If the potential is attractive, the atoms can be bound and follow Kepler-like orbits around the wire. The motion in the third dimension along the wire is free. We were able to exploit this property and constructed a novel cold atom guide, the 'Kepler guide'. We also demonstrated another type of atom guide (the 'side guide'), by combining the magnetic field of the wire with a homogeneous offset magnetic field. In this case, the atoms are held in a potential 'tube' on the side of the wire. The versatility, simplicity, and scaling properties of this guide make it an interesting technique. (author)

  12. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  13. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  14. Optics With Cold Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hau, Lene

    2004-01-01

    .... And to test the novel atom sensor, we have built a moving-molasses magneto-optical trap in a geometry tailor-suited to the nanotube detector geometry, involving construction of a highly stable laser...

  15. Experiments with cold hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonas, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous investigations of atomic processes in Waseous phase on the surface with participation of ''cold'' hydrogen atoms, made during the last years, are considered. The term ''cold atom'' means the range of relative collision energies E<10 MeV (respectively 'ultracold ' atoms at E< or approximately 1 MeV) which corresponds to the range of temperatures in tens (units) of K degrees. Three main ranges of investigations where extensive experimental programs are realized are considered: study of collisional processes with hydrogen atom participation, hydrogen atoms being of astrophysical interest; study of elastic atom-molecular scattering at superlow energies and studies on the problem of condensed hydrogen. Hydrogen atoms production is realized at dissociation in non-electrode high-frequency or superhigh-frequency discharge. A method of hydrogen quantum generator and of its modifications appeared to be rather an effective means to study collisional changes of spin state of hydrogen atoms. First important results on storage and stabilization of the gas of polarized hydrogen atoms are received

  16. Simple and efficient absorption filter for single photons from a cold atom quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Daniel T; Lee, Patricia J; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-03-09

    The ability to filter unwanted light signals is critical to the operation of quantum memories based on neutral atom ensembles. Here we demonstrate an efficient frequency filter which uses a vapor cell filled with (85)Rb and a buffer gas to attenuate both residual laser light and noise photons by nearly two orders of magnitude with little loss to the single photons associated with our cold (87)Rb quantum memory. This simple, passive filter provides an additional 18 dB attenuation of our pump laser and erroneous spontaneous emissions for every 1 dB loss of the single photon signal. We show that the addition of a frequency filter increases the non-classical correlations and the retrieval efficiency of our quantum memory by ≈ 35%.

  17. Atom chips: mesoscopic physics with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, P.; Wildermuth, S.; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.; GAllego Garcia, D.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold neutral atoms can be controlled and manipulated in microscopic potentials near surfaces of atom chips. These integrated micro-devices combine the known techniques of atom optics with the capabilities of well established micro- and nanofabrication technology. In analogy to electronic microchips and integrated fiber optics, the concept of atom chips is suitable to explore the domain of mesoscopic physics with matter waves. We use current and charge carrying structures to form complex potentials with high spatial resolution only microns from the surface. In particular, atoms can be confined to an essentially one-dimensional motion. In this talk, we will give an overview of our experiments studying the manipulation of both thermal atoms and BECs on atom chips. First experiments in the quasi one-dimensional regime will be presented. These experiments profit from strongly reduced residual disorder potentials caused by imperfections of the chip fabrication with respect to previously published experiments. This is due to our purely lithographic fabrication technique that proves to be advantageous over electroplating. We have used one dimensionally confined BECs as an ultra-sensitive probe to characterize these potentials. These smooth potentials allow us to explore various aspects of the physics of degenerate quantum gases in low dimensions. (author)

  18. Atom Interferometry for Dark Contents of the Vacuum Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrow, O. [Liverpool U.; Carroll, A. [Liverpool U.; Chattopadhyay, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Coleman, J. [Liverpool U.; Elertas, G. [Teddington, Natl. Phys. Lab; Heffer, J. [Liverpool U.; Metelko, C. [Liverpool U.; Moore, R. [Teddington, Natl. Phys. Lab; Morris, D. [Liverpool U.; Perl, M. [SLAC; Ralph, J. [Liverpool U.; Tinsley, J. [Teddington, Natl. Phys. Lab

    2017-05-25

    A cold atom interferometer is being developed using 85Rb atoms towards a search for the dark contents of the vacuum, and as a test stand for inertial sensing applications. Here we outline the current status of the experiment and report the observation of Ramsey interference fringes in the apparatus.

  19. Taming light with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard Hau, Lene

    2002-01-01

    Much of the extraordinary progress of developments in communication (e-mail, and/or internet) has been achieved due to improvements in optical communication. This paper describes a new approach which could improve the speed of communication. The ability to stop light in its tracks by passing it through a cloud of ultracold atoms could lead to new techniques for optical storage. The described slow-light experiments have triggered new physics both on the experimental and theoretical fronts. The cold atom system allows the steepest possible refractive index profiles, and therefore the most dramatic effects, as Doppler effects are eliminated. Furthermore, cold atoms provide maximum flexibility in the choice of beam geometry. This is important for the storage and retrieval of multiple pulses of optical information in an atomic medium, as it would allow individual pulses to be selectively addressed. Slow and stopped light have many potential applications in optical communication and processing, including optical information storage, ultra-sensitive optical switches, and optical delay lines. It could also be used in quantum-information processing, in which quantum-mechanical information is used for computing and communication purposes. On a very different front, slow light provides us with a totally new way of probing the unusual properties of Bose-Einstein condensates

  20. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.; Jentsch, Ch.; Schleich, W. P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193

  1. Superfluorescence with cold trapped neon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachorowski, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    A method for observation of superfluorescence in a cloud of cold metastable Ne atoms is proposed. Means of achieving a cold sample of trapped metastable atoms are discussed. The feasibility of obtaining conditions for a superfluorescence pulse is studied. The paper also discusses the prospects for obtaining intense pulses of extreme ultraviolet radiation

  2. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  3. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction 85Rb(p,n)85Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, T.; Kiss, G. G.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Simon, A.; Fueloep, Zs.; Somorjai, E.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative Q value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant 85 Rb(p,n) 85 Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16≤E c.m. ≤3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other α- and proton-induced reactions in the p, rp, and νp processes.

  4. Photoassociation of cold metastable helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decades the study of cold atoms has grown in a great measure. Research in this field has been made possible due to the development of laser cooling and trapping techniques. We use laser cooling to cool helium atoms down to a temperature of 1 mK and we are able to

  5. New sources of cold atoms for atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucouturier, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this doctoral work is the realisation of new sources of cold cesium atoms that could be useful for the conception of a compact and high-performance atomic clock. It is based on experiences of atomic physics using light induced atomic manipulation. We present here the experiences of radiative cooling of atoms that have been realised at the Laboratoire de l'Horloge Atomique from 1993 to 1996. Firstly, we applied the techniques of radiative cooling and trapping of atoms in order to create a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap. For this first experience, we developed high quality laser sources, that were used for other experiments. We imagined a new configuration of trapping (two-dimensional magneto-optical trap) that was the basis for a cold atom source. This design gives the atoms a possibility to escape towards one particular direction. Then, we have extracted the atoms from this anisotropic trap in order to create a continuous beam of cold atoms. We have applied three methods of extraction. Firstly, the launching of atoms was performed by reducing the intensity of one of the cooling laser beams in the desired launching direction. Secondly, a frequency detuning between the two laser laser beams produced the launching of atoms by a so-called 'moving molasses'. The third method consisted in applying a static magnetic field that induced the launching of atoms in the direction of this magnetic field. At the same time, another research on cold atoms was initiated at the I.H.A. It consisted in cooling a large volume of atoms from a cell, using an isotropic light. This offers an interesting alternative to the traditional optical molasses. (author)

  6. Sympathetic cooling of nanospheres with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ground state cooling of mesoscopic mechanical structures could enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. Such systems could provide coupling between photons, spins and charges via phonons. It has recently been shown theoretically that optically trapped dielectric nanospheres could reach the ground state via sympathetic cooling with trapped cold atoms. This technique can be beneficial in cases where cryogenic operation of the oscillator is not practical. We describe experimental advances towards coupling an optically levitated dielectric nanosphere to a gas of cold Rubidium atoms. The sphere and the cold atoms are in separate vacuum chambers and are coupled using a one-dimensional optical lattice. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant Nos. PHY-1205994,PHY-1506431.

  7. Manipulating cold atoms for quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: I will describe how cold atoms can be manipulated to realize arrays of addressable qbits as prototype quantum registers, focussing on how atom chips can be used in combination with cavity qed techniques to form such an array. I will discuss how the array can be generated and steered using optical lattices and the Mott transition, and describe the sources of noise and how these place limits on the use of such chips in quantum information processing. (author)

  8. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  9. Anisotropic Interactions between Cold Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2015-0002 Anisotropic interactions between cold Rydberg atoms Luis Marcassa INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 09/28...problem with the report +551633739806 Organization / Institution name Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos Grant/Contract Title The full title of the

  10. Surface Plasmon Polaritons Probed with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra; Panas, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optical mirror for cold rubidium atoms based on a repulsive dipole potential created by means of a modified recordable digital versatile disc. Using the mirror, we have determined the absolute value of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) intensity, reaching 90 times the intensity...

  11. Cold atoms in optical cavities and lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, P.

    1996-11-01

    The thesis is organized in three chapters covering different aspects of the interaction of atoms and light in the framework of theoretical quantum optics. In chapter 1 a special case of a microscopic laser where one or two atoms interact with several quantized cavity modes is discussed. In particular I investigate the properties of the light field created in one of the cavity modes. It is shown that a single-atom model already predicts average photon numbers in agreement with a semiclassical many-atom theory. The two-atom model exhibits additional collective features, such as superradiance and subradiance. In chapter 2 effects of the photon recoil on cold atoms in the limit of long-lived atomic transitions are investigated. First, I demonstrate that, in principle, relying on this scheme, a continuous-wave laser in the ultraviolet frequency domain could be established. Second, the splitting of an atomic beam into two coherent subbeams is discussed within the same scheme. Such beamsplitters play an important role in high-precision measurements using atomic interferometers. Finally, chapter 3 deals with cooling and trapping of atoms by the interaction with laser light. I discuss the properties and the light scattering of atoms trapped in a new light field configuration, a so-called dark optical superlattice. In principle, such systems allow the trapping of more than one atom in the ground state of a single optical potential well. This could give rise to the observation of e.g. atom-atom interactions and quantum statistical effects. (author)

  12. Cold atoms in a cryogenic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, S.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of quantum information processing attracts increasingly interest, where a complex collection of quantum objects and quantum bits are employed to find the ideal building blocks for quantum information systems. Hybrid quantum systems are therefore promising objects as they countervail the particular drawbacks of single quantum objects. Based on superconducting resonator technology, microwave coplanar waveguides provide a well suited interconnection for photons and solid-state quantum bits (qubits), extensively investigated in recent years. Since a quantum memory is presently missing in those electrical accessible circuit cavity quantum devices, connecting the fast processing in a solid sate device to the exceptional long coherence times in atomic ensembles, the presented work is focused to establish the technological foundations for the hybridization of such quantum systems. The microwave photons stored in a superconducting high finesse microwave resonator are therefore an ideal connection between the atom and the solid state quantum world. In the last decade, the miniaturization and integration of quantum optics and atomic physics manipulation techniques on to a single chip was successfully established. Such atom chips are capable of detailed quantum manipulation of ultra-cold atoms and provide a versatile platform to combine the manipulation techniques from atomic physics with the capability of nano-fabrication. In recent years several experiments succeeded in realization of superconducting atom chips in cryogenic environments which opens the road for integrating super-conductive microwave resonators to magnetically couple an atomic ensemble to photons stored in the coplanar high finesse cavity. This thesis presents the concept, design and experimental setup of two approaches to establish an atomic ensemble of rubidium atoms inside a cryogenic environment, based on an Electron beam driven alkali metal atom source for loading a magneto optical trap in a

  13. Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Collier, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fine, K S; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Holzscheiter, M H; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Marchesotti, M; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rochet, J; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Watson, T L; CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical underpinning of the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions is CPT invariance, which requires that the laws of physics be invariant under the combined discrete operations of charge conjugation, parity and time reversal. Antimatter, the existence of which was predicted by Dirac, can be used to test the CPT theorem experimental investigations involving comparisons of particles with antiparticles are numerous. Cold atoms and anti-atoms, such as hydrogen and anti-hydrogen, could form the basis of a new precise test, as CPT invariance implies that they must have the same spectrum. Observations of antihydrogen in small quantities and at high energies have been reported at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and at Fermilab, but were not suited to precision comparison measurements. Here we demonstrate the production of antihydrogen atoms at very low energy by mixing trapped antiprotons and positrons in a cryogenic environment. The neutral anti-atoms have been detected...

  14. Cold atomic beams of high brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhdestvensky, Yu V

    2004-01-01

    The possibility is studied for obtaining intense cold atomic beams by using the Renyi entropy to optimise the laser cooling process. It is shown in the case of a Gaussian velocity distribution of atoms, the Renyi entropy coincides with the density of particles in the phase space. The optimisation procedure for cooling atoms by resonance optical radiation is described, which is based on the thermodynamic law of increasing the Renyi entropy in time. Our method is compared with the known methods for increasing the laser cooling efficiency such as the tuning of a laser frequency in time and a change of the atomic transition frequency in an inhomogeneous transverse field of a magnetic solenoid. (laser cooling)

  15. Ramsey spectroscopy by direct use of resonant light on isotope atoms for single-photon detuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hoon; Choi, Mi Hyun; Moon, Ye Lin; Kim, Seung Jin; Kim, Jung Bog [Korea National University of Education, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate Ramsey spectroscopy with cold {sup 87}Rb atoms via a two-photon Raman process. One laser beam has a cross-over resonant frequency on the {sup 85}Rb transition and the other beam has a 6.8 GHz shifted frequency. These two laser beams fulfill the two-photon Raman resonance condition, which involves a single-photon detuning of -2.6 GHz. By implementing these two lasers on cold {sup 87}Rb atoms, we demonstrate Ramsey spectroscopy with an interrogation time of the intermediate state by using π/2 Raman pulses. In our laser system, we can change the single-photon detuning to 1.2, 4.2 or -5.6 GHz by changing the {sup 85}Rb transition line used as a locking signal and an injected sideband. The laser system that directly uses resonant light on isotope atoms will be described in this paper.

  16. The detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhongdong

    2007-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at CERN's antiproton decelerator (AD) aims for a test of CPT violation and Lorentz invariance by a comparison of hydrogen to antihydrogen atom spectroscopy and a measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter atoms. The experiment is divided into two parts: ATRAP-I, where successfully antihydrogen atoms were produced and intensive studies on the charged clouds of positrons and antiprotons were performed, and ATRAP-II which was commissioned during the beam-time 2006. ATRAP-II includes a much larger superconducting solenoid bore allowing the installation of an extended detection system as well as an optimized combined Penning-Ioffe trap. Another essential part is a new positron accumulator and delivery system which will increase the ATRAP-II efficiency drastically. Thus ATRAP-II now allows for much larger flexibility, increased performance, higher robustness, and better efficiency for the production and storage of cold antihydrogen atoms. A general overview of the experimental setup for the second phase of the ATRAP experiment will be presented in this thesis. The antiproton annihilation detector system, consisting of several layers of scintillating fibers, counts the antihydrogen atoms and determines the annihilation vertex of the atoms. This diagnostic element will allow to optimize the production of cold antihydrogen sufficiently to permit optical observations and measurements. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations concerning the track fitting and vertex reconstruction have been developed during the planned interruption of antiproton production at AD in the year 2005. Different event generators, magnetic field distributions as well as data reconstruction algorithms on simulated data were established and the results were compared to data in 2006. To improve the detector position resolution, a constraint-fit procedure was adopted. Further possible improvements, by applying certain cuts on the data, were investigated. Real-time measurements

  17. Many-body physics using cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh

    Advances in experiments on dilute ultracold atomic gases have given us access to highly tunable quantum systems. In particular, there have been substantial improvements in achieving different kinds of interaction between atoms. As a result, utracold atomic gases oer an ideal platform to simulate many-body phenomena in condensed matter physics, and engineer other novel phenomena that are a result of the exotic interactions produced between atoms. In this dissertation, I present a series of studies that explore the physics of dilute ultracold atomic gases in different settings. In each setting, I explore a different form of the inter-particle interaction. Motivated by experiments which induce artificial spin-orbit coupling for cold fermions, I explore this system in my first project. In this project, I propose a method to perform universal quantum computation using the excitations of interacting spin-orbit coupled fermions, in which effective p-wave interactions lead to the formation of a topological superfluid. Motivated by experiments which explore the physics of exotic interactions between atoms trapped inside optical cavities, I explore this system in a second project. I calculate the phase diagram of lattice bosons trapped in an optical cavity, where the cavity modes mediates effective global range checkerboard interactions between the atoms. I compare this phase diagram with one that was recently measured experimentally. In two other projects, I explore quantum simulation of condensed matter phenomena due to spin-dependent interactions between particles. I propose a method to produce tunable spin-dependent interactions between atoms, using an optical Feshbach resonance. In one project, I use these spin-dependent interactions in an ultracold Bose-Fermi system, and propose a method to produce the Kondo model. I propose an experiment to directly observe the Kondo effect in this system. In another project, I propose using lattice bosons with a large hyperfine spin

  18. Effective field theory for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Effective Field Theory (EFT) provides a powerful framework that exploits a separation of scales in physical systems to perform systematically improvable, model-independent calculations. Particularly interesting are few-body systems with short-range interactions and large two-body scattering length. Such systems display remarkable universal features. In systems with more than two particles, a three-body force with limit cycle behavior is required for consistent renormalization already at leading order. We will review this EFT and some of its applications in the physics of cold atoms. Recent extensions of this approach to the four-body system and N-boson droplets in two spatial dimensions will also be discussed

  19. Geneva University: Exploring Flatland with cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 12 mars 2012 17h00 - Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg « Exploring Flatland with cold atoms » Prof. Jean Dalibard Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, CNRS, Physics Department of Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris In his world-famous novel "Flatland" published in 1884, the English writer Edwin Abbott imagined a social life in a two-dimensional world. With a very original use of geometrical notions, E. Abbott produced a unique satire of his own society. Long after Abbott's visionary allegory, Microscopic Physics has provided a practical path for the exploration of low-dimensional worlds. With the realization of quantum wells for example, it has been possible to produce two-dimensional gases of electrons. The prope...

  20. Generation and storage of quantum states using cold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Josse, Vincent; Cviklinski, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Cold cesium or rubidium atomic samples have a good potential both for generation and storage of nonclassical states of light. Generation of nonclassical states of light is possible through the high non-linearity of cold atomic samples excited close to a resonance line. Quadrature squeezing, polar...

  1. Dynamic of cold-atom tips in anharmonic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menold, Tobias; Federsel, Peter; Rogulj, Carola; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fortágh, József

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the dynamics of ultracold quantum gases in an anharmonic potential is essential for applications in the new field of cold-atom scanning probe microscopy. Therein, cold atomic ensembles are used as sensitive probe tips to investigate nanostructured surfaces and surface-near potentials, which typically cause anharmonic tip motion. Results: Besides a theoretical description of this anharmonic tip motion, we introduce a novel method for detecting the cold-atom tip dynamics in situ and real time. In agreement with theory, the first measurements show that particle interactions and anharmonic motion have a significant impact on the tip dynamics. Conclusion: Our findings will be crucial for the realization of high-sensitivity force spectroscopy with cold-atom tips and could possibly allow for the development of advanced spectroscopic techniques such as Q-control. PMID:28144505

  2. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  4. Light localization in cold and dense atomic ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    We report on results of theoretical analysis of possibilities of light strong (Anderson) localization in a cold atomic ensemble. We predict appearance of localization in dense atomic systems in strong magnetic field. We prove that in absence of the field the light localization is impossible. (paper)

  5. Dynamics and applications of excited cold atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), realized for the first time in 1987, one can trap and cool neutral atoms to temperatures below a mK. The invention of this device caused a revolution in atomic physics. With an MOT collision and spectroscopy experiments could be performed with unprecedented accuracy.

  6. Cold atoms near surfaces: designing potentials by sculpturing wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Pietra, Leonardo; Aigner, Simon; Hagen, Christoph vom; Lezec, Henri J; Schmiedmayer, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic trapping potentials for atoms on atom chips are determined by the current flow pattern in the chip wires. By modifying the wire shape using focused ion beam nano-machining we can design specialized current flow patterns and therefore micro-design the magnetic trapping potentials. We give designs for a barrier, a quantum dot, and a double well or double barrier and show preliminary experiments with ultra cold atoms in these designed potentials

  7. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  8. Matterwave interferometric velocimetry of cold Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Max; Belal, Mohammad; Himsworth, Matthew; Bateman, James; Freegarde, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We consider the matterwave interferometric measurement of atomic velocities, which forms a building block for all matterwave inertial measurements. A theoretical analysis, addressing both the laboratory and atomic frames and accounting for residual Doppler sensitivity in the beamsplitter and recombiner pulses, is followed by an experimental demonstration, with measurements of the velocity distribution within a 20 ?K cloud of rubidium atoms. Our experiments use Raman transitions between the long-lived ground hyperfine states, and allow quadrature measurements that yield the full complex interferometer signal and hence discriminate between positive and negative velocities. The technique is most suitable for measurement of colder samples.

  9. Measurement of Local Gravity via a Cold Atom Interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Lin; Xiong Zong-Yuan; Yang Wei; Tang Biao; Peng Wen-Cui; Wang Yi-Bo; Xu Peng; Wang Jin; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a precision measurement of local gravity acceleration g in Wuhan by a compact cold atom interferometer. The atom interferometer is in vertical Mach—Zehnder configuration realized using a π/2 - π - π/2 Raman pulse sequence. Cold atoms were prepared in a magneto-optical trap, launched upward to form an atom fountain, and then coherently manipulated to interfere by stimulated Raman transition. Population signal vs Raman laser phase was recorded as interference fringes, and the local gravity was deduced from the interference signal. We have obtained a resolution of 7 × 10 −9 g after an integration time of 236s under the best vibrational environment conditions. The absolute g value was derived from the chirp rate with a difference of 1.5 × 10 −7 g compared to the gravity reference value. The tidal phenomenon was observed by continuously monitoring the local gravity over 123 h. (atomic and molecular physics)

  10. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-07-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  11. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  12. A high resolution ion microscope for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, Markus; Schefzyk, Hannah; Fortágh, József; Günther, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We report on an ion-optical system that serves as a microscope for ultracold ground state and Rydberg atoms. The system is designed to achieve a magnification of up to 1000 and a spatial resolution in the 100 nm range, thereby surpassing many standard imaging techniques for cold atoms. The microscope consists of four electrostatic lenses and a microchannel plate in conjunction with a delay line detector in order to achieve single particle sensitivity with high temporal and spatial resolution. We describe the design process of the microscope including ion-optical simulations of the imaging system and characterize aberrations and the resolution limit. Furthermore, we present the experimental realization of the microscope in a cold atom setup and investigate its performance by patterned ionization with a structure size down to 2.7 μ m. The microscope meets the requirements for studying various many-body effects, ranging from correlations in cold quantum gases up to Rydberg molecule formation. (paper)

  13. Neutron Activation Resonance Integrals of 64Zn, 68Zn, 85Rb, 100Mo, 102Ru, 113In, 123Sb, and 180Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, M. D.; Turjanski, R.; Ricabarra, G. H.

    1969-01-01

    The ratio of resonance integral to thermal activation cross sections of the isotopes 64 Zn, 68 Zn, 85 Rb, 100 Mo, 102 Ru, 113 In, 123 Sb, and 180 Hf relative to gold has been determined by measuring cadmium ratios. The standard gold or a secondary standard was mixed uniformly in the samples and the activities resolved with a lithium-drift germanium γ-ray spectrometer. Expressed as Westcott S 0 values the results were: 64 Zn = 2.06 ± 0.03, 68 Zn = 3.72 ± 0.14, 85 Rb = 18.4 ± 0.6, 100 Mo = 21.7 ± 0.8, 102 Ru = 3.76 ± 0.03, 113 In = 24.7 ± 0.5, 123 Sb = 28.3 ± 2.1, 180 Hf = 2.17 ± 0.09. All measurements are relative to S 0 = 17.7 for gold. (author)

  14. Storage ring to investigate cold unidimensional atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Caires, A. R. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Dulieu, O.; Weiner, J.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we employ a circulating ring of trapped atoms, that we have named the atomotron, to study cold collisions. The atomotron is obtained from a conventional magneto-optical trap when the two pairs of normally retroreflecting Gaussian laser beams in the x-y plane are slightly offset. Circulating stable atomic orbits then form a racetrack geometry in this plane. The circulating atom flux behaves similarly to an atomic beam with an average tangential velocity much greater than the transverse components, and is therefore suitable for one-dimensional atomic collision studies. Using the atomotron, we have investigated the polarization dependence of ultracold photoassociation collisions between Rb atoms circulating in the racetrack. The ability to investigate collisions in ultracold circulating atomic rings reveals alignment and orientation properties that are averaged away in ordinary three-dimensional magneto-optical trap collision processes

  15. Cold atomic gas in the inner Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garwood, R.W.; Dickey, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new set of 21 cm H I absorption spectra were obtained toward 21 compact continuum sources in the Galactic plane is presented. The 21 cm line velocity-averaged absorption coefficient as a function of Galactocentric distance is calculated. The result for distances within 2 kpc of the sun agrees with the local value found from absorption toward pulsars of 5-7 km/s/kpc. Overall, the absorption coefficient decreases to about half of its local value inside a Galactocentric radius of about 4 kpc. This decrease is shown to be primarily due to an increase in the mean line-of-sight distance between absorbing atomic clouds. Thus, the cool phase of the atomic gas is less abundant in the inner Galaxy than at the solar circle. The absorption spectra are similar in appearance to existing (C-12)O spectra. The spectral regions which show H I absorption also show CO emission. 43 references

  16. Thermoelectric transport and Peltier cooling of cold atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Charles; Kollath, Corinna; Georges, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    This brief review presents the emerging field of mesoscopic physics with cold atoms, with an emphasis on thermal and 'thermoelectric' transport, i.e. coupled transport of particles and entropy. We review in particular the comparison between theoretically predicted and experimentally observed thermoelectric effects in such systems. We also show how combining well-designed transport properties and evaporative cooling leads to an equivalent of the Peltier effect with cold atoms, which can be used as a new cooling procedure with improved cooling power and efficiency compared to the evaporative cooling currently used in atomic gases. This could lead to a new generation of experiments probing strong correlation effects of ultracold fermionic atoms at low temperatures.

  17. Comparing and contrasting nuclei and cold atomic gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Jensen, Aksel Stenholm

    2013-01-01

    The experimental revolution in ultracold atomic gas physics over the past decades has brought tremendous amounts of new insight to the world of degenerate quantum systems. Here we compare and contrast the developments of cold atomic gases with the physics of nuclei since many concepts, techniques......, and nomenclatures are common to both fields. However, nuclei are finite systems with interactions that are typically much more complicated than those of ultracold atomic gases. The similarities and differences must therefore be carefully addressed for a meaningful comparison and to facilitate fruitful......, interactions, and relevant length and energy scales of cold atoms and nuclei. Next we address some attempts in nuclear physics to transfer the concepts of condensates in nuclei that can in principle be built from bosonic alpha-particle constituents. We also consider Efimov physics, a prime example of nuclear...

  18. Synthetic Unruh effect in cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Tarruell, Leticia; Lewenstein, Maciej; Celi, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    We propose to simulate a Dirac field near an event horizon using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Such a quantum simulator allows for the observation of the celebrated Unruh effect. Our proposal involves three stages: (1) preparation of the ground state of a massless two-dimensional Dirac field in Minkowski space-time; (2) quench of the optical lattice setup to simulate how an accelerated observer would view that state; (3) measurement of the local quantum fluctuation spectra by one-particle excitation spectroscopy in order to simulate a De Witt detector. According to Unruh's prediction, fluctuations measured in such a way must be thermal. Moreover, following Takagi's inversion theorem, they will obey the Bose-Einstein distribution, which will smoothly transform into the Fermi-Dirac as one of the dimensions of the lattice is reduced.

  19. Physical replicas and the Bose glass in cold atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S; Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Zoller, P; Katzgraber, H G; Lewenstein, M; Buechler, H P

    2008-01-01

    We study cold atomic gases in a disorder potential and analyse the correlations between different systems subjected to the same disorder landscape. Such independent copies with the same disorder landscape are known as replicas. While, in general, these are not accessible experimentally in condensed matter systems, they can be realized using standard tools for controlling cold atomic gases in an optical lattice. Of special interest is the overlap function which represents a natural order parameter for disordered systems and is a correlation function between the atoms of two independent replicas with the same disorder. We demonstrate an efficient measurement scheme for the determination of this disorder-induced correlation function. As an application, we focus on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model and determine the overlap function within the perturbation theory and a numerical analysis. We find that the measurement of the overlap function allows for the identification of the Bose-glass phase in certain parameter regimes

  20. Optical coupling of cold atoms to a levitated nanosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Fausett, Jacob; Lim, Jason; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Cooling mechanical oscillators to their quantum ground state enables the study of quantum phenomena at macroscopic levels. In many cases, the temperature required to cool a mechanical mode to the ground state is below what current cryogenic systems can achieve. As an alternative to cooling via cryogenic systems, it has been shown theoretically that optically trapped nanospheres could reach the ground state by sympathetically cooling the spheres via cold atoms. Such cooled spheres can be used in quantum limited sensing and matter-wave interferometry, and could also enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. In our setup, optical fields are used to couple a sample of cold Rubidium atoms to a nanosphere. The sphere is optically levitated in a separate vacuum chamber, while the atoms are trapped in a 1-D optical lattice and cooled using optical molasses. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant No. PHY-1506431.

  1. Physical replicas and the Bose glass in cold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, S; Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Zoller, P [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Katzgraber, H G [Theoretische Physik, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lewenstein, M [ICAO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Buechler, H P [Institute for Theoretical Physics III, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: sarah.morrison@uibk.ac.at

    2008-07-15

    We study cold atomic gases in a disorder potential and analyse the correlations between different systems subjected to the same disorder landscape. Such independent copies with the same disorder landscape are known as replicas. While, in general, these are not accessible experimentally in condensed matter systems, they can be realized using standard tools for controlling cold atomic gases in an optical lattice. Of special interest is the overlap function which represents a natural order parameter for disordered systems and is a correlation function between the atoms of two independent replicas with the same disorder. We demonstrate an efficient measurement scheme for the determination of this disorder-induced correlation function. As an application, we focus on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model and determine the overlap function within the perturbation theory and a numerical analysis. We find that the measurement of the overlap function allows for the identification of the Bose-glass phase in certain parameter regimes.

  2. STE-QUEST—test of the universality of free fall using cold atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, D N; Braxmaier, C; Ahlers, H; Ertmer, W; Gaaloul, N; Hartwig, J; Battelier, B; Bertoldi, A; Bouyer, P; Bawamia, A; Bondarescu, R; Bongs, K; Cacciapuoti, L; Gehler, M; Chaloner, C; Chwalla, M; Gerardi, D; Franz, M; Gesa, L; Gürlebeck, N

    2014-01-01

    The theory of general relativity describes macroscopic phenomena driven by the influence of gravity while quantum mechanics brilliantly accounts for microscopic effects. Despite their tremendous individual success, a complete unification of fundamental interactions is missing and remains one of the most challenging and important quests in modern theoretical physics. The spacetime explorer and quantum equivalence principle space test satellite mission, proposed as a medium-size mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency (ESA), aims for testing general relativity with high precision in two experiments by performing a measurement of the gravitational redshift of the Sun and the Moon by comparing terrestrial clocks, and by performing a test of the universality of free fall of matter waves in the gravitational field of Earth comparing the trajectory of two Bose–Einstein condensates of 85 Rb and 87 Rb. The two ultracold atom clouds are monitored very precisely thanks to techniques of atom interferometry. This allows to reach down to an uncertainty in the Eötvös parameter of at least 2 × 10 −15 . In this paper, we report about the results of the phase A mission study of the atom interferometer instrument covering the description of the main payload elements, the atomic source concept, and the systematic error sources. (paper)

  3. Formation of cold molecules through the photo-association of cold atoms of Cesium. Existence of long range forces between between cold excited atoms of Cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparat, D.

    1999-09-01

    This thesis deals with the experimental study and the theoretical interpretation of the processes involved in photo-association and the formation of cold caesium molecules. It also presents a study of the dipolar forces between a pair of cold excited caesium atoms. We present here the first photo-association experiment on cold caesium atoms: two cold atoms absorb a photon to form an excited electronically excited molecules in a rotation-vibration level. The first production of cold molecules which was realised experimentally, after the spontaneous deexcitation of the photo-associated molecules, is described, stressing the role of the potential well of the molecular states O g - (6s+6p 3/2 ) or 1 u (6s+6p 3/2 ) of caesium. The detection of the formed caesium molecules is based on a two-photons resonant ionisation that creates Cs 2 + ions, afterwards selectively detected. Temperatures around 20-200 μK have been measured. The photo-associative spectroscopy is described on the theoretical point of view: a detailed theoretical study allows to calculate precisely the asymptotic parts of the potential curves. On the experimental point of view, we present the spectroscopy of the extern potential well of the caesium state O g - (6s+6p 3/2 ) and the construction of an effective potential curve of the RKR type. A unified theory of photo-association in weak field, considered as a collision assisted by laser, is developed. The cold atoms experiments allow to study and control the collision between two atoms whose mutual interaction is of the dipole-dipole type. Two different physical systems are studied: a sample of Rydberg atoms, and the photo-association process which is a laser-assisted collision. A modification of the motion of one pair of atoms makes it possible to control the bipolar forces and to choose the atoms relative speeds. (author)

  4. Feshbach resonances in cold collisions of potassium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambini, A.; Geltman, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic steps that allow the calculation of the scattering length in the collision of two alkali-metal atoms in a well defined magnetic polarization state, and in the presence of a static magnetic field. Calculations are actually done for the low-field seeking state F=1, μ F =-1 of bosonic potassium atoms. The electrostatic potentials obtained through Rydberg-Klein-Rees data are connected to a dispersive, long range tail in which the dominant dipole-dipole C 6 term may take different values within a specified range. We show the occurrence of Feshbach resonances in the ultra cold collision of two identical atoms, belonging either to the bosonic species 39 K or 41 K. Our results demonstrate that there is a range of C 6 values for which the collision of two 39 K atoms displays a single resonance, while for other values of C 6 no resonance occurs. On the other hand, Feshbach resonances are present in the collision of two 41 K atoms for almost all values of the dispersion coefficient C 6 in that range. We also show the origin of the different types of Feshbach resonances that occur in the cold collision of two 41 K atoms. The detection of such resonances can help establish the actual value of the dispersive coefficient

  5. Sub-Doppler temperature measurements of laser-cooled atoms using optical nanofibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, Laura; Daly, Mark J; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Deasy, Kieran; Morrissey, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the average temperature of a cloud of cold 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap using an optical nanofibre. A periodic spatial variation is applied to the magnetic fields generated by the trapping coils and this causes the trap centre to oscillate, which, in turn, causes the cloud of cold atoms to oscillate. The optical nanofibre is used to collect the fluorescence emitted by the cold atoms, and the frequency response between the motion of the centre of the oscillating trap and the cloud of atoms is determined. This allows us to make measurements of cloud temperature both above and below the Doppler limit, thereby paving the way for nanofibres to be integrated with ultracold atoms for hybrid quantum devices

  6. Fundamental symmetries studies with cold trapped francium atoms at ISAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L. A.; Perez Galvan, A.; Sheng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Sprouse, G. D.; Behr, J. A.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Aubin, S.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-01-01

    Francium combines a heavy nucleus (Z = 87) with the simple atomic structure of alkalis and is a very promising candidate for precision tests of fundamental symmetries such as atomic parity non-conservation measurements. Fr has no stable isotopes, and the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF, equipped with an actinide target, promises to provide record quantities of Fr atoms, up to 10 10 /s for some isotopes. We discuss our plans for a Fr on-line laser trapping facility at ISAC and experiments with samples of cold Fr atoms. We outline our plans for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment - a parity non-conserving, time-reversal conserving moment that arises from weak interactions between nucleons - in a chain of Fr isotopes. Its measurement is a unique probe for neutral weak interactions inside the nucleus.

  7. Cold pressor test on atomic bomb survivors, Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tomoyoshi; Sweedler, D R; Okamoto, Akira

    1964-03-12

    Cold pressor test was performed on a sample of 1156 atomic bomb survivors and other persons (ages ranging between 15 to 81 years) residing in Nagasaki City. Response values differed according to such factors as age, sex, blood pressure and month of examination. The response in systolic pressure increased with age but no evidence was found to support an acceleration of aging by irradiation. The response in diastolic blood pressure showed no change with age, but differed between Comparison Groups during the summer months. However, this was apparently due to some other cause than exposure to the atomic bomb. 25 references, 8 tables.

  8. Bichromatic electromagnetically induced transparency in cold rubidium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Jiang, K.J.; Zhan, M.S.; Zhu Yifu

    2003-01-01

    In a three-level atomic system coupled by two equal-amplitude laser fields with a frequency separation 2δ, a weak probe field exhibits a multiple-peaked absorption spectrum with a constant peak separation δ. The corresponding probe dispersion exhibits steep normal dispersion near the minimum absorption between the multiple absorption peaks, which leads to simultaneous slow group velocities for probe photons at multiple frequencies separated by δ. We report an experimental study in such a bichromatically coupled three-level Λ system in cold 87 Rb atoms. The multiple-peaked probe absorption spectra under various experimental conditions have been observed and compared with the theoretical calculations

  9. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Many Particle Cold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    simulate their dynamics far from equilibrium . It is likely that these ideas will find many applications in many areas of physics, quantum chemistry and...focus of this proposal was theoretical research on various non- equilibrium phenomena in isolated quantum systems and applications to experimental setups...theoretical research on various non- equilibrium phenomena in isolated quantum systems and applications to experimental setups largely to cold atoms

  10. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches

    OpenAIRE

    Micklitz, T.; Müller, C. A.; Altland, A.

    2013-01-01

    Signatures of strong Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Anderson localization leads to a formation of a coherence peak in the \\emph{forward} scattering direction (as opposed to the common weak localization backscattering peak). We present a microscopic, and fully time...

  11. Cold atoms near superconductors: atomic spin coherence beyond the Johnson noise limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasch, B; Hattermann, H; Cano, D; Judd, T E; Zimmermann, C; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D; Fortagh, J; Scheel, S

    2010-01-01

    We report on the measurement of atomic spin coherence near the surface of a superconducting niobium wire. As compared to normal conducting metal surfaces, the atomic spin coherence is maintained for time periods beyond the Johnson noise limit. The result provides experimental evidence that magnetic near-field noise near the superconductor is strongly suppressed. Such long atomic spin coherence times near superconductors open the way towards the development of coherently coupled cold atom/solid state hybrid quantum systems with potential applications in quantum information processing and precision force sensing.

  12. Reconstruction of a cold atom cloud by magnetic focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, C.V.

    1999-12-01

    Over the passed 15 years advances in laser cooling techniques have made it routinely possible to prepare cold clouds of atoms exhibiting temperatures of the order of several micro-Kelvin or less. Such low temperatures correspond to average atomic velocities of a few centimetres per second. Therefore, according to the de Broglie relationship p = h/λ, the atoms increasingly exhibit wave-like behaviour and can no longer be treated solely as particles. These advances in atom manipulation have renewed interest in the field of atom optics. One of the concerns of atom optics is the manipulation of atoms with optical elements analogous to those used in photon optics. The most basic of such elements is the mirror. This thesis presents a curved mirror for paramagnetic atoms fabricated from commercial video tape. It is the smoothest magnetic mirror to date and is the third generation of mirrors fabricated by our group using magnetic recording media. Previous designs used audio tape and 5 1/4 inch floppy disk. Using fluorescence imaging we have directly imaged atoms bouncing above the mirror and, owing to its smoothness, have observed the first ever reconstruction of a cold atom cloud above a curved reflector. The atoms were collected in a magneto optical trap (MOT), cooled to a temperature of 18 μK and then dropped onto the mirror. When released from a height of 13.5 mm we observed the collimation and refocusing of the cloud on consecutive bounces. Furthermore, we observed up to 14 bounces of the cloud, which corresponds to a time of ∼1.5 s. One of the factors that limited the number of observable bounces was the presence of some finite roughness in the reflecting surface. Using images of the focused cloud at the peak of even bounces we were able to measure this roughness and found it to be 5.9 mrads. By analysing magnetic force microscope (MFM) scans of the fields above the mirror we attributed this residual roughness to the spatial inhomogeneity of magnetic particles in

  13. Theory of a Quantum Scanning Microscope for Cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Laflamme, C; Vasilyev, D V; Baranov, M A; Zoller, P

    2018-03-30

    We propose and analyze a scanning microscope to monitor "live" the quantum dynamics of cold atoms in a cavity QED setup. The microscope measures the atomic density with subwavelength resolution via dispersive couplings to a cavity and homodyne detection within the framework of continuous measurement theory. We analyze two modes of operation. First, for a fixed focal point the microscope records the wave packet dynamics of atoms with time resolution set by the cavity lifetime. Second, a spatial scan of the microscope acts to map out the spatial density of stationary quantum states. Remarkably, in the latter case, for a good cavity limit, the microscope becomes an effective quantum nondemolition device, such that the spatial distribution of motional eigenstates can be measured backaction free in single scans, as an emergent quantum nondemolition measurement.

  14. Cold experiment of slag centrifugal granulation by rotary atomizer: Effect of atomizer configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jun-Jun; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Li, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Centrifugal granulation has recently been employed to produce small blast furnace slag particles, so as to recover the waste heat from the high-temperature molten blast furnace slag. An appropriate atomizer enables centrifugal granulation to become a better cost-effective process for particle production. Thus, increasing emphasis has been placed on influence of atomizer configuration on granulation. In present study, three groups of atomizers were specially designed and the granulation performance of each atomizer was experimentally tested during cold experiments. The influences of atomizer configuration on granulation modes and droplet characteristics were investigated visually. Two modified correlations were proposed to predict the granulating droplet size by means of data fitting. The results indicated that the rotary cup atomizers can inhibit the film formation in contrast to rotary disc atomizer. Moreover, atomizers with outer angle of 90° was capable of producing smaller droplets. The revised correlation as well as the newly-developed correlation including the influence of atomizer configurations, presented in good agreement with the experiment data. In addition, an analysis on atomizer design was conducted to provide a good insight for industrialization. It was recommended to adopt cup-like atomizer in granulation for its ability to produce fine particles with smaller atomizer size.

  15. Hybrid Systems: Cold Atoms Coupled to Micro Mechanical Oscillators =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya Monge, Cris A.

    Micro mechanical oscillators can serve as probes in precision measurements, as transducers to mediate photon-phonon interactions, and when functionalized with magnetic material, as tools to manipulate spins in quantum systems. This dissertation includes two projects where the interactions between cold atoms and mechanical oscillators are studied. In one of the experiments, we have manipulated the Zeeman state of magnetically trapped Rubidium atoms with a magnetic micro cantilever. The results show a spatially localized effect produced by the cantilever that agrees with Landau-Zener theory. In the future, such a scalable system with highly localized interactions and the potential for single-spin sensitivity could be useful for applications in quantum information science or quantum simulation. In a second experiment, work is in progress to couple a sample of optically trapped Rubidium atoms to a levitated nanosphere via an optical lattice. This coupling enables the cooling of the center-of-mass motion of the nanosphere by laser cooling the atoms. In this system, the atoms are trapped in the optical lattice while the sphere is levitated in a separate vacuum chamber by a single-beam optical tweezer. Theoretical analysis of such a system has determined that cooling the center-of-mass motion of the sphere to its quantum ground state is possible, even when starting at room temperature, due to the excellent environmental decoupling achievable in this setup. Nanospheres cooled to the quantum regime can provide new tests of quantum behavior at mesoscopic scales and have novel applications in precision sensing.

  16. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

    2014-03-21

    Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

  17. Cold atoms as a coolant for levitated optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Montoya, Cris; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Optically trapped dielectric objects are well suited for reaching the quantum regime of their center-of-mass motion in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment. We show that ground-state cooling of an optically trapped nanosphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold-atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle. Unlike cavity cooling in the resolved-sideband limit, this system requires only a modest cavity finesse and it allows the cooling to be turned off, permitting subsequent observation of strongly coupled dynamics between the atoms and sphere. Nanospheres cooled to their quantum ground state could have applications in quantum information science or in precision sensing.

  18. Photoionization and cold collision studies using trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have used laser cooling and trapping techniques to investigate photoionization and cold collisions. With laser-trapped Rb, they have measured the photoionization cross section from the first excited (5P) level by observing the photoionization-induced loss rate of neutral atoms from the trap. This technique has the advantage that it directly measures the photoionization rate per atom. Knowing the ionizing laser intensity and the excited-state fraction, the measured loss rate gives the absolute cross section. Using this technique, the Rb 5P photoionization cross section at ∼400 nm has been determined with an uncertainty of 9%. The authors are currently attempting to extend this method to the 5D level. Using time-ordered pulses of diode-laser light (similar to the STIRAP technique), they have performed very efficient two-photon excitation of trapped Rb atoms to 5D. Finally, they will present results from a recent collaboration which combines measurements form conventional molecular spectroscopy (single photon and double resonance) with photoassociation collisions of ultracold Na atoms to yield a precise (≤1 ppm) value for the dissociation energy of the X Σ g+ ground state of the Na 2 molecule

  19. Cold-atom gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debs, J. E.; Altin, P. A.; Barter, T. H.; Doering, D.; Dennis, G. R.; McDonald, G.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.; Anderson, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a cold-atom gravimeter operating with a sample of Bose-condensed 87 Rb atoms. Using a Mach-Zehnder configuration with the two arms separated by a two-photon Bragg transition, we observe interference fringes with a visibility of (83±6)% at T=3 ms. We exploit large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitting to increase the enclosed space-time area of the interferometer using higher-order Bragg transitions and Bloch oscillations. We also compare fringes from condensed and thermal sources and observe a reduced visibility of (58±4)% for the thermal source. We suspect the loss in visibility is caused partly by wave-front aberrations, to which the thermal source is more susceptible due to its larger transverse momentum spread. Finally, we discuss briefly the potential advantages of using a coherent atomic source for LMT, and we present a simple mean-field model to demonstrate that with currently available experimental parameters, interaction-induced dephasing will not limit the sensitivity of inertial measurements using freely falling, coherent atomic sources.

  20. Complete neutronic nuclear data evaluation for 85Rb and 87Rb from 10-5 eV to 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Gerard; Prince, Augustus; Lalie, Evelyne.

    1981-04-01

    The total, elastic, inelastic, capture, (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n, 3 He), (n,α), (n,2n), (n,n'p), (n,n'α) cross-sections have been evaluated for 85 Rb and 87 Rb in the 10 -5 eV - 20 MeV energy range. This evaluation is based on available experimental data and theoretical calculations carried out in the framework of spherical optical model and statistical model. Angular distributions for elastic and discret inelastic scattering, and energy distributions for continuum inelastic scattering and for (n,2n) reaction have also been calculated. This evaluation, set under ENDF/BIV format, completes and plainly improves the corresponding evaluation given in the ENDF/BIV files [fr

  1. Arbitrarily shaped high-coherence electron bunches from cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, A. J.; Sheludko, D. V.; Saliba, S. D.; Bell, S. C.; Junker, M.; Nugent, K. A.; Scholten, R. E.

    2011-10-01

    Ultrafast electron diffractive imaging of nanoscale objects such as biological molecules and defects in solid-state devices provides crucial information on structure and dynamic processes: for example, determination of the form and function of membrane proteins, vital for many key goals in modern biological science, including rational drug design. High brightness and high coherence are required to achieve the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, but have been limited by the thermal nature of conventional electron sources and by divergence due to repulsive interactions between the electrons, known as the Coulomb explosion. It has been shown that, if the electrons are shaped into ellipsoidal bunches with uniform density, the Coulomb explosion can be reversed using conventional optics, to deliver the maximum possible brightness at the target. Here we demonstrate arbitrary and real-time control of the shape of cold electron bunches extracted from laser-cooled atoms. The ability to dynamically shape the electron source itself and to observe this shape in the propagated electron bunch provides a remarkable experimental demonstration of the intrinsically high spatial coherence of a cold-atom electron source, and the potential for alleviation of electron-source brightness limitations due to Coulomb explosion.

  2. Improvement on Temperature Measurement of Cold Atoms in a Rubidium Fountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü De-Sheng; Qu Qiu-Zhi; Wang Bin; Zhao Jian-Bo; Liu Liang; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) method is one of the most common ways to measure the temperature of cold atoms. In the cold atomic fountain setup, the geometry of the probe beam will introduce the measurement errors to the spatial distribution of cold atomic cloud, which will lead to the measurement errors on atomic temperature. Using deconvolution, we recover the atomic cloud profile from the TOF signal. Then, we use the recovered signals other than the TOF signals to obtain a more accurate atomic temperature. This will be important in estimating the effects of cold atom collision shift and the shift due to transverse cavity phase distribution on an atomic fountain clock. (atomic and molecular physics)

  3. STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-02

    STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials We worked on a tapered fiber in cold atomic cloud...reviewed journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber...other than abstracts): Number of Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Books Number of Manuscripts: 0.00Number of

  4. Evaporative cooling of cold atoms in a surface trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammes, M.; Rychtarik, D.; Grimm, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Trapping cold atom close to a surface is a promising route for attaining a two-dimensional quantum gas. We present our gravito-optical surface trap (LOST), which consists of a horizontal evanescent-wave atom mirror in combination with a blue-detuned hollow beam for transverse confinement. Optical pre-cooling based on inelastic reflections from the evanescent wave provides good starting conditions for subsequent evaporative cooling, which can be realized by ramping down the optical potentials of the trap. Already our preliminary experiments (performed at the MPI fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg) show a 100-fold increase in phase-space density and temperature reduction to 300 nK. Substantial further improvements can be expected in our greatly improved set-up after the recent transfer of the experiment to Innsbruck. By eliminating heating processes, optimizing the evaporation ramp, polarizing the atoms and by using an additional far red-detuned laser beam we expect to soon reach the conditions of quantum degeneracy and/or two-dimensionality. (author)

  5. Clean Floquet Time Crystals: Models and Realizations in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biao; Wu, Ying-Hai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Time crystals, a phase showing spontaneous breaking of time-translation symmetry, has been an intriguing subject for systems far away from equilibrium. Recent experiments found such a phase in both the presence and the absence of localization, while in theories localization by disorder is usually assumed a priori. In this work, we point out that time crystals can generally exist in systems without disorder. A series of clean quasi-one-dimensional models under Floquet driving are proposed to demonstrate this unexpected result in principle. Robust time crystalline orders are found in the strongly interacting regime along with the emergent integrals of motion in the dynamical system, which can be characterized by level statistics and the out-of-time-ordered correlators. We propose two cold atom experimental schemes to realize the clean Floquet time crystals, one by making use of dipolar gases and another by synthetic dimensions.

  6. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, Peter L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  7. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  8. Manipulating beams of ultra-cold atoms with a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, W.J.; Lau, D.C.; Opat, G.I.; Sidorov, A.I.; McLean, R.J.; Hannaford, P.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results on the deflection of a beam of ultra-cold atoms by a static magnetic field are presented. Caesium atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are cooled using optical molasses, and then fall freely under gravity to form a beam of ultra-cold atoms. The atoms pass through a static inhomogeneous magnetic field produced by a single current-carrying wire, and are deflected by a force dependent on the magnetic substate of the atom. A schematical diagram of the experimental layout for laser trapping and cooling of cesium atom is given. The population of atoms in various magnetic substates can be altered by using resonant laser radiation to optically pump the atoms. The single-wire deflection experiment described can be considered as atomic reflexion from a cylindrical magnetic mirror; the underlying principles and techniques being relevant to the production of atomic mirrors and diffraction gratings. 16 refs., 10 figs

  9. Dynamics of bad-cavity-enhanced interaction with cold Sr atoms for laser stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäffer, S. A.; Christensen, B. T.R.; Henriksen, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid systems of cold atoms and optical cavities are promising systems for increasing the stability of laser oscillators used in quantum metrology and atomic clocks. In this paper we map out the atom-cavity dynamics in such a system and demonstrate limitations as well as robustness of the approach....... We investigate the phase response of an ensemble of cold Sr88 atoms inside an optical cavity for use as an error signal in laser frequency stabilization. With this system we realize a regime where the high atomic phase shift limits the dynamical locking range. The limitation is caused by the cavity...

  10. Some applications of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations to the cold-atom physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Deltuva, A.; Lazauskas, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present some recent applications of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations in describing atomic bound and scattering problems. We consider the scattering of a charged particle X by atomic hydrogen with special interest in X = p,e ± , systems of cold bosonic molecules and the bound and scattering properties of N=3 and N=4 atomic 4 He multimers. (authors)

  11. Velocity selection for ultra-cold atoms using bimodal mazer cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, A.; Qamar, S.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the velocity selection of ultra-cold three-level atoms in Λ configuration using a micromazer. Our model is the same as discussed by Arun et al., for mazer action in a bimodal cavity. We have shown that significantly narrowed velocity distribution of ultra-cold atoms can be obtained in this system due to the presence of dark states. (author)

  12. Two atoms scattering at low and cold energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified static-exchange model is developed to study the collision of an atom with another atom. It includes the effect of long-range dipole–dipole van der Waals interaction between two atoms in addition to the exact effect of short-range force due to Coulomb exchange between two system electrons. Both these ...

  13. Suppression of Zeeman relaxation in cold collisions of 2P1/2 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Buchachenko, A. A.; Lu, M.-J.; Weinstein, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of angular momentum depolarization in cold collisions of 2 P atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that collision-induced Zeeman relaxation of Ga( 2 P 1/2 ) and In( 2 P 1/2 ) atoms in cold 4 He gas is dramatically suppressed compared to atoms in 2 P 3/2 states. Using rigorous quantum-scattering calculations based on ab initio interaction potentials, we demonstrate that Zeeman transitions in collisions of atoms in 2 P 1/2 electronic states occur via couplings to the 2 P 3/2 state induced by the anisotropy of the interaction potential. Our results suggest the feasibility of sympathetic cooling and magnetic trapping of 2 P 1/2 -state atoms, such as halogens, thereby opening up exciting areas of research in precision spectroscopy and cold-controlled chemistry.

  14. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays. (paper)

  15. The production and investigation of cold antihydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittner, H.

    2005-04-01

    This work reports on experiments in which antihydrogen atoms have been produced in cryogenic Penning traps from antiproton and positron plasmas by two different methods and on experiments that have been carried out subsequently in order to investigate the antihydrogen atoms. By the first method antihydrogen atoms have been formed during the process of positron cooling of antiprotons in so called nested Penning traps and detected via a field ionization method. A measurement of the state distribution has revealed that the antihydrogen atoms are formed in highly excited states. This suggests along with the high production rate that the antihydrogen atoms are formed by three-body recombination processes and subsequent collisional deexcitations. However current theory cannot yet account for the measured state distribution. Typical radii of the detected antihydrogen atoms lie in the range between 0.4 μm and 0.15 μm. The deepest bound antihydrogen atoms have radii below 0.1 μm.The kinetic energy of the weakest bound antihydrogen atoms has been measured to about 200 meV. By the second method antihydrogen atoms have been synthesized in charge-exchange processes. Lasers are used to produce a Rydberg cesium beam within the cryogenic Penning trap that collides with trapped positrons so that Rydberg positronium atoms are formed via charge-exchange reactions. The Rydberg positronium atoms that collide with nearby stored antiprotons form antihydrogen atoms in charge-exchange reactions. So far, 14±4 antihydrogen atoms have been detected background-free via a field-ionization method. The antihydrogen atoms produced via the two-step charge-exchange mechanism are expected to have a temperature of 4.2 K, the temperature of the antiprotons from which they are formed

  16. Three Dimensional Imaging of Cold Atoms in a Magneto Optical Trap with a Light Field Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    with a Light Field Microscope Gordon E. Lott Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Atomic, Molecular and......https://scholar.afit.edu/etd/774 THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF COLD ATOMS IN A MAGNETO-OPTICAL TRAP WITH A LIGHT FIELD MICROSCOPE DISSERTATION Gordon E

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of the Laser Beam Waist on Cold Atom Guiding Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Hu, Di; Xu, Xiaobin; Li, Wei; Lu, Xiangxiang; Song, Yitong

    2018-02-28

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the vertical guiding laser beam waist on cold atom guiding efficiency. In this study, a double magneto-optical trap (MOT) apparatus is used. With an unbalanced force in the horizontal direction, a cold atomic beam is generated by the first MOT. The cold atoms enter the second chamber and are then re-trapped and cooled by the second MOT. By releasing a second atom cloud, the process of transferring the cold atoms from MOT to the dipole trap, which is formed by a red-detuned converged 1064-nm laser, is experimentally demonstrated. And after releasing for 20 ms, the atom cloud is guided to a distance of approximately 3 mm. As indicated by the results, the guiding efficiency depends strongly on the laser beam waist; the efficiency reaches a maximum when the waist radius ( w ₀) of the laser is in the range of 15 to 25 μm, while the initial atom cloud has a radius of 133 μm. Additionally, the properties of the atoms inside the dipole potential trap, such as the distribution profile and lifetime, are deduced from the fluorescence images.

  18. Interaction-induced decay of a heteronuclear two-atom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Jiaheng; Liu, Min; He, Xiaodong; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Kunpeng; Wang, Jin; Papoular, D. J.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two-atom systems in small traps are of fundamental interest for understanding the role of interactions in degenerate cold gases and for the creation of quantum gates in quantum information processing with single-atom traps. One of the key quantities is the inelastic relaxation (decay) time when one of the atoms or both are in a higher hyperfine state. Here we measure this quantity in a heteronuclear system of 87Rb and 85Rb in a micro optical trap and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the presence of both fast and slow relaxation processes, depending on the choice of the initial hyperfine states. This experimental method allows us to single out a particular relaxation process thus provides an extremely clean platform for collisional physics studies. Our results have also implications for engineering of quantum states via controlled collisions and creation of two-qubit quantum gates. PMID:26199051

  19. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  20. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms for sympathetic cooling of molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    We trap cold, ground-state, argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a build-up cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of co-trapped metastable argon atoms using a new type of parametric loss spectroscopy. Using this technique we als...

  1. Generation of Exotic Quantum States of a Cold Atomic Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Lund

    Over the last decades quantum effects have become more and more controllable, leading to the implementations of various quantum information protocols. These protocols are all based on utilizing quantum correlation. In this thesis we consider how states of an atomic ensemble with such correlations...... can be created and characterized. First we consider a spin-squeezed state. This state is generated by performing quantum non-demolition measurements of the atomic population difference. We show a spectroscopically relevant noise reduction of -1.7dB, the ensemble is in a many-body entangled state...... — a nanofiber based light-atom interface. Using a dual-frequency probing method we measure and prepare an ensemble with a sub-Poissonian atom number distribution. This is a first step towards the implementation of more exotic quantum states....

  2. Two atoms scattering at low and cold energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    terms exactly with exchange/antisymmetry between the system electrons. ... Figure 1a presents the picture of two atoms with nuclei A and B attached with electrons ..... Physical Chemistry Dept. of IACS, Kolkata, India, Private Communication.

  3. Thousands of cold anti-atoms produced at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The antimatter factory delivers its first major results. ATHENA has just produced thousands of anti-atoms. This is the result of techniques developed by ATRAP and ATHENA, the two collaborations aiming to study antihydrogen.

  4. Second CERN group produces cold atoms of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Levi-Goss, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    A new experiment, by CERN's ATRAP collaboration, which introduced a technique for determining the quantum state in which antihydrogen atoms are formed was discussed. To make antihydrogen, antiprotons were taken from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, further slowed down, and trapped with a configuration of electric fields. The evidence gathered confirmed that the H over bar atoms formed in the experiment occupy highly excited Rydberg states. (Edited abstract) 5 Refs.

  5. Cold atoms in microscopic traps: from wires to chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassettari, D.

    2000-05-01

    This thesis reports on the experimental demonstration of magnetic guides, traps and beam splitters for neutral atoms using current carrying wires. A straight wire allows to create two basic guide configurations: the magnetic field generated by the wire alone produces a guide where atoms in a strong field seeking state perform orbits around the wire (Kepler guide); by adding an external magnetic field, atoms in a weak field seeking state are guided at the location where the external field and the field generated by the wire cancel out (side guide). Furthermore, bending the wire in various shapes allows to modify the side guide potential and hence to create a large variety of three dimensional traps. A relevant property of these potentials is that higher trapping gradients are obtained by decreasing the current flowing in the wires. As the trap is compressed, it also moves closer to the wire. This feature has allowed us to create microscopic potentials by using thin wires designed on a surface (atom chip) by means of high resolution microfabrication techniques. Wires mounted on a surface have the advantage of being more robust and able to sustain larger currents due to their thermal coupling with the substrate. In our experiment we have developed methods to load these traps and guides with laser cooled atoms. Our first investigations have been performed with free standing wires which we have used to study the Kepler guide, the side guide and a three dimensional Ioffe-Pritchard trap. In the latter we have achieved the trapping parameters required in the experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates with much reduced power consumption. In a second time we have replaced the free standing wires with an atom chip, which we have used to compress the atomic cloud in potentials with trap frequencies above 100 kHz and ground state sizes below 100 nm. Such potentials are especially interesting for quantum information proposals of performing quantum gate operations with controlled

  6. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao, E-mail: jiangx@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-08-15

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  7. Matter-wave localization in disordered cold atom lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Uri; Castin, Yvan

    2005-07-08

    We propose to observe Anderson localization of ultracold atoms in the presence of a random potential made of atoms of another species or spin state and trapped at the nodes of an optical lattice, with a filling factor less than unity. Such systems enable a nearly perfect experimental control of the disorder, while the possibility of modeling the scattering potentials by a set of pointlike ones allows an exact theoretical analysis. This is illustrated by a detailed analysis of the one-dimensional case.

  8. A quantum trampoline for ultra-cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-de-Saint-Vincent, M.; Brantut, J.-P.; Bordé, Ch. J.; Aspect, A.; Bourdel, T.; Bouyer, P.

    2010-01-01

    We have observed the interferometric suspension of a free-falling Bose-Einstein condensate periodically submitted to multiple-order diffraction by a vertical 1D standing wave. This scheme permits simultaneously the compensation of gravity and coherent splitting/recombination of the matter waves. It results in high-contrast interference in the number of atoms detected at constant height. For long suspension times, multiple-wave interference is revealed through a sharpening of the fringes. We characterize our atom interferometer and use it to measure the acceleration of gravity.

  9. Polarization-dependent spectra in the photoassociative ionization of cold atoms in a bright sodium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; DeGraffenreid, William; Weiner, John

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of cold photoassociative ionization (PAI) spectra obtained from collisions within a slow, bright Na atomic beam. A high-brightness atom flux, obtained by optical cooling and focusing of the atom beam, permits a high degree of alignment and orientation of binary collisions with respect to the laboratory atom-beam axis. The results reveal features of PAI spectra not accessible in conventional magneto-optical trap studies. We take advantage of this high degree of alignment to selectively excite autoionizing doubly excited states of specific symmetry

  10. Strongly correlated states of a small cold-atom cloud from geometric gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N.; Guenter, K. J.; Dalibard, J.; Grass, T.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Using exact diagonalization for a small system of cold bosonic atoms, we analyze the emergence of strongly correlated states in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. This gauge field is generated by a laser beam that couples two internal atomic states, and it is related to Berry's geometrical phase that emerges when an atom follows adiabatically one of the two eigenstates of the atom-laser coupling. Our approach allows us to go beyond the adiabatic approximation, and to characterize the generalized Laughlin wave functions that appear in the strong magnetic-field limit.

  11. Strongly correlated states of a small cold-atom cloud from geometric gauge fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia-Diaz, B. [Dept. ECM, Facultat de Fisica, U. Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, E-08860 Barcelona (Spain); Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N. [Dept. ECM, Facultat de Fisica, U. Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Guenter, K. J.; Dalibard, J. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, CNRS, UPMC, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Grass, T. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, E-08860 Barcelona (Spain); Lewenstein, M. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, E-08860 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Using exact diagonalization for a small system of cold bosonic atoms, we analyze the emergence of strongly correlated states in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. This gauge field is generated by a laser beam that couples two internal atomic states, and it is related to Berry's geometrical phase that emerges when an atom follows adiabatically one of the two eigenstates of the atom-laser coupling. Our approach allows us to go beyond the adiabatic approximation, and to characterize the generalized Laughlin wave functions that appear in the strong magnetic-field limit.

  12. Tunable atom-light beam splitter using electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Wen, Rong; Chen, J. F.

    2018-06-01

    With electromagnetically induced transmission (EIT), an optical field can be converted into collective atomic excitation and stored in the atomic medium through switching off the strong-coupling field adiabatically. By varying the power of the coupling pulse, we can control the ratio between the transmitted optical field and the stored atomic mode. We use a cloud of cold 85Rb atoms prepared in magneto-optical trap as the experimental platform. Based on a model of EIT dark-state polariton, we consider the real case where the atomic medium has a finite length. The theoretical calculation gives numerical results that agree well with the experimental data. The results show that the ratio can be changed approximately from 0 to 100%, when the maximum power of the coupling pulse (the pulse length is 100 ns) varies from 0 to 20 mW, in the cold atomic ensemble with an optical depth of 40. This process can be used to achieve an atom-light hybrid beam splitter with tunable splitting ratio and thus find potential application in interferometric measurement and quantum information processing.

  13. Quantum ratchets for periodically kicked cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casati, Giulio [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unita di Como, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Poletti, Dario [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unita di Como, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    We study cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates exposed to time-dependent standing waves of light. We first discuss a quantum chaotic dissipative ratchet using the method of quantum trajectories. This system is characterized by directed transport emerging from a quantum strange attractor. We then present a very simple model of directed transport with cold atoms in a pair of periodically flashed optical lattices. Finally we study the dynamics of a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a toroidal trap and exposed to a pair of periodically flashed optical lattices. We show that the many-body atom-atom interactions, treated within the mean-field approximation, can generate directed transport.

  14. Three-body recombination of cold fermionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suno, H; Esry, B D; Greene, Chris H

    2003-01-01

    Recombination of identical, spin-polarized fermions in cold three-body collisions is investigated. We parametrize the mechanisms for recombination in terms of the 'scattering volume' V p and another length scale r 0 . Model two-body interactions were used within the framework of the adiabatic hyperspherical representation. We examine the recombination rate K 3 as a function of the collision energy E for various values of V p . Not only do we consider the dominant J Π = 1 + case, but also the next-leading order contributions from J Π = 1 - and 3 - . We discuss the behaviour near a two-body resonance and the expected universality of fermionic recombination. Comparisons with boson recombination are considered in detail

  15. Development of the Science Data System for the International Space Station Cold Atom Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harmelen, Chris; Soriano, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) is a facility that will enable scientists to study ultra-cold quantum gases in a microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) beginning in 2016. The primary science data for each experiment consists of two images taken in quick succession. The first image is of the trapped cold atoms and the second image is of the background. The two images are subtracted to obtain optical density. These raw Level 0 atom and background images are processed into the Level 1 optical density data product, and then into the Level 2 data products: atom number, Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) lifetime, magnetic chip-trap atom lifetime, and condensate fraction. These products can also be used as diagnostics of the instrument health. With experiments being conducted for 8 hours every day, the amount of data being generated poses many technical challenges, such as downlinking and managing the required data volume. A parallel processing design is described, implemented, and benchmarked. In addition to optimizing the data pipeline, accuracy and speed in producing the Level 1 and 2 data products is key. Algorithms for feature recognition are explored, facilitating image cropping and accurate atom number calculations.

  16. Signal Processing in Cold Atom Interferometry-Based INS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    angular rotation. Additionally, because of their particle nature, the atoms may be treated as inertial masses and their movement is used to determine the...G(τ)δβ(τ) = Φ(∆t)xi + wdi where β(t) is a Brownian motion process with dispersion Q, andΦ is the discrete-time state transition matrix [14]. That is...identity matrix, I. βA and βG are 3 × 1 vectors of independent, unity Brownian motions, that is, βA(t) ∼ N (0, t · I) and βG(t) ∼ N (0, t · I). The rate

  17. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cold atoms [1], with their long measurement times, promise to revolutionize the field of precision measurements. In this respect, laser-cooled Yb constitutes a useful species because its spin-zero ground state obviates the need for a second re-pumping laser, as is required for laser cooling of the more common spin-half ...

  18. Cold atoms at unitarity and inverse square interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaduri, R K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4M1 (Canada); Murthy, M V N [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India); Srivastava, M K [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2009-12-14

    Consider two identical atoms in a spherical harmonic oscillator interacting with a zero-range interaction which is tuned to produce an s-wave zero-energy bound state. The quantum spectrum of the system is known to be exactly solvable. We note that the same partial wave quantum spectrum is obtained by the one-dimensional scale-invariant inverse square potential. Long known as the Calogero-Sutherland-Moser (CSM) model, it leads to the fractional exclusion statistics (FES) of Haldane and Wu. The statistical parameter is deduced from the analytically calculated second virial coefficient. When FES is applied to a Fermi gas at unitarity, it gives good agreement with experimental data without the use of any free parameter.

  19. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter for cold atom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chun-hua; Yan, Shu-hua; Zhang, Tian

    2017-09-01

    We present an innovative and practical scheme of building a miniaturized wavemeter, with the advantages of low cost, high reliability and simple structure. Through a calibration test by a 780 nm external cavity diode laser (ECDL), the results show that our system gets a wavelength resolution of better than 1 pm, measurement accuracy of better than 2 pm (corresponding to a frequency of 1 GHz), and a measurement range of 8.5 nm. Finally, the multi-mode comparison test between our system and a commercial spectrum analyzer further indicates the high-precision, miniaturization and low cost of the proposed system, which shows that it is particularly suitable for ECDL and atom cooling and trapping experiments. The system design, experimental results and conclusions are of definite significance as a fine reference for other ranges of wavelength.

  20. Dissipative Double-Well Potential for Cold Atoms: Kramers Rate and Stochastic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2016-12-09

    We experimentally study particle exchange in a dissipative double-well potential using laser-cooled atoms in a hybrid trap. We measure the particle hopping rate as a function of barrier height, temperature, and atom number. Single-particle resolution allows us to measure rates over more than 4 orders of magnitude and distinguish the effects of loss and hopping. Deviations from the Arrhenius-law scaling at high barrier heights occur due to cold collisions between atoms within a well. By driving the system periodically, we characterize the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in the system response.

  1. Decoherence for a quantum memory in an ensemble of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedmatten, H. de; Chou, C.W.; Felinto, D.; Plyakov, S.; Kimble, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Atomic ensembles are a promising candidate for various applications in quantum information science. In particular, Duan, Lukin Cirac and Zoller (DLCZ) have proposed a protocol allowing scalable long distance quantum communication using atomic ensembles and linear optics. The DLCZ protocol is a probabilistic scheme based upon the entanglement of atomic ensembles via the detection of single photons. The detection of a single photon in the forward scattered direction is uniquely correlated with a collective atomic excitation in the sample, due to a collective enhancement effect. This collective excitation can be in principle stored for a time up to the coherence time of the system, and then released by conversion into a photon. This quantum memory is mandatory for the DLCZ scheme to be scalable. Hence, the coherence time is a critical parameter for this system. Our initial steps towards the realization of the DLCZ protocol have been by way of observations of non-classical correlations between the emitted single photons and the collective atomic excitations. However, in all the experiments reported so far using cold atomic ensembles, the coherence times were extremely short (of the order of 100 ns), thus preventing to take advantage of the quantum memory. In this contribution we explore the cause of this rather fast decoherence process and present an experimental scheme to overcome this problem. First results show an improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the coherence time. Future work includes the entanglement of two spatially separated cold atomic ensembles. (author)

  2. Observation of modified radiative properties of cold atoms in vacuum near a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V V; Cornelussen, R A; Heuvell, H B van Linden van den; Spreeuw, R J C

    2004-01-01

    We have observed a distance-dependent absorption linewidth of cold 87 Rb atoms close to a dielectric-vacuum interface. This is the first observation of modified radiative properties in vacuum near a dielectric surface. A cloud of cold atoms was created using a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and optical molasses cooling. Evanescent waves (EW) were used to observe the behaviour of the atoms near the surface. We observed an increase of the absorption linewidth by up to 25% with respect to the free-space value. Approximately half the broadening can be explained by cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) as an increase of the natural linewidth and inhomogeneous broadening. The remainder we attribute to local Stark shifts near the surface. By varying the characteristic EW length we have observed a distance dependence characteristic for CQED

  3. The Hanbury Brown ant Twiss effect for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellekens, M.

    2007-05-01

    This thesis deals with the measurement of the quantum intensity correlations in gases of metastable Helium. The measurement has been performed on thermal gases of bosonic He 4 and fermionic He 3 , as well as on Bose-Einstein condensates. In 1956, Robert Hanbury Brown et Richard Twiss measured the correlation between photons emitted from a single thermal source. The consequently demonstrated that the photons emitted by such a source tend to arrive grouped on a detector (Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect). This bunching characterizes bosons from a non-coherent source. Fermions show an anti-bunching behaviour in the same conditions. By using metastable Helium atoms, that can be detected individually through the use of micro-channel plates, we have been able to show a similar bunching of bosons He 4 from thermal sources around the micro-kelvin. As expected, the coherence of the Bose-Einstein condensates did not produce a particular correlation. The measurement on thermal gases of fermionic He 3 has demonstrated the anti-bunching. Particular effort has been employed in describing the micro-channel plate based delay-line detector, the key to the experiment. (author)

  4. Effects of quantum statistics in cold-atom gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis recalls the main properties of Bose-Einstein condensates as they have been experimentally produced since 1995 in diluted alkaline gases and as they have been magnetically trapped. The author discusses the standard theoretical approach of Bogoliubov which relies on an hypothesis of symmetry breakage. Then, the author addresses the dynamic consequences of this hypothesis, in particularly on the existence of a condensate phase jamming which results in a loss of coherence properties for the system. The third part addresses the dynamic study of a condensate within a pattern-type potential. A numerical integration of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is performed. Through variations of the non-linear parameter (which expresses interactions between atoms), the influence of non-linearities on the system behaviour is analysed. Notably, the author shows how, by increasing this parameter, the macroscopic wave function passes from a regular dynamics to a stochastic dynamics. In the fourth part, the author reports the modelling of an experiment of mixing with five waves within the context of matter waves. He shows how to adapt this experiment for fermions/bosons mixing where an incident fermion wave is sent towards a network of condensed bosons [fr

  5. Detecting many-body-localization lengths with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuefei; Li, Xiaopeng

    2018-03-01

    Considering ultracold atoms in optical lattices, we propose experimental protocols to study many-body-localization (MBL) length and criticality in quench dynamics. Through numerical simulations with exact diagonalization, we show that in the MBL phase the perturbed density profile following a local quench remains exponentially localized in postquench dynamics. The size of this density profile after long-time-dynamics defines a localization length, which tends to diverge at the MBL-to-ergodic transition as we increase the system size. The determined localization transition point agrees with previous exact diagonalization calculations using other diagnostics. Our numerical results provide evidence for violation of the Harris-Chayes bound for the MBL criticality. The critical exponent ν can be extracted from our proposed dynamical procedure, which can then be used directly in experiments to determine whether the Harris-Chayes-bound holds for the MBL transition. These proposed protocols to detect localization criticality are justified by benchmarking to the well-established results for the noninteracting three-dimensional Anderson localization.

  6. Generalized Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Ruseckas, Julius; Dalibard, Jean

    2010-01-01

    We study the possibility for generating a new type of spin-orbit coupling for the center-of-mass motion of cold atoms, using laser beams that resonantly couple N atomic internal ground states to an extra state. After a general analysis of the scheme, we concentrate on the tetrapod setup (N=4) where the atomic state can be described by a three-component spinor, evolving under the action of a Rashba-Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling for a spin 1 particle. We illustrate a consequence of this coupling by studying the negative refraction of atoms at a potential step and show that the amplitude of the refracted beam is significantly increased in comparison to the known case of spin 1/2 Rashba-Dresselhaus coupling. Finally, we explore a possible implementation of this tetrapod setup, using stimulated Raman couplings between Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of alkali-metal atoms.

  7. Atomic rubidium, the workhorse of theoretical collision physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, B.; van Kempen, E.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first realizations of Bose-Einstein condensates in ultracold atomic gases in 1995, the 85Rb and 87Rb atomic species have acted as the workhorses of experimental developments in this field. Parallel to and partly preceding this work the same isotopes figured also as workhorses for

  8. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Targat, R.

    2007-07-01

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10 -16 . It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 → J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S 0 → 3P 0 transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 μK. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope 87 Sr, at a level of a few 10 -15 . (author)

  9. Theory of the time orbiting potential (TOP) quadrupole magnetic trap for cold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minogin, V.G.; Richmond, J.A.; Opat, G.I.

    1997-12-31

    An analytical theory of the time orbiting potential (TOP) quadrupole magnetic trap for cold atoms is developed. It is shown that the rotating magnetic filed used to create the time-average harmonic potential is responsible for the formation of quasi-energy states of an atom in the trap. It is found that the motion of an atom near the origin of the trap can be represented as consisting of slow motion in the effective potential and fast oscillations with small amplitude. Dipole, quadrupole and higher order atomic transitions between quasi-energy states are shown to be responsible for an additional effective potential for slow atomic motion which is proportional to the fourth power of the atomic co-ordinate. Eigenstates and eigenfunctions are used to calculate the co-ordinate distribution for a single atom. It is concluded that at low temperature the quantum statistical co-ordinate distribution for a single atom exhibits a narrow central peak due to the ground state population, together with relatively broad wings due to the excited state population. (authors). 20 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  10. Temporal interference with frequency-controllable long photons from independent cold atomic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    The interference of single photons from independent sources is an essential tool in quantum information processing. However, the interfering of photons with long temporal states in a time-resolved manner has rarely been studied. This is because without transmitting spectral filters or coupling to a cavity mode single photons generated in traditional nonlinear crystals suffer from a short temporal profile below 1 ns. With spectral correlation maintained in the biphotons generated from spontaneous four-wave mixing process in cold atom clouds, here we demonstrate the temporal interference of two frequency-tunable long photons from two independent cold atomic sources. We observe and analyze the interference of frequency-mismatched photons, where the phenomenon of the quantum beat at megahertz separation is displayed. Our paper provides more details for the quantum beat of two independent narrow-band single photons, which may find potential application in frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing.

  11. Subthermal linewidths in photoassociation spectra of cold alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machholm, Mette; Julienne, Paul S.; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2002-01-01

    Narrow s-wave features with subthermal widths are predicted for the 1 Π g photoassociation spectra of cold alkaline-earth-metal atoms. The phenomenon is explained by numerical and analytical calculations. These show that only a small subthermal range of collision energies near threshold contributes to the s-wave features that are excited when the atoms are very far apart. The resonances survive thermal averaging, and may be detectable for Ca cooled near the Doppler cooling temperature of the 4 1 P 1 S laser-cooling transition

  12. Fifteen years of cold matter on the atom chip: promise, realizations, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Mark; Amit, Omer; Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Here we review the field of atom chips in the context of Bose–Einstein Condensates (BEC) as well as cold matter in general. Twenty years after the first realization of the BEC and 15 years after the realization of the atom chip, the latter has been found to enable extraordinary feats: from producing BECs at a rate of several per second, through the realization of matter-wave interferometry, and all the way to novel probing of surfaces and new forces. In addition, technological applications are also being intensively pursued. This review will describe these developments and more, including new ideas which have not yet been realized. PMID:27499585

  13. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Scheurer, Mathias; Rachel, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    We propose a realistic cold-atom setup which allows for a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator phase by simply tuning the hopping between the layers. We further employ cluster slave-rotor mean-field theory to study the effect of additional Hubbard onsite interactions that give rise to various spin liquid-like phases such as gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating states.

  14. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement of Narrowband Photons from Cold Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement introduced in 1935 deals with two particles that are entangled in their positions and momenta. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of EPR position-momentum entanglement of narrowband photon pairs generated from cold atoms. By using two-photon quantum ghost imaging and ghost interference, we demonstrate explicitly that the narrowband photon pairs violate the separability criterion, confirming EPR entanglement. We further demonstrate co...

  15. Saturation spectroscopy of calcium atomic vapor in hot quartz cells with cold windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilshanskaya, E. V.; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Murashkin, D. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    Saturation spectroscopy of calcium atomic vapor was performed in hot quartz cells with cold windows. The Doppler-free absorption resonances with spectral width near 50 MHz were observed. For these experiments and future applications long-lived quartz cells with buffer gas were designed and made. A cooling laser for calcium magneto-optical trap will be frequency locked to the saturation resonances in the long-lived cells.

  16. Observation of resonant symmetry lifting by an effective bias field in a parametrically modulated atomic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Moon, Geol; Kim, Ji-Hyoun; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate resonant symmetry lifting in a parametrically modulated magneto-optical trap of cold 85 Rb atoms. This is achieved by applying a weak additional modulation at half the frequency of the strong parametric modulation, which acts as an effective static bias field to the system. We measure the system response by varying the amplitude of the additional fictitious bias as well as the relative phase between the bias and the parametric drive, and the results are in good agreement with theory. The additional modulation provides an additional degree of freedom to control the system, which is useful for investigating system properties such as susceptibility, dynamic response, and related critical phenomena. We also have measured the amplitude of the response to higher harmonics of the additional modulation frequency, which allows more precise understanding of the system dynamics.

  17. Nanophotonic Optical Isolator Controlled by the Internal State of Cold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Sayrin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The realization of nanophotonic optical isolators with high optical isolation even at ultralow light levels and low optical losses is an open problem. Here, we employ the link between the local polarization of strongly confined light and its direction of propagation to realize low-loss nonreciprocal transmission through a silica nanofiber at the single-photon level. The direction of the resulting optical isolator is controlled by the spin state of cold atoms. We perform our experiment in two qualitatively different regimes, i.e., with an ensemble of cold atoms where each atom is weakly coupled to the waveguide and with a single atom strongly coupled to the waveguide mode. In both cases, we observe simultaneously high isolation and high forward transmission. The isolator concept constitutes a nanoscale quantum optical analog of microwave ferrite resonance isolators, can be implemented with all kinds of optical waveguides and emitters, and might enable novel integrated optical devices for fiber-based classical and quantum networks.

  18. Transport and interaction blockade of cold bosonic atoms in a triple-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlagheck, P; Malet, F; Cremon, J C; Reimann, S M

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the transport properties of cold bosonic atoms in a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) triple-well potential that consists of two large outer wells, which act as microscopic source and drain reservoirs, and a small inner well, which represents a quantum-dot-like scattering region. Bias and gate 'voltages' introduce a time-dependent tilt of the triple-well configuration, and are used to shift the energetic level of the inner well with respect to the outer ones. By means of exact diagonalization considering a total number of six atoms in the triple-well potential, we find diamond-like structures for the occurrence of single-atom transport in the parameter space spanned by the bias and gate voltages. We discuss the analogy with Coulomb blockade in electronic quantum dots, and point out how one can infer the interaction energy in the central well from the distance between the diamonds.

  19. Nonlinear effects in optical pumping of a cold and slow atomic beam

    KAUST Repository

    Porfido, N.

    2015-10-12

    By photoionizing hyperfine (HF) levels of the Cs state 62P3/2 in a slow and cold atom beam, we find how their population depends on the excitation laser power. The long time (around 180μs) spent by the slow atoms inside the resonant laser beam is large enough to enable exploration of a unique atom-light interaction regime heavily affected by time-dependent optical pumping. We demonstrate that, under such conditions, the onset of nonlinear effects in the population dynamics and optical pumping occurs at excitation laser intensities much smaller than the conventional respective saturation values. The evolution of population within the HF structure is calculated by numerical integration of the multilevel optical Bloch equations. The agreement between numerical results and experiment outcomes is excellent. All main features in the experimental findings are explained by the occurrence of “dark” and “bright” resonances leading to power-dependent branching coefficients.

  20. From cosmology to cold atoms: observation of Sakharov oscillations in a quenched atomic superfluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Gurarie, Victor; Chin, Cheng

    2013-09-13

    Predicting the dynamics of many-body systems far from equilibrium is a challenging theoretical problem. A long-predicted phenomenon in hydrodynamic nonequilibrium systems is the occurrence of Sakharov oscillations, which manifest in the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale correlations of galaxies. Here, we report the observation of Sakharov oscillations in the density fluctuations of a quenched atomic superfluid through a systematic study in both space and time domains and with tunable interaction strengths. Our work suggests a different approach to the study of nonequilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems and the exploration of their analogs in cosmology and astrophysics.

  1. Mott-insulating phases in unidimensional multi-components fermionic cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonne, Heloise

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the Mott insulating phases arising in one-dimensional multicomponent fermionic cold atoms systems. The first part of this work is the study of a model with alkaline-earth cold atoms with nuclear spin I = 1/2. Those atoms enjoy an additional orbital degree of freedom, due to the presence of a metastable excited state; they thus have a total of four components. Our investigation is carried at half-filling, at strong and at weak couplings by means of analytic methods (conformal theory, bosonization, refermionization, renormalisation group). We found that the zero temperature phase diagram of the system is very rich: it contains seven Mott insulating phases, among which three are particularly interesting, since they display a hidden order, related to the Haldane physics of the antiferromagnetic spin-1 Heisenberg chain. Our conclusions are checked against numerical simulations, that were carried out with the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for intermediate couplings. The comparison shows an adiabatic continuity between the different regimes. A similar study for a model of cold atoms with hyperfine spin-3/2 highlights the Haldane physics in the charge sector of the degrees of freedom, with an effective model given by an antiferromagnetic pseudo-spin-1 chain. This analysis provides us an opportunity to investigate the zero temperature properties of the SO(5) bilinear-bi-quadratic Heisenberg chain. We show the presence of two gapped phases: one is dimerized, the other has a hidden symmetry (Z 2 x Z 2 ) 2 and spin-3/2 edge states, and they are separated by a critical point that belongs to the SO(5) 1 universality class. Finally, we investigate half-integer hyperfine spin cold atoms systems with 2N components which generalized the results obtained for the hyperfine spin-3/2 model. This leads us to find an even/odd effect according to the parity of N, very similar to the even/odd effect of spin chains

  2. Cold Atom Interferometers Used In Space (CAIUS) for Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraz, O.; Luca, M.; Siemes, C.; Haagmans, R.; Silvestrin, P.

    2016-12-01

    In the past decades, it has been shown that atomic quantum sensors are a newly emerging technology that can be used for measuring the Earth's gravity field. There are two ways of making use of that technology: One is a gravity gradiometer concept and the other is in a low-low satellite-to-satellite ranging concept. Whereas classical accelerometers typically suffer from high noise at low frequencies, Cold Atom Interferometers are highly accurate over the entire frequency range. We recently proposed a concept using cold atom interferometers for measuring all diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor and the full spacecraft angular velocity in order to achieve better performance than the GOCE gradiometer over a larger part of the spectrum, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures in the gravity field better than today. This concept relies on a high common mode rejection, which relaxes the drag free control compare to GOCE mission, and benefits from a long interaction time with the free falling clouds of atoms due to the micro gravity environment in space as opposed to the 1-g environment on-ground. Other concept is also being studied in the frame of NGGM, which relies on the hybridization between quantum and classical techniques to improve the performance of accelerometers. This could be achieved as it is realized in frequency measurements where quartz oscillators are phase locked on atomic or optical clocks. This technique could correct the spectrally colored noise of the electrostatic accelerometers in the lower frequencies. In both cases, estimation of the Earth gravity field model from the instruments has to be evaluated taking into account different system parameters such as attitude control, altitude of the satellite, time duration of the mission, etc. Miniaturization, lower consumptions and upgrading Technical Readiness Level are the key engineering challenges that have to be faced for these space quantum technologie.

  3. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-eV hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper the authors examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, they examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then they review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of angstrom) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (> 10 10 cm -2 s -1 ) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. They conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment

  4. First-principles many-body theory for ultra-cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, Peter D.; Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji

    2010-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in the creation of ultra-cold atoms in the laboratory have ushered in unprecedented changes in physical science. These enormous changes in the coldest temperatures available in the laboratory mean that many novel experiments are possible. There is unprecedented control and simplicity in these novel systems, meaning that quantum many-body theory is now facing severe challenges in quantitatively understanding these new results. We discuss some of the new experiments and recently developed theoretical techniques required to predict the results obtained.

  5. px+ipy Superfluid from s-Wave Interactions of Fermionic Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Lutchyn, Roman M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional (p x +ip y ) superfluids or superconductors offer a playground for studying intriguing physics such as quantum teleportation, non-Abelian statistics, and topological quantum computation. Creating such a superfluid in cold fermionic atom optical traps using p-wave Feshbach resonance is turning out to be challenging. Here we propose a method to create a p x +ip y superfluid directly from an s-wave interaction making use of a topological Berry phase, which can be artificially generated. We discuss ways to detect the spontaneous Hall mass current, which acts as a diagnostic for the chiral p-wave superfluid

  6. Quantum Phase Transition in a Cold Atomic Spin-Boson Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Stanic, Ivan; Le Hur, Karyn

    2008-03-01

    We theoretically implement a spin array in a tunable bosonic environment using cold bosonic atoms with two (hyperfine) ground states, trapped by different potentials [1]. The first specie lies in a deep optical lattice with tightly confining wells and forms a spin array; spin-up/down corresponds to occupation by one/no atom at each site. The second specie forms a superfluid reservoir. Different species are coupled coherently via laser transitions and collisions. Whereas the laser coupling mimics a transverse field for the spins, the coupling to the reservoir phonons (sound modes) induces a ferromagnetic (Ising) coupling as well as dissipation. This results in a peculiar ferro-paramagnetic quantum phase transition where the effect of dissipation can be studied in a controllable manner. [1] Peter P. Orth, Ivan Stanic, and Karyn Le Hur, arXiv:0711.2309 [cond-mat.other].

  7. Two-body loss rates for reactive collisions of cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cop, C.; Walser, R.

    2018-01-01

    We present an effective two-channel model for reactive collisions of cold atoms. It augments elastic molecular channels with an irreversible, inelastic loss channel. Scattering is studied with the distorted-wave Born approximation and yields general expressions for angular momentum resolved cross sections as well as two-body loss rates. Explicit expressions are obtained for piecewise constant potentials. A pole expansion reveals simple universal shape functions for cross sections and two-body loss rates in agreement with the Wigner threshold laws. This is applied to collisions of metastable 20Ne and 21Ne atoms, which decay primarily through exothermic Penning or associative ionization processes. From a numerical solution of the multichannel Schrödinger equation using the best currently available molecular potentials, we have obtained synthetic scattering data. Using the two-body loss shape functions derived in this paper, we can match these scattering data very well.

  8. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant, E-mail: vasant@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-08-26

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on. - Highlights: • Getter-source loaded magneto-optic trap (MOT). • Cold atomic beam generated by deflection from the MOT. • Use of two inclined beams for deflection.

  9. Formation of cold molecules through the photo-association of cold atoms of Cesium. Existence of long range forces between between cold excited atoms of Cesium; Formation de molecules froides par photoassociation d'atomes froids de cesium. Mise en evidence de forces a longue portee entre atomes froids excites de cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comparat, D

    1999-09-01

    This thesis deals with the experimental study and the theoretical interpretation of the processes involved in photo-association and the formation of cold caesium molecules. It also presents a study of the dipolar forces between a pair of cold excited caesium atoms. We present here the first photo-association experiment on cold caesium atoms: two cold atoms absorb a photon to form an excited electronically excited molecules in a rotation-vibration level. The first production of cold molecules which was realised experimentally, after the spontaneous deexcitation of the photo-associated molecules, is described, stressing the role of the potential well of the molecular states O{sub g}{sup -}(6s+6p{sub 3/2}) or 1{sub u} (6s+6p{sub 3/2}) of caesium. The detection of the formed caesium molecules is based on a two-photons resonant ionisation that creates Cs{sub 2}{sup +} ions, afterwards selectively detected. Temperatures around 20-200 {mu}K have been measured. The photo-associative spectroscopy is described on the theoretical point of view: a detailed theoretical study allows to calculate precisely the asymptotic parts of the potential curves. On the experimental point of view, we present the spectroscopy of the extern potential well of the caesium state O{sub g}{sup -}(6s+6p{sub 3/2}) and the construction of an effective potential curve of the RKR type. A unified theory of photo-association in weak field, considered as a collision assisted by laser, is developed. The cold atoms experiments allow to study and control the collision between two atoms whose mutual interaction is of the dipole-dipole type. Two different physical systems are studied: a sample of Rydberg atoms, and the photo-association process which is a laser-assisted collision. A modification of the motion of one pair of atoms makes it possible to control the bipolar forces and to choose the atoms relative speeds. (author)

  10. Pressure broadening and frequency shift of the 5S1/2 → 5D5/2 and 5S1/2 → 7S1/2 two photon transitions in 85Rb by the noble gases and N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D; Hager, Gordon D; Erickson, Christopher J; Burke, John H

    2014-01-01

    Doppler free two photon absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the pressure broadening and frequency shift rates of the 5S 1/2 (F = 3) → 5D 5/2 (F = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) (778.105 nm) and the 5S 1/2 (F = 2) → 7S 1/2 (F = 2) (760.126 nm) two photon transitions in 85 Rb by the noble gases and N 2 . To our knowledge, these rates are reported on for the first time. The self-broadening and shift rate of the 5S 1/2 (F = 3) → 5D 5/2 (F = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) transition and self -broadening rate of the 5S 1/2 (F = 2) → 7S 1/2 (F = 2) transition were also measured. The temperature dependence of the self-frequency shift (Rb-Rb collisions) of these transitions is presented. Helium diffusion rates through Quartz and Pyrex cells are also calculated and the implication of helium diffusion through glass vapor cells is discussed in regards to atomic frequency standards based on these transitions. Experimental pressure broadening and shift rates are compared to theoretically calculated rates assuming a 6, 8 or 6, 8, 10 difference potential and pseudo potential model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between experimental and theoretical values. (paper)

  11. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in ...

  12. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  13. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of topological Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Mathias S.; Rachel, Stephan; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-02-01

    Interacting cold-atomic gases in optical lattices offer an experimental approach to outstanding problems of many body physics. One important example is the interplay of interaction and topology which promises to generate a variety of exotic phases such as the fractionalized Chern insulator or the topological Mott insulator. Both theoretically understanding these states of matter and finding suitable systems that host them have proven to be challenging problems. Here we propose a cold-atom setup where Hubbard on-site interactions give rise to spin liquid-like phases: weak and strong topological Mott insulators. They represent the celebrated paradigm of an interacting and topological quantum state with fractionalized spinon excitations that inherit the topology of the non-interacting system. Our proposal shall help to pave the way for a controlled experimental investigation of this exotic state of matter in optical lattices. Furthermore, it allows for the investigation of a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator by tuning the hopping between the layers.

  14. Additive manufacturing of magnetic shielding and ultra-high vacuum flange for cold atom sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovrosh, Jamie; Voulazeris, Georgios; Petrov, Plamen G; Zou, Ji; Gaber, Youssef; Benn, Laura; Woolger, David; Attallah, Moataz M; Boyer, Vincent; Bongs, Kai; Holynski, Michael

    2018-01-31

    Recent advances in the understanding and control of quantum technologies, such as those based on cold atoms, have resulted in devices with extraordinary metrological performance. To realise this potential outside of a lab environment the size, weight and power consumption need to be reduced. Here we demonstrate the use of laser powder bed fusion, an additive manufacturing technique, as a production technique relevant to the manufacture of quantum sensors. As a demonstration we have constructed two key components using additive manufacturing, namely magnetic shielding and vacuum chambers. The initial prototypes for magnetic shields show shielding factors within a factor of 3 of conventional approaches. The vacuum demonstrator device shows that 3D-printed titanium structures are suitable for use as vacuum chambers, with the test system reaching base pressures of 5 ± 0.5 × 10 -10 mbar. These demonstrations show considerable promise for the use of additive manufacturing for cold atom based quantum technologies, in future enabling improved integrated structures, allowing for the reduction in size, weight and assembly complexity.

  15. A compact micro-wave synthesizer for transportable cold-atom interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautier, J.; Lours, M.; Landragin, A., E-mail: arnaud.landragin@obspm.fr [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-06-15

    We present the realization of a compact micro-wave frequency synthesizer for an atom interferometer based on stimulated Raman transitions, applied to transportable inertial sensing. Our set-up is intended to address the hyperfine transitions of {sup 87}Rb at 6.8 GHz. The prototype is evaluated both in the time and the frequency domain by comparison with state-of-the-art frequency references developed at Laboratoire national de métrologie et d'essais−Systémes de référence temps espace (LNE-SYRTE). In free-running mode, it features a residual phase noise level of −65 dB rad{sup 2} Hz{sup −1} at 10 Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise level in the order of −120 dB rad{sup 2} Hz{sup −1} for Fourier frequencies above 10 kHz. The phase noise effect on the sensitivity of the atomic interferometer is evaluated for diverse values of cycling time, interrogation time, and Raman pulse duration. To our knowledge, the resulting contribution is well below the sensitivity of any demonstrated cold atom inertial sensors based on stimulated Raman transitions. The drastic improvement in terms of size, simplicity, and power consumption paves the way towards field and mobile operations.

  16. Quantum control of ultra-cold atoms: uncovering a novel connection between two paradigms of quantum nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiao; Mouritzen, Anders Sørrig; Gong, Jiangbin

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the translational motion of cold atoms using optical lattice potentials is of both theoretical and experimental interest. By designing two on-resonance time sequences of kicking optical lattice potentials, a novel connection between two paradigms of nonlinear mapping systems, i.e. the...... sequences of control fields. Extensions of this study are also discussed. The results are intended to open up a new generation of cold-atom experiments of quantum nonlinear dynamics.......Controlling the translational motion of cold atoms using optical lattice potentials is of both theoretical and experimental interest. By designing two on-resonance time sequences of kicking optical lattice potentials, a novel connection between two paradigms of nonlinear mapping systems, i...

  17. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement of Narrow-Band Photons from Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement introduced in 1935 deals with two particles that are entangled in their positions and momenta. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of EPR position-momentum entanglement of narrow-band photon pairs generated from cold atoms. By using two-photon quantum ghost imaging and ghost interference, we demonstrate explicitly that the narrow-band photon pairs violate the separability criterion, confirming EPR entanglement. We further demonstrate continuous variable EPR steering for positions and momenta of the two photons. Our new source of EPR-entangled narrow-band photons is expected to play an essential role in spatially multiplexed quantum information processing, such as, storage of quantum correlated images, quantum interface involving hyperentangled photons, etc.

  18. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement of Narrow-Band Photons from Cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-12-16

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement introduced in 1935 deals with two particles that are entangled in their positions and momenta. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of EPR position-momentum entanglement of narrow-band photon pairs generated from cold atoms. By using two-photon quantum ghost imaging and ghost interference, we demonstrate explicitly that the narrow-band photon pairs violate the separability criterion, confirming EPR entanglement. We further demonstrate continuous variable EPR steering for positions and momenta of the two photons. Our new source of EPR-entangled narrow-band photons is expected to play an essential role in spatially multiplexed quantum information processing, such as, storage of quantum correlated images, quantum interface involving hyperentangled photons, etc.

  19. ''First evaluation of the accuracy of a cesium cold atom fountain, perspectives''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezali, S.

    1997-01-01

    The present PHD thesis is, at first, a detailed description of the atomic cesium fountain 'FO1' working as a frequency standard since more than three years at the Laboratoire Primaire du Temps et des Frequences. The 'FO1' has been included in the calculation of the TA1 in the CCDS 1996. Then, this manuscript holds on the different effects such as cold collisions, inhomogeneities of the static magnetic field... affecting the fountain's accuracy, limited at 2.10 -15 because of the hydrogen maser (few hours of integration). The traverse velocity selection via stimulated Raman transitions at two dimensions constitute an important part of the present work. The possible improvements are discussed at the end of the manuscript. (author)

  20. Applicability of multisyringe chromatography coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for mercury speciation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán-Mar, J.L.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L.; Serra, A.M.; Hernández-Ramírez, A.; Cerdà, V.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: An automatic system, based on the applicability of multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) detection is developed for mercury speciation. Highlights: ► The on-line coupling of MSC to CV/AFS was developed for mercury speciation analysis. ► The speciation of MeHg + , Hg 2+ and EtHg + was achieved on a RP C18 monolithic column. ► The hyphenated system provided higher sample throughput compared to HPLC–CV/AFS. ► The limits of detection for mercury species were comparable or better than those reported by HPLC–CV/AFS. ► The developed method also provided low instrumental and operational costs. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel automatic approach for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ), methylmercury (MeHg + ) and ethylmercury (EtHg + ) using multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) was developed. For the first time, the separation of mercury species was accomplished on a RP C18 monolithic column using a multi-isocratic elution program. The elution protocol involved the use of 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)–acetonitrile (99:1, v/v), followed by 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)–acetonitrile (90:10, v/v). The eluted mercury species were then oxidized under post-column UV radiation and reduced using tin(II) chloride in an acidic medium. Subsequently, the generated mercury metal were separated from the reaction mixture and further atomized in the flame atomizer and detected by AFS. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (3σ) were found to be 0.03, 0.11 and 0.09 μg L −1 for MeHg + , Hg 2+ and EtHg + , respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of the peak height for 3, 6 and 3 μg L −1 of MeHg + , Hg 2+ and EtHg + (as Hg) ranged from 2.4 to 4.0%. Compared with the conventional HPLC–CV/AFS hyphenated systems

  1. Dependence of irradiation creep on temperature and atom displacements in 20% cold worked type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.R.

    1976-04-01

    Irradiation creep studies with pressurized tubes of 20 percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel were conducted in EBR-2. Results showed that as atom displacements are extended above 5 dpa and temperatures are increased above 375 0 C, the irradiation induced creep rate increases with both increasing atom displacements and increasing temperature. The stress exponent for irradiation induced creep remained near unity. Irradiation-induced effective creep strains up to 1.8 percent were observed without specimen failure. 13 figures

  2. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  3. Strong enhancement of Penning ionization for asymmetric atom pairs in cold Rydberg gases: the Tom and Jerry effect

    KAUST Repository

    Efimov, D K; Miculis, K; Bezuglov, N N; Ekers, Aigars

    2016-01-01

    with which feature autoionization widths that are enhanced by several orders of magnitude compared to that of two atoms in the initial laser-excited state n 0. We also show that in the high-density regime of cold Rydberg gas experiments the ionization rate

  4. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, V.; Bimbard, E.; Stanojevic, J.

    2012-01-01

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within...

  5. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  6. Stimulated cold fusion by positronium atoms, cross sections, and wall interactions in plasmas, used to diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Because of the technical complexities, involved in the controlled thermonuclear, reactions, a simple vicegerent agent cold plasma, stimulated by positronium atoms (achieved through a ring storage) as stimulus, introduced by this author in ITC 12 conference. In the present paper, the interaction between γ rays emitted through positronium atoms annihilation (in the forms of doublet and triplet electromagnetic photonic radiation) with plasma particles (including electrons, ions and neutral particles) investigated. Proper lifetime of singlet γ rays τs are about 100 ns and from that of triplet γ rays, i.e τt about 100 fems, reside in the following transition times in Ne and Argon elements in He-Ne and Ar lasers respectively: Ne*(3S2) [transition time τ = 105 ns] -> Ne*(2P4); Ar+*(3P4 4S) [transition time τ = 105 fems] -> Ar+(3P5). Then the interactions of γ rays with mater in plasma could follow up as treated from that of the laser and mater in one extreme while the comparison of this situation with normal plasmas in other extreme could serve as diagnostics key role in magnetically confined plasmas reactors. Collisions between charge and neutral species in plasma with electromagnetic radiation (γ photonic radiation) including the energy loss and scattering lead to different consequences. Light electrons can take up appreciably amounts of energy from the incident rays, lead to heating cold plasma, whereas massive ions absorb very little energy. Thus loss of incident energy in radiation occurs almost entirely in collisions with electrons , which, referred to the γ rays energy this would led to plasma heating about thermonuclear reaction ( Eγ = hν = 0.5 MeV). The heavy ions and neutral species in interaction with electromagnetic γ radiation, result on the other hand in scattering, in turn may increase the ionization level of the cold plasma, toward fully ionized plasma. Although all the essential features of these different interaction cross sections deduced

  7. Many-body dynamics with cold atoms and molecules in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachenmayer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Systems of cold atoms or molecules, trapped in a periodic potential formed from standing waves of laser light, provide an experimental possibility to study strongly correlated many-body lattice models, which are traditionally used in condensed matter physics. Due to the relatively weak energy scales in these ''optical lattices'' (next-neighbor tunneling energies are typically on the order of tens of Hertz), the time-scales of the dynamics in these systems is relatively slow and can be observed in experiments. Furthermore, the microscopic parameters of the models can be very well controlled by lattice laser intensities and external fields. Thus, optical lattices provide an excellent framework to study many-body quantum non-equilibrium dynamics, which on the theoretical level is the topic of this thesis. This thesis contains a study of many-body dynamics in optical lattices for both idealized isolated models and realistic models with imperfections. It is centered around four main topics: The first two topics are studies of coherent many-body dynamics. This contains explicitly: (i) an analysis of the possibility to dynamically prepare crystalline states of Rydberg atoms or polar molecules by adiabatically tuning laser parameters; and (ii) a study of the collapses and revivals of the momentum-distribution of a Bose-Einstein condensate with a fixed number of atoms, which is suddenly loaded into a deep optical lattice. The third main topic is entanglement and specifically the dynamical growth of entanglement between portions of an optical lattice in quench experiments. A method to create and measure large-scale entanglement is presented in this thesis. The fourth main topic addresses classical noise. Specifically, a system of atoms in an optical lattice, which is created from lasers with intensity fluctuations, is analyzed in this work. The noisy evolution of many-body correlation functions is studied and a method to cancel this noise in a realistic experimental setup is

  8. The Cold War legacy of regulatory risk analysis: The Atomic Energy Commission and radiation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Joseph B.

    From its inception in 1946 the Atomic Energy Commission pioneered the use of risk analysis as a mode of regulatory rationality and political rhetoric, yet historical treatments of risk analysis nearly always overlook the important role it played in the administration of atomic energy during the early Cold War. How this absence from history has been achieved and why it characterizes most historical accounts are the subjects of Chapter II. From there, this study goes on to develop the thesis that the advent of the atomic bomb was a world-shattering event that forced the Truman administration to choose between two novel alternatives: (1) movement towards global governance based initially on cooperative control of atomic energy or (2) unsparing pursuit of nuclear superiority. I refer to these as nuclear internationalism and nuclear nationalism, respectively. Each defined a social risk hierarchy. With the triumph of nuclear nationalism, nuclear annihilation was designated the greatest risk and a strong nuclear defense the primary means of prevention. The AEC's mission in the 1950s consisted of the rapid development of a nuclear arsenal, continual improvements in weapons technologies, and the promotion of nuclear power. The agency developed a risk-based regulatory framework through its dominant position within the National Committee on Radiation Protection. It embraced a technocratic model of risk analysis whose articulation and application it controlled, largely in secret. It used this to undergird a public rhetoric of reassurance and risk minimization. In practice, safety officials adjusted exposure levels within often wide parameters and with considerable fluidity in order to prevent safety concerns from interfering with operations. Secrecy, the political climate of the time, and a lack of accountability enabled the agency to meld technical assessments with social value judgments in a manner reflective of nuclear nationalism's risk hierarchy. In the late fifties

  9. Applicability of multisyringe chromatography coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for mercury speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Mar, J.L.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Serra, A.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hernandez-Ramirez, A. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Cerda, V., E-mail: victor.cerda@uib.es [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-12-05

    Graphical abstract: An automatic system, based on the applicability of multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) detection is developed for mercury speciation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The on-line coupling of MSC to CV/AFS was developed for mercury speciation analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The speciation of MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +} was achieved on a RP C18 monolithic column. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hyphenated system provided higher sample throughput compared to HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limits of detection for mercury species were comparable or better than those reported by HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed method also provided low instrumental and operational costs. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel automatic approach for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) and ethylmercury (EtHg{sup +}) using multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) was developed. For the first time, the separation of mercury species was accomplished on a RP C18 monolithic column using a multi-isocratic elution program. The elution protocol involved the use of 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (99:1, v/v), followed by 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (90:10, v/v). The eluted mercury species were then oxidized under post-column UV radiation and reduced using tin(II) chloride in an acidic medium. Subsequently, the generated mercury metal were separated from the reaction mixture and further atomized in the flame atomizer and detected by AFS. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (3{sigma}) were found to be 0.03, 0.11 and 0.09 {mu}g L{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +}, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of the

  10. Optimized coupling of cold atoms into a fiber using a blue-detuned hollow-beam funnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Jerome; Light, Philip S.; Kashyap, Raman; Luiten, Andre N. [Frequency Standards and Metrology Group, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Western Australia 6009, Perth (Australia); Department of Engineering Physics, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3A7 (Canada); Frequency Standards and Metrology, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Western Australia 6009, Perth (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the process of coupling cold atoms into the core of a hollow-core photonic-crystal optical fiber using a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian beam. In contrast to the use of a red-detuned Gaussian beam to couple the atoms, the blue-detuned hollow beam can confine cold atoms to the darkest regions of the beam, thereby minimizing shifts in the internal states and making the guide highly robust to heating effects. This single optical beam is used as both a funnel and a guide to maximize the number of atoms into the fiber. In the proposed experiment, Rb atoms are loaded into a magneto-optical trap (MOT) above a vertically oriented optical fiber. We observe a gravito-optical trapping effect for atoms with high orbital momentum around the trap axis, which prevents atoms from coupling to the fiber: these atoms lack the kinetic energy to escape the potential and are thus trapped in the laser funnel indefinitely. We find that by reducing the dipolar force to the point at which the trapping effect just vanishes, it is possible to optimize the coupling of atoms into the fiber. Our simulations predict that by using a low-power (2.5 mW) and far-detuned (300 GHz) Laguerre-Gaussian beam with a 20-{mu}m-radius core hollow fiber, it is possible to couple 11% of the atoms from a MOT 9 mm away from the fiber. When the MOT is positioned farther away, coupling efficiencies over 50% can be achieved with larger core fibers.

  11. Strong enhancement of Penning ionization for asymmetric atom pairs in cold Rydberg gases: the Tom and Jerry effect

    KAUST Repository

    Efimov, D K

    2016-05-18

    We consider Penning ionization of Rydberg atom pairs as an Auger-type process induced by the dipole-dipole interaction and employ semiclassical formulae for dipole transitions to calculate the autoionization width as a function of the principal quantum numbers, n d, n i, of both atoms. While for symmetric atom pairs with the well-known increase of the autoionization width with increasing n 0 is obtained, the result for asymmetric pairs is counterintuitive - for a fixed n i of the ionizing atom of the pair, the autoionization width strongly increases with decreasing n d of the de-excited atom. For H Rydberg atoms this increase reaches two orders of magnitude at the maximum of the n d dependence, and the same type of counterintuitive behavior is exhibited also by Na, Rb and Cs atoms. This is a purely quantum-mechanical effect, which points towards existence of optimal (we call them \\'Tom\\' and \\'Jerry\\' for \\'big\\' and \\'small\\') pairs of Rydberg atoms with respect to autoionization efficiency. Building on the model of population redistribution in cold Rydberg gases proposed in [1], we demonstrate that population evolution following the initial laser excitation of Rydberg atoms in state n 0 would eventually lead to the formation of such Tom-Jerry pairs with which feature autoionization widths that are enhanced by several orders of magnitude compared to that of two atoms in the initial laser-excited state n 0. We also show that in the high-density regime of cold Rydberg gas experiments the ionization rate of Tom-Jerry pairs can be substantially larger than the blackbody radiation-induced photoionization rate. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Determination of mercury in rice by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Maria Jose da [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Paim, Ana Paula S. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Pimentel, Maria Fernanda [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Cervera, M. Luisa, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Guardia, Miguel de la [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-05-14

    A cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry method (CV-AFS) has been developed for the determination of Hg in rice samples at a few ng g{sup -1} concentration level. The method is based on the previous digestion of samples in a microwave oven with HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by dilution with water containing KBr/KBrO{sub 3} and hydroxylamine and reduction with SnCl{sub 2} in HCl using external calibration. The matrix interferences and the effect of nitrogen oxide vapors have been evaluated and the method validated using a certified reference material. The limit of detection of the method was 0.9 ng g{sup -1} with a recovery percentage of 95 {+-} 4% at an added concentration of 5 ng g{sup -1}. The concentration level of Hg found in 24 natural rice samples from different origin ranged between 1.3 and 7.8 ng g{sup -1}.

  13. Ionization Spectroscopic Measurement of nP Rydberg Levels of 87Rb Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yufan; Zaheeruddin, Syed; Zhao, Dongmei; Ma, Xinwen; Yang, Jie

    2018-05-01

    We created an ultracold plasma via the spontaneous ionization of cold dense Rydberg atoms of 87Rb in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and measured the nS1/2 (n = 50-80), nP1/2 (n = 16-23), nP3/2 (n = 16-98), and nD5/2 (n = 49-96) Rydberg levels by detecting the electrons in the ultracold plasma. By fitting the energy levels of Rydberg states, the first ionization potential of 33690.950(11) cm-1 and the quantum defects of S, P, and D orbitals were obtained. The absolute transition energies of nS1/2 (n = 66-80), nP1/2 (n = 16-23), nP3/2 (n = 16-98), and nD5/2 (n = 58-96) states of 87Rb, as well as the quantum defects for p1/2 and p3/2 series, are given for the first time.

  14. Determination of mercury by multisyringe flow injection system with cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, L.O.; Elsholz, O.; Forteza, R.; Cerda, V.

    2006-01-01

    A new software-controlled time-based multisyringe flow injection system for mercury determination by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. Precise known volumes of sample, reducing agent (1.1% SnCl 2 in 3% HCl) and carrier (3% HCl) are dispensed into a gas-liquid separation cell with a multisyringe burette coupled with one three-way solenoid valve. An argon flow delivers the reduced mercury to the spectrometer. The optimization of the system was carried out testing reaction coils and gas-liquid separators of different design as well as changing parameters, such as sample and reagents volumes, reagent concentrations and carrier gas flow rate, among others. The analytical curves were obtained within the range 50-5000 ng L -1 . The detection limit (3σ b /S) achieved is 5 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.4%, evaluated from 16 successive injections of 250 ng L -1 Hg standard solution. The injection and sample throughput per hour were 44 and 11, respectively. This technique was validated by means of solid and water reference materials with good agreement with the certified values and was successfully applied to fish samples

  15. Demonstration of spatial-light-modulation-based four-wave mixing in cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juo, Jz-Yuan; Lin, Jia-Kang; Cheng, Chin-Yao; Liu, Zi-Yu; Yu, Ite A.; Chen, Yong-Fan

    2018-05-01

    Long-distance quantum optical communications usually require efficient wave-mixing processes to convert the wavelengths of single photons. Many quantum applications based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) have been proposed and demonstrated at the single-photon level, such as quantum memories, all-optical transistors, and cross-phase modulations. However, EIT-based four-wave mixing (FWM) in a resonant double-Λ configuration has a maximum conversion efficiency (CE) of 25% because of absorptive loss due to spontaneous emission. An improved scheme using spatially modulated intensities of two control fields has been theoretically proposed to overcome this conversion limit. In this study, we first demonstrate wavelength conversion from 780 to 795 nm with a 43% CE by using this scheme at an optical density (OD) of 19 in cold 87Rb atoms. According to the theoretical model, the CE in the proposed scheme can further increase to 96% at an OD of 240 under ideal conditions, thereby attaining an identical CE to that of the previous nonresonant double-Λ scheme at half the OD. This spatial-light-modulation-based FWM scheme can achieve a near-unity CE, thus providing an easy method of implementing an efficient quantum wavelength converter for all-optical quantum information processing.

  16. Speciation of methylmercury and ethylmercury by gas chromatography cold vapor atomic fluresence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggess, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-28

    Existing models and simulants of tank disposition media at SRS have presumed the presence of high concentrations of inorganic mercury. However, recent quarterly tank analyses show that mercury is present as organomercurial species at concentrations that may present challenges to remediation and disposition and may exceed the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). To-date, methylmercury analysis for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been performed off-site by Eurofins Scientific (Lancaster, PA). A series of optimization and validation experiments has been performed at SRNL, which has resulted in the development of on-site organomercury speciation capabilities using purge and trap gas chromatography coupled with thermal desorption cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (P&T GC/CVAFS). Speciation has been achieved for methylmercury, with a method reporting limit (MRL) values of 1.42 pg for methylmercury. Results obtained by SRNL from the analysis of past quarterly samples from tanks 21, 40, and 50 have demonstrated statistically indistinguishable concentration values compared with the concentration data obtained from Eurofins, while the data from SRNL has demonstrated significantly improved precision and processing time.

  17. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  18. Optical trapping of cold neutral atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, Do Thi; Viet, Nguyen Ai; Nga, Dao Thi Thuy; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a new schema of trapping cold atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube. The two light fields circularly polarized sending through a carbon nanotube generates an evanescent wave around this nanotube. By evanescent effect, the wave decays away from the nanotube producing a set of trapping minima of the total potential in the transverse plane as a ring around the nanotube. This schema allows capture of atoms to a cylindrical shell around the nanotube. We consider some possible boundary conditions leading to the non-trivial bound state solution. Our result will be compared to some recent trapping models and our previous trapping models.

  19. Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) and a ``Twist'' on Nonlinear Magneto-optical Rotation (NMOR) with Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    Within the class of nonlinear optical effects that exhibit sub-natural linewidth features, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) stand out as having made dramatic impacts on various applications including atomic clocks, magnetometry, and single photon storage. A related effect, known as electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), has received less attention in the literature. Here, we report on the first observation of EIA in cold atoms using the Hanle configuration, where a single laser beam is used to both pump and probe the atoms while sweeping a magnetic field through zero along the beam direction. We find that, associated with the EIA peak, a ``twist'' appears in the corresponding NMOR signal. A similar twist has been previously noted by Budker et al., in the context of warm vapor optical magnetometry, and was ascribed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels. By studying this feature through numerical simulations and cold atom experiments, thus rendering the hyperfine levels well resolved, we enhance the understanding of the optical pumping mechanism behind it, and elucidate its relation to EIA. Finally, we demonstrate a useful application of these studies through a simple and rapid method for nulling background magnetic fields within our atom chip apparatus.

  20. Electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor and its in-situ trapping in gold-covered graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveny, Vaclav; Rychlovsky, Petr; Netolicka, Jarmila; Sima, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The combination of more efficient flow-through electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation with its in-situ trapping in a graphite tube atomizer is described. This coupled technique has been optimized to attain the maximum sensitivity for Hg determination and to minimize the limits of detection and determination. A laboratory constructed thin-layer flow-through cell with a platinum cathode served as the cold vapor generator. Various cathode arrangements with different active surface areas were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the mercury vapor. The inner surface of the graphite tube was covered with a gold foil placed against the sampling hole. The results attained for the electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation (an absolute limit of detection of 80 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion) were compared with the traditional vapor generation using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent (an absolute limit of detection of 124 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion). The repeatability at the 5 ng ml -1 level was better than 4.1% (RSD) for electrochemical mercury vapor generation and better than 5.6% for the chemical cold vapor generation. The proposed method was applied to the determination the of Hg contents in a certified reference material and in spiked river water samples

  1. Calculations of recombination rates for cold 4He atoms from atom-dimer phase shifts and determination of universal scaling functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Three-body recombination rates for cold 4 He are calculated with a method which exploits the simple relationship between the imaginary part of the atom-dimer elastic scattering phase shift and the S-matrix for recombination. The elastic phase shifts are computed above breakup threshold by solving a three-body Faddeev equation in momentum space with inputs based on a variety of modern atom-atom potentials. Recombination coefficients for the HFD-B3-FCII potential agree very well with the only previously published results. Since the elastic scattering and recombination processes for 4 He are governed by 'Efimov physics', they depend on universal functions of a scaling variable. The computed recombination coefficients for potentials other than HFD-B3-FCII make it possible to determine these universal functions

  2. Speciation of mercury in fish samples by flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yanlin [NanoScience and Sensor Technology Research Group, School of Applied Sciences and Engineering, Monash University, Churchill, Victoria 3842 (Australia); Adeloju, Samuel B., E-mail: Sam.Adeloju@monash.edu [NanoScience and Sensor Technology Research Group, School of Applied Sciences and Engineering, Monash University, Churchill, Victoria 3842 (Australia)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful speciation of inorganic and organic Hg with Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+} and thiourea as catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best sensitivity enhancement and similar sensitivity for MeHg and Hg{sup 2+} with Fe{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful use of Hg{sup 2+} as the primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total-Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative extraction of Hg and MeHg with 2 M HCl which contained thiourea. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration with FIA for rapid analysis with a sample throughput of 180 h{sup -1}. - Abstract: A rapid flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-CCV-AAS) method is described for speciation and determination of mercury in biological samples. Varying concentrations of NaBH{sub 4} were employed for mercury vapour generation from inorganic and mixture of inorganic and organic (total) Hg. The presence of Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+} and thiourea had catalytic effect on mercury vapour generation from methylmercury (MeHg) and, when together, Cu{sup 2+} and thiourea had synergistic catalytic effect on the vapour generation. Of the two metal ions, Fe{sup 3+} gave the best sensitivity enhancement, achieving the same sensitivity for MeHg and inorganic Hg{sup 2+}. Due to similarity of resulting sensitivity, Hg{sup 2+} was used successfully as a primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total Hg. The catalysis was homogeneous in nature, and it was assumed that the breaking of the C-Hg bond was facilitated by the delocalization of the 5d electron pairs in Hg atom. The extraction of MeHg and inorganic mercury (In-Hg) in fish samples were achieved quantitatively with hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiourea and determined by FI-CCV-AAS. The application of the method to the quantification of mercury species in a fish liver reference material DOLT-4 gave 91.5% and 102.3% recoveries for total and methyl mercury

  3. Speciation of mercury in fish samples by flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanlin; Adeloju, Samuel B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Successful speciation of inorganic and organic Hg with Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ and thiourea as catalysts. ► Best sensitivity enhancement and similar sensitivity for MeHg and Hg 2+ with Fe 3+ . ► Successful use of Hg 2+ as the primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total-Hg. ► Quantitative extraction of Hg and MeHg with 2 M HCl which contained thiourea. ► Integration with FIA for rapid analysis with a sample throughput of 180 h −1 . - Abstract: A rapid flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-CCV-AAS) method is described for speciation and determination of mercury in biological samples. Varying concentrations of NaBH 4 were employed for mercury vapour generation from inorganic and mixture of inorganic and organic (total) Hg. The presence of Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ and thiourea had catalytic effect on mercury vapour generation from methylmercury (MeHg) and, when together, Cu 2+ and thiourea had synergistic catalytic effect on the vapour generation. Of the two metal ions, Fe 3+ gave the best sensitivity enhancement, achieving the same sensitivity for MeHg and inorganic Hg 2+ . Due to similarity of resulting sensitivity, Hg 2+ was used successfully as a primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total Hg. The catalysis was homogeneous in nature, and it was assumed that the breaking of the C-Hg bond was facilitated by the delocalization of the 5d electron pairs in Hg atom. The extraction of MeHg and inorganic mercury (In-Hg) in fish samples were achieved quantitatively with hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiourea and determined by FI-CCV-AAS. The application of the method to the quantification of mercury species in a fish liver reference material DOLT-4 gave 91.5% and 102.3% recoveries for total and methyl mercury, respectively. The use of flow injection enabled rapid analysis with a sample throughput of 180 h −1 .

  4. Simulation-based evaluation of a cold atom interferometry gradiometer concept for gravity field recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douch, Karim; Wu, Hu; Schubert, Christian; Müller, Jürgen; Pereira dos Santos, Franck

    2018-03-01

    The prospects of future satellite gravimetry missions to sustain a continuous and improved observation of the gravitational field have stimulated studies of new concepts of space inertial sensors with potentially improved precision and stability. This is in particular the case for cold-atom interferometry (CAI) gradiometry which is the object of this paper. The performance of a specific CAI gradiometer design is studied here in terms of quality of the recovered gravity field through a closed-loop numerical simulation of the measurement and processing workflow. First we show that mapping the time-variable field on a monthly basis would require a noise level below 5mE /√{Hz } . The mission scenarios are therefore focused on the static field, like GOCE. Second, the stringent requirement on the angular velocity of a one-arm gradiometer, which must not exceed 10-6 rad/s, leads to two possible modes of operation of the CAI gradiometer: the nadir and the quasi-inertial mode. In the nadir mode, which corresponds to the usual Earth-pointing satellite attitude, only the gradient Vyy , along the cross-track direction, is measured. In the quasi-inertial mode, the satellite attitude is approximately constant in the inertial reference frame and the 3 diagonal gradients Vxx,Vyy and Vzz are measured. Both modes are successively simulated for a 239 km altitude orbit and the error on the recovered gravity models eventually compared to GOCE solutions. We conclude that for the specific CAI gradiometer design assumed in this paper, only the quasi-inertial mode scenario would be able to significantly outperform GOCE results at the cost of technically challenging requirements on the orbit and attitude control.

  5. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2 , H 2 and H 2 O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L -1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L -1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  6. The Atoms for Peace USIS Films: Spreading the Gospel of the "Blessing" of Atomic Energy in the Early Cold War Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Tsuchiya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1955, the U.S. Information Service (USIS Tokyo produced a thirty-minute documentary film Blessing of Atomic Energy in commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The film introduced how the Japanese government, researchers, and companies were using radioisotopes offered by the U.S. Argonne National Laboratory for the “peaceful” purposes in agriculture, medicine, hygiene, industry, and disaster prevention. The film also showed the mechanism of atomic power generation, and explained that it was already put into practice in the U.S. and Europe. The images of Japanese people enjoying the “blessing” of the “peaceful” use of atomic energy, ten years after the traumatic experience of A-bombs, were not only shown all over Japan, but also translated into different languages and shown in many countries, including the UK, Finland, Indonesia, Sudan, and Venezuela. The film was part of some fifty educational and documentary films produced for President Eisenhower’s “Atoms for Peace” campaign – a global information dissemination programs on the U.S. leadership in the civilian use of nuclear energy. This paper will explore the roles USIS films played in disseminating information on the “peaceful” use of nuclear energy in the early Cold War era.

  7. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  8. Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optical switch that operates with a few hundred photons per switching pulse. The light-light interaction is mediated by laser-cooled atoms. The required strong interaction between atoms and light is achieved by simultaneously confining photons and atoms inside the microscopic...... hollow core of a single-mode photonic-crystal fiber....

  9. Charge breeding investigation in EBIS/T and collision study of ions with cold atoms for HITRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Alexey

    2010-01-29

    Highly charged ions (HCI) at low velocities or at rest are interesting systems for various atomic physics experiments. For investigations on HCI of heavy stable or radioactive nuclides the HITRAP (Highly charged Ion TRAP) decelerator facility has been set up at GSI to deliver cooled beams of HCI at an energy of 5 keV/q. The HCI are produced in a stripper foil at relativistic energies and are decelerated in several steps at ESR storage ring and HITRAP before they are delivered to experimental setups. One of the experiments is the investigation of multi-electron charge exchange in collisions of heavy HCI with cold atoms using novel MOTRIMS technique. Collision experiments on light ions from an ECR ion source colliding with cold atoms in a MOT have been performed and the results are described. An electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been tested and optimized for commissioning of the HITRAP physics experiments. The process of charge breeding in the EBIT has been successfully studied with gaseous elements and with an alkaline element injected from an external ion source. (orig.)

  10. Charge breeding investigation in EBIS/T and collision study of ions with cold atoms for HITRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    Highly charged ions (HCI) at low velocities or at rest are interesting systems for various atomic physics experiments. For investigations on HCI of heavy stable or radioactive nuclides the HITRAP (Highly charged Ion TRAP) decelerator facility has been set up at GSI to deliver cooled beams of HCI at an energy of 5 keV/q. The HCI are produced in a stripper foil at relativistic energies and are decelerated in several steps at ESR storage ring and HITRAP before they are delivered to experimental setups. One of the experiments is the investigation of multi-electron charge exchange in collisions of heavy HCI with cold atoms using novel MOTRIMS technique. Collision experiments on light ions from an ECR ion source colliding with cold atoms in a MOT have been performed and the results are described. An electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been tested and optimized for commissioning of the HITRAP physics experiments. The process of charge breeding in the EBIT has been successfully studied with gaseous elements and with an alkaline element injected from an external ion source. (orig.)

  11. Production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen atoms A first step towards high precision CPT test

    CERN Document Server

    Variola, A; Bonomi, G; Boutcha, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Riedler, P; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P

    2003-01-01

    Observations of anti-hydrogen in small quantities have been reported at CERN and at FermiLab, but these experiments were not suited to spectroscopy experiments. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration reported the production and detection of very low energy anti-hydrogen atoms produced in cryogenic environment. This is the first major step in the study of antiatom's internal structure and it can lead to a high precision test of the CPT fundamental symmetry. The method of production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen will be introduced. The absolute rate of anti-hydrogen production and the signal to background ratio in the ATHENA experiment will be discussed. (7 refs) .

  12. Delocalization of Relativistic Dirac Particles in Disordered One-Dimensional Systems and Its Implementation with Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shiliang; Zhang Danwei; Wang, Z. D.

    2009-01-01

    We study theoretically the localization of relativistic particles in disordered one-dimensional chains. It is found that the relativistic particles tend to delocalization in comparison with the nonrelativistic particles with the same disorder strength. More intriguingly, we reveal that the massless Dirac particles are entirely delocalized for any energy due to the inherent chiral symmetry, leading to a well-known result that particles are always localized in one-dimensional systems for arbitrary weak disorders to break down. Furthermore, we propose a feasible scheme to detect the delocalization feature of the Dirac particles with cold atoms in a light-induced gauge field.

  13. Determination of Hg(II) as a pollutant in Karachi coastal waters by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, I.I.; Shazli, J.; Ali, S.R.; Mohiuddin, S.; Zehra, I.

    2002-01-01

    Now a days, environmental monitoring has great importance and mercury is well known for its toxicity. Mercury (which is at trace level) is analyzed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy with amendments that are appropriate to the present laboratory need. The results are consistent with previous analysis, through other methods, two areas namely Ibrahim Hyderi and Fisheries were found to have mercury levels around 0.193 mu/L and 0.110 mu g/L, respectively. Whereas other areas have mercury levels similar to other places reported earlier. (author)

  14. Note: Design and implementation of a home-built imaging system with low jitter for cold atom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachtel, A. J.; Gillette, M. C.; Clements, E. R.; Zhong, S.; Weeks, M. R.; Bali, S., E-mail: balis@miamioh.edu [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056-1866 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    A novel home-built system for imaging cold atom samples is presented using a readily available astronomy camera which has the requisite sensitivity but no timing-control. We integrate the camera with LabVIEW achieving fast, low-jitter imaging with a convenient user-defined interface. We show that our system takes precisely timed millisecond exposures and offers significant improvements in terms of system jitter and readout time over previously reported home-built systems. Our system rivals current commercial “black box” systems in performance and user-friendliness.

  15. Magnetic-field-driven localization of light in a cold-atom gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipetrov, S E; Sokolov, I M

    2015-02-06

    We discover a transition from extended to localized quasimodes for light in a gas of immobile two-level atoms in a magnetic field. The transition takes place either upon increasing the number density of atoms in a strong field or upon increasing the field at a high enough density. It has many characteristic features of a disorder-driven (Anderson) transition but is strongly influenced by near-field interactions between atoms and the anisotropy of the atomic medium induced by the magnetic field.

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a Zeeman-sublevels Λ-system of cold 87Rb atoms in free space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaojun; Zhang Haichao; Wang Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental investigation of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Zeeman-sublevels Λ-type system of cold 87 Rb atoms in free space. We use the Zeeman substates of the hyperfine energy states 5 2 S 1/2 , F = 2 and 5 2 P 3/2 , F′ = 2 of 87 Rb D 2 line to form a Λ-type EIT scheme. The EIT signal is obtained by scanning the probe light over 1 MHz in 4 ms with an 80 MHz arbitrary waveform generator. More than 97% transparency and 100 kHz EIT window are observed. This EIT scheme is suited for an application of pulsed coherent storage atom clock (Yan B, et al. 2009 Phys. Rev. A 79 063820). (paper)

  17. Forward and backward scattering experiments in ultra-cold Rubidium atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampel, Nir Shlomo

    project, we have studied coherent forward scattering in the form of a memory experiment. In such an experiment we convert the input light pulse to an atomic excitation, and at a later time convert back the atomic excitation into the retrieved light pulse. In the first project, we investigate the source...

  18. Helium clusters as cold, liquid matrix for the laser spectroscopy of silver atoms, silver clusters and C60 fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main obstacles in the study of gas phase metal clusters is their high temperature. Even cooling in a seeded beam is only of limited used, since the condensation continuously releases energy into the system. As a consequence, spectroscopic studies of free metal clusters typically yield broad structures, which are interpreted as plasma resonances of a free electron gas. An experiment on ionic sodium clusters has shown that low temperatures lead to a narrowing of the absorption bands and the appearance of additional structure, that can not be explained within the free electron model. Thus the need for cold clusters is evident. In principle the deposition of metal clusters into inert matrices eliminates the temperature problem but it can also inflict strong changes on the electronic spectra. Droplets of liquid helium serve as a much more gentle matrix that avoids many of the above problems. In this thesis the new technique of helium droplet spectroscopy is presented as a tool for the study of extremely cold metal clusters. Clusters of silver up to a mass greater than 7000 amu have been produced by pickup of single atoms by a beam of helium droplets. The droplets are formed in a supersonic expansion. The cluster's binding energy is removed by evaporative cooling and the system remains at 0.4 K. The doped droplets are probed by laser spectroscopy with a depletion technique or resonant two photon ionization. We were able to measure the first UV absorption spectrum of metal atoms (silver) inside helium droplets. Another experiment shows that a small fraction of the captured silver atoms resides on the surface of the droplet like alkali atoms. In a two photon process previously unobserved s- and d-Rydberg states of the free silver atom (20 left angle n left angle 80) were excited. The silver atoms, initially embedded in the helium droplets, are found to move to the surface and desorb when excited to the broadened 5p level. This is the first result showing laser

  19. Continuous loading of cold atoms into a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Piet O; Hensler, Sven; Werner, Joerg; Binhammer, Thomas; Goerlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2003-01-01

    We present a robust continuous optical loading scheme for a Ioffe-Pritchard (IP) type magnetic trap (MT). Chromium atoms are cooled and trapped in a modified magneto-optical trap (MOT) consisting of a conventional 2D-MOT in the radial direction and an axial molasses. The MOT and IP trap share the same magnetic field configuration. Continuous loading of atoms into the IP trap is provided by radiative leakage from the MOT to a metastable level which is magnetically trapped and decoupled from the MOT light. We are able to accumulate 30 times more atoms in the MT than in the MOT. The absolute number of 2 x 10 8 atoms is limited by inelastic collisions. A model based on rate equations shows good agreement with the data. Our scheme can also be applied to other atoms with similar level structure like alkaline earth metals

  20. Precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P{sub 1/2} transition in atomic hydrogen on a cold thermal beam of optically excited 2S atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Axel; Kolachevsky, Nikolai; Alnis, Janis; Yost, Dylan C.; Matveev, Arthur; Parthey, Christian G.; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Khabarova, Ksenia [FSUE ' VNIIFTRI' , 141570 Moscow (Russian Federation); Haensch, Theodor W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, 80799 Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The 'proton size puzzle', i.e. the discrepancy between the values for the proton r.m.s. charge radius deduced from precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen and electron-proton-scattering on one side and the value deduced from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy on the other side, has been persisting for more than two years now. Although huge efforts have been put into trying to resolve this discrepancy from experimental and theoretical side, no convincing argument could be found so far. In this talk, we report on a unique precision spectroscopy experiment on atomic hydrogen, which is aiming to bring some light to the hydrogen part of the puzzle: In contrast to any previous high resolution experiment probing a transition frequency between the meta-stable 2S state and a higher lying nL state (n=3,4,6,8,12, L=S,P,D), our measurement of the 2S-4P{sub 1/2} transition frequency is the first experiment being performed on a cold thermal beam of hydrogen atoms optically excited to the 2S state. We will discuss how this helps to efficiently suppresses leading systematic effects of previous measurements and present the preliminary results we obtained so far.

  1. Nambu-Goldstone Fermion Mode in Quark-Gluon Plasma and Bose-Fermi Cold Atom System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, D.

    2015-01-01

    It was suggested that supersymmetry (SUSY) is broken at finite temperature, and as a result of the symmetry breaking, a Nambu-Goldstone fermion (goldstino) related to SUSY breaking appears. Since dispersion relations of quarks and gluons are almost degenerate at extremely high temperature, quasi-zero energy quark excitation was suggested to exist in quark-gluon plasma (QGP), though QCD does not have exact SUSY. On the other hand, in condensed matter system, a setup of cold atom system in which the Hamiltonian has SUSY was proposed, the goldstino was suggested to exist, and the dispersion relation of that mode at zero temperature was obtained recently. In this presentation, we obtain the expressions for the dispersion relation of the goldstino in cold atom system at finite temperature, and compare it with the dispersion of the quasi zero-mode in QGP. Furthermore, we show that the form of the dispersion relation of the goldstino can be understood by using an analogy with a magnon in ferromagnet. We also discuss on how the dispersion relation of the goldstino is reflected in observable quantities in experiment. (author)

  2. Dynamic effect of collision failure of phase in gas of cold dark atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'ichev, L.V.

    2005-01-01

    In a gas of slow atoms exhibiting the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) on the sublevels of the ground state in a spatially nonuniform light field, rare collisions destroying the CPT state initiate the irreversible exchange of momentum between radiation and atoms. This exchange is manifested as an additional force that acts on the particles. The force is of geometric origin, being determined only by the structure of the field of local CPT states. When this force is not masked by the standard collision change in atomic momentum, the observation of the kinetics of the particles may provide information on the physics of the collisions [ru

  3. How to cool down cold atoms using laser light? Principles and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guellati-Khelifa, Saida; Clade, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This article is devoted to the description of various mechanisms of the laser cooling of neutral atoms. These mechanisms are all based on the interaction between a photon, an entity of light, and an atom, an entity of matter. One of the macroscopic manifestations of this interaction is the pressure of radiation force. The effect of this force is strongly amplified when the source of photon is a laser. We will describe how it is possible to use this force with the Doppler effect in order to slow an atomic beam and also to reduce considerably the thermal agitation of atoms. We will explain how by shaping the light potentials and magnetic fields it is possible to reach extremely low temperatures of some nano-kelvin. At these temperatures, very near to the absolute zero, it is possible for certain kind of atoms, called bosons, to achieve a new state of matter, where quantum behaviour of atoms became apparent on a macroscopic scale. (authors)

  4. Heat Treatment of Gas-Atomized Powders for Cold Spray Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, William A.; Brewer, Luke N.

    2018-02-01

    This communication demonstrates the efficacy of heat treatment on the improved deposition characteristics of aluminum alloy powders. A novel furnace was constructed for solutionizing of feedstock powders in an inert atmosphere while avoiding sintering. This furnace design achieved sufficiently high cooling rates to limit re-precipitation during powder cooling. Microscopy showed homogenization of the powder particle microstructures after heat treatment. Cold spray deposition efficiency with heat-treated powders substantially increased for the alloys AA2024, AA6061, and AA7075.

  5. The Hanbury Brown ant Twiss effect for cold atoms; L'effet Hanbury Brown et Twiss pour les atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellekens, M

    2007-05-15

    This thesis deals with the measurement of the quantum intensity correlations in gases of metastable Helium. The measurement has been performed on thermal gases of bosonic He{sup 4} and fermionic He{sup 3}, as well as on Bose-Einstein condensates. In 1956, Robert Hanbury Brown et Richard Twiss measured the correlation between photons emitted from a single thermal source. The consequently demonstrated that the photons emitted by such a source tend to arrive grouped on a detector (Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect). This bunching characterizes bosons from a non-coherent source. Fermions show an anti-bunching behaviour in the same conditions. By using metastable Helium atoms, that can be detected individually through the use of micro-channel plates, we have been able to show a similar bunching of bosons He{sup 4} from thermal sources around the micro-kelvin. As expected, the coherence of the Bose-Einstein condensates did not produce a particular correlation. The measurement on thermal gases of fermionic He{sup 3} has demonstrated the anti-bunching. Particular effort has been employed in describing the micro-channel plate based delay-line detector, the key to the experiment. (author)

  6. Metal-Insulator Transition Revisited for Cold Atoms in Non-Abelian Gauge Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satija, Indubala I.; Dakin, Daniel C.; Clark, Charles W.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of realizing metal-insulator transitions with ultracold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices in the presence of artificial gauge potentials. For Abelian gauges, such transitions occur when the magnetic flux penetrating the lattice plaquette is an irrational multiple of the magnetic flux quantum. Here we present the first study of these transitions for non-Abelian U(2) gauge fields. In contrast to the Abelian case, the spectrum and localization transition in the non-Abelian case is strongly influenced by atomic momenta. In addition to determining the localization boundary, the momentum fragments the spectrum. Other key characteristics of the non-Abelian case include the absence of localization for certain states and satellite fringes around the Bragg peaks in the momentum distribution and an interesting possibility that the transition can be tuned by the atomic momenta

  7. Uranium mining during the Cold War. The Wismut plant in the Soviet atomic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boch, Rudolf; Karlsch, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The book on the Wismut plant covers the following issues: Introduction: history of uranium mining of Wismut. Significance of uranium mining in politics and science: Uranium for the strategic equilibrium; the ore of the Cold War; special zones; ''Party within the Party'', radiation protection in uranium mining; Freiberg's geoscientists searching strategic metals in the 1940ies; end of the shift. Social history and daily routine: Good money for hard work; foreign among ''friends''; personnel data; gainful employment for women and emancipation in the frame of mining; from symphony orchestra to laymen circles; the fightning spirit of pitman-sportsmen.

  8. Quantum phases of low-dimensional ultra-cold atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Ludwig G.

    2007-06-01

    In this thesis we derive and explore the quantum phases of various types of ultracold atom systems, as well as their experimental signature. The technology of cooling, trapping and manipulating ultracold atoms has advanced in an amazing fashion during the last decade, which has led to the study of many-body effects of atomic ensembles. We first consider atomic mixtures in one dimension, which show a rich structure of phases, using a Luttinger liquid description. We then go on to consider how noise correlations in time-of-flight images of one-dimensional systems can be used to draw conclusions about the many-body state that they're in. Thirdly, we consider the quantum phases of Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices, either square lattices or triangular lattices, using the powerful method of functional renormalization group analysis. Lastly, we study the phases of two-coupled quasi-superfluids in two dimensions, which shows unusual phases, and which could be used to realize the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, i.e. the generation of topological defects by ramping across a phase transition, first proposed in the context of an early universe scenario.

  9. Strongly interacting Fermi systems in 1/N expansion: From cold atoms to color superconductivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abuki, H.; Brauner, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 12 (2008), 125010/1-125010/13 ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0734 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : BCS-BEC crossover * Unitary Fermi gas * Quark matter Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 5.050, year: 2008

  10. Radiotracer investigation of the cold-vapour atomic absorption method of analysis for trace mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Because of certain problems found in application of the atomic absorption method for trace analysis of mercury, a careful check of the procedures used was undertaken, with radiotracer mercury to facilitate the investigation. The results obtained, in conjunction with those of sample ashing procedures, indicate that the method is less straightforward than its simplicity suggests. (Auth.)

  11. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  12. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO 2 + with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H 2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH + , CH 2 + , and CH 4 + have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  13. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto–optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jia-Qiang; Wu Chen-Fei; Wang Li-Jun; Yan Xue-Shu; Zhang Jian-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional (2D) magneto–optical trap (MOT) with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam to extract a cold atomic beam. With the independent pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The total atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is 4.02 × 10 10 atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D + MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 μW and detuning 0 Γ , the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by a factor of 20. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with an FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied in detail. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model. (paper)

  14. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-07-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  15. Limit Cycles and Chaos via Quasi-periodicity in Two Coupled Ensembles of Ultra-cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aniket; Yuzbashyan, Emil; Altshuler, Boris

    We study the dynamics of two mesoscopic ensembles of ultra-cold two level atoms, which are collectively coupled to an optical cavity and are being pumped incoherently to the excited state. Whereas the time independent steady states are well understood, little is known about the time dependent ones. We explore and categorize various time dependent steady states, e.g. limit cycles and chaotic behavior. We draw a non-equilibrium phase diagram indicating different steady-state behaviors in different parts of the parameter space. We discuss the synchronization of the two ensembles in the time dependent steady states. We also show the onset of chaos via quasi-periodicity. The rich time dependent steady-state behavior, especially the existence of chaos, opens up possibilities for several engineering applications. Supported in part by the University and Louis Bevier Graduate Fellowship.

  16. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  17. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I.; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. → Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. → Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min -1 Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl 2 reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO 3 -H 2 SO 4 mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml -1 or 0.08 μg g -1 in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg -1 , while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  18. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu, E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, Alin I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, Michaela, E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, Eugen, E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, Maria, E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, Emil, E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. {yields} Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. {yields} Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min{sup -1} Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl{sub 2} reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml{sup -1} or 0.08 {mu}g g{sup -1} in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg{sup -1}, while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 {+-} 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  19. Ultra-cold molecules in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynar, Roahn Helden

    2000-08-01

    This thesis is about photoassociation of Bose-condensed 87Rb. Most importantly we report that state selected 87Rb2 molecules were created at rest in a condensate of 87Rb using two-photon photoassociation. Additionally, we have identified three weakly bound states of the 87Rb2 S+u3 , potential for the |1, -1> + |1, - 1> collisional channel. The binding energies of these states are 529.4 +/- .07, 636.0094 +/- .0012, and 24.24 +/- .01 MHz respectively. We have also carried out a detailed study of the density dependence of the shift and width of the two-photon lineshape. This shift and width is modeled using the theory of Bohn and Julienne [34] and in addition to the precise measurement of binding energy we also report the first measurement of an atom molecule scattering length, aam, which we conclude is -180 +/- 150 a0, and the inelastic collision rate, Kinel dependent coherent coupling between atoms and molecules. This theory yields two coupled equations, one for the evolution of atomic condensate amplitude and one for the evolution of molecular condensate amplitude. The nature of the atomic-molecular condensate evolution is shown to depend on six, model parameters including the coherent coupling, given by cn . The other five parameters can be interpreted as light-shifts and incoherent loss rates. We present a calculation intended to estimate the values of these six parameters for the 87Rb - 87Rb 2 system. Based on the results of this calculation we identify two locations in the 87Rb2 spectrum where coherent transfer of population from atomic condensate to molecular condensate is plausible. Finally, we examine the credibility of the theoretical model used to estimate the six parameters used by the mean field theory. By comparing the measured Stark shifts of two-color resonances with predictions based on our theoretical model we conclude that the model is satisfactory for the v = 37 level of the S+u3 potential. This work also describes the experimental details of

  20. Precision Gravity Tests with Atom Interferometry in Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tino, G.M.; Sorrentino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Università di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Aguilera, D. [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center, Robert-Hooke-Strasse 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Battelier, B.; Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences, LP2N - UMR5298 - IOGS - CNRS Université Bordeaux 1, Bâtiment A30 351 cours de la Libération F-33405 TALENCE Cedex France (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Università di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bongs, K. [Midlands Ultracold Atom Research Centre School of Physics and Astronomy University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bouyer, P. [Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences, LP2N - UMR5298 - IOGS - CNRS Université Bordeaux 1, Bâtiment A30 351 cours de la Libération F-33405 TALENCE Cedex France (France); Braxmaier, C. [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center, Robert-Hooke-Strasse 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gaaloul, N. [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D 30167 Hannover (Germany); Gürlebeck, N. [University of Bremen, Centre of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), Am Fallturm, D - 29359 Bremen (Germany); Hauth, M. [Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-10-15

    Atom interferometry provides extremely sensitive and accurate tools for the measurement of inertial forces. Operation of atom interferometers in microgravity is expected to enhance the performance of such sensors. This paper presents two possible implementations of a dual {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb atom interferometer to perform differential gravity measurements in space, with the primary goal to test the Weak Equivalence Principle. The proposed scheme is in the framework of two projects of the European Space Agency, namely Q-WEP and STE-QUEST. The paper describes the baseline experimental configuration, and discusses the technology readiness, noise and error budget for the two proposed experiments.

  1. On-line preconcentration and determination of mercury in biological and environmental samples by cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrua, N.; Cerutti, S.; Salonia, J.A.; Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    An on-line procedure for the determination of traces of total mercury in environmental and biological samples is described. The present methodology combines cold vapor generation associated to atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) with preconcentration of the analyte on a minicolumn packed with activated carbon. The retained analyte was quantitatively eluted from the minicolumn with nitric acid. After that, volatile specie of mercury was generated by merging the acidified sample and sodium tetrahydroborate(III) in a continuous flow system. The gaseous analyte was subsequently introduced via a stream of Ar carrier into the atomizer device. Optimizations of both, preconcentration and mercury volatile specie generation variables were carried out using two level full factorial design (2 3 ) with 3 replicates of the central point. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 13-fold was obtained. The detection limit (3σ) was 10 ng L -1 and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.1% (n = 10) at the 5 μg L -1 level. The calibration curve using the preconcentration system for mercury was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 at levels near the detection limit up to at least 1000 μg L -1 . Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of mercury in tap water and hair samples

  2. Theoretical study of ghost imaging with cold atomic waves under the condition of partial coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Yun-Xian

    2014-01-01

    A matter wave ghost imaging mechanism is proposed and demonstrated theoretically. This mechanism is based on the Talbot-Lau effect. Periodic gratings of matter wave density, which appear as a result of interference of atoms diffracted by pulses of an optical standing wave, are utilized to produce the reference wave and the signal wave simultaneously for the ghost imaging. An advantage of this mechanism is that during the imaging process, the beam-splitter is not needed, which highly simplifies the experimental setup and makes the ghost imaging possible in the field of matter wave

  3. Entanglement manipulation via Coulomb interaction in an optomechanical cavity assisted by two-level cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Tian, Xue-Dong; Liu, Yi-Mou; Cui, Cui-Li; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the stationary entanglement properties in a hybrid system consisting of an optical cavity, a mechanical resonator, a charged object, and an atomic ensemble. Numerical results show that this hybrid system exhibits three kinds of controllable bipartite entanglements in an experimentally accessible parameter regime with the help of the charged object. More importantly, it is viable to enhance on demand each bipartite entanglement at the expense of reducing others by modulating the Coulomb coupling strength. Last but not least, these bipartite entanglements seem more robust against on the environmental temperature for the positive Coulomb interaction.

  4. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zu, Wenchuan, E-mail: zuhongshuai@126.com [Beijing Institute of Technology, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100081 (China); Beijing Center for Physical & Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China); Wang, Zhenghao [Beijing Normal University, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Methylmercury detection by ECVG-AFS without pre-separation by HPLC is proposed. • Methylmercury is atomized by direct electrochemical reduction with no reductant. • Remarkably better sensitivity is obtained than the traditional HPLC-UV-AFS method. • Glassy carbon is the best cathode material to generate Hg vapor from methylmercury. - Abstract: A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL{sup −1} methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH{sub 3}{sup +} solutions were in the range of 0.2–5 ng mL{sup −1}(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88 × 10{sup −3} ng mL{sup −1} and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL{sup −1} standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7–45.8 ng g{sup −1}. The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6–103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n = 6)were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis.

  5. Quenching of cold antiprotonic helium atoms by collisions with H/sub 2/ molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Sauge, S

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the collisional quenching of cold metastable antiprotonic atomcules pHe/sup +/u/sub n, l/ by H/sub 2/ molecules in view of the recent state-resolved measurements at CERN. Firstly, we determine ab initio the 6-D intermolecular interaction between the four (anti)nuclei at the CCSD(T)/CP level. After averaging the interaction over the fast p orbits, we exhibit reactive channels and activation barriers below few 100 mu E/sub h/. Hence, we account qualitatively for the order of magnitude and (n, l) dependence of the quenching cross-sections measured at 30 K, after estimating tunneling probabilities. We also account for the lower quenching efficiency by deuterium. However improving this overall agreement would require the determination of numerous finer contributions. We monitor the saturation of electronic correlation with larger basis sets; we estimate the importance of dynamical relaxation effects; and we stress the role of quantum vibrational and rotational delocalization for the light (p, p) nuc...

  6. Harmonically trapped cold atom systems: Few-body dynamics and application to many-body thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Kevin Michael

    Underlying the many-body effects of ultracold atomic gases are the few-body dynamics and interparticle interactions. Moreover, the study of few-body systems on their own has accelerated due to confining few atoms in each well of a deep optical lattice or in a single microtrap. This thesis studies the microscopic properties of few-body systems under external spherically symmetric harmonic confinement and how the few-body properties translate to the many-body system. Bosonic and fermionic few-body systems are considered and the dependence of the energetics and other quantities are investigated as functions of the s-wave scattering length, the mass ratio and the temperature. It is found that the condensate fraction of a weakly-interacting trapped Bose gas depletes quadratically with the s-wave scattering length. The next order term in the depletion depends not only, as might be expected naively, on the s-wave scattering length and the effective range but additionally on a two-body parameter that is not needed to reproduce the energy of weakly-interacting trapped Bose gases. This finding has important implications for effective field theory treatments of the system. Weakly-interacting atomic and molecular two-component Fermi gases with equal masses are described using perturbative approaches. The energy shifts are tabulated and interpreted, and a measure of the molecular condensate fraction is developed. We develop a measure of the molecular condensate fraction using the two-body density matrix and we develop a model of the spherical component of the momentum distribution that agrees well with stochastic variational calculations. We establish the existence of intersystem degeneracies for equal mass two-component Fermi gases with zero-range interactions, where the eigen energies of the spin-imbalanced system are degenerate with a subset of the eigen energies of the more spin-balanced system and the same total number of fermions. For unequal mass two-component Fermi

  7. Drop impacts onto cold and heated rigid surfaces: Morphological comparisons, disintegration limits and secondary atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moita, A.S.; Moreira, A.L.N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses an experimental study aimed at characterizing the mechanisms of disintegration which occur when individual water and fuel droplets impact onto heated surfaces. The experiments consider the use of a simplified flow configuration and make use of high-speed visualization together with image processing techniques to characterize the morphology of the impact and to quantify the outcome of secondary atomization in terms of droplet size and number. The results evidence that surface topography, wettability and liquid properties combine in a complex way to alter the wetting behaviour of droplets at impact at different surface temperatures. The relative importance of the dynamic vapor pressure associated with the rate of vaporization and surface roughness increases with surface temperature and becomes dominant at the film boiling regime. The analysis is aimed at giving a phenomenological description of droplet disintegration within the various heat transfer regimes

  8. Quantum incommensurate skyrmion crystals and commensurate to in-commensurate transitions in cold atoms and materials with spin-orbit couplings in a Zeeman field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study strongly interacting spinor atoms in a lattice subject to a two dimensional (2d) anisotropic Rashba type of spin orbital coupling (SOC) and an Zeeman field. We find the interplay between the Zeeman field and the SOC provides a new platform to host rich and novel classes of quantum commensurate and in-commensurate phases, excitations and phase transitions. These commensurate phases include two collinear states at low and high Zeeman field, two co-planar canted states at mirror reflected SOC parameters respectively. Most importantly, there are non-coplanar incommensurate Skyrmion (IC-SkX) crystal phases surrounded by the four commensurate phases. New excitation spectra above all the five phases, especially on the IC-SKX phase are computed. Three different classes of quantum commensurate to in-commensurate transitions from the IC-SKX to its four neighboring commensurate phases are identified. Finite temperature behaviors and transitions are discussed. The critical temperatures of all the phases can be raised above that reachable by current cold atom cooling techniques simply by tuning the number of atoms N per site. In view of recent impressive experimental advances in generating 2d SOC for cold atoms in optical lattices, these new many-body phenomena can be explored in the current and near future cold atom experiments. Applications to various materials such as MnSi, {Fe}}0.5 {Co}}0.5Si, especially the complex incommensurate magnetic ordering in Li2IrO3 are given.

  9. Temperature and phase-space density of a cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, S. P.; Mishra, S. R.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

    2014-08-15

    We present studies on modifications in the temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser-cooled atom cloud from optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically, for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap is shown first to increase with increasing magnetic field gradient and then to decrease with it after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of the magnetic-field gradient. The experimentally-measured variation in the phase-space density in the magnetic trap with changing magnetic field gradient is shown to exhibit a similar trend. However, the experimentally-measured values of the number density and the phase-space density are much lower than the theoretically-predicted values. This is attributed to the experimentally-observed temperature in the magnetic trap being higher than the theoretically-predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful for setting a higher phase-space density in the trap by establishing an optimal value of the field gradient for a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  10. Floquet Symmetry-Protected Topological Phases in Cold-Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirniche, I.-D.; Potter, A. C.; Schleier-Smith, M.; Vishwanath, A.; Yao, N. Y.

    2017-09-01

    We propose and analyze two distinct routes toward realizing interacting symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases via periodic driving. First, we demonstrate that a driven transverse-field Ising model can be used to engineer complex interactions which enable the emulation of an equilibrium SPT phase. This phase remains stable only within a parametric time scale controlled by the driving frequency, beyond which its topological features break down. To overcome this issue, we consider an alternate route based upon realizing an intrinsically Floquet SPT phase that does not have any equilibrium analog. In both cases, we show that disorder, leading to many-body localization, prevents runaway heating and enables the observation of coherent quantum dynamics at high energy densities. Furthermore, we clarify the distinction between the equilibrium and Floquet SPT phases by identifying a unique micromotion-based entanglement spectrum signature of the latter. Finally, we propose a unifying implementation in a one-dimensional chain of Rydberg-dressed atoms and show that protected edge modes are observable on realistic experimental time scales.

  11. Floquet Symmetry-Protected Topological Phases in Cold-Atom Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirniche, I-D; Potter, A C; Schleier-Smith, M; Vishwanath, A; Yao, N Y

    2017-09-22

    We propose and analyze two distinct routes toward realizing interacting symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases via periodic driving. First, we demonstrate that a driven transverse-field Ising model can be used to engineer complex interactions which enable the emulation of an equilibrium SPT phase. This phase remains stable only within a parametric time scale controlled by the driving frequency, beyond which its topological features break down. To overcome this issue, we consider an alternate route based upon realizing an intrinsically Floquet SPT phase that does not have any equilibrium analog. In both cases, we show that disorder, leading to many-body localization, prevents runaway heating and enables the observation of coherent quantum dynamics at high energy densities. Furthermore, we clarify the distinction between the equilibrium and Floquet SPT phases by identifying a unique micromotion-based entanglement spectrum signature of the latter. Finally, we propose a unifying implementation in a one-dimensional chain of Rydberg-dressed atoms and show that protected edge modes are observable on realistic experimental time scales.

  12. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N 2 /O 2 (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 ± 0.7)×10 20 m −3 was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 ± 0.4)×10 19 m −3 at 0.1 vol. %

  13. Surface modes of ultra-cold atomic clouds with very large number of vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazalilla, M A [Donostia International Physics Center, Donostia (Spain); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    We study the surface modes of some of the vortex liquids recently found by means of exact diagonalizations in systems of rapidly rotating bosons. In contrast to the surface modes of Bose condensates, we find that the surface waves have a frequency linear in the excitation angular momentum, h-bar l > 0. Furthermore, in analogy with the edge waves of electronic quantum Hall states, these excitations are chiral, that is, they can be excited only for values of l that increase the total angular momentum of the vortex liquid. However, differently from the quantum Hall phenomena for electrons, we also find other excitations that are approximately degenerate in the laboratory frame with the surface modes, and which decrease the total angular momentum by l quanta. The surface modes of the Laughlin, as well as other scalar and vector boson states are analyzed, and their observable properties characterized. We argue that measurement of the response of a vortex liquid to a weak time-dependent potential that imparts angular momentum to the system should provide valuable information to characterize the vortex liquid. In particular, the intensity of the signal of the surface waves in the dynamic structure factor has been studied and found to depend on the type of vortex liquid. We point out that the existence of surface modes has observable consequences on the density profile of the Laughlin state. These features are due to the strongly correlated behavior of atoms in the vortex liquids. We point out that these correlations should be responsible for a remarkable stability of some vortex liquids with respect to three-body losses. (author)

  14. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Geisamanda Pedrini [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente, 225, Gavea, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Calixto de Campos, Reinaldo [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente, 225, Gavea, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: rccampos@rdc.puc-rio.br; Luna, Aderval Severino [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rua S. Francisco Xavier, s/n, Maracana, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-06-30

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH{sub 4} reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO{sub 3} at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg{sup 0} and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N{sub 2} was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 {mu}g L{sup -1} of Hg{sup 2+}, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 {mu}g L{sup -1} (0.14 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 {mu}g L{sup -1}.

  15. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of mercury in ash and soil samples by oxygen flask combustion method-Cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Wenhua; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Ohki, Akira

    2008-01-01

    A simple method was developed for the determination of mercury (Hg) in coal fly ash (CFA), waste incineration ash (WIA), and soil by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). A KMnO 4 solution was used as an absorbent in the OFC method, and the sample containing a combustion agent and an ash or soil sample was combusted by the OFC method. By use of Hg-free graphite as the combustion agent, the determination of Hg in ash and soil was successfully carried out; the Hg-free graphite was prepared by use of a mild pyrolysis procedure at 500 deg. C. For six certified reference materials (three CFA samples and three soil samples), the values of Hg obtained by this method were in good agreement with the certified or reference values. In addition, real samples including nine CFAs collected from some coal-fired power plants, five WIAs collected from waste incineration plants, and two soils were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method

  17. Determination of methyl mercury by aqueous phase Eehylation, followed by gas chromatographic separation with cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wild, John F.; Olsen, Mark L.; Olund, Shane D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent national sampling of streams in the United States revealed low methyl mercury concentrations in surface waters. The resulting median and mean concentrations, calculated from 104 samples, were 0.06 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.15 ng/L, respectively. This level of methyl mercury in surface water in the United States has created a need for analytical techniques capable of detecting sub-nanogram per liter concentrations. In an attempt to create a U.S. Geological Survey approved method, the Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory has adapted a distillation/ethylation/ gas-phase separation method with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy detection for the determination of methyl mercury in filtered and unfiltered waters. This method is described in this report. Based on multiple analyses of surface water and ground-water samples, a method detection limit of 0.04 ng/L was established. Precision and accuracy were evaluated for the method using both spiked and unspiked ground-water and surface-water samples. The percent relative standard deviations ranged from 10.2 to 15.6 for all analyses at all concentrations. Average recoveries obtained for the spiked matrices ranged from 88.8 to 117 percent. The precision and accuracy ranges are within the acceptable method-performance limits. Considering the demonstrated detection limit, precision, and accuracy, the method is an effective means to quantify methyl mercury in waters at or below environmentally relevant concentrations

  18. Lorentz-Symmetry Test at Planck-Scale Suppression With a Spin-Polarized 133Cs Cold Atom Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan-Le Bars, H; Guerlin, C; Lasseri, R-D; Ebran, J-P; Bailey, Q G; Bize, S; Khan, E; Wolf, P

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of a local Lorentz invariance (LLI) test performed with the 133 Cs cold atom clock FO2, hosted at SYRTE. Such a test, relating the frequency shift between 133 Cs hyperfine Zeeman substates with the Lorentz violating coefficients of the standard model extension (SME), has already been realized by Wolf et al. and led to state-of-the-art constraints on several SME proton coefficients. In this second analysis, we used an improved model, based on a second-order Lorentz transformation and a self-consistent relativistic mean field nuclear model, which enables us to extend the scope of the analysis from purely proton to both proton and neutron coefficients. We have also become sensitive to the isotropic coefficient , another SME coefficient that was not constrained by Wolf et al. The resulting limits on SME coefficients improve by up to 13 orders of magnitude the present maximal sensitivities for laboratory tests and reach the generally expected suppression scales at which signatures of Lorentz violation could appear.

  19. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  20. Observation of Fano-Type Interference in a Coupled Cavity-Atom System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yong; Tan Zheng; Wang Jin; Zhan Ming-Sheng; Zhu Yi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    We present the experimental observation of the Fano-type interference in a coupled cavity-atom system by confining the laser-cooled "8"5Rb atoms in an optical cavity. The asymmetric Fano profile is obtained through quantum interference in a three-level atomic system coherently coupled to a single mode cavity field. The observed Fano profile can be explained by the interference between the intra-cavity dark state and the polariton state of the coupled cavity-atom system. The possible applications of our observations include all-optical switching, optical sensing and narrow band optical filters. (paper)

  1. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  2. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  3. xGASS: total cold gas scaling relations and molecular-to-atomic gas ratios of galaxies in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, Barbara; Saintonge, Amélie; Janowiecki, Steven; Cortese, Luca; Davé, Romeel; Lemonias, Jenna J.; Cooper, Andrew P.; Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron B.; Fabello, Silvia; Geréb, Katinka; Kilborn, Virginia; Wang, Jing

    2018-05-01

    We present the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (xGASS), a gas fraction-limited census of the atomic hydrogen (H I) gas content of 1179 galaxies selected only by stellar mass (M⋆ = 109-1011.5 M⊙) and redshift (0.01 new Arecibo observations of 208 galaxies, for which we release catalogues and H I spectra. In addition to extending the GASS H I scaling relations by one decade in stellar mass, we quantify total (atomic+molecular) cold gas fractions and molecular-to-atomic gas mass ratios, Rmol, for the subset of 477 galaxies observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that atomic gas fractions keep increasing with decreasing stellar mass, with no sign of a plateau down to log M⋆/M⊙ = 9. Total gas reservoirs remain H I-dominated across our full stellar mass range, hence total gas fraction scaling relations closely resemble atomic ones, but with a scatter that strongly correlates with Rmol, especially at fixed specific star formation rate. On average, Rmol weakly increases with stellar mass and stellar surface density μ⋆, but individual values vary by almost two orders of magnitude at fixed M⋆ or μ⋆. We show that, for galaxies on the star-forming sequence, variations of Rmol are mostly driven by changes of the H I reservoirs, with a clear dependence on μ⋆. Establishing if galaxy mass or structure plays the most important role in regulating the cold gas content of galaxies requires an accurate separation of bulge and disc components for the study of gas scaling relations.

  4. Rapid food decomposition by H2O2-H2SO4 for determination of total mercury by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenebon, Odair; Sakuma, Alice M; Dovidauskas, Sergio; Okada, Isaura A; de, MaioFrancaD; Lichtig, Jaim

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of 50% H2O2-H2SO4 (3 + 1, v/v) was used for decomposition of food in open vessels at 80 degrees C. The treatment allowed rapid total mercury determination by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Cabbage, potatoes, peanuts paste, hazelnuts paste, oats, tomatoes and their derivatives, oysters, shrimps, prawns, shellfish, marine algae, and many kinds of fish were analyzed by the proposed methodology with a limit of quantitation of 0.86 +/- 0.08 microg/L mercury in the final solution. Reference materials tested also gave excellent recovery.

  5. Coherent generation and dynamic manipulation of double stationary light pulses in a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Qianqian; Zhang Xiaohang; Gao Junyan; Zhang Yan; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui

    2011-01-01

    We study a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms for efficiently manipulating the dynamic propagation and evolution of a quantum probe field by modulating four classical control fields. Our numerical results show that it is viable to transform the quantum probe field into a pair of two-color stationary light pulses mutually coupled through two wave packets of atomic spin coherence. The pair of stationary light pulses can be released either from the sample entrance and exit synchronously or just from the sample exit with a controlled time delay. In addition, the two-color stationary light pulses are immune to the fast decay originating from the higher-order Fourier components of atomic spin and optical coherence, and may exhibit the quantum limited beating signals with their characteristic frequency determined by detunings of the four classical control fields. These results could be explored to design novel photonic devices, such as optical routing, beam splitter, and beat generator, for manipulating a quantum light field.

  6. Coherent generation and dynamic manipulation of double stationary light pulses in a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Qianqian; Zhang Xiaohang; Gao Junyan; Zhang Yan; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-12-15

    We study a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms for efficiently manipulating the dynamic propagation and evolution of a quantum probe field by modulating four classical control fields. Our numerical results show that it is viable to transform the quantum probe field into a pair of two-color stationary light pulses mutually coupled through two wave packets of atomic spin coherence. The pair of stationary light pulses can be released either from the sample entrance and exit synchronously or just from the sample exit with a controlled time delay. In addition, the two-color stationary light pulses are immune to the fast decay originating from the higher-order Fourier components of atomic spin and optical coherence, and may exhibit the quantum limited beating signals with their characteristic frequency determined by detunings of the four classical control fields. These results could be explored to design novel photonic devices, such as optical routing, beam splitter, and beat generator, for manipulating a quantum light field.

  7. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  8. Analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the magnetic scalar potential: An application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-06-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here, we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution and is presented through practical examples, including a nonuniform finite solenoid used to produce cold atomic beams via laser cooling. These examples allow educators to discuss the nontrivial calculation of fields off-axis using concepts familiar to most students, while offering the opportunity to introduce themes of current modern research.

  9. Control of the 133 cesium cold collisions, search for a variation of the fine structure constant using a dual rubidium-cesium atomic fountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, H.

    2005-03-01

    We developed a method of measurement of the frequency shift due to the collisions between cold atoms. This is the main systematic limitation for the accuracy of the Cs 133 based fountains (∼ 10 -15 in relative frequency). Consequently, we can measure this effect near 0.5% This opens prospects for improvements of the fountains performances in term of accuracy until 10 -16 . The fountain has also obtained a stability about 10 -14 at 1 s. We discovered for the first time, at very low magnetic field (5 ± 1 mG), Feshbach resonances. We also took a new absolute measurement of the hyperfine transition of the Rb 87 , which is the most precise ever carried out and is used now as definition for the secondary standard. By comparing this value with those measured the previous years, we could carry out a test of the stability of the fine structure constant on the level of 10 -15 /yr. We led local comparisons between atomic fountains and the other fountains of the laboratory. Most stable it is unrolled with a combined stability of 5.10 -14 at 1 s. The behavior of the difference of the two clocks goes like white frequency noise up to 3.10 -16 . The assessment of the dual fountain accuracy budget has been evaluated at 7.10 -16 for the cesium part and 8.10 -16 for the rubidium part. We contributed to the realization of the scale of International Atomic Time, by series of calibrations of hydrogen masers. An atomic comparison of fountain by satellite links was tested between our laboratory and our German counterpart. This measurement has determined the good agreement between the two clocks. (author)

  10. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  11. Methylmercury determination using a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet cold vapor multipath atomic absorption spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Reinaldo C.; Goncalves, Rodrigo A.; Brandao, Geisamanda P.; Azevedo, Marlo S.; Oliveira, Fabiana; Wasserman, Julio

    2009-01-01

    The present work investigates the use of a multipath cell atomic absorption mercury detector for mercury speciation analysis in a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography assembly. The multipath absorption cell multiplies the optical path while energy losses are compensated by a very intense primary source. Zeeman-effect background correction compensates for non-specific absorption. For the separation step, the mobile phase consisted in a 0.010% m/v mercaptoethanol solution in 5% methanol (pH = 5), a C 18 column was used as stationary phase, and post column treatment was performed by UV irradiation (60 deg. C, 13 W). The eluate was then merged with 3 mol L -1 HCl, reduction was performed by a NaBH 4 solution, and the Hg vapor formed was separated at the gas-liquid separator and carried through a desiccant membrane to the detector. The detector was easily attached to the system, since an external gas flow to the gas-liquid separator was provided. A multivariate approach was used to optimize the procedure and peak area was used for measurement. Instrumental limits of detection of 0.05 μg L -1 were obtained for ionic (Hg 2+ ) and HgCH 3 + , for an injection volume of 200 μL. The multipath atomic absorption spectrometer proved to be a competitive mercury detector in hyphenated systems in relation to the most commonly used atomic fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detectors. Preliminary application studies were performed for the determination of methyl mercury in sediments.

  12. Methylmercury determination using a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet cold vapor multipath atomic absorption spectrometry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Reinaldo C. [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: rccampos@puc-rio.br; Goncalves, Rodrigo A.; Brandao, Geisamanda P.; Azevedo, Marlo S. [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Fabiana; Wasserman, Julio [Institut of Geosciences, Fluminense Federal University, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, 24.210-340, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    The present work investigates the use of a multipath cell atomic absorption mercury detector for mercury speciation analysis in a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography assembly. The multipath absorption cell multiplies the optical path while energy losses are compensated by a very intense primary source. Zeeman-effect background correction compensates for non-specific absorption. For the separation step, the mobile phase consisted in a 0.010% m/v mercaptoethanol solution in 5% methanol (pH = 5), a C{sub 18} column was used as stationary phase, and post column treatment was performed by UV irradiation (60 deg. C, 13 W). The eluate was then merged with 3 mol L{sup -1} HCl, reduction was performed by a NaBH{sub 4} solution, and the Hg vapor formed was separated at the gas-liquid separator and carried through a desiccant membrane to the detector. The detector was easily attached to the system, since an external gas flow to the gas-liquid separator was provided. A multivariate approach was used to optimize the procedure and peak area was used for measurement. Instrumental limits of detection of 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained for ionic (Hg{sup 2+}) and HgCH{sub 3}{sup +}, for an injection volume of 200 {mu}L. The multipath atomic absorption spectrometer proved to be a competitive mercury detector in hyphenated systems in relation to the most commonly used atomic fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detectors. Preliminary application studies were performed for the determination of methyl mercury in sedi0011men.

  13. Experimental measurement of efficiency and transport coherence of a cold-atom Brownian motor in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelan, M; Hagman, H; Labaigt, G; Jonsell, S; Dion, C M

    2011-02-01

    The rectification of noise into directed movement or useful energy is utilized by many different systems. The peculiar nature of the energy source and conceptual differences between such Brownian motor systems makes a characterization of the performance far from straightforward. In this work, where the Brownian motor consists of atoms interacting with dissipative optical lattices, we adopt existing theory and present experimental measurements for both the efficiency and the transport coherence. We achieve up to 0.3% for the efficiency and 0.01 for the Péclet number.

  14. Anderson Transition of Cold Atoms with Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in Two-Dimensional Speckle Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orso, Giuliano

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the metal-insulator transition occurring in two-dimensional (2D) systems of noninteracting atoms in the presence of artificial spin-orbit interactions and a spatially correlated disorder generated by laser speckles. Based on a high order discretization scheme, we calculate the precise position of the mobility edge and verify that the transition belongs to the symplectic universality class. We show that the mobility edge depends strongly on the mixing angle between Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings. For equal couplings a non-power-law divergence is found, signaling the crossing to the orthogonal class, where such a 2D transition is forbidden.

  15. Characteristics of single-atom trapping in a magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Ji, Wangxi; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap with a single or a few atoms is presented. A very small number of 85 Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient. In order to find the optimum condition for a single-atom trap, we have investigated how the number of atoms and the size of atomic cloud change as various experimental parameters, such as a magnetic-field gradient and the trapping laser intensity and detuning. The averaged number of atoms was measured very accurately with a calibration procedure based on the single-atom saturation curve of resonance fluorescence. In addition, the number of atoms in a trap could be controlled by suppressing stochastic loading events by means of a real-time active feedback on the magnetic-field gradient

  16. The Hanbury Brown ant Twiss effect for cold atoms; L'effet Hanbury Brown et Twiss pour les atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellekens, M

    2007-05-15

    This thesis deals with the measurement of the quantum intensity correlations in gases of metastable Helium. The measurement has been performed on thermal gases of bosonic He{sup 4} and fermionic He{sup 3}, as well as on Bose-Einstein condensates. In 1956, Robert Hanbury Brown et Richard Twiss measured the correlation between photons emitted from a single thermal source. The consequently demonstrated that the photons emitted by such a source tend to arrive grouped on a detector (Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect). This bunching characterizes bosons from a non-coherent source. Fermions show an anti-bunching behaviour in the same conditions. By using metastable Helium atoms, that can be detected individually through the use of micro-channel plates, we have been able to show a similar bunching of bosons He{sup 4} from thermal sources around the micro-kelvin. As expected, the coherence of the Bose-Einstein condensates did not produce a particular correlation. The measurement on thermal gases of fermionic He{sup 3} has demonstrated the anti-bunching. Particular effort has been employed in describing the micro-channel plate based delay-line detector, the key to the experiment. (author)

  17. Topological insulators in cold-atom gases with non-Abelian gauge fields: the role of interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, Peter Philipp [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cocks, Daniel; Buchhold, Michael; Hofstetter, Walter [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe Universitaet, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rachel, Stephan [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Le Hur, Karyn [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    With the recent technological advance of creating (non)-Abelian gauge fields for ultracold atoms in optical lattices, it becomes possible to study the interplay of topological phases and interactions in these systems. Specifically, we consider a spinful and time-reversal invariant version of the Hofstadter problem. In addition, we allow for a hopping term which does not preserve S{sub z} spin symmetry and a staggered sublattice potential. Without interactions, the parameters can be tuned such that the system is a topological insulator. Using a combination of analytical techniques and the powerful real-space dynamical mean-field (R-DMFT) method, we discuss the effect of interactions and determine the interacting phase diagram.

  18. Three-body recombination of two-component cold atomic gases into deep dimers in an optical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mathias; Jensen, A. S.; Fedorov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    to the decay rate or recombination probability of the three-body system. The method is formulated in details and the relevant qualitative features are discussed as functions of scattering lengths and masses. We use zero-range model in analyses of recent recombination data. The dominating scattering length......We consider three-body recombination into deep dimers in a mass-imbalanced two-component atomic gas. We use an optical model where a phenomenological imaginary potential is added to the lowest adiabatic hyper-spherical potential. The consequent imaginary part of the energy eigenvalue corresponds...... is usually related to the non-equal two-body systems. We account for temperature smearing which tends to wipe out the higher-lying Efimov peaks. The range and the strength of the imaginary potential determine positions and shapes of the Efimov peaks as well as the absolute value of the recombination rate...

  19. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  20. Three-body recombination of two-component cold atomic gases into deep dimers in an optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, M; Jensen, A S; Fedorov, D V; Zinner, N T

    2015-01-01

    We consider three-body recombination into deep dimers in a mass-imbalanced two-component atomic gas. We use an optical model where a phenomenological imaginary potential is added to the lowest adiabatic hyper-spherical potential. The consequent imaginary part of the energy eigenvalue corresponds to the decay rate or recombination probability of the three-body system. The method is formulated in details and the relevant qualitative features are discussed as functions of scattering lengths and masses. We use zero-range model in analyses of recent recombination data. The dominating scattering length is usually related to the non-equal two-body systems. We account for temperature smearing which tends to wipe out the higher-lying Efimov peaks. The range and the strength of the imaginary potential determine positions and shapes of the Efimov peaks as well as the absolute value of the recombination rate. The Efimov scaling between recombination peaks is calculated and shown to depend on both scattering lengths. Recombination is predicted to be largest for heavy–heavy–light systems. Universal properties of the optical parameters are indicated. We compare to available experiments and find in general very satisfactory agreement. (paper)

  1. Chemical State of Radiobromine Formed by the Rb{sup 85}(n, {alpha}) Br{sup 82} Reaction; Etat Chimique Du Ra Diobrome Forme Par La Reaction {sup 85}Rb (n, {alpha}) {sup 82}Br; 0425 0418 041c 0418 0427 0415 0421 041a 041e 0415 0421 041e 0421 0422 041e 042f 041d 0418 0415 0420 0410 0414 0418 041e 0410 041a 0422 0418 0412 041d 041e 0413 041e 0411 0420 041e 041c 0410 , 041e 0411 0420 0410 0417 041e 0412 0410 041d 041d 041e 0413 041e 041f 0420 0418 0420 0415 0410 041a 0426 0418 0418 Rb{sup 85}(n, {alpha}) Br{sup 82}; Estado Quimico Del Radiobromo Formado Por La Reaccion {sup 85}Rb (n, {alpha}) {sup 82}Br

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlatkovic, M.; Kauiic, S. [' ' Ruder Boskovic' ' Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1965-04-15

    'oxydation superieur (BrO{sup -}{sub 3}) et inferieur (Br{sup -}, Br{sub 2}, BrO{sup -}), du radiobrome produit par la reaction nucleaire {sup 85}Rb(n, {alpha}) {sup 82}Br dans des composes inorganiques solides du rubidium. Les echantillons de Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Rb{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}, RbMnO{sub 4}, RbNO{sub 3}, Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} et RblO{sub 3} ont ete exposes a des neutrons de 14 MeV dans un generateur de neutrons. Il est apparu que dans le cas du Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4} irradie a la temperature ambiante ou a -195 Degree-Sign C, environ 8% de l'activite totale du {sup 82}Br se trouvaient dans la fraction bromate, le reste de l'activite ayant suivi la fraction bromure. L'irradiation de RbMnO{sub 4} et de RbNO{sub 3} a la temperature ambiante a produit environ 1% d'activite dans l'etat superieur d'oxydation du brome alors que pour Rb{sub 2S2}O{sub 8}, Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} et RbIO{sub 3} on n'a pu mesurer l'activite que dans la fraction bromure. On a observe un leger accroissement de l'activite du bromate lorsque Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4} expose aux neutrons a ete chauffe jusqu'a 250 Degree-Sign C. Aux temperatures plus elevees (jusqu'a 500 Degree-Sign C) , l'activite est passee dans l'etat d'oxydation inferieur. Le chauffage du RbMnO{sub 4} et du RbNO{sub 3} irradies n'a pas provoque d'oxydation du brome actif. Dans le cas de RbNO{sub 3}, une dose gamma de 22 Mrads prealable a l'irradiation n'a eu aucun effet sur la distribution des atomes de brome de recul, mais l'analyse d'echantillons de Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prealablement exposes aux rayons gamma (55 Mrads) a montre que l'activite du bromate etait plus elevee dans ces echantillons que dans des echantillons qui n'avaient ete que seches a 150 Degree-Sign C avant exposition aux neutrons. En conclusion, les auteurs mettent l'accent sur l'importance que presente la constitution chimique de la cible et des milieux non isotopiques en ce qui concerne la distribution des atomes de {sup 82}Br de haute energie et leur inaptitude au recuit dans les

  2. Preconcentration, speciation and determination of ultra trace amounts of mercury by modified octadecyl silica membrane disk/electron beam irradiation and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenani, Hamid [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazduni.ac.ir; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Jaffari, Abbas Ali [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjat, Abbas [Department of physics, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Mercury (II) and methyl mercury cations at the Sub-ppb level were adsorbed quantitatively from aqueous solution onto an octadecyl-bonded silica membrane disk modified by 2-[(2-mercaptophyenylimino)methyl] phenol (MPMP). The trapped mercury was then eluted with 3 ml ethanol and Hg{sup 2+} ion was directly measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, utilizing tin (II) chloride. Total mercury (Hgt) was determined after conversion of MeHg{sup +} into Hg{sup 2+} ion by electron beam irradiation. A sample volume of 1500 ml resulted in a preconcentration factor of 500 and the precision for a sampling volume of 500 ml at a concentration of 2.5 {mu}g l{sup -1} (n = 7) was 3.1%. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 3.8 ng l{sup -1}. The method was successfully applied to analysis of water samples, and the accuracy was assessed via recovery experiment.

  3. Unifying treatment of nonequilibrium and unstable dynamics of cold bosonic atom system with time-dependent order parameter in Thermo Field Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cold atoms with time-dependent condensate in nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics. → Coupled equations which describe the temporal evolution of the system are derived. → They are not the naive assemblages of presumable equations, but the self-consistently ones. → Valid even for systems with Landau or dynamical instability, and describing decays. → Transport equation has new collision term that is important in Landau instability. - Abstract: The coupled equations which describe the temporal evolution of the Bose-Einstein condensed system are derived in the framework of nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics. The key element is that they are not the naive assemblages of assumed equations, but are the self-consistent ones derived by appropriate renormalization conditions. While the order parameter is time-dependent, an explicit quasiparticle picture is constructed by a time-dependent expansion. Our formulation is valid even for the system with a unstable condensate, and describes the condensate decay caused by the Landau instability as well as by the dynamical one.

  4. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, Estefanía M; Bertón, Paula; Olsina, Roberto A; Altamirano, Jorgelina C; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2009-08-15

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(4)mim][PF(6)]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 microl of 9.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3ngL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 microg L(-1) Hg(2+) was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  5. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, Estefania M.; Berton, Paula; Olsina, Roberto A.; Altamirano, Jorgelina C.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2009-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 4 mim][PF 6 ]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 μl of 9.0 mol L -1 hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3 ng L -1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 μg L -1 Hg 2+ was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  6. Modified ionic liquid cold-induced aggregation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by atomic absorption spectrometry for trace determination of zinc in water and food samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeb, M.; Sadeghi, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a new method for the microextraction and determination of zinc (II). The ion is accumulated via ionic-liquid cold-induced aggregation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-CIA-DLLME) followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The ionic liquid (IL) 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate is dispersed into a heated sample solution containing sodium hexafluorophosphate as a common ion source. The solution is then placed in an ice-water bath upon which a cloudy solution forms due to the decrease of the solubility of the IL. Zinc is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline and extracted into the IL. The enriched phase is dissolved in a diluting agent and introduced to the FAAS. The method is not influenced by variations in the ionic strength of the sample solution. Factors affecting the performance were evaluated and optimized. At optimum conditions, the limit of detection is 0.18 μg L -1 , and the relative standard deviation is 3.0% (at n=5). The method was validated by recovery experiments and by analyzing a certified reference material and successfully applied to the determination of Zn (II) in water and food samples. (author)

  7. Quantifying uncertainty in measurement of mercury in suspended particulate matter by cold vapor technique using atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nahar; Ahuja, Tarushee; Ojha, Vijay Narain; Soni, Daya; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Leito, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    As a result of rapid industrialization several chemical forms of organic and inorganic mercury are constantly introduced to the environment and affect humans and animals directly. All forms of mercury have toxic effects; therefore accurate measurement of mercury is of prime importance especially in suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected through high volume sampler (HVS). In the quantification of mercury in SPM samples several steps are involved from sampling to final result. The quality, reliability and confidence level of the analyzed data depends upon the measurement uncertainty of the whole process. Evaluation of measurement uncertainty of results is one of the requirements of the standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005 (European Standard EN IS/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, issue1:1-28, 2006). In the presented study the uncertainty estimation in mercury determination in suspended particulate matter (SPM) has been carried out using cold vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG) technique followed by wet chemical digestion process. For the calculation of uncertainty, we have considered many general potential sources of uncertainty. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that the mercury concentration varies from 1.59 ± 0.37 to 14.5 ± 2.9 ng/m(3) with 95% confidence level (k = 2).

  8. Determination of Hg(II) in waters by on-line preconcentration using Cyanex 923 as a sorbent - Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Taicheng; Song Xuejie; Xu Jingwei; Guo Pengran; Chen Hangting; Li Hongfei

    2006-01-01

    Using a solid phase extraction mini-column home-made from a neutral extractant Cyanex 923, inorganic Hg could be on-line preconcentrated and simultaneously separated from methyl mercury. The preconcentrated Hg (II) was then eluted with 10% HNO 3 and subsequently reduced by NaBH 4 to form Hg vapor before determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal conditions for and interferences on the Hg preconcentration and measurement were at 1% HCl, for a 25 mL sample uptake volume and a 10 mL min -1 sample loading rate. The detection limit was 0.2 ng L -1 and much lower than that of conventional method (around 15.8 ng L -1 ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) is 1.8% for measurements of 40 ng L -1 of Hg and the linear working curve is from 20 to 2000 ng L -1 (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996). The method was applied in determination of inorganic Hg in city lake and deep well water (from Changchun, Jilin, China), and recovery test results for both samples were satisfactory

  9. Peaceful atoms in agriculture and food: how the politics of the Cold War shaped agricultural research using isotopes and radiation in post war divided Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    During the Cold War, the super powers advanced nuclear literacy and access to nuclear resources and technology to a first-class power factor. Both national governments and international organizations developed nuclear programs in a variety of areas and promoted the development of nuclear applications in new environments. Research into the use of isotopes and radiation in agriculture, food production, and storage gained major importance as governments tried to promote the possibility of a peaceful use of atomic energy. This study is situated in divided Germany as the intersection of the competing socio-political systems and focuses on the period of the late 1940s and 1950s. It is argued that political interests and international power relations decisively shaped the development of "nuclear agriculture". The aim is to explore whether and how politicians in both parts of the divided country fostered the new field and exerted authority over the scientists. Finally, it examines the ways in which researchers adapted to the altered political conditions and expectations within the two political structures, by now fundamentally different.

  10. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey.

  11. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap. The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS. The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically investigated. The factors influencing, the complex formation and extraction of DLLME-SFO method such as type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, concentration of salt, centrifuging time and concentration of the chelating agent were optimized. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in drinking and natural water and satisfactory relative recoveries (95–105% were achieved. The proposed procedure was based on very low consumption of organic solvents. The other benefits of the system were sensitive, simple, friendly to the environment, rejection of matrix constituent, low cost, the time consuming and high enrichment factor.

  12. Automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of mercury species in natural water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Min; Zhang, Feng-Ping; Jiao, Bao-Yu; Rao, Jin-Yu; Leng, Geng

    2017-04-14

    An automated, home-constructed, and low cost dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) device that directly coupled to a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS) system was designed and developed for the determination of trace concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg + ), ethylmercury (EtHg + ) and inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) in natural waters. With a simple, miniaturized and efficient automated DLLME system, nanogram amounts of these mercury species were extracted from natural water samples and injected into a hyphenated HPLC-CVAFS for quantification. The complete analytical procedure, including chelation, extraction, phase separation, collection and injection of the extracts, as well as HPLC-CVAFS quantification, was automated. Key parameters, such as the type and volume of the chelation, extraction and dispersive solvent, aspiration speed, sample pH, salt effect and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linear range was 10-1200ngL -1 for EtHg + and 5-450ngL -1 for MeHg + and Hg 2+ . Limits of detection were 3.0ngL -1 for EtHg + and 1.5ngL -1 for MeHg + and Hg 2+ . Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by spiking three natural water samples with different Hg concentrations, giving recoveries from 88.4-96.1%, and relative standard deviations <5.1%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    öhlich, A Griesmaier, T Pfau, H Saito, Y Kawaguchi and M Ueda High-energy-resolution molecular beams for cold collision studies L P Parazzoli, N Fitch, D S Lobser and H J Lewandowski Collisional effects in the formation of cold guided beams of polar molecules M Motsch, C Sommer, M Zeppenfeld, L D van Buuren, P W H Pinkse and G Rempe Towards sympathetic cooling of large molecules: cold collisions between benzene and rare gas atoms P Barletta, J Tennyson and P F Barker Efficient formation of ground-state ultracold molecules via STIRAP from the continuum at a Feshbach resonance Elena Kuznetsova, Marko Gacesa, Philippe Pellegrini, Susanne F Yelin and Robin Côté Emergent timescales in entangled quantum dynamics of ultracold molecules in optical lattices M L Wall and L D Carr Rotational state resolved photodissociation spectroscopy of translationally and vibrationally cold MgH+ ions: toward rotational cooling of molecular ions K Højbjerre, A K Hansen, P S Skyt, P F Staanum and M Drewsen Collective transverse cavity cooling of a dense molecular beam Thomas Salzburger and Helmut Ritsch A Stark decelerator on a chip Samuel A Meek, Horst Conrad and Gerard Meijer Deceleration of molecules by dipole force potential: a numerical simulation Susumu Kuma and Takamasa Momose Ultracold molecules: vehicles to scalable quantum information processing Kathy-Anne Brickman Soderberg, Nathan Gemelke and Cheng Chin Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions T V Tscherbul, Yu V Suleimanov, V Aquilanti and R V Krems Spectroscopy of 39K85Rb triplet excited states using ultracold a 3Σ+ state molecules formed by photoassociation J T Kim, D Wang, E E Eyler, P L Gould and W C Stwalley Pumping vortex into a Bose-Einstein condensate of heteronuclear molecules Z F Xu, R Q Wang and L You Intense atomic and molecular beams via neon buffer-gas cooling David Patterson, Julia Rasmussen and John M Doyle Dynamical properties of dipolar Fermi gases T Sogo, L He, T Miyakawa, S Yi, H Lu

  14. Preparation of a single atom in an optical microtrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, Alicia V; Fung, Yin H; Sompet, Pimonpan; Hilliard, Andrew J; Andersen, Mikkel F; Walker, Thad G

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the use of light assisted collisions for the deterministic preparation of individual atoms in a microtrap. Blue detuned light is used in order to ensure that only one of the collision partners is lost from the trap. We obtain a 91% loading efficiency of single 85 Rb atoms. This can be achieved within a total preparation time of 542 ms. A numerical model of the process quantitatively agrees with the experiment giving an in-depth understanding of the dynamics of the process and allowing us to identify the factors that still limit the loading efficiency. The fast loading time in combination with the high efficiency may be sufficient for loading quantum registers at the size required for competitive quantum computing. (letter)

  15. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  16. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  17. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro; Ferrari, Carlo; Bramanti, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg II . •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL −1 (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL −1 . -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C 9 H 9 HgNaO 2 S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH 4 solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL −1 range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL −1 . This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL −1

  18. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Chen, Bin; Corns, Warren T.; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography–cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that a novel mixture of thiourea-thiolsilica shows an excellent trapping of MeHg between a broad pH range 1–6. • We develop the method so that it can potentially be automated for inorganic and methyl-mercury. • The method is matrix independent with highly accurate results for MeHg in hair CRM extracts and spiked water samples • The limit of detection is around 40 pg/L when just 200 mL sample is used, without any intensive preparation

  19. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Chen, Bin; Corns, Warren T. [PS Analytical, Arthur House, Crayfields Industrial Estate, Main Road, Orpington, Kent BR5 3HP (United Kingdom); Feldmann, Jörg [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Krupp, Eva M., E-mail: e.krupp@abdn.ac.uk [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography–cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that a novel mixture of thiourea-thiolsilica shows an excellent trapping of MeHg between a broad pH range 1–6. • We develop the method so that it can potentially be automated for inorganic and methyl-mercury. • The method is matrix independent with highly accurate results for MeHg in hair CRM extracts and spiked water samples • The limit of detection is around 40 pg/L when just 200 mL sample is used, without any intensive preparation.

  20. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L -1 with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L -1 . The obtained results fall into a

  1. Method Performance of Total Mercury (Hg) Testing in the Biological Samples by Using Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (CV-AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanna TS; Samin

    2007-01-01

    Method performance (validation) of total mercury (Hg) testing in the biological samples by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CV-AAS) has been done. The objective of this research is to know the method performance of CV-AAS as one of points for the accreditation testing of laboratory according IS0/IEC 17025-2005. The method performance covering limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, precision and bias. As a standard material used SRM Oyster Tissue 15660 from Winopal Forshung Germany, whereas the biological samples were human hair. In principle of mercury testing for solid samples using CV-AAS is dissolving this sample and standard with 10 mL HNO 3 supra pure into a closed quartz tube and heating at 150 °C for 4 hours. The concentration of mercury in each samples was determined at the condition of operation were stirring time (T 1 ) 70 seconds, delay time (T 2 ) 15 seconds, heating time (T 3 ) 13 seconds and cooling time (T 4 ) of 25 seconds. Mercury ion in samples are reduced with SnCl 2 10 % in H 2 SO 4 20 %, and then the vapour of mercury from reduction is passed in NaOH 20 % solution and aquatridest. The result of method performance were: limit of detection (LOD) = 0.085 ng, accuracy 99.70 %, precision (RSD) = 1.64 % and bias = 0.30 %. From the validation result showed that the content of mercury total was in the range of certified values. The total mercury content (Hg) in human hair were varied from 406.93 - 699.07 ppb. (author)

  2. A cold atom electron source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taban, G.

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed bright electron sources offer the possibility to study the structure of matter in great spatial and temporal detail. An example of an indirect method is to generate hard X-ray °ashes with high brilliance, a new Free Electron Laser facility is under construction. It requires an electron source

  3. Development of asymptotic methods for the study of interactions between cold atoms: determination of scattering lengths of sodium and cesium; Developpement de methodes asymptotiques pour l'etude des interactions entre atomes froids: determination de longueurs de diffusion du sodium et du cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T' Jampens, B

    2002-12-15

    Precise knowledge of cold-atom collision properties is essential for the studies of Bose-Einstein condensation or cold molecule formation. In such experiments, the interaction mainly occurs at rather large interatomic distance, in the so-called asymptotic region. We have developed a purely asymptotic method which allows us to fully describe the collision properties of cold alkali atoms without using the inner part of the molecular potentials, which is often known with a poor precision. The key point of the method is the setting of nodal lines, which are the lines connecting the nodes of successive radial wavefunctions near the ground state threshold. Within the framework of Born-Oppenheimer approximation, computing such nodal lines, by numerical integration of the radial Schroedinger equation in the asymptotic region only, provides a very simple way to derive scattering lengths from observed bound level positions. The method has been extended to the multichannel case and appears now as a genuine parametric method, in which a few parameters (some chosen nodal lines) replace the inner part of the potentials. These nodal lines are used as fitting parameters, which are adjusted on experimental results. Once these parameters have been determined, any collision property such as scattering lengths, clock shifts or magnetic field induced Feshbach resonances can be deduced in principle. This method has been applied to obtain the collision properties of ultracold sodium and cesium atoms. (author)

  4. Millimeter wave detection via Autler-Townes splitting in rubidium Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Joshua A., E-mail: josh.gordon@nist.gov; Holloway, Christopher L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Electromagnetics Division, U.S. Department of Commerce, Boulder Laboratories, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Schwarzkopf, Andrew; Anderson, Dave A.; Miller, Stephanie; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate the detection of millimeter waves via Autler-Townes splitting in {sup 85}Rb Rydberg atoms. This method may provide an independent, atom-based, SI-traceable method for measuring mm-wave electric fields, which addresses a gap in current calibration techniques in the mm-wave regime. The electric-field amplitude within a rubidium vapor cell in the WR-10 wave guide band is measured for frequencies of 93.71 GHz and 104.77 GHz. Relevant aspects of Autler-Townes splitting originating from a four-level electromagnetically induced transparency scheme are discussed. We measured the E-field generated by an open-ended waveguide using this technique. Experimental results are compared to a full-wave finite element simulation.

  5. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  6. Uranium mining during the Cold War. The Wismut plant in the Soviet atomic complex; Uranbergbau im Kalten Krieg. Die Wismut im sowjetischen Atomkomplex. Bd. 1. Studien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boch, Rudolf [TU Chemnitz (Germany). Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte; Karlsch, Rainer (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    The book on the Wismut plant covers the following issues: Introduction: history of uranium mining of Wismut. Significance of uranium mining in politics and science: Uranium for the strategic equilibrium; the ore of the Cold War; special zones; ''Party within the Party'', radiation protection in uranium mining; Freiberg's geoscientists searching strategic metals in the 1940ies; end of the shift. Social history and daily routine: Good money for hard work; foreign among ''friends''; personnel data; gainful employment for women and emancipation in the frame of mining; from symphony orchestra to laymen circles; the fightning spirit of pitman-sportsmen.

  7. Progress with cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Johnson, I; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-01-01

    The creation of cold antihydrogen by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations, working at CERN's unique Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility, has ushered in a new era in atomic physics. This contribution will briefly review recent results from the ATHENA experiment. These include discussions of antiproton slowing down in a cold positron gas during antihydrogen formation, information derived on the dependence of the antihydrogen formation rate upon the temperature of the stored positron plasma and, finally, upon the spatial distribution of the emitted anti-atoms. We will discuss the implications of these studies for the major outstanding goal of trapping samples of antihydrogen for precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. The physics motivations for undertaking these challenging experiments will be briefly recalled.

  8. Cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  9. Dynamic generation and coherent control of beating stationary light pulses by a microwave coupling field in five-level cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Cui-Li; Meng, Shao-Ying; Fang, You-Wei; Tian, Xue-Dong

    2018-04-01

    We propose an efficient scheme for generating and controlling beating stationary light pulses in a five-level atomic sample driven into electromagnetically induced transparency condition. This scheme relies on an asymmetrical procedure of light storage and retrieval tuned by two counter-propagating control fields where an additional coupling field, such as the microwave field, is introduced in the retrieval stage. A quantum probe field, incident upon such an atomic sample, is first transformed into spin coherence excitation of the atoms and then retrieved as beating stationary light pulses exhibiting a series of maxima and minima in intensity due to the alternative constructive and destructive interference. It is convenient to control the beating stationary light pulses just by manipulating the intensity and detuning of the additional microwave field. This interesting phenomenon involves in fact the coherent manipulation of dark-state polaritons and could be explored to achieve the efficient temporal splitting of stationary light pulses and accurate measurement of the microwave intensity.

  10. Low-pressure supersonic gas expansions. A study of the formation of cold hydrogen- and deuterium atomic beams for polarised gas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nass, A.

    2002-04-01

    In the present thesis expansions of atomic and molecular gases were studied. Velocity distributions characterize thereby the arising beams very well and give conclusions on the processes occurring in the expansion. these can be described by continuum models until the transition to the molecular flow range occurs. By certain criteria this transition can be described. Because a description of all processes by these models is difficult, the possibility was studied to describe gas expansions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. These simulate by means of binary collisions the motion of the molecules of the expanding gas and calculate from the distribution of the particles in the phase space the beam parameter, like for instance density, flow velocities, and beam temperatures. The results of these calculations were tested by different experimental means. To this belong especially the measurements of the velocity distributions by the time-of-flight method and the intensity profiles by the beam-profile monitor. All experimentally obtained data agree with the results of the calculations within the measurement errors. By this it is possible to predict the behavior during an expansion both qualitatively and quantitatively. precise statements on density and velocity distributions are possible, by which for instance new beam-shaping geometries can be tested. From the simulated distributions also a novel start generator for sextupole Monte Carlo simulations can be generated, which contains no models, but relates directly to the obtained data. The thesis that by a H 2 carrier beam a hydrogen or deuterium atomic beam with high phase-space density can be produced, was uniquely disproved. The high diffusion of both kinds of particles leads to a fast mixing and by this to no improvement of the atomic- beam intensity. The measured data were confirmed by the performed Monte Carlo simulations. The calculations on the base of Navier-Stokes equations are in the flow range applied here

  11. Solid phase extraction of cadmium on 2-mercaptobenzothiazole loaded on sulfur powder in the medium of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourreza, N.; Ghanemi, K.

    2010-01-01

    A novel solid phase extractor for preconcentration of cadmium at ng L -1 levels has been developed. Cadmium ions were retained on a column packed with sulfur powder modified with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBT) in the medium of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim] + PF 6 - ) ionic liquid. The presence of ionic liquid during modification of sulfur enhanced the retention of cadmium ions on the column. The retained cadmium ions were eluted with 2 mol L -1 solution of HCl and measured by cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG-AAS). By using reaction cell-gas liquid separator (RC-GLS), gaseous cadmium vapors were produced and reached the atomic absorption spectrometer, instantaneously. The influence of different variables on both processes of solid phase extraction and CVG-AAS determination of cadmium ions was investigated. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 10-200 ng L -1 of cadmium in the initial solution with r = 0.9992 (n = 8) under optimum conditions. The limit of detection based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3S b , n = 10) was 4.6 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 25 and 150 ng L -1 of cadmium was 4.1 and 2.2% (n = 8), respectively. The procedure was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (DORM-3), water and fish samples.

  12. Cold Incineration of Chlorophenols in Aqueous Solution by Advanced Electrochemical Process Electro-Fenton. Effect of Number and Position of Chlorine Atoms on the Degradation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oturan, Nihal; Panizza, Marco; Oturan, Mehmet A.

    2009-09-01

    This study reports the kinetics of the degradation of several chlorophenols (CPs), such as monochlorophenols (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol), dichlorophenols (2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,6- dichlorophenol), trichlorophenols (2,3,5- trichlorophenol and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol), 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, by the electro-Fenton process using a carbon felt cathode and a Pt anode. The effect of number and the position of the chlorine atoms in the aromatic ring on the oxidative degradation rate was evaluated and discussed. The oxidation reaction of all the CPs with hydroxyl radicals evidenced a pseudo-first-order kinetics and the rate constant decreased with increasing the number of chlorine atoms. The absolute rate constant of second-order reaction kinetics between CPs and •OH was determined by the competition kinetics method in the range of (3.56-7.75) × 109 M-1 s-1 and follows the same sequence of the apparent rate constants. The mineralization of several CPs and of a mixture of all CPs under study was monitored by the total organic carbon (TOC) removal and the chlorine release during mineralization was followed by ion chromatography. Our results demonstrated that more chlorinated phenols are more difficult to mineralize; however for all the tested CPs, almost quantitative release of chloride ions was obtained after 6 h of treatment.

  13. Through-barrier electromagnetic imaging with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2017-07-24

    We demonstrate the penetration of thick metallic and ferromagnetic barriers for imaging of conductive targets underneath. Our system is based on an 85 Rb radio-frequency atomic magnetometer operating in electromagnetic induction imaging modality in an unshielded environment. Detrimental effects, including unpredictable magnetic signatures from ferromagnetic screens and variations in the magnetic background, are automatically compensated by active compensation coils controlled by servo loops. We exploit the tunability and low-frequency sensitivity of the atomic magnetometer to directly image multiple conductive targets concealed by a 2.5 mm ferromagnetic steel shield and/or a 2.0 mm aluminium shield, in a single scan. The performance of the atomic magnetometer allows imaging without any prior knowledge of the barriers or the targets, and without the need of background subtraction. A dedicated edge detection algorithm allows automatic estimation of the targets' size within 3.3 mm and of their position within 2.4 mm. Our results prove the feasibility of a compact, sensitive and automated sensing platform for imaging of concealed objects in a range of applications, from security screening to search and rescue.

  14. Development of cold neutron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changhee; Lee, C. H.; So, J. Y.; Park, S.; Han, Y. S.; Cho, S. J.; Moon, M. K.; Choi, Y. H.; Sun, G. M.

    2012-03-01

    Cold Neutron Triple Axsis Spectrometer (Cold-TAS) Development Ο Fabrication and Installation of the Major Cold-TAS Components Ο Performance Test of the Cold-TAS □ Cold Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectrometer(DC-TOF) Development Ο Fabrication of the Major DC-TOF Components Ο Development DC-TOF Data Reduction Software □ Expected Contribution The two world-class inelastic neutron scattering instruments measure atomic or molecular scale dynamics of meV energy range. This unprecedented measurement capability in the country will enable domestic and international scientists to observe new phenomena in their materials research to obtain world class results. Especially those who work in the fields of magnetic properties of superconductors and multiferroics, molecular dynamics, etc. will get more benefit from these two instruments

  15. A Versatile Atom Transport Apparatus for Photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussmann, B.O.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes and characterizes a setup to conduct experiments combining the fields of cold atoms and nanophotonics. Furthermore, a series of numerical simulations is employed to deepen of atom transport under experimentally realistic conditions. The study of cold atoms is usually

  16. Cold Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce how often they return. Symptoms A cold sore usually passes through several stages: Tingling and itching. Many people feel an itching, burning or tingling sensation around their lips for a day or so ...

  17. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  18. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  19. Receptor visualization and the atomic bomb. A historical account of the development of the chemical neuroanatomy of receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs during the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J M; Mengod, G

    2018-03-01

    This is a historical account of how receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs got to be seen at the regional, cellular, and subcellular levels in brain, in the years going from the end of the World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Cold War (1945-1991). The realization in the US of the problem of mental health care, as a consequence of the results of medical evaluation for military service during the war, let the US Government to act creating among other things the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH). Coincident with that, new drug treatments for these disorders were introduced. War science also created an important number of tools and instruments, such as the radioisotopes, that played a significant role in the development of our story. The scientific context was marked by the development of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and the introduction in the early 80's of the DNA recombinant technologies. The concepts of chemical neurotransmission in the brain and of receptors for drugs and transmitters, although proposed before the war, where not generally accepted. Neurotransmitters were identified and the mechanisms of biosynthesis, storage, release and termination of action by mechanisms such as reuptake, elucidated. Furthermore, the synapse was seen with the electron microscope and more important for our account, neurons and their processes visualized in the brain first by fluorescence histochemistry, then using radioisotopes and autoradiography, and later by immunohistochemistry (IHC), originating the Chemical Neuroanatomy. The concept of chemical neurotransmission evolved from the amines, expanded to excitatory and inhibitory amino acids, then to neuropeptides and finally to gases and other "atypical" neurotransmitters. In addition, coexpression of more than one transmitter in a neuron, changed the initial ideas of neurotransmission. The concept of receptors for these and other messengers underwent a significant evolution from an abstract

  20. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this contribution the author the phenomenom of so-called cold fusion, inspired by the memorable lecture of Moshe Gai on his own search for this effect. Thus much of what follows was presented by Dr. Gai; the rest is from independent reading. What is referred to as cold fusion is of course the observation of possible products of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion within deuterium-loaded (dentended) electrodes. The debate over the two vanguard cold fusion experiments has raged under far more public attention than usually accorded new scientific phenomena. The clamor commenced with the press conference of M. Fleishmann and S. Pons on March 23, 1989 and the nearly simultaneous wide circulation of a preprint of S. Jones and collaborators. The majority of work attempting to confirm these observations has at the time of this writing yet to appear in published form, but contributions to conferences and electronic mail over computer networks were certainly filled with preliminary results. To keep what follows to a reasonable length the author limit this discussion to the searches for neutron (suggested by ref. 2) or for excessive heat production (suggested by ref. 1), following a synopsis of the hypotheses of cold fusion

  1. Project COLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  2. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  3. High Fidelity Preparation of a Single Atom in Its 2D Center of Mass Ground State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompet, Pimonpan; Fung, Yin Hsien; Schwartz, Eyal; Hunter, Matthew D. J.; Phrompao, Jindaratsamee; Andersen, Mikkel F.

    2017-04-01

    Complete control over quantum states of individual atoms is important for the study of the microscopic world. Here, we present a push button method for high fidelity preparation of a single 85Rb atom in the vibrational ground state of tightly focused optical tweezers. The method combines near-deterministic preparation of a single atom with magnetically-insensitive Raman sideband cooling. We achieve 2D cooling in the radial plane with a ground state population of 0.85, which provides a fidelity of 0.7 for the entire procedure (loading and cooling). The Raman beams couple two sublevels (| F = 3 , m = 0 〉 and | F = 2 , m = 0 〉) that are indifferent to magnetic noise to first order. This leads to long atomic coherence times, and allows us to implement the cooling in an environment where magnetic field fluctuations prohibit previously demonstrated variations. Additionally, we implement the trapping and manipulation of two atoms confined in separate dynamically reconfigurable optical tweezers, to study few-body dynamics.

  4. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  5. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  6. Production of cold antihydrogen in a nested trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    The ATHENA experiment at CERN produced and detected the first cold antihydrogen atoms. Antiprotons and positrons are mixed in a double Penning trap, known as a nested trap. The production of antihydrogen atoms was identified by detecting their annihilations signatures at trap wall. With the ATHENA results subsequently confirmed by another CERN experiment, ATRAP, cold antihydrogen research is entering an exciting era. (author)

  7. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  8. Strategic Applications of Ultra-Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-07

    Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): “Laser cooling in anisotropic traps”, M. Vengalattore, R.S. Conroy, M. Prentiss...IEEE Cat. No. 04CH37598. Piscataway, NJ, IEEE, 2004, 1 pp. “Guiding of light in an ultracold, anisotropic medium”, M. Vengalattore and M. Prentiss, in...molecules the rotational dynamics imposes significantly larger Rabi frequencies than would otherwise be expected, but within this limitation, a full

  9. Cold Atom Laser Module (CALM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Navigation and Timing (PNT) is a critical resource for government and commercial aerospace. Given the high launch cost and shift toward smaller payloads,...

  10. Control of the dynamics of coupled atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates: Modified Gross-Pitaevskii approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Moumita; Dastidar, Krishna Rai

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the atomic and molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of 87 Rb in a spherically symmetric trap coupled by stimulated Raman photoassociation process. Considering the higher order nonlinearity in the atom-atom interaction we analyze the dynamics of the system using coupled modified Gross-Pitaevskii (MGP) equations and compare it with mean-field coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) dynamics. Considerable differences in the dynamics are obtained in these two approaches at large scattering length, i.e., for large values of peak-gas parameter x pk ≥10 -3 . We show how the dynamics of the coupled system is affected when the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions are considered together with the atom-atom interaction and also when the strengths of these three interactions are increased. The effect of detuning on the efficiency of conversion of atomic fractions into molecules is demonstrated and the feasibility of maximum molecular BEC formation by varying the Raman detuning parameter at different values of time is explored. Thus by varying the Raman detuning and the scattering length for atom-atom interaction one can control the dynamics of the coupled atomic-molecular BEC system. We have also solved coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations for atomic to molecular condensate formation through magnetic Feshbach resonance in a BEC of 85 Rb. We found similar features for oscillations between atomic and molecular condensates noted in previous theoretical study and obtained fairly good agreement with the evolution of total atomic condensate observed experimentally.

  11. Magnetic atom optics: mirrors, guides, traps, and chips for atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, E.A.; Hughes, I.G. [Sussex Centre for Optical and Atomic Physics, University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-21

    For the last decade it has been possible to cool atoms to microkelvin temperatures ({approx}1 cm s{sup -1}) using a variety of optical techniques. Light beams provide the very strong frictional forces required to slow atoms from room temperature ({approx}500 m s{sup -1}). However, once the atoms are cold, the relatively weak conservative forces of static electric and magnetic fields play an important role. In our group we have been studying the interaction of cold rubidium atoms with periodically magnetized data storage media. Here we review the underlying principles of the forces acting on atoms above a suitably magnetized substrate or near current-carrying wires. We also summarize the status of experiments. These structures can be used as smooth or corrugated reflectors for controlling the trajectories of cold atoms. Alternatively, they may be used to confine atoms to a plane, a line, or a dot and in some cases to reach the quantum limit of confinement. Atoms levitated above a magnetized surface can be guided electrostatically by wires deposited on the surface. The flow and interaction of atoms in such a structure may form the basis of a new technology, 'integrated atom optics' which might ultimately be capable of realizing a quantum computer. (author)

  12. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  13. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  14. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  15. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth / For Teens / Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  16. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  17. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The transmission resonance model (TRM) is combined with some electrochemistry of the cathode surface and found to provide a good fit to new data on excess heat. For the first time, a model for cold fusion not only fits calorimetric data but also predicts optimal trigger points. This suggests that the model is meaningful and that the excess heat phenomenon claimed by Fleischmann and Pons is genuine. A crucial role is suggested for the overpotential and, in particular, for the concentration overpotential, i.e., the hydrogen overvoltage. Self-similar geometry, or scale invariance, i.e., a fractal nature, is revealed by the relative excess power function. Heat bursts are predicted with a scale invariance in time, suggesting a possible link between the TRM and chaos theory. The model describes a near-surface phenomenon with an estimated excess power yield of ∼1 kW/cm 3 Pd, as compared to 50 W/cm 3 of reactor core for a good fission reactor. Transmission resonance-induced nuclear transmutation, a new type of nuclear reaction, is strongly suggested with two types emphasized: transmission resonance-induced neutron transfer reactions yielding essentially the same end result as Teller's hypothesized catalytic neutron transfer and a three-body reaction promoted by standing de Broglie waves. In this paper suggestions for the anomalous production of heat, particles, and radiation are given

  18. Cold collisions in dissipative optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piilo, J; Suominen, K-A

    2005-01-01

    The invention of laser cooling methods for neutral atoms allows optical and magnetic trapping of cold atomic clouds in the temperature regime below 1 mK. In the past, light-assisted cold collisions between laser cooled atoms have been widely studied in magneto-optical atom traps (MOTs). We describe here theoretical studies of dynamical interactions, specifically cold collisions, between atoms trapped in near-resonant, dissipative optical lattices. The extension of collision studies to the regime of optical lattices introduces several complicating factors. For the lattice studies, one has to account for the internal substates of atoms, position-dependent matter-light coupling, and position-dependent couplings between the atoms, in addition to the spontaneous decay of electronically excited atomic states. The developed one-dimensional quantum-mechanical model combines atomic cooling and collision dynamics in a single framework. The model is based on Monte Carlo wavefunction simulations and is applied when the lattice-creating lasers have frequencies both below (red-detuned lattice) and above (blue-detuned lattice) the atomic resonance frequency. It turns out that the radiative heating mechanism affects the dynamics of atomic cloud in a red-detuned lattice in a way that is not directly expected from the MOT studies. The optical lattice and position-dependent light-matter coupling introduces selectivity of collision partners. The atoms which are most mobile and energetic are strongly favoured to participate in collisions, and are more often ejected from the lattice, than the slow ones in the laser parameter region selected for study. Consequently, the atoms remaining in the lattice have a smaller average kinetic energy per atom than in the case of non-interacting atoms. For blue-detuned lattices, we study how optical shielding emerges as a natural part of the lattice and look for ways to optimize the effect. We find that the cooling and shielding dynamics do not mix

  19. Ab Initio Study of Chemical Reactions of Cold SrF and CaF Molecules with Alkali-Metal and Alkaline-Earth-Metal Atoms: The Implications for Sympathetic Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosicki, Maciej Bartosz; Kędziera, Dariusz; Żuchowski, Piotr Szymon

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of the atom exchange reaction in the SrF + alkali-metal atom and CaF + alkali-metal atom systems. Such reactions are possible only for collisions of SrF and CaF with the lithium atoms, while they are energetically forbidden for other alkali-metal atoms. Specifically, we focus on SrF interacting with Li, Rb, and Sr atoms and use ab initio methods to demonstrate that the SrF + Li and SrF + Sr reactions are barrierless. We present potential energy surfaces for the interaction of the SrF molecule with the Li, Rb, and Sr atoms in their energetically lowest-lying electronic spin states. The obtained potential energy surfaces are deep and exhibit profound interaction anisotropies. We predict that the collisions of SrF molecules in the rotational or Zeeman excited states most likely have a strong inelastic character. We discuss the prospects for the sympathetic cooling of SrF and CaF molecules using ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

  20. EPA Method 245.2: Mercury (Automated Cold Vapor Technique)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 245.2 describes procedures for preparation and analysis of drinking water samples for analysis of mercury using acid digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption. Samples are prepared using an acid digestion technique.

  1. Grooved cold moderator tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Iwasa, H.; Watanabe, N.; Ikeda, S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Ishikawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We performed some grooved cold moderator experiments for methane at 20 K by using the Hokkaido University linac to obtain information to be used in the planning of the KENS-I' project. Cold neutron gains, spatial distribution of emitted beams and time distribution of the neutrons in the grooved cold moderator were measured. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of the grooved cold moderator on the performances of the spectrometers presently installed at the KENS-I cold source. We concluded that the grooved cold moderator benefited appreciably the performances of the spectrometers

  2. Experiments with Rydberg atoms on a current-carrying atom chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cisternas San Martín, N.V.

    2018-01-01

    On one side, atom-chip experiments have demonstrated to be a versatile tool to study quantum physics in cold atoms systems. On the other side, Rydberg atoms have exaggerated properties that makes them good candidates to study quantum information and quantum simulations protocols. In this thesis both

  3. Conceptualizing Cold Disasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauta, Kristian Cedervall; Dahlberg, Rasmus; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we explore in more depth the particular circumstances and characteristics of governing what we call ‘cold disasters’, and thereby, the paper sets out to investigate how disasters in cold contexts distinguish themselves from other disasters, and what the implications hereof...... are for the conceptualization and governance of cold disasters. Hence, the paper can also be viewed as a response to Alexander’s (2012a) recent call for new theory in the field of disaster risk reduction. The article is structured in four overall parts. The first part, Cold Context, provides an overview of the specific...... conditions in a cold context, exemplified by the Arctic, and zooms in on Greenland to provide more specific background for the paper. The second part, Disasters in Cold Contexts, discusses “cold disasters” in relation to disaster theory, in order to, elucidate how cold disasters challenge existing...

  4. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.

  5. Colds and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (COPD). What medicines can I give my child? There is no cure for the cold or the flu, and antibiotics do not work against the viruses that cause colds and the flu. Pain relievers such as ...

  6. Cold knife cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References Baggish ...

  7. Cold medicines and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ingredient. Avoid giving more than one OTC cold medicine to your child. It may cause an overdose with severe side ... the dosage instructions strictly while giving an OTC medicine to your child. When giving OTC cold medicines to your child: ...

  8. Reactor cold neutron source facility, the first in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, Masahiko; Maeda, Yutaka; Kawai, Takeshi; Tashiro, Tameyoshi; Sakakibara, Shoji; Katada, Minoru.

    1986-01-01

    In the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, the first cold neutron source facility for the reactor in Japan was installed, and various tests are carried out outside the reactor. Nippon Sanso K.K. had manufactured it. After the prescribed tests outside the reactor, this facility will be installed soon in the reactor, and its outline is described on this occasion. Cold neutrons are those having very small energy by being cooled to about-250 deg C. Since the wavelength of the material waves of cold neutrons is long, and their energy is small, they are very advantageous as an experimental means for clarifying the structure of living body molecules and polymers, the atom configuration in alloys, and atomic and molecular movements by neutron scattering and neutron diffraction. The basic principle of the cold neutron source facility is to irradiate thermal neutrons on a cold moderator kept around 20 K, and to moderate and cool the neutrons by nuclear scattering to convert to cold neutrons. The preparatory research on cold neutrons and hydrogen liquefaction, the basic design to put the cold neutron source facility in the graphite moderator facility, the safety countermeasures, the manufacture and quality control, the operation outside the reactor and the performance are reported. The cold neutron source facility comprises a cold moderator tank and other main parts, a deuterium gas tank, a helium refrigerator and instrumentation. (Kako, I.)

  9. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J N; Gabrielse, G; Oxley, P; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e/sup +/ cooling of p in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H production rate by driving many cycles of e/sup +/ cooling in the nested trap, with more H counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H counted per incident high energy p is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H is formed via three-body recombination, as expected. (22 refs).

  10. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.N.; Bowden, N.S.; Gabrielse, G.; Oxley, P.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Wessels, M.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Walz, J.; Pittner, H.; Haensch, T.W.; Hessels, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e + cooling of p-bar in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H-bar produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H-bar, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p-bar storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H-bar states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H-bar production rate by driving many cycles of e + cooling in the nested trap, with more H-bar counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H-bar counted per incident high energy p-bar is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H-bar states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H-bar is formed via three-body recombination, as expected

  11. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Magnetic transport apparatus for the production of ultracold atomic gases in the vicinity of a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendel, S.; Marchant, A. L.; Wiles, T. P.; Hopkins, S. A.; Cornish, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present an apparatus designed for studies of atom-surface interactions using quantum degenerate gases of 85 Rb and 87 Rb in the vicinity of a room temperature dielectric surface. The surface to be investigated is a super-polished face of a glass Dove prism mounted in a glass cell under ultra-high vacuum. To maintain excellent optical access to the region surrounding the surface, magnetic transport is used to deliver ultracold atoms from a separate vacuum chamber housing the magneto-optical trap (MOT). We present a detailed description of the vacuum apparatus highlighting the novel design features; a low profile MOT chamber and the inclusion of an obstacle in the transport path. We report the characterization and optimization of the magnetic transport around the obstacle, achieving transport efficiencies of 70% with negligible heating. Finally, we demonstrate the loading of a hybrid optical-magnetic trap with 87 Rb and the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates via forced evaporative cooling close to the dielectric surface.

  13. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  14. Positron Plasma Control Techniques Applied to Studies of Cold Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Funakoshi, Ryo

    2003-01-01

    In the year 2002, two experiments at CERN succeeded in producing cold antihydrogen atoms, first ATHENA and subsequently ATRAP. Following on these results, it is now feasible to use antihydrogen to study the properties of antimatter. In the ATHENA experiment, the cold antihydrogen atoms are produced by mixing large amounts of antiprotons and positrons in a nested Penning trap. The complicated behaviors of the charged particles are controlled and monitored by plasma manipulation techniques. The antihydrogen events are studied using position sensitive detectors and the evidence of production of antihydrogen atoms is separated out with the help of analysis software. This thesis covers the first production of cold antihydrogen in the first section as well as the further studies of cold antihydrogen performed by using the plasma control techniques in the second section.

  15. How cold is cold dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2014-01-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed

  16. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  17. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  18. Cold formability of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, G.; Leclerq, G.; Moliexe, F.; Namdar, R.; Roesch, L.; Sanz, G.

    1977-01-01

    This work was essentially aimed to the study of the following three questions. Is it possible to assess the cold formability of steels using simple material properties as criteria. What values of mechanical properties can one expect to reach in cold formed parts. Are there simple ways of characterizing the speroidization treatments carried out on steels before cold forming operations. The present report describes the results obtained during this investigation. It is logically divided into three separate parts. Experimental study of cold formability in wire drawing. Influence of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of high carbon cold drawn wires. Contribution to the study of characterization methods of cold forming steels subjected to a spheroidization heat treatment

  19. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping "8"7Rb atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-01-01

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain "8"7Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  20. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  1. Hybrid quantum systems of ions and atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we review the progress in experiments with hybrid systems of trapped ions and ultracold neutral atoms. We give a theoretical overview over the atom-ion interactions in the cold regime and give a summary of the most important experimental results. We conclude with an overview of remaining open challenges and possible applications in hybrid quantum systems of ions and neutral atoms.

  2. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom’s angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light’s OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light–matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069766

  3. Storage of Quantum Variables in Atomic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cviklinski, J.; Ortalo, J.; Josse, V.

    2007-01-01

    Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three-level syst......-level systems allows direct mapping the quantum state of light into long lived coherences in the atomic ground state. We show that excess noise linked to atomic transitions can be made negligible. Experimental developments are discussed for atomic vapours and cold atoms....

  4. Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-24

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012494 TITLE: Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold...part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP012489 thru ADP012577 UNCLASSIFIED Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen G...and positrons. The antiprotons come initially from the new Antiproton Decel- erator facility at CERN. Good control of such cold antimatter plasmas is

  5. Laser-cooling and electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.; Migdall, A.L.; Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently it has been impossible to confine and trap neutral atoms using electromagnetic fields. While many proposals for such traps exist, the small potential energy depth of the traps and the high kinetic energy of available atoms prevented trapping. We review various schemes for atom trapping, the advances in laser cooling of atomic beams which have now made trapping possible, and the successful magnetic trapping of cold sodium atoms

  6. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  7. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  8. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  9. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  10. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth / For Teens / Cold-Weather Sports What's in this article? What to Do? Classes ... weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports can help you burn calories, increase your cardiovascular ...

  11. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  12. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  13. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  14. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  15. Spatial distribution of cold antihydrogen formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, N.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Bowe, P.D.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D.P. van der; Cesar, C.L.

    2005-01-01

    Antihydrogen is formed when antiprotons are mixed with cold positrons in a nested Penning trap. We present experimental evidence, obtained using our antihydrogen annihilation detector, that the spatial distribution of the emerging antihydrogen atoms is independent of the positron temperature and axially enhanced. This indicates that antihydrogen is formed before the antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium with the positron plasma. This result has important implications for the trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen

  16. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  17. A Narrow-Linewidth Atomic Line Filter for Free Space Quantum Key Distribution under Daytime Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Woolf, David; Hensley, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Quantum key distribution can provide secure optical data links using the established BB84 protocol, though solar backgrounds severely limit the performance through free space. Several approaches to reduce the solar background include time-gating the photon signal, limiting the field of view through geometrical design of the optical system, and spectral rejection using interference filters. Despite optimization of these parameters, the solar background continues to dominate under daytime atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate an improved spectral filter by replacing the interference filter (Δν ~ 50 GHz) with an atomic line filter (Δν ~ 1 GHz) based on optical rotation of linearly polarized light through a warm Rb vapor. By controlling the magnetic field and the optical depth of the vapor, a spectrally narrow region can be transmitted between crossed polarizers. We find that the transmission is more complex than a single peak and evaluate peak transmission as well as a ratio of peak transmission to average transmission of the local spectrum. We compare filters containing a natural abundance of Rb with those containing isotopically pure 87 Rb and 85 Rb. A filter providing > 95 % transmission and Δν ~ 1.1 GHz is achieved.

  18. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced

  19. CERN experiment provides first glimpse inside cold antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The ATRAP experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has detected and measured large numbers of cold antihydrogen atoms. Relying on ionization of the cold antiatoms when they pass through a strong electric field gradient, the ATRAP measurement provides the first glimpse inside an antiatom, and the first information about the physics of antihydrogen. The results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  20. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  1. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  2. Cold vapor-solid phase microextraction using amalgamation in different Pd-based substrates combined with direct thermal desorption in a modified absorption cell for the determination of Hg by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Vanesa; Costas-Mora, Isabel; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this work, different Pd-based substrates (i.e. Pd wire, Pd-coated stainless steel wire and Pd-coated SiO 2 ) are tried for microextraction of Hg prior to its release into a modified quartz T-cell so as to develop a cost-effective, sensitive and easy-to-handle coupling between solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and atomic absorption spectrometry. The new design allows a direct sample injection from the SPME device into a quartz T-cell thus avoiding analyte dilution. Mercury amalgamation onto a Pd wire provided the best performance in respect to sensitivity and fiber lifetime, but Pd wires could not be implemented in the SPME device due to their poor mechanical characteristics. On the contrary, Pd-coated SiO 2 fibers could be easily adapted to the typical sampling device used for SPME. Narrow time-dependent absorption signal profiles that could be integrated within 25 s were obtained. The detection limit was 90 pg mL -1 of Hg, and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was 4.3%.

  3. Assessment and Risk Mitigation Strategies for the Atom Interferometer Gravity Gradiometer Seed Lasers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GSFC has been working on an ESTO IIP - Cold Atom Gravity Gradiometer (CAGG)/Atom Interferometer Gravity Gradiometer (AIGG) for Geodesy since 2014 (Saif/551 –...

  4. Coherent Radiation in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Robert Tyler

    Over the last century, quantum mechanics has dramatically altered our understanding of light and matter. Impressively, exploring the relationship between the two continues to provide important insights into the physics of many-body systems. In this thesis, we add to this still growing field of study. Specifically, we discuss superradiant line-broadening and cooperative dipole-dipole interactions for cold atom clouds in the linear-optics regime. We then discuss how coherent radiation changes both the photon scattering properties and the excitation distribution of atomic arrays. After that, we explore the nature of superradiance in initially inverted clouds of multi-level atoms. Finally, we explore the physics of clouds with degenerate Zeeman ground states, and show that this creates quantum effects that fundamentally change the photon scattering of atomic ensembles.

  5. Chilling Out With Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and use the time to read, listen to music, or watch a movie. In other words, chill out and you might prevent a cold! Reviewed by: Patricia ... Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice ...

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  7. Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    the light-shift coefficient for two different rf- discharge lamps (i.e., a pure 87Rb lamp and a lamp filled with the natural Rb isotope abundance...for the Galileo Rb clock under the assumption of a natural (or 85Rb isotopically enriched) rf- discharge lamp for the Galileo clock. I...satellites [14]. 6.8347… GHz 85Rb Filter Cell Cell Resonance Photodiode Microwave Cavity 87Rb Discharge Lamp 87Rb & N2 Rb & Xe, Kr Optical Pumping 87Rb

  8. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  9. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  10. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  11. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  12. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  13. Reflection-type hologram for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Fujio; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2002-01-01

    A cold metastable neon atomic beam was manipulated with a reflective amplitude hologram that was encoded on a silicon surface. A black-and-white pattern of atoms was reconstructed on a microchannel plate detector. The hologram used the enhanced quantum reflection developed by authors and was made of a two-dimensional array of rectangular low and high reflective cells. The surface of the high reflective cell was composed of regularly spaced roof-shaped ridges, while the low reflective cell was simply a flat surface. The hologram was the first demonstration of reflective atom-optical elements that used universal interaction between a neutral atom and solid surface

  14. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R; Arimondo, Ennio

    2006-01-01

    Volume 54 of the Advances Series contains ten contributions, covering a diversity of subject areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics. The article by Regal and Jin reviews the properties of a Fermi degenerate gas of cold potassium atoms in the crossover regime between the Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules and the condensation of fermionic atom pairs. The transition between the two regions can be probed by varying an external magnetic field. Sherson, Julsgaard and Polzik explore the manner in which light and atoms can be entangled, with applications to quantum information processing

  15. Hypothermic general cold adaptation induced by local cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savourey, G; Barnavol, B; Caravel, J P; Feuerstein, C; Bittel, J H

    1996-01-01

    To study relationships between local cold adaptation of the lower limbs and general cold adaptation, eight subjects were submitted both to a cold foot test (CFT, 5 degrees C water immersion, 5 min) and to a whole-body standard cold air test (SCAT, 1 degree C, 2 h, nude at rest) before and after a local cold acclimation (LCA) of the lower limbs effected by repeated cold water immersions. The LCA induced a local cold adaptation confirmed by higher skin temperatures of the lower limbs during CFT and a hypothermic insulative general cold adaptation (decreased rectal temperature and mean skin temperature P adaptation was related to the habituation process confirmed by decreased plasma concentrations of noradrenaline (NA) during LCA (P general cold adaptation was unrelated either to local cold adaptation or to the habituation process, because an increased NA during SCAT after LCA (P syndrome" occurring during LCA.

  16. High-Flux Ultracold-Atom Chip Interferometers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ColdQuanta's ultimate objective is to produce a compact, turnkey, ultracold-atom system specifically designed for performing interferometry with Bose-Einstein...

  17. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  18. Engineering and control of cold molecules. Making manipulating and exploiting ultra-cold polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, N.P.; Haimberger, C.; Kleinert, J.; Tscherneck, M.; Holmes, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 12 months several groups have demonstrated the use of photo association to create cold heteronuclear (polar) molecules. We report on the formation of translationally cold NaCs molecules starting from a laser-cooled atomic vapor of Na and Cs atoms. Colliding atoms are transferred into bound molecular states in a two-step photoactivated process. We find a translational temperature of T ≅ 260 mK. To increase the density and number of trapped atoms, dark-spot techniques are used on the MOT and a Zeeman slowed sodium beam is used to load the sodium atoms into the trap. Spectroscopy of these molecules is underway using time-of-flight ion detection and trap-loss. Initial REMPI measurements indicate that both singlet and triplet states are being populated by the spontaneous-decay driven process. We measure a rate constant for molecule formation of K NaCs = 7.43 · 10 15 cm 3 s -1 . (author)

  19. Cold moderators at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, upgrading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  20. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  1. A laser system for the spectroscopy on highly charged ions, tellurium molecules, and Rydberg states of rubidium atoms; Ein Lasersystem zur Spektroskopie von hochgeladenen Ionen, Tellurmolekuelen und Rubidium-Rydberg-Zustaenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Sebastian

    2014-08-15

    Optical measuring methods allow the detection and identification of the atomic structure with extraordinary precision. Deviations to theoretical predictions can indicate unknown physical effects. Therefore, precise measurements on the atomic structure continue to be of large relevance. In this work, a laser system for precision spectroscopy on Bismuth ({sup 209}Bi{sup 82+}), Tellurium ({sup 130}Te{sub 2}) and Rydberg states of Rubidium ({sup 85}Rb) has been built and characterized. Spectroscopic measurements on Tellurium and Rubidium have been achieved with this setup. The system consists of a two-stage frequency doubled diode laser, stabilized via a cavity and an RF-offsetlock to arbitrary wavelengths with absolute high stability. The setup of the laser system will be presented and the systematic error caused by the refractive index of air inside the transfer cavity will be discussed. A stability of better then 6.14 MHz at 244 nm is obtained for planned experiments on the ground state hyperfine splitting of {sup 209}Bi{sup 82+}. This will allow an increase in precision of more then four orders of magnitude for this measurement. Further increase in precision can be achieved by using an evacuated cavity. The obtained stability is measured by comparison of the laser frequency to absorption lines of Tellurium ({sup 130}Te{sub 2}). Eight reference lines, known from literature, spanning the region from 613720.717 GHz to 616803.545 GHz have been measured. The frequency measurements of three lines, coinciding with the emission spectrum of an argon-ion-laser, show deviations with respect to the published frequencies. Further inconsistencies in literature are cleared. Part of this work is also the precise measurement of 843 Doppler-free {sup 130}Te{sub 2} reference lines spanning the frequency range from 613881.150 GHz to 616614.258 GHz at a precision of better then 4 MHz for most lines. Additionally, measurements on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using

  2. Cold water injection nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kura, Masaaki; Maeda, Masamitsu; Endo, Takio.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To inject cold water in a reactor without applying heat cycles to a reactor container and to the inner wall of a feedwater nozzle by securing a perforated plate at the outlet of the cold water injection nozzle. Constitution: A disc-like cap is secured to the final end of a return nozzle of a control rod drive. The cap prevents the flow of a high temperature water flowing downward in the reactor from entering into the nozzle. The cap is perforated with a plurality of bore holes for injecting cold water into the reactor. The cap is made to about 100 mm in thickness so that the cold water passing through the bore holes is heated by the heat conduction in the cap. Accordingly, the flow of high temperature water flowing downwardly in the reactor is inhibited by the cap from backward flowing into the nozzle. Moreover, the flow of the cold water in the nozzle is controlled and rectified when passed through the bore holes in the cap and then injected into the reactor. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. Atomic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation λ = h/(mv), where λ is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  4. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2009-11-01

    Cold atom experiments have observed atom-molecule mixtures by tuning the interactions between particles.footnotetextM.L. Olsen, J. D. Perreault, T. D. Cumby, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 80, 030701(R) (2009) We study many particle interactions by examaning a simple model that describes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. A set of functional Renomalization Group equationsfootnotetextR. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys., Vol 66 No. 1, January 1994^,footnotetextS.W. Tsai, A.H. Castro Neto, R. Shankar, D.K. Campbell, Phys. Rev. B 72, 054531 (2005) describing these processes are set up and solved numerically. The Self Energy of the fermions are attained as a function of frequency and we search for frequency dependent instabilities that could denote a transition from a disordered liquid to a BCS phase. (Financial support from NSF DMR-084781 and UC-Lab Fees Research Program.)

  5. Cold regions isotope applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids

  6. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruester, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

  7. Simple atom trap in a conical hollow mirror: Numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. A.; Lee, K. I.; Nha, H.; Noh, H. R.; Yoo, S. H.; Jhe, W

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the trap dynamic in a conical hollow (axicon) mirror system. Atom's trajectory is ring shaped if we move the coil (magnetic field) axis off the mirror axis and if we overlap these two axes trap cloud is ball shaped and it is consistent with experiment. We also make a simple comparison between 6-beam MOT and axicon MOT in the ball shaped case, and it shows that at low velocity limit the axicon MOT and typical 6-beam MOT have nearly same trap properties. The axicon trap may be useful as precooled atom source for many other atomic physics experiments such as cold atomic beam, atom funnel, and atom waveguide.

  8. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  9. Spectrum of spin waves in cold polarized gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, T. L., E-mail: phdocandreeva@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The spin dynamics of cold polarized gases are investigated using the Boltzmann equation. The dispersion relation for spin waves (transverse component of the magnetic moment) and the spin diffusion coefficient of the longitudinal component of the magnetic moment are calculated without using fitting parameters. The spin wave frequency and the diffusion coefficient for rubidium atoms are estimated numerically.

  10. Commemoration of a cold war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farbøl, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together the fields of Cold War studies and memory studies. In Denmark, a remarkable institutionalisation of Cold War memory has taken place in the midst of a heated ideological battle over the past and whether to remember the Cold War as a ‘war’. Using Danish Cold War museums...... and heritage sites as case studies, this article sheds new light on the politics of history involved in Cold War commemoration. It suggests that the Cold War is commemorated as a war, yet this war memory is of a particular kind: it is a war memory without victims....

  11. Atomic secrecy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.

    1979-01-01

    An article, The H-Bomb Secret: How We Got It, Why We're Telling It, by Howard Morland was to be published in The Progressive magazine in February, 1979. The government, after learning of the author's and the editors' intention to publish the article and failing to persuade them to voluntarily delete about 20% of the text and all of the diagrams showing how an H-bomb works, requested a court injunction against publication. Acting under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, US District Court Judge Robert W. Warren granted the government's request on March 26. Events dealing with the case are discussed in this publication. Section 1, Progressive Hydrogen Bomb Case, is discussed under the following: Court Order Blocking Magazine Report; Origins of the Howard Morland Article; Author's Motives, Defense of Publication; and Government Arguments Against Disclosure. Section 2, Access to Atomic Data Since 1939, contains information on need for secrecy during World War II; 1946 Atomic Energy Act and its effects; Soviet A-Bomb and the US H-Bomb; and consequences of 1954 Atomic Energy Act. Section 3, Disputed Need for Atomic Secrecy, contains papers entitled: Lack of Studies on H-Bomb Proliferation; Administration's Position on H-Bombs; and National Security Needs vs Free Press

  12. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  13. Cold fusion - todays situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, K.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review of the history of cold fusion is given. It is noted that it is not possible to draw any definite conclusions about all the experimental and theoretical details, but that some of the results presented do not seem to be reached according to the normal scientific methods. 6 figs

  14. Recent Cold War Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  15. Expert Cold Structure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  16. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  17. Burning Cold: Involvement of TRPA1 in Noxious Cold Sensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Kelvin Y.; Corey, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Soon after its discovery ten years ago, the ion channel TRPA1 was proposed as a sensor of noxious cold. Evidence for its activation by painfully cold temperatures (below ~15° C) has been mixed, however. Some groups found that cold elicits a nonselective conductance in cells expressing TRPA1; others found no activation, or argued that activation is an indirect effect of elevated \\(Ca^{ 2+}\\) . Sensory cells from the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia that are activated by cold were sometimes c...

  18. Moeller polarimetry with atomic hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, E.; Luppov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moeller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed. (orig.)

  19. Antimatter atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    In january 1996, CERN broadcasted the information of the creation of nine anti-hydrogen atoms, observed through disintegration products. The experimental facility was CERN LEAR ring. An antiproton beam scattered a xenon jet, and the resulting antimatter was first selected by its insensitivity to beam bending magnets. Their disintegration was detected in thin NaI detectors, in which the anti-atoms are at once deprived from their positron. Then, magnetic and time-of-flight spectrometers are used. (D.L.)

  20. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  1. Vitrification of HLW in cold crucible melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, G.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), COGEMA (Industrial Operator), and SGN (COGEMA's Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities: the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed remotely in one of the R7 vitrification

  2. Coexistence of photonic and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in ideal atomic gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Boichenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied conditions of photon Bose-Einstein condensate formation that is in thermodynamic equilibrium with ideal gas of two-level Bose atoms below the degeneracy temperature. Equations describing thermodynamic equilibrium in the system were formulated; critical temperatures and densities of photonic and atomic gas subsystems were obtained analytically. Coexistence conditions of these photonic and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates were found. There was predicted the possibility of an abrupt type of photon condensation in the presence of Bose condensate of ground-state atoms: it was shown that the slightest decrease of the temperature could cause a significant gathering of photons in the condensate. This case could be treated as a simple model of the situation known as "stopped light" in cold atomic gas. We also showed how population inversion of atomic levels can be created by lowering the temperature. The latter situation looks promising for light accumulation in atomic vapor at very low temperatures.

  3. Flu and Colds: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent colds or relieve cold symptoms. Andrographis (Andrographis paniculata) Chinese herbal medicines Green tea Guided imagery Hydrotherapy ... measurements (VAS) to assess the effectiveness of standardized Andrographis paniculata extract SHA-10 in reducing the symptoms of ...

  4. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  5. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina para espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10{mu}g.L{sup -1}. The obtained results fall

  6. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, E.H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  7. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000?y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations...

  8. Atoms stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.; Bordry, M.

    1988-01-01

    Physicists from different countries told each evening during one learning week, to an audience of young people, some great discoveries in evoking the difficulties and problems to which the researchers were confronted. From Antiquity to a more recent history, it is a succession of atoms stories. (N.C.)

  9. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.

    1991-01-01

    This general book describes the change from classical physics to quantum physics. The first part presents atom evolution since antiquity and introduces fundamental quantities and elements of relativity. Experiments which have contributed to the evolution of knowledge on matter are analyzed in the second part. Applications of wave mechanics to the study of matter properties are presented in the third part [fr

  10. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Lembessis, V. E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A. J.; Girkin, J. M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓө) modes with different ℓ indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blue-detuned light. The lattice sites can be joined to form a uniform ring trap, making it ideal for studying persistent currents and the Mott insulator transition in a ring geometry.

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Dispersion of Liquids by Ejection Atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, S. S.; Evsevleev, M. Ya.; Zharova, I. K.; Zhukov, A. S.; Zmanovskii, S. V.; Kozlov, E. A.; Konovalenko, A. I.; Trofimov, V. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the dispersivity of liquid droplets in the spray cone of ejection atomizers. The calculational droplet size distribution function was measured by the method of low angles of the probe laser radiation scattering indicatrix on a pneumohydraulic bench under cold blow conditions. The efficiency of the proposed circuit designs of atomizers has been analyzed.

  12. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-16

    magnitude. The creation of an atom trampoline , where cold atoms were dropped onto a evanescent wave of light extending out of a totally internally reflected...Staff, Electromagnetic Phenomena Research Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, 1978-1983 Head , Quantum Electronics Research Department AT&T Bell

  13. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  14. Inhomogeneous Spin Diffusion in Traps with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    increases. The inhomogeneity and the smaller nite trap size signicantly reduce the spin diusion rate at low temperatures. The resulting spin diusion rates and spin drag at longer time scales are compatible with measurements at low to high temperatures for resonant attractive interactions...

  15. Towards a gravity measurement on cold antimatter atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Caravita, R; Amsler, C; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Chlouba, K; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ereditato, A; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Forslund, O K; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Holmestad, H; Huse, T; Jernelv, I L; Jordan, E; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Kimura, M; Koetting, T; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Lehner, S; Liberadzka, J; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marx, L; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Resch, L; Rienäcker, B; Røhne, O M; Rosenberger, S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Scampoli, P; Sorrentino, F; Spacek, M; Storey, J; Strojek, I M; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Vamosi, S; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zavatarelli, S; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    The present status of the AEGIS experiment at CERN (AD-06), on the way of forming anti-hydrogen for a first gravity measurement, is reviewed. Recent results in trapping and cooling positrons and antiprotons in the main electromagnetic traps are presented, including the storage time measurement obtained during the 2014 run with antiprotons, the observation of centrifugal separation of a mixed antiproton/electron plasma and positron accumulation and transfer results obtained during 2015.

  16. Unconventional Density Wave and Superfluidity in Cold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Tsai, Chairperson Professor Kirill Shtengel Professor Vivek Aji 3 Copyright by Chen-Yen Lai 2014 4 The Dissertation of Chen-Yen Lai is approved...thank my dissertation committee members, Professor Vivek Aji and Pro- fessor Kirill Shtengel, for their help, kindness, insightful comments and...near balance to a stripe-CDW ( red ) as the imbalance increases. The insert shows the strong imbalance region, where single species p-wave majority

  17. The parametric resonance—from LEGO Mindstorms to cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra

    2017-07-01

    We show an experimental setup based on a popular LEGO Mindstorms set, allowing us to both observe and investigate the parametric resonance phenomenon. The presented method is simple but covers a variety of student activities like embedded software development, conducting measurements, data collection and analysis. It may be used during science shows, as part of student projects and to illustrate the parametric resonance in mechanics or even quantum physics, during lectures or classes. The parametrically driven LEGO pendulum gains energy in a spectacular way, increasing its amplitude from 10° to about 100° within a few tens of seconds. We provide also a short description of a wireless absolute orientation sensor that may be used in quantitative analysis of driven or free pendulum movement.

  18. The parametric resonance—from LEGO Mindstorms to cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    We show an experimental setup based on a popular LEGO Mindstorms set, allowing us to both observe and investigate the parametric resonance phenomenon. The presented method is simple but covers a variety of student activities like embedded software development, conducting measurements, data collection and analysis. It may be used during science shows, as part of student projects and to illustrate the parametric resonance in mechanics or even quantum physics, during lectures or classes. The parametrically driven LEGO pendulum gains energy in a spectacular way, increasing its amplitude from 10° to about 100° within a few tens of seconds. We provide also a short description of a wireless absolute orientation sensor that may be used in quantitative analysis of driven or free pendulum movement. (paper)

  19. The need to be cold : cold warriors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, L.

    2008-10-15

    This article discussed the changing climate of Ellesmere Island and the adaptation of the Inuit in response to the climate change, with particular reference to Canada's most northern community of Grise Fiord. Because of the changing climate, the vast northern landscape that the Inuit navigated for centuries by reading its subtle signs is becoming warmer, softer, and unpredictable. The geographic history and demographics of Grise Fiord were described. The community's main water supply comes from a glacier which is sinking. The negative impacts of ice shrinkage on this northern community and on the environment were presented. These included more international shipping through the Arctic, more resource exploration, a greater risk of environmental contamination, and reduced habitat for the polar bears and seals that eat, mate, and reproduce on the ice. Climate change impacts on the sea and sea ice were also discussed. Several photographs illustrating the changing climate were presented. The article noted that climate change could destroy the Inuit culture, making climate change an issue of human rights, notably the right to live connected to the land and the right to be cold. It was concluded that in one generation, Inuit were swept up by both a social and an economic upheaval. In one more generation, they will undergo an environmental shift. 13 figs.

  20. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  1. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  2. Cold source economic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, Serge.

    1975-01-01

    This computer code is intended for the statement of the general economic balance resulting from using a given cold source. The balance includes the investments needed for constructing the various materials, and also production balances resulting from their utilization. The case of either using an open circuit condenser on sea or river, or using air cooling systems with closed circuits or as auxiliaries can be dealt with. The program can be used to optimize the characteristics of the various parts of the cold source. The performance of the various materials can be evaluated for a given situation from using very full, precise economic balances, these materials can also be classified according to their possible uses, the outer constraints being taken into account (limits for heat disposal into rivers or seas, water temperature, air temperature). Technical choices whose economic consequences are important have been such clarified [fr

  3. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  4. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  5. Engine Cold Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    matching pre- calibrated amplifier • BEI Shaft Encoder (0.2 CAD) • Wolff Instrumented Injector The high speed data was recorded and post-processed by...14. ABSTRACT These fuels were used for testing a GEP 6.5L turbocharged V-8 diesel engine operation in a cold box. This engine architecture is...Z39.18 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A fuel’s cetane number is very important for the operation of modern diesel

  6. Support for cold neutron utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Choi, Sungmin; Choi, Yong; Kwon, Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hee

    2012-06-01

    - Support for experiments by users of cold neutron scattering instrument - Short-term training of current and potential users of cold neutron scattering instrument for their effective use of the instrument - International collaboration for advanced utilization of cold neutron scattering instruments - Selection and training of qualified instrument scientists for vigorous research endeavors and outstanding achievements in experiments with cold neutron - Research on nano/bio materials using cold neutron scattering instruments - Bulk nano structure measurement using small angle neutron scattering and development of analysis technique

  7. Cold cathode arc model in mercury discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.M.; Byszewski, W.W.; Budinger, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Voltage/current characteristics measured during the starting of metal halide lamps indicate a low voltage discharge when condensates (mainly mercury) are localized on the electrodes. In this case, even with a cold cathode which does not emit electrons, the current is very high and voltage across the lamp drops to about 15 to 20 V. This type of discharge is similar to the cold cathode mercury vapor arc found in mercury pool rectifiers. The cathode sheath in the mercury vapor arc is characterized by very small cathode spot size, on the order of 10 -c cm 2 , very high current density of about 10 6 A/cm 2 and very low cathode fall of approximately 10 volts. The discharge is modified and generalized to describe the cathode phenomena in the cold cathode mercury vapor arc. The sensitivity of calculated discharge parameters with respect to such modifications were examined. Results show that the cathode fall voltage remains fairly constant (7-8 volts) with large fractional variations of metastable mercury atoms bombarding the cathode. This result compares very well with experimental waveforms when anode fall and plasma voltage approximations are incorporated

  8. Cold neutron production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Noboru.

    1976-01-01

    The first part gives general introduction to cold neutrons, namely the definition and the role as a probe in basic science and technology. The second part reviews various methods of cold neutron production. Some physical characteristics required for cold moderators are presented, and a list summarizes a number of cold moderators and their reactor physics constants. The definition of flux gain factor and the measured values for liquid light- and heavy-hydrogen are also given. The cold neutron spectra in methane and liquid hydrogen measured by LINAC time-of-flight method are presented to show the advantage of solid methane. The cold neutron sources using experimental reactors or linear accelerators are explained along with the examples of existing facilities. Two Japanese programs, the one is the use of a high flux reactor and the other is the use of a LINAC, are also presented. The third part of this report reviews the application areas of cold neutrons. (Aoki, K.)

  9. The legacy of the cold war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martellini, M.

    1998-01-01

    More than fifty-two years have elapsed since the atomic bomb-was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Over this period, the United States and the Soviet Union have engaged in a constant nuclear arms-race, in an effort to build a growing number of warheads and launching systems of increasingly higher destructive power, reflecting the logic of the balance of terror and the threat of mutually assured destruction. The years of the Cold War have, in fact, been dominated by the incredibly rapid growth of nuclear arsenals. The end of the Cold War, which was marked by the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, coincided with the beginning of the process of nuclear disarmament and a diversion of funds from the industrial military complex. Nevertheless, 45 years of development and sophistication in nuclear armaments can't be immediately wiped off, for many reasons, the most evident of which being that the nuclear materials that forms the heart of atomic weapons, more precisely known as weapon-grade materials, can't be simply eliminated, as will be explained later in this text. Their dismantlement requires special technical means, which are not yet available to all nuclear powers. There are also other reasons why nuclear disarmament is such a complex and uneven process

  10. A theoretical study of cold nuclear fusion using barrier penetration approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    1989-06-01

    The cold nuclear fusion process is investigated in terms of barrier penetration calculations by considering both the deuteron-molecule and colliding deuteron-deuteron atoms. Atomic collisions with strongly screened interatomic potential and the resonant state formation can bring agreement with present experimental results. Analysis of the data in terms of the reaction rates is also discussed. (author). 13 refs, 1 tab

  11. Magnetic conveyor belt for transporting and merging trapped atom clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsel, W; Reichel, J; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2001-01-22

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic device which transports cold atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve mean fluxes up to 10(6) s(-1) with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this device allows merging of atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. The unification, which we demonstrate experimentally, can be performed without loss of phase space density. This novel, all-magnetic atom manipulation offers exciting perspectives, such as trapped-atom interferometry.

  12. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  13. A metastable helium trap for atomic collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colla, M.; Gulley, R.; Uhlmann, L.; Hoogerland, M.D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Metastable helium in the 2 3 S state is an important species for atom optics and atomic collision physics. Because of its large internal energy (20eV), long lifetime (∼8000s) and large collision cross section for a range of processes, metastable helium plays an important role in atmospheric physics, plasma discharges and gas laser physics. We have embarked on a program of studies on atom-atom and electron-atom collision processes involving cold metastable helium. We confine metastable helium atoms in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), which is loaded by a transversely collimated, slowed and 2-D focussed atomic beam. We employ diode laser tuned to the 1083 nm (2 3 S 1 - 2 3 P2 1 ) transition to generate laser cooling forces in both the loading beam and the trap. Approximately 10 million helium atoms are trapped at temperatures of ∼ 1mK. We use phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the trapped atomic density. The cold, trapped atoms can collide to produce either atomic He + or molecular He 2 + ions by Penning Ionisation (PI) or Associative Ionisation (AI). The rate of formation of these ions is dependant upon the detuning of the trapping laser from resonance. A further laser can be used to connect the 2 3 S 1 state to another higher lying excited state, and variation of the probe laser detuning used to measure interatomic collision potential. Electron-atom collision processes are studied using a monochromatic electron beam with a well defined spatial current distribution. The total trap loss due to electron collisions is measured as a function of electron energy. Results will be presented for these atomic collision physics measurements involving cold, trapped metastable helium atoms. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society

  14. Cold fusion in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, L.

    1989-01-01

    Since early April a great deal of excitement has been created over the Fleischmann/Pons cold fusion experiment, which if it performs as advertised, could turn out to be mankind's best hope of heading off the energy crisis scheduled for early in the next century. Dozens of groups around the world are now attempting to duplicate the experiment to see if Fleischmann and Pons' discovery is an experimental mistake, an unknown electrochemical effect or a new kind of fusion reaction. This article puts the experiment into the perspective of today and looks at how it might affect the energy scene tomorrow if it should turn out to be commercially exploitable. (author)

  15. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes that escape into vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to learn more about the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation

  16. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method’s performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 ± 11,70)μg.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L{sup −1}. The obtained

  17. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina para espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10{mu}g.L{sup -1}. The

  18. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10 -20 As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, Δ Φ / Φ total  ≤ 10 -20 , that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Optical atomic phase reference and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L.; Cornell, E. H.; Abdelrahmann, A.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10-20. As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10-20, that could make an important impact in gravity wave science. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  20. Pharao: study of an atomic clock using laser-cooled atoms and realization of a prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonde, P.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal jets and atomic fountains are two different principles on which atomic clocks are based. In atomic fountains the velocity of atoms can be reduced to a few cm/s so the classical limitations of thermal jets such as phase shift between two Ramsey impulses, second order Doppler effect become negligible. The new limitations set by atomic fountain clocks are now collisions between cold atoms and the radiation emitted by the black body. Weightlessness leads to a different running of the atomic clock and can imply an enhancement of its performances. In micro-gravity an interatomic interaction time of several seconds can be reached. The application of such atomic clocks can go beyond time or frequency metrology. This work is dedicated to the development of a spatial atomic clock to fully use the extremely low velocity of laser-cooled atoms and to quantify what can be expected of weightlessness. This study has involved the realization of a prototype and its testing in a zero-g plane. The experimental results are presented and it is highlighted that an accuracy and a one-day stability of 10 -16 are within reach with an optimized version of this atomic clock. (A.C.)

  1. Transporting, splitting and merging of atomic ensembles in a chip trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommelhoff, P; Haensel, W; Steinmetz, T; Haensch, T W; Reichel, J

    2005-01-01

    We present a toolbox for cold atom manipulation with time-dependent magnetic fields generated by an atom chip. Wire layouts, detailed experimental procedures and results are presented for the following experiments: use of a magnetic conveyor belt for positioning of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with a potential resolution of 2 nm; splitting of thermal clouds and BECs in adjustable magnetic double-well potentials; and controlled splitting of a cold reservoir. The devices that enable these manipulations can be combined with each other. We demonstrate this by combining reservoir splitter and conveyor belt to obtain a cold atom dispenser. We discuss the importance of these devices for quantum information processing, atom interferometry and Josephson junction physics on the chip. For all devices, absorption-image video sequences are provided to demonstrate their time-dependent behaviour

  2. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  3. Optical spectroscopy of rubidium Rydberg atoms with a 297 nm frequency doubled dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Th.; Germann, Th.; Thoumany, P.; Stania, G.; Urbonas, L.; Haensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Rydberg atoms have played an important role in atomic physics and optical spectroscopy since many years. Due to their long lifetime and the big dipole matrix element between neighbouring Rydberg levels they are an essential tool in microwave cavity-qed experiments. Ultracold Rydberg gases are a promising candidate for realizing controlled quantum gates in atomic ensembles. In most experiments Rydberg atoms are detected destructively, where the optically excited atoms are first ionized followed by an electronic detection of the ionization products. A Doppler-free purely optical detection was reported in a room temperature cell and in an atomic beam apparatus using the technique of electromagnetically induced transparency. In all these experiments the Rydberg atoms are excited with two lasers in a two-step ladder configuration. Here we show that Doppler-free purely optical spectroscopy is also possible with a one step excitation scheme involving a UV laser at 297 nm. We excite the 85 Rb isotope from the 5S 1/2 ground state to the 63P 3/2 state with a frequency doubled dye laser in a room temperature gas cell without buffer gas. Rydberg transitions are detected by monitoring the absorption of 780 nm laser light which is superimposed on the UV light and resonant with one hyperfine component of the Rubidium D2 line. With these two lasers we realize a V-scheme and utilize the quantum amplification effect due to the different natural lifetimes of the upper levels of the two transitions: an excitation into the 63P level hinders many absorption-emission cycles of the D2 transition and leads to a reduced absorption on that line. We discuss the shape of the observed spectra in the context of electron shelving and EIT experiments. By applying a frequency modulation to the UV laser, we can obtain dispersive signals which can be used to stabilize the laser to a specific Rydberg transition. By shifting the frequency of the 780 nm laser to crossover resonances in the

  4. Cold moderator scattering kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    New thermal-scattering-law files in ENDF format have been developed for solid methane, liquid methane liquid ortho- and para-hydrogen, and liquid ortho- and para-deuterium using up-to-date models that include such effects as incoherent elastic scattering in the solid, diffusion and hindered vibration and rotations in the liquids, and spin correlations for the hydrogen and deuterium. These files were generated with the new LEAPR module of the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Other modules of this system were used to produce cross sections for these moderators in the correct format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP) being used for cold-moderator-design calculations at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). 20 refs., 14 figs

  5. Atomic collisions under extreme conditions in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    1987-01-01

    In space, atoms and molecules are often placed under the extreme conditions which are very difficult to be realized on Earth. For instance, extremely hot and dense plasmas are found in and around various stellar objects (e.g., neutron stars) on one hand and extremely cold and diffuse gases prevail in interstellar space on the other. There is so strong a magnetic field that electron clouds in atoms and molecules are distorted. The study of atomic collisions under the extreme conditions is not only helpful in understanding the astrophysical environment but also reveals new aspects of the physics of atoms and molecules. This paper is an invitation to the study. (References are not exhaustive but only provide a clue with which more details can be found.) (author)

  6. Monitoring the vaccine cold chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheriyan, E

    1993-01-01

    Maintaining the vaccine cold chain is an essential part of a successful immunisation programme. A continuous electronic temperature monitor helped to identify breaks in the cold chain in the community and the study led to the issue of proper guidelines and replacement of faulty equipment.

  7. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in

  8. Initial heating in cold cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Teunissen, L.P.J.; Hoogh, I.M. de

    2012-01-01

    During the initial minutes after entering a cold car, people feel uncomfortably cold. Six different warming systems were investigated in a small car in order to find out how to improve the feeling of comfort using 16 volunteers. The methods were: no additional warming next to a standard heating

  9. The status of cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  10. Facts about the Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different viruses. Rhinovirus is the most common cause, accounting for 10 to 40 percent of colds. Other common cold viruses include coronavirus and ... RSS | Terms Of Use | Privacy | Sitemap Our Family Of Sites ... Introduction Risk Factors Screening Symptoms Tumor Testing Summary '; var ...

  11. A minimalistic and optimized conveyor belt for neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ritayan; Condylis, Paul C; Prakash, Vindhiya; Sahagun, Daniel; Hessmo, Björn

    2017-10-20

    Here we report of a design and the performance of an optimized micro-fabricated conveyor belt for precise and adiabatic transportation of cold atoms. A theoretical model is presented to determine optimal currents in conductors used for the transportation. We experimentally demonstrate a fast adiabatic transportation of Rubidium ( 87 Rb) cold atoms with minimal loss and heating with as few as three conveyor belt conductors. This novel design of a multilayered conveyor belt structure is fabricated in aluminium nitride (AlN) because of its outstanding thermal and electrical properties. This demonstration would pave a way for a compact and portable quantum device required for quantum information processing and sensors, where precise positioning of cold atoms is desirable.

  12. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld, David M; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    At ICAP we presented the efforts and progress at MIT towards using ultracold atoms for the realization of various forms of quantum magnetism. These efforts include a study of fermions with strong repulsive interactions in which we obtained evidence for a phase transition to itinerant ferromagnetism, the characterization of cold atom systems by noise measurements, and a new adiabatic gradient demagnetization cooling scheme which has enabled us to realize temperatures of less than 350 picokelvin and spin temperatures of less than 50 picokelvin in optical lattices. These are the lowest temperatures ever measured in any physical system.

  13. A momentum filter for atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoji; Yue, Xuguang; Zhai, Yueyang; Chen, Xuzong

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a momentum filter for atomic gas-based on a designed Talbot–Lau interferometer. It consists of two identical optical standing-wave pulses separated by a delay equal to odd multiples of the half Talbot time. The one-dimensional momentum width along the long direction of a cigar-shaped condensate is rapidly and greatly purified to a minimum, which corresponds to the ground state energy of the confining trap in our experiment. We find good agreement between theoretical analysis and experimental results. The filter is also effective for non-condensed cold atoms and could be applied widely. (paper)

  14. Quantum information processing with atoms and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroe, C.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum information processors exploit the quantum features of superposition and entanglement for applications not possible in classical devices, offering the potential for significant improvements in the communication and processing of information. Experimental realization of large-scale quantum information processors remains a long term vision, as the required nearly pure quantum behaviour is observed only in exotic hardware such as individual laser-cooled atoms and isolated photons. But recent theoretical and experimental advances suggest that cold atoms and individual photons may lead the way towards bigger and better quantum information processors, effectively building mesoscopic versions of Schroedinger's cat' from the bottom up. (author)

  15. Physics using cold antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - a neutral three-body system pe**-He**2**+(=pHe**+) produced when antiprotons (p) are stopped in various phases of helium - has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within similar to 10**-**8. This was achieved by using a newly- developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  16. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  17. Atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanna, R.

    1978-01-01

    Development of nuclear science in India, particularly the research and development work at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is described. Among the wide range of materials developed for specific functions under rigorous conditions are nuclear pure grade uranium, zirconium and beryllium, and conventional materials like aluminium, carbon steel and stainless steels. Radioisotopes are produced and used for tracer studies in various fields. Various types of nuclear gauges and nuclear instruments are produced. Radiations have been used to develop new high yielding groundnut mutants with large kernals. The sterile male technique for pest control and radiosterilization technique to process potatoes, onions and marine foods for storage are ready for exploitation. Processes and equipment have been developed for production of electrolytic hydrogen, electrothermal phosphorus and desalinated water. Indigenously manufactured components and materials are now being used for the nuclear energy programme. Indian nuclear power programme strategy is to build heavy water reactors and to utilise their byproduct plutonium and depleted uranium to feed fast breeder reactors which will produce more fissile material than burnt. Finally a special mention has been made of the manpower development programme of the BARC. BARC has established a training school in 1957 giving advanced training in physics, chemistry and various branches of engineering and metallurgy

  18. Synthesis of antihydrogen atoms in a CUSP trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Naofumi; Enomoto, Yoshinori; Michishio, Koji; Kim, Chanhyoun; Higaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Torii, Hiroyuki A.; Corradini, Maurizzio; Leali, Marco; Lodi-Rizzini, Evandro; Mascagna, Valerio; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; Fujii, Koki; Ohtsuka, Miki; Tanaka, Kazuo; Imao, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Matsuda, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    ASACUSA collaboration has been making a path to realize high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atom in flight for stringent test of the CPT symmetry. Recently, we have succeeded in synthesizing our first cold antihydrogen atoms employing a CUSP trap. It is expected that synthesized antihydrogen atoms in the low-field-seeking states are preferentially focused along the cusp magnetic field axis whereas those in the high-field-seeking states are not focused, resulting in the formation of a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam. We report the recent results of antihydrogen atom synthesis and beam production developed with the CUSP trap.

  19. Synthesis of antihydrogen atoms in a CUSP trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Naofumi, E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Enomoto, Yoshinori [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Michishio, Koji [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Kim, Chanhyoun [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Higaki, Hiroyuki [Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter (Japan); Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Torii, Hiroyuki A. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Corradini, Maurizzio; Leali, Marco; Lodi-Rizzini, Evandro; Mascagna, Valerio; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Universita di Brescia and Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l' Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Fujii, Koki; Ohtsuka, Miki; Tanaka, Kazuo [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Imao, Hiroshi [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (Japan); Nagashima, Yasuyuki [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuda, Yasuyuki [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); and others

    2012-05-15

    ASACUSA collaboration has been making a path to realize high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atom in flight for stringent test of the CPT symmetry. Recently, we have succeeded in synthesizing our first cold antihydrogen atoms employing a CUSP trap. It is expected that synthesized antihydrogen atoms in the low-field-seeking states are preferentially focused along the cusp magnetic field axis whereas those in the high-field-seeking states are not focused, resulting in the formation of a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam. We report the recent results of antihydrogen atom synthesis and beam production developed with the CUSP trap.

  20. Fast Neutral reactions in cold interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of exothermic neutral reactions between radical species have been examined, with particular attention to reactivity at the very low energies characteristic of cold interstellar clouds. Long-range interactions (electrostatic and spin-orbit) were considered within in the adiabatic capture-infinite order sudden approximation (ACIOSA). Analytic expressions have been developed for cross sections and rate constants of exothermic reactions between atoms and dipolar radicals at low temperatures. A method for approximating the adiabatic potential surface for the reactive state will be presented. The reaction systems O+OH and O+CH are both predicted to be fast at low temperatures. The systems C+CH and C+OH are expected to be nonreactive at low temperatures, and upper limits of rate constants for these reactions have been estimated. General predictions are made for other reaction systems. Implications for interstellar chemistry will be discussed

  1. Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, Eugene; Luppov, V.

    2012-01-01

    A proposal to use polarized atomic hydrogen gas as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on the Moller scattering is described. Such a gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, would provide a target of practically 100% polarized electrons. It is conceivable to reach a ∼0.3% systematic accuracy of the beam polarimetry with such a target. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed

  2. Bremsstrahlung in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Y.; Kuchiev, M.Y.; Solov'ev, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the collision of a fast atom with a target atom when the frequencies are on the order of the potentials or higher, there arises bremsstrahlung comparable in intensity with the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron with the same velocity in the field of the target atom. The mechanism by which bremsstrahlung is produced in atom-atom collisions is elucidated. Results of specific calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are given for α particles and helium atoms colliding with xenon

  3. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  4. Ionization due to the interaction between two Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robicheaux, F

    2005-01-01

    Using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo method, we have computed the ionization resulting from the interaction between two cold Rydberg atoms. We focus on the products resulting from close interaction between two highly excited atoms. We give information on the distribution of ejected electron energies, the distribution of internal atom energies and the velocity distribution of the atoms and ions after the ionization. If the potential for the atom is not purely Coulombic, the average interaction between two atoms can change from attractive to repulsive giving a Van de Graaff-like mechanism for accelerating atoms. In a small fraction of ionization cases, we find that the ionization leads to a positive molecular ion where all of the distances are larger than 1000 Bohr radii

  5. Cold fusion produces more tritium than neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the major cold fusion experiments performed in various laboratories of the world and attempts to explain them are reviewed in brief. Particular reference is made to the experiments carried out in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay. In BARC experiments, it is found that tritium is the primary product of cold fusion. Author has put forward two hypothetical pictures of D-D fusion. (1) When a metal like Pd or Ti is loaded with D 2 , a crack forms. Propogation of such a crack accelerates deuterons which bombard Pd D 2 /D held by Pd or Ti leading to neutron capture or tritium formation with the release of protons and energy. The released protons might transfer its energy to some other deuteron and a chain reaction is started. This chain reaction terminates when a substantial portion of D in the crack tip is transmuted. This picture explains fusion reaction bursts and the random distribution of reaction sites, but does not explain neutron emission. (2) The deuterons accelerated by a propogating crack may hit a Pd/Ti nucleus instead of a deuterium nucleus and may transmute Pd/Ti. (M.G.B.). 18 refs

  6. Cold fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihito.

    1994-01-01

    A Pt wire electrode is supported from the periphery relative to a Pd electrode by way of a polyethylene or teflon plate in heavy water, and electrolysis is applied while varying conditions successively in a sawteeth fashion at an initial stage, and after elapse of about one week, a pulse current is supplied to promote nuclear reaction and to generate excess heat greater than a charged electric power. That is, small amount of neutron emission is increased and electrolytic cell temperature is elevated by varying the electrolysis conditions successively in the sawteeth fashion at the initial stage. In addition, when the pulse electric current is supplied after elapse of about one week, the electrolytic cell temperature is abnormally elevated, so that the promotion of nuclear reaction phenomenon and the generation of excess heat greater than the charged electric power are recognized. Then, a way to control power level and time fluctuation of cold fusion is attained, thereby contributing to development of a further method for generating excess heat as desired. In addition, it contributes to a development for a method of obtaining such an excess heat that can be taken as a new energy. (N.H.)

  7. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  8. Super-Coulombic atom-atom interactions in hyperbolic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Cristian L.; Jacob, Zubin

    2017-01-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, which govern phenomena such as cooperative Lamb shifts, superradiant decay rates, Van der Waals forces and resonance energy transfer rates, are conventionally limited to the Coulombic near-field. Here we reveal a class of real-photon and virtual-photon long-range quantum electrodynamic interactions that have a singularity in media with hyperbolic dispersion. The singularity in the dipole-dipole coupling, referred to as a super-Coulombic interaction, is a result of an effective interaction distance that goes to zero in the ideal limit irrespective of the physical distance. We investigate the entire landscape of atom-atom interactions in hyperbolic media confirming the giant long-range enhancement. We also propose multiple experimental platforms to verify our predicted effect with phonon-polaritonic hexagonal boron nitride, plasmonic super-lattices and hyperbolic meta-surfaces as well. Our work paves the way for the control of cold atoms above hyperbolic meta-surfaces and the study of many-body physics with hyperbolic media.

  9. All-optical 3D atomic loops generated with Bessel light fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volke-Sepulveda, Karen; Jauregui, RocIo

    2009-01-01

    The propagation invariance of Bessel beams as well as their transversal structure is used to perform a comparative analysis of their effect on cold atoms for four different configurations and combinations thereof. We show that, even at temperatures for which the classical description of the atom's centre-of-mass motion is valid, the interchange of momentum, energy and orbital angular momentum between light and atoms yields efficient tools for all-optical trapping, transporting and, in general, manipulating the state of motion of cold atoms.

  10. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  11. Continuous measurement of an atomic current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, C.; Yang, D.; Zoller, P.

    2017-04-01

    We are interested in dynamics of quantum many-body systems under continuous observation, and its physical realizations involving cold atoms in lattices. In the present work we focus on continuous measurement of atomic currents in lattice models, including the Hubbard model. We describe a Cavity QED setup, where measurement of a homodyne current provides a faithful representation of the atomic current as a function of time. We employ the quantum optical description in terms of a diffusive stochastic Schrödinger equation to follow the time evolution of the atomic system conditional to observing a given homodyne current trajectory, thus accounting for the competition between the Hamiltonian evolution and measurement back action. As an illustration, we discuss minimal models of atomic dynamics and continuous current measurement on rings with synthetic gauge fields, involving both real space and synthetic dimension lattices (represented by internal atomic states). Finally, by "not reading" the current measurements the time evolution of the atomic system is governed by a master equation, where—depending on the microscopic details of our CQED setups—we effectively engineer a current coupling of our system to a quantum reservoir. This provides interesting scenarios of dissipative dynamics generating "dark" pure quantum many-body states.

  12. A Rotating-Bears Optical Dipole Trap for Cold Aatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, N.; Ozeri, R.; Khaykovich, L.; Davidson, N.

    1999-01-01

    In the last few years, several optical dipole traps for cold atoms were demonstrated and used to study cold atomic collisions, long atomic coherence times and quantum collective effects. Blue-detuned dipole traps, where repulsive light forces confines atoms mostly in dark, offer long storage, and photon-scattering times, combined with strong confinement forces. Unfortunately, such blue-detuned dipole traps involve complicated light intensity distributions that require either multiple laser beams or complicated phase elements. Here, we propose and demonstrate a novel configuration for a single-beam blue-detuned dipole trap, which enables larger trapping volume, and fast temporal changes in the trap size and shape. Our trap consists of a tightly-focused laser beam which is rapidly rotated (with rotation frequency up to 400 khz) with two orthogonal acousto optical scanners. For very high rotation frequencies the atoms feel a time-averaged static dipole potential. Therefore, when the radius of rotation is larger than the beam size, a dark volume which is completely surrounded by light is obtained around the focal region. By changing the rotation radius and the trapping laser intensity and detuning, the trap dimensions and oscillation frequency could be changed over a large parameter range. In particular trap diameters were changed between 50 to 220 microns and trap length was changed between 3.5 to 16 mm. ∼10 6 atoms were loaded into the rotating-beam dipole trap from a magneto optical trap. The density of the trapped atoms was 4x10 10 atoms/cm 3 ,their temperature was -6 pK. and the trap (1/e) lifetime was 0.65 sec, limited by collisions with background atoms. When the rotation frequency was decreased below the oscillation frequency of the atoms in the trap, the trap became unstable, and a sharp reduction of the trap lifetime was observed, in agreement with our theoretical analysis. Finally, we demonstrated adiabatic compression of atoms in the trap by decreasing

  13. Atomic weight versus atomic mass controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    A problem for the Atomic Weights Commission for the past decade has been the controversial battle over the names ''atomic weight'' and ''atomic mass''. The Commission has considered the arguments on both sides over the years and it appears that this meeting will see more of the same discussion taking place. In this paper, I review the situation and offer some alternatives

  14. Hydrothermal Cold Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu

    C, respectively. Process variables were defined and effects of individual parameters were studied systematically through control variable method with Li2MoO4-water system. Crystalline structure, fractured surface morphology and chemical bonding information of the cold sintered pellets were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, etc. Densification mechanism studies were conducted on ZnO. Through comparison experiments, it was found that the Zn2+ concentration in the solution is critical for densification, while dissolution of grains only serves as a means to the former. Through pressure dependent studies, a critical value was found, which correlated well with the hydrostatic pressure keeping liquid water from thermal expansion. These results confirmed establishment of hydrothermal condition that would be important for mass transport in densification. Densification rate variations with process time was estimated and similar time dependence to Kingery's model was found. The densification process was proposed to be consist of three consecutive stages, which are quick initial compaction, grain rearrangement and dissolution-reprecipitation events. Binary metal oxides with different acidities were subjected to cold sintering with various aqueous solutions in establishing a criteria for material selection. It was found that in general materials with high solubility at around neutral pH, high dissolution kinetics and similar free energy to their hydroxides or hydrates at ambient would be more likely for full densification with high phase purity. The anions in solution should also be wisely selected to avoid stable compound or complex formation. To extend the applicable material list for full densification, non-aqueous solvent of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) based solution was studied for cold sintering. Both improvement of pellet density and suppression of hydroxide formation were achieved for MnO by using DMSO

  15. Phonon forces and cold denaturatio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing the molec......Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing...... the molecule Is a continuum. The frequencies of the vibrational modes depend on the molecular dimensionality; hence, the zero-point energies for the folded and the denatured protein are estimated to differ by several electron volts. For a biomolecule such an energy is significant and may contribute to cold...... denaturing. This is consistent with the empirical observation that cold denaturation is exothermic anti hot denaturation endothermic....

  16. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 Th is winter ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac ...

  17. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  18. The formation and interactions of cold and ultracold molecules: new challenges for interdisciplinary physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulieu, O [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Bat. 505, Univ Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gabbanini, C [Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici del C.N.R., Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: olivier.dulieu@lac.u-psud.fr, E-mail: carlo@ipcf.cnr.it

    2009-08-15

    Progress on research in the field of molecules at cold and ultracold temperatures is reported in this review. It covers extensively the experimental methods to produce, detect and characterize cold and ultracold molecules including association of ultracold atoms, deceleration by external fields and kinematic cooling. Confinement of molecules in different kinds of traps is also discussed. The basic theoretical issues related to the knowledge of the molecular structure, the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule mutual interactions, and to their possible manipulation and control with external fields, are reviewed. A short discussion on the broad area of applications completes the review.

  19. Nonfreezing Cold-Induced Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    cold injury. ( Modi - fi ed from Jia J, Pollock M: The pathogenesis of non-freezing cold nerve injury: Observations in the rat, Brain 120:631, 1997...myelitis and sinus development ( Figures 7-17 to 7-19 ). Appearance and behavior of the neuropathic foot have many similarities to those of the diabetic ...foot. In the diabetic foot, infections tend to be polymicrobial with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Enterococcus and

  20. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  1. Highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Littman, M.G.; Zimmerman, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited atoms are often called Rydberg atoms. These atoms have a wealth of exotic properties which are discussed. Of special interest, are the effects of electric and magnetic fields on Rydberg atoms. Ordinary atoms are scarcely affected by an applied electric or magnetic field; Rydberg atoms can be strongly distorted and even pulled apart by a relatively weak electric field, and they can be squeezed into unexpected shapes by a magnetic field. Studies of the structure of Rydberg atoms in electric and magnetic fields have revealed dramatic atomic phenomena that had not been observed before

  2. Laser-assisted atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.

    1984-01-01

    The basic layer-assisted atom-atom collision processes are reviewed in order to get a simpler picture of the main physical facts. The processes can be separated into two groups: optical collisions where only one atom is changing state during the collision, the other acting as a spectator atom, and radiative collisions where the states of the two atoms are changing during the collision. All the processes can be interpreted in terms of photoexcitation of the quasimolecule formed during the collisional process. (author)

  3. Generating a picokelvin ultracold atomic ensemble in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lu; Ma, Zhao-Yuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2013-01-01

    Applying the direct Monte Carlo simulation (DSMC) method developed for a cold atom system, we study the evaporative cooling process in tilted optical dipole traps with a magnetic field gradient-induced over-levitation or merely a gravitational force. We propose a two-stage decomposed evaporative cooling process in a microgravity environment, and suggest that quantum degeneracy can be obtained at a few picokelvins with several thousand atoms. (paper)

  4. Code ATOM for calculation of atomic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    In applying atomic physics to problems of plasma diagnostics, it is necessary to determine some atomic characteristics, including energies and transition probabilities, for very many atoms and ions. Development of general codes for calculation of many types of atomic characteristics has been based on general but comparatively simple approximate methods. The program ATOM represents an attempt at effective use of such a general code. This report gives a brief description of the methods used, and the possibilities of and limitations to the code are discussed. Characteristics of the following processes can be calculated by ATOM: radiative transitions between discrete levels, radiative ionization and recombination, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, collisional excitation and ionization by point heavy particle (Born approximation only), dielectronic recombination, and autoionization. ATOM explores Born (for z=1) or Coulomb-Born (for z>1) approximations. In both cases exchange and normalization can be included. (N.K.)

  5. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frank, S; Bonneau, M; Schmiedmayer, J; Hild, S; Gross, C; Cheneau, M; Bloch, I; Pichler, T; Negretti, A; Calarco, T; Montangero, S

    2016-10-11

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  6. Cold urticaria. Dissociation of cold-evoked histamine release and urticara following cold challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keahey, T M; Greaves, M W

    1980-02-01

    Nine patients with acquired cold urticaria were studied to assess the effects of beta-adrenergic agents, xanthines, and corticosteroids on cold-evoked histamine release from skin in vivo. The patients, in all of whom an immediate urticarial response developed after cooling of the forearm, demonstrated release of histamine into the venous blood draining that forearm. Following treatment with aminophylline and albuterol in combination or prednisone alone, suppression of histamine release occurred in all but one patient. In some patients, this was accompanied by a subjective diminution in pruritus or buring, but there was no significant improvement in the ensuing edema or erythema. In one patient, total suppression of histamine release was achieved without any effect on whealing and erythema in response to cold challenge. Our results suggest that histamine is not central to the pathogenesis of vascular changes in acquired cold urticaria.

  7. Hydrogen-Antihydrogen Collisions at Cold Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygelman, Bernard

    2001-05-01

    With the CERN anti-proton de-accelerator now on line, it is anticipated that antihydrogen ( \\overline H) atoms will be created, cooled, and stored in large numbers (M. H. Holzscheitner and M. Charlton, Rep. Prog. Phys. 62),1 (1999). It has recently been proposed that the introduction of cold, spin-polarized, hydrogen atoms into a gas of trapped anti-hydrogen could allow the sympathetic cooling of the anti-hydrogen into the sub-Kelvin regime (P. Froelich, S. Jonsell, A.Saenz, B. Zygelman, and A. Dalgarno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84), 4577 (2000). In this talk we will present the results of calculations that estimate the rate of elastic scattering of H with \\overline H, and compare that to the rate in which the fragmentation reaction, H + \\overline H arrow p \\overline p + e^+ e^- occurs and limits the utility of sympathetic cooling. Unlike the ground state of the H2 system, the H \\overline H system possesses a non-vanishing electric dipole moment (B. Zygelman, A. Saenz, P. Froelich, S. Jonsell and A. Dalgarno, Phys. Rev. A, in Press (2001).) that allows for the additional inelastic reaction H + \\overline H arrow H\\overline H^* + h ν , where H \\overline H^* is a quasi-bound state of the hydrogen-antihydrogen complex. The rate for radiative association into quasi-bound states of the H \\overline H^* complex will be presented and we will explore the viability for the spectroscopic study of this novel four-body matter-antimatter system. Collaborators in this study include, A. Dalgarno, P. Froelich, A. Saenz and S. Jonsell. I wish to thank the Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics (ITAMP) for their hospitality and support during sabbatical leave where part of this work was done. Partial support was provided by NSF grants to the Smithsonian Institution and Harvard University for ITAMP.

  8. Cold acclimation and cognitive performance: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Douglas M; Bailey, Stephen P; Roelands, Bart; Buono, Michael J; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-12-01

    Athletes, occupational workers, and military personnel experience cold temperatures through cold air exposure or cold water immersion, both of which impair cognitive performance. Prior work has shown that neurophysiological pathways may be sensitive to the effects of temperature acclimation and, therefore, cold acclimation may be a potential strategy to attenuate cold-induced cognitive impairments for populations that are frequently exposed to cold environments. This review provides an overview of studies that examine repeated cold stress, cold acclimation, and measurements of cognitive performance to determine whether or not cold acclimation provides beneficial protection against cold-induced cognitive performance decrements. Studies included in this review assessed cognitive measures of reaction time, attention, logical reasoning, information processing, and memory. Repeated cold stress, with or without evidence of cold acclimation, appears to offer no added benefit of improving cognitive performance. However, research in this area is greatly lacking and, therefore, it is difficult to draw any definitive conclusions regarding the use of cold acclimation to improve cognitive performance during subsequent cold exposures. Given the current state of minimal knowledge on this topic, athletes, occupational workers, and military commands looking to specifically enhance cognitive performance in cold environments would likely not be advised to spend the time and effort required to become acclimated to cold. However, as more knowledge becomes available in this area, recommendations may change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Atom history, from intuitive ideas to reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    2007-01-01

    This book gathers the ground scientific texts that have stood out as milestones in the way scientists have built their understanding of the atom over centuries. From the very intuitive ideas of Greek philosophers to the most recent results on ultra-cold atoms, via the discovery of natural radioactivity or the existence of the neutron, about 55 articles written by prestigious physicists have been organized into 16 chapters. Each chapter being dedicated to a topic such as molecules, spectroscopy, electrons, X-rays, atom mass, artificial radioactivity..., begins with a commentary that draws the scientific context of that time, describes the links between the articles and highlights the importance of the discoveries. (A.C.)

  10. Electromagnetically induced grating with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Sobia; Ziauddin, Qamar, Shahid; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We present a scheme to realize electromagnetically induced grating in an ensemble of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, which act as superatoms due to the dipole blockade mechanism. The ensemble of three-level cold Rydberg-dressed (87Rb) atoms follows a cascade configuration where a strong standing-wave control field and a weak probe pulse are employed. The diffraction intensity is influenced by the strength of the probe intensity, the control field strength, and the van der Waals (vdW) interaction. It is noticed that relatively large first-order diffraction can be obtained for low-input intensity with a small vdW shift and a strong control field. The scheme can be considered as an amicable solution to realize the atomic grating at the microscopic level, which can provide background- and dark-current-free diffraction.

  11. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will... National Park Service (NPS) concerning the Cold War Theme Study. DATES: The teleconference meeting will be...

  12. Atomic fountain and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the development of working of MOT along with the basic principle of laser atom cooling and trapping is given. A technique to separate the cooled and trapped atoms from the MOT using atomic fountain technique will also be covered. The widely used technique for atomic fountain is, first to cool and trap the neutral atoms in MOT and then launch them in the vertical direction, using moving molasses technique. Using 133 Cs atomic fountain clock, time improvement of 2 to 3 order of magnitude over a conventional 133 Cs atomic clock has been observed

  13. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmcke, J.; Riehle, F.; Witte, A.; Kisters, T.

    1992-01-01

    Physics and experimental results of atom interferometry are reviewed and several realizations of atom interferometers are summarized. As a typical example of an atom interferometer utilizing the internal degrees of freedom of the atom, we discuss the separated field excitation of a calcium atomic beam using four traveling laser fields and demonstrate the Sagnac effect in a rotating interferometer. The sensitivity of this interferometer can be largely increased by use of slow atoms with narrow velocity distribution. We therefore furthermore report on the preparation of a laser cooled and deflected calcium atomic beam. (orig.)

  14. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abele Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10−4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS allows to test Newton’s gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Hesitant birth of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockris, J.O.

    1992-01-01

    John O'M. Bockris, a distinguished chemistry professor at Texas A ampersand M University, finds the reaction to the announcement of the discovery of cold fusion curious. Two years earlier, he notes, there had been a comparable announcement concerning the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity; it received favorable press coverage for months. The cold-fusion announcement, on the other hand, was met with dour skepticism. When other researchers failed in efforts to duplicate the findings of Martin Fleischmann and B. Stanley Pons, Bockris says, the two scientists were held up to ridicule. Bockris says he found a deep emotional opposition to cold fusion, even within his own department and university. This opposition is fueled in large part, he believes, by big science and the hot fusion lobby. A key indicator of cold fusion is the presence of tritium, Brockis claims. At Texas A ampersand M, large amounts of tritium have been found in some experiments; this also has occurred in experiments at more than 40 laboratories in nine countries, he says. Excess heat production is more difficult to attain, he acknowledges. The cold-fusion controversy has uncovered some unflattering characteristics of the scientific community, Bockris says. Among them are: scientists are no less driven by emotion that business people or politicians; research funding decisions serve to perpetuate the goals of politically powerful interest groups; and ideas have great inertia once planted in a scientist's mind

  16. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  17. Contribution to coherent atom optics - Design of multiple wave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impens, F.

    2008-03-01

    The theoretical work presented in this manuscript addresses two complementary issues in coherent atom optics. The first part addresses the perspectives offered by coherent atomic sources through the design of two experiment involving the levitation of a cold atomic sample in a periodic series of light pulses, and for which coherent atomic clouds are particularly well-suited. These systems appear as multiple wave atom interferometers. A striking feature of these experiments is that a unique system performs both the sample trapping and interrogation. To obtain a transverse confinement, a novel atomic lens is proposed, relying on the interaction between an atomic wave with a spherical light wave. The sensitivity of the sample trapping towards the gravitational acceleration and towards the pulse frequencies is exploited to perform the desired measurement. These devices constitute atomic wave resonators in momentum space, which is a novel concept in atom optics. A second part develops new theoretical tools - most of which inspired from optics - well-suited to describe the propagation of coherent atomic sources. A phase-space approach of the propagation, relying on the evolution of moments, is developed and applied to study the low-energy dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. The ABCD method of propagation for atomic waves is extended beyond the linear regime to account perturbatively for mean-field atomic interactions in the atom-optical aberration-less approximation. A treatment of the atom laser extraction enabling one to describe aberrations in the atomic beam, developed in collaboration with the Atom Optics group at the Institute of Optics, is exposed. Last, a quality factor suitable for the characterization of diluted matter waves in a general propagation regime has been proposed. (author)

  18. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  19. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Basic research of neutron radiography using cold neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Tasaka, Kanji

    1995-01-01

    As the result of demanding high quality images, now the nuclear reactors which can supply stably intense neutron beam have become the most general neutron source for radiography. For the purpose, mostly thermal neutrons have been used, but it is indispensable to use other neutrons than thermal neutrons for advancing neutron radiography technology and expanding the application fields. The radiography using cold neutrons is most behind in the development because the suitable neutron source was not available in Japan. The neutron sources for exclusively obtaining intense cold neutron beam were installed in the Kyoto University reactor in 1986 and in the JRR-3M of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1991. Basically as neutron energy lowers, the cross section of substances increases. In certain crystalline substances, the Bragg cutoff arises. The removal of scattered neutrons, the measurement of parallelism of beam and the relation of the thickness of objects with the transmissivity of cold neutrons are described. The imaging by TV method and the cold neutron CT in the CNRF and the simplified neutron CT by film method are reported. (K.I.)