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Sample records for codon optimization chaperone

  1. Codon optimization underpins generalist parasitism in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badet, Thomas; Peyraud, Remi; Mbengue, Malick; Navaud, Olivier; Derbyshire, Mark; Oliver, Richard P; Barbacci, Adelin; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    The range of hosts that parasites can infect is a key determinant of the emergence and spread of disease. Yet, the impact of host range variation on the evolution of parasite genomes remains unknown. Here, we show that codon optimization underlies genome adaptation in broad host range parasites. We found that the longer proteins encoded by broad host range fungi likely increase natural selection on codon optimization in these species. Accordingly, codon optimization correlates with host range across the fungal kingdom. At the species level, biased patterns of synonymous substitutions underpin increased codon optimization in a generalist but not a specialist fungal pathogen. Virulence genes were consistently enriched in highly codon-optimized genes of generalist but not specialist species. We conclude that codon optimization is related to the capacity of parasites to colonize multiple hosts. Our results link genome evolution and translational regulation to the long-term persistence of generalist parasitism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22472.001 PMID:28157073

  2. Codon optimizing for increased membrane protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzadeh, K.; Toddo, S.; Nørholm, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Reengineering a gene with synonymous codons is a popular approach for increasing production levels of recombinant proteins. Here we present a minimalist alternative to this method, which samples synonymous codons only at the second and third positions rather than the entire coding sequence...

  3. Optimal codon randomization via mathematical programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nov, Yuval; Segev, Danny

    2013-10-21

    Codon randomization via degenerate oligonucleotides is a widely used approach for generating protein libraries. We use integer programming methodology to model and solve the problem of computing the minimal mixture of oligonucleotides required to induce an arbitrary target probability over the 20 standard amino acids. We consider both randomization via conventional degenerate oligonucleotides, which incorporate at each position of the randomized codon certain nucleotides in equal probabilities, and randomization via spiked oligonucleotides, which admit arbitrary nucleotide distribution at each of the codon's positions. Existing methods for computing such mixtures rely on various heuristics. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Codon optimization of genes for efficient protein expression in mammalian cells by selection of only preferred human codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko; Sato, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    A simple design method for codon optimization of genes to express a heterologous protein in mammalian cells is described. Codon optimization was performed by choosing only codons preferentially used in humans and with over 60% GC content, and the method was named the "preferred human codon-optimized method." To test our simple rule for codon optimization, the preferred human codon-optimized genes for six proteins containing photoproteins (aequorin and clytin II) and luciferases (Gaussia luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and firefly luciferases from Photinus pyralis and Luciola cruciata) were chemically synthesized and transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells. All preferred human codon-optimized genes showed higher luminescence activity than the corresponding wild-type genes. Our simple design method could be used to improve protein expression in mammalian cells efficiently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Codon Preference Optimization Increases Prokaryotic Cystatin C Expression

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    Qing Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression is closely related to optimal vector-host system pairing in many prokaryotes. Redesign of the human cystatin C (cysC gene using the preferred codons of the prokaryotic system may significantly increase cysC expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli. Specifically, cysC expression may be increased by removing unstable sequences and optimizing GC content. According to E. coli expression system codon preferences, the gene sequence was optimized while the amino acid sequence was maintained. The codon-optimized cysC (co-cysC and wild-type cysC (wt-cysC were expressed by cloning the genes into a pET-30a plasmid, thus transforming the recombinant plasmid into E. coli BL21. Before and after the optimization process, the prokaryotic expression vector and host bacteria were examined for protein expression and biological activation of CysC. The recombinant proteins in the lysate of the transformed bacteria were purified using Ni2+-NTA resin. Recombinant protein expression increased from 10% to 46% based on total protein expression after codon optimization. Recombinant CysC purity was above 95%. The significant increase in cysC expression in E. coli expression produced by codon optimization techniques may be applicable to commercial production systems.

  6. Establishment and comparison of three different codon optimization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-16

    C. elegan). It can raise the n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio in mammalian cells. To reveal the impact of different codon optimizations of fat1 gene in influencing the catalysis efficiency of n-6 PUFAs into n-3.

  7. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

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    Chung Bevan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC, on the level of protein expression. Results In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. Conclusions The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology.

  8. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2012-10-20

    The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU) has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC), on the level of protein expression. In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology.

  9. Simple and efficient expression of codon-optimized mouse leukemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    90 % pluripotent stem cells culture medium [8]. It is urgent to obtain various forms of LIF in high quantities and at a low cost and biological active. E. coli is a commonly used host for expression of heterologous protein, but has a marked preference for certain codons. Differences in preference for codons between prokaryotes ...

  10. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  11. Simple and efficient expression of codon-optimized mouse leukemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To obtain a higher yield of mouse leukemia inhibitory factor to maintain the proliferation potential of pluripotent stem cells at a low cost. Methods: A method was designed to produce recombinant mLIF protein (rmLIF) in Escherichia coli. Through analysis of rmLIF sequence, it was found that rare codons were ...

  12. Codon optimization, expression and enzymatic comparison of Rhizopus oryzae lipases pro-ROL and m-ROL in Pichia pastoris.

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    Yang, Jiangke; Yan, Xiangxiang; Huang, Ribo; Zhang, Bo

    2011-12-01

    Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) is not only a biocatalyst used in a broad range of biotechnological fields, but also a model to investigate the function of intramolecular chaperone in the post-translational processing of lipase. In this study, we cloned and expressed the mature lipase gene (m-ROL) containing the pre-sequence (pro-ROL) of R. oryzae HU3005 in Pichia pastoris GS115 and characterized their enzymatic activities. m-ROL exhibited higher hydrolysis activity towards middle-chain substrates (C10 and C12) at pH 9.0, whereas pro-ROL preferred short-chain substrates (C4) and displayed maximal activity at pH 8.0. Moreover, pro-ROL possessed better thermal stability than m-ROL. This enzymatic discrepancy between m-ROL and p-ROL may be due to the pre-sequence that affects the folding and conformation of the mature lipase domain. To improve the expression level of m-ROL in P. pastoris, overlap extension PCR was conducted to substitute eight less-frequently used codons of m-ROL with frequently used codons. After methanol-induced expression for 72 h, the activity and protein content of the codon optimized m-ROL reached 132.7 U/mL and 50.4 mg/L, while the activity of the parental m-ROL and pro-ROL are 28.7 U/mL and 14.4 mg/L, 29.6 U/mL and 14.1 mg/L, respectively.

  13. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    -optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose...... that non-optimal (wobbly) matching codons influence protein synthesis during the cell cycle. We describe a new mathematical model that shows how codon usage can give rise to cell-cycle regulation. In summary, our data indicate that cells exploit wobbling to generate cell cycle-dependent dynamics...

  14. [Cloning, codon optimization and expression of mature lipase gene Penicillium expansum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengping; Yang, Jiangke; Xu, Li; Liu, Yun; Yan, Yunjun

    2010-02-01

    To clone Penicillum expansum CICC 40356 lipase (PEL) gene cDNA and to over-express active lipase in Pichia pastoris GS115. Primers were designed according to the nucleotide sequence of reported lipase gene from Penicillum. Ten rare codons of PEL and nine of the alpha-signal peptide were optimized by PCR. The native and codon-optimized PEL genes were respectively cloned into pPIC9K, pPIC9KM, and pPIC3.5K vectors. The properties of recombinant lipase were also determined. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the PEL cDNA contained an 858 bp open reading frame. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to 286 amino acid residues, including a potential signal peptide sequence of 20 amino acid residues. The hydrolysis activity of PEL was enhanced with codon-optimization. Its optimal temperature and pH were 35 degrees C and 9.5. It favored medium chain esters (C8-C12) and showed the maximal activity toward C8 acyl-chains. It could be stimulated by Ca2+ and Mg2+, but strongly inhibited by EDTA and slightly repressed by Fe2+, Zn2+ and Cu2+. The activity of PEL was improved 2.3-2.5 folds compared to that of the wild type, suggesting that the codon optimization is an efficient measure to produce the active PEL in P. pastoris system.

  15. Effects of codon optimization on the mRNA levels of heterologous genes in filamentous fungi.

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    Tanaka, Mizuki; Tokuoka, Masafumi; Gomi, Katsuya

    2014-05-01

    Filamentous fungi, particularly Aspergillus species, have recently attracted attention as host organisms for recombinant protein production. Because the secretory yields of heterologous proteins are generally low compared with those of homologous proteins or proteins from closely related fungal species, several strategies to produce substantial amounts of recombinant proteins have been conducted. Codon optimization is a powerful tool for improving the production levels of heterologous proteins. Although codon optimization is generally believed to improve the translation efficiency of heterologous genes without affecting their mRNA levels, several studies have indicated that codon optimization causes an increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of heterologous genes in filamentous fungi. However, the mechanism that determines the low mRNA levels when native heterologous genes are expressed was poorly understood. We recently showed that the transcripts of heterologous genes are polyadenylated prematurely within the coding region and that the heterologous gene transcripts can be stabilized significantly by codon optimization, which is probably attributable to the prevention of premature polyadenylation in Aspergillus oryzae. In this review, we describe the detailed mechanism of premature polyadenylation and the rapid degradation of mRNA transcripts derived from heterologous genes in filamentous fungi.

  16. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2012-01-01

    ...), on the level of protein expression. In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression...

  17. Immunogenicity and efficacy of codon optimized DNA vaccines encoding the F-protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternette, Nicola; Tippler, Bettina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2007-10-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus F-protein (RSV-F) is poorly expressed from DNA expression plasmids containing the wild type RSV-F open reading frame. By codon optimization, premature polyadenylation signals were deleted and a striking enhancement of RSV-F expression levels was achieved. Therefore, the immunogenicity and efficacy of wild type DNA vaccines were compared to codon optimized expression plasmids encoding full-length RSV-F or its ectodomain. Mice were immunized twice with the different DNA vaccines followed by an RSV challenge. Only codon optimized DNA vaccines and in particular the one encoding the ectodomain of RSV-F induced substantial antibody levels and reduced viral load 13-170-fold. Thus, codon optimization enhances the immunogenicity and efficacy of RSV encoding DNA vaccines.

  18. Codon-Optimized Luciola Italica Luciferase Variants for Mammalian Gene Expression in Culture and in Vivo

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    Casey A. Maguire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Luciferases have proven to be useful tools in advancing our understanding of biologic processes. Having a multitude of bioluminescent reporters with different properties is highly desirable. We characterized codon-optimized thermostable green- and red-emitting luciferase variants from the Italian firefly Luciola italica for mammalian gene expression in culture and in vivo. Using lentivirus vectors to deliver and stably express these luciferases in mammalian cells, we showed that both variants displayed similar levels of activity and protein half-lives as well as similar light emission kinetics and higher stability compared to the North American firefly luciferase. Further, we characterized the red-shifted variant for in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Intramuscular injection of tumor cells stably expressing this variant into nude mice yielded a robust luciferase activity. Light emission peaked at 10 minutes post-D-luciferin injection and retained > 60% of signal at 1 hour. Similarly, luciferase activity from intracranially injected glioma cells expressing the red-shifted variant was readily detected and used as a marker to monitor tumor growth over time. Overall, our characterization of these codon-optimized luciferases lays the groundwork for their further use as bioluminescent reporters in mammalian cells.

  19. A codon-optimized green fluorescent protein for live cell imaging in Zymoseptoria tritici.

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    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Studholme, D; Soanes, D; Lin, C; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools to investigate intracellular dynamics and protein localization. Cytoplasmic expression of FPs in fungal pathogens allows greater insight into invasion strategies and the host-pathogen interaction. Detection of their fluorescent signal depends on the right combination of microscopic setup and signal brightness. Slow rates of photo-bleaching are pivotal for in vivo observation of FPs over longer periods of time. Here, we test green-fluorescent proteins, including Aequorea coerulescens GFP (AcGFP), enhanced GFP (eGFP) from Aequorea victoria and a novel Zymoseptoria tritici codon-optimized eGFP (ZtGFP), for their usage in conventional and laser-enhanced epi-fluorescence, and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. We show that eGFP, expressed cytoplasmically in Z. tritici, is significantly brighter and more photo-stable than AcGFP. The codon-optimized ZtGFP performed even better than eGFP, showing significantly slower bleaching and a 20-30% further increase in signal intensity. Heterologous expression of all GFP variants did not affect pathogenicity of Z. tritici. Our data establish ZtGFP as the GFP of choice to investigate intracellular protein dynamics in Z. tritici, but also infection stages of this wheat pathogen inside host tissue. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transformation of Paramecium caudatum with a novel expression vector harboring codon-optimized GFP gene.

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    Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Haga, Nobuyuki; Harumoto, Terue; Matsuura, Tadashi; Mitsui, Youji

    2002-02-06

    We have developed a novel expression vector, pTub-tel3, for transformation in Paramecium caudatum. The vector was constructed by cloning P. caudatum alpha-tubulin 5' and 3' non-coding regions. To examine transformation with the pTub-tel3 construct, we chose the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a selection marker. When a linearized pTub-tel3 vector containing a GFP open reading frame was injected into the macronucleus, the GFP transcript was expressed in many clones whereas protein expression was detected only after extensive optimization of original GFP codons. GFP-derived fluorescence was distributed throughout the nuclei and cytoplasm except for contractile and food vacuoles. Upon continuous cell division, notable heterogeneity of GFP fluorescence among descendants from the same transformant has emerged. This expression vector can be applied to the analysis of protein trafficking and localization in addition to exogenous gene expression in P. caudatum.

  1. Expression of Codon-Optimized Plant Glycosyltransferase UGT72B14 in Escherichia coli Enhances Salidroside Production

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    Feiyan Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside, a plant secondary metabolite in Rhodiola, has been demonstrated to have several adaptogenic properties as a medicinal herb. Due to the limitation of plant source, microbial production of salidroside by expression of plant uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferase (UGT is promising. However, glycoside production usually remains hampered by poor expression of plant UGTs in microorganisms. Herein, we achieved salidroside production by expression of Rhodiola UGT72B14 in Escherichia coli (E. coli and codon optimization was accordingly applied. UGT72B14 expression was optimized by changing 278 nucleotides and decreasing the G+C content to 51.05% without altering the amino acid sequence. The effect of codon optimization on UGT72B14 catalysis for salidroside production was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, salidroside production by codon-optimized UGT72B14 is enhanced because of a significantly improved protein yield (increased by 4.8-fold and an equivalently high activity as demonstrated by similar kinetic parameters (KM and Vmax, compared to that by wild-type protein. In vivo, both batch and fed-batch cultivation using the codon-optimized gene resulted in a significant increase in salidroside production, which was up to 6.7 mg/L increasing 3.2-fold over the wild-type UGT72B14.

  2. Expression of Codon-Optimized Plant Glycosyltransferase UGT72B14 in Escherichia coli Enhances Salidroside Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feiyan; Guo, Huili; Hu, Yingying; Liu, Ran; Huang, Lina; Lv, Heshu; Liu, Chunmei; Yang, Mingfeng; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Salidroside, a plant secondary metabolite in Rhodiola, has been demonstrated to have several adaptogenic properties as a medicinal herb. Due to the limitation of plant source, microbial production of salidroside by expression of plant uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferase (UGT) is promising. However, glycoside production usually remains hampered by poor expression of plant UGTs in microorganisms. Herein, we achieved salidroside production by expression of Rhodiola UGT72B14 in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and codon optimization was accordingly applied. UGT72B14 expression was optimized by changing 278 nucleotides and decreasing the G+C content to 51.05% without altering the amino acid sequence. The effect of codon optimization on UGT72B14 catalysis for salidroside production was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, salidroside production by codon-optimized UGT72B14 is enhanced because of a significantly improved protein yield (increased by 4.8-fold) and an equivalently high activity as demonstrated by similar kinetic parameters (K M and V max), compared to that by wild-type protein. In vivo, both batch and fed-batch cultivation using the codon-optimized gene resulted in a significant increase in salidroside production, which was up to 6.7 mg/L increasing 3.2-fold over the wild-type UGT72B14.

  3. Combination of the Endogenous lhcsr1 Promoter and Codon Usage Optimization Boosts Protein Expression in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

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    Manuel Hiss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The moss Physcomitrella patens is used both as an evo-devo model and biotechnological production system for metabolites and pharmaceuticals. Strong in vivo expression of genes of interest is important for production of recombinant proteins, e.g., selectable markers, fluorescent proteins, or enzymes. In this regard, the choice of the promoter sequence as well as codon usage optimization are two important inside factors to consider in order to obtain optimum protein accumulation level. To reliably quantify fluorescence, we transfected protoplasts with promoter:GFP fusion constructs and measured fluorescence intensity of living protoplasts in a plate reader system. We used the red fluorescent protein mCherry under 2x 35S promoter control as second reporter to normalize for different transfection efficiencies. We derived a novel endogenous promoter and compared deletion variants with exogenous promoters. We used different codon-adapted green fluorescent protein (GFP genes to evaluate the influence of promoter choice and codon optimization on protein accumulation in P. patens, and show that the promoter of the gene of P. patens chlorophyll a/b binding protein lhcsr1 drives expression of GFP in protoplasts significantly (more than twofold better than the commonly used 2x 35S promoter or the rice actin1 promoter. We identified a shortened 677 bp version of the lhcsr1 promoter that retains full activity in protoplasts. The codon optimized GFP yields significantly (more than twofold stronger fluorescence signals and thus demonstrates that adjusting codon usage in P. patens can increase expression strength. In combination, new promotor and codon optimized GFP conveyed sixfold increased fluorescence signal.

  4. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes.

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    Fei Xia

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17 and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19 are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high

  5. Codon Optimization Leads to Functional Impairment of RD114-TR Envelope Glycoprotein

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    Eleonora Zucchelli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviral vectors (LVs are a highly valuable tool for gene transfer currently exploited in basic, applied, and clinical studies. Their optimization is therefore very important for the field of vectorology and gene therapy. A key molecule for LV function is the envelope because it guides cell entry. The most commonly used in transiently produced LVs is the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G envelope, whose continuous expression is, however, toxic for stable LV producer cells. In contrast, the feline endogenous retroviral RD114-TR envelope is suitable for stable LV manufacturing, being well tolerated by producer cells under constitutive expression. We have previously reported successful, transient and stable production of LVs pseudotyped with RD114-TR for good transduction of T lymphocytes and CD34+ cells. To further improve RD114-TR-pseudotyped LV cell entry by increasing envelope expression, we codon-optimized the RD114-TR open reading frame (ORF. Here we show that, despite the RD114-TRco precursor being produced at a higher level than the wild-type counterpart, it is unexpectedly not duly glycosylated, exported to the cytosol, and processed. Correct cleavage of the precursor in the functional surface and transmembrane subunits is prevented in vivo, and, consequently, the unprocessed precursor is incorporated into LVs, making them inactive.

  6. Codon Optimization Leads to Functional Impairment of RD114-TR Envelope Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Eleonora; Pema, Monika; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovan, Claudia; Scavullo, Cinzia; Giuliani, Erica; Bossi, Sergio; Corna, Stefano; Asperti, Claudia; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian-Paolo; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2017-03-17

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are a highly valuable tool for gene transfer currently exploited in basic, applied, and clinical studies. Their optimization is therefore very important for the field of vectorology and gene therapy. A key molecule for LV function is the envelope because it guides cell entry. The most commonly used in transiently produced LVs is the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope, whose continuous expression is, however, toxic for stable LV producer cells. In contrast, the feline endogenous retroviral RD114-TR envelope is suitable for stable LV manufacturing, being well tolerated by producer cells under constitutive expression. We have previously reported successful, transient and stable production of LVs pseudotyped with RD114-TR for good transduction of T lymphocytes and CD34+ cells. To further improve RD114-TR-pseudotyped LV cell entry by increasing envelope expression, we codon-optimized the RD114-TR open reading frame (ORF). Here we show that, despite the RD114-TRco precursor being produced at a higher level than the wild-type counterpart, it is unexpectedly not duly glycosylated, exported to the cytosol, and processed. Correct cleavage of the precursor in the functional surface and transmembrane subunits is prevented in vivo, and, consequently, the unprocessed precursor is incorporated into LVs, making them inactive.

  7. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously identified the mycobacterial high G+C codon usage bias as a limiting factor in heterologous expression of MAP proteins from Lb.salivarius, and demonstrated that codon optimisation of a synthetic coding gene greatly enhances MAP protein production. Here, we effectively demonstrate ...

  8. Optimization of overexpression of a chaperone protein of steroid C25 dehydrogenase for biochemical and biophysical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Mrugała, Beata; Rugor, Agnieszka; Czub, Mateusz P; Skotnicka, Anna; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Szaleniec, Maciej; Minor, Wladek; Lewiński, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Molybdenum is an essential nutrient for metabolism in plant, bacteria, and animals. Molybdoenzymes are involved in nitrogen assimilation and oxidoreductive detoxification, and bioconversion reactions of environmental, industrial, and pharmaceutical interest. Molybdoenzymes contain a molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which is a pyranopterin heterocyclic compound that binds a molybdenum atom via a dithiolene group. Because Moco is a large and complex compound deeply buried within the protein, molybdoenzymes are accompanied by private chaperone proteins responsible for the cofactor's insertion into the enzyme and the enzyme's maturation. An efficient recombinant expression and purification of both Moco-free and Moco-containing molybdoenzymes and their chaperones is of paramount importance for fundamental and applied research related to molybdoenzymes. In this work, we focused on a D1 protein annotated as a chaperone of steroid C25 dehydrogenase (S25DH) from Sterolibacterium denitrificans Chol-1S. The D1 protein is presumably involved in the maturation of S25DH engaged in oxygen-independent oxidation of sterols. As this chaperone is thought to be a crucial element that ensures the insertion of Moco into the enzyme and consequently, proper folding of S25DH optimization of the chaperon's expression is the first step toward the development of recombinant expression and purification methods for S25DH. We have identified common E. coli strains and conditions for both expression and purification that allow us to selectively produce Moco-containing and Moco-free chaperones. We have also characterized the Moco-containing chaperone by EXAFS and HPLC analysis and identified conditions that stabilize both forms of the protein. The protocols presented here are efficient and result in protein quantities sufficient for biochemical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix K M Lorenz

    Full Text Available Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine.

  10. Protective Efficacy and Immunogenicity of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Encoding the Codon-Optimized F Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V.; Tenbusch, Matthias; Überla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the c...

  11. Partial optimization of the 5-terminal codon increased a recombination porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL expression in Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhao

    Full Text Available Pancreatic lipase plays a key role in intestinal digestion of feed fat, and is often deficient in young animals such as weaning piglets. The objective of this study was to express and characterize a partial codon optimized porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL. A 537 bp cDNA fragment encoding N-terminus amino acid residue of the mature porcine pancreatic lipase was synthesized according to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris and ligated to the full-length porcine pancreatic lipase cDNA fragment. The codon optimized PPL was cloned into the pPICZαA (Invitrogen, Beijing, China vector. After the resultant opPPL/pPICZαΑ plasmid was transformed into P. pastoris, the over-expressed extracellular opPPL containing a His-tag to the C terminus was purified using Ni Sepharose affinity column (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ, USA, and was characterized against the native enzyme (commercial PPL from porcine pancreas, Sigma. The opPPL exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa, and showed optimal temperature (40°C, optimal pH (8.0, Km (0.041 mM, and Vmax (2.008 µmol x mg protein(-1 x min(-1 similar to those of the commercial enzyme with p-NPP as the substrate. The recombinant enzyme was stable at 60°C, but lost 80% (P<0.05 of its activity after exposure to heat ≥60°C for 20 min. The codon optimization increased opPPL yield for ca 4 folds (146 mg x L(-1 vs 36 mg x L(-1 and total enzyme activity increased about 5 folds (1900 IU x L(-1 vs 367 IU x L(-1 compared with those native naPPL/pPICZαΑ tranformant. Comparison of gene copies and mRNA profiles between the two strains indicated the increased rePPL yields may partly be ascribed to the increased protein translational efficiency after codon optimization. In conclusion, we successfully optimized 5-terminal of porcine pancreatic lipase encoding gene and over-expressed the gene in P. pastoris as an extracellular, functional enzyme. The recombination enzyme demonstrates a potential for future use as an

  12. Novel integration strategy coupling codon and fermentation optimization for efficiently enhancing sarcosine oxidase (SOX) production in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yanjun; Yang, Hailin; Xin, Yu; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Wu

    2015-05-01

    Sarcosine oxidase (SOX) was an important diagnostic enzyme in the renal function examination. An integrated strategy coupling codon and fermentation optimization was firstly proposed for improving SOX production from recombinant E. coli in 3-L fermentor. The expression suppression (gene phase) and poor balance between SOX expression and cell growth (fermentation phase) in the traditional SOX production were respectively improved by the multiple strategies. Based on the codon bias, the expression suppression was weakened via codon optimization and SOX activity reached 1,521 U/L. The induction toxicity was reduced with the optimal induction condition and SOX production increased to 4,015 U/L. Based on the kinetic analysis of μ x and μ p , a better balance between cell growth and expression was achieved by the two-stage pH-stat control strategy. The SOX activity was further improved to 8,490 U/L and fermentation cycle was also significantly shortened from 44 to 32 h. The substrate inhibition was weakened with a constant feeding fed-batch. With the assistance of integrated strategy, the activity and productivity reached 12,466 U/L and 389.6 U/(L h), respectively, or 3.1-fold and 4.3-fold of the uncontrolled fermentation. The strategy would be also useful in the industrial application of other similar enzymes.

  13. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of α-Amylase Gene from Bacillus licheniformis in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Amylase as an important industrial enzyme has been widely used in starch processing, detergent, and paper industries. To improve expression efficiency of recombinant α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis, the α-amylase gene from B. licheniformis was optimized according to the codon usage of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris and expressed in P. pastoris. Totally, the codons encoding 305 amino acids were optimized in which a total of 328 nucleotides were changed and the G+C content was increased from 47.6 to 49.2%. The recombinants were cultured in 96-deep-well microplates and screened by a new plate assay method. Compared with the wild-type gene, the optimized gene is expressed at a significantly higher level in P. pastoris after methanol induction for 168 h in 5- and 50-L bioreactor with the maximum activity of 8100 and 11000 U/mL, which was 2.31- and 2.62-fold higher than that by wild-type gene. The improved expression level makes the enzyme a good candidate for α-amylase production in industrial use.

  14. Ribosome collisions and Translation efficiency: Optimization by codon usage and mRNA destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    process as a traffic problem, we here analyze conditions and consequences of collisions and queuing. The model allowed us to determine the on-rate (0.8 to 1.1 initiations/s) and the time (1 s) the preceding ribosome occludes initiation for Escherichia coli lacZ mRNA in vivo. We find that ribosome...... collisions and queues are inevitable consequences of a stochastic translation mechanism that reduce the translation efficiency substantially on natural mRNAs. The cells minimize collisions by having its mRNAs being unstable and by a highly selected codon usage in the start of the mRNA. The cost of m...

  15. Protective Efficacy and Immunogenicity of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Encoding the Codon-Optimized F Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V.; Tenbusch, Matthias; Überla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans. PMID:19776123

  16. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector vaccine encoding the codon-optimized F protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans.

  17. Transient B cell depletion or improved transgene expression by codon optimization promote tolerance to factor VIII in gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    Full Text Available The major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A is the development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII. The current method for eradicating inhibitors, termed immune tolerance induction (ITI, is costly and protracted. Clinical protocols that prevent rather than treat inhibitors are not yet established. Liver-directed gene therapy hopes to achieve long-term correction of the disease while also inducing immune tolerance. We sought to investigate the use of adeno-associated viral (serotype 8 gene transfer to induce tolerance to human B domain deleted FVIII in hemophilia A mice. We administered an AAV8 vector with either human B domain deleted FVIII or a codon-optimized transgene, both under a liver-specific promoter to two strains of hemophilia A mice. Protein therapy or gene therapy was given either alone or in conjunction with anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion. Gene therapy with a low-expressing vector resulted in sustained near-therapeutic expression. However, supplementary protein therapy revealed that gene transfer had sensitized mice to hFVIII in a high-responder strain but not in mice of a low-responding strain. This heightened response was ameliorated when gene therapy was delivered with anti-murine CD20 treatment. Transient B cell depletion prevented inhibitor formation in protein therapy, but failed to achieve a sustained hypo-responsiveness. Importantly, use of a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene resulted in sustained therapeutic expression and tolerance without a need for B cell depletion. Therefore, anti-CD20 may be beneficial in preventing vector-induced immune priming to FVIII, but higher levels of liver-restricted expression are preferred for tolerance.

  18. SwiftLib: rapid degenerate-codon-library optimization through dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Timothy M; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Kuhlman, Brian; Leaver-Fay, Andrew

    2015-03-11

    Degenerate codon (DC) libraries efficiently address the experimental library-size limitations of directed evolution by focusing diversity toward the positions and toward the amino acids (AAs) that are most likely to generate hits; however, manually constructing DC libraries is challenging, error prone and time consuming. This paper provides a dynamic programming solution to the task of finding the best DCs while keeping the size of the library beneath some given limit, improving on the existing integer-linear programming formulation. It then extends the algorithm to consider multiple DCs at each position, a heretofore unsolved problem, while adhering to a constraint on the number of primers needed to synthesize the library. In the two library-design problems examined here, the use of multiple DCs produces libraries that very nearly cover the set of desired AAs while still staying within the experimental size limits. Surprisingly, the algorithm is able to find near-perfect libraries where the ratio of amino-acid sequences to nucleic-acid sequences approaches 1; it effectively side-steps the degeneracy of the genetic code. Our algorithm is freely available through our web server and solves most design problems in about a second. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Genetic Code Optimization for Cotranslational Protein Folding: Codon Directional Asymmetry Correlates with Antiparallel Betasheets, tRNA Synthetase Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Seligmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new codon property, codon directional asymmetry in nucleotide content (CDA, reveals a biologically meaningful genetic code dimension: palindromic codons (first and last nucleotides identical, codon structure XZX are symmetric (CDA = 0, codons with structures ZXX/XXZ are 5′/3′ asymmetric (CDA = −1/1; CDA = −0.5/0.5 if Z and X are both purines or both pyrimidines, assigning negative/positive (−/+ signs is an arbitrary convention. Negative/positive CDAs associate with (a Fujimoto's tetrahedral codon stereo-table; (b tRNA synthetase class I/II (aminoacylate the 2′/3′ hydroxyl group of the tRNA's last ribose, respectively; and (c high/low antiparallel (not parallel betasheet conformation parameters. Preliminary results suggest CDA-whole organism associations (body temperature, developmental stability, lifespan. Presumably, CDA impacts spatial kinetics of codon-anticodon interactions, affecting cotranslational protein folding. Some synonymous codons have opposite CDA sign (alanine, leucine, serine, and valine, putatively explaining how synonymous mutations sometimes affect protein function. Correlations between CDA and tRNA synthetase classes are weaker than between CDA and antiparallel betasheet conformation parameters. This effect is stronger for mitochondrial genetic codes, and potentially drives mitochondrial codon-amino acid reassignments. CDA reveals information ruling nucleotide-protein relations embedded in reversed (not reverse-complement sequences (5′-ZXX-3′/5′-XXZ-3′.

  20. High-level expression of a ZEN-detoxifying gene by codon optimization and biobrick in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, La; Wang, Qinhong; Zhou, Yuling; Yin, Lifeng; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-12-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) can be degraded by a lactone hydrolase ZHD, which was derived from Gliocladium roseum. Here, based on the native ZHD encoding gene zhd101, a codon optimized zhd gene was synthesized, which was used for high expression of ZHD in Pichia pastoris GS115. Meanwhile, to further improve the expression of recombinant ZHD, the plasmids containing 1 to 4 copies of the zhd expression cassette were constructed, respectively, using the biobrick method. The protein expression in the recombinant P. pastoris X3c, which was transformed with the plasmid containing 3 copies of zhd expression cassette, was the highest. In addition, the enzymatic activity of ZHD against ZEN was defined for the first time based on a standard curve of peak area vs ZEN concentration. The ZEN degradation activity of ZHD from shake flask fermentation was calculated as 22.5U/mL with the specific activity of 4976.5U/mg. Furthermore, the high-density fermentation of P. pastoris X3c strain was also performed in 5L fermenter. The maximum enzyme activity of the supernatant was 150.1U/mL, which were 6.7-fold higher than that of the shake flask fermentation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Correction of Murine Diabetic Hyperglycaemia With A Single Systemic Administration of An AAV2/8 Vector Containing A Novel Codon Optimized Human Insulin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Shu Uin; Notaridou, Maria; Fu, Zhen Ying; Lee, Kok Onn; Sia, Kian Chuan; Nathwani, Amit Chunilal; Della Peruta, Marco; Calne, Roy Yorke

    2016-01-01

    We report the correction of hyperglycemia of STZ induced diabetic mice using one intravenous systemic administration of a single stranded serotype 8 pseudotyped adeno-associated virus (ssAAV2/8) vector encoding the human proinsulin gene under a constitutive liver specific promoter. In vivo dose titration experiments were carried out and we identified an optimal range that achieved maintenance of euglycaemia or a mild diabetic condition for at least 9 months and ongoing to beyond 1 year for some animals, accompanied by human C-peptide secretion and weight gain. Further DNA codon optimization of the insulin gene construct resulted in approximately 3-10 times more human C-peptide secreted in the blood of codon optimized treated animals thereby reducing the number of vector particles required to achieve the same extent of reduction in blood glucose levels as the non-codon optimized vector. The constitutive secretion of insulin achieved with a single administration of the vector could be of therapeutic value for some diabetic patients.

  2. TK.007: A novel, codon-optimized HSVtk(A168H) mutant for suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Ellen; Treschow, Alexandra; Newrzela, Sebastian; Brücher, Daniela; Weber, Kristoffer; Felldin, Ulrika; Alici, Evren; Gahrton, Gösta; von Laer, Dorothee; Dilber, M Sirac; Fehse, Boris

    2010-08-01

    Conditional elimination of infused gene-modified alloreactive T cells, using suicide gene activation, has been shown to be an efficient strategy to abrogate severe graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in the context of adoptive immunotherapy. To overcome shortcomings of the most widely used suicide gene, wild-type (splice-corrected) herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (scHSVtk), we generated two new variants: the codon-optimized coHSVtk and, by introducing an additional mutation (A168H), the novel TK.007. We transduced human hematopoietic cell lines and primary T cells with retroviral "sort-suicide vectors" encoding combinations of selection markers (tCD34 and OuaSelect) with one of three HSVtk variants. In vitro we observed higher expression levels and sustained long-term expression of TK.007, indicating lower nonspecific toxicity. Also, we noted significantly improved kinetics of ganciclovir (GCV)-mediated killing for TK.007-transduced cells. In an experimental (murine) allogeneic transplantation model, TK.007-transduced T cells mediated severe GvHD, which was readily abrogated by application of GCV (10 mg/kg). Last, we established a modified allotransplantation model that allowed quantitative comparison of the in vivo activities of TK.007 versus scHSVtk. We found that TK.007 mediates both significantly faster and higher absolute killing at low GCV concentrations (10 and 25 mg/kg). In summary, we demonstrate that the novel TK.007 suicide gene combines better killing performance with reduced nonspecific toxicity (as compared with the frequently used splice-corrected wild-type scHSVtk gene), thus representing a promising alternative for suicide gene therapy.

  3. A codon-optimized Mecp2 transgene corrects breathing deficits and improves survival in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matagne, Valerie; Ehinger, Yann; Saidi, Lydia; Borges-Correia, Ana; Barkats, Martine; Bartoli, Marc; Villard, Laurent; Roux, Jean-Christophe

    2017-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is primarily caused by mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). RTT is the second most prevalent cause of intellectual disability in girls and there is currently no cure for the disease. The finding that the deficits caused by the loss of Mecp2 are reversible in the mouse has bolstered interest in gene therapy as a cure for RTT. In order to assess the feasibility of gene therapy in a RTT mouse model, and in keeping with translational goals, we investigated the efficacy of a self-complementary AAV9 vector expressing a codon-optimized version of Mecp2 (AAV9-MCO) delivered via a systemic approach in early symptomatic Mecp2-deficient (KO) mice. Our results show that AAV9-MCO administered at a dose of 2×10 11 viral genome (vg)/mouse was able to significantly increase survival and weight gain, and delay the occurrence of behavioral deficits. Apneas, which are one of the core RTT breathing deficits, were significantly decreased to WT levels in Mecp2 KO mice after AAV9-MCO administration. Semi-quantitative analysis showed that AAV9-MCO administration in Mecp2 KO mice resulted in 10 to 20% Mecp2 immunopositive cells compared to WT animals, with the highest Mecp2 expression found in midbrain regions known to regulate cardio-respiratory functions. In addition, we also found a cell autonomous increase in tyrosine hydroxylase levels in the A1C1 and A2C2 catecholaminergic Mecp2+ neurons in treated Mecp2 KO mice, which may partly explain the beneficial effect of AAV9-MCO administration on apneas occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Codon usage and codon pair patterns in non-grass monocot genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Purabi; Binti Othman, RofinaYasmin; Mebus, Katharina; Ramakrishnan, N; Ann Harikrishna, Jennifer

    2017-11-28

    Studies on codon usage in monocots have focused on grasses, and observed patterns of this taxon were generalized to all monocot species. Here, non-grass monocot species were analysed to investigate the differences between grass and non-grass monocots. First, studies of codon usage in monocots were reviewed. The current information was then extended regarding codon usage, as well as codon-pair context bias, using four completely sequenced non-grass monocot genomes (Musa acuminata, Musa balbisiana, Phoenix dactylifera and Spirodela polyrhiza) for which comparable transcriptome datasets are available. Measurements were taken regarding relative synonymous codon usage, effective number of codons, derived optimal codon and GC content and then the relationships investigated to infer the underlying evolutionary forces. The research identified optimal codons, rare codons and preferred codon-pair context in the non-grass monocot species studied. In contrast to the bimodal distribution of GC3 (GC content in third codon position) in grasses, non-grass monocots showed a unimodal distribution. Disproportionate use of G and C (and of A and T) in two- and four-codon amino acids detected in the analysis rules out the mutational bias hypothesis as an explanation of genomic variation in GC content. There was found to be a positive relationship between CAI (codon adaptation index; predicts the level of expression of a gene) and GC3. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between coding and genomic GC content and negative correlation of GC3 with gene length, indicating a strong impact of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in shaping codon usage and nucleotide composition in non-grass monocots. Optimal codons in these non-grass monocots show a preference for G/C in the third codon position. These results support the concept that codon usage and nucleotide composition in non-grass monocots are mainly driven by gBGC.

  5. [Full-length of human papillomavirus type 18L1 gene optimized using the plant preferred codons and synthesized by overlapping PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Li-Yi; Liu, Chang-Zheng; Zhou, Xiao-Hong

    2009-03-01

    The Human papillomavirus type 18L1 (HPV18L1) gene was synthesized by overlapping PCR after optimization using plant preferred codons. The gene sequences of HPV18L1 were obtained from GenBank and analyzed using DNAMAN, Lasergene, Vector NTI and BLAST. The target sequence was selected and modified using plant preferred codons by the Synthetic Gene Designer and JCat (Java Codon Adaptation Tool) with the addition of a His-tag to the C-terminus to construct the full-length modified HPV18L1 (mHPV18L1). mHPV18L1 was divided into 5 large segments, namely LS1 to LS5, with sizes ranging from 204 to 477 bp. Forty-three small oligonucleotide fragments with sizes of 57-59 bp and 6 pairs of primers were designed and synthesized. mHPV18L1 was amplified by overlapping PCR and subcloned into pMD18-T vector. The recombinant plasmid was identified by restriction enzymes digestion and sequencing. mHPV18L1 was successfully assembled using overlapping PCR. The results of digestion with restriction enzymes and PCR amplification confirmed that the recombinant vector pMD18T- mHPV18L1 contained the inserts with expected size of 1749 bp. mHPV18L1 sequence was confirmed by sequencing. mHPV18L1 with plant preferred codons and the recombinant vector pMD18T- mHPV18L1 have been obtained.

  6. Clinical manufacturing of recombinant human interleukin 15. I. Production cell line development and protein expression in E. coli with stop codon optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Vinay V; Esposito, Dominic; Sumpter, Terry L; Broadt, Trevor L; Hartley, James; Knapp, George C; Cheng, Wei; Jiang, Man-Shiow; Roach, John M; Yang, Xiaoyi; Giardina, Steven L; Mitra, George; Yovandich, Jason L; Creekmore, Stephen P; Waldmann, Thomas A; Zhu, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) has shown remarkable biological properties of promoting NK- and T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as enhancing antitumor immunity of CD8(+) T cells in preclinical models. Here, we report the development of an E. coli cell line to express recombinant human Interleukin-15 (rhIL-15) for clinical manufacturing. Human IL-15 cDNA sequence was inserted into a pET28b plasmid and expressed in several E. coli BL21 strains. Through product quality comparisons among several E. coli strains, including E. coli BL21(DE3), BL21(DE3)pLysS, BLR(DE3)pLysS, and BL21-AI, E. coli BL21-AI was selected for clinical manufacturing. Expression optimization was carried out at shake flask and 20-L fermenter scales, and the product was expressed as inclusion bodies that were solubilized, refolded, and purified to yield active rhIL-15. Stop codons of the expression construct were further investigated after 15-20% of the purified rhIL-15 showed an extraneous peak corresponding to an extra tryptophan residue based on peptide mapping and mass spectrometry analysis. It was determined that the presence of an extra tryptophan was due to a stop codon wobble effect, which could be eliminated by replacing TGA (opal) stop codon with TAA (ochre). As a novel strategy, a simple method of demonstrating lack of tRNA suppressors in the production host cells was developed to validate the cells in this study. The E. coli BL21-AI cells containing the rhIL-15 coding sequence with a triplet stop codon TAATAATGA were banked for further clinical manufacturing. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  7. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Y. Sardesai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC. This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6 with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development.

  8. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishan Fang

    Full Text Available NADH oxidases (NOXs play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3 was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme, with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol 20 μM/min, Km(Glycerol 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH 12.5 μM/min and Km (NADH 51.3 μM, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis.

  9. CRPV genomes with synonymous codon optimizations in the CRPV E7 gene show phenotypic differences in growth and altered immunity upon E7 vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M Cladel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. Recent studies have demonstrated that synonymous codon changes in viral genes can lead to increased protein production when the codons are matched to those of cells in which the protein is being expressed. We theorized that the immunogenicity of the virus would be enhanced by matching codons of selected viral genes to those of the host. We report here that synonymous codon changes in the E7 oncogene are tolerated in the context of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV genome. Papilloma growth rates differ depending upon the changes made indicating that synonymous codons are not necessarily neutral. Immunization with wild type E7 DNA yielded significant protection from subsequent challenge by both wild type and codon-modified genomes. The reduction in growth was most dramatic with the genome containing the greatest number of synonymous codon changes.

  10. Effect of codon optimization and subcellular targeting on Toxoplasma gondii antigen SAG1 expression in tobacco leaves to use in subcutaneous and oral immunization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguía-Becher, Melina; Martín, Valentina; Kraemer, Mauricio; Corigliano, Mariana; Yacono, María L; Goldman, Alejandra; Clemente, Marina

    2010-07-15

    Codon optimization and subcellular targeting were studied with the aim to increase the expression levels of the SAG178-322 antigen of Toxoplasma gondii in tobacco leaves. The expression of the tobacco-optimized and native versions of the SAG1 gene was explored by transient expression from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary expression vector, which allows targeting the recombinant protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the apoplast. Finally, mice were subcutaneously and orally immunized with leaf extracts-SAG1 and the strategy of prime boost with rSAG1 expressed in Escherichia coli was used to optimize the oral immunization with leaf extracts-SAG1. Leaves agroinfiltrated with an unmodified SAG1 gene accumulated 5- to 10-fold more than leaves agroinfiltrated with a codon-optimized SAG1 gene. ER localization allowed the accumulation of higher levels of native SAG1. However, no significant differences were observed between the mRNA accumulations of the different versions of SAG1. Subcutaneous immunization with leaf extracts-SAG1 (SAG1) protected mice against an oral challenge with a non-lethal cyst dose, and this effect could be associated with the secretion of significant levels of IFN-gamma. The protection was increased when mice were ID boosted with rSAG1 (SAG1+boost). This group elicited a significant Th1 humoral and cellular immune response characterized by high levels of IFN-gamma. In an oral immunization assay, the SAG1+boost group showed a significantly lower brain cyst burden compared to the rest of the groups. Transient agroinfiltration was useful for the expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested. Our results support the usefulness of endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The results showed that this plant-produced protein has potential for use as vaccine and provides a potential means for protecting humans and animals against toxoplasmosis.

  11. Improved Prefusion Stability, Optimized Codon Usage, and Augmented Virion Packaging Enhance the Immunogenicity of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein in a Vectored-Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Ngwuta, Joan O; Surman, Sonja; Kabatova, Barbora; Liu, Xiang; Lingemann, Matthias; Liu, Xueqiao; Yang, Lijuan; Herbert, Richard; Swerczek, Joanna; Chen, Man; Moin, Syed M; Kumar, Azad; McLellan, Jason S; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral agent of severe pediatric respiratory tract disease worldwide, but it lacks a licensed vaccine or suitable antiviral drug. A live attenuated chimeric bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 (rB/HPIV3) was developed previously as a vector expressing RSV fusion (F) protein to confer bivalent protection against RSV and HPIV3. In a previous clinical trial in virus-naive children, rB/HPIV3 was well tolerated but the immunogenicity of wild-type RSV F was unsatisfactory. We previously modified RSV F with a designed disulfide bond (DS) to increase stability in the prefusion (pre-F) conformation and to be efficiently packaged in the vector virion. Here, we further stabilized pre-F by adding both disulfide and cavity-filling mutations (DS-Cav1), and we also modified RSV F codon usage to have a lower CpG content and a higher level of expression. This RSV F open reading frame was evaluated in rB/HPIV3 in three forms: (i) pre-F without vector-packaging signal, (ii) pre-F with vector-packaging signal, and (iii) secreted pre-F ectodomain trimer. Despite being efficiently expressed, the secreted pre-F was poorly immunogenic. DS-Cav1 stabilized pre-F, with or without packaging, induced higher titers of pre-F specific antibodies in hamsters, and improved the quality of RSV-neutralizing serum antibodies. Codon-optimized RSV F containing fewer CpG dinucleotides had higher F expression, replicated more efficiently in vivo, and was more immunogenic. The combination of DS-Cav1 pre-F stabilization, optimized codon usage, reduced CpG content, and vector packaging significantly improved vector immunogenicity and protective efficacy against RSV. This provides an improved vectored RSV vaccine candidate suitable for pediatric clinical evaluation.IMPORTANCE RSV and HPIV3 are the first and second leading viral causes of severe pediatric respiratory disease worldwide. Licensed vaccines or suitable antiviral drugs are not available. We

  12. A codon-optimized bacterial antibiotic gene used as selection marker for stable nuclear transformation in the marine red alga Pyropia yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Toshiki; Hirata, Ryo; Fukuda, Satoru; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Saga, Naotsune

    2014-06-01

    Marine macroalgae play an important role in marine coastal ecosystems and are widely used as sea vegetation foodstuffs and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there have been increased demands for useful species and varieties of these macroalgae. However, genetic transformation in macroalgae has not yet been established. We have developed a dominant selection marker for stable nuclear transformation in the red macroalga Pyropia yezoensis. We engineered the coding region of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene aph7″ from Streptomyces hygroscopicus to adapt codon usage of the nuclear genes of P. yezoensis. We designated this codon-optimized aph7″ gene as PyAph7. After bombarding P. yezoensis cells with plasmids containing PyAph7 under the control of their endogenous promoter, 1.9 thalli (or individuals) of hygromycin-resistant strains were isolated from a 10-mm square piece of the bombarded thallus. These transformants were stably maintained throughout the asexual life cycle. Stable expression of PyAph7was verified using Southern blot analysis and genomic PCR and RT-PCR analyses. PyAph7 proved to be a new versatile tool for stable nuclear transformation in P. yezoensis.

  13. Formation of virus-like particles from O-type foot-and-mouth disease virus in insect cells using codon-optimized synthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yimei; Sun, Pu; Fu, Yuanfang; Bai, Xingwen; Tian, Feipen; Liu, Xiangtao; Lu, Zengjun; Liu, Zaixin

    2010-09-01

    A recombinant baculovirus was constructed to simultaneously express codon-optimized virus-like particles (VLP), A VP1-2A-VP3 and VP0 of serotype O foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), from individual promoters. The target proteins were expressed in insect cells at high level, as shown by indirect sandwich ELISA; and the expressed VP1-2A-VP3 could autocatalytically be cleaved into the individual proteins, VP1-2A and VP3, as shown by Western-blot analyses. In addition, in the insect cells, the structural proteins, VP0, VP3 and VP1-2A, self-assembled into virus-like particles resembling the authentic FMDV particles. This information should prove useful for the development of more efficient VLP assembly using shorter genes.

  14. High yield expression in a recombinant E. coli of a codon optimized chicken anemia virus capsid protein VP1 useful for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Bang-Jau

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chicken anemia virus (CAV, the causative agent chicken anemia, is the only member of the genus Gyrovirus of the Circoviridae family. CAV is an immune suppressive virus and causes anemia, lymph organ atrophy and immunodeficiency. The production and biochemical characterization of VP1 protein and its use in a subunit vaccine or as part of a diagnostic kit would be useful to CAV infection prevention. Results Significantly increased expression of the recombinant full-length VP1 capsid protein from chicken anemia virus was demonstrated using an E. coli expression system. The VP1 gene was cloned into various different expression vectors and then these were expressed in a number of different E. coli strains. The expression of CAV VP1 in E. coli was significantly increased when VP1 was fused with GST protein rather than a His-tag. By optimizing the various rare amino acid codons within the N-terminus of the VP1 protein, the expression level of the VP1 protein in E. coli BL21(DE3-pLysS was further increased significantly. The highest protein expression level obtained was 17.5 g/L per liter of bacterial culture after induction with 0.1 mM IPTG for 2 h. After purification by GST affinity chromatography, the purified full-length VP1 protein produced in this way was demonstrated to have good antigenicity and was able to be recognized by CAV-positive chicken serum in an ELISA assay. Conclusions Purified recombinant VP1 protein with the gene's codons optimized in the N-terminal region has potential as chimeric protein that, when expressed in E. coli, may be useful in the future for the development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests.

  15. High yield expression in a recombinant E. coli of a codon optimized chicken anemia virus capsid protein VP1 useful for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Shiou; Hseu, You-Cheng; Lai, Guan-Hua; Chang, Wen-Te; Chen, Hsi-Jien; Huang, Chi-Hung; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Wang, Min-Ying; Kao, Jung-Yie; You, Bang-Jau; Lin, Wen- Hsin; Lien, Yi-Yang; Lin, Ming-Kuem

    2011-07-23

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV), the causative agent chicken anemia, is the only member of the genus Gyrovirus of the Circoviridae family. CAV is an immune suppressive virus and causes anemia, lymph organ atrophy and immunodeficiency. The production and biochemical characterization of VP1 protein and its use in a subunit vaccine or as part of a diagnostic kit would be useful to CAV infection prevention. Significantly increased expression of the recombinant full-length VP1 capsid protein from chicken anemia virus was demonstrated using an E. coli expression system. The VP1 gene was cloned into various different expression vectors and then these were expressed in a number of different E. coli strains. The expression of CAV VP1 in E. coli was significantly increased when VP1 was fused with GST protein rather than a His-tag. By optimizing the various rare amino acid codons within the N-terminus of the VP1 protein, the expression level of the VP1 protein in E. coli BL21(DE3)-pLysS was further increased significantly. The highest protein expression level obtained was 17.5 g/L per liter of bacterial culture after induction with 0.1 mM IPTG for 2 h. After purification by GST affinity chromatography, the purified full-length VP1 protein produced in this way was demonstrated to have good antigenicity and was able to be recognized by CAV-positive chicken serum in an ELISA assay. Purified recombinant VP1 protein with the gene's codons optimized in the N-terminal region has potential as chimeric protein that, when expressed in E. coli, may be useful in the future for the development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests.

  16. Expression of a codon-optimized β-glucosidase from Cellulomonas flavigena PR-22 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bioethanol production from cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Fránquez, Francisco Javier; González-Bautista, Enrique; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana Carmela; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor Mario; García-Mena, Jaime; Martinez, Alfredo

    2017-05-01

    Bioethanol is one of the main biofuels produced from the fermentation of saccharified agricultural waste; however, this technology needs to be optimized for profitability. Because the commonly used ethanologenic yeast strains are unable to assimilate cellobiose, several efforts have been made to express cellulose hydrolytic enzymes in these yeasts to produce ethanol from lignocellulose. The C. flavigenabglA gene encoding β-glucosidase catalytic subunit was optimized for preferential codon usage in S. cerevisiae. The optimized gene, cloned into the episomal vector pRGP-1, was expressed, which led to the secretion of an active β-glucosidase in transformants of the S. cerevisiae diploid strain 2-24D. The volumetric and specific extracellular enzymatic activities using pNPG as substrate were 155 IU L -1 and 222 IU g -1 , respectively, as detected in the supernatant of the cultures of the S. cerevisiae RP2-BGL transformant strain growing in cellobiose (20 g L -1 ) as the sole carbon source for 48 h. Ethanol production was 5 g L -1 after 96 h of culture, which represented a yield of 0.41 g g -1 of substrate consumed (12 g L -1 ), equivalent to 76% of the theoretical yield. The S. cerevisiae RP2-BGL strain expressed the β-glucosidase extracellularly and produced ethanol from cellobiose, which makes this microorganism suitable for application in ethanol production processes with saccharified lignocellulose.

  17. Effect of codon optimization and subcellular targeting on Toxoplasma gondii antigen SAG1 expression in tobacco leaves to use in subcutaneous and oral immunization in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacono María L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon optimization and subcellular targeting were studied with the aim to increase the expression levels of the SAG178-322 antigen of Toxoplasma gondii in tobacco leaves. The expression of the tobacco-optimized and native versions of the SAG1 gene was explored by transient expression from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary expression vector, which allows targeting the recombinant protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the apoplast. Finally, mice were subcutaneously and orally immunized with leaf extracts-SAG1 and the strategy of prime boost with rSAG1 expressed in Escherichia coli was used to optimize the oral immunization with leaf extracts-SAG1. Results Leaves agroinfiltrated with an unmodified SAG1 gene accumulated 5- to 10-fold more than leaves agroinfiltrated with a codon-optimized SAG1 gene. ER localization allowed the accumulation of higher levels of native SAG1. However, no significant differences were observed between the mRNA accumulations of the different versions of SAG1. Subcutaneous immunization with leaf extracts-SAG1 (SAG1 protected mice against an oral challenge with a non-lethal cyst dose, and this effect could be associated with the secretion of significant levels of IFN-γ. The protection was increased when mice were ID boosted with rSAG1 (SAG1+boost. This group elicited a significant Th1 humoral and cellular immune response characterized by high levels of IFN-γ. In an oral immunization assay, the SAG1+boost group showed a significantly lower brain cyst burden compared to the rest of the groups. Conclusion Transient agroinfiltration was useful for the expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested. Our results support the usefulness of endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The results showed that this plant-produced protein has potential for use as vaccine and provides a potential means for protecting humans and

  18. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  19. Codon-Optimized Expression and Purification of Truncated ORF2 Protein of Hepatitis E Virus in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshadpour, Fatemeh; Taherkhani, Reza; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Rajabi Memari, Hamid; Samarbafzadeh, Ali Reza

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a causative agent of acute hepatitis among people of different age groups and has high mortality rate of up to 30% among pregnant women. Therefore, primary prevention of HEV infection is essential. The aim of this study was to obtain the highly purified truncated open reading frames 2 (ORF2) protein, which might be a future HEV vaccine candidate. The truncated orf2 gene (orf2.1), encoding the 112-660 amino acid of HEV capsid protein sequence, was optimized, synthesized, and cloned into pBluescript II SK(+) vector. After subcloning into expression vector pET-30a (+), a 193-nucleotide fragment was deleted from the construct and the recombinant plasmid pET-30a-ORF2.2 (orf2.2 encodes 112-608 amino acid sequence of HEV capsid protein) was constructed and used for transformation of Escherichia coli BL21 cells. After induction with isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and optimizing the conditions of expression, the target protein was highly expressed and purified by Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography. The expressed and purified protein was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting. The subcloning was confirmed by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, and DNA sequencing of recombinant plasmid pET30a-ORF2.2. The results obtained from optimizing the expression conditions showed that the highest expression of the protein was obtained by adding IPTG at a final concentration of 1 mM at 37℃ for four hours. The expression and purification of truncated ORF2 protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a protein band of about 55 kDa. SDS-PAGE of the purified protein revealed that the highest amount of target protein in elution buffer at the pH of 4.5 was obtained. The yield of the purified protein was about 1 mg/L of culture media. In this study, the optimized truncated ORF2 protein was expressed in E. coli successfully and the highly purified

  20. Constitutive high-level expression of a codon-optimized β-fructosidase gene from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Carmen; Martínez, Duniesky; Trujillo, Luis E; Mazola, Yuliet; González, Ernesto; Pérez, Enrique R; Hernández, Lázaro

    2013-02-01

    Enzymes for use in the sugar industry are preferred to be thermotolerant. In this study, a synthetic codon-optimized gene encoding a highly thermostable β-fructosidase (BfrA, EC 3.2.1.26) from the bacterium Thermotoga maritima was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The gradual increase of the transgene dosage from one to four copies under the control of the constitutive glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter had an additive effect on BfrA yield without causing cell toxicity. Maximal values of cell biomass (115 g/l, dry weight) and overall invertase activity (241 U/ml) were reached at 72 h in fed-batch fermentations using cane sugar as the main carbon source for growth. Secretion driven by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal peptide resulted in periplasmic retention (44 %) and extracellular release (56 %) of BfrA. The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides did not influence the optimal activity, thermal stability, kinetic properties, substrate specificity, and exo-type action mode of the yeast-secreted BfrA in comparison to the native unglycosylated enzyme. Complete inversion of cane sugar at initial concentration of 60 % (w/v) was achieved by periplasmic BfrA in undisrupted cells reacting at pH 5.5 and 70 °C, with average productivity of 4.4 g of substrate hydrolyzed per grams of biomass (wet weight) per hour. The high yield of fully active glycosylated BfrA here attained by recombinant P. pastoris in a low-cost fermentation process appears to be attractive for the large-scale production of this thermostable enzyme useful for the manufacture of inverted sugar syrup.

  1. Codon usage biases in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhu, Tong-Yang; Jiang, Zheng-Xin; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Yue-Lan; Zhang, Song; Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Wang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Lin; Xia, Wen-Hao; Li, Lei; Chen, Ji-Jun; Wang, Jia-Yue; Wang, Wei-Wei; Zheng, Wei-Juan

    2010-05-01

    Establishing codon usage biases are crucial for understanding the etiology of central nervous system neurodegenerative diseases (CNSNDD) especially Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as genetic factors. G and C ending codons are strongly biased in the coding sequences of these proteins as a result of genomic GC composition constraints. On the other hand, codons that identified as translationally optimal in the major trend all end in C or G, suggesting translational selection should also be taken into consideration additional to compositional constraints. Furthermore, this investigation reveals that three common codons, CGC (Arg), AGC (Ser), and GGC (Gly), are also critical in affecting codon usage bias. They not only can offer an insight into the codon usage bias of AD and its mechanism, but also may help in the possible cures for these diseases.

  2. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias in Crenarchaea and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the pattern of optimal codon usage in Archaea. Comparative analysis was executed to understand the pattern of codon usage bias between the high expression genes (HEG) and the whole genomes in two Archaeal phyla, Crenarchaea and Euryarchaea. The G+C% of the ...

  3. Codon usage patterns in Nematoda: analysis based on over 25 million codons in thirty-two species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Background Codon usage has direct utility in molecular characterization of species and is also a marker for molecular evolution. To understand codon usage within the diverse phylum Nematoda, we analyzed a total of 265,494 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from 30 nematode species. The full genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae were also examined. A total of 25,871,325 codons were analyzed and a comprehensive codon usage table for all species was generated. This is the first codon usage table available for 24 of these organisms. Results Codon usage similarity in Nematoda usually persists over the breadth of a genus but then rapidly diminishes even within each clade. Globodera, Meloidogyne, Pristionchus, and Strongyloides have the most highly derived patterns of codon usage. The major factor affecting differences in codon usage between species is the coding sequence GC content, which varies in nematodes from 32% to 51%. Coding GC content (measured as GC3) also explains much of the observed variation in the effective number of codons (R = 0.70), which is a measure of codon bias, and it even accounts for differences in amino acid frequency. Codon usage is also affected by neighboring nucleotides (N1 context). Coding GC content correlates strongly with estimated noncoding genomic GC content (R = 0.92). On examining abundant clusters in five species, candidate optimal codons were identified that may be preferred in highly expressed transcripts. Conclusion Evolutionary models indicate that total genomic GC content, probably the product of directional mutation pressure, drives codon usage rather than the converse, a conclusion that is supported by examination of nematode genomes. PMID:26271136

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Codon Usage Bias in Epichloë festucae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhang Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of codon usage data has both practical and theoretical applications in understanding the basics of molecular biology. Differences in codon usage patterns among genes reflect variations in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. Recently, there have been several reports related to codon usage in fungi, but little is known about codon usage bias in Epichloë endophytes. The present study aimed to assess codon usage patterns and biases in 4870 sequences from Epichloë festucae, which may be helpful in revealing the constraint factors such as mutation or selection pressure and improving the bioreactor on the cloning, expression, and characterization of some special genes. The GC content with 56.41% is higher than the AT content (43.59% in E. festucae. The results of neutrality and effective number of codons plot analyses showed that both mutational bias and natural selection play roles in shaping codon usage in this species. We found that gene length is strongly correlated with codon usage and may contribute to the codon usage patterns observed in genes. Nucleotide composition and gene expression levels also shape codon usage bias in E. festucae. E. festucae exhibits codon usage bias based on the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU values of 61 sense codons, with 25 codons showing an RSCU larger than 1. In addition, we identified 27 optimal codons that end in a G or C.

  5. DNATagger, colors for codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, N M; Basso, D M

    2008-09-16

    DNATagger is a web-based tool for coloring and editing DNA, RNA and protein sequences and alignments. It is dedicated to the visualization of protein coding sequences and also protein sequence alignments to facilitate the comprehension of evolutionary processes in sequence analysis. The distinctive feature of DNATagger is the use of codons as informative units for coloring DNA and RNA sequences. The codons are colored according to their corresponding amino acids. It is the first program that colors codons in DNA sequences without being affected by "out-of-frame" gaps of alignments. It can handle single gaps and gaps inside the triplets. The program also provides the possibility to edit the alignments and change color patterns and translation tables. DNATagger is a JavaScript application, following the W3C guidelines, designed to work on standards-compliant web browsers. It therefore requires no installation and is platform independent. The web-based DNATagger is available as free and open source software at http://www.inf.ufrgs.br/~dmbasso/dnatagger/.

  6. Mycobacterial codon optimization of the gene encoding the Sm14 antigen of Schistosoma mansoni in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin enhances protein expression but not protection against cercarial challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaldo, Paula B; Miyaji, Eliane N; Vilar, Monica M; Campos, Adriano S; Dias, Waldely O; Armôa, Geraldo R G; Tendler, Miriam; Leite, Luciana C C; McIntosh, Douglas

    2006-10-01

    A mycobacterial codon-optimized gene encoding the Sm14 antigen of Schistosoma mansoni was generated using oligonucleotide assembly. This synthetic gene enhanced approximately fourfold the protein expression level in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (rBCG) when compared to that obtained using the native gene in the same expression vector. Immunization of mice with rBCG expressing Sm14 via the synthetic gene induced specific cellular Th1-predominant immune responses, as determined by interferon-gamma production of Sm14-stimulated splenocytes, which were comparable to those recorded in animals immunized with an rBCG strain expressing the native gene. Administration of a single dose of the rBCG-Sm14 construct carrying the synthetic gene conferred protection against cercarial challenge in outbred Swiss mice, at a level equivalent to those provided by either a single dose of rBCG expressing the native gene or three doses of Escherichia coli-derived recombinant Sm14. Our data demonstrated that despite improving the level of antigen expression, the codon optimization strategy did not result in enhanced immunity or protection against cercarial S. mansoni challenge.

  7. Evaluation of the attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a live virus vaccine generated by codon-pair bias de-optimization of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Anafu, Amanda; Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-20

    Codon-pair bias de-optimization (CPBD) of viruses involves re-writing viral genes using statistically underrepresented codon pairs, without any changes to the amino acid sequence or codon usage. Previously, this technology has been used to attenuate the influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus. The de-optimized virus was immunogenic and protected inbred mice from challenge. In order to assess whether CPBD could be used to produce a live vaccine against a clinically relevant influenza virus, we generated an influenza A/California/07/2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus with de-optimized HA and NA gene segments (2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min)), and evaluated viral replication and protein expression in MDCK cells, and attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy in outbred ferrets. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus grew to a similar titer as the 2009 pH1N1 wild type (wt) virus in MDCK cells (∼10(6)TCID50/ml), despite reduced HA and NA protein expression on western blot. In ferrets, intranasal inoculation of 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus at doses ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50 led to seroconversion in all animals and protection from challenge with the 2009 pH1N1 wt virus 28 days later. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus did not cause clinical illness in ferrets, but replicated to a similar titer as the wt virus in the upper and lower respiratory tract, suggesting that de-optimization of additional gene segments may be warranted for improved attenuation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the potential of using CPBD technology for the development of a live influenza virus vaccine if the level of attenuation is optimized. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Patients' attitudes to chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Roger

    1985-01-01

    In a survey of 200 female patients attending a five-man practice in a health centre, 75 per cent of the respondents stated that they would like to be offered a chaperone at pelvic examinations. Only six per cent would accept the offer if the examination was performed by their own doctor and 17 per cent if a different doctor examined them. Patients expressing a definite wish for a chaperone were significantly younger and were less likely to have had a previous pelvic examination. Those who def...

  9. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in the edible fungus Volvariella volvacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Lv, Beibei; Wu, Xiao; Wang, Jinbin; Wu, Guogan; Shi, Chunhui; Tang, Xueming

    2017-03-01

    In this study, trends in synonymous codons usage of Volvariella volvecea have been first examined by analysis of complete coding sequences and gene chip data. The results showed that GC content at three codon positions are obviously different and there were several factors shaping the codon usage of V. volvacea genes, including base composition. The comparison of codon usage among four edible fungi such as V. volvacea, Agaricus bisporus, Coprinopsis cinerea, and Pleurotus ostreatus indicated that the similar codon usage pattern was used among V. volvacea, A. bisporus and P. ostreatus, but there was significantly different codon usage pattern of C. cinerea. Two arrays of optimal codons were determined by effective number of codons (ENC) values and gene chip database separately, resulting that most of the ENC-predicted optimal codons were included in the array of gene chip resulted optimal codons. This study can provide useful information for codon usage pattern analysis and gene transformation of V. volvacea. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Optimization of codon composition and regulatory elements for expression of human insulin like growth factor-1 in transgenic chloroplasts and evaluation of structural identity and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandberg Laurence

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic chloroplasts are potential bioreactors for recombinant protein production, especially for achievement of high levels of protein expression and proper folding. Production of therapeutic proteins in leaves provides transgene containment by elimination of reproductive structures. Therefore, in this study, human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 is expressed in transgenic chloroplasts for evaluation of structural identity and function. Results Expression of the synthetic Insulin like Growth Factor 1 gene (IGF-1s, 60% AT was observed in transformed E. coli. However, no native IGF-1 gene (IGF-1n, 41% AT product was detected in the western blots in E. coli. Site-specific integration of the transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome was confirmed after transformation using PCR. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the transgenic lines were homoplasmic. The transgenic plant lines had IGF-1s expression levels of 11.3% of total soluble protein (TSP. The IGF-1n plants contained 9.5% TSP as IGF-1n, suggesting that the chloroplast translation machinery is more flexible than E. coli in codon preference and usage. The expression of IGF-1 was increased up to 32% TSP under continuous illumination by the chloroplast light regulatory elements. IgG-Sepharose affinity column chromatographic separation of Z domain containing chloroplast derived IGF-1 protein, single and two dimensional electrophoresis methods and mass spectrometer analysis confirmed the identity of human IGF-1 in transgenic chloroplasts. Two spots analyzed from 2-D focusing/phoresis acrylamide gel showed the correct amino acid sequence of human IGF-1 and the S. aureus Z-tag. Cell proliferation assays in human HU-3 cells demonstrated the biological activity of chloroplast derived IGF-1 even in the presence of the S. aureus Z tag. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 expressed in transgenic chloroplasts is identical to the native

  11. Exploring codon context bias for synthetic gene design of a thermostable invertase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Han Bin; Klement, Maximilian; Ang, Kok Siong; Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Ow, Dave Siak-Wei; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-01-01

    Various isoforms of invertases from prokaryotes, fungi, and higher plants has been expressed in Escherichia coli, and codon optimisation is a widely-adopted strategy for improvement of heterologous enzyme expression. Successful synthetic gene design for recombinant protein expression can be done by matching its translational elongation rate against heterologous host organisms via codon optimization. Amongst the various design parameters considered for the gene synthesis, codon context bias has been relatively overlooked compared to individual codon usage which is commonly adopted in most of codon optimization tools. In addition, matching the rates of transcription and translation based on secondary structure may lead to enhanced protein folding. In this study, we evaluated codon context fitness as design criterion for improving the expression of thermostable invertase from Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli and explored the relevance of secondary structure regions for folding and expression. We designed three coding sequences by using (1) a commercial vendor optimized gene algorithm, (2) codon context for the whole gene, and (3) codon context based on the secondary structure regions. Then, the codon optimized sequences were transformed and expressed in E. coli. From the resultant enzyme activities and protein yield data, codon context fitness proved to have the highest activity as compared to the wild-type control and other criteria while secondary structure-based strategy is comparable to the control. Codon context bias was shown to be a relevant parameter for enhancing enzyme production in Escherichia coli by codon optimization. Thus, we can effectively design synthetic genes within heterologous host organisms using this criterion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does codon bias have an evolutionary origin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biro Jan C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a 3-fold redundancy in the Genetic Code; most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon. These synonymous codons are not used equally; there is a Codon Usage Bias (CUB. This article will provide novel information about the origin and evolution of this bias. Results Codon Usage Bias (CUB, defined here as deviation from equal usage of synonymous codons was studied in 113 species. The average CUB was 29.3 ± 1.1% (S.E.M, n = 113 of the theoretical maximum and declined progressively with evolution and increasing genome complexity. A Pan-Genomic Codon Usage Frequency (CUF Table was constructed to describe genome-wide relationships among codons. Significant correlations were found between the number of synonymous codons and (i the frequency of the respective amino acids (ii the size of CUB. Numerous, statistically highly significant, internal correlations were found among codons and the nucleic acids they comprise. These strong correlations made it possible to predict missing synonymous codons (wobble bases reliably from the remaining codons or codon residues. Conclusion The results put the concept of "codon bias" into a novel perspective. The internal connectivity of codons indicates that all synonymous codons might be integrated parts of the Genetic Code with equal importance in maintaining its functional integrity.

  13. Positive selection for unpreferred codon usage in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan James E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection has traditionally been understood as a force responsible for pushing genes to states of higher translational efficiency, whereas lower translational efficiency has been explained by neutral mutation and genetic drift. We looked for evidence of directional selection resulting in increased unpreferred codon usage (and presumably reduced translational efficiency in three divergent clusters of eukaryotic genomes using a simple optimal-codon-based metric (Kp/Ku. Results Here we show that for some genes natural selection is indeed responsible for causing accelerated unpreferred codon substitution, and document the scope of this selection. In Cryptococcus and to a lesser extent Drosophila, we find many genes showing a statistically significant signal of selection for unpreferred codon usage in one or more lineages. We did not find evidence for this type of selection in Saccharomyces. The signal of positive selection observed from unpreferred synonymous codon substitutions is coincident in Cryptococcus and Drosophila with the distribution of upstream open reading frames (uORFs, another genic feature known to reduce translational efficiency. Functional enrichment analysis of genes exhibiting low Kp/Ku ratios reveals that genes in regulatory roles are particularly subject to this type of selection. Conclusion Through genome-wide scans, we find recent selection for unpreferred codon usage at approximately 1% of genetic loci in a Cryptococcus and several genes in Drosophila. Unpreferred codons can impede translation efficiency, and we find that genes with translation-impeding uORFs are enriched for this selection signal. We find that regulatory genes are particularly likely to be subject to selection for unpreferred codon usage. Given that expression noise can propagate through regulatory cascades, and that low translational efficiency can reduce expression noise, this finding supports the hypothesis that translational

  14. Selection on start codons in prokaryotes and potential compensatory nucleotide substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinky, Frida; Rogozin, Igor B; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-09-29

    Reconstruction of the evolution of start codons in 36 groups of closely related bacterial and archaeal genomes reveals purifying selection affecting AUG codons. The AUG starts are replaced by GUG and especially UUG significantly less frequently than expected under the neutral expectation derived from the frequencies of the respective nucleotide triplet substitutions in non-coding regions and in 4-fold degenerate sites. Thus, AUG is the optimal start codon that is actively maintained by purifying selection. However, purifying selection on start codons is significantly weaker than the selection on the same codons in coding sequences, although the switches between the codons result in conservative amino acid substitutions. The only exception is the AUG to UUG switch that is strongly selected against among start codons. Selection on start codons is most pronounced in evolutionarily conserved, highly expressed genes. Mutation of the start codon to a sub-optimal form (GUG or UUG) tends to be compensated by mutations in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence towards a stronger translation initiation signal. Together, all these findings indicate that in prokaryotes, translation start signals are subject to weak but significant selection for maximization of initiation rate and, consequently, protein production.

  15. Improved secretory production of calf prochymosin by codon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chymosin as an important industrial enzyme used widely in cheese manufacture. In our preliminary study, low yields (80 U mL-1) were obtained when Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 was used to express chymosin. We investigated whether this poor secretion could be improved by codon optimization and disruption of PMR1 ...

  16. Improved secretory production of calf prochymosin by codon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... Chymosin as an important industrial enzyme used widely in cheese manufacture. In our preliminary study, low yields (80 U mL-1) were obtained when Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 was used to express chymosin. We investigated whether this poor secretion could be improved by codon optimization and.

  17. Codon optimization, constitutive expression and antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-07-12

    Jul 12, 2012 ... to use methanol as a carbon resource. The AOX1 promoter is induced by methanol, and repressed by glucose and glycerol. However, methanol is extremely toxic. It is a volatile, colorless and flammable liquid which is very difficult to remove during the downstream protein production. Since Waterham et al.

  18. Nucleic acid chaperons: a theory of an RNA-assisted protein folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biro Jan C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background Proteins are assumed to contain all the information necessary for unambiguous folding (Anfinsen's principle. However, ab initio structure prediction is often not successful because the amino acid sequence itself is not sufficient to guide between endless folding possibilities. It seems to be a logical to try to find the "missing" information in nucleic acids, in the redundant codon base. Results mRNA energy dot plots and protein residue contact maps were found to be rather similar. The structure of mRNA is also conserved if the protein structure is conserved, even if the sequence similarity is low. These observations led me to suppose that some similarity might exist between nucleic acid and protein folding. I found that amino acid pairs, which are co-located in the protein structure, are preferentially coded by complementary codons. This codon complementarity is not perfect; it is suboptimal where the 1st and 3rd codon residues are complementary to each other in reverse orientation, while the 2nd codon letters may be, but are not necessarily, complementary. Conclusion Partial complementary coding of co-locating amino acids in protein structures suggests that mRNA assists in protein folding and functions not only as a template but even as a chaperon during translation. This function explains the role of wobble bases and answers the mystery of why we have a redundant codon base.

  19. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns between dipteran and hymenopteran sequenced genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon bias is a phenomenon of non-uniform usage of codons whereas codon context generally refers to sequential pair of codons in a gene. Although genome sequencing of multiple species of dipteran and hymenopteran insects have been completed only a few of these species have been analyzed for codon usage bias. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use bioinformatics approaches to analyze codon usage bias and codon context patterns in a genome-wide manner among 15 dipteran and 7 hymenopteran insect species. Results show that GAA is the most frequent codon in the dipteran species whereas GAG is the most frequent codon in the hymenopteran species. Data reveals that codons ending with C or G are frequently used in the dipteran genomes whereas codons ending with A or T are frequently used in the hymenopteran genomes. Synonymous codon usage orders (SCUO vary within genomes in a pattern that seems to be distinct for each species. Based on comparison of 30 one-to-one orthologous genes among 17 species, the fruit fly Drosophila willistoni shows the least codon usage bias whereas the honey bee (Apis mellifera shows the highest bias. Analysis of codon context patterns of these insects shows that specific codons are frequently used as the 3'- and 5'-context of start and stop codons, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Codon bias pattern is distinct between dipteran and hymenopteran insects. While codon bias is favored by high GC content of dipteran genomes, high AT content of genes favors biased usage of synonymous codons in the hymenopteran insects. Also, codon context patterns vary among these species largely according to their phylogeny.

  20. Codon usage bias in 5' terminal coding sequences reveals distinct enrichment of gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiling; Rahman, Siddiq Ur; Mao, Yuanhui; Xu, Xiaodong; Tao, Shiheng

    2017-10-01

    Codon bias at the 5' terminal of coding sequence (CDS) is known to be distinct from the rest of the CDS. A number of events occur in this short region to regulate early translation elongation and co-translational translocation. In the genes encoding secretory proteins, there is a special signal sequence which has a higher occurrence of rare codons. In this study, we analyzed codon bias of secretory genes in several eukaryotes. The results showed that secretory genes in the species except mammals had a higher occurrence of rare codons in the 5' terminal of CDS, and the bias was greater than the same region of non-secretory genes. GO analysis revealed that secretory genes containing rare codon clusters in different regions were responsible for various roles in gene functions. Moreover, codon bias in the region encoding the hydrophobic region of protein is similar in secretory and non-secretory genes, indicating that codon bias in secretory genes was partly influenced by amino acid bias. Rare codon clusters are found more frequently in specific regions, and continuous rare codons are not favoured probably because they will increase the probability of ribosome collision and drop-off. Based on ribosome profiling data, there is no significant difference in the average translation efficiencies between rare and optimal codons. Higher ribosomal density in the 5' terminal may result from ribosome pausing which could be involved in different translation events. These findings collectively provided rich information on codon bias in secretory genes, which may shed light on the co-effect of codon bias, mRNA structure and tRNA abundance in translational regulations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Synonymous codons influencing gene expression in organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sutanuka Mitra,1 Suvendra Kumar Ray,2 Rajat Banerjee1 1Department of Biotechnology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur, Assam, India Abstract: Nowadays, it is beyond doubt that synonymous codons are not the same with respect to expression of a gene. In favor of this, ribosome profiling experiments in vivo and in vitro have suggested that ribosome occupancy time is not the same for different synonymous codons. Therefore, synonymous codons influence differently the speed of translation elongation, which guides further cotranslational folding kinetics of a protein. It is now realized that the position of each codon in a coding sequence is important. The effect of synonymous codons on protein structure is an exciting field of research nowadays. This review discusses the recent developments in this field. Keywords: codon usage bias, synonymous codons, ribosome profiling, cotranslational protein folding, protein structure

  2. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availabili...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  3. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierling, Elizabeth [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  4. Codon usage regulates protein structure and function by affecting translation elongation speed in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangzhou; Yu, Chien-Hung; Liu, Yi

    2017-08-21

    Codon usage biases are found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and have been proposed to regulate different aspects of translation process. Codon optimality has been shown to regulate translation elongation speed in fungal systems, but its effect on translation elongation speed in animal systems is not clear. In this study, we used a Drosophila cell-free translation system to directly compare the velocity of mRNA translation elongation. Our results demonstrate that optimal synonymous codons speed up translation elongation while non-optimal codons slow down translation. In addition, codon usage regulates ribosome movement and stalling on mRNA during translation. Finally, we show that codon usage affects protein structure and function in vitro and in Drosophila cells. Together, these results suggest that the effect of codon usage on translation elongation speed is a conserved mechanism from fungi to animals that can affect protein folding in eukaryotic organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Comparative evolutionary genomics of Corynebacterium with special reference to codon and amino acid usage diversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shilpee; Sarkar, Indrani; Roy, Ayan; Mohapatra, Pradeep K Das; Mondal, Keshab C; Sen, Arnab

    2018-02-01

    The present study has been aimed to the comparative analysis of high GC composition containing Corynebacterium genomes and their evolutionary study by exploring codon and amino acid usage patterns. Phylogenetic study by MLSA approach, indel analysis and BLAST matrix differentiated Corynebacterium species in pathogenic and non-pathogenic clusters. Correspondence analysis on synonymous codon usage reveals that, gene length, optimal codon frequencies and tRNA abundance affect the gene expression of Corynebacterium. Most of the optimal codons as well as translationally optimal codons are C ending i.e. RNY (R-purine, N-any nucleotide base, and Y-pyrimidine) and reveal translational selection pressure on codon bias of Corynebacterium. Amino acid usage is affected by hydrophobicity, aromaticity, protein energy cost, etc. Highly expressed genes followed the cost minimization hypothesis and are less diverged at their synonymous positions of codons. Functional analysis of core genes shows significant difference in pathogenic and non-pathogenic Corynebacterium. The study reveals close relationship between non-pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic Corynebaterium as well as between molecular evolution and survival niches of the organism.

  6. Site-specific codon bias in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.M.; Smith, N.H. [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    Sequences of the gapA and ompA genes from 10 genera of enterobacteria have been analyzed. There is strong bias in codon usage, but different synonymous codons are preferred at different sites in the same gene. Site-specific preference for unfavored codons is not confined to the first 100 codons and is usually manifest between two codons utilizing the same tRNA. Statistical analyses, based on conclusions reached in an accompanying paper, show that the use of an unfavored codon at a given site in different genera is not due to common descent and must therefore be caused either by sequence-specific mutation or sequence-specific selection. Reasons are given for thinking that sequence-specific mutation cannot be responsible. We are unable to explain the preference between synonymous codons ending in C or T, but synonymous choice between A and G at third sites is largely explained by avoidance of AG-G (where the hyphen indicates the boundary between codons). We also observed that the preferred codon for proline in Enterobacter cloacea has changed from CCG to CCA. 27 refs., 7 tabs.

  7. Codon Usage Patterns in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Mutational Bias, Natural Selection and Amino Acid Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiming Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The alternative synonymous codons in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known bacterium used in industry for the production of amino acid, have been investigated by multivariate analysis. As C. glutamicum is a GC-rich organism, G and C are expected to predominate at the third position of codons. Indeed, overall codon usage analyses have indicated that C and/or G ending codons are predominant in this organism. Through multivariate statistical analysis, apart from mutational selection, we identified three other trends of codon usage variation among the genes. Firstly, the majority of highly expressed genes are scattered towards the positive end of the first axis, whereas the majority of lowly expressed genes are clustered towards the other end of the first axis. Furthermore, the distinct difference in the two sets of genes was that the C ending codons are predominate in putatively highly expressed genes, suggesting that the C ending codons are translationally optimal in this organism. Secondly, the majority of the putatively highly expressed genes have a tendency to locate on the leading strand, which indicates that replicational and transciptional selection might be invoked. Thirdly, highly expressed genes are more conserved than lowly expressed genes by synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions among orthologous genes fromthe genomes of C. glutamicum and C. diphtheriae. We also analyzed other factors such as the length of genes and hydrophobicity that might influence codon usage and found their contributions to be weak.

  8. Codon usage in twelve species of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powell Jeffrey R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon usage bias (CUB, the uneven use of synonymous codons, is a ubiquitous observation in virtually all organisms examined. The pattern of codon usage is generally similar among closely related species, but differs significantly among distantly related organisms, e.g., bacteria, yeast, and Drosophila. Several explanations for CUB have been offered and some have been supported by observations and experiments, although a thorough understanding of the evolutionary forces (random drift, mutation bias, and selection and their relative importance remains to be determined. The recently available complete genome DNA sequences of twelve phylogenetically defined species of Drosophila offer a hitherto unprecedented opportunity to examine these problems. We report here the patterns of codon usage in the twelve species and offer insights on possible evolutionary forces involved. Results (1 Codon usage is quite stable across 11/12 of the species: G- and especially C-ending codons are used most frequently, thus defining the preferred codons. (2 The only amino acid that changes in preferred codon is Serine with six species of the melanogaster group favoring TCC while the other species, particularly subgenus Drosophila species, favor AGC. (3 D. willistoni is an exception to these generalizations in having a shifted codon usage for seven amino acids toward A/T in the wobble position. (4 Amino acids differ in their contribution to overall CUB, Leu having the greatest and Asp the least. (5 Among two-fold degenerate amino acids, A/G ending amino acids have more selection on codon usage than T/C ending amino acids. (6 Among the different chromosome arms or elements, genes on the non-recombining element F (dot chromosome have the least CUB, while genes on the element A (X chromosome have the most. (7 Introns indicate that mutation bias in all species is approximately 2:1, AT:GC, the opposite of codon usage bias. (8 There is also evidence for some

  9. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Kristoffer T.; Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did...... not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement...... the ClpX chaperone....

  10. A geometric model for codon recognition logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halitsky, D

    1994-06-01

    Known types of pairings between mRNA bases and tRNA nucleosides are shown to be consistent with the notion of a translation space TS constructed such that certain wobble-pairings cannot be used in the same translation system without engendering confusion between keto-final codon twins like AAU(ASN)/AAG(LYS) and between amino-final codon twins like AAC(ASN)/AAA(LYS). When TS is abstractly formalized using Coxeter's face-first three-dimensional projection of a four-dimensional hypercube, the resulting model suggests a specific configurational logic for codon recognition by cognate tRNAs. Although this logic will in general permit codons and anticodons to form matching configurations whose loci are six lines parallel to the axis of a cylinder, confusion of keto-final and amino-final codon twins may result from wobble-pairings whose loci are the two of these lines off the surface of the cylinder.

  11. A codon window in mRNA downstream of the initiation codon where NGG codons give strongly reduced gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Isaksson, Leif A

    2004-01-01

    The influences on gene expression by codons at positions +2, +3, +5 and +7 downstream of the initiation codon have been compared. Most of the +2 codons that are known to give low gene expression are associated with a higher expression if placed at the later positions. The NGG codons AGG, CGG, UGG...

  12. Di-codon Usage for Gene Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh N.; Ma, Jianmin; Fogel, Gary B.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.

    Classification of genes into biologically related groups facilitates inference of their functions. Codon usage bias has been described previously as a potential feature for gene classification. In this paper, we demonstrate that di-codon usage can further improve classification of genes. By using both codon and di-codon features, we achieve near perfect accuracies for the classification of HLA molecules into major classes and sub-classes. The method is illustrated on 1,841 HLA sequences which are classified into two major classes, HLA-I and HLA-II. Major classes are further classified into sub-groups. A binary SVM using di-codon usage patterns achieved 99.95% accuracy in the classification of HLA genes into major HLA classes; and multi-class SVM achieved accuracy rates of 99.82% and 99.03% for sub-class classification of HLA-I and HLA-II genes, respectively. Furthermore, by combining codon and di-codon usages, the prediction accuracies reached 100%, 99.82%, and 99.84% for HLA major class classification, and for sub-class classification of HLA-I and HLA-II genes, respectively.

  13. Codon Bias and Mutability in HIV Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Waelbroeck, H

    1997-01-01

    A survey of the patterns of synonymous codon preferences in the HIV env gene reveals a relation between the codon bias and the mutability requirements in different regions in the protein. At hypervariable regions in $gp120$, one finds a greater proportion of codons that tend to mutate non-synonymously, but to a target that is similar in hydrophobicity and volume. We argue that this strategy results from a compromise between the selective pressure placed on the virus by the induced immune response, which favours amino acid substitutions in the complementarity determining regions, and the negative selection against missense mutations that violate structural constraints of the env protein.

  14. Analysis of codon usage pattern in Taenia saginata based on a transcriptome dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing; Luo, Xuenong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-12-02

    Codon usage bias is an important evolutionary feature in a genome and has been widely documented in many genomes. Analysis of codon usage bias has significance for mRNA translation, design of transgenes, new gene discovery, and studies of molecular biology and evolution, etc. However, the information about synonymous codon usage pattern of T. saginata genome remains unclear. T. saginata is a food-borne zoonotic cestode which infects approximataely 50 million humans worldwide, and causes significant health problems to the host and considerable socio-economic losses as a consequence. In this study, synonymous codon usage in T. saginata were examined. Total RNA was isolated from T. saginata cysticerci and 91,487 unigenes were generated using Illumina sequencing technology. After filtering, the final sequence collection containing 11,399 CDSs was used for our analysis. Neutrality analysis showed that the T. saginata had a wide GC3 distribution and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. NC-plot showed most of genes on or close to the expected curve, but only a few points with low-ENC values were below it, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified twenty-three optimal codons in the T. saginata genome, all of which were ended with a G or C residue. These results suggest that mutational and selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in T. saginata genome. Meanwhile, other factors such as protein length, gene expression, GC content of genes, the hydropathicity of each protein also influence codon usage. Here, we systematically analyzed the codon usage pattern and identified factors shaping in codon usage bias in T. saginata. Currently, no complete nuclear genome is available for codon usage analysis at the genome level in T. saginata. This is the first report to investigate codon biology in

  15. Insight into the assembly of chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Stegmann, R.; Manakova, E.; Roessle, M.; Hermann, T.; Heumann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried (Germany); Axmann, S.; Plueckthun, A. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland); Wiedenmann, A. [HMI, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Chaperones are proteins that help other proteins (substrate proteins) to acquire a `good` conformation. The folding is a dynamic process and involves repetitive binding and release of the chaperone components and of the substrate protein. Small-angle neutron scattering is used to investigate the structural changes that appear to happen during the folding process. (author). 2 refs.

  16. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studieshave reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate coppertrafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in ...

  17. Codon optimisation is key for pernisine expression in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Šnajder

    Full Text Available Pernisine is an extracellular serine protease from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Low yields from the natural host and expression problems in heterologous hosts have limited the potential applications of pernisine in industry.The challenges of pernisine overexpression in Escherichia coli were overcome by codon preference optimisation and de-novo DNA synthesis. The following forms of the pernisine gene were cloned into the pMCSGx series of vectors and expressed in E. coli cells: wild-type (pernisinewt, codon-optimised (pernisineco, and codon-optimised with a S355A mutation of a predicted active site (pernisineS355Aco. The fusion-tagged pernisines were purified using fast protein liquid chromatography equipped with Ni2+ chelate and gel filtration chromatography columns. The identities of the resultant proteins were confirmed with N-terminal sequencing, tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and immunodetection. Pernisinewt was not expressed in E. coli at detectable levels, while pernisineco and pernisineS355Aco were expressed and purified as 55-kDa proforms with yields of around 10 mg per litre E. coli culture. After heat activation of purified pernisine, the proteolytic activity of the mature pernisineco was confirmed using zymography, at a molecular weight of 36 kDa, while the mutant pernisineS355Aco remained inactive. Enzymatic performances of pernisine evaluated under different temperatures and pHs demonstrate that the optimal enzymatic activity of the recombinant pernisine is ca. 100°C and pH 7.0, respectively.These data demonstrate that codon optimisation is crucial for pernisine overexpression in E. coli, and that the proposed catalytic Ser355 has an important role in pernisine activity, but not in its activation process. Pernisine is activated by autoproteolytical cleavage of its N-terminal proregion. We have also confirmed that the recombinant pernisine retains the characteristics of native pernisine, as a calcium

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosen

    , for the amino acid lysine, AAG showed almost similar usage frequency to its synonymous partner AAA. (favored codon). The exceptional RSCU score of these two G-ending codons may be due to the presence of TpT and ApA dinucleotides.

  19. Generalized iterative annealing model for the action of RNA chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of the rugged landscape of RNA molecules their folding is described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism according to which only a small fraction (ϕF) reaches the folded state while the remaining fraction of molecules is kinetically trapped in misfolded intermediates. The transition from the misfolded states to the native state can far exceed biologically relevant time. Thus, RNA folding in vivo is often aided by protein cofactors, called RNA chaperones, that can rescue RNAs from a multitude of misfolded structures. We consider two models, based on chemical kinetics and chemical master equation, for describing assisted folding. In the passive model, applicable for class I substrates, transient interactions of misfolded structures with RNA chaperones alone are sufficient to destabilize the misfolded structures, thus entropically lowering the barrier to folding. For this mechanism to be efficient the intermediate ribonucleoprotein complex between collapsed RNA and protein cofactor should have optimal stability. We also introduce an active model (suitable for stringent substrates with small ϕF), which accounts for the recent experimental findings on the action of CYT-19 on the group I intron ribozyme, showing that RNA chaperones do not discriminate between the misfolded and the native states. In the active model, the RNA chaperone system utilizes chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to repeatedly bind and release misfolded and folded RNAs, resulting in substantial increase of yield of the native state. The theory outlined here shows, in accord with experiments, that in the steady state the native state does not form with unit probability.

  20. Effect of codon adaptation on codon-level and gene-level translation efficiency in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahigashi, Kenji; Takai, Yuki; Shiwa, Yuh; Wada, Mei; Honma, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Tomita, Masaru; Kanai, Akio; Mori, Hirotada

    2014-12-16

    There is a significant difference between synonymous codon usage in many organisms, and it is known that codons used more frequently generally showed efficient decoding rate. At the gene level, however, there are conflicting reports on the existence of a correlation between codon adaptation and translation efficiency, even in the same organism. To resolve this issue, we cultured Escherichia coli under conditions designed to maintain constant levels of mRNA and protein and subjected the cells to ribosome profiling (RP) and mRNA-seq analyses. We showed that the RP results correlated more closely with protein levels generated under similar culture conditions than with the mRNA abundance from the mRNA-seq. Our result indicated that RP/mRNA ratio could be used as a measure of translation efficiency at gene level. On the other hand, the RP data showed that codon-specific ribosome density at the decoding site negatively correlated with codon usage, consistent with the hypothesis that preferred codons display lower ribosome densities due to their faster decoding rate. However, highly codon-adapted genes showed higher ribosome densities at the gene level, indicating that the efficiency of translation initiation, rather than higher elongation efficiency of preferred codons, exerted a greater effect on ribosome density and thus translation efficiency. These findings indicate that evolutionary pressure on highly expressed genes influenced both codon bias and translation initiation efficiency and therefore explains contradictory findings that codon usage bias correlates with translation efficiency of native genes, but not with the artificially created gene pool, which was not subjected to evolution pressure.

  1. Comparative study on factors influencing the codon and amino acid usage in Lactobacillus sakei 23K and 13 other lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Kinshuk Chandra

    2012-01-01

    In this study, major factors shaping codon and amino acid usage variation Lactobacillus sakei 23K were investigated. It included 13 other Lactobacillus species for a comparative analysis. The correspondence analysis (COA) showed that in 13 species the major trend of synonymous codon usage was highly correlated with gene expression level as assessed by the "Codon Adaptation Index" (CAI) values. In addition, Nc (effective number of codons) plot, SCUO (synonymous codon usage order) plot and correlation analyses showed that the base composition and mutational bias have dominant role in the codon usage variation. However, the translational selection for genes at higher expression level, where more frequent synonymous codons correspond to more abundant cognate transfer RNAs (tRNAs), was not found to be similar in all species. The study also showed that the amino acid usage in these species was significantly (P<0.01) influenced by hydrophobicity and aromaticity of proteins. Furthermore, 24 codons that were found to be optimally used by L. sakei and its comparative study with 13 Lactobacillus species might provide some useful information in their further study of molecular evolution and genetic engineering.

  2. Universality and Shannon entropy of codon usage

    CERN Document Server

    Frappat, L; Sciarrino, A; Sorba, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The distribution functions of the codon usage probabilities, computed over all the available GenBank data, for 40 eukaryotic biological species and 5 chloroplasts, do not follow a Zipf law, but are best fitted by the sum of a constant, an exponential and a linear function in the rank of usage. For mitochondriae the analysis is not conclusive. A quantum-mechanics-inspired model is proposed to describe the observed behaviour. These functions are characterized by parameters that strongly depend on the total GC content of the coding regions of biological species. It is predicted that the codon usage is the same in all exonic genes with the same GC content. The Shannon entropy for codons, also strongly depending on the exonic GC content, is computed.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Bias Patterns in Microsporidian Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Xiang

    Full Text Available The sub-3 Mbp genomes from microsporidian species of the Encephalitozoon genus are the smallest known among eukaryotes and paragons of genomic reduction and compaction in parasites. However, their diminutive stature is not characteristic of all Microsporidia, whose genome sizes vary by an order of magnitude. This large variability suggests that different evolutionary forces are applied on the group as a whole. In this study, we have compared the codon usage bias (CUB between eight taxonomically distinct microsporidian genomes: Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Spraguea lophii, Trachipleistophora hominis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Nematocida parisii, Nosema bombycis and Nosema ceranae. While the CUB was found to be weak in all eight Microsporidia, nearly all (98% of the optimal codons in S. lophii, T. hominis, E. bieneusi, N. parisii, N. bombycis and N. ceranae are fond of A/U in third position whereas most (64.6% optimal codons in the Encephalitozoon species E. intestinalis and E. cuniculi are biased towards G/C. Although nucleotide composition biases are likely the main factor driving the CUB in Microsporidia according to correlation analyses, directed mutational pressure also likely affects the CUB as suggested by ENc-plots, correspondence and neutrality analyses. Overall, the Encephalitozoon genomes were found to be markedly different from the other microsporidians and, despite being the first sequenced representatives of this lineage, are uncharacteristic of the group as a whole. The disparities observed cannot be attributed solely to differences in host specificity and we hypothesize that other forces are at play in the lineage leading to Encephalitozoon species.

  4. Improved production of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli by selective codon substitutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten H.H.; Toddo, Stephen; Virkki, Minttu T.I.

    2013-01-01

    K) for membrane transporters. For both coding sequences, synonymous codon substitutions in the region adjacent to the AUG start led to significant improvements in expression, whereas multi-parameter sequence optimization of codons throughout the coding sequence failed. We conclude that coding sequences can be re......Membrane proteins are extremely challenging to produce in sufficient quantities for biochemical and structural analysis and there is a growing demand for solutions to this problem. In this study we attempted to improve expression of two difficult-to-express coding sequences (araH and nar......-wired for high-level protein expression by selective engineering of the 5′ coding sequence with synonymous codons, thus circumventing the need to consider whole sequence optimization....

  5. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  6. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin; Wu, Liang; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Shengfeng; An, Wei; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Lin

    2013-11-01

    The codon usage patterns of rhizobia have received increasing attention. However, little information is available regarding the conserved features of the codon usage patterns in a typical rhizobial genus. The codon usage patterns of six completely sequenced strains belonging to the genus Rhizobium were analysed as model rhizobia in the present study. The relative neutrality plot showed that selection pressure played a role in codon usage in the genus Rhizobium. Spearman's rank correlation analysis combined with correspondence analysis (COA) showed that the codon adaptation index and the effective number of codons (ENC) had strong correlation with the first axis of the COA, which indicated the important role of gene expression level and the ENC in the codon usage patterns in this genus. The relative synonymous codon usage of Cys codons had the strongest correlation with the second axis of the COA. Accordingly, the usage of Cys codons was another important factor that shaped the codon usage patterns in Rhizobium genomes and was a conserved feature of the genus. Moreover, the comparison of codon usage between highly and lowly expressed genes showed that 20 unique preferred codons were shared among Rhizobium genomes, revealing another conserved feature of the genus. This is the first report of the codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

  7. Quantitative effect of suboptimal codon usage on translational efficiency of mRNA encoding HIV-1 gag in intact T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholiswa C Ngumbela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 are characterized by low GC content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of DNA vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering RNA stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in DNA vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been quantified. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To quantify translational efficiency of gag mRNA in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic mRNA corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative ELISA and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per microg of input mRNA. We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold. In contrast when cells were transfected with DNA vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag mRNA, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag production. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that suboptimal codon usage by HIV-1 results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from DNA vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear RNA.

  8. Quantitative effect of suboptimal codon usage on translational efficiency of mRNA encoding HIV-1 gag in intact T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngumbela, Kholiswa C; Ryan, Kieran P; Sivamurthy, Rohini; Brockman, Mark A; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Kavanagh, Daniel G

    2008-06-04

    The sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) are characterized by low GC content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of DNA vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering RNA stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in DNA vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been quantified. To quantify translational efficiency of gag mRNA in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic mRNA corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative ELISA and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per microg of input mRNA. We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold). In contrast when cells were transfected with DNA vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag mRNA, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag production. We conclude that suboptimal codon usage by HIV-1 results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from DNA vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear RNA.

  9. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambre eSala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the Trigger Factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen M. tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin (TA system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria.

  10. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Ambre; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the trigger factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria.

  11. Estimating empirical codon hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Nicola; Holmes, Ian; Schlötterer, Christian; Kosiol, Carolin

    2013-03-01

    Empirical codon models (ECMs) estimated from a large number of globular protein families outperformed mechanistic codon models in their description of the general process of protein evolution. Among other factors, ECMs implicitly model the influence of amino acid properties and multiple nucleotide substitutions (MNS). However, the estimation of ECMs requires large quantities of data, and until recently, only few suitable data sets were available. Here, we take advantage of several new Drosophila species genomes to estimate codon models from genome-wide data. The availability of large numbers of genomes over varying phylogenetic depths in the Drosophila genus allows us to explore various divergence levels. In consequence, we can use these data to determine the appropriate level of divergence for the estimation of ECMs, avoiding overestimation of MNS rates caused by saturation. To account for variation in evolutionary rates along the genome, we develop new empirical codon hidden Markov models (ecHMMs). These models significantly outperform previous ones with respect to maximum likelihood values, suggesting that they provide a better fit to the evolutionary process. Using ECMs and ecHMMs derived from genome-wide data sets, we devise new likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) of positive selection. We found classical LRTs very sensitive to the presence of MNSs, showing high false-positive rates, especially with small phylogenies. The new LRTs are more conservative than the classical ones, having acceptable false-positive rates and reduced power.

  12. Codon usage bias and the evolution of influenza A viruses. Codon Usage Biases of Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Emily HM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influenza A virus is an important infectious cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and was responsible for 3 pandemics in the 20th century. As the replication of the influenza virus is based on its host's machinery, codon usage of its viral genes might be subject to host selection pressures, especially after interspecies transmission. A better understanding of viral evolution and host adaptive responses might help control this disease. Results Relative Synonymous Codon Usage (RSCU values of the genes from segment 1 to segment 6 of avian and human influenza viruses, including pandemic H1N1, were studied via Correspondence Analysis (CA. The codon usage patterns of seasonal human influenza viruses were distinct among their subtypes and different from those of avian viruses. Newly isolated viruses could be added to the CA results, creating a tool to investigate the host origin and evolution of viral genes. It was found that the 1918 pandemic H1N1 virus contained genes with mammalian-like viral codon usage patterns, indicating that the introduction of this virus to humans was not through in toto transfer of an avian influenza virus. Many human viral genes had directional changes in codon usage over time of viral isolation, indicating the effect of host selection pressures. These changes reduced the overall GC content and the usage of G at the third codon position in the viral genome. Limited evidence of translational selection pressure was found in a few viral genes. Conclusions Codon usage patterns from CA allowed identification of host origin and evolutionary trends in influenza viruses, providing an alternative method and a tool to understand the evolution of influenza viruses. Human influenza viruses are subject to selection pressure on codon usage which might assist in understanding the characteristics of newly emerging viruses.

  13. Nucleotide composition bias and codon usage trends of gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The GC and AT skews estimate nucleotide composition bias at different positions of nucleotide triplets and the protein consideration caused by the nucleotide composition bias at codon positions 1 and 2 largely take part in synonymous codon usage patterns of the two mycoplasmas. The correlation between the codon ...

  14. Codon usage bias analysis for the coding sequences of Camellia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Additionally, the rare codons were identified by computing the recurrence of event of all codons in coding sequences of C. sinensis and B. campestris. The host cell, Escherichia coli used universally, failed to express smoothly many eukaryotic genes. For this, the authors prognosticated the codons showing the highest and ...

  15. Evaluating codon bias perspective in barbiturase gene using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GC3 of synonymously variable codons, RSCU, NC and CAI were estimated with statistical softwares. Examination of DNA composition along with codon usage was done to reveal dynamics of gene evolution and expression of this enzyme. Keywords: Codon usage, barbiturase gene, multivariate statistical analysis

  16. Evaluating codon bias perspective in barbiturase gene using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdullah

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... codons, RSCU, NC and CAI were estimated with statistical softwares. Examination of DNA composition along with codon usage was done to reveal dynamics of gene evolution and expression of this enzyme. Key words: Codon usage, barbiturase gene, multivariate statistical analysis. INTRODUCTION.

  17. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in house built Perl script was used to derive various genomic traits and codon indices. Analysis was done using R statistical package, and correlations and multivariate regressions were performed. We report the existence of codon usage bias that might suggest existence of weak translational selection. The codon bias is ...

  18. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Jose M.; Montalvo, Ana M.; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis. PMID:26167482

  19. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Requena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis.

  20. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Schwientek, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Tripp, H. James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rinke, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Huntemann, Marcel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Visel, Axel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Kyrpides, Nikos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rubin, Edward [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  1. Molecular chaperones: The modular evolution of cellular networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-22

    Mar 22, 2007 ... Molecular chaperones play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Chaperones have ...

  2. Effective Chaperone Selection and Training for Enhanced Youth Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily J.; Roop, Kelsey; MacArthur, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    This article identifies key strategies for selecting and training chaperones for youth programs. Although substantial research on volunteer core competencies and training exists, very little has been written to specifically address volunteers who serve in a chaperone capacity. We surveyed chaperones who had participated in an international youth…

  3. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 ...

  4. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Auluck P K, Chan H Y, Trojanowski J Q, Lee V M -Y and Bonini. N M 2002a Chaperone suppression of alpha-synuclein toxicity in a Drosophila model for Parkinson's disease; Science 295. 865–868. Bagatell R and Whitesell L 2004 Altered Hsp90 function in cancer: a unique therapeutic opportunity; Mol.

  5. Chaperone binding at the ribosomal exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Gajhede, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The exit tunnel region of the ribosome is well established as a focal point for interaction between the components that guide the fate of nascent polypeptides. One of these, the chaperone trigger factor (TF), associates with the 50S ribosomal subunit through its N-terminal domain. Targeting of TF...

  6. Molecular evolution of synonymous codon usage in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvarsson Pär K

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of synonymous codon usage is thought to be determined by a balance between mutation, genetic drift and natural selection on translational efficiency. However, natural selection on codon usage is considered to be a weak evolutionary force and selection on codon usage is expected to be strongest in species with large effective population sizes. Results I examined the evolution of synonymous codons using EST data from five species of Populus. Data on relative synonymous codon usage in genes with high and low gene expression were used to identify 25 codons from 18 different amino acids that were deemed to be preferred codons across all five species. All five species show significant correlations between codon bias and gene expression, independent of base composition, thus indicating that translational selection has shaped synonymous codon usage. Using a set of 158 orthologous genes I detected an excess of unpreferred to preferred (U → P mutations in two lineages, P. tremula and P. deltoides. Maximum likelihood estimates of the strength of selection acting on synonymous codons was also significantly greater than zero in P. tremula, with the ML estimate of 4Nes = 0.720. Conclusion The data is consistent with weak selection on preferred codons in all five species. There is also evidence suggesting that selection on synonymous codons has increased in P. tremula. Although the reasons for the increase in selection on codon usage in the P. tremula lineage are not clear, one possible explanation is an increase in the effective population size in P. tremula.

  7. Approaches to the isolation and characterization of molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, William S; Boshoff, Aileen; Ludewig, Michael H; Hennessy, Fritha; Jung, Martin; Blatch, Gregory L

    2006-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are integral components of the cellular machinery involved in ensuring correct protein folding and the continued maintenance of protein structure. An understanding of these ubiquitous molecules is key to finding cures to protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jacob diseases. In addition, further understanding of chaperones will enhance our comprehension of the way the body copes with the environmental stresses that humans encounter daily. Our laboratory and our collaborators specialize in the production and characterization of chaperones from a wide variety of sources in order to gain a fuller understanding of how chaperones function in the cell. In this review, we primarily use the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone pair as an example to discuss recent advances in technology and reductions in cost that lend themselves to chaperone purification from both native and recombinant sources. Common assays to assess purified chaperone activity are also discussed.

  8. Codon Deviation Coefficient: A novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2012-03-22

    Background: Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB). Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not statistically evaluated the significance of CUB in sequence analysis.Results: Here we propose a novel measure--Codon Deviation Coefficient (CDC)--that provides an informative measurement of CUB and its statistical significance without requiring any prior knowledge. Unlike previous measures, CDC estimates CUB by accounting for background nucleotide compositions tailored to codon positions and adopts the bootstrapping to assess the statistical significance of CUB for any given sequence. We evaluate CDC by examining its effectiveness on simulated sequences and empirical data and show that CDC outperforms extant measures by achieving a more informative estimation of CUB and its statistical significance.Conclusions: As validated by both simulated and empirical data, CDC provides a highly informative quantification of CUB and its statistical significance, useful for determining comparative magnitudes and patterns of biased codon usage for genes or genomes with diverse sequence compositions. 2012 Zhang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Codon-by-codon modulation of translational speed and accuracy via mRNA folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Rong Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid cell growth demands fast protein translational elongation to alleviate ribosome shortage. However, speedy elongation undermines translational accuracy because of a mechanistic tradeoff. Here we provide genomic evidence in budding yeast and mouse embryonic stem cells that the efficiency-accuracy conflict is alleviated by slowing down the elongation at structurally or functionally important residues to ensure their translational accuracies while sacrificing the accuracy for speed at other residues. Our computational analysis in yeast with codon resolution suggests that mRNA secondary structures serve as elongation brakes to control the speed and hence the fidelity of protein translation. The position-specific effect of mRNA folding on translational accuracy is further demonstrated experimentally by swapping synonymous codons in a yeast transgene. Our findings explain why highly expressed genes tend to have strong mRNA folding, slow translational elongation, and conserved protein sequences. The exquisite codon-by-codon translational modulation uncovered here is a testament to the power of natural selection in mitigating efficiency-accuracy conflicts, which are prevalent in biology.

  10. Codon Deviation Coefficient: a novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB. Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not statistically evaluated the significance of CUB in sequence analysis. Results Here we propose a novel measure--Codon Deviation Coefficient (CDC--that provides an informative measurement of CUB and its statistical significance without requiring any prior knowledge. Unlike previous measures, CDC estimates CUB by accounting for background nucleotide compositions tailored to codon positions and adopts the bootstrapping to assess the statistical significance of CUB for any given sequence. We evaluate CDC by examining its effectiveness on simulated sequences and empirical data and show that CDC outperforms extant measures by achieving a more informative estimation of CUB and its statistical significance. Conclusions As validated by both simulated and empirical data, CDC provides a highly informative quantification of CUB and its statistical significance, useful for determining comparative magnitudes and patterns of biased codon usage for genes or genomes with diverse sequence compositions.

  11. A common periodic table of codons and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C; Benyó, B; Sansom, C; Szlávecz, A; Fördös, G; Micsik, T; Benyó, Z

    2003-06-27

    A periodic table of codons has been designed where the codons are in regular locations. The table has four fields (16 places in each) one with each of the four nucleotides (A, U, G, C) in the central codon position. Thus, AAA (lysine), UUU (phenylalanine), GGG (glycine), and CCC (proline) were placed into the corners of the fields as the main codons (and amino acids) of the fields. They were connected to each other by six axes. The resulting nucleic acid periodic table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons. The corresponding amino acid table also displaced periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydropathy) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table emphasizes the importance of the central nucleotide in the codons and predicts that purines control the charge while pyrimidines determine the polarity of the amino acids. This prediction was experimentally tested.

  12. Codon usage and amino acid usage influence genes expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Prosenjit; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-02-01

    Highly expressed genes in any species differ in the usage frequency of synonymous codons. The relative recurrence of an event of the favored codon pair (amino acid pairs) varies between gene and genomes due to varying gene expression and different base composition. Here we propose a new measure for predicting the gene expression level, i.e., codon plus amino bias index (CABI). Our approach is based on the relative bias of the favored codon pair inclination among the genes, illustrated by analyzing the CABI score of the Medicago truncatula genes. CABI showed strong correlation with all other widely used measures (CAI, RCBS, SCUO) for gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, CABI outperforms all other measures by showing better correlation with the wet-lab data. This emphasizes the importance of the neighboring codons of the favored codon in a synonymous group while estimating the expression level of a gene.

  13. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Alawad, Mohammed A; Schulze, Katharina V; Hudson, André O

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for the optimization of local DNA molecular dynamics via GC content at synonymous sites (≈GC3). We confirm a strong association between GC3-related intrinsic DNA flexibility and codon bias across 24 different prokaryotic multiple whole-genome alignments. We develop a novel test of natural selection targeting synonymous sites and demonstrate that GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics have been subject to moderate selective pressure, perhaps contributing to our observation that many genes possess extreme DNA backbone dynamics for their given protein space. This dual function of codons may impose universal functional constraints affecting the evolution of synonymous and non-synonymous sites. We propose that synonymous sites may have evolved as an 'accessory' during an early expansion of a primordial genetic code, allowing for multiplexed protein coding and structural dynamic information within the same molecular context. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Codon size reduction as the origin of the triplet genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V Baranov

    Full Text Available The genetic code appears to be optimized in its robustness to missense errors and frameshift errors. In addition, the genetic code is near-optimal in terms of its ability to carry information in addition to the sequences of encoded proteins. As evolution has no foresight, optimality of the modern genetic code suggests that it evolved from less optimal code variants. The length of codons in the genetic code is also optimal, as three is the minimal nucleotide combination that can encode the twenty standard amino acids. The apparent impossibility of transitions between codon sizes in a discontinuous manner during evolution has resulted in an unbending view that the genetic code was always triplet. Yet, recent experimental evidence on quadruplet decoding, as well as the discovery of organisms with ambiguous and dual decoding, suggest that the possibility of the evolution of triplet decoding from living systems with non-triplet decoding merits reconsideration and further exploration. To explore this possibility we designed a mathematical model of the evolution of primitive digital coding systems which can decode nucleotide sequences into protein sequences. These coding systems can evolve their nucleotide sequences via genetic events of Darwinian evolution, such as point-mutations. The replication rates of such coding systems depend on the accuracy of the generated protein sequences. Computer simulations based on our model show that decoding systems with codons of length greater than three spontaneously evolve into predominantly triplet decoding systems. Our findings suggest a plausible scenario for the evolution of the triplet genetic code in a continuous manner. This scenario suggests an explanation of how protein synthesis could be accomplished by means of long RNA-RNA interactions prior to the emergence of the complex decoding machinery, such as the ribosome, that is required for stabilization and discrimination of otherwise weak triplet codon

  15. On ribosome load, codon bias and protein abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Klumpp

    Full Text Available Different codons encoding the same amino acid are not used equally in protein-coding sequences. In bacteria, there is a bias towards codons with high translation rates. This bias is most pronounced in highly expressed proteins, but a recent study of synthetic GFP-coding sequences did not find a correlation between codon usage and GFP expression, suggesting that such correlation in natural sequences is not a simple property of translational mechanisms. Here, we investigate the effect of evolutionary forces on codon usage. The relation between codon bias and protein abundance is quantitatively analyzed based on the hypothesis that codon bias evolved to ensure the efficient usage of ribosomes, a precious commodity for fast growing cells. An explicit fitness landscape is formulated based on bacterial growth laws to relate protein abundance and ribosomal load. The model leads to a quantitative relation between codon bias and protein abundance, which accounts for a substantial part of the observed bias for E. coli. Moreover, by providing an evolutionary link, the ribosome load model resolves the apparent conflict between the observed relation of protein abundance and codon bias in natural sequences and the lack of such dependence in a synthetic gfp library. Finally, we show that the relation between codon usage and protein abundance can be used to predict protein abundance from genomic sequence data alone without adjustable parameters.

  16. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer T. Bæk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoteichoic acid (LTA is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone.

  17. Mutation-selection models of codon substitution and their use to estimate selective strengths on codon usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ziheng; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Current models of codon substitution are formulated at the levels of nucleotide substitution and do not explicitly consider the separate effects of mutation and selection. They are thus incapable of inferring whether mutation or selection is responsible for evolution at silent sites. Here we impl...... codon usage in mammals. Estimates of selection coefficients nevertheless suggest that selection on codon usage is weak and most mutations are nearly neutral. The sensitivity of the analysis on the assumed mutation model is discussed....

  18. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  19. Gender-specific selection on codon usage in plant genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krochko Joan E

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is little data available regarding the role of gender-specific gene expression on synonymous codon usage (translational selection in most organisms, and particularly plants. Using gender-specific EST libraries (with > 4000 ESTs from Zea mays and Triticum aestivum, we assessed whether gender-specific gene expression per se and gender-specific gene expression level are associated with selection on codon usage. Results We found clear evidence of a greater bias in codon usage for genes expressed in female than in male organs and gametes, based on the variation in GC content at third codon positions and the frequency of species-preferred codons. This finding holds true for both highly and for lowly expressed genes. In addition, we found that highly expressed genes have greater codon bias than lowly expressed genes for both female- and male-specific genes. Moreover, in both species, genes with female-specific expression show a greater usage of species-specific preferred codons for each of the 18 amino acids having synonymous codons. A supplemental analysis of Brassica napus suggests that bias in codon usage could also be higher in genes expressed in male gametophytic tissues than in heterogeneous (flower tissues. Conclusion This study reports gender-specific bias in codon usage in plants. The findings reported here, based on the analysis of 1 497 876 codons, are not caused either by differences in the biological functions of the genes or by differences in protein lengths, nor are they likely attributable to mutational bias. The data are best explained by gender-specific translational selection. Plausible explanations for these findings and the relevance to these and other organisms are discussed.

  20. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ken-ichi Kucho1 Kentaro Kakoi1 Masatoshi Yamaura1 Mari Iwashita2 Mikiko Abe1 Toshiki Uchiumi1. Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, Korimoto 1-21-35, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan; Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Faculty of Science, Kagoshima University, Korimoto 1-21-35 ...

  1. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... supplies the product to host plants. Owing to the symbiosis, actinorhizal plants grow fast even in oligotrophic lands and improve soil fertility, thus they are often used for afforesta- tion. In 2007, complete genome sequences of three Frankia strains with different host ranges were determined (Normand et al.

  2. Fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the driving force of codon usage bias in the hepatitis A virus capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Aragonès

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the prototype of genus Hepatovirus, has several unique biological characteristics that distinguish it from other members of the Picornaviridae family. Among these, the need for an intact eIF4G factor for the initiation of translation results in an inability to shut down host protein synthesis by a mechanism similar to that of other picornaviruses. Consequently, HAV must inefficiently compete for the cellular translational machinery and this may explain its poor growth in cell culture. In this context of virus/cell competition, HAV has strategically adopted a naturally highly deoptimized codon usage with respect to that of its cellular host. With the aim to optimize its codon usage the virus was adapted to propagate in cells with impaired protein synthesis, in order to make tRNA pools more available for the virus. A significant loss of fitness was the immediate response to the adaptation process that was, however, later on recovered and more associated to a re-deoptimization rather than to an optimization of the codon usage specifically in the capsid coding region. These results exclude translation selection and instead suggest fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the underlying mechanism of the codon usage bias in this specific genome region. Additionally, the results provide clear evidence of the Red Queen dynamics of evolution since the virus has very much evolved to re-adapt its codon usage to the environmental cellular changing conditions in order to recover the original fitness.

  3. Effect of Codon Optimisation on the Production of Recombinant Fish Growth Hormone in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin A. Rothan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was established to test the hypothesis of whether the codon optimization of fish growth hormone gene (FGH based on P. pastoris preferred codon will improve the quantity of secreted rFGH in culture supernatant that can directly be used as fish feed supplements. The optimized FGH coding sequence (oFGH and native sequence (nFGH of giant grouper fish (Epinephelus lanceolatus were cloned into P. pastoris expression vector (pPICZαA downstream of alcohol oxidase gene (AOX1 for efficient induction of extracellular rFGH by adding 1% of absolute methanol. The results showed that recombinant P. pastoris was able to produce 2.80±0.27 mg of oFGH compared to 1.75±0.25 of nFGH in one litre of culture supernatant. The total body weight of tiger grouper fingerlings fed with oFGH increased significantly at third (P<0.05 and fourth weeks (P<0.01 of four-week experiment period compared to those fed with nFGH. Both oFGH and nFGH significantly enhanced the final biomass and fish survival percentage. In conclusion, codon optimization of FGH fragment was useful to increase rFGH quantity in the culture supernatant of P. pastoris that can be directly used as fish feed supplements. Further studies are still required for large scale production of rFGH and practical application in aquaculture production.

  4. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  5. Strain engineering and process optimization for enhancing the production of a thermostable steryl glucosidase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Florencia; Aguirre, Andres; Menzella, Hugo G; Peiru, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesels produced from transesterification of vegetable oils have a major problem in quality due to the presence of precipitates, which are mostly composed of steryl glucosides (SGs). We have recently described an enzymatic method for the efficient removal of SGs from biodiesel, based on the activity of a thermostable β-glycosidase from Thermococcus litoralis. In the present work, we describe the development of an Escherichia coli-based expression system and a high cell density fermentation process. Strain and process engineering include the assessment of different promoters to drive the expression of a codon-optimized gene, the co-expression of molecular chaperones and the development of a high cell density fermentation process. A 200-fold increase in the production titers was achieved, which directly impacts on the costs of the industrial process for treating biodiesel.

  6. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank (Wyeth)

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  7. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    chloroplast genome might display particular characteristics of codon usage that are different from its host nuclear ge- nome. ... [Liu Q. and Xue Q. 2005 Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and their host nuclear genes in four plant spe- cies. .... factors in the evolution of genomic structures (Bellgard.

  8. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    j.khobondo

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... The objective of the study was to determine the codon usage bias in the porcine genome and decipher its determinants. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of codon bias, the coding sequence (CDS) from the swine reference sequence (ssc10.2) was extracted using Biomart. An in house built Perl ...

  9. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A detailed comparison was made of codon usage of chloroplast genes with their host (nuclear) genes in the four angiosperm species Oryza sativa, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum and Arabidopsis thaliana. The average GC content of the entire genes, and at the three codon positions individually, was higher in nuclear than in ...

  10. Rare codon content affects the solubility of recombinant proteins in a codon bias-adjusted Escherichia coli strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccarelli Eduardo A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli is strongly affected by codon bias. This phenomenon occurs when the codon usage of the mRNA coding for the foreign protein differs from that of the bacterium. The ribosome pauses upon encountering a rare codon and may detach from the mRNA, thereby the yield of protein expression is reduced. Several bacterial strains have been engineered to overcome this effect. However, the increased rate of translation may lead to protein misfolding and insolubilization. In order to prove this assumption, the solubility of several recombinant proteins from plants was studied in a codon bias-adjusted E. coli strain. Results The expression of eight plant proteins in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3-pLysS and BL21(DE3-CodonPlus-pRIL was systematically studied. The CodonPlus strain contains extra copies of the argU, ileY, and leuW tRNA genes, which encode tRNAs that recognize the codons AGA/AGG, AUA and CUA, respectively (RIL codons. The level of expression and solubility of the recombinant proteins were analyzed by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. We found that for all proteins the solubility was at least 25% in the BL21(DE3-pLysS strain. However, when expressed in the BL21(DE3-CodonPlus-pRIL strain, proteins having more than 5% of amino acids coded by RIL codons were localized mainly in the insoluble fraction. Also, their expression caused retarded growth and low cell yield in the codon bias-adjusted strain at all temperatures tested. On the contrary, the solubility of proteins containing less than 5% of amino acids coded by RIL codons remained unchanged in both strains and their expression caused no effect on cell growth. Conclusion Our results show that the expression of heterologous proteins coded by high RIL codon content coding sequences in a codon bias-adjusted strain is detrimental for their solubility. Our data support the

  11. Emergent Rules for Codon Choice Elucidated by Editing Rare Arginine Codons in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    spontaneous mutations would improve fitness. After 78 d, no additional AGR codons were detected in a sequenced population (sequencing data are...Oscar Vargas-Rodriguezj, Farren J. Isaacsk, Dieter Söllj,l, and George M. Churcha,b,2 aDepartment of Genetics , Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115...University, Columbus, OH, and approved July 29, 2016 (received for review April 22, 2016) The degeneracy of the genetic code allows nucleic acids to encode

  12. Protein Synthesis in E. coli: Dependence of Codon-Specific Elongation on tRNA Concentration and Codon Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorf, Sophia; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    To synthesize a protein, a ribosome moves along a messenger RNA (mRNA), reads it codon by codon, and takes up the corresponding ternary complexes which consist of aminoacylated transfer RNAs (aa-tRNAs), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and GTP. During this process of translation elongation, the ribosome proceeds with a codon-specific rate. Here, we present a general theoretical framework to calculate codon-specific elongation rates and error frequencies based on tRNA concentrations and codon usages. Our theory takes three important aspects of in-vivo translation elongation into account. First, non-cognate, near-cognate and cognate ternary complexes compete for the binding sites on the ribosomes. Second, the corresponding binding rates are determined by the concentrations of free ternary complexes, which must be distinguished from the total tRNA concentrations as measured in vivo. Third, for each tRNA species, the difference between total tRNA and ternary complex concentration depends on the codon usages of the corresponding cognate and near-cognate codons. Furthermore, we apply our theory to two alternative pathways for tRNA release from the ribosomal E site and show how the mechanism of tRNA release influences the concentrations of free ternary complexes and thus the codon-specific elongation rates. Using a recently introduced method to determine kinetic rates of in-vivo translation from in-vitro data, we compute elongation rates for all codons in Escherichia coli. We show that for some tRNA species only a few tRNA molecules are part of ternary complexes and, thus, available for the translating ribosomes. In addition, we find that codon-specific elongation rates strongly depend on the overall codon usage in the cell, which could be altered experimentally by overexpression of individual genes.

  13. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  14. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  15. Translation of the F protein of hepatitis C virus is initiated at a non-AUG codon in a +1 reading frame relative to the polyprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Martin; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2005-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) followed by a large open reading frame coding for a polyprotein that is cleaved into 10 proteins. An additional HCV protein, the F protein, was recently suggested to result from a +1 frameshift by a minority of ribosomes that initiated translation at the HCV AUG initiator codon of the polyprotein. In the present study, we reassessed the mechanism accounting for the synthesis of the F protein by measuring the expression in cultured cells of a luciferase reporter gene with an insertion encompassing the IRES plus the beginning of the HCV-coding region preceding the luciferase-coding sequence. The insertion was such that luciferase expression was either in the +1 reading frame relative to the HCV AUG initiator codon, mimicking the expression of the F protein, or in-frame with this AUG, mimicking the expression of the polyprotein. Introduction of a stop codon at various positions in-frame with the AUG initiator codon and substitution of this AUG with UAC inhibited luciferase expression in the 0 reading frame but not in the +1 reading frame, ruling out that the synthesis of the F protein results from a +1 frameshift. Introduction of a stop codon at various positions in the +1 reading frame identified the codon overlapping codon 26 of the polyprotein in the +1 reading frame as the translation start site for the F protein. This codon 26(+1) is either GUG or GCG in the viral variants. Expression of the F protein strongly increased when codon 26(+1) was replaced with AUG, or when its context was mutated into an optimal Kozak context, but was severely decreased in the presence of low concentrations of edeine. These observations are consistent with a Met-tRNA(i)-dependent initiation of translation at a non-AUG codon for the synthesis of the F protein.

  16. Rescue of ATP7B function in hepatocyte-like cells from Wilson's disease induced pluripotent stem cells using gene therapy or the chaperone drug curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiqiang; Chen, Shen; Li, Wen; Guo, Xiangpeng; Zhao, Ping; Xu, Jianyong; Chen, Yan; Pan, Qiong; Liu, Xiaorong; Zychlinski, Daniela; Lu, Hai; Tortorella, Micky D; Schambach, Axel; Wang, Yan; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A

    2011-08-15

    Directed hepatocyte differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) potentially provides a unique platform for modeling liver genetic diseases and performing drug-toxicity screening in vitro. Wilson's disease is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene, whose product is a liver transporter protein responsible for coordinated copper export into bile and blood. Interestingly, the spectrum of ATP7B mutations is vast and can influence clinical presentation (a variable spectrum of hepatic and neural manifestations), though the reason is not well understood. We describe the generation of iPSCs from a Chinese patient with Wilson's disease that bears the R778L Chinese hotspot mutation in the ATP7B gene. These iPSCs were pluripotent and could be readily differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells that displayed abnormal cytoplasmic localization of mutated ATP7B and defective copper transport. Moreover, gene correction using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector that expresses codon optimized-ATP7B or treatment with the chaperone drug curcumin could reverse the functional defect in vitro. Hence, our work describes an attractive model for studying the pathogenesis of Wilson's disease that is valuable for screening compounds or gene therapy approaches aimed to correct the abnormality. In the future, once relevant safety concerns (including the stability of the mature liver-like phenotype) and technical issues for the transplantation procedure are solved, hepatocyte-like cells from similarly genetically corrected iPSCs could be an option for autologous transplantation in Wilson's disease.

  17. Codon-Precise, Synthetic, Antibody Fragment Libraries Built Using Automated Hexamer Codon Additions and Validated through Next Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Frigotto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described ProxiMAX, a technology that enables the fabrication of precise, combinatorial gene libraries via codon-by-codon saturation mutagenesis. ProxiMAX was originally performed using manual, enzymatic transfer of codons via blunt-end ligation. Here we present Colibra™: an automated, proprietary version of ProxiMAX used specifically for antibody library generation, in which double-codon hexamers are transferred during the saturation cycling process. The reduction in process complexity, resulting library quality and an unprecedented saturation of up to 24 contiguous codons are described. Utility of the method is demonstrated via fabrication of complementarity determining regions (CDR in antibody fragment libraries and next generation sequencing (NGS analysis of their quality and diversity.

  18. Absolute in vivo translation rates of individual codons in Escherichia coli: The two glutamic acid codons GAA and GAG are translated with a threefold difference in rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.; Pedersen, Steen

    1991-01-01

    .4-fold slower (6.4 codons/s). These two codons are read by the same tRNA species. Codon CCG and CGA are both read by abundant tRNA species but nevertheless we found them to be translated slowly with rates of 5.8 and 4.2 codons/second, respectively. The context of these codons were varied, but we found...

  19. Codon usage of HIV regulatory genes is not determined by nucleotide composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phakaratsakul, Supinya; Sirihongthong, Thanyaporn; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2018-02-01

    Codon usage bias can be a result of either mutational bias or selection for translational efficiency and/or accuracy. Previous data has suggested that nucleotide composition constraint was the main determinant of HIV codon usage, and that nucleotide composition and codon usage were different between the regulatory genes, tat and rev, and other viral genes. It is not clear whether translational selection contributed to the codon usage difference and how nucleotide composition and translational selection interact to determine HIV codon usage. In this study, a model of codon bias due to GC composition with modification for the A-rich third codon position was used to calculate predicted HIV codon frequencies based on its nucleotide composition. The predicted codon usage of each gene was compared with the actual codon frequency. The predicted codon usage based on GC composition matched well with the actual codon frequencies for the structural genes (gag, pol and env). However, the codon usage of the regulatory genes (tat and rev) could not be predicted. Codon usage of the regulatory genes was also relatively unbiased showing the highest effective number of codons (ENC). Moreover, the codon adaptation index (CAI) of the regulatory genes showed better adaptation to human codons when compared to other HIV genes. Therefore, the early expressed genes responsible for regulation of the replication cycle, tat and rev, were more similar to humans in terms of codon usage and GC content than other HIV genes. This may help these genes to be expressed efficiently during the early stages of infection.

  20. Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Mantu; Farrell, Daniel W.; Dill, Ken A.

    2017-01-01

    Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell’s proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell’s many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data on chaperoning, folding, and aggregation rates with expression levels of proteins and chaperones measured at different growth rates. We find that the proteostasis machine recognizes and sorts a client protein based on two biophysical properties of the client’s misfolded state (M state): its stability and its kinetic accessibility from its unfolded state (U state). The machine is energy-efficient (the sickest proteins use the most ATP-expensive chaperones), comprehensive (it can handle any type of protein), and economical (the chaperone concentrations are just high enough to keep the whole proteome folded and disaggregated but no higher). The cell needs higher chaperone levels in two situations: fast growth (when protein production rates are high) and very slow growth (to mitigate the effects of protein degradation). This type of model complements experimental knowledge by showing how the various chaperones work together to achieve the broad folding and disaggregation needs of the cell. PMID:28292901

  1. Presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations in southeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the opinions, attitude, and preferences of Nigerian women to the presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations. Materials and Methods: A cross‑sectional survey of first time gynecology clinic attendees on their opinions, attitudes, and preferences with respect to the presence of chaperones ...

  2. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  3. Disaggregases, molecular chaperones that resolubilize protein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Z. Mokry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of folding is a seminal event in the life of a protein, as it is essential for proper protein function and therefore cell physiology. Inappropriate folding, or misfolding, can not only lead to loss of function, but also to the formation of protein aggregates, an insoluble association of polypeptides that harm cell physiology, either by themselves or in the process of formation. Several biological processes have evolved to prevent and eliminate the existence of non-functional and amyloidogenic aggregates, as they are associated with several human pathologies. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins are specialized in controlling the quality of the proteins in the cell, specifically by aiding proper folding, and dissolution and clearance of already formed protein aggregates. The latter is a function of disaggregases, mainly represented by the ClpB/Hsp104 subfamily of molecular chaperones, that are ubiquitous in all organisms but, surprisingly, have no orthologs in the cytosol of metazoan cells. This review aims to describe the characteristics of disaggregases and to discuss the function of yeast Hsp104, a disaggregase that is also involved in prion propagation and inheritance.

  4. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-21

    . The relationship between the synonymous codon usage and different protein secondary structural classes were investigated using 401 Homo sapiens proteins extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). A simple Chi-square ...

  5. Does adaptation to vertebrate codon usage relate to flavivirus emergence potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Di Paola

    Full Text Available Codon adaptation index (CAI is a measure of synonymous codon usage biases given a usage reference. Through mutation, selection, and drift, viruses can optimize their replication efficiency and produce more offspring, which could increase the chance of secondary transmission. To evaluate how higher CAI towards the host has been associated with higher viral titers, we explored temporal trends of several historic and extensively sequenced zoonotic flaviviruses and relationships within the genus itself. To showcase evolutionary and epidemiological relationships associated with silent, adaptive synonymous changes of viruses, we used codon usage tables from human housekeeping and antiviral immune genes, as well as tables from arthropod vectors and vertebrate species involved in the flavivirus maintenance cycle. We argue that temporal trends of CAI changes could lead to a better understanding of zoonotic emergences, evolutionary dynamics, and host adaptation. CAI appears to help illustrate historically relevant trends of well-characterized viruses, in different viral species and genetic diversity within a single species. CAI can be a useful tool together with in vivo and in vitro kinetics, phylodynamics, and additional functional genomics studies to better understand species trafficking and viral emergence in a new host.

  6. Does adaptation to vertebrate codon usage relate to flavivirus emergence potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Nicholas; Freire, Caio César de Melo; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2018-01-01

    Codon adaptation index (CAI) is a measure of synonymous codon usage biases given a usage reference. Through mutation, selection, and drift, viruses can optimize their replication efficiency and produce more offspring, which could increase the chance of secondary transmission. To evaluate how higher CAI towards the host has been associated with higher viral titers, we explored temporal trends of several historic and extensively sequenced zoonotic flaviviruses and relationships within the genus itself. To showcase evolutionary and epidemiological relationships associated with silent, adaptive synonymous changes of viruses, we used codon usage tables from human housekeeping and antiviral immune genes, as well as tables from arthropod vectors and vertebrate species involved in the flavivirus maintenance cycle. We argue that temporal trends of CAI changes could lead to a better understanding of zoonotic emergences, evolutionary dynamics, and host adaptation. CAI appears to help illustrate historically relevant trends of well-characterized viruses, in different viral species and genetic diversity within a single species. CAI can be a useful tool together with in vivo and in vitro kinetics, phylodynamics, and additional functional genomics studies to better understand species trafficking and viral emergence in a new host.

  7. Organisms can essentially be classified according to two codon patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, T; Sorimachi, K

    2009-02-01

    We recently classified 23 bacteria into two types based on their complete genomes; "S-type" as represented by Staphylococcus aureus and "E-type" as represented by Escherichia coli. Classification was characterized by concentrations of Arg, Ala or Lys in the amino acid composition calculated from the complete genome. Based on these previous classifications, not only prokaryotic but also eukaryotic genome structures were investigated by amino acid compositions and nucleotide contents. Organisms consisting of 112 bacteria, 15 archaea and 18 eukaryotes were classified into two major groups by cluster analysis using GC contents at the three codon positions calculated from complete genomes. The 145 organisms were classified into "AT-type" and "GC-type" represented by high A or T (low G or C) and high G or C (low A or T) contents, respectively, at every third codon position. Reciprocal changes between G or C and A or T contents at the third codon position occurred almost synchronously in every codon among the organisms. Correlations between amino acid concentrations (Ala, Ile and Lys) and the nucleotide contents at the codon position were obtained in both "AT-type" and "GC-type" organisms, but with different regression coefficients. In certain correlations of amino acid concentrations with GC contents, eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria showed different behaviors; thus these kingdoms evolved differently. All organisms are basically classifiable into two groups having characteristic codon patterns; organisms with low GC and high AT contents at the third codon position and their derivatives, and organisms with an inverse relationship.

  8. Clustering of low usage codons in the translation initiation region of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-hua; Su, Jun-hong; Chen, Hao-tai; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Li-na; Ding, Yao-zhong; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Szathmary, Susan; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2013-08-01

    The adaptation of the overall codon usage pattern of hepatitis C virus (HCV) to that of human is estimated by the synonymous codon usage value (RSCU). The synonymous codon usage biases for the translation initiation region (TIR) of this virus are also analyzed by calculation of usage fluctuation of each synonymous codon along the TIR (the first 30 codon sites of the whole coding sequence of HCV). As for the overall codon usage pattern of HCV, this virus has a significant tendency to delete the codons with CpG or TpA dinucleotides. Turning to the adaptation of the overall codon usage of HCV to that of human, over half part of codons has a similar usage pattern between this virus and human, suggesting that the host cellular environment of the overall codon usage pattern influences the formation of codon usage for HCV. In addition, there is no obvious phenomenon that the codons with relatively low energy tend to be highly selected in the TIR of HCV, suggesting that the synonymous codon usage patterns for the TIR of HCV might be not affected by the secondary structure of nucleotide sequence, however, the formation of synonymous codons usage in the TIR of HCV is influenced by the overall codon usage patterns of human to some degree. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E. Lackie; Rachel E. Lackie; Andrzej Maciejewski; Andrzej Maciejewski; Valeriy G. Ostapchenko; Jose Marques-Lopes; Wing-Yiu Choy; Martin L. Duennwald; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degrada...

  10. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  11. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  12. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  13. P-value based visualization of codon usage data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fricke Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two important and not yet solved problems in bacterial genome research are the identification of horizontally transferred genes and the prediction of gene expression levels. Both problems can be addressed by multivariate analysis of codon usage data. In particular dimensionality reduction methods for visualization of multivariate data have shown to be effective tools for codon usage analysis. We here propose a multidimensional scaling approach using a novel similarity measure for codon usage tables. Our probabilistic similarity measure is based on P-values derived from the well-known chi-square test for comparison of two distributions. Experimental results on four microbial genomes indicate that the new method is well-suited for the analysis of horizontal gene transfer and translational selection. As compared with the widely-used correspondence analysis, our method did not suffer from outlier sensitivity and showed a better clustering of putative alien genes in most cases.

  14. In Arabidopsis thaliana codon volatility scores reflect GC3 composition rather than selective pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Mary J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synonymous codon usage bias has typically been correlated with, and attributed to translational efficiency. However, there are other pressures on genomic sequence composition that can affect codon usage patterns such as mutational biases. This study provides an analysis of the codon usage patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana in relation to gene expression levels, codon volatility, mutational biases and selective pressures. Results We have performed synonymous codon usage and codon volatility analyses for all genes in the A. thaliana genome. In contrast to reports for species from other kingdoms, we find that neither codon usage nor volatility are correlated with selection pressure (as measured by dN/dS, nor with gene expression levels on a genome wide level. Our results show that codon volatility and usage are not synonymous, rather that they are correlated with the abundance of G and C at the third codon position (GC3. Conclusions Our results indicate that while the A. thaliana genome shows evidence for synonymous codon usage bias, this is not related to the expression levels of its constituent genes. Neither codon volatility nor codon usage are correlated with expression levels or selective pressures but, because they are directly related to the composition of G and C at the third codon position, they are the result of mutational bias. Therefore, in A. thaliana codon volatility and usage do not result from selection for translation efficiency or protein functional shift as measured by positive selection.

  15. Gene expression, nucleotide composition and codon usage bias of genes associated with human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position. The codon usage pattern was different in different genes as revealed from correspondence analysis (COA). A significant correlation between effective number of codons (ENC) and various GC contents suggests that both mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern of genes located in human Y chromosome. In addition, Y-linked genes have significant difference in GC contents at the second and third codon positions, expression level, and codon usage pattern of some codons like the SPANX genes in X chromosome.

  16. Codon usage bias analysis for the coding sequences of Camellia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-02-24

    Feb 24, 2016 ... Codon usage bias plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. ... 1994); (e) protein structure (D'Onofrio et al., 2002); (f) .... Figure 2. ENc values plotted against the CAI for the cds of Camellia sinensis and Brassica campestris. The coefficient of determination (denoted as R2) is 0.37 and 0.15 ...

  17. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-20

    Jan 20, 2012 ... oedema and possibly pain and blistering (sunburn). Al- though associations between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and various types of cancer, ..... Radiation-induced cutaneous carcinoma of the head and neck: is there an early role for p53 mutations? Clin. Exp. Dermatol. 31 793–798. Han J, Kraft P, Nan ...

  18. Nucleotide composition bias and codon usage trends of gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-10

    Jun 10, 2015 ... to investigate the factors that influence the codon usage trends of gene populations and to analyse the ... vant to disease control measures and exploring reasons for adaptation to their host and environment. ..... Brown D. R., Zacher L. A. and Farmerie W. G. 2004 Spreading factors of Mycoplasma alligatoris, ...

  19. Codon usage determines translation rate in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Kurland, C G; Pedersen, Steen

    1989-01-01

    We wish to determine whether differences in translation rate are correlated with differences in codon usage or with differences in mRNA secondary structure. We therefore inserted a small DNA fragment in the lacZ gene either directly or flanked by a few frame-shifting bases, leaving the reading fr...

  20. Local synteny and codon usage contribute to asymmetric sequence divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergthorsson Ulfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated genes frequently experience asymmetric rates of sequence evolution. Relaxed selective constraints and positive selection have both been invoked to explain the observation that one paralog within a gene-duplicate pair exhibits an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the majority of studies where asymmetric divergence has been established, there is no indication as to which gene copy, ancestral or derived, is evolving more rapidly. In this study we investigated the effect of local synteny (gene-neighborhood conservation and codon usage on the sequence evolution of gene duplicates in the S. cerevisiae genome. We further distinguish the gene duplicates into those that originated from a whole-genome duplication (WGD event (ohnologs versus small-scale duplications (SSD to determine if there exist any differences in their patterns of sequence evolution. Results For SSD pairs, the derived copy evolves faster than the ancestral copy. However, there is no relationship between rate asymmetry and synteny conservation (ancestral-like versus derived-like in ohnologs. mRNA abundance and optimal codon usage as measured by the CAI is lower in the derived SSD copies relative to ancestral paralogs. Moreover, in the case of ohnologs, the faster-evolving copy has lower CAI and lowered expression. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that relaxation of selection for codon usage and gene expression contribute to rate asymmetry in the evolution of duplicated genes and that in SSD pairs, the relaxation of selection stems from the loss of ancestral regulatory information in the derived copy.

  1. GC-Content of Synonymous Codons Profoundly Influences Amino Acid Usage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Ying; Yang, Sihai; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids typically are encoded by multiple synonymous codons that are not used with the same frequency. Codon usage bias has drawn considerable attention, and several explanations have been offered, including variation in GC-content between species. Focusing on a simple parameter—combined GC proportion of all the synonymous codons for a particular amino acid, termed GCsyn—we try to deepen our understanding of the relationship between GC-content and amino acid/codon usage in more details. W...

  2. Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Focuses on mathematical structure, and on real-world applications. This book includes developments in several optimization-related topics such as decision theory, linear programming, turnpike theory, duality theory, convex analysis, and queuing theory.

  3. Comparative analysis of codon usage pattern and its influencing factors in Schistosoma japonicum and Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Gulshana A; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-12-20

    Schistosoma japonicum and Ascaris suum are considered as the major parasites of human which cause various life threatening diseases such as schistomiasis and ascariasis. The codon usage bias (CUB) is known as the phenomenon of more usage of a specific codon than the other synonymous codons for an amino acid. The factors that influence the codon usage bias are mutation pressure, natural selection, gene expression, gene length, GC content, RNA stability, recombination rates, codon position etc. Here we had used various bioinformatic tools and statistical analyses to understand the compositional features, expression level and codon usage bias in the genes of these two species.After estimating the effective number of codon (ENC) in both the species, codon usage bias was found to be low and gene expression was high. The nucleobase A and T were used most often than C and G. From neutrality plot and correspondence analysis it was found that both natural selection and mutation pressure played an important role in shaping the codon usage pattern of both species. Moreover, natural selection played a major role while mutation pressure played a minor role in shaping the codon usage bias in S. japonicum and A.suum. This is the first report on the codon usage biology in S. japonicum and A.suum, and the factors influencing their codon usage bias. These results are expected to be useful for genetic engineering and evolutionary studies.

  4. Variation in global codon usage bias among prokaryotic organisms is associated with their lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely acknowledged that synonymous codons are used unevenly among genes in a genome. In organisms under translational selection, genes encoding highly expressed proteins are enriched with specific codons. This phenomenon, termed codon usage bias, is common to many organisms and has been recognized as influencing cellular fitness. This suggests that the global extent of codon usage bias of an organism might be associated with its phenotypic traits. Results To test this hypothesis we used a simple measure for assessing the extent of codon bias of an organism, and applied it to hundreds of sequenced prokaryotes. Our analysis revealed a large variability in this measure: there are organisms showing very high degrees of codon usage bias and organisms exhibiting almost no differential use of synonymous codons among different genes. Remarkably, we found that the extent of codon usage bias corresponds to the lifestyle of the organism. Especially, organisms able to live in a wide range of habitats exhibit high extents of codon usage bias, consistent with their need to adapt efficiently to different environments. Pathogenic prokaryotes also demonstrate higher extents of codon usage bias than non-pathogenic prokaryotes, in accord with the multiple environments that many pathogens occupy. Our results show that the previously observed correlation between growth rate and metabolic variability is attributed to their individual associations with codon usage bias. Conclusions Our results suggest that the extent of codon usage bias of an organism plays a role in the adaptation of prokaryotes to their environments. PMID:22032172

  5. Different contributions of HtrA protease and chaperone activities to Campylobacter jejuni stress tolerance and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Skórko-Glonek, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    activity is sufficient for growth at high temperature or oxidative stress, whereas the HtrA protease activity is only essential at conditions close to the growth limit for C. jejuni. However, the protease activity was required to prevent induction of the cytoplasmic heat-shock response even at optimal......, but little is known about how each of these activities contributes to stress tolerance in bacteria. In vitro experiments showed temperature dependent protease and chaperone activities of C. jejuni HtrA. A C. jejuni mutant lacking only the protease activity of HtrA was used to show that the HtrA chaperone...... growth conditions. Interestingly, the requirement of HtrA at high temperatures was found to depend on the oxygen level and our data suggest that HtrA may protect oxidatively damaged proteins. Finally, protease activity stimulates HtrA production and oligomer formation, suggesting that a regulatory role...

  6. Refolding and purification of histidine-tagged protein by artificial chaperone-assisted metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Jun; Sun, Yan

    2009-07-03

    This article has proposed an artificial chaperone-assisted immobilized metal affinity chromatography (AC-IMAC) for on-column refolding and purification of histidine-tagged proteins. Hexahistidine-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and refolded and purified from urea-solubilized inclusion bodies by the strategy. The artificial chaperone system was composed of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). In the refolding process, denatured protein was mixed with CTAB to form a protein-CTAB complex. The mixture was then loaded to IMAC column and the complex was bound via metal chelating to the histidine tag. This was followed by washing with a refolding buffer containing beta-CD that removed CTAB from the bound protein and initiated on-column refolding. The effect of the washing time (i.e., on-column refolding time) on mass and fluorescence recoveries was examined. Extensive studies by comparison with other related refolding techniques have proved the advantages of AC-IMAC. In the on-column refolding, the artificial chaperone system suppressed protein interactions and facilitated protein folding to its native structure. So, the on-column refolding by AC-IMAC led to 99% pure EGFP with a fluorescence recovery of 80%. By comparison at a similar final EGFP concentration (0.6-0.8 mg/mL), this fluorescence recovery value was not only much higher than direct dilution (14%) and AC-assisted refolding (26%) in bulk solutions, but also superior to its partner, IMAC (60%). The operating conditions would be further optimized to improve the refolding efficiency.

  7. Chaperone Use by Residents During Pelvic, Breast, Testicular, and Rectal Exams

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Farber, Neil J.; Collier, Virginia U; Aboff, Brian M

    2000-01-01

    We designed a questionnaire survey to study internal medicine residents' plans to use a chaperone during the pelvic, breast, rectal, and testicular examinations. We found chaperone use by male and female residents differed markedly, and neither group planned to use chaperones universally. When examining female patients, male residents overall were very likely to use a chaperone during a pelvic exam, but less likely for the breast exam and rectal exam. For the female resident, there was a sign...

  8. The Hsp90 chaperone in action: following the ATP cycle of a molecular machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagoz, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding in the cell is assisted by molecular chaperones. Hsp90 is the most abundant molecular chaperone in the cytosol. It facilitates the folding and activation of mainly signalling molecules. Its chaperoning of regulatory proteins places Hsp90 in the cross road of several important

  9. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-15

    In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick's hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C³ and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising) result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six) with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C(3) codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  10. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fimmel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick’s hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C3 and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C3 codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  11. Nucleotide sequence conservation in paramyxoviruses; the concept of codon constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Bert K

    2015-05-01

    The stability and conservation of the sequences of RNA viruses in the field and the high error rates measured in vitro are paradoxical. The field stability indicates that there are very strong selective constraints on sequence diversity. The nature of these constraints is discussed. Apart from constraints on variation in cis-acting RNA and the amino acid sequences of viral proteins, there are other ones relating to the presence of specific dinucleotides such CpG and UpA as well as the importance of RNA secondary structures and RNA degradation rates. Recent other constraints identified in other RNA viruses, such as effects of secondary RNA structure on protein folding or modification of cellular tRNA complements, are also discussed. Using the family Paramyxoviridae, I show that the codon usage pattern (CUP) is (i) specific for each virus species and (ii) that it is markedly different from the host - it does not vary even in vaccine viruses that have been derived by passage in a number of inappropriate host cells. The CUP might thus be an additional constraint on variation, and I propose the concept of codon constellation to indicate the informational content of the sequences of RNA molecules relating not only to stability and structure but also to the efficiency of translation of a viral mRNA resulting from the CUP and the numbers and position of rare codons. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. The AGG codon is translated slowly in E. coli even at very low expression levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonekamp, Fons; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented which indicate that AGG codons for arginine are translated significantly more slowly than the CGU codons for the same amino acid even when their expression level from the probe is very low. The two types of codons were inser ted (three in tandem) on a multicopy plasmid in an ar......Data are presented which indicate that AGG codons for arginine are translated significantly more slowly than the CGU codons for the same amino acid even when their expression level from the probe is very low. The two types of codons were inser ted (three in tandem) on a multicopy plasmid...... IPTG. At all induction levels it was found that the frequency of transcription past the pyrE attenuator was approximately nine times lower when the AGG codons were present in the leader than with CGT codons present. This shows that AGG codons decouple translation from transcription in the pyr......E attenuator region even when the concentration of this codon is not increased significantly relative to that in the unperturbed wild type strain. Thus the results indicate that AGG codons are always slowly translated in Eacherichia coli....

  13. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino...... acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby...... ribosomes by affecting the appearance of 'traffic jams' where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this 'context effect' further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated...

  14. Presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations in southeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-12

    Dec 12, 2012 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Oct-Dec 2013 • Vol 16 • Issue 4. Abstract. Objectives: To assess the opinions, attitude, and preferences of Nigerian women to the presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of first time gynecology clinic ...

  15. Treatment of Fabry's Disease with the Pharmacologic Chaperone Migalastat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germain, Dominique P; Hughes, Derralynn A; Nicholls, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry's disease, an X-linked disorder of lysosomal α-galactosidase deficiency, leads to substrate accumulation in multiple organs. Migalastat, an oral pharmacologic chaperone, stabilizes specific mutant forms of α-galactosidase, increasing enzyme trafficking to lysosomes. METHODS: The...

  16. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  17. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their

  18. Synonymous codon ordering: a subtle but prevalent strategy of bacteria to improve translational efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Qing Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In yeast coding sequences, once a particular codon has been used, subsequent occurrence of the same amino acid tends to use codons sharing the same tRNA. Such a phenomenon of co-tRNA codons pairing bias (CTCPB is also found in some other eukaryotes but it is not known whether it occurs in prokaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we focused on a total of 773 bacterial genomes to investigate their synonymous codon pairing preferences. After calculating the actual frequencies of synonymous codon pairs and comparing them with their expected values, we detected an obvious pairing bias towards identical codon pairs. This seems consistent with the previously reported CTCPB phenomenon, since identical codons are certainly read by the same tRNA. However, among co-tRNA but non-identical codon pairs, only 22 were often found overrepresented, suggesting that many co-tRNA codons actually do not preferentially pair together in prokaryotes. Therefore, the previously reported co-tRNA codons pairing rule needs to be more rigorously defined. The affinity differences between a tRNA anticodon and its readable codons should be taken into account. Moreover, both within-gene-shuffling tests and phylogenetic analyses support the idea that translational selection played an important role in shaping the observed synonymous codon pairing pattern in prokaryotes. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, a high level of synonymous codon pairing bias was detected in 73% investigated bacterial species, suggesting the synonymous codon ordering strategy has been prevalently adopted by prokaryotes to improve their translational efficiencies. The findings in this study also provide important clues to better understand the complex dynamics of translational process.

  19. Modified 'one amino acid-one codon' engineering of high GC content TaqII-coding gene from thermophilic Thermus aquaticus results in radical expression increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Zolnierkiewicz, Olga; Sliwinska, Katarzyna; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2014-01-11

    An industrial approach to protein production demands maximization of cloned gene expression, balanced with the recombinant host's viability. Expression of toxic genes from thermophiles poses particular difficulties due to high GC content, mRNA secondary structures, rare codon usage and impairing the host's coding plasmid replication.TaqII belongs to a family of bifunctional enzymes, which are a fusion of the restriction endonuclease (REase) and methyltransferase (MTase) activities in a single polypeptide. The family contains thermostable REases with distinct specificities: TspGWI, TaqII, Tth111II/TthHB27I, TspDTI and TsoI and a few enzymes found in mesophiles. While not being isoschizomers, the enzymes exhibit amino acid (aa) sequence homologies, having molecular sizes of ~120 kDa share common modular architecture, resemble Type-I enzymes, cleave DNA 11/9 nt from the recognition sites, their activity is affected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We describe the taqIIRM gene design, cloning and expression of the prototype TaqII. The enzyme amount in natural hosts is extremely low. To improve expression of the taqIIRM gene in Escherichia coli (E. coli), we designed and cloned a fully synthetic, low GC content, low mRNA secondary structure taqIIRM, codon-optimized gene under a bacteriophage lambda (λ) PR promoter. Codon usage based on a modified 'one amino acid-one codon' strategy, weighted towards low GC content codons, resulted in approximately 10-fold higher expression of the synthetic gene. 718 codons of total 1105 were changed, comprising 65% of the taqIIRM gene. The reason for we choose a less effective strategy rather than a resulting in high expression yields 'codon randomization' strategy, was intentional, sub-optimal TaqII in vivo production, in order to decrease the high 'toxicity' of the REase-MTase protein. Recombinant wt and synthetic taqIIRM gene were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The modified 'one amino acid-one codon' method tuned for thermophile

  20. Chaperone therapy for neuronopathic lysosomal diseases: competitive inhibitors as chemical chaperones for enhancement of mutant enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Seiichiro; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2009-05-26

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular approach to lysosomal diseases, a group of human genetic diseases causing severe brain damage. We found two valienamine derivatives, N-octyl-4-epi-beta-valienamine (NOEV) and N-octyl-beta-valienamine (NOV), as promising therapeutic agents for human beta-galactosidase deficiency disorders (mainly G(M1)-gangliosidosis) and beta-glucosidase deficiency disorders (Gaucher disease), respectively. We briefly reviewed the historical background of research in carbasugar glycosidase inhibitors. Originally NOEV and NOV had been discovered as competitive inhibitors, and then their paradoxical bioactivities as chaperones were confirmed in cultured fibroblasts from patients with these disorders. Subsequently G(M1)-gangliosidosis model mice were developed and useful for experimental studies. Orally administered NOEV entered the brain through the blood-brain barrier, enhanced beta-galactosidase activity, reduced substrate storage, and improved neurological deterioration clinically. Furthermore, we executed computational analysis for prediction of molecular interactions between beta-galactosidase and NOEV. Some preliminary results of computational analysis of molecular interaction mechanism are presented in this article. NOV also showed the chaperone effect toward several beta-glucosidase gene mutations in Gaucher disease. We hope chaperone therapy will become available for some patients with G(M1)-gangliosidosis, Gaucher disease, and potentially other lysosomal storage diseases with central nervous system involvement.

  1. Impact of bias discrepancy and amino acid usage on estimates of the effective number of codons used in a gene, and a test for selection on codon usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The effective number of codons (Nc) used in a gene is one of the most commonly used measures of synonymous codon usage bias, owing much of its popularity to the fact that it is species independent and that simulation studies have shown that it is less dependent of gene length than other measures....... that exists for Buchnera sp. APS and Borrelia burgdorferi....

  2. Codon changed immobilization antigen (iAg), a potent DNA vaccine in fish against Cryptocaryon irritans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Priya, T A; Lin, Yen-Hong; Wang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Chii-Shen; Chang, Poh-Shing; Song, Yen-Ling

    2012-01-20

    The immobilization antigen (iAg) DNA sequence from Chiayi isolate of Cryptocaryon irritans was computationally reviewed to replace the stop codons with suitable amino acids and its GC content was intensified. The plasmid construct comprising the codon changed iAg (optiAg/optimized iAg) was successfully expressed in the bacterial strain BL21 and also in grouper fin cells (GF-1). Results of immobilization assay, ELISA and western blot of C. irritans theront and recombinant iAg by grouper antiserum against optiAg DNA indicated that the codon changed iAg retains the native conformation. The DNA vaccine construct pcDNA3.1-optiAg was encapsulated in water-oil-water triple layer emulsions measuring 19 μm diameters and was used for the immunization experiment. In trial I experiment, grouper fish were immunized twice via intramuscular injection with the pcDNA3.1-optiAg and were challenged with C. irritans at 8-day post immunization (dpi), which resulted in 46% relative percent survival (RPS). In trial II, single immunization with pcDNA3.1-optiAg boosted with recombinant iAg protein, resulted in 40% RPS. The data from this study reveal that codon change in iAg not only accomplished the expression of iAg protein in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems, but also optiAg was proved as immunogenic due to the protection it confers to the immunized fish against C. irritans infection. Hence, it is concluded that iAg can be a potent DNA vaccine in fish against infection of the ciliated protozoan, C. irritans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chaperones and multitasking proteins in the nucleolus: networking together for survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bański, Piotr; Kodiha, Mohamed; Stochaj, Ursula

    2010-07-01

    The nucleolus has emerged as a key player that regulates cell growth, survival and the recovery from stress. Progress in proteomics made it possible to sequence the nucleolar proteome under different physiological conditions. Together with other research, this work revealed the presence of multiple chaperones and co-chaperones in the nucleolus. Molecular chaperones are components of a larger network that promotes protein homeostasis, thereby providing continuous adaptation to a changing environment. Recent studies suggest that the cellular chaperone network is divided into individual branches which orchestrate specific functions. Input from separate branches is then combined to 'fine-tune' the cellular proteostasis network. Based on the latest developments in nucleolar and chaperone biology, we speculate that a unique network comprising chaperones, co-chaperones and multitasking proteins is located in nucleoli. This network supports and regulates fundamental biological processes, including ribosome biogenesis, cell signaling, and the stress response. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genes optimized by evolution for accurate and fast translation encode in Archaea and Bacteria a broad and characteristic spectrum of protein functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkl Rainer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many microbial genomes, a strong preference for a small number of codons can be observed in genes whose products are needed by the cell in large quantities. This codon usage bias (CUB improves translational accuracy and speed and is one of several factors optimizing cell growth. Whereas CUB and the overrepresentation of individual proteins have been studied in detail, it is still unclear which high-level metabolic categories are subject to translational optimization in different habitats. Results In a systematic study of 388 microbial species, we have identified for each genome a specific subset of genes characterized by a marked CUB, which we named the effectome. As expected, gene products related to protein synthesis are abundant in both archaeal and bacterial effectomes. In addition, enzymes contributing to energy production and gene products involved in protein folding and stabilization are overrepresented. The comparison of genomes from eleven habitats shows that the environment has only a minor effect on the composition of the effectomes. As a paradigmatic example, we detailed the effectome content of 37 bacterial genomes that are most likely exposed to strongest selective pressure towards translational optimization. These effectomes accommodate a broad range of protein functions like enzymes related to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle, ATP synthases, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, chaperones, proteases that degrade misfolded proteins, protectants against oxidative damage, as well as cold shock and outer membrane proteins. Conclusions We made clear that effectomes consist of specific subsets of the proteome being involved in several cellular functions. As expected, some functions are related to cell growth and affect speed and quality of protein synthesis. Additionally, the effectomes contain enzymes of central metabolic pathways and cellular functions sustaining microbial life under stress situations. These

  5. Complete motif analysis of sequence requirements for translation initiation at non-AUG start codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Arce, Alexander J; Noderer, William L; Wang, Clifford L

    2018-01-25

    The initiation of mRNA translation from start codons other than AUG was previously believed to be rare and of relatively low impact. More recently, evidence has suggested that as much as half of all translation initiation utilizes non-AUG start codons, codons that deviate from AUG by a single base. Furthermore, non-AUG start codons have been shown to be involved in regulation of expression and disease etiology. Yet the ability to gauge expression based on the sequence of a translation initiation site (start codon and its flanking bases) has been limited. Here we have performed a comprehensive analysis of translation initiation sites that utilize non-AUG start codons. By combining genetic-reporter, cell-sorting, and high-throughput sequencing technologies, we have analyzed the expression associated with all possible variants of the -4 to +4 positions of non-AUG translation initiation site motifs. This complete motif analysis revealed that 1) with the right sequence context, certain non-AUG start codons can generate expression comparable to that of AUG start codons, 2) sequence context affects each non-AUG start codon differently, and 3) initiation at non-AUG start codons is highly sensitive to changes in the flanking sequences. Complete motif analysis has the potential to be a key tool for experimental and diagnostic genomics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Codon bias and gene ontology in holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, David B; Makowski, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between preferred codon use (PCU), developmental mode, and gene ontology (GO) was investigated in a sample of nine insect species with sequenced genomes. These species were selected to represent two distinct modes of insect development, holometabolism and hemimetabolism, with an aim toward determining whether the differences in developmental timing concomitant with developmental mode would be mirrored by differences in PCU in their developmental genes. We hypothesized that the developmental genes of holometabolous insects should be under greater selective pressure for efficient translation, manifest as increased PCU, than those of hemimetabolous insects because holometabolism requires abundant protein expression over shorter time intervals than hemimetabolism, where proteins are required more uniformly in time. Preferred codon sets were defined for each species, from which the frequency of PCU for each gene was obtained. Although there were substantial differences in the genomic base composition of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects, both groups exhibited a general preference for GC-ending codons, with the former group having higher PCU averaged across all genes. For each species, the biological process GO term for each gene was assigned that of its Drosophila homolog(s), and PCU was calculated for each GO term category. The top two GO term categories for PCU enrichment in the holometabolous insects were anatomical structure development and cell differentiation. The increased PCU in the developmental genes of holometabolous insects may reflect a general strategy to maximize the protein production of genes expressed in bursts over short time periods, e.g., heat shock proteins. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 686-698, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association of HER2 codon 655 polymorphism with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrowski, Rafał; Castillo-Tong, Dan Cacsire; Schuster, Eva; Fischer, Michael B; Speiser, Paul; Zeillinger, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The role of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) codon 655 (Ile655Val) polymorphism in ovarian cancer is not fully understood. Two studies indicated a possible association between the Val allele and elevated risk or reduced prognosis of ovarian cancer. We investigated the HER2 codon 655 (rs1136201) polymorphism in 242 Austrian women-142 ovarian cancer patients and 100 healthy controls-by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Associations between Ile655Val polymorphism and clinicopathological variables (e.g., age, FIGO stage, grading, serous vs. non-serous histology) were evaluated. The genotype distributions in ovarian cancer patients and controls were: AA; 66.2 %, AG; 25.35 %, GG; 8.45 %, and AA; 63 %, AG; 34 %, GG; 3.7 %, respectively (OR 1.15, CI 95 % 0.67-1.96). We observed a non-significant trend toward elevated cancer risk in Val/Val genotype (OR 2.98, CI 95 % 0.82-10.87, p = 0.10). Of note, 11 out of 12 Val/Val homozygotes were postmenopausal. The link between the Val/Val homozygosity and age over 50 years at diagnosis (OR 0.15, CI 95 % 0.02-1.2) was barely significant (p = 0.056). Summarizing, our data indicated a non-significant trend toward increased ovarian cancer risk in the Val/Val homozygosity, especially in women aged above 50 years. Further large-cohort studies focusing on the role of the HER2 codon 655 Val allele are needed.

  8. Protein evolution via amino acid and codon elimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Banerjee, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    correlation between the number of residues randomized and the size of the resulting ensemble. Using GFP as the model protein, we present a strategy, termed protein evolution via amino acid and codon elimination, through which simplified, native-like polypeptides encoded by a reduced genetic code were obtained...... a common buried residue, Phe, from the green fluorescent protein (GFP), while retaining activity. A GFP variant containing 11 Phe residues was used as starting scaffold to generate 10 separate variants in which each Phe was replaced individually (in one construct two adjacent Phe residues were changed...

  9. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Pasheva, Evdokia, E-mail: eva@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  10. Metal chaperones: a holistic approach to the treatment of AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Anthony Adlard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the burden of proof for the role of metal ion dysregulation in the pathogenesis of multiple CNS disorders grows, it has become important to more precisely identify and differentiate the biological effects of various pharmacological modulators of metal ion homeostasis. This is particularly evident in disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, where the use of metal chaperones (that transport metals, as opposed to chelators (which exclude metals from biological interactions, may prove to be the first truly disease modifying approach for this condition. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight the emerging notion that metal chaperones, such as PBT2 (Prana Biotechnology, modulate a variety of critical pathways affecting key aspects of the AD cascade to provide a more holistic approach to the treatment of this disease.

  11. From Chaperones to the Membrane with a BAM!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Ashlee M; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a central role in the integrity of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Unfolded OMPs (uOMPs) transit across the periplasm, and subsequent folding and assembly are crucial for biogenesis. Chaperones and the essential β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex facilitate these processes. In vitro studies suggest that some chaperones sequester uOMPs in internal cavities during their periplasmic transit to prevent deleterious aggregation. Upon reaching the outer membrane, the BAM complex acts catalytically to accelerate uOMP folding. Complementary in vivo experiments have revealed the localization and activity of the BAM complex in living cells. Completing an understanding of OMP biogenesis will require a holistic view of the interplay among the individual components discussed here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chaperone use during intimate examinations in primary care: postal survey of family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians have long been advised to have a third party present during certain parts of a physical examination; however, little is known about the frequency of chaperone use for those specific intimate examinations regularly performed in primary care. We aimed to determine the frequency of chaperone use among family physicians across a variety of intimate physical examinations for both male and female patients, and also to identify the factors associated with chaperone use. Methods Questionnaires were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 500 Ontario members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Participants were asked about their use of chaperones when performing a variety of intimate examinations, namely female pelvic, breast, and rectal exams and male genital and rectal exams. Results 276 of 500 were returned (56%, of which 257 were useable. Chaperones were more commonly used with female patients than with males (t = 9.09 [df = 249], p Conclusion Clinical practice concerning the use of chaperones during intimate exams continues to be discordant with the recommendations of medical associations and medico-legal societies. Chaperones are used by only a minority of Ontario family physicians. Chaperone use is higher for examinations of female patients than of male patients and is highest for female pelvic exams. The availability of a nurse in the clinic to act as a chaperone is associated with more frequent use of chaperones.

  13. Codes in the codons: construction of a codon/amino acid periodic table and a study of the nature of specific nucleic acid-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, B; Biro, J C; Benyo, Z

    2004-01-01

    The theory of "codon-amino acid coevolution" was first proposed by Woese in 1967. It suggests that there is a stereochemical matching - that is, affinity - between amino acids and certain of the base triplet sequences that code for those amino acids. We have constructed a common periodic table of codons and amino acids, where the nucleic acid table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons and the corresponding amino acid table also displayed periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydrophobicity) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table indicates that the middle (2/sup nd/) amino acid in the codon has a prominent role in determining some of the structural features of the amino acids. The possibility that physical contact between codons and amino acids might exist was tested on restriction enzymes. Many recognition site-like sequences were found in the coding sequences of these enzymes and as many as 73 examples of codon-amino acid co-location were observed in the 7 known 3D structures (December 2003) of endonuclease-nucleic acid complexes. These results indicate that the smallest possible units of specific nucleic acid-protein interaction are indeed the stereochemically compatible codons and amino acids.

  14. Representation of DNA sequences in genetic codon context with applications in exon and intron prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchuan

    2015-04-01

    To apply digital signal processing (DSP) methods to analyze DNA sequences, the sequences first must be specially mapped into numerical sequences. Thus, effective numerical mappings of DNA sequences play key roles in the effectiveness of DSP-based methods such as exon prediction. Despite numerous mappings of symbolic DNA sequences to numerical series, the existing mapping methods do not include the genetic coding features of DNA sequences. We present a novel numerical representation of DNA sequences using genetic codon context (GCC) in which the numerical values are optimized by simulation annealing to maximize the 3-periodicity signal to noise ratio (SNR). The optimized GCC representation is then applied in exon and intron prediction by Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) approach. The results show the GCC method enhances the SNR values of exon sequences and thus increases the accuracy of predicting protein coding regions in genomes compared with the commonly used 4D binary representation. In addition, this study offers a novel way to reveal specific features of DNA sequences by optimizing numerical mappings of symbolic DNA sequences.

  15. Cloning and molecular characterization of a copper chaperone gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cDNA encoding a copper chaperone, designated as HbCCH1, was isolated from Hevea brasiliensis. HbCC1 was 589 bp long containing a 261 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 86 amino acids, flanked by a 103 bp 5'UTR and a 225 bp 3'UTR. The predicted molecular mass of HbCCH1 was 9.2 kDa, ...

  16. Evolutionary patterns of codon usage in the chloroplast gene rbcL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dennis P; Herbeck, Joshua T

    2003-06-01

    In this study we reconstruct the evolution of codon usage bias in the chloroplast gene rbcL using a phylogeny of 92 green-plant taxa. We employ a measure of codon usage bias that accounts for chloroplast genomic nucleotide content, as an attempt to limit plausible explanations for patterns of codon bias evolution to selection- or drift-based processes. This measure uses maximum likelihood-ratio tests to compare the performance of two models, one in which a single codon is overrepresented and one in which two codons are overrepresented. The measure allowed us to analyze both the extent of bias in each lineage and the evolution of codon choice across the phylogeny. Despite predictions based primarily on the low G + C content of the chloroplast and the high functional importance of rbcL, we found large differences in the extent of bias, suggesting differential molecular selection that is clade specific. The seed plants and simple leafy liverworts each independently derived a low level of bias in rbcL, perhaps indicating relaxed selectional constraint on molecular changes in the gene. Overrepresentation of a single codon was typically plesiomorphic, and transitions to overrepresentation of two codons occurred commonly across the phylogeny, possibly indicating biochemical selection. The total codon bias in each taxon, when regressed against the total bias of each amino acid, suggested that twofold amino acids play a strong role in inflating the level of codon usage bias in rbcL, despite the fact that twofolds compose a minority of residues in this gene. Those amino acids that contributed most to the total codon usage bias of each taxon are known through amino acid knockout and replacement to be of high functional importance. This suggests that codon usage bias may be constrained by particular amino acids and, thus, may serve as a good predictor of what residues are most important for protein fitness.

  17. Eukaryotic evolutionary transitions are associated with extreme codon bias in functionally-related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Hudson

    Full Text Available Codon bias in the genome of an organism influences its phenome by changing the speed and efficiency of mRNA translation and hence protein abundance. We hypothesized that differences in codon bias, either between-species differences in orthologous genes, or within-species differences between genes, may play an evolutionary role. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the genome-wide codon bias in six species that occupy vital positions in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life. We acquired the entire protein coding sequences for these organisms, computed the codon bias for all genes in each organism and explored the output for relationships between codon bias and protein function, both within- and between-lineages. We discovered five notable coordinated patterns, with extreme codon bias most pronounced in traits considered highly characteristic of a given lineage. Firstly, the Homo sapiens genome had stronger codon bias for DNA-binding transcription factors than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, whereas the opposite was true for ribosomal proteins--perhaps underscoring transcriptional regulation in the origin of complexity. Secondly, both mammalian species examined possessed extreme codon bias in genes relating to hair--a tissue unique to mammals. Thirdly, Arabidopsis thaliana showed extreme codon bias in genes implicated in cell wall formation and chloroplast function--which are unique to plants. Fourthly, Gallus gallus possessed strong codon bias in a subset of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins--perhaps reflecting the enhanced bioenergetic efficiency in birds that co-evolved with flight. And lastly, the G. gallus genome had extreme codon bias for the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor--which may help to explain their spontaneous recovery from deafness. We propose that extreme codon bias in groups of genes that encode functionally related proteins has a pathway-level energetic explanation.

  18. Stops making sense: translational trade-offs and stop codon reassignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgar Greg S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient gene expression involves a trade-off between (i premature termination of protein synthesis; and (ii readthrough, where the ribosome fails to dissociate at the terminal stop. Sense codons that are similar in sequence to stop codons are more susceptible to nonsense mutation, and are also likely to be more susceptible to transcriptional or translational errors causing premature termination. We therefore expect this trade-off to be influenced by the number of stop codons in the genetic code. Although genetic codes are highly constrained, stop codon number appears to be their most volatile feature. Results In the human genome, codons readily mutable to stops are underrepresented in coding sequences. We construct a simple mathematical model based on the relative likelihoods of premature termination and readthrough. When readthrough occurs, the resultant protein has a tail of amino acid residues incorrectly added to the C-terminus. Our results depend strongly on the number of stop codons in the genetic code. When the code has more stop codons, premature termination is relatively more likely, particularly for longer genes. When the code has fewer stop codons, the length of the tail added by readthrough will, on average, be longer, and thus more deleterious. Comparative analysis of taxa with a range of stop codon numbers suggests that genomes whose code includes more stop codons have shorter coding sequences. Conclusions We suggest that the differing trade-offs presented by alternative genetic codes may result in differences in genome structure. More speculatively, multiple stop codons may mitigate readthrough, counteracting the disadvantage of a higher rate of nonsense mutation. This could help explain the puzzling overrepresentation of stop codons in the canonical genetic code and most variants.

  19. Oxidative stress and expression of chaperones in aging mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanina, Anna V; Sokolova, Inna M; Sukhotin, Alexey A

    2008-05-01

    The mechanisms of aging are not well understood in animals with continuous growth such as fish, reptiles, amphibians and numerous invertebrates, including mollusks. We studied the effects of age on oxidative stress, cellular defense mechanisms (including two major antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase), and molecular chaperones in two mollusks--eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica and hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria. In order to detect the age-related changes in these parameters, correction for the effects of size was performed where appropriate to account for growth-related dilution. Fluorescent age pigments accumulated with age in both species. Protein carbonyls did not change with age or size indicating that they are not a good marker of aging in mollusks possibly due to the fast turnover and degradation of oxidized proteins in growing tissues. SOD did not show a compensatory increase with aging in either species, while catalase significantly decreased with age. Mitochondrial heat shock protein (HSP60) decreased with age in mollusks suggesting an age-related decline in mitochondrial chaperone protection. In contrast, changes in cytosolic chaperones were species-specific. HSP70 increased and HSP90 declined with age in clams, whereas in oysters HSP70 expression did not change, and HSP90 increased with aging.

  20. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  1. Regulation of Nod1 by Hsp90 chaperone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2005-08-15

    Nod1 and Nod2 proteins play important roles in mammalian innate immune responses as intracellular sensors for bacterial peptidoglycan. Nod1 and Nod2 share structural homology with many R proteins involved in plant disease resistance. It has been demonstrated that plant Hsp90 and its co-chaperone RAR1 are implicated in R-mediated disease resistance. Here the Chp-1 gene encoding a mammalian homologue of plant RAR1 was identified as a new target for transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), a stress-responsive HSF isoform. In addition, Nod1 is demonstrated to be a client protein of the Hsp90 chaperone complex containing the Chp-1. Chp-1 interacts with the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) and the ATPase domain of Hsp90 via two distinct zinc-binding cysteine and histidine rich domains (CHORDs). These findings suggest a common regulatory mechanism involving the Hsp90 chaperone complex in R-mediated disease resistance in plants and Nod1-mediated innate immune response in mammals.

  2. Ambroxol chaperone therapy for neuronopathic Gaucher disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Aya; Shirai, Kentarou; Itamura, Shinji; Matsuda, Atsue; Ishihara, Akiko; Matsushita, Kumi; Fukuda, Chisako; Kubota, Norika; Takayama, Rumiko; Shigematsu, Hideo; Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Kotaro; Watanabe, Yoriko; Kosugi, Saori; Nishida, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yukiko; Endo, Yusuke; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Togawa, Masami; Saito, Yoshiaki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Although enzyme-replacement and substrate-reduction therapies are available, their efficacies in treating the neurological manifestations of GD are negligible. Pharmacological chaperone therapy is hypothesized to offer a new strategy for treating the neurological manifestations of this disease. Specifically, ambroxol, a commonly used expectorant, has been proposed as a candidate pharmacological chaperone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and neurological efficacy of ambroxol in patients with neuronopathic GD. This open-label pilot study included five patients who received high-dose oral ambroxol in combination with enzyme replacement therapy. Safety was assessed by adverse event query, physical examination, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and drug concentration. Biochemical efficacy was assessed through evidence of glucocerebrosidase activity in the lymphocytes and glucosylsphingosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neurological efficacy was evaluated using the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale, Gross Motor Function Measure, Functional Independence Measure, seizure frequency, pupillary light reflex, horizontal saccadic latency, and electrophysiologic studies. High-dose oral ambroxol had good safety and tolerability, significantly increased lymphocyte glucocerebrosidase activity, permeated the blood-brain barrier, and decreased glucosylsphingosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Myoclonus, seizures, and pupillary light reflex dysfunction markedly improved in all patients. Relief from myoclonus led to impressive recovery of gross motor function in two patients, allowing them to walk again. Pharmacological chaperone therapy with high-dose oral ambroxol shows promise in treating neuronopathic GD, necessitating further clinical trials.

  3. Ambushing the Ambush Hypothesis: predicting and evaluating off-frame codon frequencies in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgens, David W; Chang, Charlotte H; Cavalcanti, Andre R O

    2013-06-22

    In this paper, we address the evidence for the Ambush Hypothesis. Proposed by Seligmann and Pollock, this hypothesis posits that there exists a selection for off-frame stop codons (OSCs) to counteract the possible deleterious effects of translational frameshifts, including the waste of resources and potential cytotoxicity. Two main types of study have been used to support the hypothesis. Some studies analyzed codon usage and showed that codons with more potential to create OSCs seem to be favored over codons with lower potential; they used this finding to support the Ambush Hypothesis. Another study used 342 bacterial genomes to evaluate the hypothesis directly, finding significant excesses of OSCs in these genomes. We repeated both analyses with newer datasets and searched for other factors that could explain the observed trends. In the first case, the relative frequency of codons with the potential to create OSCs is directly correlated with the GC content of organisms, as stop codons are GC-poor. When evaluating the frequency of OSCs directly in 1,976 bacterial genomes we also detected a significant excess. However, when comparing the excess of OSCs with similarly obtained results for the frequency of out-of-frame sense codons, some sense codons have a more significant excess than stop codons. Two avenues of study have been used to support the Ambush Hypothesis. Using the same methods as these previous studies, we demonstrate that the evidence in support of the Ambush Hypothesis does not hold up against more rigorous testing.

  4. Features of Recent Codon Evolution: A Comparative Polymorphism-Fixation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of amino-acid and codon changes can provide us important insights on protein evolution. So far, investigators have often examined mutation patterns at either interspecies fixed substitution or intraspecies nucleotide polymorphism level, but not both. Here, we performed a unique analysis of a combined set of intra-species polymorphisms and inter-species substitutions in human codons. Strong difference in mutational pattern was found at codon positions 1, 2, and 3 between the polymorphism and fixation data. Fixation had strong bias towards increasing the rarest codons but decreasing the most frequently used codons, suggesting that codon equilibrium has not been reached yet. We detected strong CpG effect on CG-containing codons and subsequent suppression by fixation. Finally, we detected the signature of purifying selection against A∣U dinucleotides at synonymous dicodon boundaries. Overall, fixation process could effectively and quickly correct the volatile changes introduced by polymorphisms so that codon changes could be gradual and directional and that codon composition could be kept relatively stable during evolution.

  5. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M. [Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  6. Mapping codon usage of the translation initiation region in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou Yong-xi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respitatory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a recently emerged pathogen and severely affects swine populations worldwide. The replication of PRRSV is tightly controlled by viral gene expression and the codon usage of translation initiation region within each gene could potentially regulate the translation rate. Therefore, a better understanding of the codon usage pattern of the initiation translation region would shed light on the regulation of PRRSV gene expression. Results In this study, the codon usage in the translation initiation region and in the whole coding sequence was compared in PRRSV ORF1a and ORFs2-7. To investigate the potential role of codon usage in affecting the translation initiation rate, we established a codon usage model for PRRSV translation initiation region. We observed that some non-preferential codons are preferentially used in the translation initiation region in particular ORFs. Although some positions vary with codons, they intend to use codons with negative CUB. Furthermore, our model of codon usage showed that the conserved pattern of CUB is not directly consensus with the conserved sequence, but shaped under the translation selection. Conclusions The non-variation pattern with negative CUB in the PRRSV translation initiation region scanned by ribosomes is considered the rate-limiting step in the translation process.

  7. [Comparison of protective properties of the smallpox DNA-vaccine based on the variola virus A30L gene and its variant with modified codon usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksiutov, R A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of candidate DNA-vaccines based on the variola virus natural gene A30L and artificial gene A30Lopt with modified codon usage, optimized for expression in mammalian cells, was tested. The groups of mice were intracutaneously immunized three times with three-week intervals with candidate DNA-vaccines: pcDNA_A30L or pcDNA_A30Lopt, and in three weeks after the last immunization all mice in the groups were intraperitoneally infected by the ectromelia virus K1 strain in 10 LD50 dose for the estimation of protection. It was shown that the DNA-vaccines based on natural gene A30L and codon-optimized gene A30Lopt elicited virus, thereby neutralizing the antibody response and protected mice from lethal intraperitoneal challenge with the ectromelia virus with lack of statistically significant difference.

  8. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackie, Rachel E.; Maciejewski, Andrzej; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Marques-Lopes, Jose; Choy, Wing-Yiu; Duennwald, Martin L.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp) family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1), an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC). Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i) interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii) triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular STI1 and the

  9. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Lackie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptide—either soluble (oligomers or insoluble (plaques and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1, an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC. Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular

  10. A Comprehensive Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns in Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala Based on RNA-Seq Data

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    Xiaoke Duan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala is an important fish species for its delicacy and high economic value in China. Codon usage analysis could be helpful to understand its codon biology, mRNA translation and vertebrate evolution. Based on RNA-Seq data for M. amblycephala, high-frequency codons (CUG, AGA, GUG, CAG and GAG, as well as low-frequency ones (NUA and NCG codons were identified. A total of 724 high-frequency codon pairs were observed. Meanwhile, 14 preferred and 199 avoided neighboring codon pairs were also identified, but bias was almost not shown with one or more intervening codons inserted between the same pairs. Codon usage bias in the regions close to start and stop codons indicated apparent heterogeneity, which even occurs in the flanking nucleotide sequence. Codon usage bias (RSCU and SCUO was related to GC3 (GC content of 3rd nucleotide in codon bias. Six GO (Gene ontology categories and the number of methylation targets were influenced by GC3. Codon usage patterns comparison among 23 vertebrates showed species specificities by using GC contents, codon usage and codon context analysis. This work provided new insights into fish biology and new information for breeding projects.

  11. Chaperone use during intimate examinations in primary care: postal survey of family physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Upshur Ross EG; Tracy C Shawn; Price David H

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Physicians have long been advised to have a third party present during certain parts of a physical examination; however, little is known about the frequency of chaperone use for those specific intimate examinations regularly performed in primary care. We aimed to determine the frequency of chaperone use among family physicians across a variety of intimate physical examinations for both male and female patients, and also to identify the factors associated with chaperone use...

  12. Post-translational modifications of Hsp90 and their contributions to chaperone regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mollapour, Mehdi; Neckers, Len

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperones, as the name suggests, are involved in folding, maintenance, intracellular transport, and degradation of proteins as well as in facilitating cell signaling. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential eukaryotic molecular chaperone that carries out these processes in normal and cancer cells. Hsp90 function in vivo is coupled to its ability to hydrolyze ATP and this can be regulated by co-chaperones and post-translational modifications. In this review, we explore the var...

  13. A comparative analysis on the synonymous codon usage pattern in viral functional genes and their translational initiation region of ASFV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Hua; Gao, Zong-Liang; Sun, Dong-Jie; Ding, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Jie; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Szathmary, Susan; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Liu, Yong-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    The synonymous codon usage pattern of African swine fever virus (ASFV), the similarity degree of the synonymous codon usage between this virus and some organisms and the synonymous codon usage bias for the translation initiation region of viral functional genes in the whole genome of ASFV have been investigated by some simply statistical analyses. Although both GC12% (the GC content at the first and second codon positions) and GC3% (the GC content at the third codon position) of viral functional genes have a large fluctuation, the significant correlations between GC12 and GC3% and between GC3% and the first principal axis of principle component analysis on the relative synonymous codon usage of the viral functional genes imply that mutation pressure of ASFV plays an important role in the synonymous codon usage pattern. Turning to the synonymous codon usage of this virus, the codons with U/A end predominate in the synonymous codon family for the same amino acid and a weak codon usage bias in both leading and lagging strands suggests that strand compositional asymmetry does not take part in the formation of codon usage in ASFV. The interaction between the absolute codon usage bias and GC3% suggests that other selections take part in the formation of codon usage, except for the mutation pressure. It is noted that the similarity degree of codon usage between ASFV and soft tick is higher than that between the virus and the pig, suggesting that the soft tick plays a more important role than the pig in the codon usage pattern of ASFV. The translational initiation region of the viral functional genes generally have a strong tendency to select some synonymous codons with low GC content, suggesting that the synonymous codon usage bias caused by translation selection from the host takes part in modulating the translation initiation efficiency of ASFV functional genes.

  14. Experimental Test of L- and D-Amino Acid Binding to L- and D-Codons Suggests that Homochirality and Codon Directionality Emerged with the Genetic Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Root-Bernstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available L-amino acids bind preferentially to their D-codons, but almost nothing is known about whether D-amino acids correspondingly prefer L-codons, or how codon directionality affects amino acid binding. To investigate these issues, two D-RNA-oligonucleotides having inverse base sequences (D-CGUA and D-AUGC and their corresponding L-RNA-oligonucleotides (L-CGUA and L-AUGC were synthesized and their affinity determined for Gly and eleven pairs of L- and D-amino acids. The data support the hypothesis (Root-Bernstein, Bioessays 2007; 29: 689–698 that homochirality and codon directionality emerged as a function of the origin of the genetic code itself. Further tests involving amplification methods are proposed.

  15. Chaperone Use by Residents During Pelvic, Breast, Testicular, and Rectal Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Farber, Neil J; Collier, Virginia U; Aboff, Brian M

    2000-01-01

    We designed a questionnaire survey to study internal medicine residents' plans to use a chaperone during the pelvic, breast, rectal, and testicular examinations. We found chaperone use by male and female residents differed markedly, and neither group planned to use chaperones universally. When examining female patients, male residents overall were very likely to use a chaperone during a pelvic exam, but less likely for the breast exam and rectal exam. For the female resident, there was a significantly lower likelihood of using chaperones during the pelvic, breast, or rectal exams. There was a much lower rate of chaperone use during the sensitive portions of the male physical examination compared with the female examination, with somewhat higher use by female residents. We concluded that male and female residents differ significantly in their patterns of chaperone use. It would be valuable to develop guidelines for chaperone use to help residents understand the issues involved in the choices, and to protect the residents from the possible medico-legal consequences of forgoing chaperones. PMID:10940150

  16. Roles of Intramolecular and Intermolecular Interactions in Functional Regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein Co-Chaperone Sis1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-04-01

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at heir C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways, Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activity with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interactions between the J-domain and glycine-rich region control co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD binding adaptor proteins. These interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.

  17. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

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    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  18. The p53 codon 72 polymorphism and association to prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... Tp53 is an important tumor suppressor gene, which induces cell growth arrest or apoptosis when subjected to cytotoxic stimuli. Association has been reported between various cancers and p53 codon. 72 polymorphism. Our objective was to investigate the possible association between p53 at codon 72.

  19. Animal products and K-ras codon 12 and 13 mutations in colon carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Voskuil, D.W.; Kraats, van A.A.; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Goldbohm, R.S.; Veer, van 't P.

    2000-01-01

    K-ras gene mutations (codons 12 and 13) were determined by PCR-based mutant allele-specific amplification (MASA) in tumour tissue of 185 colon cancer patients: 36␑arboured mutations, of which 82 ere located in codon 12. High intakes of animal protein, calcium and poultry were differently associated

  20. Probable relationship between partitions of the set of codons and the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Gallardo, Mauricio O; Osorio, Manuel I

    2014-03-01

    Here we study the distribution of randomly generated partitions of the set of amino acid-coding codons. Some results are an application from a previous work, about the Stirling numbers of the second kind and triplet codes, both to the cases of triplet codes having four stop codons, as in mammalian mitochondrial genetic code, and hypothetical doublet codes. Extending previous results, in this work it is found that the most probable number of blocks of synonymous codons, in a genetic code, is similar to the number of amino acids when there are four stop codons, as well as it could be for a primigenious doublet code. Also it is studied the integer partitions associated to patterns of synonymous codons and it is shown, for the canonical code, that the standard deviation inside an integer partition is one of the most probable. We think that, in some early epoch, the genetic code might have had a maximum of the disorder or entropy, independent of the assignment between codons and amino acids, reaching a state similar to "code freeze" proposed by Francis Crick. In later stages, maybe deterministic rules have reassigned codons to amino acids, forming the natural codes, such as the canonical code, but keeping the numerical features describing the set partitions and the integer partitions, like a "fossil numbers"; both kinds of partitions about the set of amino acid-coding codons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of codon usage pattern of mitochondrial protein-coding genes in different hookworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Bornali; Uddin, Arif; Mazumder, Gulshana Akthar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-11-20

    The phenomenon of unequal usage of synonymous codons encoding an amino acid in which some codons are more preferred to others is the codon usage bias (CUB) and it is species specific. Analysis of CUB helps in understanding evolution at molecular level and acquires significance in mRNA translation, design of transgenes and new gene discovery. In our current study, we analyzed synonymous codon usage pattern and the factors influencing it on mitochondrial protein coding genes of 6 different hookworms i.e. Ancylostoma ceylanicum, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma tubaeforme, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria sanguinis as no work was reported yet. The effective number of codons for mitochondrial genes suggested that codon usage bias was high in most species. The GC content was lower than AT content i.e. genes were AT rich as indicated by nucleotide composition analysis. The overall nucleotide composition along with its composition at 3rd codon position and correspondence analysis suggested that both natural selection and mutation pressure might have affected the codon usage bias in mitochondrial genes. However, neutrality plot revealed that mutation pressure might have played a major role in A. ceylanicum while natural selection might have played the dominant role in Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma tubaeforme, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria sanguinis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Polypeptide release factors and stop codon recognition in the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Suniti; Kumar, Vikash; Gupta, Ankit; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Habib, Saman

    2016-06-01

    Correct termination of protein synthesis would be a critical step in translation of organellar open reading frames (ORFs) of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of the malaria parasite. We identify release factors (RFs) responsible for recognition of the UAA and UGA stop-codons of apicoplast ORFs and the sole UAA stop-codon that terminates translation from the three mitochondrial ORFs. A single nuclear-encoded canonical RF2, PfRF2Api , localizes to the apicoplast. It has a conserved tripeptide motif (SPF) for stop-codon recognition and is sufficient for peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis (PTH) from both UAA and UGA. Two RF family proteins are targeted to the parasite mitochondrion; a canonical RF1, PfRF1Mit , with a variant codon-recognition motif (PxN instead of the conserved RF1 PxT) is the major peptidyl-hydrolase with specific recognition of the UAA codon relevant to mitochondrial ORFs. Mutation of the N residue of the PfRF1Mit PxN motif and two other conserved residues of the codon recognition domain lowers PTH activity from pre-termination ribosomes indicating their role in codon-recognition. The second RF imported by the mitochondrion is the non-canonical PfICT1 that functions as a dimer and mediates codon nonspecific peptide release. Our results help delineate a critical step in organellar translation in Plasmodium, which is an important target for anti-malarials. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Highly Expressed Genes in Marine Sponge Suberites domuncula Prefer C- and G-Ending Codons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Perina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are the simplest extant phylum of Metazoa; they are closest to the common ancestor of all multicellular animals. A total of 223 coding sequences from Suberites domuncula (Demospongiae represent the dataset for the codon usage analysis. A total of 46038 codons had an average guanine and cytosine (G+C content of 45.8 % and an average content of guanine and cytosine at the synonymous third position of codons (GC3S of 43.4 %. In this sample of genes considerable variations in synonymous codon usage were found. The G+C content of the coding sequences varied from 34 to 56.1 % and GC3S from 19 to 58.7 %. Correspondence analysis revealed that highly expressed genes preferentially use a limited subset of codons (preferred codons. A total of 15 preferred codons were found and they all, with one exception, end with C or G. The preferential use of C- or G-ending codons in highly expressed genes was possibly developed in a common ancestor of sponges and other Metazoa and it has remained conserved throughout the sponge evolution.

  4. The p53 codon 72 polymorphism and association to prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The p53 codon 72 polymorphism and association to prostate cancer in Iranian patients. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... at codon 72 for Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro and Pro/Pro allele polymorphisms in blood samples from 187 prostate cancer patients and 185 controls in southwest Iran by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ...

  5. Analysis of codon use features of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene in Camellia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lu-Lu; Wang, Yu; Hu, Jian-Hui; Ding, Zhao-Tang; Li, Chen

    2013-10-07

    The stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (SAD) gene widely exists in all kinds of plants. In this paper, the Camellia sinensis SAD gene (CsSAD) sequence was firstly analyzed by Codon W, CHIPS, and CUSP programs online, and then compared with genomes of the tea plant, other species and SAD genes from 11 plant species. The results show that the CsSAD gene and the selected 73 of C. sinensis genes have similar codon usage bias. The CsSAD gene has a bias toward the synonymous codons with A and T at the third codon position, the same as the 73 of C. sinensis genes. Compared with monocotyledons such as Triticum aestivum and Zea mays, the differences in codon usage frequency between the CsSAD gene and dicotyledons such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tobacum are less. Therefore, A. thaliana and N. tobacum expression systems may be more suitable for the expression of the CsSAD gene. The analysis result of SAD genes from 12 plant species also shows that most of the SAD genes are biased toward the synonymous codons with G and C at the third codon position. We believe that the codon usage bias analysis presented in this study will be essential for providing a theoretical basis for discussing the structure and function of the CsSAD gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Analysis of codon use features of CBF gene in Camellia sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiu-Li; Wang, Yu; Yang, Lu-Cheng; Ding, Zhao-Tang

    2012-12-01

    CBF (C-repeat-binding factor) transcription factor exists widely in all kinds of plants. It is an important regulative factor in the process of plant resistance adversity. In this paper, Camellia sinensis CBF1 gene sequence was analyzed by Codon W, CHIPS, and CUSP programs online, and then compared with C. sinensis genes, genomes in other species, and CBF genes from 39 plant species. It is important to identify the codon usage of CsCBF1 gene and select appropriate expression systems. The results showed that CsCBF1 gene and selected 70 C. sinensis genes had distinct usage differences. CsCBF1 gene was bias toward the synonymous codons with G and C at the third codon position, but 70 C. sinensis genes were bias toward the synonymous codons with A and T. The differences in codon usage frequency between CsCBF1 gene and dicotyledons such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tobacum were less than monocotyledons such as wheat (Triticum aestivum) and corn (Zea mays). Therefore, A. thaliana and N. tobacum expression systems may be more suitable for the expression of CsCBF1 gene. The analysis results of CBF genes from 40 plant species also showed that most of the CBF genes were bias toward the synonymous codons with G and C at the third codon position. The reason of this phenomenon is possible due to special functions of these genes.

  7. Differences in codon bias cannot explain differences in translational power among microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dethlefsen Les

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translational power is the cellular rate of protein synthesis normalized to the biomass invested in translational machinery. Published data suggest a previously unrecognized pattern: translational power is higher among rapidly growing microbes, and lower among slowly growing microbes. One factor known to affect translational power is biased use of synonymous codons. The correlation within an organism between expression level and degree of codon bias among genes of Escherichia coli and other bacteria capable of rapid growth is commonly attributed to selection for high translational power. Conversely, the absence of such a correlation in some slowly growing microbes has been interpreted as the absence of selection for translational power. Because codon bias caused by translational selection varies between rapidly growing and slowly growing microbes, we investigated whether observed differences in translational power among microbes could be explained entirely by differences in the degree of codon bias. Although the data are not available to estimate the effect of codon bias in other species, we developed an empirically-based mathematical model to compare the translation rate of E. coli to the translation rate of a hypothetical strain which differs from E. coli only by lacking codon bias. Results Our reanalysis of data from the scientific literature suggests that translational power can differ by a factor of 5 or more between E. coli and slowly growing microbial species. Using empirical codon-specific in vivo translation rates for 29 codons, and several scenarios for extrapolating from these data to estimates over all codons, we find that codon bias cannot account for more than a doubling of the translation rate in E. coli, even with unrealistic simplifying assumptions that exaggerate the effect of codon bias. With more realistic assumptions, our best estimate is that codon bias accelerates translation in E. coli by no more than

  8. Timing is everything: unifying codon translation rates and nascent proteome behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, Daniel A; O'Brien, Edward P

    2014-12-31

    Experiments have demonstrated that changing the rate at which the ribosome translates a codon position in an mRNA molecule's open reading frame can alter the behavior of the newly synthesized protein. That is, codon translation rates can govern nascent proteome behavior. We emphasize that this phenomenon is a manifestation of the nonequilibrium nature of cotranslational processes, and as such, there exist theoretical tools that offer a potential means to quantitatively predict the influence of codon translation rates on the broad spectrum of nascent protein behaviors including cotranslational folding, aggregation, and translocation. We provide a review of the experimental evidence for the impact that codon translation rates can have, followed by a discussion of theoretical methods that can describe this phenomenon. The development and application of these tools are likely to provide fundamental insights into protein maturation and homeostasis, codon usage bias in organisms, the origins of translation related diseases, and new rational design methods for biotechnology and biopharmaceutical applications.

  9. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric ? ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt C-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the ? ring 1?4 . Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit 5?10 . We report that the base subassembly of the proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by th...

  10. Translational autocontrol of the Escherichia coli hfq RNA chaperone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecerek, Branislav; Moll, Isabella; Bläsi, Udo

    2005-06-01

    The conserved bacterial RNA chaperone Hfq has been shown to play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that Hfq synthesis is autoregulated at the translational level. We have mapped two Hfq binding sites in the 5'-untranslated region of hfq mRNA and show that Hfq binding inhibits formation of the translation initiation complex. In vitro translation and in vivo studies further revealed that Hfq binding to both sites is required for efficient translational repression of hfq mRNA.

  11. Activating K-Ras mutations outwith ‘hotspot' codons in sporadic colorectal tumours – implications for personalised cancer medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G; Bounds, R; Wolf, H; Steele, R J C; Carey, F A; Wolf, C R

    2010-01-01

    Background: Response to EGFR-targeted therapies in colorectal cancer patients has been convincingly associated with Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) mutation status. Current mandatory mutation testing for patient selection is limited to the K-Ras ‘hotspot' codons 12 and 13. Methods: Colorectal tumours (n=106) were screened for additional K-Ras mutations, phenotypes compared in transformation and Ras GTPase activating assays and gene and pathway changes induced by individual K-Ras mutants identified by microarray analysis. Taqman-based gene copy number and FISH analyses were used to investigate K-Ras gene amplification. Results: Four additional K-Ras mutations (Leu19Phe (1 out of 106 tumours), Lys117Asn (1 out of 106), Ala146Thr (7 out of 106) and Arg164Gln (1 out of 106)) were identified. Lys117Asn and Ala146Thr had phenotypes similar to the hotspot mutations, whereas Leu19Phe had an attenuated phenotype and the Arg164Gln mutation was phenotypically equivalent to wt K-Ras. We additionally identified a new K-Ras gene amplification event, present in approximately 2% of tumours. Conclusions: The identification of mutations outwith previously described hotspot codons increases the K-Ras mutation burden in colorectal tumours by one-third. Future mutation screening to facilitate optimal patient selection for treatment with EGFR-targeted therapies should therefore be extended to codon 146, and in addition should consider the unique molecular signatures associated with individual K-Ras mutations. PMID:20147967

  12. The cellular chaperone hsc70 is specifically recruited to reovirus viral factories independently of its chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Susanne; Coffey, Caroline M; Parker, John S L

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses replicate and assemble in the cytosol of infected cells. A viral nonstructural protein, μNS, forms large inclusion-like structures called viral factories (VFs) in which assembling viral particles can be identified. Here we examined the localization of the cellular chaperone Hsc70 and found that it colocalizes with VFs in infected cells and also with viral factory-like structures (VFLs) formed by ectopically expressed μNS. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Hsc70 did not affect the formation or maintenance of VFLs. We further showed that dominant negative mutants of Hsc70 were also recruited to VFLs, indicating that Hsc70 recruitment to VFLs is independent of the chaperone function. In support of this finding, μNS was immunoprecipitated with wild-type Hsc70, with a dominant negative mutant of Hsc70, and with the minimal substrate-binding site of Hsc70 (amino acids 395 to 540). We identified a minimal region of μNS between amino acids 222 and 271 that was sufficient for the interaction with Hsc70. This region of μNS has not been assigned any function previously. However, neither point mutants with alterations in this region nor the complete deletion of this domain abrogated the μNS-Hsc70 interaction, indicating that a second portion of μNS also interacts with Hsc70. Taken together, these findings suggest a specific chaperone function for Hsc70 within viral factories, the sites of reovirus replication and assembly in cells.

  13. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid

    OpenAIRE

    Babbitt, Gregory A.; Alawad, Mohammed A.; Schulze, Katharina V.; Hudson, André O.

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for ...

  14. Modulation of polyglutamine inclusion formation by the Hsp70 chaperone machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rujano, M. A.; Kampinga, H. H.; Salomons, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Components of the Hsp70 chaperone machine have been implied in protection against polyglutamine (poly-Q) pathologies. Yet, little is known about specific mechanisms and the rate-limiting components that account for this protective effect. Here, we examined the effects of an Hsp70 chaperone family

  15. Chaperone-like properties of tobacco plastid thioredoxins f and m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Barrio, Ruth; Fernández-San Millán, Alicia; Carballeda, Jon; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Seguí-Simarro, José M.; Farran, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous disulphide reductases that play important roles in the redox regulation of many cellular processes. However, some redox-independent functions, such as chaperone activity, have also been attributed to Trxs in recent years. The focus of our study is on the putative chaperone function of the well-described plastid Trxs f and m. To that end, the cDNA of both Trxs, designated as NtTrxf and NtTrxm, was isolated from Nicotiana tabacum plants. It was found that bacterially expressed tobacco Trx f and Trx m, in addition to their disulphide reductase activity, possessed chaperone-like properties. In vitro, Trx f and Trx m could both facilitate the reactivation of the cysteine-free form of chemically denatured glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (foldase chaperone activity) and prevent heat-induced malate dehydrogenase aggregation (holdase chaperone activity). Our results led us to infer that the disulphide reductase and foldase chaperone functions prevail when the proteins occur as monomers and the well-conserved non-active cysteine present in Trx f is critical for both functions. By contrast, the holdase chaperone activity of both Trxs depended on their oligomeric status: the proteins were functional only when they were associated with high molecular mass protein complexes. Because the oligomeric status of both Trxs was induced by salt and temperature, our data suggest that plastid Trxs could operate as molecular holdase chaperones upon oxidative stress, acting as a type of small stress protein. PMID:21948853

  16. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Brehme

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN, an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Structure of Spa15, a type III secretion chaperone from Shigella flexneri with broad specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, André van; Hamiaux, Cyril; Pérez, Javier; Parsot, Claude; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2004-01-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to inject virulence proteins into the cells of their hosts. Several of these virulence effectors require TTS chaperones that maintain them in a secretion-competent state. Whereas most chaperones bind only one effector, Spa15

  18. A DNAJB Chaperone Subfamily with HDAC-Dependent Activities Suppresses Toxic Protein Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Rujano, Maria A.; van Waarde, Maria A. W. H.; Kakkar, Vaishali; Dirks, Ron P.; Govorukhina, Natalia; Oosterveld-Hut, Henderika M. J.; Lubsen, Nicolette H.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2010-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation are associated with cytotoxicity in several protein folding diseases. A large network of molecular chaperones ensures protein quality control. Here, we show that within the Hsp70, Hsp110, and Hsp40 (DNAJ) chaperone families, members of a subclass of the DNAJB family

  19. Identification of Conserved and Species-Specific Functions of the Listeria monocytogenes PrsA2 Secretion Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Laty A.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that relies on the regulated secretion and activity of a variety of proteins that sustain life within diverse environments. PrsA2 has recently been identified as a secreted peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone that is dispensable for bacterial growth in broth culture but essential for L. monocytogenes virulence. Following host infection, PrsA2 contributes to the proper folding and activity of secreted proteins that are required for bacterial replication within the host cytosol and for bacterial spread to adjacent cells. PrsA2 is one member of a family of Gram-positive secretion chaperones that appear to play important roles in bacterial physiology; however, it is not known how these proteins recognize their substrate proteins or the degree to which their function is conserved across diverse Gram-positive species. We therefore examined PrsA proteins encoded by a variety of Gram-positive bacteria for functional complementation of L. monocytogenes mutants lacking prsA2. PrsA homologues encoded by Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactococcus lactis were examined for functional complementation of a variety of L. monocytogenes PrsA2-associated phenotypes central to L. monocytogenes pathogenesis and bacterial cell physiology. Our results indicate that while selected aspects of PrsA2 function are broadly conserved among diverse Gram-positive bacteria, PrsA2 exhibits unique specificity for L. monocytogenes target proteins required for pathogenesis. The L. monocytogenes PrsA2 chaperone thus appears evolutionarily optimized for virulence factor secretion within the host cell cytosol while still maintaining aspects of activity relevant to more general features of Gram-positive protein translocation. PMID:26216425

  20. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  2. Humanin is an endogenous activator of chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenwei; Tasset, Inmaculada; Diaz, Antonio; Anguiano, Jaime; Tas, Emir; Cui, Lingguang; Kuliawat, Regina; Liu, Honghai; Kühn, Bernhard; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muzumdar, Radhika

    2017-11-29

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) serves as quality control during stress conditions through selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Humanin (HN) is a mitochondria-associated peptide that offers cytoprotective, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate that HN directly activates CMA by increasing substrate binding and translocation into lysosomes. The potent HN analogue HNG protects from stressor-induced cell death in fibroblasts, cardiomyoblasts, neuronal cells, and primary cardiomyocytes. The protective effects are lost in CMA-deficient cells, suggesting that they are mediated through the activation of CMA. We identified that a fraction of endogenous HN is present at the cytosolic side of the lysosomal membrane, where it interacts with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and stabilizes binding of this chaperone to CMA substrates as they bind to the membrane. Inhibition of HSP90 blocks the effect of HNG on substrate translocation and abolishes the cytoprotective effects. Our study provides a novel mechanism by which HN exerts its cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects. © 2018 Gong et al.

  3. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: permeant cations chaperoned by anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-28

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Mirsafian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure.

  5. Codon usage and gene function are related in sequences of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapello, H; Lisacek, F; Caboche, M; Hénaut, A

    1998-03-16

    In this paper, the relationship between codon usage and the physiological pattern of expression of a gene is investigated while considering a dataset of 815 nuclear genes of Arabidopsis thaliana. Factorial Correspondence Analysis, a commonly used multivariate statistical approach in codon usage analysis, was used in order to analyse codon usage bias gene by gene. The analysis reveals a single major trend in codon usage among genes in Arabidopsis. At one end of the trend lie genes with a highly G/C biased codon usage. This group contains mainly photosynthetic and housekeeping genes which are known to encode the most abundant proteins of the vegetal cell. At the other extreme lie genes with a weaker A/T-biased codon usage. This group contain genes with various functions which exhibits most of the time a strong tissue-specific pattern of expression in relation, for example, to stress conditions. These observations were confirmed by the detailed analysis of codon usage in the multigene family of tubulins and appear to be general in plant species, even as distant from Arabidopsis thaliana as a monocotyledonous plant such as maize. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Gaining insights into the codon usage patterns of TP53 gene across eight mammalian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul Huda Mazumder

    Full Text Available TP53 gene is known as the "guardian of the genome" as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution.

  7. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Synonymous Codon Usage Patterns in Riemerella anatipestifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer (RA belongs to the Flavobacteriaceae family and can cause a septicemia disease in poultry. The synonymous codon usage patterns of bacteria reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable bacteria to improve tolerance of the various environments. We detailed the codon usage patterns of RA isolates from the available 12 sequenced genomes by multiple codon and statistical analysis. Nucleotide compositions and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU analysis revealed that A or U ending codons are predominant in RA. Neutrality analysis found no significant correlation between GC12 and GC3 (p > 0.05. Correspondence analysis and ENc-plot results showed that natural selection dominated over mutation in the codon usage bias. The tree of cluster analysis based on RSCU was concordant with dendrogram based on genomic BLAST by neighbor-joining method. By comparative analysis, about 50 highly expressed genes that were orthologs across all 12 strains were found in the top 5% of high CAI value. Based on these CAI values, we infer that RA contains a number of predicted highly expressed coding sequences, involved in transcriptional regulation and metabolism, reflecting their requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. These results provide some useful information on the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage bias and evolution of RA.

  8. High codon adaptation in citrus tristeza virus to its citrus host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-fei; Wu, Xiao-yun; Wang, Hui-zhong; Sun, Yu-qiang; Qian, Yong-sheng; Luo, Lu

    2012-06-14

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a member of the genus Closterovirus within the family Closteroviridae, is the causal agent of citrus tristeza disease. Previous studies revealed that the negative selection, RNA recombination and gene flow were the most important forces that drove CTV evolution. However, the CTV codon usage was not studied and thus its role in CTV evolution remains unknown. A detailed comparative analysis of CTV codon usage pattern was done in this study. Results of the study show that although in general CTV does not have a high degree of codon usage bias, the codon usage of CTV has a high level of resemblance to its host codon usage. In addition, our data indicate that the codon usage resemblance is only observed for the woody plant-infecting closteroviruses but not the closteroviruses infecting the herbaceous host plants, suggesting the existence of different virus-host interactions between the herbaceous plant-infecting and woody plant-infecting closteroviruses. Based on the results, we suggest that in addition to RNA recombination, negative selection and gene flow, host plant codon usage selection can also affect CTV evolution.

  9. Analysis of synonymous codon usage in Aeropyrum pernix K1 and other Crenarchaeota microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Sun, Xiao; Lu, Zuhong

    2007-03-01

    In this study, a comparative analysis of the codon usage bias was performed in Aeropyrum pernix K1 and two other phylogenetically related Crenarchaeota microorganisms (i.e., Pyrobaculum aerophilum str. IM2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM 639). The results indicated that the synonymous codon usage in A. pernix K1 was less biased, which was highly correlated with the GC(3S) value. The codon usage patterns were phylogenetically conserved among these Crenarchaeota microorganisms. Comparatively, it is the species function rather than the gene function that determines their gene codon usage patterns. A. pernix K1, P. aerophilum str. IM2, and S. acidocaldarius DSM 639 live in differently extreme conditions. It is presumed that the living environment played an important role in determining the codon usage pattern of these microorganisms. Besides, there was no strain-specific codon usage among these microorganisms. The extent of codon bias in A. pernix K1 and S. acidocaldarius DSM 639 were highly correlated with the gene expression level, but no such association was detected in P. aerophilum str. IM2 genomes.

  10. Versatile dual reporter gene systems for investigating stop codon readthrough in plants.

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    Nga T Lao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Translation is most often terminated when a ribosome encounters the first in-frame stop codon (UAA, UAG or UGA in an mRNA. However, many viruses (and some cellular mRNAs contain "stop" codons that cause a proportion of ribosomes to terminate and others to incorporate an amino acid and continue to synthesize a "readthrough", or C-terminally extended, protein. This dynamic redefinition of codon meaning is dependent on specific sequence context.We describe two versatile dual reporter systems which facilitate investigation of stop codon readthrough in vivo in intact plants, and identification of the amino acid incorporated at the decoded stop codon. The first is based on the reporter enzymes NAN and GUS for which sensitive fluorogenic and histochemical substrates are available; the second on GST and GFP.We show that the NAN-GUS system can be used for direct in planta measurements of readthrough efficiency following transient expression of reporter constructs in leaves, and moreover, that the system is sufficiently sensitive to permit measurement of readthrough in stably transformed plants. We further show that the GST-GFP system can be used to affinity purify readthrough products for mass spectrometric analysis and provide the first definitive evidence that tyrosine alone is specified in vivo by a 'leaky' UAG codon, and tyrosine and tryptophan, respectively, at decoded UAA, and UGA codons in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV readthrough context.

  11. Does antiretroviral treatment change HIV-1 codon usage patterns in its genes: a preliminary bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Osman, Nathan; Ohnona, Frédéric; Xu, Hong-Tao; Brenner, Bluma; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2017-01-07

    Codon usage bias has been described for various organisms and is thought to contribute to the regulation of numerous biological processes including viral infections. HIV-1 codon usage has been previously shown to be different from that of other viruses and man. It is evident that the antiretroviral drugs used to restrict HIV-1 replication also select for resistance variants. We wanted to test whether codon frequencies in HIV-1 sequences from treatment-experienced patients differ from those of treatment-naive individuals due to drug pressure affecting codon usage bias. We developed a JavaScript to determine the codon frequencies of aligned nucleotide sequences. Irrespective of subtypes, using HIV-1 pol sequences from 532 treatment-naive and 52 treatment-experienced individuals, we found that pol sequences from treatment-experienced patients had significantly increased AGA (arginine; p = 0.0002***) and GGU (glycine; p = 0.0001***), and decreased AGG (arginine; p = 0.0001***) codon frequencies. The same pattern was not observed when subtypes B and C sequences were analyzed separately. Additionally, irrespective of subtypes, using HIV-1 gag sequences from 524 treatment-naive and 54 treatment-experienced individuals, gag sequences from treatment-experienced patients had significantly increased CUA (leucine; p HIV-1 genome, we show that antiretroviral therapy changed certain HIV-1 codon frequencies in a subtype specific way.

  12. A single sequence context cannot satisfy all non-AUG initiator codons in yeast†

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    Wang Tzu-Ling

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that ALA1 (encoding alanyl-tRNA synthetase and GRS1 (encoding glycyl-tRNA synthetase respectively use ACG and TTG as their alternative translation initiator codons. To explore if any other non-ATG triplets can act as initiator codons in yeast, ALA1 was used as a reporter for screening. Results We show herein that except for AAG and AGG, all triplets that differ from ATG by a single nucleotide were able to serve as initiator codons in ALA1. Among these initiator codons, TTG, CTG, ACG, and ATT had ~50% initiating activities relative to that of ATG, while GTG, ATA, and ATC had ~20% initiating activities relative to that of ATG. Unexpectedly, these non-AUG initiator codons exhibited different preferences toward various sequence contexts. In particular, GTG was one of the most efficient non-ATG initiator codons, while ATA was essentially inactive in the context of GRS1. Conclusion This finding indicates that a sequence context that is favorable for a given non-ATG initiator codon might not be as favorable for another.

  13. NECTAR: a database of codon-centric missense variant annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Sungsam; Ware, James S; Walsh, Roddy; Cook, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    NECTAR (Non-synonymous Enriched Coding muTation ARchive; http://nectarmutation.org) is a database and web application to annotate disease-related and functionally important amino acids in human proteins. A number of tools are available to facilitate the interpretation of DNA variants identified in diagnostic or research sequencing. These typically identify previous reports of DNA variation at a given genomic location, predict its effects on transcript and protein sequence and may predict downstream functional consequences. Previous reports and functional annotations are typically linked by the genomic location of the variant observed. NECTAR collates disease-causing variants and functionally important amino acid residues from a number of sources. Importantly, rather than simply linking annotations by a shared genomic location, NECTAR annotates variants of interest with details of previously reported variation affecting the same codon. This provides a much richer data set for the interpretation of a novel DNA variant. NECTAR also identifies functionally equivalent amino acid residues in evolutionarily related proteins (paralogues) and, where appropriate, transfers annotations between them. As well as accessing these data through a web interface, users can upload batches of variants in variant call format (VCF) for annotation on-the-fly. The database is freely available to download from the ftp site: ftp://ftp.nectarmutation.org.

  14. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  15. Towards Reassignment of the Methionine Codon AUG to Two Different Noncanonical Amino Acids in Bacterial Translation

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    Alessandro De Simone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs through sense codon reassignment is an efficient tool for expanding the chemical functionality of proteins. Incorporation of multiple ncAAs, however, is particularly challenging. This work describes the first attempts to reassign the sense methionine (Met codon AUG to two different ncAAs in bacterial protein translation. Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS charges two tRNAs with Met: tRNAfMet initiates protein synthesis (starting AUG codon, whereas elongator tRNAMet participates in protein elongation (internal AUG codon(s. Preliminary in vitro experiments show that these tRNAs can be charged with the Met analogues azidohomoalanine (Aha and ethionine (Eth by exploiting the different substrate specificities of EcMetRS and the heterologous MetRS / tRNAMet pair from the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, respectively. Here, we explored whether this configuration would allow a differential decoding during in vivo protein initiation and elongation. First, we eliminated the elongator tRNAMet from a methionine auxotrophic E. coli strain, which was then equipped with a rescue plasmid harboring the heterologous pair. Although the imported pair was not fully orthogonal, it was possible to incorporate preferentially Eth at internal AUG codons in a model protein, suggesting that in vivo AUG codon reassignment is possible. To achieve full orthogonality during elongation, we imported the known orthogonal pair of Methanosarcina mazei pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS / tRNAPyl and devised a genetic selection system based on the suppression of an amber stop codon in an important glycolytic gene, pfkA, which restores enzyme functionality and normal cellular growth. Using an evolved PylRS able to accept Met analogues, it should be possible to reassign the AUG codon to two different ncAAs by using directed evolution. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

  16. Codon 201Gly Polymorphic Type of the DCC Gene is Related to Disseminated Neuroblastoma

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    Xiao-Tang Kong

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC gene is a potential tumor- suppressor gene on chromosome 18821.3. The relatively high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH and loss of expression of this gene in neuroblastoma, especially in the advanced stages, imply the possibility of involvement of the DCC gene in progression of neuroblastoma. However, only few typical mutations have been identified in this gene, indicating that other possible mechanisms for the inactivation of this gene may exist. A polymorphic change (Arg to Gly at DCC codon 201 is related to advanced colorectal carcinoma and increases in the tumors with absent DCC protein expression. In order to understand whether this change is associated with the development or progression of neuroblastoma, we investigated codon 201 polymorphism of the DCC gene in 102 primary neuroblastomas by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism. We found no missense or nonsense mutations, but a polymorphic change from CGA (Arg to GGA (Gly at codon 201 resulting in three types of polymorphism: codon 201Gly type, codon 201Arg/Gly type, and codon 201Arg type. The codon 201Gly type occurred more frequently in disseminated (stages IV and IVs neuroblastomas (72% than in localized (stages I, II, and III tumors (48% (P=.035, and normal controls (38% (P=.024. In addition, the codon 201Gly type was significantly more common in tumors found clinically (65% than in those found by mass screening (35% (P=.002. The results suggested that the codon 201Gly type of the DCC gene might be associated with a higher risk of disseminating neuroblastoma.

  17. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Scot P; Rueden, Kelsey J; Rucks, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones and their roles in the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines

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    Michael William Graner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a major site of passage for proteins en route to other organelles, to the cell surface, and to the extracellular space. It is also the transport route for peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome into the ER for loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I molecules for eventual antigen presentation at the cell surface. Chaperones within the ER are critical for many of these processes; however, outside the ER certain of those chaperones may play important and direct roles in immune responses. In some cases, particular ER chaperones have been utilized as vaccines against tumors or infectious disease pathogens when purified from tumor tissue or recombinantly generated and loaded with antigen. In other cases, the cell surface location of ER chaperones has implications for immune responses as well as possible tumor resistance. We have produced heat shock protein/chaperone protein-based cancer vaccines called CRCL (Chaperone-Rich Cell Lysate that are conglomerates of chaperones enriched from solid tumors by an isoelectric focusing technique. These preparations have been effective against numerous murine tumors, as well as in a canine with an advanced lung carcinoma treated with autologous CRCL. We also published extensive proteomic analyses of CRCL prepared from human surgically-resected tumor samples. Of note, these preparations contained at least ten ER chaperones and a number of other residents, along with many other chaperones/heat shock proteins. Gene ontology and network analyses utilizing these proteins essentially recapitulate the antigen presentation pathways and interconnections. In conjunction with our current knowledge of cell surface/extracellular ER chaperones, these data collectively suggest that a systems-level view may provide insight into the potent immune stimulatory activities of CRCL with an emphasis on the roles of ER components in those processes.

  19. In vivo functional expression of a screened P. aeruginosa chaperone-dependent lipase in E. coli

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    Wu Xiangping

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases particularly Pseudomonas lipases are widely used for biotechnological applications. It is a meaningful work to design experiments to obtain high-level active lipase. There is a limiting factor for functional overexpression of the Pseudomonas lipase that a chaperone is necessary for effective folding. As previously reported, several methods had been used to resolve the problem. In this work, the lipase (LipA and its chaperone (LipB from a screened strain named AB which belongs to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were overexpressed in E. coli with two dual expression plasmid systems to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA without in vitro refolding process. Results In this work, we screened a lipase-produced strain named AB through the screening procedure, which was identified as P. aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA. Genomic DNA obtained from the strain was used to isolate the gene lipA (936 bp and lipase specific foldase gene lipB (1023 bp. One single expression plasmid system E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and two dual expression plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB and E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB were successfully constructed. The lipase activities of the three expression systems were compared to choose the optimal expression method. Under the same cultured condition, the activities of the lipases expressed by E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB were 1300 U/L and 3200 U/L, respectively, while the activity of the lipase expressed by E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was up to 8500 U/L. The lipase LipA had an optimal temperature of 30°C and an optimal pH of 9 with a strong pH tolerance. The active LipA could catalyze the reaction between fatty alcohols and fatty acids to generate fatty acid alkyl esters, which meant that LipA was able to catalyze esterification reaction. The most suitable fatty acid and alcohol substrates for esterification were octylic acid and hexanol

  20. The normal distribution of PRNP codon 129 polymorphism in the Moroccan population (Arabs and Casablanca residents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadifi, S; Slassi, I; Hachimi, K M El; Gazzaz, B; Bellayou, H; Raddaoui, K; Laplanche, J L

    2008-05-01

    The common prion protein gene (PRNP) codon 129 polymorphism is a strong susceptibility factor for human prion diseases. In this study, we examined the allelic variation of methionine and valine at codon 129 in 147 subjects representing the normal Moroccan population. The sharing of the genotype was 57.1% for Methionine-Methionine (MM), 36% for Methionine-Valine (MV), and 6, 8% for Valine-Valine (VV). These results are indeed intermediate between those discovered at the European and Asian populations. However, and for a better assessment of the risk to develop prion diseases in the Moroccan population, the survey of the frequency of the codon 219 polymorphism is required.

  1. The effect of multiple evolutionary selections on synonymous codon usage of genes in the Mycoplasma bovis genome.

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    Jian-hua Zhou

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma bovis is a major pathogen causing arthritis, respiratory disease and mastitis in cattle. A better understanding of its genetic features and evolution might represent evidences of surviving host environments. In this study, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in M. bovis (three strains' genomes were analyzed. The overall nucleotide content of genes in the M. bovis genome is AT-rich. Although the G and C contents at the third codon position of genes in the leading strand differ from those in the lagging strand (p<0.05, the 59 synonymous codon usage patterns of genes in the leading strand are highly similar to those in the lagging strand. The over-represented codons and the under-represented codons were identified. A comparison of the synonymous codon usage pattern of M. bovis and cattle (susceptible host indicated the independent formation of synonymous codon usage of M. bovis. Principal component analysis revealed that (i strand-specific mutational bias fails to affect the synonymous codon usage pattern in the leading and lagging strands, (ii mutation pressure from nucleotide content plays a role in shaping the overall codon usage, and (iii the major trend of synonymous codon usage has a significant correlation with the gene expression level that is estimated by the codon adaptation index. The plot of the effective number of codons against the G+C content at the third codon position also reveals that mutation pressure undoubtedly contributes to the synonymous codon usage pattern of M. bovis. Additionally, the formation of the overall codon usage is determined by certain evolutionary selections for gene function classification (30S protein, 50S protein, transposase, membrane protein, and lipoprotein and translation elongation region of genes in M. bovis. The information could be helpful in further investigations of evolutionary mechanisms of the Mycoplasma family and heterologous expression of its functionally

  2. The Effect of Multiple Evolutionary Selections on Synonymous Codon Usage of Genes in the Mycoplasma bovis Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-hua; Ding, Yao-zhong; He, Ying; Chu, Yue-feng; Zhao, Ping; Ma, Li-ya; Wang, Xin-jun; Li, Xue-rui; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a major pathogen causing arthritis, respiratory disease and mastitis in cattle. A better understanding of its genetic features and evolution might represent evidences of surviving host environments. In this study, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in M. bovis (three strains’ genomes) were analyzed. The overall nucleotide content of genes in the M. bovis genome is AT-rich. Although the G and C contents at the third codon position of genes in the leading strand differ from those in the lagging strand (p<0.05), the 59 synonymous codon usage patterns of genes in the leading strand are highly similar to those in the lagging strand. The over-represented codons and the under-represented codons were identified. A comparison of the synonymous codon usage pattern of M. bovis and cattle (susceptible host) indicated the independent formation of synonymous codon usage of M. bovis. Principal component analysis revealed that (i) strand-specific mutational bias fails to affect the synonymous codon usage pattern in the leading and lagging strands, (ii) mutation pressure from nucleotide content plays a role in shaping the overall codon usage, and (iii) the major trend of synonymous codon usage has a significant correlation with the gene expression level that is estimated by the codon adaptation index. The plot of the effective number of codons against the G+C content at the third codon position also reveals that mutation pressure undoubtedly contributes to the synonymous codon usage pattern of M. bovis. Additionally, the formation of the overall codon usage is determined by certain evolutionary selections for gene function classification (30S protein, 50S protein, transposase, membrane protein, and lipoprotein) and translation elongation region of genes in M. bovis. The information could be helpful in further investigations of evolutionary mechanisms of the Mycoplasma family and heterologous expression of its functionally important

  3. A New Glucocerebrosidase Chaperone Reduces α-Synuclein and Glycolipid Levels in iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons from Patients with Gaucher Disease and Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K; Moaven, Nima; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Rogers, Steven A; Patnaik, Samarjit; Schoenen, Frank J; Westbroek, Wendy; Zheng, Wei; Sullivan, Patricia; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Khaliq, Zayd M; Lopez, Grisel J; Goldstein, David S; Ory, Daniel S; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-07-13

    Among the known genetic risk factors for Parkinson disease, mutations in GBA1, the gene responsible for the lysosomal disorder Gaucher disease, are the most common. This genetic link has directed attention to the role of the lysosome in the pathogenesis of parkinsonism. To study how glucocerebrosidase impacts parkinsonism and to evaluate new therapeutics, we generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from four patients with Type 1 (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, two with and two without parkinsonism, and one patient with Type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, and differentiated them into macrophages and dopaminergic neurons. These cells exhibited decreased glucocerebrosidase activity and stored the glycolipid substrates glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, demonstrating their similarity to patients with Gaucher disease. Dopaminergic neurons from patients with Type 2 and Type 1 Gaucher disease with parkinsonism had reduced dopamine storage and dopamine transporter reuptake. Levels of α-synuclein, a protein present as aggregates in Parkinson disease and related synucleinopathies, were selectively elevated in neurons from the patients with parkinsonism or Type 2 Gaucher disease. The cells were then treated with NCGC607, a small-molecule noninhibitory chaperone of glucocerebrosidase identified by high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry structure optimization. This compound successfully chaperoned the mutant enzyme, restored glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels, and reduced glycolipid storage in both iPSC-derived macrophages and dopaminergic neurons, indicating its potential for treating neuronopathic Gaucher disease. In addition, NCGC607 reduced α-synuclein levels in dopaminergic neurons from the patients with parkinsonism, suggesting that noninhibitory small-molecule chaperones of glucocerebrosidase may prove useful for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Because GBA1 mutations are the most common genetic risk factor for

  4. Proteotoxicity is not the reason for the dependence of cancer cells on the major chaperone Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Teresa A; Gabai, Vladimir L; Sherman, Michael Y

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago a hypothesis was proposed that the survival of cancer cells depend on elevated expression of molecular chaperones because these cells are prone to proteotoxic stress. A critical prediction of this hypothesis is that depletion of chaperones in cancer cells should lead to proteotoxicity. Here, using the major chaperone Hsp70 as example, we demonstrate that its depletion does not trigger proteotoxic stress, thus refuting the model. Accordingly, other functions of chaperones, e.g., their role in cell signaling, might define the requirements for chaperones in cancer cells, which is critical for rational targeting Hsp70 in cancer treatment.

  5. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

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    Murat Cetinbaş

    Full Text Available Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  6. Molecular chaperones: guardians of the proteome in normal and disease states [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Wilson Jeng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure in order to gain functional activity, or must they? An ever-increasing number of intrinsically disordered proteins and amyloid-forming polypeptides challenge this dogma. While molecular chaperones and proteases are traditionally associated with protein quality control inside the cell, it is now apparent that molecular chaperones not only promote protein folding in the “forward” direction by facilitating folding and preventing misfolding and aggregation, but also facilitate protein unfolding and even disaggregation resulting in the recovery of functional protein from aggregates. Here, we review our current understanding of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones that harness the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to fuel their chaperone functions. An emerging theme is that most of these chaperones do not work alone, but instead function together with other chaperone systems to maintain the proteome. Hence, molecular chaperones are the major component of the proteostasis network that guards and protects the proteome from damage. Furthermore, while a decline of this network is detrimental to cell and organismal health, a controlled perturbation of the proteostasis network may offer new therapeutic avenues against human diseases.

  7. Anticodon domain modifications contribute order to tRNA for ribosome-mediated codon binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendeix, Franck A P; Dziergowska, Agnieszka; Gustilo, Estella M; Graham, William D; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F

    2008-06-10

    The accuracy and efficiency with which tRNA decodes genomic information into proteins require posttranscriptional modifications in or adjacent to the anticodon. The modification uridine-5-oxyacetic acid (cmo (5)U 34) is found at wobble position 34 in a single isoaccepting tRNA species for six amino acids, alanine, leucine, proline, serine, threonine, and valine, each having 4-fold degenerate codons. cmo (5)U 34 makes possible the decoding of 24 codons by just six tRNAs. The contributions of this important modification to the structures and codon binding affinities of the unmodified and fully modified anticodon stem and loop domains of tRNA (Val3) UAC (ASL (Val3) UAC) were elucidated. The stems of the unmodified ASL (Val3) UAC and that with cmo (5)U 34 and N (6)-methyladenosine, m (6)A 37, adopted an A-form RNA conformation (rmsd approximately 0.6 A) as determined with NMR spectroscopy and torsion-angle molecular dynamics. However, the UV hyperchromicity, circular dichroism ellipticity, and structural analyses indicated that the anticodon modifications enhanced order in the loop. ASL (Val3) UAC-cmo (5)U 34;m (6)A 37 exhibited high affinities for its cognate and wobble codons GUA and GUG, and for GUU in the A-site of the programmed 30S ribosomal subunit, whereas the unmodified ASL (Val3) UAC bound less strongly to GUA and not at all to GUG and GUU. Together with recent crystal structures of ASL (Val3) UAC-cmo (5)U 34;m (6)A 37 bound to all four of the valine codons in the A-site of the ribosome's 30S subunit, these results clearly demonstrate that the xo (5)U 34-type modifications order the anticodon loop prior to A-site codon binding for an expanded codon reading, possibly reducing an entropic energy barrier to codon binding.

  8. An environmental signature for 323 microbial genomes based on codon adaptation indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Friis, Carsten; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Background: Codon adaptation indices ( CAIs) represent an evolutionary strategy to modulate gene expression and have widely been used to predict potentially highly expressed genes within microbial genomes. Here, we evaluate and compare two very different methods for estimating CAI values, one......, we show that codon usage preference provides an environmental signature by which it is possible to group bacteria according to their lifestyle, for instance soil bacteria and soil symbionts, spore formers, enteric bacteria, aquatic bacteria, and intercellular and extracellular pathogens. Conclusion...

  9. Antarctic krill 454 pyrosequencing reveals chaperone and stress transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody S Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp. In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS, providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. CONCLUSIONS: This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical "stress proteins", such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of "stress" genes for studies understanding

  10. Codon sextets with leading role of serine create "ideal" symmetry classification scheme of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Vladimir

    2014-06-10

    The standard classification scheme of the genetic code is organized for alphabetic ordering of nucleotides. Here we introduce the new, "ideal" classification scheme in compact form, for the first time generated by codon sextets encoding Ser, Arg and Leu amino acids. The new scheme creates the known purine/pyrimidine, codon-anticodon, and amino/keto type symmetries and a novel A+U rich/C+G rich symmetry. This scheme is built from "leading" and "nonleading" groups of 32 codons each. In the ensuing 4 × 16 scheme, based on trinucleotide quadruplets, Ser has a central role as initial generator. Six codons encoding Ser and six encoding Arg extend continuously along a linear array in the "leading" group, and together with four of six Leu codons uniquely define construction of the "leading" group. The remaining two Leu codons enable construction of the "nonleading" group. The "ideal" genetic code suggests the evolution of genetic code with serine as an initiator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Codon 129 polymorphism of prion protein gene in is not a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerusa Smid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of prion protein and amyloid-b oligomers has been demonstrated recently. Homozygosity at prion protein gene (PRNP codon 129 is associated with higher risk for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This polymorphism has been addressed as a possible risk factor in Alzheimer disease (AD. Objective To describe the association between codon 129 polymorphisms and AD. Methods We investigated the association of codon 129 polymorphism of PRNP in 99 AD patients and 111 controls, and the association between this polymorphism and cognitive performance. Other polymorphisms of PRNP and additive effect of apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE were evaluated. Results Codon 129 genotype distribution in AD 45.5% methionine (MM, 42.2% methionine valine (MV, 12.1% valine (VV; and 39.6% MM, 50.5% MV, 9.9% VV among controls (p>0.05. There were no differences of cognitive performance concerning codon 129. Stratification according to ApoE genotype did not reveal difference between groups. Conclusion Codon 129 polymorphism is not a risk factor for AD in Brazilian patients.

  12. High Frequency of Codon 12 but not Codon 13 and 61 K-ras Gene Mutations in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of Breast in a South Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushma, C; Prasad, Shiva; Devi, Rudrama; Murthy, Sudha; Rao, Ts; Naidu, Ck

    2015-01-01

    Ras genes are thought to play an important role in human cancer since they have been found to be activated frequently in several types of tumors including breast cancer, where the overall incidence of K-RAS oncogene activation is 0-10%. Evaluation of K-RAS gene not only for mutational frequency but also for mutation types in this downstream signaling gene pathway is necessary to determine the mechanisms of action. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that K-RAS activation is involved in breast cancer risk of south Indian population. A total of 70 paired pathologically confirmed tumor and non-tumor tissues from the same breast cancer patients were analysed for most common K-RAS mutations of codon 12,13 and 61 by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction digestion and direct nucleotide sequencing method. We found that a high rate of homozygous and heterozygous mutations of codon 12, but not codon 13 and 61, may influence the invasive ductal carcinoma of breast risk in this study. Our study indicated that only codon 12 may be involved in initiating breast carcinogenesis in India.

  13. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  14. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus phages: effect of translation initiation efficiency on differential codon adaptation mediated by virulent and temperate lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Ramanandan; Chithambaram, Shivapriya; Xia, Xuhua

    2015-05-01

    Rapid biosynthesis is key to the success of bacteria and viruses. Highly expressed genes in bacteria exhibit a strong codon bias corresponding to the differential availability of tRNAs. However, a large clade of lambdoid coliphages exhibits relatively poor codon adaptation to the host translation machinery, in contrast to other coliphages that exhibit strong codon adaptation to the host. Three possible explanations were previously proposed but dismissed: (1) the phage-borne tRNA genes that reduce the dependence of phage translation on host tRNAs, (2) lack of time needed for evolving codon adaptation due to recent host switching, and (3) strong strand asymmetry with biased mutation disrupting codon adaptation. Here, we examined the possibility that phages with relatively poor codon adaptation have poor translation initiation which would weaken the selection on codon adaptation. We measured translation initiation by: (1) the strength and position of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence, and (2) the stability of the secondary structure of sequences flanking the SD and start codon known to affect accessibility of the SD sequence and start codon. Phage genes with strong codon adaptation had significantly stronger SD sequences than those with poor codon adaptation. The former also had significantly weaker secondary structure in sequences flanking the SD sequence and start codon than the latter. Thus, lambdoid phages do not exhibit strong codon adaptation because they have relatively inefficient translation initiation and would benefit little from increased elongation efficiency. We also provided evidence suggesting that phage lifestyle (virulent versus temperate) affected selection intensity on the efficiency of translation initiation and elongation. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. Thiol-based copper handling by the copper chaperone Atox1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Yuta; Inouye, Sachiye; Akagi, Reiko

    2017-04-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) plays a crucial role in cellular copper homeostasis. Atox1 captures cytosolic copper for subsequent transfer to copper pumps in trans Golgi network, thereby facilitating copper supply to various copper-dependent oxidereductases matured within the secretory vesicles. Atox1 and other copper chaperones handle cytosolic copper using Cys thiols which are ideal ligands for coordinating Cu(I). Recent studies demonstrated reversible oxidation of these Cys residues in copper chaperones, linking cellular redox state to copper homeostasis. Highlighted in this review are unique redox properties of Atox1 and other copper chaperones. Also, summarized are the redox nodes in the cytosol which potentially play dominant roles in the redox regulation of copper chaperones. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):246-254, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Calcium measurements in living filamentous fungi expressing codon-optimized aequorin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, G.; Kozlova-Zwinderman, O.; Collis, A.J.; Knight, M.R.; Fincham, J.R.S.; Stanger, C.P.; Renwick, A.; Hessing, J.G.M.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Read, N.D.

    2004-01-01

    Calcium signalling is little understood in filamentous fungi largely because easy and routine methods for calcium measurement in living hyphae have previously been unavailable. We have developed the recombinant aequorin method for this purpose. High levels of aequorin expression were obtained in

  17. Advantages of a mechanistic codon substitution model for evolutionary analysis of protein-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanzo Miyazawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A mechanistic codon substitution model, in which each codon substitution rate is proportional to the product of a codon mutation rate and the average fixation probability depending on the type of amino acid replacement, has advantages over nucleotide, amino acid, and empirical codon substitution models in evolutionary analysis of protein-coding sequences. It can approximate a wide range of codon substitution processes. If no selection pressure on amino acids is taken into account, it will become equivalent to a nucleotide substitution model. If mutation rates are assumed not to depend on the codon type, then it will become essentially equivalent to an amino acid substitution model. Mutation at the nucleotide level and selection at the amino acid level can be separately evaluated. RESULTS: The present scheme for single nucleotide mutations is equivalent to the general time-reversible model, but multiple nucleotide changes in infinitesimal time are allowed. Selective constraints on the respective types of amino acid replacements are tailored to each gene in a linear function of a given estimate of selective constraints. Their good estimates are those calculated by maximizing the respective likelihoods of empirical amino acid or codon substitution frequency matrices. Akaike and Bayesian information criteria indicate that the present model performs far better than the other substitution models for all five phylogenetic trees of highly-divergent to highly-homologous sequences of chloroplast, mitochondrial, and nuclear genes. It is also shown that multiple nucleotide changes in infinitesimal time are significant in long branches, although they may be caused by compensatory substitutions or other mechanisms. The variation of selective constraint over sites fits the datasets significantly better than variable mutation rates, except for 10 slow-evolving nuclear genes of 10 mammals. An critical finding for phylogenetic analysis is that

  18. The Role of Co-chaperones in Synaptic Proteostasis and Neurodegenerative Disease

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    Erica L. Gorenberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Synapses must be preserved throughout an organism's lifespan to allow for normal brain function and behavior. Synapse maintenance is challenging given the long distances between the termini and the cell body, reliance on axonal transport for delivery of newly synthesized presynaptic proteins, and high rates of synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Hence, synapses rely on efficient proteostasis mechanisms to preserve their structure and function. To this end, the synaptic compartment has specific chaperones to support its functions. Without proper synaptic chaperone activity, local proteostasis imbalances lead to neurotransmission deficits, dismantling of synapses, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we address the roles of four synaptic chaperones in the maintenance of the nerve terminal, as well as their genetic links to neurodegenerative disease. Three of these are Hsp40 co-chaperones (DNAJs: Cysteine String Protein alpha (CSPα; DNAJC5, auxilin (DNAJC6, and Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis 8 (RME-8; DNAJC13. These co-chaperones contain a conserved J domain through which they form a complex with heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70, enhancing the chaperone's ATPase activity. CSPα is a synaptic vesicle protein known to chaperone the t-SNARE SNAP-25 and the endocytic GTPase dynamin-1, thereby regulating synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis. Auxilin binds assembled clathrin cages, and through its interactions with Hsc70 leads to the uncoating of clathrin-coated vesicles, a process necessary for the regeneration of synaptic vesicles. RME-8 is a co-chaperone on endosomes and may have a role in clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis on this organelle. These three co-chaperones maintain client function by preserving folding and assembly to prevent client aggregation, but they do not break down aggregates that have already formed. The fourth synaptic chaperone we will discuss is Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110, which interacts with Hsc70, DNAJAs, and

  19. Phosphorylation-mediated control of histone chaperone ASF1 levels by tousled-like kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim Pilyugin; Jeroen Demmers; Peter Verrijzer, C.; Francois Karch; Moshkin, Yuri M.

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHistone chaperones are at the hub of a diverse interaction networks integrating a plethora of chromatin modifying activities. Histone H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 is a target for cell-cycle regulated Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) and both proteins cooperate during chromatin replication. However, the precise role of post-translational modification of ASF1 remained unclear. Here, we identify the TLK phosphorylation sites for both Drosophila and human ASF1 proteins. Loss of TLK- mediated phosp...

  20. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  1. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected residue clusters may be

  2. Production of 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from oleic acid by whole recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing 10S-dioxygenase from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 with the aid of a chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Seo, Min-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2017-01-01

    To increase the production of 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from oleic acid by whole recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing Nostoc punctiforme 10S-dioxygenase with the aid of a chaperone. The optimal conditions for 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid production by recombinant cells co-expressing chaperone plasmid were pH 9, 35 °C, 15 % (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide, 40 g cells l(-1), and 10 g oleic acid l(-1). Under these conditions, recombinant cells co-expressing chaperone plasmid produced 7.2 g 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid l(-1) within 30 min, with a conversion yield of 72 % (w/w) and a volumetric productivity of 14.4 g l(-1) h(-1). The activity of recombinant cells expressing 10S-dioxygenase was increased by 200 % with the aid of a chaperone, demonstrating the first biotechnological production of 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid using recombinant cells expressing 10S-dioxygenase.

  3. Amyloid-β oligomers are sequestered by both intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priyanka; Meehan, Sarah; Carver, John A; Wilson, Mark R; Dobson, Christopher M; Klenerman, David

    2012-11-20

    The aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide into β-sheet rich, fibrillar structures proceeds via a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomeric intermediates that have been associated with neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular interest in this context are the mechanisms by which molecular chaperones, part of the primary biological defenses against protein misfolding, influence Aβ aggregation. We have used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to compare the interactions between distinct aggregation states (monomers, oligomers, and amyloid fibrils) of the AD-associated amyloid-β(1-40) peptide, and two molecular chaperones, both of which are upregulated in the brains of patients with AD and have been found colocalized with Aβ in senile plaques. One of the chaperones, αB-crystallin, is primarily found inside cells, while the other, clusterin, is predominantly located in the extracellular environment. We find that both chaperones bind to misfolded oligomeric species and form long-lived complexes, thereby preventing both their further growth into fibrils and their dissociation. From these studies, we conclude that these chaperones have a common mechanism of action based on sequestering Aβ oligomers. This conclusion suggests that these chaperones, both of which are ATP-independent, are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic Aβ oligomer-associated processes whether they occur in the extracellular or intracellular environment.

  4. Molecular Characterization of MaCCS, a Novel Copper Chaperone Gene Involved in Abiotic and Hormonal Stress Responses in Musa acuminata cv. Tianbaojiao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Chen, Fanglan; Liu, Weihua; Thu, Min Kyaw; Zhang, Zihao; Chen, Yukun; Cheng, Chunzhen; Lin, Yuling; Wang, Tianchi; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2016-03-24

    Copper/zinc superoxide dismutases (Cu/ZnSODs) play important roles in improving banana resistance to adverse conditions, but their activities depend on the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (CCS) delivering copper to them. However, little is known about CCS in monocots and under stress conditions. Here, a novel CCS gene (MaCCS) was obtained from a banana using reverse transcription PCR and rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. Sequence analyses showed that MaCCS has typical CCS domains and a conserved gene structure like other plant CCSs. Alternative transcription start sites (ATSSs) and alternative polyadenylation contribute to the mRNA diversity of MaCCS. ATSSs in MaCCS resulted in one open reading frame containing two in-frame start codons to form two protein versions, which is supported by the MaCCS subcellular localization of in both cytosol and chloroplasts. Furthermore, MaCCS promoter was found to contain many cis-elements associated with abiotic and hormonal responses. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that MaCCS was expressed in all tested tissues (leaves, pseudostems and roots). In addition, MaCCS expression was significantly induced by light, heat, drought, abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid, but inhibited by relatively high concentrations of CuSO₄ and under cold treatment, which suggests that MaCCS is involved in abiotic and hormonal responses.

  5. Nuclear genetic codes with a different meaning of the UAG and the UAA codon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pánek, Tomáš; Žihala, David; Sokol, Martin; Derelle, Romain; Klimeš, Vladimír; Hradilová, Miluše; Zadrobílková, Eliška; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J; Čepička, Ivan; Eliáš, Marek

    2017-02-13

    Departures from the standard genetic code in eukaryotic nuclear genomes are known for only a handful of lineages and only a few genetic code variants seem to exist outside the ciliates, the most creative group in this regard. Most frequent code modifications entail reassignment of the UAG and UAA codons, with evidence for at least 13 independent cases of a coordinated change in the meaning of both codons. However, no change affecting each of the two codons separately has been documented, suggesting the existence of underlying evolutionary or mechanistic constraints. Here, we present the discovery of two new variants of the nuclear genetic code, in which UAG is translated as an amino acid while UAA is kept as a termination codon (along with UGA). The first variant occurs in an organism noticed in a (meta)transcriptome from the heteropteran Lygus hesperus and demonstrated to be a novel insect-dwelling member of Rhizaria (specifically Sainouroidea). This first documented case of a rhizarian with a non-canonical genetic code employs UAG to encode leucine and represents an unprecedented change among nuclear codon reassignments. The second code variant was found in the recently described anaerobic flagellate Iotanema spirale (Metamonada: Fornicata). Analyses of transcriptomic data revealed that I. spirale uses UAG to encode glutamine, similarly to the most common variant of a non-canonical code known from several unrelated eukaryotic groups, including hexamitin diplomonads (also a lineage of fornicates). However, in these organisms, UAA also encodes glutamine, whereas it is the primary termination codon in I. spirale. Along with phylogenetic evidence for distant relationship of I. spirale and hexamitins, this indicates two independent genetic code changes in fornicates. Our study documents, for the first time, that evolutionary changes of the meaning of UAG and UAA codons in nuclear genomes can be decoupled and that the interpretation of the two codons by the cytoplasmic

  6. Systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for production of the chemical chaperone ectoine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Judith; Schäfer, Rudolf; Kohlstedt, Michael; Harder, Björn J; Borchert, Nicole S; Stöveken, Nadine; Bremer, Erhard; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-11-15

    The stabilizing and function-preserving effects of ectoines have attracted considerable biotechnological interest up to industrial scale processes for their production. These rely on the release of ectoines from high-salinity-cultivated microbial producer cells upon an osmotic down-shock in rather complex processor configurations. There is growing interest in uncoupling the production of ectoines from the typical conditions required for their synthesis, and instead design strains that naturally release ectoines into the medium without the need for osmotic changes, since the use of high-salinity media in the fermentation process imposes notable constraints on the costs, design, and durability of fermenter systems. Here, we used a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain as a cellular chassis to establish a microbial cell factory for the biotechnological production of ectoines. The implementation of a mutant aspartokinase enzyme ensured efficient supply of L-aspartate-beta-semialdehyde, the precursor for ectoine biosynthesis. We further engineered the genome of the basic C. glutamicum strain by integrating a codon-optimized synthetic ectABCD gene cluster under expressional control of the strong and constitutive C. glutamicum tuf promoter. The resulting recombinant strain produced ectoine and excreted it into the medium; however, lysine was still found as a by-product. Subsequent inactivation of the L-lysine exporter prevented the undesired excretion of lysine while ectoine was still exported. Using the streamlined cell factory, a fed-batch process was established that allowed the production of ectoine with an overall productivity of 6.7 g L(-1) day(-1) under growth conditions that did not rely on the use of high-salinity media. The present study describes the construction of a stable microbial cell factory for recombinant production of ectoine. We successfully applied metabolic engineering strategies to optimize its synthetic production in the industrial workhorse C

  7. Codon utilization, DNA landscaping and fractal analysis in bacteriophage phi(adh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, N R

    2005-01-01

    The bacteriophage phi(adh) has a low G+C content and encodes its protein products using a restricted number of the codons, which it could theoretically use. Investigated were (i) the restricted codon usage by determining codon indices and codon distances for various genes and ORFs, (ii) distribution of purines and pyrimidines on the two strands of the double-stranded genome and within all genes and ORFs, and (iii) nucleotide positional bias within the genome. The genes and ORFs can be clustered into four groups, based on codon distance analysis. The genome landscape showed that the plus strand was more purine-rich than the negative one and that the only area of the genome where the landscape was located in the pyrimidine-rich region was at the start of the sequence which was also the only region of the genome where ORFs were found on the negative strand. The nucleotide composition of the genome, examined by fractal analysis showed little, if any, DNA positional bias, as opposed to overall compositional bias with a self-similarity profile. The ORFs showed a bias in favour of purines on the coding strand.

  8. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in sixty-four different bivalve species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gerdol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias (CUB is a defined as the non-random usage of codons encoding the same amino acid across different genomes. This phenomenon is common to all organisms and the real weight of the many factors involved in its shaping still remains to be fully determined. So far, relatively little attention has been put in the analysis of CUB in bivalve mollusks due to the limited genomic data available. Taking advantage of the massive sequence data generated from next generation sequencing projects, we explored codon preferences in 64 different species pertaining to the six major evolutionary lineages in Bivalvia. We detected remarkable differences across species, which are only partially dependent on phylogeny. While the intensity of CUB is mild in most organisms, a heterogeneous group of species (including Arcida and Mytilida, among the others display higher bias and a strong preference for AT-ending codons. We show that the relative strength and direction of mutational bias, selection for translational efficiency and for translational accuracy contribute to the establishment of synonymous codon usage in bivalves. Although many aspects underlying bivalve CUB still remain obscure, we provide for the first time an overview of this phenomenon in this large, commercially and environmentally important, class of marine invertebrates.

  9. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Should a Chaperone Accompany Our Therapeutic Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin L.; Li, Chengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors. PMID:22885705

  10. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-04

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP-used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor's nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  11. Regulation of GPCR Anterograde Trafficking by Molecular Chaperones and Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brent; Wertman, Jaime; Dupré, Denis J

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) make up a superfamily of integral membrane proteins that respond to a wide variety of extracellular stimuli, giving them an important role in cell function and survival. They have also proven to be valuable targets in the fight against various diseases. As such, GPCR signal regulation has received considerable attention over the last few decades. With the amplitude of signaling being determined in large part by receptor density at the plasma membrane, several endogenous mechanisms for modulating GPCR expression at the cell surface have come to light. It has been shown that cell surface expression is determined by both exocytic and endocytic processes. However, the body of knowledge surrounding GPCR trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, commonly known as anterograde trafficking, has considerable room for growth. We focus here on the current paradigms of anterograde GPCR trafficking. We will discuss the regulatory role of both the general and "nonclassical private" chaperone systems in GPCR trafficking as well as conserved motifs that serve as modulators of GPCR export from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Together, these topics summarize some of the known mechanisms by which the cell regulates anterograde GPCR trafficking. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DEAD-box proteins as RNA helicases and chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmoskaite, Inga; Russell, Rick

    2010-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous in RNA-mediated processes and function by coupling cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to changes in affinity for single-stranded RNA. Many DEAD-box proteins use this basic mechanism as the foundation for a version of RNA helicase activity, efficiently separating the strands of short RNA duplexes in a process that involves little or no translocation. This activity, coupled with mechanisms to direct different DEAD-box proteins to their physiological substrates, allows them to promote RNA folding steps and rearrangements and to accelerate remodeling of RNA-protein complexes. This review will describe the properties of DEAD-box proteins as RNA helicases and the current understanding of how the energy from ATPase activity is used to drive the separation of RNA duplex strands. It will then describe how the basic biochemical properties allow some DEAD-box proteins to function as chaperones by promoting RNA folding reactions, with a focus on the self-splicing group I and group II intron RNAs. PMID:21297876

  13. Rare codons effect on expression of recombinant gene cassette in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghil Esmaeili-Bandboni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the sensitivity of expression of fusion genes to existence of a large number of rare codons in recombinant gene sequenced. Methods: Primers for amplification of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were designed by Primer3 software and synthesized. All of these 3 genes were cloned. Then the genes were fused together by restriction sites and enzymatic method. Two linkers were used as a flexible bridge in connection of these genes. Results: Cloning and fusion of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were done correctly. After that, expression of the recombinant gene construction was surveyed. Conclusions: According to what was seen, because of the accumulation of 12 rare codons of Shiga toxin B and 19 rare codons of cholera toxin B in this gene cassette, the expression of the recombinant gene cassette, in Escherichia coli BL21, failed.

  14. Functional consequence of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkoori, Venkat R; Manne, Upender; Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S; Basson, Marc D; Haan, Pam; Coffey, Daniel; Bumpers, Harvey L

    2017-09-29

    The codon 72 polymorphism in p53 has been implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, prognosis and CRC health disparities. We examined the functional consequence of this polymorphism in CRC. Plasmids (pCMV6) that express different phenotypes of p53 [p53 wild type (wt) at codon 72 (R72wt), R72wt with mutation at codon 273 cysteine (R72273Cys), p53 mutation at codon 72 (P72wt) and P72wt with mutation at codon 273 (P72273Cys)] were constructed. The CRC cell line Caco2, which does not express p53 for in vitro studies, was used as host. CRC xenografts were established in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice using established cell lines. CRC surgical specimens, corresponding normal colon, and tumor xenografts were sequenced for codon 72 polymorphism of p53. Proteins signaling mechanisms were evaluated to assess the functional consequence of P72 phenotype of p53. This study demonstrated a significantly increased survival of cells expressing P72wt, mutant phenotype, versus R72wt phenotype. WB analyses revealed that P72wt induced activation of p38 and RAF/MEK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAP kinases. Activation of CREB was found to be higher in tumors that exhibit P72 phenotype. Metastatic lesions of CRC expressed more phospho-CREB than non-metastatic lesions. The expression of P72wt promoted CRC metastasis. P72 contributes to the aggressiveness of CRC. Because P72 is over-expressed in CRC, specifically in African-American patients, this suggests a role for P72 in cancer health disparities. This work was supported by NIH/NCI Workforce Diversity Grant R21-CA171251 & U54CA118948.

  15. Maximum likelihood estimation of ancestral codon usage bias parameters in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Bauer DuMont, Vanessa L; Hubisz, Melissa J

    2007-01-01

    We present a likelihood method for estimating codon usage bias parameters along the lineages of a phylogeny. The method is an extension of the classical codon-based models used for estimating dN/dS ratios along the lineages of a phylogeny. However, we add one extra parameter for each lineage...... in the mutation rate from C to T. However, neither a reduction in the strength of selection nor a change in the mutational pattern can alone explain all of the data observed in the D. melanogaster lineage. For example, we also confirm previous results showing that the Notch locus has experienced positive...

  16. Exploring the mechanisms used by promiscuous chaperones to assist protein folding in the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Andrew I.

    There are two popular theories to explain how molecular chaperones boost the yield of folded protein in the cell: According to the Anfinsen cage model, (ACM) chaperonins protect denatured proteins from aggregation. A competing theory, the iterative annealing model (IAM) claims that ATP regulated chaperone binding and release accelerates folding by freeing proteins from long-lived kinetic traps. We present experimental and kinetic evidence to argue that the IAM is not a complete picture of how the GroEL/ES chaperonin works. Surprisingly some substrate proteins experience folding rate enhancements without undergoing multiple rounds of ATP-induced binding and release from the chaperonin. An explanation of this data requires going beyond the ACM and IAM models. Our work uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the folding of a highly frustrated protein within a chaperonin cavity. The chaperonin interior is modeled by a sphere with variable degree of attraction to the protein inside. We demonstrate that this cavity, similar to the weakly hydrophobic interior of the GroEL cavity upon complexion with ATP and GroES, is sufficient to accelerate the folding of a frustrated protein by more than an order of magnitude. Our simulations uncover a novel form of the IAM in which the substrate exhibits spontaneous binding and release from the wall of the chaperonin cage. This mimics the behavior observed in the standard IAM, with the difference that thermal fluctuations, rather than ATP, allow the substrate to unbind from the chaperone. An growing number of smaller cageless chaperones have been discovered that can assist protein folding without the consumption of ATP, including artificial "minichaperones" (fragments of larger chaperones). It is tempting to speculate that the same thermally-driven IAM mechanism could play a role with these chaperones as well. We performed additional simulations of protein folding outside the sphere. We find that in order to accelerate

  17. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the thermal inactivation and chaperone assisted folding of zebrafish dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Rashid, Naira; Chaudhuri Chattopadhyay, Pratima

    2017-11-11

    The maintenance of thermal stability is a major issue in protein engineering as many proteins tend to form inactive aggregates at higher temperatures. Zebrafish DHFR, an essential protein for the survival of cells, shows irreversible thermal unfolding transition. The protein exhibits complete unfolding and loss of activity at 50 °C as monitored by UV-Visible, fluorescence and far UV-CD spectroscopy. The heat induced inactivation of zDHFR follows first-order kinetics and Arrhenius law. The variation in the value of inactivation rate constant, k with increasing temperatures depicts faster inactivation at elevated temperatures. We have attempted to study the chaperoning ability of a shorter variant of GroEL (minichaperone) and compared it with that of conventional GroEL-GroES chaperone system. Both the chaperone system prevented the aggregation and assisted in refolding of zDHFR. The rate of thermal inactivation was significantly retarded in the presence of chaperones which indicate that it enhances the thermal stability of the enzyme. As minichaperone is less complex, and does not require high energy co-factors like ATP, for its function as compared to conventional GroEL-GroES system, it can act as a very good in vitro as well as in vivo chaperone model for monitoring assisted protein folding phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  19. Functional adaptations of the bacterial chaperone trigger factor to extreme environmental temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin-Roulling, Amandine; Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Schmid, Franz X; Feller, Georges

    2015-07-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is the first molecular chaperone interacting cotranslationally with virtually all nascent polypeptides synthesized by the ribosome in bacteria. Thermal adaptation of chaperone function was investigated in TFs from the Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, the mesophile Escherichia coli and the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. This series covers nearly all temperatures encountered by bacteria. Although structurally homologous, these TFs display strikingly distinct properties that are related to the bacterial environmental temperature. The hyperthermophilic TF strongly binds model proteins during their folding and protects them from heat-induced misfolding and aggregation. It decreases the folding rate and counteracts the fast folding rate imposed by high temperature. It also functions as a carrier of partially folded proteins for delivery to downstream chaperones ensuring final maturation. By contrast, the psychrophilic TF displays weak chaperone activities, showing that these functions are less important in cold conditions because protein folding, misfolding and aggregation are slowed down at low temperature. It efficiently catalyses prolyl isomerization at low temperature as a result of its increased cellular concentration rather than from an improved activity. Some chaperone properties of the mesophilic TF possibly reflect its function as a cold shock protein in E. coli. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions.

  1. Cellular Chaperones As Therapeutic Targets in ALS to Restore Protein Homeostasis and Improve Cellular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Kalmar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps are ubiquitously expressed chaperone proteins that enable cells to cope with environmental stresses that cause misfolding and denaturation of proteins. With aging this protein quality control machinery becomes less effective, reducing the ability of cells to cope with damaging environmental stresses and disease-causing mutations. In neurodegenerative disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, such mutations are known to result in protein misfolding, which in turn results in the formation of intracellular aggregates cellular dysfunction and eventual neuronal death. The exact cellular pathology of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases has been elusive and thus, hindering the development of effective therapies. However, a common scheme has emerged across these “protein misfolding” disorders, in that the mechanism of disease involves one or more aspects of proteostasis; from DNA transcription, RNA translation, to protein folding, transport and degradation via proteosomal and autophagic pathways. Interestingly, members of the Hsp family are involved in each of these steps facilitating normal protein folding, regulating the rate of protein synthesis and degradation. In this short review we summarize the evidence that suggests that ALS is a disease of protein dyshomeostasis in which Hsps may play a key role. Overwhelming evidence now indicates that enabling protein homeostasis to cope with disease-causing mutations might be a successful therapeutic strategy in ALS, as well as other neurodegenerative diseases. Novel small molecule co-inducers of Hsps appear to be able to achieve this aim. Arimoclomol, a hydroxylamine derivative, has shown promising results in cellular and animal models of ALS, as well as other protein misfolding diseases such as Inclusion Body Myositis (IBM. Initial clinical investigations of Arimoclomol have shown promising results. Therefore, it is possible that the long series of

  2. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor secretion: don’t leave the cell without a chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laty Adriella Cahoon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Gram-positive bacteria, the secretion of proteins requires translocation of polypeptides across the bacterial membrane into the highly charged environment of the membrane-cell wall interface. Here, proteins must be folded and often further delivered across the matrix of the cell wall. While many aspects of protein secretion have been well studied in Gram-negative bacteria, which possess both an inner and outer membrane, generally less attention has been given to the mechanics of protein secretion across the single cell membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. In this review, we focus on the role of a post-translocation secretion chaperone in Listeria monocytogenes known as PrsA2, and compare what is known regarding PrsA2 with PrsA homologues in other Gram-positive bacteria. PrsA2 is a member of a family of membrane-associated lipoproteins that contribute to the folding and stability of secreted proteins as they cross the bacterial membrane. PrsA2 contributes to the integrity of the L. monocytogenes cell wall as well as swimming motility and bacterial resistance to osmotic stress, however its most critical role may be its requirement for L. monocytogenes virulence and viability within host cells. A better understanding of the role of PrsA2 and PrsA-like homologues will provide insight into the dynamics of protein folding and stability in Gram-positive bacteria and may result in new strategies for optimizing protein secretion as well as inhibiting the production of virulence factors.

  3. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Spencer M.; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L.; Kapralov, Maxim V.

    2015-01-01

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco’s biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tobAtL plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tobAtL-R1 plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tobAtL-R1 and Arabidopsis leaves at 10–15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8AS8t Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tobAtL-R1 leaves compared with tobAtL, despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tobAtL-R1. Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tobAtL-R1 lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  4. Rubredoxin refolding on nanostructured hydrophobic surfaces: evidence for a new type of biomimetic chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriani, Matteo; Iametti, Stefania; Kurtz, Donald M; Bonomi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Rubredoxins (Rds) are small proteins containing a tetrahedral Fe(SCys)4 site. Folded forms of metal free Rds (apoRds) show greatly impaired ability to incorporate iron compared with chaotropically unfolded apoRds. In this study, formation of the Rd holoprotein (holoRd) on addition of iron to a structured, but iron-uptake incompetent apoRd was investigated in the presence of polystyrene nanoparticles (NP). In our rationale, hydrophobic contacts between apoRd and the NP surface would expose protein regions (including ligand cysteines) buried in the structured apoRd, allowing iron incorporation and folding to the native holoRd. Burial of the hydrophobic regions in the folded holoRd would allow its detachment from the NP surface. We found that both rate and yield of holoRd formation increased significantly in the presence of NP and were influenced by the NP concentration and size. Rates and yields had an optimum at "catalytic" NP concentrations (0.2 g/L NP) when using relatively small NP (46 nm diameter). At these optimal conditions, only a fraction of the apoRd was bound to the NP, consistent with the occurrence of turnover events on the NP surface. Lower rates and yields at higher NP concentrations or when using larger NP (200 nm) suggest that steric effects and molecular crowding on the NP surface favor specific "iron-uptake-competent" conformations of apoRd on the NP surface. This bio-mimetic chaperone system may be applicable to other proteins requiring an unfolding step before cofactor-triggered refolding, particularly when over-expressed under limited cofactor accessibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The RNA chaperone Hfq impacts growth, metabolism and production of virulence factors in Yersinia enterocolitica.

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    Tamara Kakoschke

    Full Text Available To adapt to changes in environmental conditions, bacteria regulate their gene expression at the transcriptional but also at the post-transcriptional level, e.g. by small RNAs (sRNAs which modulate mRNA stability and translation. The conserved RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of many sRNAs with their target mRNAs, thereby playing a global role in fine-tuning protein production. In this study, we investigated the significance of Hfq for the enteropathogen Yersina enterocolitica serotype O:8. Hfq facilitated optimal growth in complex and minimal media. Our comparative protein analysis of parental and hfq-negative strains suggested that Hfq promotes lipid metabolism and transport, cell redox homeostasis, mRNA translation and ATP synthesis, and negatively affects carbon and nitrogen metabolism, transport of siderophore and peptides and tRNA synthesis. Accordingly, biochemical tests indicated that Hfq represses ornithine decarboxylase activity, indole production and utilization of glucose, mannitol, inositol and 1,2-propanediol. Moreover, Hfq repressed production of the siderophore yersiniabactin and its outer membrane receptor FyuA. In contrast, hfq mutants exhibited reduced urease production. Finally, strains lacking hfq were more susceptible to acidic pH and oxidative stress. Unlike previous reports in other Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq was dispensable for type III secretion encoded by the virulence plasmid. Using a chromosomally encoded FLAG-tagged Hfq, we observed increased production of Hfq-FLAG in late exponential and stationary phases. Overall, Hfq has a profound effect on metabolism, resistance to stress and modulates the production of two virulence factors in Y. enterocolitica, namely urease and yersiniabactin.

  6. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  7. Enhanced expression in tobacco of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein by modification of its codon usage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwendal, G.J.A.; Mendes, O.; Wolbert, E.J.H.; Boer, de A.D.

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria was resynthesized to adapt its codon usage for expression in plants by increasing the frequency of codons with a C or a G in the third position from 32 to 60%. The strategy for constructing the synthetic gfp gene was based on

  8. Mutational and selective pressures on codon and amino acid usage in Buchnera, endosymbiotic bacteria of aphids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispe, C.; Delmotte, F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Moya, A.

    2004-01-01

    We have explored compositional variation at synonymous (codon usage) and nonsynonymous (amino acid usage) positions in three complete genomes of Buchnera, endosymbiotic bacteria of aphids, and also in their orthologs in Escherichia coli, a close free-living relative. We sought to discriminate genes

  9. Nucleotide composition of the Zika virus RNA genome and its codon usage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, Formijn; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses have genomes with a distinct nucleotide composition and codon usage. We present the global characteristics of the RNA genome of Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging pathogen within the Flavivirus genus. ZIKV was first isolated in 1947 in Uganda, caused a widespread epidemic in South and

  10. High frequency of the HRAS oncogene codon 12 mutation in Macedonian patients with urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasho Panov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations at codon 12 of the HRAS (v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog oncogene are one of the best defined and widely studied molecular genetic events in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. The aim of this study was to use the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue-derived DNA to determine the frequency of the HRAS oncogene G ->T codon 12 mutation in TCC patients being treated at the University Urology Clinic in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue (PET surgically removed TCC specimens of 62 (81.58% out of 76 patients were successfully amplified, the remaining 14 (18.42% showing compromised DNA integrity. The codon 12 mutation of the HRAS oncogene was found in 24 (38.71% out of 62 successfully tested TCC urinary bladder samples. No significant relationship between the mutation frequency and the histopathological grade of tumor differentiation was detected (chi² = 0.044; p = 0.978. The relatively high frequency of mutations found in our study was comparable with some of the previously reported data obtained by this and/or other PCR-based methods. This highly sensitive and specific PCR-RFLP analysis was demonstrated to be a suitable method for the detection of mutations at codon 12 of the HRAS oncogene in PET samples of urinary bladder TCC.

  11. Unassigned Codons, Nonsense Suppression, and Anticodon Modifications in the Evolution of the Genetic Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.S. van der Gulik (Peter); W.D. Hoff (Wouter)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe origin of the genetic code is a central open problem regarding the early evolution of life. Here, we consider two undeveloped but important aspects of possible scenarios for the evolutionary pathway of the translation machinery: the role of unassigned codons in early stages

  12. Multiple start codons and phosphorylation result in discrete Rad52 protein species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mayolo, A.A.; Lisby, M.; Erdeniz, N.

    2006-01-01

    protein species are due to promiscuous choice of start codons as well as post-translational modification. Specifically, Rad52 is phosphorylated both in a cell cycle-independent and in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Furthermore, phosphorylation is dependent on the presence of the Rad52 C terminus...

  13. Influenza A virus attenuation by codon deoptimization of the NS gene for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Dewhurst, Stephen; Topham, David J; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2014-09-01

    Influenza viral infection represents a serious public health problem that causes contagious respiratory disease, which is most effectively prevented through vaccination to reduce transmission and future infection. The nonstructural (NS) gene of influenza A virus encodes an mRNA transcript that is alternatively spliced to express two viral proteins, the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) and the nuclear export protein (NEP). The importance of the NS gene of influenza A virus for viral replication and virulence has been well described and represents an attractive target to generate live attenuated influenza viruses with vaccine potential. Considering that most amino acids can be synthesized from several synonymous codons, this study employed the use of misrepresented mammalian codons (codon deoptimization) for the de novo synthesis of a viral NS RNA segment based on influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) (PR8) virus. We generated three different recombinant influenza PR8 viruses containing codon-deoptimized synonymous mutations in coding regions comprising the entire NS gene or the mRNA corresponding to the individual viral protein NS1 or NEP, without modifying the respective splicing and packaging signals of the viral segment. The fitness of these synthetic viruses was attenuated in vivo, while they retained immunogenicity, conferring both homologous and heterologous protection against influenza A virus challenges. These results indicate that influenza viruses can be effectively attenuated by synonymous codon deoptimization of the NS gene and open the possibility of their use as a safe vaccine to prevent infections with these important human pathogens. Vaccination serves as the best therapeutic option to protect humans against influenza viral infections. However, the efficacy of current influenza vaccines is suboptimal, and novel approaches are necessary for the prevention of disease cause by this important human respiratory pathogen. The nonstructural (NS) gene of

  14. Analysis of Low Frequency Protein Truncating Stop-Codon Variants and Fasting Concentration of Growth Hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hallengren

    Full Text Available The genetic background of Growth Hormone (GH secretion is not well understood. Mutations giving rise to a stop codon have a high likelihood of affecting protein function.To analyze likely functional stop codon mutations that are associated with fasting plasma concentration of Growth Hormone.We analyzed stop codon mutations in 5451 individuals in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study by genotyping the Illumina Exome Chip. To enrich for stop codon mutations with likely functional effects on protein function, we focused on those disrupting >80% of the predicted amino acid sequence, which were carried by ≥ 10 individuals. Such mutations were related to GH concentration, measured with a high sensitivity assay (hs-GH and, if nominally significant, to GH related phenotypes, using linear regression analysis.Two stop codon mutations were associated with the fasting concentration of hs-GH. rs121909305 (NP_005370.1:p.R93* [Minor Allele Frequency (MAF = 0.8%] in the Myosin 1A gene (MYO1A was associated with a 0.36 (95%CI, 0.04 to 0.54; p=0.02 increment of the standardized value of the natural logarithm of hs-GH per 1 minor allele and rs35699176 (NP_067040.1:p.Q100* in the Zink Finger protein 77 gene (ZNF77 (MAF = 4.8% was associated with a 0.12 (95%CI, 0.02 to 0.22; p = 0.02 increase of hs-GH. The mutated high hs-GH associated allele of MYO1A was related to lower BMI (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.05, waist (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.04, body fat percentage (β-coefficient, -0.23; p = 0.03 and with higher HDL (β-coefficient, 0.23; p = 0.04. The ZNF77 stop codon was associated with height (β-coefficient, 0.11; p = 0.02 but not with cardiometabolic risk factors.We here suggest that a stop codon of MYO1A, disrupting 91% of the predicted amino acid sequence, is associated with higher hs-GH and GH-related traits suggesting that MYO1A is involved in GH metabolism and possibly body fat distribution. However, our results are preliminary and need replication in

  15. Analysis of Low Frequency Protein Truncating Stop-Codon Variants and Fasting Concentration of Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallengren, Erik; Almgren, Peter; Engström, Gunnar; Persson, Margaretha; Melander, Olle

    2015-01-01

    The genetic background of Growth Hormone (GH) secretion is not well understood. Mutations giving rise to a stop codon have a high likelihood of affecting protein function. To analyze likely functional stop codon mutations that are associated with fasting plasma concentration of Growth Hormone. We analyzed stop codon mutations in 5451 individuals in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study by genotyping the Illumina Exome Chip. To enrich for stop codon mutations with likely functional effects on protein function, we focused on those disrupting >80% of the predicted amino acid sequence, which were carried by ≥ 10 individuals. Such mutations were related to GH concentration, measured with a high sensitivity assay (hs-GH) and, if nominally significant, to GH related phenotypes, using linear regression analysis. Two stop codon mutations were associated with the fasting concentration of hs-GH. rs121909305 (NP_005370.1:p.R93*) [Minor Allele Frequency (MAF) = 0.8%] in the Myosin 1A gene (MYO1A) was associated with a 0.36 (95%CI, 0.04 to 0.54; p=0.02) increment of the standardized value of the natural logarithm of hs-GH per 1 minor allele and rs35699176 (NP_067040.1:p.Q100*) in the Zink Finger protein 77 gene (ZNF77) (MAF = 4.8%) was associated with a 0.12 (95%CI, 0.02 to 0.22; p = 0.02) increase of hs-GH. The mutated high hs-GH associated allele of MYO1A was related to lower BMI (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.05), waist (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.04), body fat percentage (β-coefficient, -0.23; p = 0.03) and with higher HDL (β-coefficient, 0.23; p = 0.04). The ZNF77 stop codon was associated with height (β-coefficient, 0.11; p = 0.02) but not with cardiometabolic risk factors. We here suggest that a stop codon of MYO1A, disrupting 91% of the predicted amino acid sequence, is associated with higher hs-GH and GH-related traits suggesting that MYO1A is involved in GH metabolism and possibly body fat distribution. However, our results are preliminary and need replication in

  16. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. UGA is an additional glycine codon in uncultured SR1 bacteria from the human microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James H.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Campbell, Alisha G.; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Söll, Dieter; Podar, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    The composition of the human microbiota is recognized as an important factor in human health and disease. Many of our cohabitating microbes belong to phylum-level divisions for which there are no cultivated representatives and are only represented by small subunit rRNA sequences. For one such taxon (SR1), which includes bacteria with elevated abundance in periodontitis, we provide a single-cell genome sequence from a healthy oral sample. SR1 bacteria use a unique genetic code. In-frame TGA (opal) codons are found in most genes (85%), often at loci normally encoding conserved glycine residues. UGA appears not to function as a stop codon and is in equilibrium with the canonical GGN glycine codons, displaying strain-specific variation across the human population. SR1 encodes a divergent tRNAGlyUCA with an opal-decoding anticodon. SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase acylates tRNAGlyUCA with glycine in vitro with similar activity compared with normal tRNAGlyUCC. Coexpression of SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNAGlyUCA in Escherichia coli yields significant β-galactosidase activity in vivo from a lacZ gene containing an in-frame TGA codon. Comparative genomic analysis with Human Microbiome Project data revealed that the human body harbors a striking diversity of SR1 bacteria. This is a surprising finding because SR1 is most closely related to bacteria that live in anoxic and thermal environments. Some of these bacteria share common genetic and metabolic features with SR1, including UGA to glycine reassignment and an archaeal-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) involved in AMP recycling. UGA codon reassignment renders SR1 genes untranslatable by other bacteria, which impacts horizontal gene transfer within the human microbiota. PMID:23509275

  18. Codon reassignment to facilitate genetic engineering and biocontainment in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of microalgae as low-cost hosts for the synthesis of recombinant products such as therapeutic proteins and bioactive metabolites. In particular, the chloroplast, with its small, genetically tractable genome (plastome) and elaborate metabolism, represents an attractive platform for genetic engineering. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of the 69 protein-coding genes in the plastome uses the stop codon UGA, therefore this spare codon can be exploited as a useful synthetic biology tool. Here, we report the assignment of the codon to one for tryptophan and show that this can be used as an effective strategy for addressing a key problem in chloroplast engineering: namely, the assembly of expression cassettes in Escherichia coli when the gene product is toxic to the bacterium. This problem arises because the prokaryotic nature of chloroplast promoters and ribosome-binding sites used in such cassettes often results in transgene expression in E. coli, and is a potential issue when cloning genes for metabolic enzymes, antibacterial proteins and integral membrane proteins. We show that replacement of tryptophan codons with the spare codon (UGG→UGA) within a transgene prevents functional expression in E. coli and in the chloroplast, and that co-introduction of a plastidial trnW gene carrying a modified anticodon restores function only in the latter by allowing UGA readthrough. We demonstrate the utility of this system by expressing two genes known to be highly toxic to E. coli and discuss its value in providing an enhanced level of biocontainment for transplastomic microalgae. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. UGA is an additional glycine codon in uncultured SR1 bacteria from the human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James H; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Campbell, Alisha G; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Söll, Dieter; Podar, Mircea

    2013-04-02

    The composition of the human microbiota is recognized as an important factor in human health and disease. Many of our cohabitating microbes belong to phylum-level divisions for which there are no cultivated representatives and are only represented by small subunit rRNA sequences. For one such taxon (SR1), which includes bacteria with elevated abundance in periodontitis, we provide a single-cell genome sequence from a healthy oral sample. SR1 bacteria use a unique genetic code. In-frame TGA (opal) codons are found in most genes (85%), often at loci normally encoding conserved glycine residues. UGA appears not to function as a stop codon and is in equilibrium with the canonical GGN glycine codons, displaying strain-specific variation across the human population. SR1 encodes a divergent tRNA(Gly)UCA with an opal-decoding anticodon. SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase acylates tRNA(Gly)UCA with glycine in vitro with similar activity compared with normal tRNA(Gly)UCC. Coexpression of SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNA(Gly)UCA in Escherichia coli yields significant β-galactosidase activity in vivo from a lacZ gene containing an in-frame TGA codon. Comparative genomic analysis with Human Microbiome Project data revealed that the human body harbors a striking diversity of SR1 bacteria. This is a surprising finding because SR1 is most closely related to bacteria that live in anoxic and thermal environments. Some of these bacteria share common genetic and metabolic features with SR1, including UGA to glycine reassignment and an archaeal-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) involved in AMP recycling. UGA codon reassignment renders SR1 genes untranslatable by other bacteria, which impacts horizontal gene transfer within the human microbiota.

  20. Selective Constraints on Amino Acids Estimated by a Mechanistic Codon Substitution Model with Multiple Nucleotide Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Sanzo

    2011-01-01

    Background Empirical substitution matrices represent the average tendencies of substitutions over various protein families by sacrificing gene-level resolution. We develop a codon-based model, in which mutational tendencies of codon, a genetic code, and the strength of selective constraints against amino acid replacements can be tailored to a given gene. First, selective constraints averaged over proteins are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of each 1-PAM matrix of empirical amino acid (JTT, WAG, and LG) and codon (KHG) substitution matrices. Then, selective constraints specific to given proteins are approximated as a linear function of those estimated from the empirical substitution matrices. Results Akaike information criterion (AIC) values indicate that a model allowing multiple nucleotide changes fits the empirical substitution matrices significantly better. Also, the ML estimates of transition-transversion bias obtained from these empirical matrices are not so large as previously estimated. The selective constraints are characteristic of proteins rather than species. However, their relative strengths among amino acid pairs can be approximated not to depend very much on protein families but amino acid pairs, because the present model, in which selective constraints are approximated to be a linear function of those estimated from the JTT/WAG/LG/KHG matrices, can provide a good fit to other empirical substitution matrices including cpREV for chloroplast proteins and mtREV for vertebrate mitochondrial proteins. Conclusions/Significance The present codon-based model with the ML estimates of selective constraints and with adjustable mutation rates of nucleotide would be useful as a simple substitution model in ML and Bayesian inferences of molecular phylogenetic trees, and enables us to obtain biologically meaningful information at both nucleotide and amino acid levels from codon and protein sequences. PMID:21445250

  1. Interplay between Molecular Chaperones and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Targeting of Misfolded Proteins for Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    interacting with purified 26S proteasomes, and the subsequent characterization of two novel proteasome interacting proteins. The third study was aimed at analyzing the chaperone-assisted pathway leading to degradation of misfolded kinetochore proteins in S. pombe. In this study chaperones, E2s, E3s and DUBs...

  2. Mechanisms of Translocation of ER Chaperones to the Cell Surface and Immunomodulatory Roles in Cancer and Autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Valerie; Michalak, Marek; Abdullah, Trefa M; Bremer, Edwin; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones (e.g., calreticulin, heat shock proteins, and isomerases) perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g., drugs,

  3. Both Hsp70 chaperone and Clp protease plastidial systems are required for protection against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2017-03-04

    Environmental stress conditions such as high light, extreme temperatures, salinity or drought trigger oxidative stress and eventually protein misfolding in plants. In chloroplasts, chaperone systems refold proteins after stress, while proteases degrade misfolded and aggregated proteins that cannot be refolded. We observed that reduced activity of chloroplast Hsp70 chaperone or Clp protease systems both prevented growth of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings after treatment with the oxidative agent methyl viologen. Besides showing a role for these particular protein quality control components on the protection against oxidative stress, we provide evidence supporting the existence of a yet undiscovered pathway for Clp-mediated degradation of the damaged proteins.

  4. The Chaperone Activity of Clusterin is Dependent on Glycosylation and Redox Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Rohne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Clusterin (CLU, also known as Apolipoprotein J (ApoJ is a highly glycosylated extracellular chaperone. In humans it is expressed from a broad spectrum of tissues and related to a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and cancer. In its dominant form it is expressed as a secretory protein (secreted CLU, sCLU. During its maturation, the sCLU-precursor is N-glycosylated and cleaved into an α- and a β-chain, which are connected by five symmetrical disulfide bonds. Recently, it has been demonstrated that besides the predominant sCLU, rare intracellular CLU forms are expressed in stressed cells. Since these forms do not enter or complete the secretory pathway, they are not proteolytically modified and show either no or only core glycosylation. Due to their sparsity, these intracellular forms are functionally poorly characterized. To evaluate the function(s of these stress-related intracellular forms, we investigate for the first time the impact of proteolytic cleavage, differential glycosylation and the influence of the redox environment on the chaperone activity of CLU. Methods: Non-cleavable sCLU was generated by expression from a mutant construct of sCLU, in which the furin-like proprotein convertase (PC recognition site was modified. After purification of recombinant uncleaved sCLU from the medium of over-expressing cells, we performed chaperone activity assays to compare the activities of wild-type (cleaved and uncleaved mutant sCLU. Additionally, this approach enabled us to investigate the role of carbohydrates, the proteolytic maturation and reducing conditions on CLU chaperone activity. Further, we characterized the differentially treated CLU forms by using MALDI-TOF, CD-spectroscopy and Western blotting in addition to the functional assay. Results: We show that the PC-cleavage is dispensable for sCLU chaperone activity. Moreover, our data demonstrate that

  5. Proteomics analysis of exported chaperone/co-chaperone complexes of P. falciparum reveals an array of complex protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Przyborski, Jude (Prof. Dr.)

    2016-01-01

    In order to grow and survive the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum synthesizes and exports hundreds of proteins in order to modify the infected red blood cell. In previous studies, our group found that two members of parasite encoded type II Hsp40s (PEF55, PFA660) associate with highly mobile structure in the infected host cell, which are referred to as J-dots. Furthermore, an exported parasite chaperone, PfHsp70x was i...

  6. Large-Scale Genomic Analysis of Codon Usage in Dengue Virus and Evaluation of Its Phylogenetic Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Lara-Ramírez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of dengue virus (DENV genome sequences available allows identifying the contributing factors to DENV evolution. In the present study, the codon usage in serotypes 1–4 (DENV1–4 has been explored for 3047 sequenced genomes using different statistics methods. The correlation analysis of total GC content (GC with GC content at the three nucleotide positions of codons (GC1, GC2, and GC3 as well as the effective number of codons (ENC, ENCp versus GC3 plots revealed mutational bias and purifying selection pressures as the major forces influencing the codon usage, but with distinct pressure on specific nucleotide position in the codon. The correspondence analysis (CA and clustering analysis on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU within each serotype showed similar clustering patterns to the phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for DENV1–4. These clustering patterns are strongly related to the virus geographic origin. The phylogenetic dependence analysis also suggests that stabilizing selection acts on the codon usage bias. Our analysis of a large scale reveals new feature on DENV genomic evolution.

  7. The use of the rare UUA codon to define "expression space" for genes involved in secondary metabolism, development and environmental adaptation in streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Keith F; Chandra, Govind

    2008-02-01

    In Streptomyces coelicolor, bldA encodes the only tRNA for a rare leucine codon, UUA. This tRNA is unnecessary for growth, but is required for some aspects of secondary metabolism and morphological development, as revealed by the phenotypes of bldA mutants in diverse streptomycetes. This article is a comprehensive review of out understanding of this unusual situation. Based on information from four sequenced genomes it now appears that, typically, about 2 approximately 3% of genes in any one streptomycete contain a TTA codon, most having been acquired through species-specific horizontal gene transfer. Among the few widely conserved TTA-containing genes, mutations in just one, the pleiotropic regulatory gene adpA, give an obvious phenotype: such mutants are defective in aerial growth and sporulation, but vary in the extent of their impairment in secondary metabolism in different streptomycetes. The TTA codon in adpA is largely responsible for the morphological phenotype of a bldA mutant of S. coelicolor. AdpA-dependent targets include several genes involved in the integrated action of extracellular proteases that, at least in some species, are involved in the conversion of primary biomass into spores. The effects of bldA mutations on secondary metabolism are mostly attributable to the presence of TTA codons in pathway-specific genes, particularly in transcriptional activator genes. This is not confined to S. coelicolor-it is true for about half of all known antibiotic biosynthetic gene sets from streptomycetes. Combined microarray and proteomic analysis of liquid (and therefore non-sporulating) S. coelicolor bldA mutant cultures revealed effects of the mutation during rapid growth, during transition phase, and in stationary phase. Some of these effects may be secondary consequences of changes in the pattern of ppGpp accumulation. It is argued that the preferential accumulation of the bldA tRNA under conditions in which growth is significantly constrained has evolved

  8. The human mitochondrial tRNAMet: structure/function relationship of a unique modification in the decoding of unconventional codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbille, Yann; Gustilo, Estella M; Harris, Kimberly A; Jones, Christie N; Lusic, Hrvoje; Kaiser, Robert J; Delaney, Michael O; Spremulli, Linda L; Deiters, Alexander; Agris, Paul F

    2011-02-18

    Human mitochondrial mRNAs utilize the universal AUG and the unconventional isoleucine AUA codons for methionine. In contrast to translation in the cytoplasm, human mitochondria use one tRNA, hmtRNA(Met)(CAU), to read AUG and AUA codons at both the peptidyl- (P-), and aminoacyl- (A-) sites of the ribosome. The hmtRNA(Met)(CAU) has a unique post-transcriptional modification, 5-formylcytidine, at the wobble position 34 (f(5)C(34)), and a cytidine substituting for the invariant uridine at position 33 of the canonical U-turn in tRNAs. The structure of the tRNA anticodon stem and loop domain (hmtASL(Met)(CAU)), determined by NMR restrained molecular modeling, revealed how the f(5)C(34) modification facilitates the decoding of AUA at the P- and the A-sites. The f(5)C(34) defined a reduced conformational space for the nucleoside, in what appears to have restricted the conformational dynamics of the anticodon bases of the modified hmtASL(Met)(CAU). The hmtASL(Met)(CAU) exhibited a C-turn conformation that has some characteristics of the U-turn motif. Codon binding studies with both Escherichia coli and bovine mitochondrial ribosomes revealed that the f(5)C(34) facilitates AUA binding in the A-site and suggested that the modification favorably alters the ASL binding kinetics. Mitochondrial translation by many organisms, including humans, sometimes initiates with the universal isoleucine codons AUU and AUC. The f(5)C(34) enabled P-site codon binding to these normally isoleucine codons. Thus, the physicochemical properties of this one modification, f(5)C(34), expand codon recognition from the traditional AUG to the non-traditional, synonymous codons AUU and AUC as well as AUA, in the reassignment of universal codons in the mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hauber

    Full Text Available Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1 selection is weak; and 2 similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele.

  10. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombination–deletion between homologous cassettes in retrovirus is suppressed via a strategy of degenerate codon substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eung Jun; Bais, Anthony J; Yang, Wen; Ma, Qiangzhong; Guo, Xiuyang; Sepe, Steven M; Junghans, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Transduction and expression procedures in gene therapy protocols may optimally transfer more than a single gene to correct a defect and/or transmit new functions to recipient cells or organisms. This may be accomplished by transduction with two (or more) vectors, or, more efficiently, in a single vector. Occasionally, it may be useful to coexpress homologous genes or chimeric proteins with regions of shared homology. Retroviridae include the dominant vector systems for gene transfer (e.g., gamma-retro and lentiviruses) and are capable of such multigene expression. However, these same viruses are known for efficient recombination–deletion when domains are duplicated within the viral genome. This problem can be averted by resorting to two-vector strategies (two-chain two-vector), but at a penalty to cost, convenience, and efficiency. Employing a chimeric antigen receptor system as an example, we confirm that coexpression of two genes with homologous domains in a single gamma-retroviral vector (two-chain single-vector) leads to recombination–deletion between repeated sequences, excising the equivalent of one of the chimeric antigen receptors. Here, we show that a degenerate codon substitution strategy in the two-chain single-vector format efficiently suppressed intravector deletional loss with rescue of balanced gene coexpression by minimizing sequence homology between repeated domains and preserving the final protein sequence. PMID:25419532

  12. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  13. Conserved TRAM Domain Functions as an Archaeal Cold Shock Protein via RNA Chaperone Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold shock proteins (Csps enable organisms to acclimate to and survive in cold environments and the bacterial CspA family exerts the cold protection via its RNA chaperone activity. However, most Archaea do not contain orthologs to the bacterial csp. TRAM, a conserved domain among RNA modification proteins ubiquitously distributed in organisms, occurs as an individual protein in most archaeal phyla and has a structural similarity to Csp proteins, yet its biological functions remain unknown. Through physiological and biochemical studies on four TRAM proteins from a cold adaptive archaeon Methanolobus psychrophilus R15, this work demonstrated that TRAM is an archaeal Csp and exhibits RNA chaperone activity. Three TRAM encoding genes (Mpsy_0643, Mpsy_3043, and Mpsy_3066 exhibited remarkable cold-shock induced transcription and were preferentially translated at lower temperature (18°C, while the fourth (Mpsy_2002 was constitutively expressed. They were all able to complement the cspABGE mutant of Escherichia coli BX04 that does not grow in cold temperatures and showed transcriptional antitermination. TRAM3066 (gene product of Mpsy_3066 and TRAM2002 (gene product of Mpsy_2002 displayed sequence-non-specific RNA but not DNA binding activity, and TRAM3066 assisted RNases in degradation of structured RNA, thus validating the RNA chaperone activity of TRAMs. Given the chaperone activity, TRAM is predicted to function beyond a Csp.

  14. Nucleosome assembly protein-1 is a linker histone chaperone in Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintomi, Keishi; Iwabuchi, Mari; Saeki, Hideaki; Ura, Kiyoe; Kishimoto, Takeo; Ohsumi, Keita

    2005-06-07

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is primarily packaged into nucleosomes through sequential ordered binding of the core and linker histone proteins. The acidic proteins termed histone chaperones are known to bind to core histones to neutralize their positive charges, thereby facilitating their proper deposition onto DNA to assemble the core of nucleosomes. For linker histones, however, little has been known about the regulatory mechanism for deposition of linker histones onto the linker DNA. Here we report that, in Xenopus eggs, the linker histone is associated with the Xenopus homologue of nucleosome assembly protein-1 (NAP-1), which is known to be a chaperone for the core histones H2A and H2B in Drosophila and mammalian cells [Ito, T., Bulger, M., Kobayashi, R. & Kadonaga, J. T. (1996) Mol. Cell Biol. 16, 3112-3124; Chang, L., Loranger, S. S., Mizzen, C., Ernst, S. G., Allis, C. D. & Annunziato, A. T. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 469-480]. We show that NAP-1 acts as the chaperone for the linker histone in both sperm chromatin remodeling into nucleosomes and linker histone binding to nucleosome core dimers. In the presence of NAP-1, the linker histone is properly deposited onto linker DNA at physiological ionic strength, without formation of nonspecific aggregates. These results strongly suggest that NAP-1 functions as a chaperone for the linker histone in Xenopus eggs.

  15. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  16. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  17. Chaperone gelator for the chiral self-assembly of all proteinogenic amino acids and their enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Minghua

    2016-05-04

    A concept of a chaperone gelator that can assist non-gelator molecules to form gels is proposed. Such a new gelator was developed and found to tune all the proteinogenic l-amino acids, as well as their enantiomers into supramolecular gels.

  18. Histone Chaperone NAP1 Mediates Sister Chromatid Resolution by Counteracting Protein Phosphatase 2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); C.M. Doyen (Cécile); T.W. Kan (Tsung Wai); G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); K. Sap (Karen); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); Z. Özgür (Zeliha); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractChromosome duplication and transmission into daughter cells requires the precisely orchestrated binding and release of cohesin. We found that the Drosophila histone chaperone NAP1 is required for cohesin release and sister chromatid resolution during mitosis. Genome-wide surveys revealed

  19. Chaperone proteostasis in Parkinson's disease : stabilization of the Hsp70/alpha-synuclein complex by Hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodveldt, Cintia; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Andersson, August; van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Hsu, Shang-Te; Fernandez-Montesinos, Rafael; de Jong, Jannie; van Ham, Tjakko J.; Nollen, Ellen A.; Pozo, David; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent protein chaperone heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) displays broad anti-aggregation functions and has a critical function in preventing protein misfolding pathologies. According to in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease (PD), loss of Hsp70 activity is associated with

  20. The Attitudes and Practices of General Practitioners about the Use of Chaperones in Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver van Hecke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To consider the use of medical chaperones during certain clinical examinations is important whether one practises as a specialist, nurse, medical student, or generalist. Chaperones have been used by doctors conducting intimate examinations for many years but their true extent remains largely unknown. Until recently, there was no national guidance in Australia. Aim. To explore the attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GP regarding their use of chaperones in urban Melbourne, Australia. Method. Qualitative two focus groups involving seventeen GPs from two locations. Discussions were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed. Results. Common themes and subthemes emerged which were grouped into three main areas: (a practitioner-related, (b patient-related and (c practice related. Discussion. This is the first study from an Australian primary care perspective to gauge the attitudes and experiences of GPs on their use of chaperones. It will provide vital information to inform the next step of extending this research to a national GP audience. From an international perspective, this study provides an excellent template for other primary care clinicians to conduct research in this important field of doctor-patient relationship.

  1. LINE-1 retrotransposition requires the nucleic acid chaperone activity of the ORF1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Cruceanu, Margareta; Branciforte, Dan; Wai-Lun Li, Patrick; Kwok, Stanley C; Hodges, Robert S; Williams, Mark C

    2005-05-06

    LINE-1 is a highly successful, non-LTR retrotransposon that has played a leading role in shaping mammalian genomes. These elements move autonomously through an RNA intermediate using target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT). L1 encodes two essential polypeptides for retrotransposition, the products of its two open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2. The exact function of the ORF1 protein (ORF1p) in L1 retrotransposition is unknown, although it is an RNA-binding protein that can act as a nucleic acid chaperone. Here, we investigate the requirements for these two activities in L1 retrotransposition by examining the consequences of mutating two adjacent and highly conserved arginine residues in the ORF1p from mouse L1. Substitution of both arginine residues with alanine strongly reduces the affinity of the protein for single-stranded nucleic acid, whereas substitution of one or both with lysine has only minimal effects on this feature. Rather, the lysine substitutions alter the delicate balance between the ORF1 protein's melting and reannealing activities, thereby reducing its nucleic acid chaperone activity. These findings establish the importance of the nucleic acid chaperone activity of ORF1p to successful L1 retrotransposition, and provide insight into the essential properties of nucleic acid chaperones.

  2. Oral pharmacological chaperone migalastat compared with enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Derralynn A.; Nicholls, Kathleen; Shankar, Suma P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA mutations, resulting in α-galactosidase (α-Gal) deficiency and accumulation of lysosomal substrates. Migalastat, an oral pharmacological chaperone being developed as an alternative to intravenous enzyme replacement t...

  3. The chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on Gaucher cells and normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Zhuo; Li, Linjing; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Kousaku

    2013-04-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), caused by a defect of acid β-glucosidase (β-Glu), is one of the most common sphingolipidoses. Recently, ambroxol, an FDA-approved drug used to treat airway mucus hypersecretion and hyaline membrane disease in newborns, was identified as a chemical chaperone for GD. In the present study, we investigated the chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on both cultured GD patient cells and normal mice. We found that ambroxol treatment significantly increased N370S, F213I, N188S/G193W and R120W mutant β-Glu activities in GD fibroblasts with low cytotoxicity. Additionally, we measured the β-Glu activity in the tissues of normal mice which received water containing increasing concentrations of ambroxol ad libitum for one week. No serious adverse effect was observed during this experiment. Ambroxol significantly increased the β-Glu activity in the spleen, heart and cerebellum of the mice. This result showed its oral availability and wide distribution and chaperone activity in the tissues, including the brain, and its lack of acute toxicity. These characteristics of ambroxol would make it a potential therapeutic chaperone in the treatment of GD with neurological manifestations. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analytical background and discussion of the chaperone model of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liautard, J P

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that prion infection is due solely to a protein i.e. the protein-only hypothesis. The essential constituent of infectious prions is the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) which is chemically indistinguishable from the normal, cellular protein (PrPC) but exhibits distinct secondary and tertiary structure. This very unusual feature seems to be in contradiction with a major paradigm of present structural biology stated by Anfinsen: a protein folds to the most stable conformation, this means only one structure. In order to reconcile the results obtained on prions with the biophysics of protein folding, a model is proposed. It is based on the hypothesis that a thermodynamically irreversible step is involved in protein folding. The model is then extended to chaperone-assisted protein folding. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the transitory secondary structure formed during the earlier step of folding could interact with chaperone. Analysis shows that chaperone may help the protein to find correct conformation. On the other hand, analysis reveals the possibility that more than one structure may form from a single polypeptide chain. Under these conditions, the behaviour of chaperones resembles the characteristics of prion diseases.

  5. Chaperone-usher fimbriae in a diverse selection of Gallibacterium genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudirkiene, Egle; Bager, Ragnhild Jørgensen; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    encoding a putative major fimbrial subunit, a chaperone, an usher and a fimbrial adhesin. Five fimbrial clusters (Flf-Flf4) and eight conserved domain groups were defined to accommodate the identified fimbriae. Although, the number of different fimbrial clusters in individual Gallibacterium genomes was low...

  6. A conserved co-chaperone is required for virulence in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Libera; López Díaz, Cristina; Turrà, David; Di Pietro, Antonio; Hampel, Martin; Heimel, Kai; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-02-01

    The maize pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis experiences endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress during plant colonization and relies on the unfolded protein response (UPR) to cope with this stress. We identified the U. maydis co-chaperone, designated Dnj1, as part of this conserved cellular response to ER stress. ∆dnj1 cells are sensitive to the ER stressor tunicamycin and display a severe virulence defect in maize infection assays. A dnj1 mutant allele unable to stimulate the ATPase activity of chaperones phenocopies the null allele. A Dnj1-mCherry fusion protein localizes in the ER and interacts with the luminal chaperone Bip1. The Fusarium oxysporum Dnj1 ortholog contributes to the virulence of this fungal pathogen in tomato plants. Unlike the human ortholog, F. oxysporum Dnj1 partially rescues the virulence defect of the Ustilago dnj1 mutant. By enabling the fungus to restore ER homeostasis and maintain a high secretory activity, Dnj1 contributes to the establishment of a compatible interaction with the host. Dnj1 orthologs are present in many filamentous fungi, but are absent in budding and fission yeasts. We postulate a conserved and essential role during virulence for this class of co-chaperones. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Promiscuous histone mis-assembly is actively prevented by chaperones | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    About the Cover Chaperone HJURP drives the proper loading of protein CENP-A to the centromere of a chromosome. The effect of HJURP on CENP-A's structural dynamics are observed and explained using dual-resolution in silico simulations, while in vivo experiments demonstrate how CENP-A mutations influence its specific localization in human cells. Abstract

  8. The story of stolen chaperones: how overexpression of Q/N proteins cures yeast prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkatch, Irina L; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-seeding alternate protein conformations. Most yeast prions contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich domains that promote the formation of amyloid-like prion aggregates. Chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, are required to continually break these aggregates into smaller "seeds." Decreasing aggregate size and increasing the number of growing aggregate ends facilitates both aggregate transmission and growth. Our previous work showed that overexpression of 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains facilitates the de novo aggregation of Sup35 into the [PSI(+)] prion, presumably by a cross-seeding mechanism. We now discuss our recent paper, in which we showed that overexpression of most of these same 11 Q/N-rich proteins, including Pin4C and Cyc8, destabilized pre-existing Q/N rich prions. Overexpression of both Pin4C and Cyc8 caused [PSI(+)] aggregates to enlarge. This is incompatible with a previously proposed "capping" model where the overexpressed Q/N-rich protein poisons, or "caps," the growing aggregate ends. Rather the data match what is expected of a reduction in prion severing by chaperones. Indeed, while Pin4C overexpression does not alter chaperone levels, Pin4C aggregates sequester chaperones away from the prion aggregates. Cyc8 overexpression cures [PSI(+)] by inducing an increase in Hsp104 levels, as excess Hsp104 binds to [PSI(+)] aggregates in a way that blocks their shearing.

  9. Key for protein coding sequences identification: computer analysis of codon strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, F; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Ehrlich, R; Reiss, C

    1982-01-11

    The signal qualifying an AUG or GUG as an initiator in mRNAs processed by E. coli ribosomes is not found to be a systematic, literal homology sequence. In contrast, stability analysis reveals that initiators always occur within nucleic acid domains of low stability, for which a high A/U content is observed. Since no aminoacid selection pressure can be detected at N-termini of the proteins, the A/U enrichment results from a biased usage of the code degeneracy. A computer analysis is presented which allows easy detection of the codon strategy. N-terminal codons carry rather systematically A or U in third position, which suggests a mechanism for translation initiation and helps to detect protein coding sequences in sequenced DNA.

  10. Tuning protein expression using synonymous codon libraries targeted to the 5' mRNA coding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Borch Jensen, Martin; Bentin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    sequence allowed tuning of protein expression over ~300-fold with preservation of amino acid identity. This approach is simple and should be generally applicable in bacteria. The data support that features in the 5' mRNA coding region near the AUG start codon are key in determining translation output......In bacteria, the 5' mRNA coding region plays an important role in determining translation output. Here, we report synthetic sequences that when placed in the 5'-mRNA coding region, leading to recombinant proteins containing short N-terminal extensions, virtually abolish, enhance or produce...... intermediate expression levels of green fluorescent protein in Escherichia coli. At least in one case, no apparent effect on protein stability was observed, pointing to RNA level effects as the principal reason for the observed expression differences. Targeting a synonymous codon library to the 5' coding...

  11. Lack of IRS-1 codon 513 and 972 polymorphism in Pima Indians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celi, F.S.; Silver, K.; Walston, J. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), a 1242 amino acid protein, an endogenous substrate for the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, mediates many or all of the metabolic actions of insulin. Recently, polymorphism at codons 513 and 972 of the IRS-1 gene resulting in 2 amino acid substitutions that were associated with type II diabetes were found in a Caucasian population. Using allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization, we screened 242 diabetic and 190 nondiabetic Pima Indians, a population with a very high prevalence of type II diabetes. Neither of the two mutations was present in either diabetic or nondiabetic subjects. We conclude that polymorphism at codons 513 and 972 of the IRS-1 gene observed in certain Caucasian populations is very rare or absent in Pima Indians. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. In vitro readthrough of termination codons by gentamycin in the Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellais, Samuel; Le Goff, Carine; Dagoneau, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    The Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome (SWS) is a frequently lethal chondrodysplasia caused by null mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene (LIFR) responsible for an impaired activation of the JAK-STAT pathway after LIF stimulation. Most LIFR mutations are nonsense mutations, thus prompting us to investigate the impact of aminoglycosides on the readthrough of premature termination codons (PTCs). Culturing skin fibroblasts from three SWS patients and controls for 48 h in the presence of gentamycin (200-500 microg/ml) partially restored the JAK-STAT3 pathway when stimulated by LIF. Consistently, quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that gentamycin stabilized LIFR mRNAs carrying UGA premature termination codons. We conclude that high gentamycin concentrations can partially restore functional LIFR protein synthesis in vitro, prompting us to investigate PTC readthrough using less toxic and more efficient drugs in this presently untreatable lethal condition.

  13. In vitro readthrough of termination codons by gentamycin in the Stüve–Wiedemann Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellais, Samuel; Le Goff, Carine; Dagoneau, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    The Stüve–Wiedemann Syndrome (SWS) is a frequently lethal chondrodysplasia caused by null mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene (LIFR) responsible for an impaired activation of the JAK–STAT pathway after LIF stimulation. Most LIFR mutations are nonsense mutations, thus prompting us to investigate the impact of aminoglycosides on the readthrough of premature termination codons (PTCs). Culturing skin fibroblasts from three SWS patients and controls for 48 h in the presence of gentamycin (200–500 μg/ml) partially restored the JAK–STAT3 pathway when stimulated by LIF. Consistently, quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that gentamycin stabilized LIFR mRNAs carrying UGA premature termination codons. We conclude that high gentamycin concentrations can partially restore functional LIFR protein synthesis in vitro, prompting us to investigate PTC readthrough using less toxic and more efficient drugs in this presently untreatable lethal condition. PMID:19603067

  14. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picking Wendy L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. Results In this study, we present the 3.3 Å crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155 of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC1-151. Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric "head-to- head" dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC1-151. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II

  15. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may

  16. p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Fei; Li, Bo; Wei, Yong-Gang; Yan, Lv-Nan; Wen, Tian-Fu

    2011-03-07

    To evaluate the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer risk by means of meta-analysis. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase and Chinese Biomedicine databases. Summary odds ratios and 95% CI for p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer were calculated in fixed-effects model (Mantel-Haenszel method) and random-effects model (DerSimonian and Laird method) when appropriate. This meta-analysis included 1115 liver cancer cases and 1778 controls. The combined results based on all studies showed that there was a statistically significant link between Pro/Pro genotype and liver cancer, but not between Arg/Arg or Pro/Arg genotype and liver cancer. When stratifying for race, similar results were obtained, i.e. patients with liver cancer had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro genotype than non-cancer patients among Asians. After stratifying the various studies by control source, gender, family history of liver cancer and chronic hepatitis virus infection, we found that (1) patients among hospital-based studies had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro and a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg genotype than individuals without cancer; (2) female patients with liver cancer had a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg and a higher frequency of Pro/Arg+Pro/Pro genotypes than female individuals without cancer; (3) subgroup analyses for family history of liver cancer did not reveal any significant association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer development; and (4) patients with negative hepatitis virus infection had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro and a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg genotype than individuals without cancer. This meta-analysis suggests that the p53 codon 72 polymorphism may be associated with liver cancer among Asians.

  17. Genotyping of K-ras codons 12 and 13 mutations in colorectal cancer by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ling; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2009-06-26

    Point mutations of the K-ras gene located in codons 12 and 13 cause poor responses to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Besides, mutations of K-ras gene have also been proven to play an important role in human tumor progression. We established a simple and effective capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for simultaneous point mutation detection in codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. We combined one universal fluorescence-based nonhuman-sequence primer and two fragment-oriented primers in one tube, and performed this two-in-one polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR fragments included wild type and seven point mutations at codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. The amplicons were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP)-CE method. The CE analysis was performed by using a 1x Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 1.5% (w/v) hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) (MW 250,000) under reverse polarity with 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Ninety colorectal cancer patients were blindly genotyped using this developed method. The results showed good agreement with those of DNA sequencing method. The SSCP-CE was feasible for mutation screening of K-ras gene in populations.

  18. CRISPR-Mediated Base Editing Enables Efficient Disruption of Eukaryotic Genes through Induction of STOP Codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon, Pierre; Bryant, Eric E; Joseph, Sarah A; Nambiar, Tarun S; Hayward, Samuel B; Rothstein, Rodney; Ciccia, Alberto

    2017-09-21

    Standard CRISPR-mediated gene disruption strategies rely on Cas9-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that CRISPR-dependent base editing efficiently inactivates genes by precisely converting four codons (CAA, CAG, CGA, and TGG) into STOP codons without DSB formation. To facilitate gene inactivation by induction of STOP codons (iSTOP), we provide access to a database of over 3.4 million single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for iSTOP (sgSTOPs) targeting 97%-99% of genes in eight eukaryotic species, and we describe a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay that allows the rapid detection of iSTOP-mediated editing in cell populations and clones. To simplify the selection of sgSTOPs, our resource includes annotations for off-target propensity, percentage of isoforms targeted, prediction of nonsense-mediated decay, and restriction enzymes for RFLP analysis. Additionally, our database includes sgSTOPs that could be employed to precisely model over 32,000 cancer-associated nonsense mutations. Altogether, this work provides a comprehensive resource for DSB-free gene disruption by iSTOP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Codon-based phylogenetics introduces novel flagellar gene markers to oomycete systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robideau, Gregg P; Rodrigue, Nicolas; André Lévesque, C

    2014-10-01

    Oomycete systematics has traditionally been reliant on ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sequences. Here we report the use of two single-copy protein-coding flagellar genes, PF16 and OCM1, in oomycete systematics, showing their utility in phylogenetic reconstruction and species identification. Applying a recently proposed mutation-selection model of codon substitution, the phylogenetic relationships inferred by flagellar genes are largely in agreement with the current views of oomycete evolution, whereas nucleotide- and amino acid-level models produce biologically implausible reconstructions. Interesting parallels exist between the phylogeny inferred from the flagellar genes and zoospore ontology, providing external support for the tree obtained using the codon model. The resolution achieved for species identification is ample using PF16, and quite robust using OCM1, and the described PCR primers are able to amplify both genes for a range of oomycete genera. Altogether, when analyzed with a rich codon substitution model, these flagellar genes provide useful markers for the oomycete molecular toolbox. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of correlated tRNA abundances on translation errors and evolution of codon usage bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premal Shah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that tRNA abundances are thought to play a major role in determining translation error rates, their distribution across the genetic code and the resulting implications have received little attention. In general, studies of codon usage bias (CUB assume that codons with higher tRNA abundance have lower missense error rates. Using a model of protein translation based on tRNA competition and intra-ribosomal kinetics, we show that this assumption can be violated when tRNA abundances are positively correlated across the genetic code. Examining the distribution of tRNA abundances across 73 bacterial genomes from 20 different genera, we find a consistent positive correlation between tRNA abundances across the genetic code. This work challenges one of the fundamental assumptions made in over 30 years of research on CUB that codons with higher tRNA abundances have lower missense error rates and that missense errors are the primary selective force responsible for CUB.

  1. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Deng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9 in tRNAArg(UCU and tRNAGlu(UUC and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell.

  2. The Unfolded Protein Response and Chemical Chaperones Reduce Protein Misfolding and Colitis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAO, STEWART SIYAN; ZIMMERMANN, ELLEN M.; CHUANG, BRANDY–MENGCHIEH; SONG, BENBO; NWOKOYE, ANOSIKE; WILKINSON, J. ERBY; EATON, KATHRYN A.; KAUFMAN, RANDAL J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with development of inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effects of ER stress–induced chaperone response and the orally active chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) and 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), which facilitate protein folding and reduce ER stress, in mice with colitis. METHODS We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis in mice that do not express the transcription factor ATF6α or the protein chaperone P58IPK. We examined the effects of TUDCA and PBA in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IECs); in wild-type, P58IPK−/−, and Atf6α−/− mice with colitis; and in Il10−/− mice. RESULTS P58IPK−/− and Atf6α−/− mice developed more severe colitis following administration of DSS than wild-type mice. IECs from P58IPK−/− mice had excessive ER stress, and apoptotic signaling was activated in IECs from Atf6α−/− mice. Inflammatory stimuli induced ER stress signals in cultured IECs, which were reduced by incubation with TUDCA or PBA. Oral administration of either PBA or TUDCA reduced features of DSS-induced acute and chronic colitis in wild-type mice, the colitis that develops in Il10−/− mice, and DSS-induced colitis in P58IPK−/− and Atf6α−/− mice. Reduced signs of colonic inflammation in these mice were associated with significantly decreased ER stress in colonic epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS The unfolded protein response induces expression of genes that encode chaperones involved in ER protein folding; these factors prevent induction of colitis in mice. Chemical chaperones such as TUDCA and PBA alleviate different forms of colitis in mice and might be developed for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23336977

  3. [Preparation of anticolon carcinoma vaccine with rich chaperone peptides and study on its anticancer efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Gang; Huang, Chang-Xin; Yang, Guan-Gen; Jin, Jian-Fang; Kang, Yun-Ping; Xia, Da-Jing; Wang, Qing-Qing

    2009-05-01

    To prepare the anticolon carcinoma vaccine with rich chaperone peptide and to examine its anticancer immunological efficacy. CT26 colon carcinoma cells were cultured in 1 mg/L Trichosanthin 1640 medium at different temperatures to induce the chaperone expression and promote the synthesis of antigen peptides. Groups of these cells treated under the different condition were lysed by the sonic disintegration, and the lysates were centrifuged. The rawpurified proteins were obtained from the supernatants by precipitating with saturated ammonium sulfate and removing the molecules below 50,000 and above 300,000 in molecular weight via dialysis. Furthermore, the proteins with the molecular weights in 70,000, 90,000, 95,000, 110,000 and 170,000 were collected through gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. The purified proteins were analysed by Western blotting, and inspected on the anticancer immunological effects including lymphocyte proliferation and the activities of NK and CTL. Major of the chaperone peptides of anticancer effects in CT26 cells, including antigen peptides joining with HSP70, HSP90, gp96, HSP110 and HSP170, was satisfactorily extracted and condensed, and rich chaperone peptide composites were successfully obtained. The composites prepared under various condition could all enhance lymphocyte proliferation and the activities of CTL and NK(P<0.01). The rich chaperone peptide composites are successfully prepared via dialysis, salt fractionation and gel filtration combined with SDS-PAGE. Both the heat stress and Trichosanthin can increase the composites, which treated by 42 centi-degree heat stress and Trichosanthin are found to possess the strongest anticancer efficacy.

  4. Improving the growth rate of Escherichia coli DH5alpha at low temperature through engineering of GroEL/S chaperone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Heo, Mi-Ae; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kim, June-Hyung; Kim, Byung-Gee; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2008-02-15

    GroEL/S is a molecular chaperone system in Escherichia coli which not only assists the folding of intracellular proteins but also affects the cellular activity against the change of environmental condition. Here we show that the growth rate of E. coli DH5alpha can be improved at low temperature by expressing a GroEL/S variant achieved through irrational protein engineering approach. The GroELS variant (GroELS(var)) accelerating the growth of E. coli DH5alpha was screened through enrichment culture of the mutant libraries obtained by random mutagenesis. E. coli DH5alpha harboring the groELS(var) gene exhibited approximately 1.5-2 times higher growth rate compared to the strain with wild-type GroELS at 15-30 degrees C. At 10 degrees C, a temperature that the growth of E. coli DH5alpha almost stops, the GroELS(var) triggered the growth of E. coli DH5alpha. We identified that seven nucleotides of groELS gene and six amino acids of the GroELS were changed through the mutagenesis and screening. Site directed mutagenic analysis revealed that H360 in GroEL(var) is the most crucial residue determining the activity of GroELS(var) and more than one of the other residues in GroEL(var) may be additionally involved in the activity of GroELS(var). The improvement of growth rate induced by the GroELS(var) was observed only in the strain DH5alpha and not detected in other E. coli strains, such as BL21, BW25113, codon+, JM110, Top10, and XL1-blue. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Oxidative stress induces monocyte necrosis with enrichment of cell-bound albumin and overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Tang

    Full Text Available In the present study, monocytes were treated with 5-azacytidine (azacytidine, gossypol or hydrogen peroxide to induce cell death through oxidative stress. A shift from apoptotic to necrotic cell death occurred when monocytes were treated with 100 µM azacytidine for more than 12 hours. Necrotic monocytes exhibited characteristics, including enrichment of cell-bound albumin and up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones to protect mitochondrial integrity, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549 and HOC1a. Our results show that the cell-bound albumin originates in the culture medium rather than from monocyte-derived hepatocytes, and that HSP60 is a potential binding partner of the cell-bound albumin. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase are the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial and ER-chaperones, and that both HSP60 and calreticulin are ubiquitinated in necrotic monocytes. In contrast, expression levels of the cytosolic chaperones HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in the azacytidine-treated monocytes, concomitant with an increase in the levels of these chaperones in the cell culture medium. Collectively, our results demonstrates that chaperones from different organelles behave differently in necrotic monocytes, ER- and mitochondrial chaperones being retained and cytosolic and nuclear chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. HSP60 may serve as a new target for development of myeloid leukemia treatment.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the interplay between hsc70 and its co-chaperone HspBP1

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    Hicham Mahboubi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chaperones and their co-factors are components of a cellular network; they collaborate to maintain proteostasis under normal and harmful conditions. In particular, hsp70 family members and their co-chaperones are essential to repair damaged proteins. Co-chaperones are present in different subcellular compartments, where they modulate chaperone activities.Methods and Results. Our studies assessed the relationship between hsc70 and its co-factor HspBP1 in human cancer cells. HspBP1 promotes nucleotide exchange on hsc70, but has also chaperone-independent functions. We characterized the interplay between hsc70 and HspBP1 by quantitative confocal microscopy combined with automated image analyses and statistical evaluation. Stress and the recovery from insult changed significantly the subcellular distribution of hsc70, but had little effect on HspBP1. Single-cell measurements and regression analysis revealed that the links between the chaperone and its co-factor relied on (i the physiological state of the cell and (ii the subcellular compartment. As such, we identified a linear relationship and strong correlation between hsc70 and HspBP1 distribution in control and heat-shocked cells; this correlation changed in a compartment-specific fashion during the recovery from stress. Furthermore, we uncovered significant stress-induced changes in the colocalization between hsc70 and HspBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm.Discussion. Our quantitative approach defined novel properties of the co-chaperone HspBP1 as they relate to its interplay with hsc70. We propose that changes in cell physiology promote chaperone redistribution and thereby stimulate chaperone-independent functions of HspBP1.

  7. The Malarial Exported PFA0660w Is an Hsp40 Co-Chaperone of PfHsp70-x.

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    Michael O Daniyan

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum, the human pathogen responsible for the most dangerous malaria infection, survives and develops in mature erythrocytes through the export of proteins needed for remodelling of the host cell. Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein (Hsp family are prominent members of the exportome, including a number of Hsp40s and a Hsp70. PFA0660w, a type II Hsp40, has been shown to be exported and possibly form a complex with PfHsp70-x in the infected erythrocyte cytosol. However, the chaperone properties of PFA0660w and its interaction with human and parasite Hsp70s are yet to be investigated. Recombinant PFA0660w was found to exist as a monomer in solution, and was able to significantly stimulate the ATPase activity of PfHsp70-x but not that of a second plasmodial Hsp70 (PfHsp70-1 or a human Hsp70 (HSPA1A, indicating a potential specific functional partnership with PfHsp70-x. Protein binding studies in the presence and absence of ATP suggested that the interaction of PFA0660w with PfHsp70-x most likely represented a co-chaperone/chaperone interaction. Also, PFA0660w alone produced a concentration-dependent suppression of rhodanese aggregation, demonstrating its chaperone properties. Overall, we have provided the first biochemical evidence for the possible role of PFA0660w as a chaperone and as co-chaperone of PfHsp70-x. We propose that these chaperones boost the chaperone power of the infected erythrocyte, enabling successful protein trafficking and folding, and thereby making a fundamental contribution to the pathology of malaria.

  8. Self-catalytic DNA depurination underlies human β-globin gene mutations at codon 6 that cause anemias and thalassemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Amosova, Olga; Fresco, Jacques R

    2013-04-19

    The human β-globin gene contains an 18-nucleotide coding strand sequence centered at codon 6 and capable of forming a stem-loop structure that can self-catalyze depurination of the 5'G residue of that codon. The resultant apurinic lesion is subject to error-prone repair, consistent with the occurrence about this codon of mutations responsible for 6 anemias and β-thalassemias and additional substitutions without clinical consequences. The 4-residue loop of this stem-loop-forming sequence shows the highest incidence of mutation across the gene. The loop and first stem base pair-forming residues appeared early in the mammalian clade. The other stem-forming segments evolved more recently among primates, thereby conferring self-depurination capacity at codon 6. These observations indicate a conserved molecular mechanism leading to β-globin variants underlying phenotypic diversity and disease.

  9. Differentiating between near- and non-cognate codons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Ewan P Plant

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Decoding of mRNAs is performed by aminoacyl tRNAs (aa-tRNAs. This process is highly accurate, however, at low frequencies (10(-3 - 10(-4 the wrong aa-tRNA can be selected, leading to incorporation of aberrant amino acids. Although our understanding of what constitutes the correct or cognate aa-tRNA:mRNA interaction is well defined, a functional distinction between near-cognate or single mismatched, and unpaired or non-cognate interactions is lacking.Misreading of several synonymous codon substitutions at the catalytic site of firefly luciferase was assayed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the results in the context of current kinetic and biophysical models of aa-tRNA selection suggests that the defining feature of near-cognate aa-tRNAs is their potential to form mini-helical structures with A-site codons, enabling stimulation of GTPase activity of eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A (eEF1A. Paromomycin specifically stimulated misreading of near-cognate but not of non-cognate aa-tRNAs, providing a functional probe to distinguish between these two classes. Deletion of the accessory elongation factor eEF1Bgamma promoted increased misreading of near-cognate, but hyperaccurate reading of non-cognate codons, suggesting that this factor also has a role in tRNA discrimination. A mutant of eEF1Balpha, the nucleotide exchange factor for eEF1A, promoted a general increase in fidelity, suggesting that the decreased rates of elongation may provide more time for discrimination between aa-tRNAs. A mutant form of ribosomal protein L5 promoted hyperaccurate decoding of both types of codons, even though it is topologically distant from the decoding center.It is important to distinguish between near-cognate and non-cognate mRNA:tRNA interactions, because such a definition may be important for informing therapeutic strategies for suppressing these two different categories of mutations underlying many human diseases. This study suggests that the defining feature

  10. Differentiating between near- and non-cognate codons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Ewan P; Nguyen, Phuc; Russ, Jonathan R; Pittman, Yvette R; Nguyen, Thai; Quesinberry, Jack T; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2007-06-13

    Decoding of mRNAs is performed by aminoacyl tRNAs (aa-tRNAs). This process is highly accurate, however, at low frequencies (10(-3) - 10(-4)) the wrong aa-tRNA can be selected, leading to incorporation of aberrant amino acids. Although our understanding of what constitutes the correct or cognate aa-tRNA:mRNA interaction is well defined, a functional distinction between near-cognate or single mismatched, and unpaired or non-cognate interactions is lacking. Misreading of several synonymous codon substitutions at the catalytic site of firefly luciferase was assayed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the results in the context of current kinetic and biophysical models of aa-tRNA selection suggests that the defining feature of near-cognate aa-tRNAs is their potential to form mini-helical structures with A-site codons, enabling stimulation of GTPase activity of eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A (eEF1A). Paromomycin specifically stimulated misreading of near-cognate but not of non-cognate aa-tRNAs, providing a functional probe to distinguish between these two classes. Deletion of the accessory elongation factor eEF1Bgamma promoted increased misreading of near-cognate, but hyperaccurate reading of non-cognate codons, suggesting that this factor also has a role in tRNA discrimination. A mutant of eEF1Balpha, the nucleotide exchange factor for eEF1A, promoted a general increase in fidelity, suggesting that the decreased rates of elongation may provide more time for discrimination between aa-tRNAs. A mutant form of ribosomal protein L5 promoted hyperaccurate decoding of both types of codons, even though it is topologically distant from the decoding center. It is important to distinguish between near-cognate and non-cognate mRNA:tRNA interactions, because such a definition may be important for informing therapeutic strategies for suppressing these two different categories of mutations underlying many human diseases. This study suggests that the defining feature of near

  11. TP53 Codon 72 Polymorphism and P53 Protein Expression in Colorectal Cancer Specimens in Isfahan

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    Mehdi Nikbahkt Dastjerdi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The TP53 tumor suppressor gene plays important roles in genomic stability. A common polymorphism at codon 72 of TP53 gene has been associated with increased risk for many human cancers. The p53 protein is expressed in colorectal cancer, but the reported prevalence of its expression varies widely. In the present study, the p53 protein expression in different genotypes of its codon 72 , was investigated. We undertook a case-control study on 250 controls and 250 paraffin block specimens of sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas from the city of Isfahan. PCR amplification of TP53 codon 72 polymorphism: TP53 codon 72 genotypes were detected by PCR using specific primer pairs for amplifying the proline or the arginine Alleles. The PCR reaction was done separately for each of the two polymorphic variants. The amplified products were subjected to electrophoresis on 1% agarose gel in 1× TBE buffer and visualized on a transilluminator using ethidium bromide. Immunohistochemical Staining: We evaluated the expression patterns of p53 protein, as potential prognostic marker in colorectal cancer specimens by immunohistochemical staining. Statistical analyses: The χ2-test was used to assess the significance of any difference in the prevalence of TP53 codon 72 polymorphism between colorectal cancer patients and controls. The odds ratio and 95% CI (confidence intervals was used as a measure of the strength of the association. Statistical significance level was set to P≤0.05. In control samples, the genotype distribution for TP53 polymorphism showed 30.4%, 45.2% and 24.4% for the arginine/arginine, arginine/proline and proline/proline genotypes, respectively. Allelic frequencies corresponded to 0.663 for the arginine allele and 0.338 for the proline allele. In the cancer group 38.8% of the cases were arginine/arginine, 40.4% were arginine/proline and 20.8% were proline/proline. The corresponding frequencies were 0.590 for the arginine allele and 0.410 for the

  12. XPD codon 312 and 751 polymorphisms, and AFB1 exposure, and hepatocellular carcinoma risk

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    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may influence individual variation in DNA repair capacity, which may be associated with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC related to the exposure of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. In this study, we have focused on the polymorphisms of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD codon 312 and 751 (namely Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, involved in nucleotide excision repair. Methods We conducted a case-control study including 618 HCC cases and 712 controls to evaluate the associations between these two polymorphisms and HCC risk for Guangxi population by means of TaqMan-PCR and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results We found that individuals featuring the XPD genotypes with codon 751 Gln alleles (namely XPD-LG or XPD-GG were related to an elevated risk of HCC compared to those with the homozygote of XPD codon 751 Lys alleles [namely XPD-LL, adjusted odds ratios (ORs were 1.75 and 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CIs were 1.30-2.37 and 1.62-3.76, respectively]. A gender-specific role was evident that showed an higher risk for women (adjusted OR was 8.58 for XPD-GG than for men (adjusted OR = 2.90 for XPD-GG. Interestingly, the interactive effects of this polymorphism and AFB1-exposure information showed the codon 751 Gln alleles increase the risk of HCC for individuals facing longer exposure years (Pinteraction = 0.011, OR = 0.85. For example, long-exposure-years (> 48 years individuals who carried XDP-GG had an adjusted OR of 470.25, whereas long-exposure-years people with XDP-LL were at lower risk (adjusted OR = 149.12. However, we did not find that XPD codon 312 polymorphism was significantly associated with HCC risk. Conclusion These findings suggest that XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism is an important modulator of AFB1 related-HCC development in Guangxi population.

  13. Comparative analysis of codon usage patterns and identification of predicted highly expressed genes in five Salmonella genomes

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    Mondal U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To anlyse codon usage patterns of five complete genomes of Salmonella , predict highly expressed genes, examine horizontally transferred pathogenicity-related genes to detect their presence in the strains, and scrutinize the nature of highly expressed genes to infer upon their lifestyle. Methods: Protein coding genes, ribosomal protein genes, and pathogenicity-related genes were analysed with Codon W and CAI (codon adaptation index Calculator. Results: Translational efficiency plays a role in codon usage variation in Salmonella genes. Low bias was noticed in most of the genes. GC3 (guanine cytosine at third position composition does not influence codon usage variation in the genes of these Salmonella strains. Among the cluster of orthologous groups (COGs, translation, ribosomal structure biogenesis [J], and energy production and conversion [C] contained the highest number of potentially highly expressed (PHX genes. Correspondence analysis reveals the conserved nature of the genes. Highly expressed genes were detected. Conclusions: Selection for translational efficiency is the major source of variation of codon usage in the genes of Salmonella . Evolution of pathogenicity-related genes as a unit suggests their ability to infect and exist as a pathogen. Presence of a lot of PHX genes in the information and storage-processing category of COGs indicated their lifestyle and revealed that they were not subjected to genome reduction.

  14. C.U.R.R.F. (Codon Usage regarding Restriction Finder): a free Java(®)-based tool to detect potential restriction sites in both coding and non-coding DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatter, Michael; Gatter, Thomas; Matthäus, Falk

    2012-10-01

    The synthesis of complete genes is becoming a more and more popular approach in heterologous gene expression. Reasons for this are the decreasing prices and the numerous advantages in comparison to classic molecular cloning methods. Two of these advantages are the possibility to adapt the codon usage to the host organism and the option to introduce restriction enzyme target sites of choice. C.U.R.R.F. (Codon Usage regarding Restriction Finder) is a free Java(®)-based software program which is able to detect possible restriction sites in both coding and non-coding DNA sequences by introducing multiple silent or non-silent mutations, respectively. The deviation of an alternative sequence containing a desired restriction motive from the sequence with the optimal codon usage is considered during the search of potential restriction sites in coding DNA and mRNA sequences as well as protein sequences. C.U.R.R.F is available at http://www.zvm.tu-dresden.de/die_tu_dresden/fakultaeten/fakultaet_mathematik_und_naturwissenschaften/fachrichtung_biologie/mikrobiologie/allgemeine_mikrobiologie/currf.

  15. Periplasmic expression of soluble single chain T cell receptors is rescued by the chaperone FkpA

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    Bogen Bjarne

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient expression systems exist for antibody (Ab molecules, which allow for characterization of large numbers of individual Ab variants. In contrast, such expression systems have been lacking for soluble T cell receptors (TCRs. Attempts to generate bacterial systems have generally resulted in low yields and material which is prone to aggregation and proteolysis. Here we present an optimized periplasmic bacterial expression system for soluble single chain (sc TCRs. Results The effect of 1 over-expression of the periplasmic chaperon FkpA, 2 culture conditions and 3 molecular design was investigated. Elevated levels of FkpA allowed periplasmic soluble scTCR expression, presumably by preventing premature aggregation and inclusion body formation. Periplasmic expression enables disulphide bond formation, which is a prerequisite for the scTCR to reach its correct fold. It also enables quick and easy recovery of correctly folded protein without the need for time-consuming downstream processing. Expression without IPTG induction further improved the periplasmic expression yield, while addition of sucrose to the growth medium showed little effect. Shaker flask yield of mg levels of active purified material was obtained. The Vαβ domain orientation was far superior to the Vβα domain orientation regarding monomeric yield of functionally folded molecules. Conclusion The general expression regime presented here allows for rapid production of soluble scTCRs and is applicable for 1 high yield recovery sufficient for biophysical characterization and 2 high throughput screening of such molecules following molecular engineering.

  16. Chaperone-Assisted Formation of Cucurbit[8]uril-Based Molecular Porous Materials with One-Dimensional Channel Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Chen; Lan, Yue; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Gao, Ning; Ji, Jingwei; Li, Guangtao

    2016-09-06

    Exploiting "chaperone molecule" to navigate the successful assembly energy landscapes has been extensively used in biological systems, whereas in artifical supramolecular systems the "chaperone-assisted" assembly strategy to be used for the synthesis of materials with novel structures or the structures to be hardly prepared by "conventional" methods are still far from realizing the potential functions. In this work, we present a new example of small organic molecule acting as "chaperone molecule" in the facile formation of organic molecular porous materials. This porous material is composed of pure cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) macrocycle and possesses a honeycomb-like structure with an isolated and relatively large one-dimensional (1D) nanochannel. Moreover, it has good chemical and thermal stability, and shows a good adsorption capability for large molecule loading. Importantly, with the assistance of chaperone molecules, pure CB[8] could also be recycled even from a complex aqueous solution, demonstrating a powerful purification method of CB[8] from complex systems.

  17. Individuals' decision to co-donate or donate alone: an archival study of married whole body donors in Hawaii.

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    Michel Anteby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cadavers are crucial to numerous aspects of health care, including initial and continuing training of medical doctors and advancement of medical research. Concerns have periodically been raised about the limited number of whole body donations. Little is known, however, about a unique form of donation, namely co-donations or instances when married individuals decide to register at the same time as their spouse as whole body donors. Our study aims to determine the extent of whole body co-donation and individual factors that might influence co-donation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed all records of registrants to the University of Hawaii Medical School's whole body donation program from 1967 through 2006 to identify married registrants. We then examined the 806 married individuals' characteristics to understand their decision to register alone or with their spouse. We found that married individuals who registered at the same time as their spouse accounted for 38.2 percent of married registrants. Sex differences provided an initial lens to understand co-donation. Wives were more likely to co-donate than to register alone (p = 0.002. Moreover, registrants' main occupational background had a significant effect on co-donations (p = 0.001. Married registrants (regardless of sex in female-gendered occupations were more likely to co-donate than to donate alone (p = 0.014. Female-gendered occupations were defined as ones in which women represented more than 55 percent of the workforce (e.g., preschool teachers. Thus, variations in donors' occupational backgrounds explained co-donation above and beyond sex differences. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to secure whole body donations have historically focused on individual donations regardless of donors' marital status. More attention needs to be paid, however, to co-donations since they represent a non-trivial number of total donations. Also, targeted outreach efforts to male and female members of

  18. Context-dependent codon partition models provide significant increases in model fit in atpB and rbcL protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, Guy; Van de Peer, Yves; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2011-05-27

    Accurate modelling of substitution processes in protein-coding sequences is often hampered by the computational burdens associated with full codon models. Lately, codon partition models have been proposed as a viable alternative, mimicking the substitution behaviour of codon models at a low computational cost. Such codon partition models however impose independent evolution of the different codon positions, which is overly restrictive from a biological point of view. Given that empirical research has provided indications of context-dependent substitution patterns at four-fold degenerate sites, we take those indications into account in this paper. We present so-called context-dependent codon partition models to assess previous empirical claims that the evolution of four-fold degenerate sites is strongly dependent on the composition of its two flanking bases. To this end, we have estimated and compared various existing independent models, codon models, codon partition models and context-dependent codon partition models for the atpB and rbcL genes of the chloroplast genome, which are frequently used in plant systematics. Such context-dependent codon partition models employ a full dependency scheme for four-fold degenerate sites, whilst maintaining the independence assumption for the first and second codon positions. We show that, both in the atpB and rbcL alignments of a collection of land plants, these context-dependent codon partition models significantly improve model fit over existing codon partition models. Using Bayes factors based on thermodynamic integration, we show that in both datasets the same context-dependent codon partition model yields the largest increase in model fit compared to an independent evolutionary model. Context-dependent codon partition models hence perform closer to codon models, which remain the best performing models at a drastically increased computational cost, compared to codon partition models, but remain computationally interesting

  19. Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes are vital contributors to membrane bound replication and movement complexes during plant RNA virus infection.

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    Jeanmarie eVerchot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes play central roles in the formation of positive strand and negative strand RNA virus infection. This article examines the key cellular chaperones and discusses evidence that these factors are diverted from their cellular functions to play alternative roles in virus infection. For most chaperones discussed, their primary role in the cell is to ensure protein quality control. They are system components that drive substrate protein folding, complex assembly or disaggregation. Their activities often depend upon co-chaperones and ATP hydrolysis. During plant virus infection, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins play central roles in the formation of membrane bound replication complexes for certain members of the tombusvirus, tobamovirus, potyvirus, dianthovirus, potexvirus, and carmovirus genus. There are several co-chaperones, including Yjd1, RME-8 and Hsp40 that associate with the bromovirus replication complex, pomovirus TGB2, and tospovirus Nsm movement proteins. There are also examples of plant viruses that rely on chaperone systems in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to support cell-to-cell movement. TMV relies on calreticulin to promote virus intercellular transport. Calreticulin also resides in the plasmodesmata and plays a role in calcium sequestration as well as glycoprotein folding. The pomovirus TGB2 interacts with RME-8 in the endosome. The potexvirus TGB3 protein stimulates expression of ER resident chaperones via the bZIP60 transcription factor. Upregulating factors involved in protein folding may be essential to handling the load of viral proteins translated along the ER. In addition TGB3 stimulates SKP1 which is a co-factor in proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins. Such chaperones and co-factors are potential targets for antiviral defense.

  20. Review Article A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Apoptosis by Calreticulin, a Molecular Chaperone in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Ihara, Yoshito

    2003-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a Ca"--binding lectin-like molecular chaperone of the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Recently, CRT has been revealed to be a multi-functional molecule related with glycoprotein maturation and chaperone function, Ca" homeostasis, cell adhesion, cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and nuclear transporting mechanisms. CRT is also essential for cardiac and neural development in mice, suggesting an importance in the regulation of cell survival and death during de...

  1. The Role of System-Specific Molecular Chaperones in the Maturation of Molybdoenzymes in Bacteria

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    Meina Neumann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenesis of prokaryotic molybdoenzymes is a complex process with the final step representing the insertion of a matured molybdenum cofactor (Moco into a folded apoenzyme. Usually, specific chaperones of the XdhC family are required for the maturation of molybdoenzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are characterized to contain an equatorial sulfur ligand at the molybdenum center of Moco. This sulfur ligand is inserted into Moco while bound to the XdhC-like protein and before its insertion into the target enzyme. In addition, enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family bind either the molybdopterin (Mo-MPT form of Moco or the modified molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor (MCD. In both cases, only the matured cofactor is inserted by a proofreading process of XdhC. The roles of these specific XdhC-like chaperones during the biogenesis of enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria are described.

  2. The heat shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Jacob, Pierre

    2016-11-15

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multi-stress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone

  3. Amino acid sequence determinants and molecular chaperones in amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerelius, Charlotte; Fitzen, Michael; Johansson, Jan

    2010-05-21

    Amyloid consists of cross-beta-sheet fibrils and is associated with about 25 human diseases, including several neurodegenerative diseases, systemic and localized amyloidoses and type II diabetes mellitus. Amyloid-forming proteins differ in structures and sequences, and it is to a large extent unknown what makes them convert from their native conformations into amyloid. In this review, current understanding of amino acid sequence determinants and the effects of molecular chaperones on amyloid formation are discussed. Studies of the nonpolar, transmembrane surfactant protein C (SP-C) have revealed amino acid sequence features that determine its amyloid fibril formation, features that are also found in the amyloid beta-peptide in Alzheimer's disease and the prion protein. Moreover, a proprotein chaperone domain (CTC(Brichos)) that prevents amyloid-like aggregation during proSP-C biosynthesis can prevent fibril formation also of other amyloidogenic proteins. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochemical characterization and cooperation with co-chaperones of heat shock protein 90 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mari; Tomomari, Taichi; Kanzaki, Taro; Abe, Tetsuya; Oka, Toshihiko; Yohda, Masafumi

    2013-10-01

    The characterization of Hsp90 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was performed. Hsp90 of S. pombe existed as a dimer and exhibited ATP-dependent conformational changes. It captured unfolded proteins in the ATP-free open conformation and protected them from thermal aggregation. Hsp90 of S. pombe was also able to refold thermally denatured firefly luciferase. The co-chaperones Sti1 and Aha1 bound Hsp90 and modulated its activity. Because the affinity of Sti1 was higher than that of Aha1, the effect of Sti1 appeared to dominate when both co-chaperones existed simultaneously. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry (Dupont)

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  6. Transthyretin Amyloidosis: Chaperone Concentration Changes and Increased Proteolysis in the Pathway to Disease.

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    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Transthyretin amyloidosis is a conformational pathology characterized by the extracellular formation of amyloid deposits and the progressive impairment of the peripheral nervous system. Point mutations in this tetrameric plasma protein decrease its stability and are linked to disease onset and progression. Since non-mutated transthyretin also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis and some mutation bearers are asymptomatic throughout their lives, non-genetic factors must also be involved in transthyretin amyloidosis. We discovered, using a differential proteomics approach, that extracellular chaperones such as fibrinogen, clusterin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-anti-trypsin and 2-macroglobulin are overrepresented in transthyretin amyloidosis. Our data shows that a complex network of extracellular chaperones are over represented in human plasma and we speculate that they act synergistically to cope with amyloid prone proteins. Proteostasis may thus be as important as point mutations in transthyretin amyloidosis.

  7. Comparative Mitogenomics of Plant Bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae): Identifying the AGG Codon Reassignments between Serine and Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2014-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24988409

  8. Measuring and detecting molecular adaptation in codon usage against nonsense errors during protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Michael A; Shah, Premal; Zaretzki, Russell

    2009-12-01

    Codon usage bias (CUB) has been documented across a wide range of taxa and is the subject of numerous studies. While most explanations of CUB invoke some type of natural selection, most measures of CUB adaptation are heuristically defined. In contrast, we present a novel and mechanistic method for defining and contextualizing CUB adaptation to reduce the cost of nonsense errors during protein translation. Using a model of protein translation, we develop a general approach for measuring the protein production cost in the face of nonsense errors of a given allele as well as the mean and variance of these costs across its coding synonyms. We then use these results to define the nonsense error adaptation index (NAI) of the allele or a contiguous subset thereof. Conceptually, the NAI value of an allele is a relative measure of its elevation on a specific and well-defined adaptive landscape. To illustrate its utility, we calculate NAI values for the entire coding sequence and across a set of nonoverlapping windows for each gene in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c genome. Our results provide clear evidence of adaptation to reduce the cost of nonsense errors and increasing adaptation with codon position and expression. The magnitude and nature of this adaptation are also largely consistent with simulation results in which nonsense errors are the only selective force driving CUB evolution. Because NAI is derived from mechanistic models, it is both easier to interpret and more amenable to future refinement than other commonly used measures of codon bias. Further, our approach can also be used as a starting point for developing other mechanistically derived measures of adaptation such as for translational accuracy.

  9. Comparative mitogenomics of plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae: identifying the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes.

  10. Metabolic and chaperone gene loss marks the origin of animals: evidence for Hsp104 and Hsp78 chaperones sharing mitochondrial enzymes as clients.

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    Albert J Erives

    Full Text Available The evolution of animals involved acquisition of an emergent gene repertoire for gastrulation. Whether loss of genes also co-evolved with this developmental reprogramming has not yet been addressed. Here, we identify twenty-four genetic functions that are retained in fungi and choanoflagellates but undetectable in animals. These lost genes encode: (i sixteen distinct biosynthetic functions; (ii the two ancestral eukaryotic ClpB disaggregases, Hsp78 and Hsp104, which function in the mitochondria and cytosol, respectively; and (iii six other assorted functions. We present computational and experimental data that are consistent with a joint function for the differentially localized ClpB disaggregases, and with the possibility of a shared client/chaperone relationship between the mitochondrial Fe/S homoaconitase encoded by the lost LYS4 gene and the two ClpBs. Our analyses lead to the hypothesis that the evolution of gastrulation-based multicellularity in animals led to efficient extraction of nutrients from dietary sources, loss of natural selection for maintenance of energetically expensive biosynthetic pathways, and subsequent loss of their attendant ClpB chaperones.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose regulated protein 170-Pokemon complexes elicit a robust antitumor immune response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Wu, Xianqu; Jing, Junjie; Chen, Kangning; Liu, Guojun; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2012-07-01

    Previous evidence suggested that the stress protein grp170 can function as a highly efficient molecular chaperone, binding to large protein substrates and acting as a potent vaccine against specific tumors when purified from the same tumor. In addition, Pokemon can be found in almost all malignant tumor cells and is regarded to be a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. However, the potential of the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex has not been well described. In the present study, the natural chaperone complex between grp170 and the Pokemon was formed by heat shock, and its immunogenicity was detected by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays in vitro and by tumor bearing models in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex could elicit T cell responses as determined by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays. In addition, immunized C57BL/6 mice were challenged with subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of Lewis cancer cells to induce primary tumors. Treatment of mice with the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex also significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex might represent a powerful approach to tumor immunotherapy and have significant potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms of Translocation of ER Chaperones to the Cell Surface and Immunomodulatory Roles in Cancer and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Valerie R.; Michalak, Marek; Abdullah, Trefa M.; Bremer, Edwin; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones (e.g., calreticulin, heat shock proteins, and isomerases) perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g., drugs, UV irradiation, and microbial stimuli. Once on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, the ER chaperones can take on immunogenic characteristics, as mostly described in the context of cancer, appearing as damage-associated molecular patterns recognized by the immune system. How ER chaperones relocate to the cell surface and interact with other intracellular proteins appears to influence whether a tumor cell is targeted for cell death. The relocation of ER proteins to the cell surface can be exploited to target cancer cells for elimination by immune mechanism. Here we evaluate the evidence for the different mechanisms of ER protein translocation and binding to the cell surface and how ER protein translocation can act as a signal for cancer cells to undergo killing by immunogenic cell death and other cell death pathways. The release of chaperones can also exacerbate underlying autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and the immunomodulatory role of extracellular chaperones as potential cancer immunotherapies requires cautious monitoring, particularly in cancer patients with underlying autoimmune disease. PMID:25688334

  13. Mechanisms of translocation of ER chaperones to the cell surface and immunomodulatory roles in cancer and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie R. Wiersma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones (e.g. calreticulin, heat shock proteins and isomerases perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g. drugs, UV irradiation and microbial stimuli. Once on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, the ER chaperones can take on immunogenic characteristics, as mostly described in the context of cancer, appearing as damage-associated molecular patterns recognized by the immune system. How ER chaperones relocate to the cell surface and interact with other intracellular proteins appears to influence whether a tumor cell is targeted for cell death. The relocation of ER proteins to the cell surface can be exploited to target cancer cells for elimination by immune mechanism. Here we evaluate the evidence for the different mechanisms of ER protein translocation and binding to the cell surface and how ER protein translocation can act as a signal for cancer cells to undergo killing by immunogenic cell death and other cell death pathways. The release of chaperones can also exacerbate underlying autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and the immunomodulatory role of extracellular chaperones as potential cancer immunotherapies requires cautious monitoring, particularly in cancer patients with underlying autoimmune disease.

  14. Mechanisms of Translocation of ER Chaperones to the Cell Surface and Immunomodulatory Roles in Cancer and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Valerie R; Michalak, Marek; Abdullah, Trefa M; Bremer, Edwin; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones (e.g., calreticulin, heat shock proteins, and isomerases) perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g., drugs, UV irradiation, and microbial stimuli. Once on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, the ER chaperones can take on immunogenic characteristics, as mostly described in the context of cancer, appearing as damage-associated molecular patterns recognized by the immune system. How ER chaperones relocate to the cell surface and interact with other intracellular proteins appears to influence whether a tumor cell is targeted for cell death. The relocation of ER proteins to the cell surface can be exploited to target cancer cells for elimination by immune mechanism. Here we evaluate the evidence for the different mechanisms of ER protein translocation and binding to the cell surface and how ER protein translocation can act as a signal for cancer cells to undergo killing by immunogenic cell death and other cell death pathways. The release of chaperones can also exacerbate underlying autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and the immunomodulatory role of extracellular chaperones as potential cancer immunotherapies requires cautious monitoring, particularly in cancer patients with underlying autoimmune disease.

  15. Enhanced Transport Capabilities via Nanotechnologies: Impacting Bioefficacy, Controlled Release Strategies, and Novel Chaperones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomai Panagiotou

    2011-01-01

    side affects and providing improved therapeutic interventions. Innovative nanotechnology applications, such as simultaneous targeting, imaging and delivery to tumors, are now possible through use of novel chaperones. Other examples include nanoparticles attachment to T-cells, release from novel hydrogel implants, and functionalized encapsulants. Difficult tasks such as drug delivery to the brain via the blood brain barrier and/or the cerebrospinal fluid are now easier to accomplish.

  16. Structural and functional characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CupB chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Cai

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen, is estimated to be responsible for ∼10% of nosocomial infections worldwide. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa starts from its colonization in the damaged tissue or medical devices (e.g. catheters, prothesis and implanted heart valve etc. facilitated by several extracellular adhesive factors including fimbrial pili. Several clusters containing fimbrial genes have been previously identified on the P. aeruginosa chromosome and named cup[1]. The assembly of the CupB pili is thought to be coordinated by two chaperones, CupB2 and CupB4. However, due to the lack of structural and biochemical data, their chaperone activities remain speculative. In this study, we report the 2.5 Å crystal structure of P. aeruginosa CupB2. Based on the structure, we further tested the binding specificity of CupB2 and CupB4 towards CupB1 (the presumed major pilus subunit and CupB6 (the putative adhesin using limited trypsin digestion and strep-tactin pull-down assay. The structural and biochemical data suggest that CupB2 and CupB4 might play different, but not redundant, roles in CupB secretion. CupB2 is likely to be the chaperone of CupB1, and CupB4 could be the chaperone of CupB4:CupB5:CupB6, in which the interaction of CupB4 and CupB6 might be mediated via CupB5.

  17. Interactive Domains in the Molecular Chaperone Human ?B Crystallin Modulate Microtubule Assembly and Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Joy G.; Houck, Scott A.; Clark, John I.

    2007-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113)FISREFHR(120) exposed on the ...

  18. An Expanding Range of Functions for the Copper Chaperone/Antioxidant Protein Atox1

    OpenAIRE

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1 in human cells) is a copper chaperone for the copper export pathway with an essential role in cellular copper distribution. In vitro, Atox1 binds and transfers copper to the copper-transporting ATPases, stimulating their catalytic activity. Inactivation of Atox1 in cells inhibits maturation of secreted cuproenzymes as well as copper export from cells. Recent Advances: Accumulating data suggest that cellular functions of Atox1 are not limited to its c...

  19. Multiscale modeling of metabolism and macromolecular synthesis in E. coli and its application to the evolution of codon usage.

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    Ines Thiele

    Full Text Available Biological systems are inherently hierarchal and multiscale in time and space. A major challenge of systems biology is to describe biological systems as a computational model, which can be used to derive novel hypothesis and drive experiments leading to new knowledge. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis approach has been successfully applied to metabolism and to the macromolecular synthesis machinery assembly. Here, we present the first integrated stoichiometric multiscale model of metabolism and macromolecular synthesis for Escherichia coli K12 MG1655, which describes the sequence-specific synthesis and function of almost 2000 gene products at molecular detail. We added linear constraints, which couple enzyme synthesis and catalysis reactions. Comparison with experimental data showed improvement of growth phenotype prediction with the multiscale model over E. coli's metabolic model alone. Many of the genes covered by this integrated model are well conserved across enterobacters and other, less related bacteria. We addressed the question of whether the bias in synonymous codon usage could affect the growth phenotype and environmental niches that an organism can occupy. We created two classes of in silico strains, one with more biased codon usage and one with more equilibrated codon usage than the wildtype. The reduced growth phenotype in biased strains was caused by tRNA supply shortage, indicating that expansion of tRNA gene content or tRNA codon recognition allow E. coli to respond to changes in codon usage bias. Our analysis suggests that in order to maximize growth and to adapt to new environmental niches, codon usage and tRNA content must co-evolve. These results provide further evidence for the mutation-selection-drift balance theory of codon usage bias. This integrated multiscale reconstruction successfully demonstrates that the constraint-based modeling approach is well suited to whole-cell modeling endeavors.

  20. Support vector machine for classification of meiotic recombination hotspots and coldspots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on codon composition

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    Sun Xiao

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiotic double-strand breaks occur at relatively high frequencies in some genomic regions (hotspots and relatively low frequencies in others (coldspots. Hotspots and coldspots are receiving increasing attention in research into the mechanism of meiotic recombination. However, predicting hotspots and coldspots from DNA sequence information is still a challenging task. Results We present a novel method for classification of hot and cold ORFs located in hotspots and coldspots respectively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using support vector machine (SVM, which relies on codon composition differences. This method has achieved a high classification accuracy of 85.0%. Since codon composition is a fusion of codon usage bias and amino acid composition signals, the ability of these two kinds of sequence attributes to discriminate hot ORFs from cold ORFs was also investigated separately. Our results indicate that neither codon usage bias nor amino acid composition taken separately performed as well as codon composition. Moreover, our SVM based method was applied to the full genome: We predicted the hot/cold ORFs from the yeast genome by using cutoffs of recombination rate. We found that the performance of our method for predicting cold ORFs is not as good as that for predicting hot ORFs. Besides, we also observed a considerable correlation between meiotic recombination rate and amino acid composition of certain residues, which probably reflects the structural and functional dissimilarity between the hot and cold groups. Conclusion We have introduced a SVM-based novel method to discriminate hot ORFs from cold ones. Applying codon composition as sequence attributes, we have achieved a high classification accuracy, which suggests that codon composition has strong potential to be used as sequence attributes in the prediction of hot and cold ORFs.

  1. Molecular functions of the histone acetyltransferase chaperone complex Rtt109-Vps75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Lindner, Scott E; Lee, Susan; Holton, James M; Kaufman, Paul D; Keck, James L; Denu, John M [UMASS, MED; (UCB); (UW-MED)

    2010-01-12

    Histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling regulate DNA damage repair, replication and transcription. Rtt109, a recently discovered histone acetyltransferase (HAT) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functions with the histone chaperone Asf1 to acetylate lysine K56 on histone H3 (H3K56), a modification associated with newly synthesized histones. In vitro analysis of Rtt109 revealed that Vps75, a Nap1 family histone chaperone, could also stimulate Rtt109-dependent acetylation of H3K56. However, the molecular function of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex remains elusive. Here we have probed the molecular functions of Vps75 and the Rtt109-Vps75 complex through biochemical, structural and genetic means. We find that Vps75 stimulates the kcat of histone acetylation by {approx}100-fold relative to Rtt109 alone and enhances acetylation of K9 in the H3 histone tail. Consistent with the in vitro evidence, cells lacking Vps75 showed a substantial reduction (60%) in H3K9 acetylation during S phase. X-ray structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of Vps75 indicate a unique, structurally dynamic Nap1-like fold that suggests a potential mechanism of Vps75-dependent activation of Rtt109. Together, these data provide evidence for a multifunctional HAT-chaperone complex that acetylates histone H3 and deposits H3-H4 onto DNA, linking histone modification and nucleosome assembly.

  2. Jasmonate signalling in Arabidopsis involves SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves A; Cheng, Zhenyu; Bush, Jenifer; Ausubel, Frederick M

    Plant hormones play pivotal roles in growth, development and stress responses. Although it is essential to our understanding of hormone signalling, how plants maintain a steady state level of hormone receptors is poorly understood. We show that mutation of the Arabidopsis thaliana co-chaperone SGT1b impairs responses to the plant hormones jasmonate, auxin and gibberellic acid, but not brassinolide and abscisic acid, and that SGT1b and its homologue SGT1a are involved in maintaining the steady state levels of the F-box proteins COI1 and TIR1, receptors for jasmonate and auxin, respectively. The association of SGT1b with COI1 is direct and is independent of the Arabidopsis SKP1 protein, ASK1. We further show that COI1 is a client protein of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes and that the complexes function in hormone signalling by stabilizing the COI1 protein. This study extends the SGT1b-HSP90 client protein list and broadens the functional scope of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

  3. A primate specific extra domain in the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwadeepak Tripathi

    Full Text Available Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90 is an essential molecular chaperone that mediates folding and quality control of client proteins. Many of them such as protein kinases, steroid receptors and transcription factors are involved in cellular signaling processes. Hsp90 undergoes an ATP hydrolysis dependent conformational cycle to assist folding of the client protein. The canonical Hsp90 shows a typical composition of three distinct domains and interacts with individual cochaperone partners such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase that regulate the reaction cycle of the molecular chaperone. A bioinformatic survey identified an additional domain of 122 amino acids in front of the canonical Hsp90 sequence. This extra domain (E domain is specific to the Catarrhini or drooping nose monkeys, a subdivision of the higher primates that includes man, the great apes and the old world monkeys but is absent from all other species. Our biochemical analysis reveals that Hsp103 associates with cochaperone proteins such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 similar to Hsp90. However, the extra domain reduces the ATP hydrolysis rate to about half when compared to Hsp90 thereby acting as a negative regulator of the molecular chaperonés intrinsic ATPase activity.

  4. COLLABORATIVE ACTION OF CELL CYCLE, MOLECULAR CHAPERONES, AND UBIQUITIN PROTEASOME SYSTEM IN NEUROONCOLOGY

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    Pravir Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available he striking feature in tumor biology is uncontrolled cell proliferation and growth. Any alteration in the genetic make up may cause cell cycle deregulation that leads to aberrant cell cycle re-entry. These cascades ultimately cause cancerous situation with unwanted cell growth and division. There are several factors in cell cycle events that can lead to cancerous situations, for instance, checkpoint breach, extracellular signals, malfunctioned protein kinases, re-expression of cyclins and cyclin-CDKs complex. A crucial function of cyclinCDK complex is phosphorylation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene that inhibits its ability to regulate the action of E2F transcription factor, which induces the gene expression and thus cause cell proliferation. To maintain the cellular homeostasis under tumorous condition, a line of protective mechanism is switched on such as availability of molecular chaperones; and if repair work fails, ubiquitin proteasome system comes in action. These regulatory mechanisms are highly conserved and play a critical role in maintaining several molecular events in the brain tumor or any stress situation. Misfolded proteins in tumor tissues are either rectified by chaperone activity upto a certain threshold or follow a degradation pathway by proteolytic activity of ubiquitinproteasome system. In this review, we have highlighted an extensive explorative potential of molecular chaperones in combination with ubiquitin E3 ligase enzymes activities in brain tumors.

  5. Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (hop): beyond interactions with chaperones and prion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Edkins, Adrienne L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop), also known as stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1), has received considerable attention for diverse cellular functions in both healthy and diseased states. There is extensive evidence that intracellular Hop is a co-chaperone of the major chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, playing an important role in the productive folding of Hsp90 client proteins. Consequently, Hop is implicated in a number of key signalling pathways, including aberrant pathways leading to cancer. However, Hop is also secreted and it is now well established that Hop also serves as a receptor for the prion protein, PrP(C). The intracellular and extracellular forms of Hop most likely represent two different isoforms, although the molecular determinants of these divergent functions are yet to be identified. There is also a growing body of research that reports the involvement of Hop in cellular activities that appear independent of either chaperones or PrP(C). While Hop has been shown to have various cellular functions, its biological function remains elusive. However, recent knockout studies in mammals suggest that Hop has an important role in embryonic development. This review provides a critical overview of the latest molecular, cellular and biological research on Hop, critically evaluating its function in healthy systems and how this function is adapted in diseases states.

  6. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

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    Chang-Jin Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs or resistance (R proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  7. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  8. Schizosaccharomyces pombe disaggregation machinery chaperones support Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth and prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Michael; Sharma, Ruchika; Masison, Daniel C

    2013-05-01

    Hsp100 chaperones protect microorganisms and plants from environmental stress by cooperating with Hsp70 and its nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) and Hsp40 cochaperones to resolubilize proteins from aggregates. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 (Sc-Hsp104)-based disaggregation machinery also is essential for replication of amyloid-based prions. Escherichia coli ClpB can substitute for Hsp104 to propagate [PSI(+)] prions in yeast, but only if E. coli DnaK and GrpE (Hsp70 and NEF) are coexpressed. Here, we tested if the reported inability of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hsp104 (Sp-Hsp104) to support [PSI(+)] propagation was due to similar species-specific chaperone requirements and find that Sp-Hsp104 alone supported propagation of three different yeast prions. Sp-Hsp70 and Sp-Fes1p (NEF) likewise functioned in place of their Sa. cerevisiae counterparts. Thus, chaperones of these long-diverged species possess conserved activities that function in processes essential for both cell growth and prion propagation, suggesting Sc. pombe can propagate its own prions. We show that curing by Hsp104 overexpression and inactivation can be distinguished and confirm the observation that, unlike Sc-Hsp104, Sp-Hsp104 cannot cure yeast of [PSI(+)] when it is overexpressed. These results are consistent with a view that mechanisms underlying prion replication and elimination are distinct.

  9. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  10. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  11. Conformational switching of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 via regulated phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Joanna; Wandinger, Sebastian K; Mäusbacher, Nina; Schreiber, Thiemo; Richter, Klaus; Daub, Henrik; Buchner, Johannes

    2012-02-24

    Hsp90 is an essential molecular chaperone in the eukaryotic cytosol. Its function is modulated by cochaperones and posttranslational modifications. Importantly, the phosphatase Ppt1 is a dedicated regulator of the Hsp90 chaperone system. Little is known about Ppt1-dependent phosphorylation sites and how these affect Hsp90 activity. Here, we identified the major phosphorylation sites of yeast Hsp90 in its middle or the C-terminal domain and determined the subset regulated by Ppt1. In general, phosphorylation decelerates the Hsp90 machinery, reduces chaperone function in vivo, sensitizes yeast cells to Hsp90 inhibition and affects DNA repair processes. Modification of one particular site (S485) is lethal, whereas others modulate Hsp90 activity via distinct mechanisms affecting the ATPase activity, cochaperone binding and manipulating conformational transitions in Hsp90. Our mechanistic analysis reveals that phosphorylation of Hsp90 permits a regulation of the conformational cycle at distinct steps by targeting switch points for the communication of remote regions within Hsp90. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Viral proteins originated de novo by overprinting can be identified by codon usage: application to the "gene nursery" of Deltaretroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Pavesi

    Full Text Available A well-known mechanism through which new protein-coding genes originate is by modification of pre-existing genes, e.g. by duplication or horizontal transfer. In contrast, many viruses generate protein-coding genes de novo, via the overprinting of a new reading frame onto an existing ("ancestral" frame. This mechanism is thought to play an important role in viral pathogenicity, but has been poorly explored, perhaps because identifying the de novo frames is very challenging. Therefore, a new approach to detect them was needed. We assembled a reference set of overlapping genes for which we could reliably determine the ancestral frames, and found that their codon usage was significantly closer to that of the rest of the viral genome than the codon usage of de novo frames. Based on this observation, we designed a method that allowed the identification of de novo frames based on their codon usage with a very good specificity, but intermediate sensitivity. Using our method, we predicted that the Rex gene of deltaretroviruses has originated de novo by overprinting the Tax gene. Intriguingly, several genes in the same genomic region have also originated de novo and encode proteins that regulate the functions of Tax. Such "gene nurseries" may be common in viral genomes. Finally, our results confirm that the genomic GC content is not the only determinant of codon usage in viruses and suggest that a constraint linked to translation must influence codon usage.

  13. Alternative translation initiation codons for the plastid maturase MatK: unraveling the pseudogene misconception in the Orchidaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthet, Michelle M; Moukarzel, Keenan; Smith, Kayla N; Patel, Jaimin; Hilu, Khidir W

    2015-09-29

    The plastid maturase MatK has been implicated as a possible model for the evolutionary "missing link" between prokaryotic and eukaryotic splicing machinery. This evolutionary implication has sparked investigations concerning the function of this unusual maturase. Intron targets of MatK activity suggest that this is an essential enzyme for plastid function. The matK gene, however, is described as a pseudogene in many photosynthetic orchid species due to presence of premature stop codons in translations, and its high rate of nucleotide and amino acid substitution. Sequence analysis of the matK gene from orchids identified an out-of-frame alternative AUG initiation codon upstream from the consensus initiation codon used for translation in other angiosperms. We demonstrate translation from the alternative initiation codon generates a conserved MatK reading frame. We confirm that MatK protein is expressed and functions in sample orchids currently described as having a matK pseudogene using immunodetection and reverse-transcription methods. We demonstrate using phylogenetic analysis that this alternative initiation codon emerged de novo within the Orchidaceae, with several reversal events at the basal lineage and deep in orchid history. These findings suggest a novel evolutionary shift for expression of matK in the Orchidaceae and support the function of MatK as a group II intron maturase in the plastid genome of land plants including the orchids.

  14. Translation initiation factors eIF3 and HCR1 control translation termination and stop codon read-through in yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Beznosková

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Translation is divided into initiation, elongation, termination and ribosome recycling. Earlier work implicated several eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs in ribosomal recycling in vitro. Here, we uncover roles for HCR1 and eIF3 in translation termination in vivo. A substantial proportion of eIF3, HCR1 and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3 but not eIF5 (a well-defined "initiation-specific" binding partner of eIF3 specifically co-sediments with 80S couples isolated from RNase-treated heavy polysomes in an eRF1-dependent manner, indicating the presence of eIF3 and HCR1 on terminating ribosomes. eIF3 and HCR1 also occur in ribosome- and RNA-free complexes with both eRFs and the recycling factor ABCE1/RLI1. Several eIF3 mutations reduce rates of stop codon read-through and genetically interact with mutant eRFs. In contrast, a slow growing deletion of hcr1 increases read-through and accumulates eRF3 in heavy polysomes in a manner suppressible by overexpressed ABCE1/RLI1. Based on these and other findings we propose that upon stop codon recognition, HCR1 promotes eRF3·GDP ejection from the post-termination complexes to allow binding of its interacting partner ABCE1/RLI1. Furthermore, the fact that high dosage of ABCE1/RLI1 fully suppresses the slow growth phenotype of hcr1Δ as well as its termination but not initiation defects implies that the termination function of HCR1 is more critical for optimal proliferation than its function in translation initiation. Based on these and other observations we suggest that the assignment of HCR1 as a bona fide eIF3 subunit should be reconsidered. Together our work characterizes novel roles of eIF3 and HCR1 in stop codon recognition, defining a communication bridge between the initiation and termination/recycling phases of translation.

  15. Dietary nitrogen alters codon bias and genome composition in parasitic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Emily A; Kelly, Steven

    2016-11-15

    Genomes are composed of long strings of nucleotide monomers (A, C, G and T) that are either scavenged from the organism's environment or built from metabolic precursors. The biosynthesis of each nucleotide differs in atomic requirements with different nucleotides requiring different quantities of nitrogen atoms. However, the impact of the relative availability of dietary nitrogen on genome composition and codon bias is poorly understood. Here we show that differential nitrogen availability, due to differences in environment and dietary inputs, is a major determinant of genome nucleotide composition and synonymous codon use in both bacterial and eukaryotic microorganisms. Specifically, low nitrogen availability species use nucleotides that require fewer nitrogen atoms to encode the same genes compared to high nitrogen availability species. Furthermore, we provide a novel selection-mutation framework for the evaluation of the impact of metabolism on gene sequence evolution and show that it is possible to predict the metabolic inputs of related organisms from an analysis of the raw nucleotide sequence of their genes. Taken together, these results reveal a previously hidden relationship between cellular metabolism and genome evolution and provide new insight into how genome sequence evolution can be influenced by adaptation to different diets and environments.

  16. Unbiased Mitoproteome Analyses Confirm Non-canonical RNA, Expanded Codon Translations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic MS/MS mass spectrometry detections are usually biased towards peptides cleaved by experimentally added digestion enzyme(s. Hence peptides resulting from spontaneous degradation and natural proteolysis usually remain undetected. Previous analyses of tryptic human proteome data (cleavage after K, R detected non-canonical tryptic peptides translated according to tetra- and pentacodons (codons expanded by silent mono- and dinucleotides, and from transcripts systematically (a deleting mono-, dinucleotides after trinucleotides (delRNAs, (b exchanging nucleotides according to 23 bijective transformations. Nine symmetric and fourteen asymmetric nucleotide exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C; and X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A produce swinger RNAs. Here unbiased reanalyses of these proteomic data detect preferentially non-canonical tryptic peptides despite assuming random cleavage. Unbiased analyses couldn't reconstruct experimental tryptic digestion if most detected non-canonical peptides were false positives. Detected non-tryptic non-canonical peptides map preferentially on corresponding, previously described non-canonical transcripts, as for tryptic non-canonical peptides. Hence unbiased analyses independently confirm previous trypsin-biased analyses that showed translations of del- and swinger RNA and expanded codons. Accounting for natural proteolysis completes trypsin-biased mitopeptidome analyses, independently confirms non-canonical transcriptions and translations.

  17. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus precore stop codon mutations in chronically infected children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermeyer, Philip; Gerner, Patrick; Gehring, Stephan; Karimi, Afshin; Wirth, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find out whether there is a significant difference in the prevalence of the precore stop codon mutation between HBeAg positive and anti-HBe positive children. METHODS: We investigated a large pediatric population of 155 European children (mean age 10.9 years) with chronic hepatitis B by PCR and direct sequencing. Ninety were HBeAg positive and 65 had seroconversion to anti-HBe. Additionally genotyping was performed. RESULTS: Seventy-four (48%) of the sequenced HBV strains were attributed to genotype D and 81 (52%) to genotype A. In the group of 90 HBeAg positive patients, 2 (2.2%) 1896-G-to-A transitions leading to precore stop codon mutation were found, and in the group of 65 anti-HBe positive children, 5 (7.7%) were identified harbouring HBeAg-minus mutants. The difference was not statistically significant (P= 0 .13). CONCLUSIONS: HBeAg minus variants as predominant viral HB strains play a minor role in the course of chronic hepatitis B in European children. PMID:16610027

  18. Optimizing doped libraries by using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Dirk; Schober, Andreas; Schwienhorst, Andreas

    1997-01-01

    The insertion of random sequences into protein-encoding genes in combination with biologicalselection techniques has become a valuable tool in the design of molecules that have usefuland possibly novel properties. By employing highly effective screening protocols, a functionaland unique structure that had not been anticipated can be distinguished among a hugecollection of inactive molecules that together represent all possible amino acid combinations.This technique is severely limited by its restriction to a library of manageable size. Oneapproach for limiting the size of a mutant library relies on `doping schemes', where subsetsof amino acids are generated that reveal only certain combinations of amino acids in a proteinsequence. Three mononucleotide mixtures for each codon concerned must be designed, suchthat the resulting codons that are assembled during chemical gene synthesis represent thedesired amino acid mixture on the level of the translated protein. In this paper we present adoping algorithm that `reverse translates' a desired mixture of certain amino acids into threemixtures of mononucleotides. The algorithm is designed to optimally bias these mixturestowards the codons of choice. This approach combines a genetic algorithm with localoptimization strategies based on the downhill simplex method. Disparate relativerepresentations of all amino acids (and stop codons) within a target set can be generated.Optional weighing factors are employed to emphasize the frequencies of certain amino acidsand their codon usage, and to compensate for reaction rates of different mononucleotidebuilding blocks (synthons) during chemical DNA synthesis. The effect of statistical errors thataccompany an experimental realization of calculated nucleotide mixtures on the generatedmixtures of amino acids is simulated. These simulations show that the robustness of differentoptima with respect to small deviations from calculated values depends on their concomitantfitness. Furthermore

  19. C-terminal Domain Modulates the Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein via an Electrostatic Mechanism*

    OpenAIRE

    Qualley, Dominic F.; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M.; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retrovir...

  20. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. Thermostable proteins bioprocesses: The activity of restriction endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus thermophilus (RM.TthHB27I cloned in Escherichia coli is critically affected by the codon composition of the synthetic gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Krefft

    Full Text Available Obtaining thermostable enzymes (thermozymes is an important aspect of biotechnology. As thermophiles have adapted their genomes to high temperatures, their cloned genes' expression in mesophiles is problematic. This is mainly due to their high GC content, which leads to the formation of unfavorable secondary mRNA structures and codon usage in Escherichia coli (E. coli. RM.TthHB27I is a member of a family of bifunctional thermozymes, containing a restriction endonuclease (REase and a methyltransferase (MTase in a single polypeptide. Thermus thermophilus HB27 (T. thermophilus produces low amounts of RM.TthHB27I with a unique DNA cleavage specificity. We have previously cloned the wild type (wt gene into E. coli, which increased the production of RM.TthHB27I over 100-fold. However, its enzymatic activities were extremely low for an ORF expressed under a T7 promoter. We have designed and cloned a fully synthetic tthHB27IRM gene, using a modified 'codon randomization' strategy. Codons with a high GC content and of low occurrence in E. coli were eliminated. We incorporated a stem-loop circuit, devised to negatively control the expression of this highly toxic gene by partially hiding the ribosome-binding site (RBS and START codon in mRNA secondary structures. Despite having optimized 59% of codons, the amount of produced RM.TthHB27I protein was similar for both recombinant tthHB27IRM gene variants. Moreover, the recombinant wt RM.TthHB27I is very unstable, while the RM.TthHB27I resulting from the expression of the synthetic gene exhibited enzymatic activities and stability equal to the native thermozyme isolated from T. thermophilus. Thus, we have developed an efficient purification protocol using the synthetic tthHB27IRM gene variant only. This suggests the effect of co-translational folding kinetics, possibly affected by the frequency of translational errors. The availability of active RM.TthHB27I is of practical importance in molecular biotechnology

  2. Thermostable proteins bioprocesses: The activity of restriction endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus thermophilus (RM.TthHB27I) cloned in Escherichia coli is critically affected by the codon composition of the synthetic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krefft, Daria; Papkov, Aliaksei; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Skowron, Piotr M

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining thermostable enzymes (thermozymes) is an important aspect of biotechnology. As thermophiles have adapted their genomes to high temperatures, their cloned genes' expression in mesophiles is problematic. This is mainly due to their high GC content, which leads to the formation of unfavorable secondary mRNA structures and codon usage in Escherichia coli (E. coli). RM.TthHB27I is a member of a family of bifunctional thermozymes, containing a restriction endonuclease (REase) and a methyltransferase (MTase) in a single polypeptide. Thermus thermophilus HB27 (T. thermophilus) produces low amounts of RM.TthHB27I with a unique DNA cleavage specificity. We have previously cloned the wild type (wt) gene into E. coli, which increased the production of RM.TthHB27I over 100-fold. However, its enzymatic activities were extremely low for an ORF expressed under a T7 promoter. We have designed and cloned a fully synthetic tthHB27IRM gene, using a modified 'codon randomization' strategy. Codons with a high GC content and of low occurrence in E. coli were eliminated. We incorporated a stem-loop circuit, devised to negatively control the expression of this highly toxic gene by partially hiding the ribosome-binding site (RBS) and START codon in mRNA secondary structures. Despite having optimized 59% of codons, the amount of produced RM.TthHB27I protein was similar for both recombinant tthHB27IRM gene variants. Moreover, the recombinant wt RM.TthHB27I is very unstable, while the RM.TthHB27I resulting from the expression of the synthetic gene exhibited enzymatic activities and stability equal to the native thermozyme isolated from T. thermophilus. Thus, we have developed an efficient purification protocol using the synthetic tthHB27IRM gene variant only. This suggests the effect of co-translational folding kinetics, possibly affected by the frequency of translational errors. The availability of active RM.TthHB27I is of practical importance in molecular biotechnology, extending

  3. The influence of the polymorphism in apolipoprotein B codon 2488 on insulin and lipid levels in a Danish twin population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, J; Poulsen, P; Vaag, A

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: The apolipoprotein B codon 2488 polymorphism has been associated with the metabolism of lipoproteins in subjects with Type 2 diabetes. However, no data are available on the influence of the polymorphism on insulin or glucose metabolism. This study examines the impact of the polymorphism...... on parameters associated with the insulin resistance syndrome in Danish twins. METHODS: The effect of the polymorphism on lipid, glucose and insulin measures was studied in 548 same sex twins aged 55-74 years. RESULTS: The codon 2488 polymorphism influenced fasting triglyceride levels, as well as insulin...... of triglyceride (P = 0.04) and insulin (P = 0.02) and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The T-allele of the codon 2488 polymorphism influenced parameters related to the insulin resistance syndrome, i.e. increased levels of insulin, increased levels of triglyceride and decreased levels of HDL...

  4. Phylogenetically Conserved Sequences Around Myelin P0 Stop Codon are Essential for Translational Readthrough to Produce L-MPZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihide; Baba, Hiroko

    2018-01-01

    Myelin protein zero (P0, MPZ) is the main cell adhesion molecule in peripheral myelin, the sequence of which is evolutionarily highly conserved. Large myelin protein zero (L-MPZ) is a novel translational readthrough molecule in mammals in a physiological status and is encoded by the P0 mRNA with an extra domain. The sequence similarities in the L-MPZ-specific region are found in humans and frogs but not in fish P0 cDNA. Actual synthesis of L-MPZ has been detected in rat and mouse sciatic nerve but not yet evaluated in frogs and humans. The production mechanism and physiological functions of L-MPZ remain unknown. Additionally, the sequence context around the canonical stop codon is significant for readthrough in viruses and yeast, but the correlation between the sequence around P0 stop codon and L-MPZ synthesis is unclear. Here, we focused on the phylogenetic pathways in L-MPZ synthesis. We have shown that L-MPZ is widely produced from frogs to humans using western blotting against L-MPZ. Mutation analysis of the sequence around the stop codon for L-MPZ synthesis using a mammalian in vitro transcription/translation system revealed that the evolutionarily conserved sequence around P0 stop codon is susceptible to readthrough and is similar to the consensus motif in viruses and yeast UAG stop codon type molecules. Our results demonstrate that the phylogenetically conserved sequence around the canonical P0 stop codon is essential for L-MPZ synthesis, suggesting that phylogenetic emergence of L-MPZ in amphibians may be related to particular distribution and/or function in the PNS myelin.

  5. Contrasting Codon Usage Patterns and Purifying Selection at the Mating Locus in Putatively Asexual Alternaria Fungal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jane E.; Kawabe, Masato; Abdo, Zaid; Arie, Tsutomu; Peever, Tobin L.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in heterothallic ascomycete fungi is controlled by a single mating-type locus called MAT1 with two alternate alleles or idiomorphs, MAT1-1 and MAT1-2. These alleles lack sequence similarity and encode different transcriptional regulators. A large number of phytopathogenic fungi including Alternaria spp. are considered asexual, yet still carry expressed MAT1 genes. The molecular evolution of Alternaria MAT1 was explored using nucleotide diversity, nonsynonymous vs. synonymous substitution (dn/ds) ratios and codon usage statistics. Likelihood ratio tests of site-branch models failed to detect positive selection on MAT1-1-1 or MAT1-2-1. Codon-site models demonstrated that both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 are under purifying selection and significant differences in codon usage were observed between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1. Mean GC content at the third position (GC3) and effective codon usage (ENC) were significantly different between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 with values of 0.57 and 48 for MAT1-1-1 and 0.62 and 46 for MAT1-2-1, respectively. In contrast, codon usage of Pleospora spp. (anamorph Stemphylium), a closely related Dothideomycete genus, was not significantly different between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1. The purifying selection and biased codon usage detected at the MAT1 locus in Alternaria spp. suggest a recent sexual past, cryptic sexual present and/or that MAT1 plays important cellular role(s) in addition to mating. PMID:21625561

  6. Three types of preS1 start codon deletion variants in the natural course of chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Won Hyeok; Kim, Hong; Lee, So-Young; Choi, Yu-Min; Kwon, So Young; Moon, Hee Won; Hur, Mina; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2017-12-12

    Naturally occurring hepatitis B virus variants carrying a deletion in the preS1 start codon region may evolve during long-lasting virus-host interactions in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The aim of this study was to determine the immune phase-specific prevalent patterns of preS1 start codon deletion variants and related factors during the natural course of CHB. A total of 399 CHB patients were enrolled. Genotypic analysis of three different preS1 start codon deletion variants (classified by deletion size: 15-base pair [bp], 18-bp, and 21-bp deletion variants) was performed. PreS1 start codon deletion variants were detected in 155 of 399 patients (38.8%). The predominant variant was a 15-bp deletion in the immune-tolerance phase (18/50, 36%) and an 18-bp deletion in the immune-clearance phase (69/183, 37.7%). A 21-bp deletion was the predominant variant in the low replicative phase (3/25, 12.0%) and reactivated hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg)-negative phase (22/141, 15.6%). The 15-bp and 18-bp deletion variants were more frequently found in HBeAg-positive patients (P start codon deletion variants changes according to the immune phases of CHB infection, and each variant type is associated with different clinical parameters. PreS1 start codon deletion variants might interact with the host immune response differently according to their variant types. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. A 21-kDa C-terminal fragment of protein-disulfide isomerase has isomerase, chaperone, and anti-chaperone activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, A; Primm, T P; Surendran, R; Lee, J C; Ballard, K D; Orkiszewski, R S; Makarov, V; Gilbert, H F

    1997-12-26

    A catalyst of disulfide formation and isomerization during protein folding, protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two catalytic sites housed in two domains homologous to thioredoxin, one near the N terminus and the other near the C terminus. The thioredoxin domains, by themselves, can catalyze disulfide formation, but they are unable to catalyze disulfide isomerizations (Darby, N. J. and Creighton, T. E. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 11725-11735). A 21-kDa, C-terminal fragment of PDI (amino acids 308-491), termed weePDI, comprises the C-terminal third of the molecule. The kcat for ribonuclease oxidative folding by weePDI is 0.26 +/- 0.02 min-1, 3-fold lower than the wild-type enzyme but indistinguishable from the activity of a full-length mutant of PDI in which both active site cysteines of the N-terminal thioredoxin domain have been mutated to serine. Eliminating the ability of weePDI to escape easily from covalent complexes with substrate by mutating the active site cysteine nearer the C terminus to serine has a large effect on the isomerase activity of weePDI compared with its effect on the full-length enzyme. weePDI also displays chaperone and anti-chaperone activity characteristic of the full-length molecule. As isolated, weePDI is a disulfide-linked dimer in which the single cysteine (Cys-326) outside active site cross-links two weePDI monomers. The presence of the intermolecular disulfide decreases the activity by more than 2-fold. The results imply that the functions of the core thioredoxin domains of PDI and other members of the thioredoxin superfamily might be modified quite easily by the addition of relatively small accessory domains.

  8. Harvey ras genes transform without mutant codons, apparently activated by truncation of a 5' exon (exon -1).

    OpenAIRE

    Cichutek, K; Duesberg, P H

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis is tested that the ras gene of Harvey sarcoma virus (Ha-SV) and the proto-ras DNAs from certain tumor cells derive transforming function from specific codons in which they differ from normal proto-ras genes. Molecularly cloned Harvey proviral vectors carrying viral ras, normal rat proto-ras, and recombinant ras genes in which the virus-specific ras codons 12 and 59 were replaced by proto-ras equivalents each transformed aneuploid mouse 3T3 cells after latent periods that ranged...

  9. Role of p53 codon 72 polymorphism in the risk of development of distal gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo Ignacio; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco Javier; Crosatti, Maria Luisa; Tijerina-Menchaca, Rolando; Garza-González, Elvira

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the codon 72 of exon 4 in the p53 gene have been associated with higher risk in the development of several types of cancer. This polymorphism occurs with two alleles encoding either arginine (CGC) or proline (CCC). The aim of this study was to assess the role of the codon 72 polymorphism of p53 in the risk for the development of distal gastric cancer (GC) in a Mexican population. We studied 247 patients who were enrolled at the Servicio de Gastroenterologia, Hospital Universitario "Dr. José Eleuterio González" Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. The study group included 65 distal GC cases [mean age, 58.2 (22-84), median = 60, F:M = 0.6] and 182 patients without evidence of GC [mean age 53.9 (18-89), median = 53, F:M = 1.07) as the control group. The polymorphism in the codon 72 of the p53 gene was determined by PCR-RFLP in all the patients. As expected, the majority of GC patients were old male. We found a previously unknown association of the Arg/Arg genotype and distal GC (OR: 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-3.61, p =0.03). Because of age and gender differences, cases and controls were matched in those two variables and the association of Arg/Arg genotype with distal GC persisted (OR: 2.29, 95% CI = 1.22-4.32, p = 0.01). When cases and controls were matched by age, gender, H. pylori positivity and excluding patients with atrophic gastritis and/or intestinal metaplasia (n=97) the association was stronger (OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.18-4.77, p = 0.01). The results of this study suggest that the carriage of the Arg/Arg genotype could be associated with the development of distal GC in this Mexican population.

  10. Characterization of an Hsp90-independent interaction between the co-chaperone p23 and the transcription factor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiwen; Hyun, Jashil; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Park, Sung Jean; Dyson, Jane

    2018-01-15

    The cancer-suppressing transcription factor p53 is regulated by a wide variety of cellular factors, including many chaperones. The DNA-binding domain (DBD) of p53 is known to interact with the chaperone Hsp90, but the role of other members of the chaperone network, including co-chaperones such as p23 is unknown. Using a combination of NMR titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and native agarose gel electrophoresis, we have identified a direct interaction between the p53 DBD and the Hsp90 co-chaperone p23 that occurs in the absence of Hsp90. The affinity is relatively weak, and largely determined by electrostatic interactions between the acidic C-terminal disordered tail of p23 and the two DNA binding regions of p53 DBD. We show by NMR and native agarose gel electrophoresis that a p53-specific double-stranded DNA sequence competes successfully with p23 for binding to the p53 DBD. The Hsp90-independence of the interaction between p23 and p53 DBD, together with the p23-DNA competition for p53, raise the intriguing possibility that p23, like other small charged proteins, may affect the p53 in hitherto-unknown ways.

  11. Parkinson disease-linked GBA mutation effects reversed by molecular chaperones in human cell and fly models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Beavan, Michelle; Gegg, Matthew E.; Chau, Kai-Yin; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Schapira, Anthony H. V.

    2016-01-01

    GBA gene mutations are the greatest cause of Parkinson disease (PD). GBA encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) but the mechanisms by which loss of GCase contributes to PD remain unclear. Inhibition of autophagy and the generation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are both implicated. Mutant GCase can unfold in the ER and be degraded via the unfolded protein response, activating ER stress and reducing lysosomal GCase. Small molecule chaperones that cross the blood brain barrier help mutant GCase refold and traffic correctly to lysosomes are putative treatments for PD. We treated fibroblast cells from PD patients with heterozygous GBA mutations and Drosophila expressing human wild-type, N370S and L444P GBA with the molecular chaperones ambroxol and isofagomine. Both chaperones increased GCase levels and activity, but also GBA mRNA, in control and mutant GBA fibroblasts. Expression of mutated GBA in Drosophila resulted in dopaminergic neuronal loss, a progressive locomotor defect, abnormal aggregates in the ER and increased levels of the ER stress reporter Xbp1-EGFP. Treatment with both chaperones lowered ER stress and prevented the loss of motor function, providing proof of principle that small molecule chaperones can reverse mutant GBA-mediated ER stress in vivo and might prove effective for treating PD. PMID:27539639

  12. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  13. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  14. Nucleotide sequences of three tRNA(Ser) from Drosophila melanogaster reading the six serine codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, D L; Gillam, I C; Tener, G M

    1987-10-05

    The nucleotide sequences of three serine tRNAs from Drosophila melanogaster, together capable of decoding the six serine codons, were determined. tRNA(Ser)2b has the anticodon GCU, tRNA(Ser)4 has CGA and tRNA(Ser)7 has IGA. tRNA(Ser)2b differs from the last two by about 25%. However, tRNA(Ser)4 and tRNA(Ser)7 are 96% homologous, differing only at the first position of the anticodon and two other sites. This unusual sequence relationship suggests, together with similar pairs in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that eukaryotic tRNA(Ser)UCN may be undergoing concerted evolution.

  15. The histone chaperone HJURP is a new independent prognostic marker for luminal A breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Berger, Frédérique; Rehman, Haniya; Martel, Elise; Corpet, Armelle; de Koning, Leanne; Vassias, Isabelle; Wilson, Laurence O W; Meseure, Didier; Reyal, Fabien; Savignoni, Alexia; Asselain, Bernard; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with different molecular subtypes that have varying responses to therapy. An ongoing challenge in breast cancer research is to distinguish high-risk patients from good prognosis patients. This is particularly difficult in the low-grade, ER-positive luminal A tumors, where robust diagnostic tools to aid clinical treatment decisions are lacking. Recent data implicating chromatin regulators in cancer initiation and progression offers a promising avenue to develop new tools to help guide clinical decisions. Here we exploit a published transcriptome dataset and an independent validation cohort to correlate the mRNA expression of selected chromatin regulators with respect to the four intrinsic breast cancer molecular subtypes. We then perform univariate and multivariate analyses to compare the prognostic value of a panel of chromatin regulators to Ki67, a currently utilized proliferation marker. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed a gene cluster containing several histone chaperones and histone variants highly-expressed in the proliferative subtypes (basal-like, HER2-positive, luminal B) but not in the luminal A subtype. Several chromatin regulators, including the histone chaperones CAF-1 (subunits p150 and p60), ASF1b, and HJURP, and the centromeric histone variant CENP-A, associated with local and metastatic relapse and poor patient outcome. Importantly, we find that HJURP can discriminate favorable and unfavorable outcome within the luminal A subtype, outperforming the currently utilized proliferation marker Ki67, as an independent prognostic marker for luminal A patients. The integration of chromatin regulators as clinical biomarkers, in particular the histone chaperone HJURP, will help guide patient substratification and treatment options for low-risk luminal A breast carcinoma patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Broadening the functionality of a J-protein/Hsp70 molecular chaperone system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda A Schilke

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available By binding to a multitude of polypeptide substrates, Hsp70-based molecular chaperone systems perform a range of cellular functions. All J-protein co-chaperones play the essential role, via action of their J-domains, of stimulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70, thereby stabilizing its interaction with substrate. In addition, J-proteins drive the functional diversity of Hsp70 chaperone systems through action of regions outside their J-domains. Targeting to specific locations within a cellular compartment and binding of specific substrates for delivery to Hsp70 have been identified as modes of J-protein specialization. To better understand J-protein specialization, we concentrated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIS1, which encodes an essential J-protein of the cytosol/nucleus. We selected suppressors that allowed cells lacking SIS1 to form colonies. Substitutions changing single residues in Ydj1, a J-protein, which, like Sis1, partners with Hsp70 Ssa1, were isolated. These gain-of-function substitutions were located at the end of the J-domain, suggesting that suppression was connected to interaction with its partner Hsp70, rather than substrate binding or subcellular localization. Reasoning that, if YDJ1 suppressors affect Ssa1 function, substitutions in Hsp70 itself might also be able to overcome the cellular requirement for Sis1, we carried out a selection for SSA1 suppressor mutations. Suppressing substitutions were isolated that altered sites in Ssa1 affecting the cycle of substrate interaction. Together, our results point to a third, additional means by which J-proteins can drive Hsp70's ability to function in a wide range of cellular processes-modulating the Hsp70-substrate interaction cycle.

  17. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola (EBOV and Marburg (MARV viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3, a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs, as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA. Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles.

  18. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  19. The Clp chaperones and proteases of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L Y; Artz, Jennifer D; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Goodman, C Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A

    2010-12-03

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Broadening the functionality of a J-protein/Hsp70 molecular chaperone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Brenda A; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Kamiya, Erina; Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Hines, Justin K; Markley, John L; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2017-10-01

    By binding to a multitude of polypeptide substrates, Hsp70-based molecular chaperone systems perform a range of cellular functions. All J-protein co-chaperones play the essential role, via action of their J-domains, of stimulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70, thereby stabilizing its interaction with substrate. In addition, J-proteins drive the functional diversity of Hsp70 chaperone systems through action of regions outside their J-domains. Targeting to specific locations within a cellular compartment and binding of specific substrates for delivery to Hsp70 have been identified as modes of J-protein specialization. To better understand J-protein specialization, we concentrated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIS1, which encodes an essential J-protein of the cytosol/nucleus. We selected suppressors that allowed cells lacking SIS1 to form colonies. Substitutions changing single residues in Ydj1, a J-protein, which, like Sis1, partners with Hsp70 Ssa1, were isolated. These gain-of-function substitutions were located at the end of the J-domain, suggesting that suppression was connected to interaction with its partner Hsp70, rather than substrate binding or subcellular localization. Reasoning that, if YDJ1 suppressors affect Ssa1 function, substitutions in Hsp70 itself might also be able to overcome the cellular requirement for Sis1, we carried out a selection for SSA1 suppressor mutations. Suppressing substitutions were isolated that altered sites in Ssa1 affecting the cycle of substrate interaction. Together, our results point to a third, additional means by which J-proteins can drive Hsp70's ability to function in a wide range of cellular processes-modulating the Hsp70-substrate interaction cycle.

  1. Differential Regulation of G1 CDK Complexes by the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Hallett

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Selective recruitment of protein kinases to the Hsp90 system is mediated by the adaptor co-chaperone Cdc37. We show that assembly of CDK4 and CDK6 into protein complexes is differentially regulated by the Cdc37-Hsp90 system. Like other Hsp90 kinase clients, binding of CDK4/6 to Cdc37 is blocked by ATP-competitive inhibitors. Cdc37-Hsp90 relinquishes CDK6 to D3- and virus-type cyclins and to INK family CDK inhibitors, whereas CDK4 is relinquished to INKs but less readily to cyclins. p21CIP1 and p27KIP1 CDK inhibitors are less potent than the INKs at displacing CDK4 and CDK6 from Cdc37. However, they cooperate with the D-type cyclins to generate CDK4/6-containing ternary complexes that are resistant to cyclin D displacement by Cdc37, suggesting a molecular mechanism to explain the assembly factor activity ascribed to CIP/KIP family members. Overall, our data reveal multiple mechanisms whereby the Hsp90 system may control formation of CDK4- and CDK6-cyclin complexes under different cellular conditions. : Hallett et al. reconstitute CDK4/6 client kinase handover from Cdc37-Hsp90 to CDK regulatory partners and propose a model for the assembly factor activity of CIP/KIP CDK inhibitors. They find that CDK4/6 inhibitors in clinical use can displace G1 CDKs from the Cdc37-Hsp90 chaperone system at submicromolar concentrations. Keywords: Cdc37, CDK, chaperone, CIP/KIP, cyclin D, Hsp90, INK, kinase, palbociclib, ribociclib

  2. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: From Defective Chaperoning of snRNP Assembly to Neuromuscular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Lanfranco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA is a neuromuscular disorder that results from decreased levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN is part of a multiprotein complex that also includes Gemins 2–8 and Unrip. The SMN-Gemins complex cooperates with the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 complex, whose constituents include WD45, PRMT5 and pICln. Both complexes function as molecular chaperones, interacting with and assisting in the assembly of an Sm protein core onto small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs to generate small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are the operating components of the spliceosome. Molecular and structural studies have refined our knowledge of the key events taking place within the crowded environment of cells and the numerous precautions undertaken to ensure the faithful assembly of snRNPs. Nonetheless, it remains unclear whether a loss of chaperoning in snRNP assembly, considered as a “housekeeping” activity, is responsible for the selective neuromuscular phenotype in SMA. This review thus shines light on in vivo studies that point toward disturbances in snRNP assembly and the consequential transcriptome abnormalities as the primary drivers of the progressive neuromuscular degeneration underpinning the disease. Disruption of U1 snRNP or snRNP assembly factors other than SMN induces phenotypes that mirror aspects of SMN deficiency, and splicing defects, described in numerous SMA models, can lead to a DNA damage and stress response that compromises the survival of the motor system. Restoring the correct chaperoning of snRNP assembly is therefore predicted to enhance the benefit of SMA therapeutic modalities based on augmenting SMN expression.

  3. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chlenski

    Full Text Available Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+ concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+ activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+ concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and ECM. Fluorescently labeled collagen I, fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin were co-internalized with SPARC by fibroblasts, and semi-quantitative Western blot showed that SPARC mediates internalization of collagen I. Using a novel 3-dimensional model of fluorescent ECM networks pre-deposited by live fibroblasts, we demonstrated that degradation of ECM depends on the chaperone activity of SPARC. These results indicate that SPARC may represent a new class of scavenger chaperones, which mediate ECM degradation, remodeling and repair by disassembling ECM networks and shuttling ECM proteins into the cell. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide

  4. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.; Li, Huilin; Christie, P. J.

    2016-06-27

    ABSTRACT

    The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains ofEscherichia coliuse this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function.

    IMPORTANCEPili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. UropathogenicE. colirelies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to

  5. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo P. Ivanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs in its >700-nucleotide (nt 5′ leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5′ region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5′ conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro. In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression.

  6. Detecting consistent patterns of directional adaptation using differential selection codon models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parto, Sahar; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2017-06-23

    Phylogenetic codon models are often used to characterize the selective regimes acting on protein-coding sequences. Recent methodological developments have led to models explicitly accounting for the interplay between mutation and selection, by modeling the amino acid fitness landscape along the sequence. However, thus far, most of these models have assumed that the fitness landscape is constant over time. Fluctuations of the fitness landscape may often be random or depend on complex and unknown factors. However, some organisms may be subject to systematic changes in selective pressure, resulting in reproducible molecular adaptations across independent lineages subject to similar conditions. Here, we introduce a codon-based differential selection model, which aims to detect and quantify the fine-grained consistent patterns of adaptation at the protein-coding level, as a function of external conditions experienced by the organism under investigation. The model parameterizes the global mutational pressure, as well as the site- and condition-specific amino acid selective preferences. This phylogenetic model is implemented in a Bayesian MCMC framework. After validation with simulations, we applied our method to a dataset of HIV sequences from patients with known HLA genetic background. Our differential selection model detects and characterizes differentially selected coding positions specifically associated with two different HLA alleles. Our differential selection model is able to identify consistent molecular adaptations as a function of repeated changes in the environment of the organism. These models can be applied to many other problems, ranging from viral adaptation to evolution of life-history strategies in plants or animals.

  7. Enhanced expression of lipase I from Galactomyces geotrichum by codon optimisation in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hanzhen; Zhang, Wenfei; Guan, Wutai; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Shihai; Deng, Zixiao

    2017-10-01

    Relatively poor heterologous protein yields have limited the commerical applications of Galactomyces geotrichum lipase I (GGl I) efficacy trials. To address this, we have redesigned the GGl I gene to preferentially match codon frequencies of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) while retaining the same amino acid sequence. The wild type and codon optimised GGl I (GGl I-wt and GGl I-op) were synthesised and cloned into pPICZαA with an N-terminal 6 × His tag sequence and expressed in P. pastoris X 33. The hydrolytic activity of GGl I-op was 150 U/mL, whereas the activity of the GGl I-wt could not be detected. GGl I-op recombinant proteins were purified by Ni-affinity chromatography and then characterised. The identity and purity of GGl I were confirmed by SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis. Enzymatic deglycosylation was used to show that the lipase is a glycosylated protein, containing ∼10% sugar. The molecular weight (MW) of the GGl I secreted by recombinant P. pastoris was approximated at 63 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant lipase were 8.0 and 35 °C, respectively. The enzyme was active over a broad pH range (7.0-9.0) and temperature range (20 °C-45 °C). The lipase showed high activity toward medium- and long-chain fatty acid methyl esters (C8-C16) and retained much of its activity in the presence of Tween-80 and Trition X-100. Lipase activity was stimulated by Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+) and inhibited by Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Zn(2+) and Co(2+). This lipase may prove useful to the detergent industry and in organic synthesis reactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Functional Conservation and Specialization among Eukaryotic Anti-Silencing Function 1 Histone Chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Tamburini, Beth A.; Carson, Joshua J.; Adkins, Melissa W.; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2005-01-01

    Chromatin disassembly and reassembly, mediated by histone chaperones such as anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1), are likely to accompany all nuclear processes that occur on the DNA template. In order to gain insight into the functional conservation of Asf1 across eukaryotes, we have replaced the budding yeast Asf1 protein with Drosophila Asf1 (dAsf1) or either of the two human Asf1 (hAsf1a and hAsf1b) counterparts. We found that hAsf1b is best able to rescue the growth defect of Saccharomyces c...

  9. Large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis unveils general rules that fine-tune evolution of mRNA primary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Moura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon usage and codon-pair context are important gene primary structure features that influence mRNA decoding fidelity. In order to identify general rules that shape codon-pair context and minimize mRNA decoding error, we have carried out a large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis of 119 fully sequenced genomes. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed mathematical and software tools for large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis. These methodologies unveiled general and species specific codon-pair context rules that govern evolution of mRNAs in the 3 domains of life. We show that evolution of bacterial and archeal mRNA primary structure is mainly dependent on constraints imposed by the translational machinery, while in eukaryotes DNA methylation and tri-nucleotide repeats impose strong biases on codon-pair context. CONCLUSIONS: The data highlight fundamental differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decoding rules, which are partially independent of codon usage.

  10. Out with the old: Hsp90 finds amino acid residue more useful than co-chaperone protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey D. Zuehlke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Redundant functions maintained from single to multi-cellular organisms have made Saccharomyces cere-visiae an important model for the analysis of con-served com-plex cellular processes. Yeast has been especially useful in understanding the regulation and function of the essential molecular chaperone, Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90. Research focused on Hsp90 has determined that it is highly regulated by both co-chaperones and posttranslational modifications. A recent study per-formed by (Zuehlke et al., 2017 demonstrates that the function of one co-chaperone in yeast is replaced by posttranslational modification (PTM of a single amino acid within Hsp90 in higher eukaryotes.

  11. Transient erythromycin resistance phenotype associated with peptidyl-tRNA drop-off on early UGG and GGG codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macvanin, Mirjana; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Ardell, David H

    2007-01-01

    Expression of minigenes encoding tetra- or pentapeptides MXLX or MXLXV (E peptides), where X is a nonpolar amino acid, renders cells erythromycin resistant whereas expression of minigenes encoding tripeptide MXL does not. By using a 3A' reporter gene system beginning with an E-peptide-encoding se......Expression of minigenes encoding tetra- or pentapeptides MXLX or MXLXV (E peptides), where X is a nonpolar amino acid, renders cells erythromycin resistant whereas expression of minigenes encoding tripeptide MXL does not. By using a 3A' reporter gene system beginning with an E......-peptide-encoding sequence, we asked whether the codons UGG and GGG, which are known to promote peptidyl-tRNA drop-off at early positions in mRNA, would result in a phenotype of erythromycin resistance if located after this sequence. We find that UGG or GGG, at either position +4 or +5, without a following stop codon......, is associated with an erythromycin resistance phenotype upon gene induction. Our results suggest that, while a stop codon at +4 gives a tripeptide product (MIL) and erythromycin sensitivity, UGG or GGG codons at the same position give a tetrapeptide product (MILW or MILG) and phenotype of erythromycin...

  12. Comparative investigation of the various determinants that influence the codon and amino acid usage patterns in the genus Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ayan; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasish; Sarkar, Indrani; Sen, Arnab

    2015-06-01

    Various strains of the genus Bifidobacterium are crucial members of the human, animal and insect gut, associated with beneficial probiotic activities. An extensive analysis on codon and amino acid usage of the GC rich genus Bifidobacterium has been executed in the present study. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed a coupled effect of GC compositional constraint and natural selection for translational efficiency to be operative in producing the observed codon usage variations. Gene expression level was inferred to be the most crucial factor governing the codon usage patterns. Amino acid usage was found to be influenced significantly by hydrophobic and aromatic character of the encoded proteins. Gene expressivity and protein energetic cost also had considerable impact on the differential mode of amino acid usage. The genus was found to strictly obey the cost-minimization hypothesis as was reflected from the amino acid usage patterns of the potential highly expressed gene products. Evolutionary analysis revealed that the highly expressed genes were candidates to extreme evolutionary selection pressure and indicated a high degree of conservation at the proteomic level. Interestingly, the complimentary strands of replication appeared to evolve under similar evolutionary constraints which might be addressed as a consequence of absence of replicational selection and lack of strand-specific asymmetry among the members of the genus. Thus, the present endeavor confers considerable know-how pertaining to the codon and amino acid usage intricacies in Bifidobacterium and might prove handy for further scientific investigations associated with the concerned domain.

  13. Mutations of codon 918 in the RET proto-oncogene correlate to poor prognosis in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zedenius, J.; Svensson, A.; Baeckdahl, M.; Wallin, G. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes types 2A and B (MEN 2A and B) were recently linked to germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, altering one of five cysteine residues in exon 10 or 11 (MEN 2A), or substituting a methionine for a threonine at codon 918 in exon 16 (MEN 2B). The latter mutation also occurs somatically in some sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC), and has in a previous study been correlated with a less favorable clinical outcome. In the present study, 46 MTCs were selected for investigation of the codon 918 mutation. The mutation was found in 29 tumors (63%), and was significantly correlated with a poor outcome, with regard to distant metastasis or tumor recurrence (p<10{sup 4}). Two tumors showed multifocal growth and C-cell hyperplasia, and these patients were therefore also investigated for germline mutations in exons 10, 11 and 16. The codon 918 mutation was found only in the tumors, thus of somatic origin. The RET codon 918 mutation may have prognostic impact, and therefore preoperative assessment may influence decision-making in the treatment of patients suffering from MTC. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and cervical cancer : a pooled analysis of individual data from 49 studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klug, Stefanie J.; Ressing, Meike; Koenig, Jochem; Abba, Martin C.; Agorastos, Theodoros; Brenna, Sylvia M. F.; Ciotti, Marco; Das, B. R.; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Dybikowska, Aleksandra; Giuliano, Anna R.; Gudleviciene, Zivile; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haws, Andrea L. F.; Helland, Aslaug; Herrington, C. Simon; Hildesheim, Alan; Humbey, Olivier; Jee, Sun H.; Kim, Jae Weon; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Menczer, Joseph; Ngan, Hextan Y. S.; Nishikawa, Akira; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Pegoraro, Rosemary; Pillai, M. R.; Ranzani, Gulielmina; Rezza, Giovanni; Rosenthal, Adam N.; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Schmitt, Virginia M.; Sengupta, Sharmila; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Stoler, Mark H.; Suarez-Rincon, Angel E.; Szarka, Krisztina; Tachezy, Ruth; Ueda, Masatsugu; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Doeberitz, Magnus von Knebel; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Blettner, Maria

    Background Cervical cancer is caused primarily by human papillomaviruses (HPV). The polymorphism rs1042522 at codon 72 of the TP53 tumour-suppressor gene has been investigated as a genetic cofactor. More than 80 studies were done between 1998 and 2006, after it was initially reported that women who

  15. Using Student Writing and Lexical Analysis to Reveal Student Thinking about the Role of Stop Codons in the Central Dogma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B.; Smith, Michelle K.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that students have persistent difficulties in understanding how central dogma processes can be affected by a stop codon mutation. To explore these difficulties, we modified two multiple-choice questions from the Genetics Concept Assessment into three open-ended questions that asked students to write about how a stop codon…

  16. [Polymorphism in codon 72 of the p53 gene and cervico-uterine cancer risk in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Rincón, Angel Emillo; Morán-Moguel, María Cristina; Montoya-Fuentes, Héctor; Gallegos-Arreola, Martha Patricia; Sánchez-Corona, José

    2002-07-01

    A polymorphism at codon 72 in the p53 gen has been reported as a potential risk factor to cervical cancer (CC) because human papillomavirus (HPV) is more effective at degrading p53 Arg-72 than p53 Pro-72, making individuals homozygous for p53 Arg-72 seven times more likely to develop HPV-associated CC. As In Mexico the CC is a health public problem, we designed this study to determinate whether the p53 codon 72 polymorphism represent a risk factor to CC in our population. A case-controls study was performed. DNA was obtained from paraffin-embedded cervical fixed tissue samples. Analysis of the p53 genotype at position 72 was performed by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers and Accll digestion. Among cases with CC the proportions of the p53 genotypes at codon 72 were 0.05 to proline homozygous, 0.5 to heterozygous, and 0.45 to arginine-homozygous. In controls the proportions were 0.08, 0.62, and 0.31. X2 test showed no significant difference In the proportions. We conclude than In our population, as other worldwide countries, the homozygous for arginine at codon 72 of the p53 gene is not a risk factor to cervical cancer.

  17. The influence of the polymorphism in apolipoprotein B codon 2488 on insulin and lipid levels in a Danish twin population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, J; Poulsen, P; Vaag, A

    2002-01-01

    on parameters associated with the insulin resistance syndrome in Danish twins. METHODS: The effect of the polymorphism on lipid, glucose and insulin measures was studied in 548 same sex twins aged 55-74 years. RESULTS: The codon 2488 polymorphism influenced fasting triglyceride levels, as well as insulin...

  18. Kissing loops hide premature termination codons in pre-mRNAof selenoprotein genes and in genes containing programmedribosomal frameshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Steen; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    A novel RNA secondary structure that places the selenocysteine codon UGA in one hairpin and a donor splice site in another, has been discovered in selenoprotein genes. The presence of the structure resolves the discrepancy that the selenocysteine triplet, UGA, should block splicing. Without...... a specific signal such as the novel RNA secondary structure, selenoproteins could not be produced from genes containing intervening sequences....

  19. The M129V polymorphism of codon 129 in the prion gene (PRNP) in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Henrik; Broholm, Helle; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2008-01-01

    was isolated from 352 samples and alleles were detected by allele specific real-time PCR and/or restriction endonuclease treatment followed by agarose gelelectrophoresis. The distribution of the genotypes at codon 129 was found to be Met/Met 35%, Met/Val 48% and Val/Val 17%. The other polymorphisms were found...

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA and p53 codon 72 polymorphism in prostate carcinomas of patients from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn Tomas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, causatively linked to cervical cancer, might also play a role in the development of prostate cancer. Furthermore, the polymorphism at codon 72 (encoding either arginine or proline of the p53 tumor-suppressor gene is discussed as a possible determinant for cancer risk. The HPV E6 oncoprotein induces degradation of the p53 protein. The aim of this study was to analyse prostate carcinomas and hyperplasias of patients from Argentina for the presence of HPV DNA and the p53 codon 72 polymorphism genotype. Methods HPV DNA detection and typing were done by consensus L1 and type-specific PCR assays, respectively, and Southern blot hybridizations. Genotyping of p53 codon 72 polymorphism was performed both by allele specific primer PCRs and PCR-RFLP (Bsh1236I. Fischer's test with Woolf's approximation was used for statistical analysis. Results HPV DNA was detected in 17 out of 41 (41.5 % carcinoma samples, whereas all 30 hyperplasia samples were HPV-negative. Differences in p53 codon 72 allelic frequencies were not observed, neither between carcinomas and hyperplasias nor between HPV-positive and HPV-negative carcinomas. Conclusion These results indicate that the p53 genotype is probably not a risk factor for prostate cancer, and that HPV infections could be associated with at least a subset of prostate carcinomas.

  1. Four-base codon mediated mRNA display to construct peptide libraries that contain multiple nonnatural amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Norihito; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sisido, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    In vitro selection and directed evolution of peptides from mRNA display are powerful strategies to find novel peptide ligands that bind to target biomolecules. In this study, we expanded the mRNA display method to include multiple nonnatural amino acids by introducing three different four-base codons at a randomly selected single position on the mRNA. Another nonnatural amino acid may be introduced by suppressing an amber codon that may appear from a (NNK)n nucleotide sequence on the mRNA. The mRNA display was expressed in an Escherichia coli in vitro translation system in the presence of three types of tRNAs carrying different four-base anticodons and a tRNA carrying an amber anticodon, the tRNAs being chemically aminoacylated with different nonnatural amino acids. The complexity of the starting mRNA-displayed peptide library was estimated to be 1.1 × 1012 molecules. The effectiveness of the four-base codon mediated mRNA display method was demonstrated in the selection of biocytin-containing peptides on streptavidin-coated beads. Moreover, a novel streptavidin-binding nonnatural peptide containing benzoylphenylalanine was obtained from the nonnatural peptide library. The nonnatural peptide library from the four-base codon mediated mRNA display provides much wider functional and structural diversity than conventional peptide libraries that are constituted from 20 naturally occurring amino acids. PMID:16397292

  2. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  3. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  4. Acid-denatured Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Rosa E; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used in several molecular and cellular biology applications, since it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, native GFP is resistant to the most common chemical denaturants; however, a low fluorescence signal has been observed after acid-induced denaturation. Furthermore, this acid-denatured GFP has been used as substrate in studies of the folding activity of some bacterial chaperones and other chaperone-like molecules. Protein disulfide isomerase enzymes, a family of eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds in nascent polypeptides, play a key role in protein folding and it could display chaperone activity. However, contrasting results have been reported using different proteins as model substrates. Here, we report the further application of GFP as a model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) enzymes. Since refolding of acid-denatured GFP can be easily and directly monitored, a simple micro-assay was used to study the effect of the molecular participants in protein refolding assisted by PDI. Additionally, the effect of a well-known inhibitor of PDI chaperone activity was also analyzed. Because of the diversity their functional activities, PDI enzymes are potentially interesting drug targets. Since PDI may be implicated in the protection of cells against ER stress, including cancer cells, inhibitors of PDI might be able to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy; furthermore, it has been demonstrated that blocking the reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds of proteins associated with the cell surface markedly reduces the infectivity of the human immunodeficiency virus. Although several high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to test PDI reductase activity have been described, we report here a novel and simple micro-assay to test the chaperone activity of PDI enzymes, which is amenable for HTS of PDI

  5. Delay of diabetic cataract in rats by the antiglycating potential of cumin through modulation of alpha-crystallin chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pasupulati Anil; Reddy, Paduru Yadagiri; Srinivas, P N B S; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2009-07-01

    alpha-Crystallin, a molecular chaperone of the eye lens, plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the lens by preventing the aggregation/inactivation of several proteins and enzymes in addition to its structural role. alpha-Crystallin is a long-lived protein and is susceptible to several posttranslational modifications during aging, more so in certain clinical conditions such as diabetes. Nonenzymatic glycation of lens proteins and decline in the chaperone-like function of alpha-crystallin have been reported in diabetic conditions. Therefore, inhibitors of nonenzymatic protein glycation appear to be a potential target to preserve the chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin and to combat cataract under hyperglycemic conditions. In this study, we investigated the antiglycating potential of cumin in vitro and its ability to modulate the chaperone-like activity of alpha-crystallin vis-à-vis the progression of diabetic cataract in vivo. Aqueous extract of cumin was tested for its antiglycating ability against fructose-induced glycation of goat lens total soluble protein (TSP), alpha-crystallin from goat lens and a nonlenticular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The antiglycating potential of cumin was also investigated by feeding streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with diet containing 0.5% cumin powder. The aqueous extract of cumin prevented in vitro glycation of TSP, alpha-crystallin and BSA. Slit lamp examination revealed that supplementation of cumin delayed progression and maturation of STZ-induced cataract in rats. Cumin was effective in preventing glycation of TSP and alpha-crystallin in diabetic lens. Interestingly, feeding of cumin to diabetic rats not only prevented loss of chaperone activity but also attenuated the structural changes of alpha-crystallin in lens. These results indicated that cumin has antiglycating properties that may be attributed to the modulation of chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin, thus delaying cataract in

  6. Identification of a Rare β(0)-Thalassemia Mutation, Codon 54 (-T) (HBB: c.165delT) in an Iranian Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian Dastjerdy, Nadia; Banihashemi, Ali; Azizi, Mandana; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is the most widespread autosomal recessive disorder worldwide. The present study describes a very rare β-globin gene mutation, codon 54 (-T) (HBB: c.165delT), in a family from northern Iran. Nucleotide sequencing of amplified DNA obtained from a 28-year-old man revealed a deletion (-T) at codon 54 of the β-globin gene that results in a nonsense sequence at codon 60 and inphase termination at codon 59. Moreover, the haplotype combination of six different restriction enzyme sites in the β-globin cluster was determined for this mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second article reporting the codon 54 mutation worldwide and the first report of this mutation in the Iranian population, emphasizing the high heterogeneity of this population.

  7. Abortive translation caused by peptidyl-tRNA drop-off at NGG codons in the early coding region of mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Isaksson, Leif A

    2005-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the codons CGG, AGG, UGG or GGG (NGG codons) but not GGN or GNG (where N is non-G) are associated with low expression of a reporter gene, if located at positions +2 to +5. Induction of a lacZ reporter gene with any one of the NGG codons at position +2 to +5 does not influence......-type or the mutant strain. The inhibitory effect on the pth mutant strain by NGG codons at location +5 was suppressed by overexpression of the Pth enzyme from a plasmid. However, the overexpression of cognate tRNAs for AGG or GGG did not rescue from the growth inhibition associated with these codons early...

  8. Conformational changes in human Hsp70 induced by high hydrostatic pressure produce oligomers with ATPase activity but without chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Thaís L S; Borges, Julio Cesar; Ramos, Carlos H; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; Oliveira Júnior, Reinaldo S; Pascutti, Pedro G; Foguel, Debora; Palhano, Fernando L

    2014-05-13

    We investigated the folding of the 70 kDa human cytosolic inducible protein (Hsp70) in vitro using high hydrostatic pressure as a denaturing agent. We followed the structural changes in Hsp70 induced by high hydrostatic pressure using tryptophan fluorescence, molecular dynamics, circular dichroism, high-performance liquid chromatography gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, ATPase activity, and chaperone activity. Although monomeric, Hsp70 is very sensitive to hydrostatic pressure; after pressure had been removed, the protein did not return to its native sate but instead formed oligomeric species that lost chaperone activity but retained ATPase activity.

  9. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase...... for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling...... histones genome wide during DNA replication....

  10. Genetic polymorphism at codon 10 of the transforming growth factor-β1 gene in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Joon; Park, Soo Kyung; Won, In Sik; Kim, Dong Kyu; Jung, Young Kul; Ku, Yang Suh; Kim, Yun Soo; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) is a key cytokine in the production of extracellular matrix. A genetic polymorphism at codon 10 of the TGF-β1 gene is associated with liver fibrosis. We investigated the effect of genetic polymorphisms at codon 10 on the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC). Methods In total, 119 controls and 182 patients with ALC, were enrolled in the study. Clinical and laboratory data including total lifetime alcohol intake were collected at enrollment. The genotype at codon 10 was determined for each patient by single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results There were three types of genetic polymorphism at codon 10: homozygous proline (P/P), heterozygous proline/leucine (P/L), and homozygous leucine (L/L). Among the controls, the proportions of P/P, P/L, and L/L were 26.1%, 44.5%, and 29.4%, respectively in the ALC group, these proportions were 23.1%, 43.4%, and 33.5%, respectively. The genotype distribution did not differ between the controls and the ALC group. In the ALC group, age, total lifetime alcohol intake, and distribution of Child-Pugh class did not differ with the genotype. Of the male patients with ALC (n=164), the proportions of P/P, P/L, and L/L were 20.1%, 44.5%, and 35.4%, respectively the genotype distribution did not differ between the male controls and the male ALC patients. Conclusions The genotype at codon 10 in TGF-β1 does not appear to influence the development of ALC. Further study is needed to investigate other genetic factors that influence the development of ALC in patients with