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Sample records for cobalt alloys

  1. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  2. Electroplated zinc-cobalt alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.E.O.S.; Farr, J.P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the deposition and use of ectrodeposited zinc-cobalt alloys is surveyed. Alloys containing lower of Nuclear quantities of cobalt are potentially more useful. The structures of the deposits is related to their chemical and mechanical properties. The inclusion of oxide and its role in the deposition mechanism may be significant. Chemical and engineering properties relate to the metallurgical structure of the alloys, which derives from the mechanism of deposition. The inclusion of oxides and hydroxides in the electroplate may provide evidence for this mechanism. Electrochemical impedance measurements have been made at significant deposition potentials, in alkaline electrolytes. These reveal a complex electrode behaviour which depends not only on the electrode potential but on the Co content of the electrolyte. For the relevant range of cathodic potential zinc-cobalt alloy electrodeposition occurs through a stratified interface. The formation of an absorbed layer ZnOH/sup +/ is the initial step, this inhibits the deposition of cobalt at low cathodic potentials, so explaining its 'anomalous deposition'. A porous layer of zinc forms on the adsorbed ZnOH/sup +/ at underpotential. As the potential becomes more cathodic, cobalt co- deposits from its electrolytic complex forming a metallic solid solution of Co in Zn. In electrolytes containing a high concentration of cobalt a mixed entity (ZnCo)/sub +/ is assumed to adsorb at the cathode from which a CoZn intermetallic deposits. (author)

  3. Derivative spectrophotometry of cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of derivative spectrophotometry is briefly described, and derivative absorption spectra are presented for samarium, cobalt, and commercial Sm-Co alloys. It is shown that the use of derivative spectrophotometry not only improves the accuracy and selectivity of element determinations but also simplifies the analysis of alloys. Results of a statistical evaluation of the metrological characteristics of the analytical procedure described here are presented. 8 references

  4. Nickel and cobalt base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlle, P.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel base alloys have a good resistance to pitting, cavernous or cracks corrosion. Nevertheless, all the nickel base alloys are not equivalent. Some differences exit between all the families (Ni, Ni-Cu, Ni-Cr-Fe, Ni-Cr-Fe-Mo/W-Cu, Ni-Cr-Mo/W, Ni-Mo). Cobalt base alloys in corrosive conditions are generally used for its wear and cracks resistance, with a compromise to its localised corrosion resistance properties. The choice must be done from the perfect knowledge of the corrosive medium and of the alloys characteristics (chemical, metallurgical). A synthesis of the corrosion resistance in three medium (6% FeCl 3 , 4% NaCl + 1% HCl + 0.1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , 11.5% H 2 SO 4 + 1.2% HCl + 1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + 1% CuCl 2 ) is presented. (A.B.). 11 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs

  5. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...

  6. Relaxation resistance of heat resisting alloys with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzdyka, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Relaxation resistance of refractory nickel-chromium alloys containing 5 to 14 % cobalt is under study. The tests involve the use of circular samples at 800 deg to 850 deg C. It is shown that an alloy containing 14% cobalt possesses the best relaxation resistance exceeding that of nickel-chromium alloys without any cobalt by a factor of 1.5 to 2. The relaxation resistance of an alloy with 5% cobalt can be increased by hardening at repeated loading

  7. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  8. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    Alloys 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revet -se tside lf necessary and identify by block number) ~ lThe sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion of cobalt and...Figures 12 and 13. The Na2 SO 4 was observed to form puddles on the oxide-covered specimen surface. An oxide slag was usually suspended in the... slag (black arrows) were suspended (30 sees at 1000°C in air). b) After washing the Na2SO 4 from the specimen, the exposed oxide surface was highly

  9. Tribological research of cobalt alloys used as biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karpiński

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study provides information about the cobalt alloys used in dentistry and medicine. The work includes a review of the literature describing the general properties of cobalt alloys. In addition it describes the impact of the manufacturing conditions and alloy additives used , on the structure and mechanical properties of these alloys. The research methodology and the results obtained has been presented in the study. Two cobalt-based alloys Co-CrMo-W and Co-Cr-Ni-Mo were selected for the tests. The first one was prepared with the use of casting technique whereas the second was obtained due to plastic forming. An analysis of the chemical composition and in vitro tribological tests with the use of tribotester of "ball-on-disc" type was conducted. Comparative tribological characteristics of these alloys has been presented.

  10. Passivation and corrosion behaviours of cobalt and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Babic, R.

    2007-01-01

    Passivation and corrosion behaviour of the cobalt and cobalt-base alloy Co30Cr6Mo was studied in a simulated physiological solution containing chloride and bicarbonate ions and with pH of 6.8. The oxido-reduction processes included solid state transformations occurring at the cobalt/electrolyte interface are interpreted using theories of surface electrochemistry. The dissolution of cobalt is significantly suppressed by alloying it with chromium and molybdenum, since the alloy exhibited 'chromium like' passivity. The structural and protective properties of passive oxide films formed spontaneously at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarization were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the wide frequency range

  11. Tungsen--nickel--cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, J.M.; Riley, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing this tungsten--nickel--cobalt alloy is further described and comprises coating the tungsten particles with a nickel--cobalt alloy, pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, heating the compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400 0 C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500 0 C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, cooling to about 1200 0 C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1 / 2 hour, and cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere

  12. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  13. The development of cobalt-base alloy ball bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xinshui; Chen Jianting; Wang Zaishu; Wang Ximei; Huang Chongming.

    1986-01-01

    The main technologies and experiences in developing a Cobalt-base alloy ball bearing are described. In the hardfacing of bearing races, a lower-hardness alloy of type St-6 is used rather than an alloy with hardness similar to that of the ball and finally the hardness of race is increased to match that of the ball by heat treatment. This improvement has certain advantages. The experience of whole developing technology indicates that strict control of the technology in the bearing-race hardfacing is the key problem in the quality assurance of bearings

  14. Cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Kimball, Bryn E.; Shedd, Kim B.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Cobalt is a silvery gray metal that has diverse uses based on certain key properties, including ferromagnetism, hardness and wear-resistance when alloyed with other metals, low thermal and electrical conductivity, high melting point, multiple valences, and production of intense blue colors when combined with silica. Cobalt is used mostly in cathodes in rechargeable batteries and in superalloys for turbine engines in jet aircraft. Annual global cobalt consumption was approximately 75,000 metric tons in 2011; China, Japan, and the United States (in order of consumption amount) were the top three cobalt-consuming countries. In 2011, approximately 109,000 metric tons of recoverable cobalt was produced in ores, concentrates, and intermediate products from cobalt, copper, nickel, platinum-group-element (PGE), and zinc operations. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo [Kinshasa]) was the principal source of mined cobalt globally (55 percent). The United States produced a negligible amount of byproduct cobalt as an intermediate product from a PGE mining and refining operation in southeastern Montana; no U.S. production was from mines in which cobalt was the principal commodity. China was the leading refiner of cobalt, and much of its production came from cobalt ores, concentrates, and partially refined materials imported from Congo (Kinshasa).The mineralogy of cobalt deposits is diverse and includes both primary (hypogene) and secondary (supergene) phases. Principal terrestrial (land-based) deposit types, which represent most of world’s cobalt mine production, include primary magmatic Ni-Cu(-Co-PGE) sulfides, primary and secondary stratiform sediment-hosted Cu-Co sulfides and oxides, and secondary Ni-Co laterites. Seven additional terrestrial deposit types are described in this chapter. The total terrestrial cobalt resource (reserves plus other resources) plus past production, where available, is calculated to be 25.5 million metric tons. Additional resources of

  15. Testing of cobalt-free alloys for valve applications using a special test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.

    1992-01-01

    Considering that use of cobalt alloys should be avoided as far as possible in PWR components, a programme aimed at establishing the performance of cobalt-free alloys has been performed for valve applications, where cobalt alloys are mainly used. Referring to past work, two types of cobalt-free alloys were selected: Ni-Cr-B-Si and Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. Cobalt-free valves' behaviour has been evaluated comparatively with cobalt valves by implementation of a programme in a special PWR test loop. At the issue of the loop test programme, which included endurance, thermal shock and erosion tests, cobalt-free alloys candidate to replace cobalt alloys are proposed in relation with valve type (globe valve and swing check valve). The following was established: (i) Colmonoy 4-26 (Ni-Cr-B-Si alloy) and Cenium Z20 (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) deposited by plasma arc process were found suitable for use in 3inch swing check valves; (ii) for integral parts acting as guide rings, Nitronic 60 and Cesium Z20/698 were tested successfully; (iii) for small-bore components such as 2inch globe valves, no solution can yet be proposed; introduction of cobalt-free alloys is dependent on the development of automatic advanced arc surfacing techniques applied to small-bore components

  16. Brightness coatings of zinc-cobalt alloys by electrolytic way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julve, E.

    1993-01-01

    Zinc-cobalt alloys provide corrosion resistance for the ferrous based metals. An acidic electrolyte for zinc-cobalt electrodeposition is examined in the present work. The effects of variations in electrolyte composition, in electrolyte temperature, pH and agitation on electrodeposit composition have been studied, as well as the current density influence. It was found that the following electrolyte gave the optimum results: 79 g.1''-1 ZnCl 2 , 15.3 g.1''-1 CoCl 2 .6H 2 O, 160 g.1''-1 KCl, 25 g.1''-1 H 3 BO 3 and 5-10 cm''3.1''-1 of an organic additive (caffeine, coumarin and sodium lauryl-sulphonate). The operating conditions were: pH=5,6 temperature: 30 degree centigree, current density: 0,025-0,035 A. cm''2, anode: pure zinc, agitation: slowly with air and filtration: continuous. The throwing power and cathode current efficiency of the electrolyte were also studied. This electrolyte yielded zinc-cobalt alloys white and lustrous and had a cobalt content of 0,5-0,8% (Author) 3 refs. 5 fig

  17. Discontinuous precipitation in cobalt-tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieba, P.; Cliff, G.; Lorimer, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    Discontinuous precipitation in a Co32 wt% W alloy aged in the temperature range from 875 K to 1025 K has been investigated. Philips EM 430 STEM has been used to characterize the microstructure and to measure the composition profiles across individual lamellae of ε Co and Co 3 W phases in partially transformed specimens. Two kinds of cellular precipitates have been found in the alloy. The initial transformation product, identified as primary lamellae with spacing of a few nanometers is replaced during prolonged ageing by secondary lamellae with a much larger interlamellar spacing, typically a few tens of nm. Line scans across cell boundaries of the primary lamellae revealed that, just behind the advancing cell boundary, the solute content is far from the equilibrium state. This solute excess within the cells is quickly removed at the ageing temperature. Calculations show that the diffusion process was too rapid to be identified as ordinary volume diffusion. Investigation of the kinetics showed that discontinuous precipitation is controlled by diffusion processes at the advancing cell boundary. This proposal has been confirmed by STEM analysis of tungsten profiles in the depleted ε Co lamellae

  18. Substitution of cobalt alloying in PWR primary circuit gate valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachon, L.; Sudreau, F.; Brunel, L.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this study is qualify cobalt-free alternative alloys for valve applications. This paper focus on tribological characterization of numerous coatings is done by using the first one, of a classical type. Then tests are performed with the second one which simulates solicitations supported by gate valves in primary circuit of PWR. 35% Ni-Cr - 65% Cr 3 C 2 coating, deposited by detonation gun technology, gives us hope to find a substitute of Stelite 6. (author). 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  20. Metallic ion release from biocompatible cobalt-based alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Ivana D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials, which are mainly used for the damaged hard tissue replacements, are materials with high strength, excellent toughness and good wear resistance. The disadvantages of metals as implant materials are their susceptibility to corrosion, the elastic modulus mismatch between metals and human hard tissues, relatively high density and metallic ion release which can cause serious health problems. The aim of this study was to examine metallic ion release from Co-Cr-Mo alloy in artificial saliva. In that purpose, alloy samples were immersed into artificial saliva with different pH values (4.0, 5.5 and 7.5. After a certain immersion period (1, 3 and 6 weeks the concentrations of released ions were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS. The research findings were used in order to define the dependence between the concentration of released metallic ions, artificial saliva pH values and immersion time. The determined released metallic ions concentrations were compared with literature data in order to describe and better understand the phenomenon of metallic ion release from the biocompatible cobalt-based alloy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46010 i br. ON 174004

  1. Preparation of rare earth-cobalt magnet alloy by reduction-diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    Preparation of rare earth-cobalt alloys by reduction-diffusion (R-D) process is described. The process essentially involves mixing of the rare earth oxide and cobalt/cobalt oxide powders in proper proportion and high temperature reduction of the charge in hydrogen atmosphere, followed by aqueous leaching of the reduced mass to yield the alloy powder. Comparison is made of the magnetic properties of the R-D powder with those of the powder prepared by the direct melting (DM) route and it is observed from the reported values for SmCo 5 that the energy product of the R-D powder (approximately 22 MGOe) is only marginally lower than that of the directly melted alloy (approximately 25 MGOe). The paper also includes the results of studies carried out at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, on the preparation of misch metal-cobalt alloy by the R-D process. (auth.)

  2. Toughness behaviour of tungsten-carbide-cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, L.S.

    1985-05-01

    In the present work the mechanisms of crack propagation in technically important WC-Co alloys are investigated and a model describing the influence of microstructural parameters and of the mechanical properties of the constituents is developed. An energy concept is used for modelling fracture toughness. The energies dissipated in the four crack-paths (trans- and intergranular carbide fracture, fracture across the binder-ligaments, fracture in the binder close to the carbide/binder interface) are summed up using the experimentally determined area-fractions of the crack-paths, the specific energy of brittle fracture in the carbide and of ductile fracture is calculated by integrating the energy to deform a volume element over the plastically deformed region. In contrast to all earlier models, this concept describes fracture toughness of WC-Co alloys only with physically meaningful parameters. The excellent agreement with experimental toughness values and with qualitative observations of crack propagation show that the new model includes all effects which influence toughness. As demonstrated with WC-based hardmetals with a cobalt-nickel binder, the results open new possibilities for optimizing the toughness of composites in which a small amount of a tough phase is embedded in a brittle matrix. (Author, shortened by G.Q.)

  3. Synthesis of cobalt alloy through smelting method and its characterization as prosthesis bone implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminatun,; Putri, N.S Efinda; Indriani, Arista; Himawati, Umi; Hikmawati, Dyah; Suhariningsih

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-based alloys are widely used as total hip and knee replacements because of their excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance, fatigue strength and biocompatibility. In this work, cobalt alloys with variation of Cr (28.5; 30; 31.5; 33, and 34.5% wt) have been synthesized by smelting method began with the process of compaction, followed by smelting process using Tri Arc Melting Furnace at 200A. Continued by homogenization process at recrystallization temperature (1250° C) for 3 hours to allow the atoms diffuses and transform into γ phase. The next process is rolling process which is accompanied by heating at 1200° C for ± 15 minutes and followed by quenching. This process is repeated until the obtained thickness of ± 1 mm. The evaluated material properties included microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness value. It was shown that microstructure of cobalt alloys with variation of Cr is dominant by γ phase, thus making the entire cobalt alloys have high hardness. It was also shown from the surface morphology of entire cobalt alloys sample indicated the whole process of synthesis that had good solubility were at flat surface area. Hardness value test showed all of cobalt alloys sample had high hardness, just variation of 33% Cr be in the range of ASTMF75, it were 345,24 VHN which is potential to be applied as an implant prosthesis

  4. Thermomagnetic method to determine cobalt content in solid WC-Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanov, V.I.; Loshakov, A.L.; Korchakova, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    A thermomagnetic method of cobalt amount determination in tungsten solid alloys is suggested. The method consists in the following: a sample of solid alloy is placed in a magnetic field sufficient to achieve technical saturation (not less than 10 kOe), and specific magnetization of saturation of the alloy σ is determined, then the sample is heated and according to the curves of magnetic permeability dependence on the temperature the Curie point of the alloy THETA is determined and cobalt amount is calculated by the formula qsub(Co)=σ100/(kTHETA+b). The analysis duration is approximately 30 min. Comparative data of cobalt amount determination in solid alloys WC-Co using thermonagnetic and potentiometric methods are presented. Results obtained by thermomagnetic and chemical method are in good agreement. Efficiency of the thermomagnetic method is much higher

  5. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of gamma-prime particles in a gamma matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest gamma-prime particles, and had the lowest gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650 gamma C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760 C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the gamma-prime particle size distribution and the gamma-gamma-prime mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  6. [Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiuxia, Yang; Ying, Yang; Han, Xu; Di, Wu; Ke, Guo

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH = 5.0). The specimens were soaked in fluorine for 24 h, and the surface microstructure was observed under a field emission scanning electron microscope after immersing the specimens in the test solution at constant temperature. The corrosion potential (Ecorr) value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast decreased with increasing fluoride concentration in acidic artificial saliva. The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes changed significantly when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P technology processes exhibited a statistically significant difference. The Icorr value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was higher than that in the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P technology processes. The corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was worse than that of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20%.

  7. Influence of Cobalt on the Properties of Load-Sensitive Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kerber

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, magnesium is alloyed with varying amounts of the ferromagnetic alloying element cobalt in order to obtain lightweight load-sensitive materials with sensory properties which allow an online-monitoring of mechanical forces applied to components made from Mg-Co alloys. An optimized casting process with the use of extruded Mg-Co powder rods is utilized which enables the production of magnetic magnesium alloys with a reproducible Co concentration. The efficiency of the casting process is confirmed by SEM analyses. Microstructures and Co-rich precipitations of various Mg-Co alloys are investigated by means of EDS and XRD analyses. The Mg-Co alloys’ mechanical strengths are determined by tensile tests. Magnetic properties of the Mg-Co sensor alloys depending on the cobalt content and the acting mechanical load are measured utilizing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. Within the scope of this work, the influence of the element cobalt on magnesium is investigated in detail and an optimal cobalt concentration is defined based on the performed examinations.

  8. Assessment of corrosion resistance of cast cobalt- and nickel-chromium dental alloys in acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Sven; Caligari Conti, Malcolm; Buhagiar, Joseph; Camilleri, Josette

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degradation resistance of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys used as a base material for partial dentures in contact with saliva. Wiron® 99 and Wironit Extra-Hard® were selected as representative casting alloys for Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys, respectively. The alloys were tested in contact with deionized water, artificial saliva and acidified artificial saliva. Material characterization was performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and microhardness and nanohardness testing. The corrosion properties of the materials were then analyzed using open circuit potential analysis and potentiodynamic analysis. Alloy leaching in solution was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Co-Cr alloy was more stable than the Ni-Cr alloy in all solutions tested. Leaching of nickel and corrosion attack was higher in Ni-Cr alloy in artificial saliva compared with the acidified saliva. The corrosion resistance of the Co-Cr alloy was seen to be superior to that of the Ni-Cr alloy, with the former exhibiting a lower corrosion current in all test solutions. Microstructural topographical changes were observed for Ni-Cr alloy in contact with artificial saliva. The Ni-Cr alloy exhibited microstructural changes and lower corrosion resistance in artificial saliva. The acidic changes did not enhance the alloy degradation. Ni-Cr alloys are unstable in solution and leach nickel. Co-Cr alloys should be preferred for clinical use.

  9. Microstructure And Functional Properties Of Prosthetic Cobalt Alloys CoCrW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadolski M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The material subject to investigation was two commercial alloys of cobalt CoCrW (No. 27 and 28 used in prosthodontics. The scope of research included performing an analysis of microstructure and functional properties (microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance, as well as dilatometric tests. The examined alloys were characterized by diverse properties, which was considerably influenced by the morphology of precipitates in these materials. Alloy No. 27 has a higher corrosion resistance, whereas alloy No. 28 shows higher microhardness, better wear resistance and higher coefficient of linear expansion. Lower value of the expansion coefficient indicates less probability of initiation of a crack in the facing ceramic material.

  10. Tensile strength of laser welded cobalt-chromium alloy with and without an argon atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Anna; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2010-06-01

    The tensile strength and depth of weld of two cobalt chromium alloys before and after laser welding with and without an argon gas atmosphere were investigated. Using two cobalt chromium alloys, rod shaped specimens (5 cm x 1.5 mm) were cast. Specimens were sand blasted, sectioned and welded with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding machine and tested in tension using an Instron universal testing machine. A statistically significant difference in tensile strength was observed between the two alloys. The tensile strength of specimens following laser welding was significantly less than the unwelded controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the micro-structure of the cast alloy was altered in the region of the weld. No statistically significant difference was found between specimens welded with or without an argon atmosphere.

  11. Construction of an apparatus for nuclear orientation measurements at low temperatures. Application to neodymium-cobalt alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, E.

    1965-10-01

    We describe experiments along which has been studied the anisotropy of γ radiations emitted by oriented nuclei. We have used the great hyperfine fields acting on nuclei in ferromagnetic metals so as to produce alignment at low temperature. By irradiation we obtained a few cobalt 60 nuclei in our samples which were then cooled down to 0,01 K. The anisotropic rate of the 1,33 MeV γ radiation was measured in function of the sample temperature, using as thermometer the anisotropy of γ radiation emitted by cobalt 60 nuclei in a cobalt single crystal. Cobalt 60 was lined up in a cobalt nickel alloy (40% Ni). The hyperfine field at the cobalt was measured compared to the effective field in metallic cobalt: Heff(Co Ni)/Heff(Co metal) = 0.71 ± 0.12. These results are in good agreement with specific heat measurements made previously. Cobalt 60 has been polarised in a neodymium-cobalt alloy (NdCo 5 ). The field at the cobalt in NdCo 5 has been measured compared to the field in metallic cobalt and taking the non-saturation into account we found 165000 oersteds 5 ) [fr

  12. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    The costs and hazards resulting from nuclear plant radiation exposure with activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. However, the hardnesses of many cobalt-base wear alloys are significantly lower than conventional PVD hard coatings, and mechanical support of the hard coating is a concern. Four approaches have been taken to minimize the hardness differences between the substrate and PVD hard coating: (1) use a thin Cr-nitride hard coating with layers that are graded with respect to hardness, (2) use a thicker, multilayered coating (Cr-nitride or Zr-nitride) with graded layers, (3) use nitriding to harden the alloy subsurface followed by application of a multilayered coating of Cr-nitride, and (4) use of nitriding alone. Since little work has been done on application of PVD hard coatings to cobalt-base alloys, some details on process development and characterization of the coatings is presented. Scratch testing was used to evaluate the adhesion of the different coatings. A bench-top rolling contact test was used to evaluate the wear resistance of the coatings. The test results are discussed, and the more desirable coating approaches are identified

  13. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Rashidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinylalcohol (PVA on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, fieldemission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques(VSM, respectively. The polymeric cobalt ferrite nano-composites were obtained by employing atwo-step procedure: the cobalt ferrite of 20 nm mean particle size was first synthesized by mechanicalalloying route and then was embedded in PEG or PVA biopolymer matrix by milling process. Theresults revealed that PEG melted due to the local temperature raise during milling. Despite thisphenomenon, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were entirely embedded in PEG matrix. It seems, PAV is anappropriate candidate for producing nano-composite samples due to its high melting point. InPVA/CF nano-composites, the mean crystallite size and milling induced strain decreased to 13 nm and0.48, respectively. Moreover, milling process resulted in well distribution of CF in PVA matrix eventhough the mean particle size of cobalt ferrite has not been significantly affecetd. FTIR resultconfirmed the attachment of PVA to the surface of nano-particles. Magnetic properties evaluationshowed that saturation magnetization and coercivity values decreased in nano-composite samplecomparing the pure cobalt ferrite.

  14. Assessment of wrought ASTM F1058 cobalt alloy properties for permanent surgical implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, C O; Jedwab, M R; Mayer, D W; Thompson, P J; Stinson, J S

    1997-01-01

    The behavior of the ASTM F1058 wrought cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum-iron alloy (commonly referred to as Elgiloy or Phynox) is evaluated in terms of mechanical properties, magnetic resonance imaging, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. The data found in the literature, the experimental corrosion and biocompatibility results presented in this article, and its long track record as an implant material demonstrate that the cobalt superalloy is an appropriate material for permanent surgical implants that require high yield strength and fatigue resistance combined with high elastic modulus, and that it can be safely imaged with magnetic resonance.

  15. Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarova, I.A.; Bunakova, N.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The neutron-activation method for determining cobalt in rocks, polymetallic and iron ores and rockforming minerals at 2x10 -6 -5x10 -3 % content is developed. Cobalt determination is based on the formation under the effect of thermal neutrons of nuclear reactor of the 60 Co radioactive isotope by the 59 Co (n, γ) 60 Co reaction with radiation energy of the most intensive line of 1333 keV. Cobalt can be determined by the scheme of the multicomponent analysis from the sample with other elements. Co is determined in the solution after separation of all determinable by the scheme elements. The 60 Co intensity is measured by the mUltichannel gamma-spectrometer with Ge(Li)-detector

  16. Standard specification for cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum-tungsten alloy (UNS R31233) plate, sheet and strip. ASTM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt, and Alloys Containing Nickel or Cobalt or Both as Principal Constituents. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as B 818-91. Last previous edition was B 818-93

  17. Nanocrystalline Iron-Cobalt Alloys for High Saturation Indutance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    film deposited just like the pick-up of a turn-table music player. The contact pads provide the electrical contacts to the starting and end point of...anisotropy using the geometry of the thin toroid. We have shown experimentally that the thin film toroid calculations may be applicable to up to millimeter...thin film as well as bulk devices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Micromagnetic Calculations, Nanocrystalline cobalt-iron, Thin Film Toroids 16. SECURITY

  18. Cobalt-based orthopaedic alloys: Relationship between forming route, microstructure and tribological performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Bhairav [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Favaro, Gregory [CSM Instruments SA, Rue de la Gare 4, Galileo Center, CH-2034 Peseux (Switzerland); Inam, Fawad [Advanced Composite Training and Development Centre and School of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, Glyndwr University, Mold Road, Wrexham LL11 2AW (United Kingdom); School of Engineering and Materials Science and Nanoforce Technology Ltd, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Reece, Michael J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science and Nanoforce Technology Ltd, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Angadji, Arash [Orthopaedic Research UK, Furlong House, 10a Chandos Street, London W1G 9DQ (United Kingdom); Bonfield, William [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Huang, Jie [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Edirisinghe, Mohan, E-mail: m.edirisinghe@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The average longevity of hip replacement devices is approximately 10-15 years, which generally depends on many factors. But for younger generation patients this would mean that revisions may be required at some stage in order to maintain functional activity. Therefore, research is required to increase the longevity to around 25-30 years; a target that was initially set by John Charnley. The main issues related to metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacement devices are the high wear rates when malpositioned and the release of metallic ions into the blood stream and surrounding tissues. Work is required to reduce the wear rates and limit the amount of metallic ions being leached out of the current MoM materials, to be able to produce an ideal hip replacement material. The most commonly used MoM material is the cobalt-based alloys, more specifically ASTM F75, due to their excellent wear and corrosion resistance. They are either fabricated using the cast or wrought method, however powder processing of these alloys has been shown to improve the properties. One powder processing technique used is spark plasma sintering, which utilises electric current Joule heating to produce high heating rates to sinter powders to form an alloy. Two conventionally manufactured alloys (ASTM F75 and ASTM F1537) and a spark plasma sintered (SPS) alloy were evaluated for their microstructure, hardness, tribological performance and the release of metallic content. The SPS alloy with oxides and not carbides in its microstructure had the higher hardness, which resulted in the lowest wear and friction coefficient, with lower amounts of chromium and molybdenum detected from the wear debris compared to the ASTM F75 and ASTM F1537. In addition the wear debris size and size distribution of the SPS alloy generated were considerably small, indicating a material that exhibits excellent performance and more favourable compared to the current conventional cobalt based alloys used in orthopaedics. - Highlights

  19. The influence of x-rays radiation on the kinetic electrocrystallization of nickel and cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchik, V.M.; Val'ko, N.G.; Moroz, N.I.; Vorontsov, A.S.; Vojna, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    In the work research kinetic electrocrystallization of nickel and cobalt coatings of coverings from sulfate electrolyte under the influence of x-ray radiation. It has been revealed that under the influence of radiation the thickness coatings alloy and the alloy exit on a current increases in comparison with control samples. It is caused by increase in streams diffusion ions of restored metal to cathodes and formation intermediate Co xN i 1-1 in irradiated electrolytes. Thus, on the above stated processes essential influence is rendered by length of a wave of operating radiation. (authors)

  20. [Comparison of the clinical effects of selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy base crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-min; Wang, Wei-qian; Ma, Jing-yuan

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of selective laser melting (SLM) deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns. One hundred and sixty eight patients treated with either SLM deposition basal crowns (110 teeth) or cobalt chromium alloy casting basal crowns (110 teeth) were followed-up for 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. The revised standard of American Public Health Association was used to evaluate the clinical effect of restoration, including the color of porcelain crowns, gingival inflammation, gingival margin discoloration, and crack or fracture. Data analysis was conducted with SPSS 20 software package for Student's t test and Chi-square test. Six cases were lost to follow-up. The patients who were treated with SLM deposition basal crowns (104 teeth) and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns (101 teeth) completed the study. Patients were more satisfied with SLM deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crowns. There was 1 prosthesis with poor marginal fit after 24 months of restoration in SLM crowns. There were 6 prostheses with edge coloring and 8 with poor marginal fit in cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns, which was significantly different between the 2 groups(P<0.05). The SLM deposition copings results in smaller edge coloring and better marginal fit than those of cobalt-chrome copings. Patients are pleased with short-term clinical results.

  1. Microstructural and wear characteristics of cobalt free, nickel base intermetallic alloy deposited by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kumar, Santosh; Viswanadham, C.S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Limaye, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the microstructural and wear characteristics of Ni base intermetallic hardfacing alloy (Tribaloy-700) deposited on stainless steel-316 L substrate by laser cladding technique. Cobalt base hardfacing alloys have been most commonly used hardfacing alloys for application involving wear, corrosion and high temperature resistance. However, the high cost and scarcity of cobalt led to the development of cobalt free hardfacing alloys. Further, in the nuclear industry, the use of cobalt base alloys is limited due to the induced activity of long lived radioisotope 60 Co formed. These difficulties led to the development of various nickel and iron base alloys to replace cobalt base hardfacing alloys. In the present study Ni base intermetallic alloy, free of Cobalt was deposited on stainless steel- 316 L substrate by laser cladding technique. Traditionally, welding and thermal spraying are the most commonly employed hardfacing techniques. Laser cladding has been explored for the deposition of less diluted and fusion-bonded Nickel base clad layer on stainless steel substrate with a low heat input. The laser cladding parameters (Laser power density: 200 W/mm 2 , scanning speed: 430 mm/min, and powder feed rate: 14 gm/min) resulted in defect free clad with minimal dilution of the substrate. The microstructure of the clad layer was examined by Optical microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The phase analysis was performed by X-ray diffraction technique. The clad layer exhibited sharp substrate/clad interface in the order of planar, cellular, and dendritic from the interface upwards. Dilution of clad with Fe from substrate was very low passing from ∼ 15% at the interface (∼ 40 μm) to ∼ 6% in the clad layer. The clad layer was characterized by the presence of hexagonal closed packed (hcp, MgZn 2 type) intermetallic Laves phase dispersed in the eutectic of Laves and face centered cubic (fcc) gamma solid solution. The

  2. High density tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt alloys having improved hardness and method for making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrice, T.W.; Bost, J.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the process of making high density alloy containing about 85 to 98 weight percent tungsten and the balance of the alloy being essentially a binder of nickel, iron and cobalt, and wherein the cobalt is present in an amount within the range of about 5 to 47.5 weight percent of the binder, comprising: blending powders of the tungsten, nickel, iron and cobalt into a homogeneous composition, compacting the homogeneous composition into a shaped article, heating the shaped article to a temperature and for a time sufficient to sinter the article, subjecting the sintered article to a temperature sufficient to enable the intermetallic phase formed at the matrix to tungsten interface to diffuse into the gamma austenitic phase whereby the alpha tungsten/gamma austenite boundaries are essentially free of such intermetallic phase, quenching the article, and swaging the article to a reduction in area of about 5 to 40 percent, the article having improved mechanical properties, including improved tensile strength and hardness while maintaining suitable ductility for subsequent working thereof

  3. Effect of reduced cobalt contents on hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy U-700 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of reducing the cobalt content of prealloyed powders of UDIMET 700 (U-700) alloys to 12.7, 8.6, 4.3, and 0% was examined. The powders were hot isostatically pressed into billets, which were given heat treatments appropriate for turbine disks, namely partial solutioning at temperatures below the gamma prime solvus and four step aging treatments. Chemical analyses, metallographic examinations, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the materials. Minor effects on gamma prime content and on room temperature and 650 C tensile properties were observed. Creep rupture lives at 650 C reached a maximum at the 8.4% concentration, while at 760 C a maximum in life was reached at the 4.3% cobalt level. Minimum creep rates increased with decreasing cobalt content at both test temperatures. Extended exposures at 760 and 815 C resulted in decreased tensile strengths and rupture lives for all alloys. Evidence of sigma phase formation was also found.

  4. Characterization of fabricated cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bafandeh, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: mr.bafandeh@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gharahkhani, Raziyeh; Fathi, Mohammad Hossein [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    In this work, cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass (NBG) composites with 10, 15 and 20 wt% NBG were prepared and their bioactivity after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 to 4 weeks was studied. Scanning electron microscopy images of two- step sintered composites revealed relatively dense microstructure. The results showed that density of composite samples decreased with increase in NBG amount. The microstructure analysis as well as energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) revealed that small amount of calcium phosphate phases precipitates on the surface of composite samples after 1 week immersion in SBF. After 2 weeks immersion, considerable amounts of cauliflower-like shaped precipitations were seen on the surface of the composites. Based on EDX analysis, these precipitations were composed mainly from Ca, P and Si. The observed bands in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of immersed composites samples for 4 weeks in SBF, were characteristic bands of hydroxyapatite. Therefore it is possible to form hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of composite samples during immersion in SBF. The results indicated that prepared composites unlike cobalt-based alloy are bioactive, promising their possibility for implant applications. - Highlights: • Co-based alloy/nano bioactive glass (NBG) composites with 10, 15 and 20 wt% NBG were prepared. • In order to study their bioactivity, composite samples were immersed in SBF solution for 1 to 4 weeks. • Immersion in SBF accompanied with precipitation of hydroxyapatite on surface of samples. • Prepared composite samples unlike cobalt-based alloy were bioactive.

  5. Characterization of fabricated cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bafandeh, Mohammad Reza; Gharahkhani, Raziyeh; Fathi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In this work, cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass (NBG) composites with 10, 15 and 20 wt% NBG were prepared and their bioactivity after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 to 4 weeks was studied. Scanning electron microscopy images of two- step sintered composites revealed relatively dense microstructure. The results showed that density of composite samples decreased with increase in NBG amount. The microstructure analysis as well as energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) revealed that small amount of calcium phosphate phases precipitates on the surface of composite samples after 1 week immersion in SBF. After 2 weeks immersion, considerable amounts of cauliflower-like shaped precipitations were seen on the surface of the composites. Based on EDX analysis, these precipitations were composed mainly from Ca, P and Si. The observed bands in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of immersed composites samples for 4 weeks in SBF, were characteristic bands of hydroxyapatite. Therefore it is possible to form hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of composite samples during immersion in SBF. The results indicated that prepared composites unlike cobalt-based alloy are bioactive, promising their possibility for implant applications. - Highlights: • Co-based alloy/nano bioactive glass (NBG) composites with 10, 15 and 20 wt% NBG were prepared. • In order to study their bioactivity, composite samples were immersed in SBF solution for 1 to 4 weeks. • Immersion in SBF accompanied with precipitation of hydroxyapatite on surface of samples. • Prepared composite samples unlike cobalt-based alloy were bioactive.

  6. Investigations of the high-temperature corrosion of cobalt and cobalt alloys using radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterhager, H.; Krug, H.P.; Widmayer, H.

    1977-01-01

    High-temperature oxidation tests with Co, Co-Fe and Co-Fe-Cr alloys have been made by means of the S 35 method and by measuring the thickness of the oxidation coating. In any case, several different coatings formed by oxidation were found and described generally. The compact surface consists of sulfides of the pentlandite-type; indirection to the metal sore there follow several heterogeneous layers. The measured activity-distribution excludes any lattice-diffusion sulfur defects in the scale-coating enable the oxidation to permeate to the metal core. (orig./IHOE) [de

  7. Trunnion Failure of the Recalled Low Friction Ion Treatment Cobalt Chromium Alloy Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urish, Kenneth L; Hamlin, Brian R; Plakseychuk, Anton Y; Levison, Timothy J; Higgs, Genymphas B; Kurtz, Steven M; DiGioia, Anthony M

    2017-09-01

    Gross trunnion failure (GTF) is a rare complication in total hip arthroplasty (THA) reported across a range of manufacturers. Specific lots of the Stryker low friction ion treatment (LFIT) anatomic cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr) V40 femoral head were recalled in August 2016. In part, the recall was based out of concerns for disassociation of the femoral head from the stem and GTF. We report on 28 patients (30 implants) with either GTF (n = 18) or head-neck taper corrosion (n = 12) of the LFIT CoCr femoral head and the Accolade titanium-molybdenum-zirconium-iron alloy femoral stems. All these cases were associated with adverse local tissue reactions requiring revision of the THA. In our series, a conservative estimate of the incidence of failure was 4.7% (n = 636 total implanted) at 8.0 ± 1.4 years from the index procedure. Failures were associated with a high-offset 127° femoral stem neck angle and increased neck lengths; 43.3% (13 of 30) of the observed failures included implant sizes outside the voluntary recall (27.8% [5 of 18] of the GTF and 75.0% [8 of 12] of the taper corrosion cases). Serum cobalt and chromium levels were elevated (cobalt: 8.4 ± 7.0 μg/mL; chromium: 3.4 ± 3.3 μ/L; cobalt/chromium ratio: 3.7). The metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated large cystic fluid collections typical with adverse local tissue reactions. During revision, a pseudotumor was observed in all cases. Pathology suggested a chronic inflammatory response. Impending GTF could be diagnosed based on aspiration of black synovial fluid and an oblique femoral head as compared with the neck taper on radiographs. In our series of the recalled LFIT CoCr femoral head, the risk of impending GTF or head-neck taper corrosion should be considered as a potential diagnosis in a painful LFIT femoral head and Accolade titanium-molybdenum-zirconium-iron alloy THA with unknown etiology. Almost half of the failures we observed included sizes outside of the

  8. Magnetic properties of exchange-coupled trilayers of amorphous rare-earth-cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuechner, S.; Toussaint, J.C.; Voiron, J.

    1997-01-01

    From amorphous thin films from alloys of rare earths (Gd, Sm), yttrium or zirconium with cobalt we have prepared trilayers with very clean interfaces appropriate for the study of magnetic coupling. The sandwiches were typically Y-Co/Gd-Co/Y-Co and Sm-Co/X/Sm-Co ' (X=Gd-Co, Co-Zr, Co). The three individual layers are coupled magnetically by exchange interactions between cobalt moments throughout the entire sample. This coupling associated with the specific properties of the given alloy (magnetic moment, anisotropy, coercivity) leads to ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic structures of the magnetization of adjacent layers and to novel magnetization processes. For systems consisting of magnetically hard external layers with different coercivities and a soft central layer (Sm-Co/X/Sm-Co ' , X=Gd-Co, Co-Zr), the influence of the central layer close-quote s thickness and type of the material on coupling and magnetization processes have been studied quantitatively. Numerical simulations using a one-dimensional model for describing the magnetization processes observed in sandwich systems fit the magnetization curves of these model systems particularly well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Microstructure and Properties of Cobalt-and Zinc-Containing Magnetic Magnesium Alloys Processed by High-Pressure Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian; Demminger, Christian; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    The inherent magnetic properties of lightweight alloys based on magnesium and cobalt offer a novel way in order to measure mechanical loads throughout the entire structural component using the magnetoelastic effect. Because the solubility of cobalt in the magnesium matrix is negligible, the magnetic properties mainly originate from Co-rich precipitates. Thus, the size and distribution of Co-containing phases within the alloy's microstructure wields a major influence on the amplitude of the load-sensitive properties which can be measured by employing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. In this study, Mg-Co-based alloys are produced by several casting methods which allow the application of different cooling rates, e.g. gravity die casting and high-pressure die casting. The differences between the manufactured alloys' micro- and phase structures are compared depending on the applied cooling rate and the superior magnetic and mechanical properties of the high-pressure die cast material are demonstrated.

  10. [Energy dispersive spectrum analysis of surface compositions of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by different processing parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liang; Zeng, Li; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2015-06-01

    To fabricate selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples by different processing parameters, and to analyze the changes of energy dispersive spectrum(EDS) on their surface. Nine groups were set up by orthogonal experimental design according to different laser powers,scanning speeds and powder feeding rates(laser power:2500-3000 W, scanning speed: 5-15 mm/s, powder feeding rate: 3-6 r/min). Three cylinder specimens(10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were fabricated in each group through Rofin DL 035Q laser cladding system using cobalt-chromium alloy powders which were developed independently by our group.Their surface compositions were then measured by EDS analysis. Results of EDS analysis of the 9 groups fabricated by different processing parameters(Co:62.98%-67.13%,Cr:25.56%-28.50%,Si:0.49%-1.23%) were obtained. They were similar to the compositions of cobalt-chromium alloy used in dental practice. According to EDS results, the surface compositions of the selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples are stable and controllable, which help us gain a preliminary sight into the range of SLM processing parameters. Supported by "973" Program (2012CB910401) and Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (12441903001 and 13140902701).

  11. Tantalum-based multilayer coating on cobalt alloys in total hip and knee replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagna, C., E-mail: cristina.balagna@polito.it [Institute of Materials Engineering and Physics, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,10129 Torino (Italy); Faga, M.G. [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Strada delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino (Italy); Spriano, S. [Institute of Materials Engineering and Physics, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,10129 Torino (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys are widely used in total hip and knee joint replacement, due to high mechanical properties and resistance to wear and corrosion. They are able to form efficient artificial joints by means of coupling metal-on-polymer or metal-on-metal contacts. However, a high concentration of stress and direct friction between surfaces leads to the formation of polyethylene wear debris and the release of toxic metal ions into the human body, limiting, as a consequence, the lifetime of implants. The aim of this research is a surface modification of CoCrMo alloys in order to improve their biocompatibility and to decrease the release of metal ions and polyethylene debris. Thermal treatment in molten salts was the process employed for the deposition of tantalum-enriched coating. Tantalum and its compounds are considered biocompatible materials with low ion release and high corrosion resistance. Three different CoCrMo alloys were processed as substrates. An adherent coating of about 1 {mu}m of thickness, with a multilayer structure consisting of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum was deposited. The substrates and modified layers were characterized by means of structural, chemical and morphological analysis. Moreover nanoindentation, scratch and tribological tests were carried out in order to evaluate the mechanical behavior of the substrates and coating. The hardness of the coated samples increases more than double than the untreated alloys meanwhile the presence of the coating reduced the wear volume and rate of about one order of magnitude. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal treatment in molten salts deposits a Ta-based coating on Co-based alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coating is composed by one or two tantalum carbides and/or metallic tantalum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coating structure depends on thermal temperature and substrates carbon content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coating is able to

  12. Effect of preconditioning cobalt and nickel based dental alloys with Bacillus sp. extract on their surface physicochemical properties and theoretical prediction of Candida albicans adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balouiri, Mounyr, E-mail: b.mounyr@gmail.com [Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2202, 30007 Fez (Morocco); Bouhdid, Samira [Faculté des Sciences de Tétouan, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, Avenue de Sebta, Mhannech II, 93002 Tétouan (Morocco); Sadiki, Moulay; Ouedrhiri, Wessal; Barkai, Hassan; El Farricha, Omar [Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2202, 30007 Fez (Morocco); Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi [Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2202, 30007 Fez (Morocco); Cité de l' innovation, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2626, 30007 Fez (Morocco); Harki, El Houssaine [Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2202, 30007 Fez (Morocco)

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm formation on dental biomaterials is implicated in various oral health problems. Thus the challenge is to prevent the formation of this consortium of microorganisms using a safe approach such as antimicrobial and anti-adhesive natural products. Indeed, in the present study, the effects of an antifungal extract of Bacillus sp., isolated from plant rhizosphere, on the surface physicochemical properties of cobalt and nickel based dental alloys were studied using the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, in order to predict the adhesion of Candida albicans to the treated and untreated dental alloys, the total free energy of adhesion was calculated based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approach. Results showed hydrophobic and weak electron-donor and electron-acceptor characteristics of both untreated dental alloys. After treatment with the antifungal extract, the surface free energy of both dental alloys was influenced significantly, mostly for cobalt based alloy. In fact, treated cobalt based alloy became hydrophilic and predominantly electron donating. Those effects were time-dependent. Consequently, the total free energy of adhesion of C. albicans to this alloy became unfavorable after treatment with the investigated microbial extract. A linear relationship between the electron-donor property and the total free energy of adhesion has been found for both dental alloys. Also, a linear relationship has been found between this latter and the hydrophobicity for the cobalt based alloy. However, the exposure of nickel based alloy to the antifungal extract failed to produce the same effect. - Highlights: • Assessment of dental alloys physicochemical properties using contact angle method • Evaluation for the first time of microbial coating impact on dental alloys surface • Decrease of hydrophobicity of treated cobalt-chromium alloy with antifungal extract • Increase of Lewis base property of treated cobalt-chromium with treatment

  13. Effect of preconditioning cobalt and nickel based dental alloys with Bacillus sp. extract on their surface physicochemical properties and theoretical prediction of Candida albicans adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balouiri, Mounyr; Bouhdid, Samira; Sadiki, Moulay; Ouedrhiri, Wessal; Barkai, Hassan; El Farricha, Omar; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Harki, El Houssaine

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation on dental biomaterials is implicated in various oral health problems. Thus the challenge is to prevent the formation of this consortium of microorganisms using a safe approach such as antimicrobial and anti-adhesive natural products. Indeed, in the present study, the effects of an antifungal extract of Bacillus sp., isolated from plant rhizosphere, on the surface physicochemical properties of cobalt and nickel based dental alloys were studied using the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, in order to predict the adhesion of Candida albicans to the treated and untreated dental alloys, the total free energy of adhesion was calculated based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approach. Results showed hydrophobic and weak electron-donor and electron-acceptor characteristics of both untreated dental alloys. After treatment with the antifungal extract, the surface free energy of both dental alloys was influenced significantly, mostly for cobalt based alloy. In fact, treated cobalt based alloy became hydrophilic and predominantly electron donating. Those effects were time-dependent. Consequently, the total free energy of adhesion of C. albicans to this alloy became unfavorable after treatment with the investigated microbial extract. A linear relationship between the electron-donor property and the total free energy of adhesion has been found for both dental alloys. Also, a linear relationship has been found between this latter and the hydrophobicity for the cobalt based alloy. However, the exposure of nickel based alloy to the antifungal extract failed to produce the same effect. - Highlights: • Assessment of dental alloys physicochemical properties using contact angle method • Evaluation for the first time of microbial coating impact on dental alloys surface • Decrease of hydrophobicity of treated cobalt-chromium alloy with antifungal extract • Increase of Lewis base property of treated cobalt-chromium with treatment

  14. Composition tunable cobalt–nickel and cobalt–iron alloy nanoparticles below 10 nm synthesized using acetonated cobalt carbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schooneveld, Matti M. van; Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Pet, Jeroen; Meeldijk, Johannes D.; Rijssel, Jos van; Meijerink, Andries; Erné, Ben H.; Groot, Frank M. F. de

    2012-01-01

    A general organometallic route has been developed to synthesize Co x Ni 1−x and Co x Fe 1−x alloy nanoparticles with a fully tunable composition and a size of 4–10 nm with high yield. In contrast to previously reported synthesis methods using dicobalt octacarbonyl (Co 2 (CO) 8 ), here the cobalt–cobalt bond in the carbonyl complex is first broken with anhydrous acetone. The acetonated compound, in the presence of iron carbonyl or nickel acetylacetonate, is necessary to obtain small composition tunable alloys. This new route and insights will provide guidelines for the wet-chemical synthesis of yet unmade bimetallic alloy nanoparticles.

  15. Ammonia synthesis with barium-promoted iron–cobalt alloys supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    Iron–cobalt alloys supported on carbon were investigated as ammonia synthesis catalysts. Barium was found to have a promoting effect for Fe with an optimum atomic ratio Ba/Fe of 0.35. At this Ba loading, a local maximum for the NH3 synthesis activity was found at 4 wt% Co by varying the Fe/Co ratio....... Samples containing only Co and no Fe, however, yielded by far the most active catalysts (7.0 μmol (NH3) g−1 s−1, 673 K, 10 bar). Barium was a very efficient promoter for Co, increasing the NH3 synthesis activity by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the unpromoted Co samples, while...

  16. Thermal cooling effects in the microstructure and properties of cast cobalt-base biomedical alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Valer, Vladimir

    Joint replacement prosthesis is widely used in the biomedical field to provide a solution for dysfunctional human body joints. The demand for orthopedic knee and hip implants motivate scientists and manufacturers to develop novel materials or to increase the life of service and efficiency of current materials. Cobalt-base alloys have been investigated by various researchers for biomedical implantations. When these alloys contain Chromium, Molybdenum, and Carbon, they exhibit good tribological and mechanical properties, as well as excellent biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In this study, the microstructure of cast Co-Cr-Mo-C alloy is purposely modified by inducing rapid solidification through fusion welding processes and solution annealing heat treatment (quenched in water at room temperature. In particular the effect of high cooling rates on the athermal phase transformation FCC(gamma)↔HCP(epsilon) on the alloy hardness and corrosion resistance is investigated. The Co-alloy microstructures were characterized using metallography and microscopy techniques. It was found that the as cast sample typically dendritic with dendritic grain sizes of approximately 150 microm and containing Cr-rich coarse carbide precipitates along the interdendritic boundaries. Solution annealing gives rise to a refined microstructure with grain size of 30 microm, common among Co-Cr-Mo alloys after heat treating. Alternatively, an ultrafine grain structure (between 2 and 10 microm) was developed in the fusion zone for specimens melted using Laser and TIG welding methods. When laser surface modification treatments were implemented, the developed solidification microstructure shifted from dendritic to a fine cellular morphology, with possible nanoscale carbide precipitates along the cellular boundaries. In turn, the solidified regions exhibited high hardness values (461.5HV), which exceeds by almost 110 points from the alloy in the as-cast condition. The amount of developed athermal

  17. Ballistic transport of spin waves incident from cobalt leads across cobalt–gadolinium alloy nanojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashokan, V.; Abou Ghantous, M.; Ghader, D.; Khater, A.

    2014-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the scattering and ballistic transport of spin waves (SW) incident from cobalt leads, on ultrathin ferrimagnetic cobalt–gadolinium ‥Co][Co (1−c) Gd (c) ] ℓ [Co‥ nanojunction systems. The nanojunction [Co (1−c) Gd (c) ] ℓ itself is a randomly disordered alloy of thickness ℓ hcp lattice planes between matching hcp planes of the Co leads, at known stable concentrations c≤0.5 for this alloy system. To compute the spin dynamics, and the SW scattering and ballistic transport, this alloy nanojunction is modeled in the virtual crystal approximation (VCA), valid in particular at the length scale of the nanojunction for submicroscopic SW wavelengths. The phase field matching theory (PFMT) is applied to compute the localized and resonant magnons on the nanojunction. These magnons, characteristic of the embedded nanostructure, propagate in its symmetry plane with spin precession amplitudes that decay or match the spin wave states in the semi-infinite leads. The eigenvectors of these magnon modes are calculated for certain cases to illustrate the spin precession configurations on the nanojunction. The VCA-PFMT approach is also used to calculate the reflection and transmission spectra for the spin waves incident from the Co leads on the nanojunction. The results demonstrate resonance assisted maxima for the ballistic SW transmission spectra due to interactions between the incident spin waves and the nanojunction magnon modes. These properties are general for variable nanojunction thicknesses and alloy stable concentrations c≤0.5. In particular, the positions of the resonance assisted maxima of spin wave transmission can be modified with nanojunction thickness and alloy concentration. - Highlights: • Model is presented for spin wave scattering at CoGd disordered alloy nanojunctions. • Computations yield the localized and resonant magnon modes on the nanojunctions. • The spin waves ballistic reflection and transmission

  18. In vitro study of stimulation effect on endothelialization by a copper bearing cobalt alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shujing; Qi, Xun; Wang, Tongmin; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke; Zhong, Hongshan

    2018-02-01

    Endothelialization is an important process after stenting in coronary artery. Recovery of the injured site timely can reduce the neointima formation and platelet absorbance, leading to a lower risk of in-stent restenosis. Copper is known to be critical in vascular construction. Thus a combination of copper with stent materials is a meaningful attempt. A copper bearing L605-Cu cobalt alloy was prepared and its effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated in vitro in this study. It was found that HUVECs attached and stretched better on the surface of L605-Cu compared with L605, and the apoptosis of cells was decreased simultaneously. The migration and tube formation of HUVECs were also enhanced by the extract of L605-Cu. Furthermore, L605-Cu increased the mRNA expression of VEGF in HUVECs significantly. However it had no effect on the secretion of NO or mRNA expression of eNOS. The result of blood clotting test indicated that L605-Cu had better blood compatibility. These results above have demonstrated that the L605-Cu alloy is promising to be a new stent material with function of accelerating endothelialization. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 561-569, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effects of long-time elevated temperature exposures on hot-isostatically-pressed power-metallurgy Udimet 700 alloys with reduced cobalt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Because almost the entire U.S. consumption of cobalt depends on imports, this metal has been designated "strategic'. The role and effectiveness of cobalt is being evaluated in commercial nickel-base superalloys. Udiment 700 type alloys in which the cobalt content was reduced from the normal 17% down to 12.7%, 8.5%, 4.3%, and 0% were prepared by standard powder metallurgy techniques and hot isostatically pressed into billets. Mechanical testing and microstructural investigations were performed. The mechanical properties of alloys with reduced cobalt contents which were heat-treated identically were equal or better than those of the standard alloy, except that creep rates tended to increase as cobalt was reduced. The effects of long time exposures at 760 C on mechanical properties and at 760 C and 845 C on microstructures were determined. Decreased tensile properties and shorter rupture lives with increased creep rates were observed in alloy modifications. The exposures caused gamma prime particle coarsening and formation of sigma phase in the alloys with higher cobalt contents. Exposure at 845 C also reduced the amount of MC carbides.

  20. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauryn Samelko

    Full Text Available Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1 and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p500pg/mL. Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (<2pg/mL from Gram-negative bacteria, seem to have negligible contribution to the danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the unique nature of Cobalt alloy particle bioreactivity is strong enough to illicit danger signaling that secondarily activate concomitant TLR activation, and may in part explain Cobalt particulate

  1. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelko, Lauryn; Landgraeber, Stefan; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua; Hallab, Nadim James

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome) vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs) remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1) and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p500pg/mL). Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (<2pg/mL) from Gram-negative bacteria, seem to have negligible contribution to the danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the unique nature of Cobalt alloy particle bioreactivity is strong enough to illicit danger signaling that secondarily activate concomitant TLR activation, and may in part explain Cobalt particulate associated

  2. Evaluation of the mechanical properties and porcelain bond strength of cobalt-chromium dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Haiting; Gai, Xiuying; Wang, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the microstructure and mechanical properties of dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) dental alloy fabricated by SLM and to determine the correlation between its microstructure and mechanical properties and its porcelain bond strength. Five metal specimens and 10 metal ceramic specimens were fabricated to evaluate the mechanical properties of SLM Co-Cr dental alloy (SLM alloy) with a tensile test and its porcelain bond strength with a 3-point bending test. The relevant properties of the SLM alloy were compared with those of the currently used Co-Cr dental alloy fabricated with conventional cast technology (cast alloy). The Student t test was used to compare the results of the SLM alloy and the cast alloy (α=.05). The microstructure of the SLM alloy was analyzed with a metallographic microscope; the metal ceramic interface of the SLM porcelain bonded alloy was studied with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and an electron probe microanalyzer. Both the mean (standard deviation) yield strength (884.37 ± 8.96 MPa) and tensile strength (1307.50 ±10.65 MPa) of the SLM alloy were notably higher than yield strength (568.10 ± 30.94 MPa) and tensile strength (758.73 ± 25.85 MPa) of the currently used cast alloy, and the differences were significant (P.05). Microstructure analysis suggested that the SLM alloy had a dense and obviously orientated microstructure, which led to excellent mechanical properties. Analysis from scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the electron probe microanalyzer indicated that the SLM alloy had an intermediate layer with elemental interpenetration between the alloy and the porcelain, which resulted in an improved bonding interface. Compared with the currently used cast alloy, SLM alloy possessed improved mechanical

  3. Construction of an apparatus for nuclear orientation measurements at low temperatures. Application to neodymium-cobalt alloy; Realisation d'un appareil pour des mesures d'orientation nucleaire a basse temperature. Application a l'alliage neodyme-cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-10-01

    We describe experiments along which has been studied the anisotropy of {gamma} radiations emitted by oriented nuclei. We have used the great hyperfine fields acting on nuclei in ferromagnetic metals so as to produce alignment at low temperature. By irradiation we obtained a few cobalt 60 nuclei in our samples which were then cooled down to 0,01 K. The anisotropic rate of the 1,33 MeV {gamma} radiation was measured in function of the sample temperature, using as thermometer the anisotropy of {gamma} radiation emitted by cobalt 60 nuclei in a cobalt single crystal. Cobalt 60 was lined up in a cobalt nickel alloy (40% Ni). The hyperfine field at the cobalt was measured compared to the effective field in metallic cobalt: Heff(Co Ni)/Heff(Co metal) = 0.71 {+-} 0.12. These results are in good agreement with specific heat measurements made previously. Cobalt 60 has been polarised in a neodymium-cobalt alloy (NdCo{sub 5}). The field at the cobalt in NdCo{sub 5} has been measured compared to the field in metallic cobalt and taking the non-saturation into account we found 165000 oersteds < Heff(NdCo{sub 5}) < 220000 oersteds. (author) [French] Nous decrivons des experiences au cours desquelles nous avons etudie l'anisotropie de rayonnements {gamma} emis par des noyaux orientes. Nous avons utilise les grands champs hyperfins agissant sur las noyaux dans les metaux ferromagnetiques pour produire l'alignement a basse temperature. Par irradiation nous avons obtenu quelques noyaux de cobalt 60 dans nos echantillons qui furent ensuite refroidis a 0,01 K. Le degre d'anisotropie du rayonnement {gamma} de 1,33 MeV fut mesure en fonction de la temperature de l'echantillon en utilisant l'anisotropie du rayonnement {gamma} de noyaux de cobalt 60 dans un monocristal de cobalt metallique utilise comme thermometre. Le cobalt 60 a ete aligne dans un alliage de cobalt-nickel (40% Ni). Le champ hyperfin au niveau du cobalt a ete mesure par rapport au champ effectif dans le cobalt metallique

  4. Effect of Alkaline Peroxides on the Surface of Cobalt Chrome Alloy: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Glenda Lara Lopes; Curylofo, Patricia Almeida; Raile, Priscilla Neves; Macedo, Ana Paula; Paranhos, Helena Freitas Oliveira; Pagnano, Valeria Oliveira

    2018-03-24

    Removable denture hygiene care is very important for the longevity of the rehabilitation treatment; however, it is necessary to analyze the effects that denture cleansers can cause on the surfaces of prostheses. Thus, this study evaluated the effect of alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets on the surface of cobalt-chromium alloys (Co-Cr) used in removable partial dentures. Circular metallic specimens (12 × 3 mm) were fabricated and were immersed (n = 16) in: control, Polident 3 Minute (P3M), Steradent (S), Efferdent (E), Polident for Partials (PFP), and Corega Tabs (CT). The surface roughness (μm) (n = 10) was measured before and after periods of cleanser immersion corresponding to 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years. Ion release was analyzed (n = 5) for Co, Cr, and molybdenum (Mo). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and an Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were conducted in one specimen. The surface roughness data were statistically analyzed (α = 0.05) with the Kruskal-Wallis test to compare the solutions, and the Friedman test compared the immersion durations. Ion release analysis was performed using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. There was no significant surface roughness difference when comparing the solutions (p > 0.05) and the immersion durations (p = 0.137). Regarding ion release (μg/L), CT, E, and control produced a greater release of Co ions than S (p < 0.05). CT produced a greater release of Cr ions than control, S, and P3M (p < 0.05). Finally, E caused the greatest release of Mo ions (p < 0.05). SEM confirmed that the solutions did not damage the surfaces and EDS confirmed that there were no signs of oxidation. The various solutions tested did not have any deleterious effects on the Co-Cr alloy surface. Steradent, however, presented the smallest ionic release. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Critical evaluation on structural stiffness of porous cellular structure of cobalt chromium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Malek, N. M. S.; Mohamed, S. R.; Che Ghani, S. A.; Harun, W. S. Wan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the stiffness characteristics of orthopedic devices implants that mimic the mechanical behavior of bone need to be considered. With the capability of Additive layer manufacturing processes to produce orthopedic implants with tailored mechanical properties are needed. This paper discusses finite element (FE) analysis and mechanical characterization of porous medical grade cobalt chromium (CoCr) alloy in cubical structures with volume based porosity ranging between 60% to 80% produced using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process. ANSYS 14.0 FE modelling software was used to predict the effective elastic modulus of the samples and comparisons were made with the experimental data. The effective mechanical properties of porous samples that were determined by uniaxial compression testing show exponential decreasing trend with the increase in porosity. Finite element model shows good agreement with experimentally obtained stress-strain curve in the elastic regions. The models prove that numerical analysis of actual prosthesis implant can be computed particularly in load bearing condition

  6. Critical evaluation on structural stiffness of porous cellular structure of cobalt chromium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Malek, N M S; Mohamed, S R; Che Ghani, S A; Wan Harun, W S

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the stiffness characteristics of orthopedic devices implants that mimic the mechanical behavior of bone need to be considered. With the capability of Additive layer manufacturing processes to produce orthopedic implants with tailored mechanical properties are needed. This paper discusses finite element (FE) analysis and mechanical characterization of porous medical grade cobalt chromium (CoCr) alloy in cubical structures with volume based porosity ranging between 60% to 80% produced using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process. ANSYS 14.0 FE modelling software was used to predict the effective elastic modulus of the samples and comparisons were made with the experimental data. The effective mechanical properties of porous samples that were determined by uniaxial compression testing show exponential decreasing trend with the increase in porosity. Finite element model shows good agreement with experimentally obtained stress-strain curve in the elastic regions. The models prove that numerical analysis of actual prosthesis implant can be computed particularly in load bearing condition (paper)

  7. Dental implant suprastructures using cobalt-chromium alloy compared with gold alloy framework veneered with ceramic or acrylic resin: a retrospective cohort study up to 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teigen, Kyrre; Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2012-07-01

    An association between the long-term success and survival of implant-supported prostheses as a function of biomaterial combinations has not been established. The use of cast cobalt-chromium for the suprastructure framework may be an alternative to the conventional approach of using type 3 gold alloys. A retrospective chart audit of all patients who had received implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDP) before 1996 was identified in a private practice clinic. Data were recorded for FDPs made from four combinations of alloy frameworks and veneering material, i.e. type 3 gold and cobalt-chromium with ceramic or prefabricated acrylic teeth. The extracted data from the charts were subjected to explorative statistical tests including Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Patients (n=198) with 270 short and extensive FDPs supported entirely by 1117 implants were identified. The average follow-up observation periods varied between 4 and 220 months, with an average of 120 months. The success and survival, as well as event rates and types of biological and technical complications, were similar for implant-supported FDPs using cobalt-chromium and type 3 gold alloy frameworks veneered with ceramics or prefabricated acrylic teeth. An influence of the suprastructure biomaterial combination on the clinical performance of the individual supporting implants could not be established. Implant-supported FDPs made from type 3 gold or cobalt-chromium frameworks and veneered with ceramic or prefabricated acrylic teeth demonstrate comparable clinical performance. The biomaterial combinations do not appear to influence the success or survival of the individual implants. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of mixtures of cobalt and titanium oxides by mechanical alloyed and Sol-Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basurto S, R.; Bonifacio M, J.; Fernandez V, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical alloyed techniques continued by combustion and Sol-Gel method, were used for the synthesis of CoTiO 3 . With the first technique was used Co 3 O 4 obtained in a balls mill SPEX in argon atmosphere, using cobalt nitrate and urea, the combustion is realized at 400 and 500 C, the characterization by X-ray diffraction showed the obtaining of the valence oxide mixed of cobalt with crystallite size from 10 to 12.5 nm and the particle size of 60 to 75 nm was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. To prepare the CoTiO 3 , the obtained Co 3 O 4 was mixed with TiO 2 on a relationship in weight (1:1) and with a milling time of 2.5 h and the combustion at 800 C. the mixed oxide of titanium cobalt was also obtained by the Sol-Gel technique starting from cobalt chloride and titanium propoxide in acetic-water acid, the gel is burned to temperature of 300, 500, 700 and 900 C, finding that this last temperature it is that provides the compound with crystalline size from 50 to 75 nm. (Author)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of palladium-cobalt alloy for new medical micro-devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafrouni, Lina

    According to Canadian Cancer Statistics, it is estimated that 196,900 Canadians will develop cancer and 78,000 will die of cancer in 2015. Given that tumor cells are more sensitive to a temperature increase than healthy ones, this property can be used in vivo to destroy the cancerous cells by elevation of body temperature, otherwise known as hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is a promising technique for cancer treatment because of ease in targeting the cancerous cells using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and hence having fewer side effects than chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Despite the use of magnetic hyperthermia to treat cancer for thousands of years, the challenge of only heating malignant cells remains daunting. Thus, oncologists often use the heat treatment in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy or both. The combined approach results in eliminating many cancer cells in addition to making the resistant cancer cells more vulnerable to other treatments. To use stand-alone magnetic hyperthermia therapy, difficulties in surface modification of magnetic particles for selective uptake by cancerous cells and stability as well as magnetic properties for high heating capacity (> 1000 W/g) must be overcome. The ultimate objective of this thesis is to synthesize an excellent candidate for a powerful magnetic hyperthermia. Due to rapid advances in nanotechnology, a synthesis method of nanoparticles (NPs) with the ability to rigorously control the structure and morphology, such as size, shape and crystallinity, is needed. Electrodeposition is a versatile method for the synthesis of metal NPs directly and selectively onto conductive substrates, simply by regulating applied current or voltage. Furthermore, the particles size and the shape are easily controllable. Besides, studies have shown that the electrodeposition technique is of great utility in the fabrication of nanocrystalline palladium-cobalt (PdCo) alloys. The primary goal of this project is to synthesize

  10. Cobalt-alloy implant debris induce HIF-1α hypoxia associated responses: a mechanism for metal-specific orthopedic implant failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauryn Samelko

    Full Text Available The historical success of orthopedic implants has been recently tempered by unexpected pathologies and early failures of some types of Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloy containing artificial hip implants. Hypoxia-associated responses to Cobalt-alloy metal debris were suspected as mediating this untoward reactivity at least in part. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α is a major transcription factor involved in hypoxia, and is a potent coping mechanism for cells to rapidly respond to changing metabolic demands. We measured signature hypoxia associated responses (i.e. HIF-1α, VEGF and TNF-α to Cobalt-alloy implant debris both in vitro (using a human THP-1 macrophage cell line and primary human monocytes/macrophages and in vivo. HIF-1α in peri-implant tissues of failed metal-on-metal implants were compared to similar tissues from people with metal-on-polymer hip arthroplasties, immunohistochemically. Increasing concentrations of cobalt ions significantly up-regulated HIF-1α with a maximal response at 0.3 mM. Cobalt-alloy particles (1 um-diameter, 10 particles/cell induced significantly elevated HIF-1α, VEGF, TNF-α and ROS expression in human primary macrophages whereas Titanium-alloy particles did not. Elevated expression of HIF-1α was found in peri-implant tissues and synovial fluid of people with failing Metal-on-Metal hips (n = 5 compared to failed Metal-on-Polymer articulating hip arthroplasties (n = 10. This evidence suggests that Cobalt-alloy, more than other metal implant debris (e.g. Titanium alloy, can elicit hypoxia-like responses that if unchecked can lead to unusual peri-implant pathologies, such as lymphocyte infiltration, necrosis and excessive fibrous tissue growths.

  11. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Samelko, Lauryn; Landgraeber, Stefan; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua; Hallab, Nadim James

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome) vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs) remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation ...

  12. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks.

  13. On the rolling of hard-to-work iron-cobalt alloys with application of electric current of high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, K.M.; Mordukhovich, A.M.; Glezer, A.M.; Molotilov, B.V.

    1981-01-01

    Results on experimental fabrication of thin sheets of commercial iron-cobalt 49KF alloy (Se-Co-2%V) without preliminary quenching and intermediate annealings by rolling with application of high-density electric current are considered. It is shown that rolling with application of high-density electric current in the deformation zone permits to obtain thin sheets of difficult-to-form magnetically soft materials without preliminary thermal treatments. Electric current effect on metal in the deformation zone results in the increase of dislocation mobility and facilitates the cross glide [ru

  14. Biocompatibility of metal injection molded versus wrought ASTM F562 (MP35N) and ASTM F1537 (CCM) cobalt alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Sago, Alan; West, Shari; Farina, Jeff; Eckert, John; Broadley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis between biocompatibility test results of wrought and Metal Injection Molded (MIM) ASTM F562-02 UNS R30035 (MP35N) and F1537 UNS R31538 (CCM) alloy samples that have undergone the same generic orthopedic implant's mechanical, chemical surface pre-treatment, and a designed pre-testing sample preparation method. Because the biocompatibility properties resulting from this new MIM cobalt alloy process are not well understood, we conducted tests to evaluate cytotoxicity (in vitro), hemolysis (in vitro), toxicity effects (in vivo), tissue irritation level (in vivo), and pyrogenicity count (in vitro) on such samples. We show that our developed MIM MP35N and CCM materials and treatment processes are biocompatible, and that both the MIM and wrought samples, although somewhat different in microstructure and surface, do not show significant differences in biocompatibility.

  15. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    The level of nuclear plant radiation exposure due to activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. Laboratory pin-on-disc and rolling contact wear tests were used to evaluate the wear performance of several coatings. Based on the results of these tests, multilayer Cr-nitride coatings and ion nitriding are the most promising approaches

  16. Correlation between crystallographic texture, microstructure and magnetic properties of pulse electrodeposited nanocrystalline Nickel–Cobalt alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Amit; Chhangani, Sumit; Madhavan, R.; Suwas, Satyam, E-mail: satyamsuwas@materials.iisc.ernet.in

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Nano-crystalline Ni–Co materials with varying composition has been deposited by pulse electrodeposition. • Overall weakening of <1 1 1> texture and strengthening of <2 0 0> fibre texture is observed with increasing cobalt content. • Higher thermal stability of Ni–70Co is interpreted in terms of low mobility twins and texture. • A clear transition from soft to hard magnetic character is observed with an increase cobalt content. - Abstract: This paper reports the evolution of microstructure and texture in Nickel–Cobalt electrodeposits fabricated by pulse electrodeposition (PED) technique and the correlation of these attributes with the magnetic properties. The structural and microstructural investigation using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopic studies indicate the presence of nanocrystalline grains and nano-twins in the electrodeposits. Convoluted Multiple Whole profile fitting reveals an increase in dislocation density and twin density with increasing cobalt content in the as-deposited samples. Strengthening of <1 1 1> fibre texture and weakening of <2 0 0> fibre texture with increasing cobalt concentration has been observed with X-ray texture analysis. A corresponding significant increase in the saturation magnetization and coercivity observed with increasing cobalt content. A significant improvement in the soft magnetic character in the electrodeposits in terms of increase in saturation magnetization and decrease in coercivity has been observed with thermal annealing.

  17. An investigation of force components in orthogonal cutting of medical grade cobalt-chromium alloy (ASTM F1537).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Szymon; Ahearne, Eamonn

    2017-04-01

    An ageing population, increased physical activity and obesity are identified as lifestyle changes that are contributing to the ongoing growth in the use of in-vivo prosthetics for total hip and knee arthroplasty. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloys, due to their mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, qualify as a class of materials that meet the stringent functional requirements of these devices. To cost effectively assure the required dimensional and geometric tolerances, manufacturers rely on high-precision machining. However, a comprehensive literature review has shown that there has been limited research into the fundamental mechanisms in mechanical cutting of these alloys. This article reports on the determination of the basic cutting-force coefficients in orthogonal cutting of medical grade Co-Cr-Mo alloy ASTM F1537 over an extended range of cutting speeds ([Formula: see text]) and levels of undeformed chip thickness ([Formula: see text]). A detailed characterisation of the segmented chip morphology over this range is also reported, allowing for an estimation of the shear plane angle and, overall, providing a basis for macro-mechanic modelling of more complex cutting processes. The results are compared with a baseline medical grade titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V ASTM F136, and it is shown that the tangential and thrust-force components generated were, respectively, ≈35% and ≈84% higher, depending primarily on undeformed chip thickness but with some influence of the cutting speed.

  18. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  19. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  20. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  1. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Mehta, Aruna S

    2012-01-01

    Remelting previously cast base metal alloy can adversely affect the mechanical properties of the alloy and necessitates addition of new alloy. To study the effect of remelting different combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy on its mechanical properties and microstructure. Using induction casting, 24 tensile test specimens were prepared for eight different combinations of new and used Co-Cr alloy. The test specimens were assessed for yield strength and percentage elongation. Microhardness was evaluated using Vickers's hardness tester. The tensile testing was carried out on a 50 kN servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. Microstructure analysis was done using an optical photomicroscope on the fractured samples after acid etching. The mean values (±standard deviation) and coefficient of variation were calculated. Student's 't' test was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was assumed at P=.05. The mean yield strength of eight different combination groups were as follows: group A: 849 MPa, group B ₁ : 834 MPa, group B ₂ : 915 MPa, group B ₃ : 897 MPa, group C ₁ : 874 MPa, group C ₂ : 859 MPa, group D ₁ : 845 MPa, and group D ₂ : 834 MPa. The mean percentage elongation for the different groups were as follows: group A: 7%, group B ₁ : 7%, group B ₂ : 8%, group B ₃ : 7%, group C ₁ : 8%, group C ₂ : 7%, group D ₁ : 7%, and group D 2 : 8%. The mean hardness values were as follows: group A: 373 VHN, group B ₁ : 373 VHN, group B ₂ : 346 VHN, group B ₃ : 346 VHN, group C ₁ : 364 VHN, group C ₂ : 343 VHN, group D ₁ : 376 VHN, and group D ₂ : 373 VHN. Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight) of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in

  2. Synthesis and characterization of iron-cobalt (FeCo) alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotiris; Barfod, Rasmus; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    2017-01-01

    of the alloy nanoparticles differed depending on the preparation method. When the wet impregnation technique of acetate precursor salts of Fe and Co were used for the synthesis, the size of FeCo alloy nanoparticles was approximately 13 nm. FeCo alloy nanoparticles were characterized by crystallography (XRD...

  3. Effect of annealing procedure on the bonding of ceramic to cobalt-chromium alloys fabricated by rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulga, Ayca

    2018-04-01

    An annealing procedure is a heat treatment process to improve the mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys. However, information is lacking about the effect of the annealing process on the bonding ability of ceramic to Co-Cr alloys fabricated by rapid prototyping. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of the fabrication techniques and the annealing procedure on the shear bond strength of ceramic to Co-Cr alloys fabricated by different techniques. Ninety-six cylindrical specimens (10-mm diameter, 10-mm height) made of Co-Cr alloy were prepared by casting (C), milling (M), direct process powder-bed (LaserCUSING) with and without annealing (CL+, CL), and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) with annealing (EL+) and without annealing (EL). After the application of ceramic to the metal specimens, the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed using a shear force test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Shear bond strength values were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). Although statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups (M, 29.87 ±2.06; EL, 38.92 ±2.04; and CL+, 40.93 ±2.21; P=.002), no significant differences were found among the others (P>.05). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited mixed failure mode. These results showed that the direct process powder-bed method is promising in terms of metal-ceramic bonding ability. The manufacturing technique of Co-Cr alloys and the annealing process influence metal-ceramic bonding. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of cobalt content on the structure and hard magnetic properties of nanocomposite (Fe,Co)-Pt-B alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabias, A., E-mail: agnieszka.grabias@itme.edu.pl [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Kopcewicz, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Latuch, J.; Oleszak, D. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Pękała, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Al. Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Nanocomposite alloys were formed by annealing of the rapidly quenched alloys. • Magnetically hard L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt and soft (Fe,Co){sub 2}B or (Fe,Co)B were formed. • Mössbauer spectra revealed Co substitution for Fe in L1{sub 0} FePt, FeB and Fe{sub 2}B phases. • Annealed alloys exhibit hard magnetic properties which depend on phase compositions. • Co addition was found to decrease the magnetization and the energy product. - Abstract: The influence of Co content on the structural and hard magnetic properties of two sets of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 52−x}Co{sub x}Pt{sub 28}B{sub 20} (x = 0–26) and Fe{sub 60−y}Co{sub y}Pt{sub 25}B{sub 15} (y = 0–40) alloys was studied. The alloys were prepared as ribbons by the rapid quenching technique. The nanocomposite structure in the alloys was obtained by annealing at 840–880 K for 30 min. Structural characterization of the samples was performed using the Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties of the samples were studied by the measurements of the hysteresis loops and of the magnetization at increasing temperatures. An amorphous phase prevailed in the as-quenched Fe{sub 52−x}Co{sub x}Pt{sub 28}B{sub 20} alloys while a disordered solid solution of fcc-(Fe,Co)Pt was a dominating phase in the Fe{sub 60−y}Co{sub y}Pt{sub 25}B{sub 15} ribbons. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements revealed one or two exothermic peaks at temperatures up to 993 K, depending on the composition of the alloys. Thermal treatment of the samples led to the formation of the magnetically hard ordered L1{sub 0} tetragonal (Fe,Co)Pt nanocrystallites and magnetically softer phases of (Fe,Co)B (for Fe{sub 52−x}Co{sub x}Pt{sub 28}B{sub 20}) or (Fe,Co){sub 2}B (for Fe{sub 60−y}Co{sub y}Pt{sub 25}B{sub 15}). Detailed Mössbauer spectroscopy studies revealed that cobalt substituted for iron in both the L1{sub 0} phase and in iron borides. The nanocomposite Fe{sub 60−y}Co{sub y

  5. A comparison of corrosion resistance of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum metal ceramic alloy fabricated with selective laser melting and traditional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2014-11-01

    A cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy fabricated by selective laser melting is a promising material; however, there are concerns about the change in its corrosion behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in corrosion behavior of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy fabricated by the selective laser melting technique before and after ceramic firing, with traditional processing of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy serving as a control. Two groups of specimens were designated as group selective laser melting and group traditional. For each group, 20 specimens with a cylindrical shape were prepared and divided into 4 cells: selective laser melting as-cast, selective laser melting fired in pH 5.0 and 2.5, traditional as-cast, and traditional fired in pH 5.0 and 2.5. Specimens were prepared with a selective laser melting system for a selective laser melting alloy and the conventional lost wax technique for traditional cast alloy. After all specimen surfaces had been wet ground with silicon carbide paper (1200 grit), each group of 10 specimens was put through a series of ceramic firing cycles. Microstructure, Vickers microhardness, surface composition, oxide film thickness, and corrosion behavior were examined for specimens before and after ceramic firing. Three-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the effect of porcelain firing and pH values on the corrosion behavior of the 2 alloys (α=.05). Student t tests were used to compare the Vickers hardness. Although porcelain firing changed the microstructure, microhardness, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, it showed no significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the selective laser melting alloy and traditional cast alloy (P>.05). No statistically significant influence was found on the corrosion behavior of the 2 alloys in different pH value solutions (P>.05). The porcelain firing process had no significant influence on the corrosion resistance results of the 2 alloys. Compared with traditional

  6. Comparison and evaluation of marginal and internal gaps in cobalt-chromium alloy copings fabricated using subtractive and additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal and internal gaps of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy copings fabricated using subtractive and additive manufacturing. A study model of an abutment tooth 46 was prepared by a 2-step silicone impression with dental stone. Fifteen stereolithography files for Co-Cr alloy copings were compiled using a model scanner and dental CAD software. Using the lost wax (LW), wax block (WB), soft metal block (SMB), microstereolithography (μ-SLA), and selected laser melting (SLM) techniques, 15 Co-Cr alloy copings were fabricated per group. The marginal and internal gaps of these Co-Cr alloy copings were measured using a digital microscope (160×), and the data obtained were analyzed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis H-test and post-hoc Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction. The mean values of the marginal, axial wall, and occlusal gaps were 91.8, 83.4, and 163μm in the LW group; 94.2, 77.5, and 122μm in the WB group; 60.0, 79.4, and 90.8μm in the SMB group; 154, 72.4, and 258μm in the μ-SLA group; and 239, 73.6, and 384μm in the SLM group, respectively. The differences in the marginal and occlusal gaps between the 5 groups were statistically significant (P<.05). The marginal gaps of the LW, WB, and SMB groups were within the clinically acceptable limit, but further improvements in the μ-SLA and SLM approaches may be required prior to clinical implementation. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Constitution, structure and magnetic properties of some rare-earth - cobalt-aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.; Harris, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution and structure of the alloys represented by the formulae Cesub(1-x)Alsub(x)Co 5 and Prsub(1-x)Alsub(x)Co 5 (where 0 = 5 produces a mixture of the 1:5 and 2:17 phases based on CeCo 5 and Ce 2 Co 17 ; there are two variations of the 2:17 phase which are isostructural with the hexagonal Th 2 Ni 17 -type and rhombohedral Th 2 Zn 17 -type phases. At the composition Cesub(0.76)Alsub(0.24)Co 5 (4 at % Al) the alloy consists only of the 2:17-type phases and metallographically the alloy is one phase in appearance. Further substitution of Al results in the precipitation of an fcc phase, based on the Co-Al solid solution, in the 2:17 matrix. The crystal structures of the Prsub(1-x)Alsub(x)Co 5 alloys are very similar to those of the equivalent cerium alloys. The metallographic structures of the Pr alloys in the composition range 1 to 3 at % Al show significant differences from the corresponding Ce alloys. Determination of the Curie temperatures of the Rsub(1-x)Alsub(x)Co 5 alloys (R = Ce and Pr) in the composition range 0 = 5 and PrCo 5 phases. (author)

  8. Coated air-stable cobalt--rare earth alloy particles and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeggil, J.C.; Charles, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for producing novel air-stable coated particles of a magnetic transition metal-rare earth alloys. An organometallic compound which decomposes at a temperature below 500 0 C is heated to produce a metal vapor which is contacted with particles of a transition metal-rare earth alloy to deposit a metal coating on the particles. (U.S.)

  9. Standard enthalpies of formation of some Lanthanide–Cobalt binary alloys by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschel, S.V., E-mail: meschel@jfi.uchicago.edu [Illinois Institute of Technology, Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, IL (United States); University of Chicago, Gordon Center of Interactive Science, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Nash, P. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, IL (United States); Gao, Q.N.; Wang, J.C.; Du, Y. [Central South University, State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2013-11-25

    Highlights: •Studied binary Lanthanide–Cobalt intermetallic alloys by high temperature calorimetry. •Determined the enthalpies of formation of 16 magnetostrictive alloys. •Compared the experimental measurements with theoretical predictions by two different models. -- Abstract: The standard enthalpies of formation of intermetallic compounds of some Lanthanide–Cobalt systems have been measured by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry at 1373 ± 2 K. The following results in kJ/mol of atoms are reported: CeCo{sub 5}(−9.4 ± 3.3); Ce{sub 2}Co{sub 17}(−6.8 ± 3.2); PrCo{sub 5}(−10.5 ± 2.4); Pr{sub 2}Co{sub 17}(−6.8 ± 3.6); NdCo{sub 5}(−12.7 ± 2.6); Nd{sub 2}Co{sub 17}(−6.6 ± 2.7); SmCo{sub 5}(−12.2 ± 1.8); Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17}(−7.2 ± 2.5); GdCo{sub 5}(−10.0 ± 2.4); Tb{sub 2}Co{sub 17}(−7.7 ± 2.9); Dy{sub 2}Co{sub 17}(−8.1 ± 2.9); HoCo{sub 3}(−17.5 ± 2.2); ErCo{sub 3}(−19.7 ± 3.3); TmCo{sub 3}(−22.9 ± 3.0); LuCo{sub 3}(−23.0 ± 2.6). The measurements are compared with values from the literature and with predicted values of the semi empirical model of Miedema and Coworkers. We also compare the measurements with predicted values by ab initio calculations. We will present a systematic picture of how the enthalpies of formation may be related to the atomic number of the Lanthanide element (LA). We will also compare the thermochemical behavior of the Fe, Co and Ni binary alloys with Lanthanide elements.

  10. Metallurgical characterization of new palladium-containing cobalt chromium and nickel chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Raghav

    Recently introduced to the market has been an entirely new subclass of casting alloy composition whereby palladium (˜25 wt%) is added to traditional base metal alloys such as CoCr and NiCr. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microstructure and Vickers hardness of two new CoPdCr and one new NiPdCr alloy and compare them to traditional CoCr and NiCr alloys. Methods. The casting alloys investigated were: CoPdCr-A (Noble Crown NF, The Argen Corporation), CoPdCr-I (Callisto CP+, Ivoclar Vivadent), NiPdCr (Noble Crown, Argen), CoCr (Argeloy N.P. Special, Argen), and NiCr (Argeloy N.P. Star, Argen). As-cast cylindrical alloy specimens were mounted in epoxy resin and prepared with standard metallographic procedures, i.e. grinding with successive grades of SiC paper and polishing with alumina suspensions. The alloys were examined with an optical microscope, SEM/EPMA, and XRD to gain insight into their microstructure, composition, and crystal structure. Vickers hardness (VHN) was measured and statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). Results. Optical microscopy showed a dendritic microstructure for all alloys. The Pd-containing alloys appear to possess a more complex microstructure. SEM/EPMA showed Cr to be rather uniformly distributed in the matrix with palladium tending to be segregated apart from Mo and Ni or Co. Areas of different composition may explain the poor electrochemical results noted in previous studies. XRD suggested the main phase in the Ni-containing solutions was a face centered cubic Ni solid solution, whereas the CoCr exhibited a hexagonal crystal structure that was altered to face centered cubic when Pd was included in the composition. For Vickers hardness, the Co-containing alloys possessed a greater hardness than the Ni-containing alloys. However, the incorporation of Pd in CoCr and NiCr had only a slight effect on microhardness. Conclusion. Overall, the inclusion of palladium increases the

  11. Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menne, Torkil; Liden, Carola

    2012-01-01

    -containing dental alloys and revised hip implant components.Results. Six of eight dental alloys and 10 of 98 revised hip implant components released cobalt in the cobalt spot test, whereas none of 50 mobile phones gave positive reactions. The clinical relevance of positive cobalt test reactions was difficult......-tested dermatitis patients in an attempt to better understand cobalt allergy.Materials and methods. 19 780 dermatitis patients aged 4-99 years were patch tested with nickel, chromium or cobalt between 1985 and 2010. The cobalt spot test was used to test for cobalt ion release from mobile phones as well as cobalt...

  12. Study of soft magnetic iron cobalt based alloys processed by powder injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Aline; Lozano, Jaime A.; Machado, Ricardo; Escobar, Jairo A.; Wendhausen, Paulo A.P.

    2008-01-01

    As a near net shape process, powder injection molding (PIM) opens new possibilities to process Fe-Co alloys for magnetic applications. Due to the fact that PIM does not involve plastic deformation of the material during processing, we envisioned the possibility of eliminating vanadium (V), which is generally added to Fe-Co alloys to improve the ductility in order to enable its further shaping by conventional processes such as forging and cold rolling. In our investigation we have found out two main futures related to the elimination of V, which lead to a cost-benefit gain in manufacturing small magnetic components where high-saturation induction is needed at low frequencies. Firstly, the elimination of V enables the achievement of much better magnetic properties when alloys are processed by PIM. Secondly, a lower sintering temperature can be used when the alloy is processed starting with elemental Fe and Co powders without the addition of V

  13. Carbon-encapsulated nickel-cobalt alloys nanoparticles fabricated via new post-treatment strategy for hydrogen evolution in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hailing; Youliwasi, Nuerguli; Zhao, Lei; Chai, Yongming; Liu, Chenguang

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses a new post-treatment strategy for the formation of carbon-encapsulated nickel-cobalt alloys nanoparticles, which is easily controlled the performance of target products via changing precursor composition, calcination conditions (e.g., temperature and atmosphere) and post-treatment condition. Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified by the as-obtained carbon-encapsulated mono- and bi-transition metal nanoparticles exhibit excellent electro-catalytic activity for hydrogen production in alkaline water electrolysis. Especially, Ni0.4Co0.6@N-Cs800-b catalyst prepared at 800 °C under an argon flow exhibited the best electrocatalytic performance towards HER. The high HER activity of the Ni0.4Co0.6@N-Cs800-b modified electrode is related to the appropriate nickel-cobalt metal ratio with high crystallinity, complete and homogeneous carbon layers outside of the nickel-cobalt with high conductivity and the synergistic effect of nickel-cobalt alloys that also accelerate electron transfer process.

  14. Corrosion study of iron-cobalt alloys for MRI-based propulsion embedded in untethered microdevices operating in the vascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Savadogo, Oumarou; Napporn, Teko; Yahia, L'hocine; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    Our group have shown in an experiment performed in the carotid artery of a living swine that magnetic gradients generated by a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could propel and navigate untethered medical microdevices and micro-nanorobots in the human vasculature. The main problem with these devices is that the metal necessary for magnetic propulsion may corrode and induce cytotoxic effects. The challenge, then, is to find an alloy with low corrosion yet providing an adequate magnetization level for propulsion in often stringent physiological conditions. Because of their high magnetization, we studied the corrosion behavior of two iron-cobalt alloys, Permendur (49% Fe, 49% Co, 2% V) and Vacoflux 17 (81% Fe, 17% Co, 2% Cr), in physiological solution by potentiodynamic polarization assay, surface analysis, and corrosion electrolyte analysis. Both alloys exhibited low corrosion parameters such as a corrosion potential (E(corr)) of -0.57 V/SCE and E(corr) of -0.42 V/SCE for Vacoflux 17. The surface of Permendur samples was homogenously degraded. Vacoflux 17 surface was impaired by cracks and crevices. Both alloys had a stoichiometric dissolution in the electrolyte, and they released enough cobalt to induce cytotoxic effects. This study concluded that Fe-Co alloys could be used preferably in medical microdevices if they were coated so as not to come in contact with physiological solutions.

  15. Annealed coated air-stable cobalt--rare earth alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeggil, J.C.; Charles, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for producing novel air-stable coated particles of a magnetic transition metal-rare earth alloy. An organometallic compound which decomposes at a temperature below 500 0 C is heated to produce a metal vapor which is contacted with particles of a transition metal-rare earth alloy to deposit a metal coating thereon. The coated particles are heated at a temperature ranging from 50 to 200 0 C for a period of time sufficient to increase their intrinsic coercive force by at least 10 percent. (U.S.)

  16. Effect of stacking fault energy on high-temperature creep parameters of nickel-cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerodenko, L.M.; Dabizha, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of creep investigation are discussed for two alloys of the Ni-Co system. In terms of the structural creep model an analysis is made for the effect of stacking fault energy on averaged parameters of the dislocation structure: inovable dislocation density subgrain size, activation volume. The rate of steady-state creep is determined by the process of dislocation passing through the subgrain boundaries with activation energy of 171.0 and 211.5 kJ/mol for the Ni-25% Co and Ni-65% Co alloys, respectively

  17. Recovery of cobalt-rare earth alloy particles by hydration-disintegration in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, C.M.; Lerman, T.B.; Rockwood, A.C.

    1975-01-01

    A process for recovering magnetic alloy particles from a reaction product cake. The cake is placed in a reactor where it is contacted with a flowing water vapor-carrying gas which reacts with its calcium content to disintegrate the cake and produce a hydrated powder comprised substantially of calcium hydroxide and the alloy particles. A magnetic zone is generated into a cross-section of the reactor substantially encircling the inside wall thereof. The zone is generated by at least two poles of opposite polarity running the length of the zone. The hydrated powder is fluidized to dissociate and pass the calcium hydroxide out of the reactor. Finer-sized alloy particles carried by the fluidizing gas into the magnetic zone are subjected to the magnetic field where the poles are rotated or reversed at a rate which reverses the positions of the particles sufficiently to release adherent calcium hydroxide leaving the finer-sized alloy particles substantially within the magnetic zone. (auth)

  18. Mechanical properties of modified low cobalt powder metallurgy Udimet 700 type alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1989-01-01

    Eight superalloys derived from Udimet 700 were prepared by powder metallurgy, hot isostatically pressed, heat treated and their tensile and creep rupture properties determined. Several of these alloys displayed properties superior to those of Udimet 700 similarly prepared, in one case exceeding the creep rupture life tenfold. Filter clogging by extracted gamma prime, its measurement and significance are discussed in an appendix.

  19. Effect of Cobalt on Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Ni-Based Alloy Coating Fabricated by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiming Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ni-based alloy powders with different contents of cobalt (Co have been deposited on a 42CrMo steel substrate surface using a fiber laser. The effects of Co content on the microstructure, composition, hardness, and wear properties of the claddings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, a hardness tester, and a wear tester. The results show that the phases in the cladding layers are mainly γ, M7(C, B3, M23(C, B6, and M2B. With the increase in Co content, the amounts of M7(C, B3, M23(C, B6, and M2B gradually decrease, and the width of the eutectic structure in the cladding layer also gradually decreases. The microhardness decreases but the wear resistance of the cladding layer gradually improves with the increase of Co content. The wear resistance of the NiCo30 cladding layer is 3.6 times that of the NiCo00 cladding layer. With the increase of Co content, the wear mechanism of the cladding layer is changed from abrasive wear to adhesive wear.

  20. Air-stable compact of cobalt-rare earth alloy particles and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeggil, J.C.; Charles, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for producing novel air-stable magnetic products. An organometallic compound which decomposes at a temperature below 500 0 C is mixed with particles of a transition metal-rare earth alloy. The resulting mixture is pressed to form a green body, which is then heated to decompose the organometallic compound to produce a metal vapor that deposits an interconnecting metal coating on the exposed surfaces of the pressed particles. (U.S.)

  1. Mass-selected iron-cobalt alloy clusters. Correlation of magnetic and structural properties; Massenselektierte Eisen-Kobalt-Legierungscluster. Korrelation magnetischer und struktureller Eigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulut, Furkan

    2008-10-13

    In this work, I present results concerning structural and magnetic properties of massselected iron-cobalt alloy clusters with diameters between 5 and 15 nm. I have studied the structure of FeCo alloy clusters with high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). I have also investigated the crystalline structure of pure iron and pure cobalt clusters with HRTEM to ensure a reliable determination of the lattice parameter for the alloy clusters. The FeCo nanoparticles have a truncated dodecahedral shape with a CsCl-structure. The clusters were produced with a continuously working arc cluster ion source and subsequently mass-selected with an electrostatic quadrupole deflector. The composition of the alloy clusters was checked with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The lateral size distribution was investigated by TEM and the height of the deposited FeCo clusters on the (110) surface of tungsten was determined by STM. Comparing the results I have observed that the supported clusters were flattened due to the high surface energy of W(110). The decrease in height of the mass-selected supported clusters amounts to about 1 nm. Furthermore, element specific magnetic studies performed by means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) have shown that magnetic moments of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} alloy clusters are in good agreement with the theoretically expected values in the bulk. I have also examined the behavior of the alloy clusters at elevated temperatures. The clusters exhibit an anisotropic melting on the W(110) surface. (orig.)

  2. Effect of cobalt on microstructure and properties of AlCr1.5CuFeNi2Cox high-entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vikas; Patnaik, Amar; Bhat, I. K.

    2018-04-01

    The present paper investigates the effect of Co addition on the alloying behaviour, microstructure and the resulting properties of cast AlCr1.5CuFeNi2Cox high-entropy alloys intended to be used for high temperature applications. The elements Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni and Co (Purity > 99) weighing approximately 800 g was melted in a high temperature vacuum induction furnace. The microstructure, phase transformation, density, microhardness and compressive strength of the samples were analysed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopes (SEM), Vickers microhardness tester and universal Testing machine. The crystalline structure of the alloys exhibits simple FCC and BCC phases. The microstructures investigation of the alloys shows the segregation of copper in the interdendritic region resulting in Cu-rich FCC phase. The addition of Co further enhances the formation of FCC phase resulting in the decrease in micro hardness value of the alloys, which varies from 471 HV to 364 HV with increase in the cobalt content from x = 0 to x = 1 (molar ratio). The similar decreasing trend is also observed for the compressive strength of the alloys.

  3. The α → ω Transformation in Titanium-Cobalt Alloys under High-Pressure Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar R. Kilmametov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pressure influence on the α → ω transformation in Ti–Co alloys has been studied during high pressure torsion (HPT. The α → ω allotropic transformation takes place at high pressures in titanium, zirconium and hafnium as well as in their alloys. The transition pressure, the ability of high pressure ω-phase to retain after pressure release, and the pressure interval where α and ω phases coexist depend on the conditions of high-pressure treatment. During HPT in Bridgeman anvils, the high pressure is combined with shear strain. The presence of shear strain as well as Co addition to Ti decreases the onset of the α → ω transition from 10.5 GPa (under quasi-hydrostatic conditions to about 3.5 GPa. The portion of ω-phase after HPT at 7 GPa increases in the following sequence: pure Ti → Ti–2 wt % Co → Ti–4 wt % Co → Ti–4 wt % Fe.

  4. Creep-resistant, cobalt-free alloys for high temperature, liquid-salt heat exchanger systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-09-06

    An essentially Fe- and Co-free alloy is composed essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.0 to 7.5 Cr, 0 to 0.15 Al, 0.5 to 0.85 Mn, 11 to 19.5 Mo, 0.03 to 4.5 Ta, 0.01 to 9 W, 0.03 to 0.08 C, 0 to 1 Re, 0 to 1 Ru, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0005 to 0.005 N, balance Ni, the alloy being characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 25 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 38 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 25 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2 sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 3 to 10.

  5. Studying the initial stages of film electrodeposition of magnetic cobalt-tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachinskas, V.S.; Orlovskaya, L.V.; Parfenov, V.A.; Yasulajtene, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Initial stages of magnetic film electrodeposition by recording potentiodynamic polarization and j c ,t-curves, determination of surface structure of electrolytically deposited films by the method of XPS and study of thin coating properties have been considered. It is shown that at initial stage of electrodeposition of magnetic Co-W-films a sharp decrease in cathode process rate and formation of Co(OH) 2 , WO 3 and/or WO 4 2- occur on Cu-cathode surface. Electrodeposition of metallic magnetic Co-W-alloy, consisting of Co, W and containing basic compounds of co-deposited metals, takes place after a certain time period depending on deposition E c . 6 refs.; 3 figs

  6. Structural relaxation in an amorphous rapidly quenched cobalt-based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradin, V.; Grynszpan, R.I.; Alves, F.; Houzali, A.; Perron, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    An amorphous melt-spun Co-based alloy (Metglas 2705 MN) is investigated by Doppler Broadening and Positron Lifetime techniques in order to follow the microstructural changes yielded by isochronal annealings before crystallization. The results are correlated with those of Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Coercive Field measurements. The quenched empty spaces underlined by Lifetime measurements are less than one atomic volume in size and migrate without clustering in larger voids. Both Positron Annihilation and Coercive Field investigations suggest that the overall decrease of free volume related to structural relaxation in this amorphous material, proceeds mainly via compositional short-range ordering. These local chemical rearrangements which lead to a partial disorientation of the magnetic moments act as strong pinning points for Bloch Walls. (orig.)

  7. Oxidised zirconium versus cobalt alloy bearing surfaces in total knee arthroplasty: 3D laser scanning of retrieved polyethylene inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F L; Koch, C N; Elpers, M E; Wright, T M; Haas, S B; Heyse, T J

    2017-06-01

    We sought to establish whether an oxidised zirconium (OxZr) femoral component causes less loss of polyethylene volume than a cobalt alloy (CoCr) femoral component in total knee arthroplasty. A total of 20 retrieved tibial inserts that had articulated with OxZr components were matched with 20 inserts from CoCr articulations for patient age, body mass index, length of implantation, and revision diagnosis. Changes in dimensions of the articular surfaces were compared with those of pristine inserts using laser scanning. The differences in volume between the retrieved and pristine surfaces of the two groups were calculated and compared. The loss of polyethylene volume was 122 mm 3 (standard deviation (sd) 87) in the OxZr group and 170 mm 3 (sd 96) in the CoCr group (p = 0.033). The volume loss in the OxZr group was also lower in the medial (72 mm 3 (sd 67) versus 92 mm 3 (sd 60); p = 0.096) and lateral (49 mm 3 (sd 36) versus 79 mm 3 (sd 61); p = 0.096) compartments separately, but these differences were not significant. Our results corroborate earlier findings from in vitro testing and visual retrieval analysis which suggest that polyethylene volume loss is lower with OxZr femoral components. Since both OxZr and CoCr are hard surfaces that would be expected to create comparable amounts of polyethylene creep, the differences in volume loss may reflect differences in the in vivo wear of these inserts. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:793-8. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in microstructure.

  9. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  10. Investigations on chloride-induced high temperature corrosion of iron-, nickel-, cobalt-base alloys by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microspot analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.; Umland, F.

    1984-01-01

    The direct oxidation at 900 0 C in air and the corrosion of alloys in air after short exposure to chloride have been compared under identical conditions. Chloride destroys the original oxide layers by recristallisation and modifies the following scale growing in such a manner that no firmly sticking layers can be rebuilt. After a chloride induction therefore all other following corrosions will be enhanced. Experiments in a closed system, a so called transport furnace, showed that the chloride also acts as a gas phase carrier transporting firstly the oxide layer, under reducing conditions metals, too, as volatile chloro metal gas complexes in this case from hot to cold region of the furnace. Cobalt base alloys are less attacked than iron or nickel base alloys. As chloride is not found implicitly on the treated surface the identification of the chloride induced corrosion is difficult. However the scanning electron microscopy combined with quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis has been proved as an appropriate method for early detection. As the phenomena depend on the type of alloy, respectively, an illustration and interpretation catalogue is necessary. (orig.) [de

  11. [The study of the colorimetric characteristics of the cobalt-chrome alloys abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns by using dental spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Liu, Hongchun; Meng, Yukun; Chao, Yonglie; Liu, Changhong

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the optical data of the different sites of the cobalt-chrome (Co-Cr) alloy abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns and the color difference between the crowns and target tab using a digital dental spectrophotometer. Ten Co-Cr alloy abutments were made and tried in four different groups of all-ceramic crowns, namely, Procera aluminia, Procera zirconia, Lava zirconia (Lava-Zir), and IPS E.max glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced monolithic. The color data of the cervical, body, and incisal sites of the samples were recorded and analyzed by dental spectrophotometer. The CIE L*, a*, b* values were again measured after veneering. The color difference between the abutments covered by all-ceramic crowns and A2 dentine shade tab was evaluated. The L* and b* values of the abutments can be increased by all of the four groups of all-ceramic copings, but a* values were decreased in most groups. A statistical difference was observed among four groups. After being veneered, the L* values of all the copings declined slightly, and the values of a*, b* increased significantly. When compared with A2 dentine shade tab, the ΔE of the crowns was below 4. Four ceramic copings were demonstrated to promote the lightness and hue of the alloy abutments effecttively. Though the colorimetric baseline of these copings was uneven, veneer porcelain can efficiently decrease the color difference between the samples and thee target.

  12. Influence of cobalt and chromium additions on the precipitation processes in a Cu-4Ti alloys; Influencia de la adicion de cobalto y cromo en el proceso de precipitacion en una aleacion de Cu-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, E.

    2010-07-01

    The influence of 0.5% atomic cobalt and 1% atomic chromium additions on the precipitation hardening of Cu-4Ti alloy was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and microhardness measurements. The analysis of the calorimetric curves, for binary alloy, shows the presence of two overlapping exothermic reactions (stages 1 and 2) attributed to the formation of Cu{sub 4}Ti and Cu{sub 3}Ti particles in the copper matrix, respectively. DSC curves for Cu-4Ti-0.5Co alloy shows three exothermic effects (overlapping stages 3 and 4 and stage 5) associated to the formation of phases Ti{sub 2}Co, TiCo and Cu{sub 4}Ti, respectively. DSC curves for Cu-4Ti1Cr alloy shows three exothermic reactions (stages 6, 7 and 9) and one endothermic peak (stage 8). The exothermic reactions correspond to the formation of phases Cr{sub 2}Ti, Cu{sub 4}Ti and Cu{sub 3}Ti, respectively, and the endothermic reactions are attributed to the Cr{sub 2}Ti dissolution. The activation energies calculated using the modified Kissinger method were lower than the ones corresponding to diffusion of cobalt, chromium, and titanium in copper. Kinetic parameters were obtained by a convolution method based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) formalism. Microhardness measurements confirmed the formation of the mentioned phases. Also, these measurements confirmed the effect of cobalt and chromium addition on the binary alloy hardness. (Author). 31 refs.

  13. Hard hardfacing by welding in the manufacture of valves; Problem Cobalt, alternatives, advantages, disadvantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquer Caballero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Alloys of recharge usually used in the field of the valves are base alloys cobalt (stellite), but in the field of nuclear power plants, due to radioactive activation of the cobalt, there is a growing trend to replace these alloys with other calls cobalt free . In this paper we will explore the most frequent and will be deducted the relevant advantages and disadvantages of these, in comparison with base alloys cobalt. (Author)

  14. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  15. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets and their applications, August 31 - September 2, 1982, and third international symposium on magnetic anisotropy and coercivity in rare earth-transition metal alloys, September 3, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, J.

    1982-01-01

    The first part (workshop) is concerned specifically with applications of rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets. The session headings are 1) electro-mechanical applications 2) electronic and miscellaneous applications 3) magneto-mechanical applications plus workshop on measurement methods 4) new materials and processes 5) industrial applications of REPM and future aspects. The second part (symposium) is concerned with physical properties of specific rare earth-transition metal alloys. (G.Q.)

  16. Cobalt-doped Ti–48Al–2Cr–2Nb alloy fabricated by cold compaction and pressureless sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Y. [The University of Queensland, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Yu, P. [Department of Micro-Nano Material and Device, The South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Schaffer, G.B. [The University of Queensland, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    An addition of 1.5 at% Co to Ti–48Al–2Cr–2Nb (in at%) transformed the alloy from essentially unsinterable to fully sinterable at 1300 °C. This, together with a simple powder coating process developed recently, has allowed near-net shape fabrication of the alloy for the first time by cold compaction and pressureless sintering. The addition of Co results in the formation of an intermediate face centred cubic (fcc) CoAl{sub 2}Ti phase prior to 1220 °C during heating. It subsequently reacts with an α phase leading to the formation of a Co-containing, wettable sintering liquid through a two-step process, CoAl{sub 2}Ti+α→Liquid at 1256.2 °C and CoAl{sub 2}Ti+α→γ-TiAl+Liquid at 1267.2 °C, and therefore full densification of the alloy. Without Co, sintering of the Ti–48Al–2Cr–2Nb alloy powder at 1300 °C is controlled by the slow self-diffusion of Ti and interdiffusion of Ti and Al according to the activation energy determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified an fcc CoAl{sub 2}Ti phase and a hexagonal close packed (hcp) Co-enriched Ti(Al, Co, Cr, Nb) phase in the final as-sintered Ti–48Al–2Cr–2Nb–1.5Co alloy. They both form during cooling at 1240 °C through Liquid+α→CoAl{sub 2}Ti+Ti (Al, Co, Cr, Nb). The tensile and compressive properties of the as-sintered Ti–48Al–2Cr–2Nb–1.5Co alloy were compared to the original General Electric (GE) Ti–48Al–2Cr–2Nb alloy fabricated by casting or metal injection moulding.

  17. Incentives and opportunities for reducing the cobalt content in reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Cobalt in core components contributes to radiation field buildup on out-of-core surfaces. Core components containing cobalt-base alloys and cobalt as an impurity are identified. The use of cobalt-free wear-resistant alloys and construction materials with lower impurity levels of cobalt is disused. It is argued that such measures are cost effective. Lower radiation fields and disposal costs will offset higher raw material costs. Component performance will not be affected. (author)

  18. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We...... investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found...... that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses...

  19. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy causes metal accumulation and metallothionein up-regulation in rat liver and kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2007-01-01

    in liver and kidney. We found that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys and suggest that they are released by dissolucytosis, a process where macrophages causes the metallic surface to release metal ions. Animals with intramuscular implants accumulated metal in liver and kidney and metallohionein I....../II were elevated in liver tissue. The present data do not tell whether kidney and liver are the primary target organs or what possible toxicological effect the different metal ions might have, but they show that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys that are not subjected to mechanical wear...... and that they accumulate in liver and kidney tissue. That the liberated metal ions affect the tissues is supported by an up-regulation of the detoxifying/pacifying metalloprotein I/II in the liver. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  20. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author).

  1. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author)

  2. Synthesis and characterization of mixtures of cobalt and titanium oxides by mechanical alloyed and Sol-Gel;Sintesis y caracterizacion de mezclas de oxidos de cobalto y titanio por aleado mecanico y Sol-Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basurto S, R.; Bonifacio M, J.; Fernandez V, S. M., E-mail: rafael.basurto@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The mechanical alloyed techniques continued by combustion and Sol-Gel method, were used for the synthesis of CoTiO{sub 3}. With the first technique was used Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} obtained in a balls mill SPEX in argon atmosphere, using cobalt nitrate and urea, the combustion is realized at 400 and 500 C, the characterization by X-ray diffraction showed the obtaining of the valence oxide mixed of cobalt with crystallite size from 10 to 12.5 nm and the particle size of 60 to 75 nm was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. To prepare the CoTiO{sub 3}, the obtained Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was mixed with TiO{sub 2} on a relationship in weight (1:1) and with a milling time of 2.5 h and the combustion at 800 C. the mixed oxide of titanium cobalt was also obtained by the Sol-Gel technique starting from cobalt chloride and titanium propoxide in acetic-water acid, the gel is burned to temperature of 300, 500, 700 and 900 C, finding that this last temperature it is that provides the compound with crystalline size from 50 to 75 nm. (Author)

  3. Electrocatalysts with platinum, cobalt and nickel preparations by mechanical alloyed and CVD for the reaction of oxygen reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the molecular oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated on electrocatalysts of Co, Ni, Pt and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi and PtCoNi by using H 2 SO 4 0.5 and KOH 0.5 M solutions as electrolytes. The electrocatalysts were synthesized by Mechanical Alloying (MA) and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) processes. For MA, metallic powders were processed during 20 h of milling in a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. For CVD, a hot-wall reactor was utilized and Co, Ni and Pt acetilactetonates were used as precursors. Films were deposited at a total pressure of 1 torr and temperatures of 400-450 C. Electrocatalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Electrocatalysts prepared by mechanical alloying showed a homogeneously dispersed agglomeration of particles with nano metric size. Electrocatalysts obtained by CVD showed, in some cases, non uniform films, with particles of nano metric size, as well. The electrocatalytic performance was evaluated by using the Rotating Disk Electrode technique (RDE). Electrocatalysts prepared by MA showed higher activity than those obtained by CVD. All electrocatalysts were evaluated in alkaline media. Only electrocatalysts containing Pt were evaluated in acid media, because those materials with Co, Ni and their alloys showed instability in acidic media. Most electrocatalysts followed a mechanism for the ORR producing a certain proportion of H 2 O 2 . All electrocatalysts, exhibited a fair or good electrocatalytic activity in comparison with other similar reported materials. It was found that MA and CVD are appropriate processes to prepare electrocatalysts for the ORR with particles of nano metric size and performing with an acceptable catalytic activity. PtCoNi 70-23-7% by MA and PtCoNi-CVD electrocatalysts showed the highest activity in alkaline media, while in acidic electrolyte PtCoNi 70

  4. Influence of Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum Alloy (ASTM F75) on Bone Ingrowth in an Experimental Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchuat, Jésica; Berli, Marcelo; Maldonado, Ysaí; Decco, Oscar

    2017-12-26

    Cr-Co-Mo (ASTM F75) alloy has been used in the medical environment, but its use as a rigid barrier membrane for supporting bone augmentation therapies has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, Cr-Co-Mo membranes of different heights were placed in New Zealand white, male rabbit tibiae to assess the quality and volume of new bone formation, without the use of additional factors. Animals were euthanized at 20, 30, 40, and 60 days. Bone formation was observed in all of the cases, although the tibiae implanted with the standard membranes reached an augmentation of bone volume that agreed with the density values over the timecourse. In all cases, plasmatic exudate was found under the membrane and in contact with the new bone. Histological analysis indicated the presence of a large number of chondroblasts adjacent to the inner membrane surface in the first stages, and osteoblasts and osteocytes were observed under them. The bone formation was appositional. The Cr-Co-Mo alloy provides a scaffold with an adequate microenvironment for vertical bone volume augmentation, and the physical dimensions and disposition of the membrane itself influence the new bone formation.

  5. Influence of Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum Alloy (ASTM F75 on Bone Ingrowth in an Experimental Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jésica Zuchuat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cr-Co-Mo (ASTM F75 alloy has been used in the medical environment, but its use as a rigid barrier membrane for supporting bone augmentation therapies has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, Cr-Co-Mo membranes of different heights were placed in New Zealand white, male rabbit tibiae to assess the quality and volume of new bone formation, without the use of additional factors. Animals were euthanized at 20, 30, 40, and 60 days. Bone formation was observed in all of the cases, although the tibiae implanted with the standard membranes reached an augmentation of bone volume that agreed with the density values over the timecourse. In all cases, plasmatic exudate was found under the membrane and in contact with the new bone. Histological analysis indicated the presence of a large number of chondroblasts adjacent to the inner membrane surface in the first stages, and osteoblasts and osteocytes were observed under them. The bone formation was appositional. The Cr-Co-Mo alloy provides a scaffold with an adequate microenvironment for vertical bone volume augmentation, and the physical dimensions and disposition of the membrane itself influence the new bone formation.

  6. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe_6_6Co_3_4) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe_2O_4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  7. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, B. [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Andrew, J. S. [University of Florida, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Arnold, D. P., E-mail: darnold@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe{sub 66}Co{sub 34}) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  8. Cobalt: for strength and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  9. Study of thermodynamic properties of binary and ternary liquid alloys of aluminium with the elements iron, cobalt, nickel and oxygen; Etude des proprietes thermodynamiques des alliages liquides binaires et ternaires de l'aluminium avec les elements fer, cobalt, nickel et l'oxygene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachet, F [CEA Vallee du Rhone, 26-Pierrelatte (France)

    1966-07-01

    The present work deals with the thermodynamic study of aluminium liquid alloys with the metals iron, cobalt and nickel. The experiments carried out lead to the activity, at 1600 deg C, of aluminium in the (Al, Fe), (Al, Co), (Al, Ni) liquid alloys. The experimental method used consists in studying the partition of aluminium between the liquid immiscible phases made up with the pairs of metals (Fe, Ag), (Co, Ag), (Ni, Ag). The informations so obtained are used for drawing the isothermal equilibrium phases diagrams sections of (Al, Fe, Ag), (Al, Co, Ag), (Al, Ni, Ag) systems. The study of the partition of silver between lead and aluminium joined with the determinations of several authors allows us to determine the aluminium activity, analytically presented, in the metal M (iron cobalt and nickel). The Wagner's interaction parameters of aluminium in metal M are determined. The results obtained as the equilibrium phases diagrams of (Al, M) systems allow to compare the thermodynamic properties of the Al Fe system in liquid and solid states and to estimate the enthalpies of melting of the AlCo and AlNi intermetallic compounds. The activity, at 1600 deg C, of aluminium in (Al, Fe, Co), (Al, Fe, Ni), (Al, Co, Ni) liquid alloys is estimated through thermodynamic properties of binary components systems by application of several methods leading to results in good agreement. The study of aluminium-oxygen interactions in the liquid metallic solvants M allows us to propose an explanation for the shape of the deoxidation equilibrium line of iron, cobalt and nickel by aluminium and to compare the de-oxidizing power of aluminium toward iron, cobalt and nickel oxides. (author) [French] Le travail presente se rapporte a l'etude thermodynamique des alliages liquides de l'aluminium avec les metaux fer, cobalt et nickel. Les experiences effectuees ont pour but de determiner l'activite, a 1600 C, de l'aluminium dans les alliages liquides (Al, Fe), (Al, Co), (Al, Ni). La methode

  10. Effects of as-cast and wrought Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum and Titanium-Aluminium-Vanadium alloys on cytokine gene expression and protein secretion in J774A.1 macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2007-01-01

    the cell viability. Surface properties of the discs were characterised with a profilometer and with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We here report, for the first time, that the prosthetic material surface (non-phagocytable) of as-cast high carbon CoCrMo reduces the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6......Insertion of metal implants is associated with a possible change in the delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory proteins, probably leading to an unfavourable predominantly pro-inflammatory milieu. The most likely cause is an inappropriate activation of macrophages in close relation...... to the metal implant and wear-products. The aim of the present study was to compare surfaces of as-cast and wrought Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys and Titanium-Aluminium-Vanadium (TiAlV) alloy when incubated with mouse macrophage J774A.1 cell cultures. Changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines...

  11. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Wise, John Pierce, E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  12. Effects of as-cast and wrought Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum and Titanium-Aluminium-Vanadium alloys on cytokine gene expression and protein secretion in J774A.1 macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2007-01-01

    to the metal implant and wear-products. The aim of the present study was to compare surfaces of as-cast and wrought Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys and Titanium-Aluminium-Vanadium (TiAlV) alloy when incubated with mouse macrophage J774A.1 cell cultures. Changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines...... transcription, the chemokine MCP-1 secretion, and M-CSF secretion by 77%, 36%, and 62%, respectively. Furthermore, we found that reducing surface roughness did not affect this reduction. The results suggest that as-cast CoCrMo alloy is more inert than wrought CoCrMo and wrought TiAlV alloys and could prove...... the cell viability. Surface properties of the discs were characterised with a profilometer and with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We here report, for the first time, that the prosthetic material surface (non-phagocytable) of as-cast high carbon CoCrMo reduces the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6...

  13. Cobalt-free nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Michio; Harada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Cobalt-free nickel-base cast superalloys have been developed. Cobalt is considered to be a beneficial element to strengthen the alloys but should be eliminated in alloys to be used for direct cycle helium turbine driven by helium gas from HTGR (high temp. gas reactor). The elimination of cobalt is required to avoid the formation of radioactive 60 Co from the debris or scales of the alloys. Cobalt-free alloys are also desirable from another viewpoint, i.e. recently the shortage of the element has become a serious problem in industry. Cobalt-free Mar-M200 type alloys modified by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2 wt% B and 1 - 1.5 wt% Hf were found to have a creep rupture strength superior or comparable to that of the original Mar-M200 alloy bearing cobalt. The ductility in tensile test at 800 0 C, as cast or after prolonged heating at 900 0 C (the tensile test was done without removing the surface layer affected by the heating), was also improved by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf. The morphology of grain boundaries became intricated by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf, to such a degree that one can hardly distinguish grain boundaries by microscopes. The change in the grain boundary morphology was considered, as suggested previously by one of the authors (M.Y.), to be the reason for the improvements in the creep rupture strength and tensile ductility. (author)

  14. Hard hardfacing by welding in the manufacture of valves; Problem Cobalt, alternatives, advantages, disadvantages; Recargues Duros por Soldadura en la Fabricacion de Valvulas ; el Problema del Cobalto, alternativas, ventajas, inconvenientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquer Caballero, J.

    2014-07-01

    Alloys of recharge usually used in the field of the valves are base alloys cobalt (stellite), but in the field of nuclear power plants, due to radioactive activation of the cobalt, there is a growing trend to replace these alloys with other calls cobalt free . In this paper we will explore the most frequent and will be deducted the relevant advantages and disadvantages of these, in comparison with base alloys cobalt. (Author)

  15. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  16. Effects of as-cast and wrought Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum and Titanium-Aluminium-Vanadium alloys on cytokine gene expression and protein secretion in J774A.1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Stig S; Larsen, A; Stoltenberg, M; Bruun, J M; Soballe, K

    2007-09-11

    Insertion of metal implants is associated with a possible change in the delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory proteins, probably leading to an unfavourable predominantly pro-inflammatory milieu. The most likely cause is an inappropriate activation of macrophages in close relation to the metal implant and wear-products. The aim of the present study was to compare surfaces of as-cast and wrought Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys and Titanium-Aluminium-Vanadium (TiAlV) alloy when incubated with mouse macrophage J774A.1 cell cultures. Changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-10) and proteins known to induce proliferation (M-CSF), chemotaxis (MCP-1) and osteogenesis (TGF-beta, OPG) were determined by ELISA and Real Time reverse transcriptase - PCR (Real Time rt-PCR). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was measured in the medium to asses the cell viability. Surface properties of the discs were characterised with a profilometer and with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We here report, for the first time, that the prosthetic material surface (non-phagocytable) of as-cast high carbon CoCrMo reduces the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 transcription, the chemokine MCP-1 secretion, and M-CSF secretion by 77%, 36%, and 62%, respectively. Furthermore, we found that reducing surface roughness did not affect this reduction. The results suggest that as-cast CoCrMo alloy is more inert than wrought CoCrMo and wrought TiAlV alloys and could prove to be a superior implant material generating less inflammation which might result in less osteolysis.

  17. Effects of cobalt on structure, microchemistry and properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the basic mechanical properties and microstructure of wrought nickel-base superalloys has been investigated experimentally by systematically replacing cobalt by nickel in Udimet 700 (17 wt% Co) commonly used in gas turbine (jet engine) applications. It is shown that the room temperature tensile yield strength and tensile strength only slightly decrease in fine-grained (disk) alloys and are basically unaffected in coarse-grained (blading) alloys as cobalt is removed. Creep and stress rupture resistances at 760 C are found to be unaffected by cobalt level in the blading alloys and decrease sharply only when the cobalt level is reduced below 8 vol% in the disk alloys. The effect of cobalt is explained in terms of gamma prime strengthening kinetics.

  18. Evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of porcelain to a beryllium-free alloy of nickel-chromium, nickel and beryllium free alloy of cobalt-chromium, and titanium: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Singh

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: It could be concluded that newer nickel and beryllium free Co-Cr alloys and titanium alloys with improved strength to weight ratio could prove to be good alternatives to the conventional nickel-based alloys when biocompatibility was a concern.

  19. Cobalt-60 control in Ontario Hydro reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of specifying reduced Cobalt-59 in the primary heat transport circuit materials of construction on the radiation fields developed around the primary circuit. An eight-fold reduction in steam generator radiation fields due to Cobalt-60 has been observed for two identical sets of reactors, one with and one without Cobalt-59 control. The comparison is between eight reactors at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). Units 5 to 8 (PNGS-B) are identical to Units 1 to 4 (PNGS-A) except that PNGS-B has reduced impurity Cobalt-59 in the alloys of construction and a reduced use of stellite. The effects of chemistry control are also discussed

  20. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air......A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt oxide and titanium mixtures using mechanical alloying and its response to oxygen reduction; Sintesis y caracterizacion de mezclas de oxidos de cobalto y titanio por aleado mecanico y su respuesta para la reduccion de oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basurto S, R.; Bonifacio-Martinez, J.; Fernandez, S.M [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: rafael.basurto@inin.gob.mx

    2009-09-15

    The synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CoTiO{sub 3} oxides was conducted using mechanical alloying and combustion. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} used was obtained using a SPEX ball mill with cobalt nitrate, Co(NO{sub 3})36H{sub 2}O plus urea, CH{sub 4}N{sub 2}O, in a molar ratio of 1:1 and a ball weight ratio of 1:4 with grinding times of 2.5 hours in an argon atmosphere. The material obtained after alloying underwent combustion at 400 degrees Celsius and 500 degrees Celsius, obtaining oxides of mixed cobalt valence. This material was mixed with TiO{sub 2} with a weight ratio of 1:1 and was mechanically alloyed with a ball weight ratio of 1:8; grinding was performed for 2.5 hours in argon atmosphere and it underwent combustion at 800 degrees Celsius. Characterization was performed using x-ray diffraction, low-vacuum sweep electron microscopy and EDS. The electrochemical performance was obtained in a galvanostat-potentiostat (Princenton Applied Research modelo 273). Both materials present electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium. [Spanish] La sintesis de los oxidos: Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} y CoTiO3 se realizo por la tecnica de aleado mecanico y combustion. El Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} utilizado, se obtuvo por con un molino de bolas SPEX, utilizando nitrato de cobalto, Co(NO{sub 3})36H{sub 2}O mas urea, CH{sub 4}N{sub 2}O, en una relacion molar 1:1.y una relacion en peso de bolas de 1:4 con tiempos de molienda de 2.5 horas, en atmosfera de argon, al termino del aleado el material obtenido se llevo a combustion a 400 grados centigrados y 500 grados centigrados, obteniendose el oxido de valencia mixta de cobalto. Este material se mezclo con TiO{sub 2}, en una relacion en peso de 1:1 y se aleo mecanicamente, con una relacion en peso de bolas de 1:8, por 2.5 horas de molienda en atmosfera de argon y llevandolo a combustion a 800 grados centigrados. La caracterizacion se hizo por: Difraccion de Rayos X, Microscopia Electronica de Barrido de Bajo Vacio y EDS El

  2. Electrocatalysts of platinum, cobalt and nickel prepared by mechanical alloying for the oxygen reduction reaction in H2SO4 0.5M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Vargas G, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Metallic powders of Pt, Co and Nickel were processed by mechanical alloyed and electrocatalysts were synthesized for the oxygen reduction reaction, applicable in fuel cells. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using X-ray Diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloyed powders formed agglomerates that consist of crystalline particles of nano metric size. Its were obtained polarization curves by the Electrode of Rotational Disk technique in a solution of H 2 SO 4 0.5 M, used as electrolyte, to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of mechanically alloyed powders. Tafel graphics were built to determine the kinetic parameters of each electro catalyst. The PtCoNi alloy exhibited the biggest electrocatalytic activity, with the smallest over potential for the oxygen reduction reaction. (Author)

  3. Cobalt-boron amorphous alloy prepared in water/cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide/n-hexanol microemulsion as anode for alkaline secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, D.G.; Wang, D.; Chu, W.; Sun, J.H.; Wu, P.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous cobalt-boron (Co-B) with uniform nanoparticles was prepared for the first time via reduction of cobalt acetate by potassium borohydride in the water/cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide/n-hexanol microemulsion system. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, cyclic voltammetry, differential scanning calorimetry, temperature-programmed desorption, scanning electron microscopy, charge-discharge test and electrochemical impedance spectra. The results demonstrate that electrochemical activity of the as-synthesized Co-B was higher than that of the regular Co-B prepared in aqueous solution. It indicates that the homogeneous distribution and large specific surface area helped the electrochemical hydrogen storage of the as-synthesized Co-B. Furthermore, the as-synthesized Co-B even had 347 mAh g -1 after 50 cycles, while the regular Co-B prepared in aqueous solution only had 254 mAh g -1 after 30 cycles at a current of 100 mA g -1 . The better cycling performance can be ascribed to its smaller interfacial impedance between electrode and electrolyte.

  4. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  5. The use of hardfacing alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarinen, K.; Aaltonen, P.

    1987-08-01

    In this report the structure and applications of cobalt-, nickel- and iron-based hardfacing alloys are reviewed. Cobalt-based hardfacing alloys are widely used in nuclear power plant components due to their good wear and corrosion resistance. However, the wear and corrosion products of the cobalt-containing alloys are released into the primary cooling water and transported to the reactor core where cobalt (Co-59) is transmuted to the radioactive isotope Co-60. It has been estimated that cobalt-based hardfacing alloys are responsible for up to 90% of the total cobalt released to the primary water circuit. The cobalt based hardfacing alloys are used in such components as valves, control blade pins and pumps, etc. In the Finnish nuclear power plants they are not used in in-core components. The replacement of cobalt-containing alloys in primary cooling system components is studied in many laboratories, but substitutes for the cobalt-based alloys in the complete range of nuclear hardfacing applications have so far not been found. However, the modified austenitic stainless steels have showed good resistance to galling wear and are therefore considered substitutes for cobalt-based alloys

  6. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for preparing novel sintered cobalt--rare earth intermetallic products which can be magnetized to form permanent magnets having stable improved magnetic properties. A cobalt--rare earth metal alloy is formed having a composition which at sintering temperature falls outside the composition covered by the single Co 5 R intermetallic phase on the rare earth richer side. The alloy contains a major amount of the Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a second solid CoR phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase. The specific cobalt and rare earth metal content of the alloy is substantially the same as that desired in the sintered product. The alloy, in particulate form, is pressed into compacts and sintered to the desired density. The sintered product is comprised of a major amount of the Co 5 R solid intermetallic phase and up to about 35 percent of the product of the second solid CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase

  7. Influence of thermo-mechanical cycling on porcelain bonding to cobalt-chromium and titanium dental alloys fabricated by casting, milling, and selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antanasova, Maja; Kocjan, Andraž; Kovač, Janez; Žužek, Borut; Jevnikar, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The aim has been to determine the effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on shear-bond-strength (SBS) of dental porcelain to Co-Cr and Ti-based alloys fabricated by casting, computer-numerical-controlled milling, and selective-laser-melting (SLM). Seven groups (n=22/group) of metal cylinders were fabricated by casting (Co-Cr and commercially pure-cpTi), milling (Co-Cr, cpTi, Ti-6Al-4V) or by SLM (Co-Cr and Ti-6Al-4V) and abraded with airborne-particles. The average surface roughness (R a ) was determined for each group. Dental porcelain was applied and each metal-ceramic combination was divided into two subgroups - stored in deionized water (24-h, 37°C), or subjected to both thermal (6000-cycles, between 5 and 60°C) and mechanical cycling (10 5 -cycles, 60N-load). SBS test-values and failure modes were recorded. Metal-ceramic interfaces were analyzed with a focused-ion-beam/scanning-electron-microscope (FIB/SEM) and energy-dispersive-spectroscopy (EDS). The elastic properties of the respective metal and ceramic materials were evaluated by instrumented-indentation-testing. The oxide thickness on intact Ti-based substrates was measured with Auger-electron-spectroscopy (AES). Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and t-tests (α=0.05). The SBS-means differed according to the metal-ceramic combination (p<0.0005) and to the fatigue conditions (p<0.0005). The failure modes and interface analyses suggest better porcelain adherence to Co-Cr than to Ti-based alloys. Values of R a were dependent on the metal substrate (p<0.0005). Ti-based substrates were not covered with thick oxide layers following digital fabrication. Ti-based alloys are more susceptible than Co-Cr to reduction of porcelain bond strength following thermo-mechanical cycling. The porcelain bond strength to Ti-based alloys is affected by the applied metal processing technology. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  9. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future......Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items...

  10. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...

  11. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology-A brief update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole, E-mail: LOSimonsen@dadlnet.dk; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-08-15

    phase lasting several weeks, and with a significant long-term retention in tissues for several years. In serum cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) binds to albumin, and the concentration of free, ionized Co{sup 2+} is estimated at 5-12% of the total cobalt concentration. In human red cells the membrane transport pathway for cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) uptake appears to be shared with calcium (Ca{sup 2+}), but with the uptake being essentially irreversible as cobalt is effectively bound in the cytosol and is not itself extruded by the Ca-pump. It is tempting to speculate that this could perhaps also be the case in other animal cells. If this were actually the case, the tissue partitioning and biokinetics of cobalt in cells and tissues would be closely related to the uptake of calcium, with cobalt partitioning primarily into tissues with a high calcium turn-over, and with cobalt accumulation and retention in tissues with a slow turn-over of the cells. The occupational cobalt exposure, e.g. in cobalt processing plants and hard-metal industry is well known and has probably been somewhat reduced in more recent years due to improved work place hygiene. Of note, however, adverse reactions to heart and lung have recently been demonstrated following cobalt exposure near or slightly under the current occupational exposure limit. Over the last decades the use of cobalt-chromium hard-metal alloys in orthopedic joint replacements, in particular in metal-on-metal bearings in hip joint arthroplasty, has created an entirely new source of internal cobalt exposure. Corrosion and wear produce soluble metal ions and metal debris in the form of huge numbers of wear particles in nanometric size, with systemic dissemination through lymph and systemic vascular system. This may cause adverse local reactions in peri-prosthetic soft-tissues, and in addition systemic toxicity. Of note, the metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be clearly more toxic than larger, micrometer-sized particles, and this has made the

  12. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  13. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology—A brief update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-01-01

    with a significant long-term retention in tissues for several years. In serum cobalt (Co 2+ ) binds to albumin, and the concentration of free, ionized Co 2+ is estimated at 5–12% of the total cobalt concentration. In human red cells the membrane transport pathway for cobalt (Co 2+ ) uptake appears to be shared with calcium (Ca 2+ ), but with the uptake being essentially irreversible as cobalt is effectively bound in the cytosol and is not itself extruded by the Ca-pump. It is tempting to speculate that this could perhaps also be the case in other animal cells. If this were actually the case, the tissue partitioning and biokinetics of cobalt in cells and tissues would be closely related to the uptake of calcium, with cobalt partitioning primarily into tissues with a high calcium turn-over, and with cobalt accumulation and retention in tissues with a slow turn-over of the cells. The occupational cobalt exposure, e.g. in cobalt processing plants and hard-metal industry is well known and has probably been somewhat reduced in more recent years due to improved work place hygiene. Of note, however, adverse reactions to heart and lung have recently been demonstrated following cobalt exposure near or slightly under the current occupational exposure limit. Over the last decades the use of cobalt–chromium hard-metal alloys in orthopedic joint replacements, in particular in metal-on-metal bearings in hip joint arthroplasty, has created an entirely new source of internal cobalt exposure. Corrosion and wear produce soluble metal ions and metal debris in the form of huge numbers of wear particles in nanometric size, with systemic dissemination through lymph and systemic vascular system. This may cause adverse local reactions in peri-prosthetic soft-tissues, and in addition systemic toxicity. Of note, the metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be clearly more toxic than larger, micrometer-sized particles, and this has made the concept of nanotoxicology a crucial, new

  14. Biocompatibility and mechanical properties of diamond-like coatings on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum steel and titanium-aluminum-vanadium biomedical alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinüber, C; Kleemann, C; Friederichs, R J; Haubold, L; Scheibe, H J; Schuelke, T; Boehlert, C; Baumann, M J

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are favored for wear components because of diamond-like hardness, low friction, low wear, and high corrosion resistance (Schultz et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2004;35:924-928; Lappalainen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2003;66B:410-413; Tiainen, Diam Relat Mater 2001;10:153-160). Several studies have demonstrated their inertness, nontoxicity, and the biocompatibility, which has led to interest among manufacturers of surgical implants (Allen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2001;58:319-328; Uzumaki et al., Diam Relat Mater 2006;15:982-988; Hauert, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:583-589; Grill, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:166-170). In this study, hydrogen-free amorphous, tetrahedrally bonded DLC films (ta-C) were deposited at low temperatures by physical vapor deposition on medical grade Co28Cr6Mo steel and the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Scheibe et al., Surf Coat Tech 1996;85:209-214). The mechanical performance of the ta-C was characterized by measuring its surface roughness, contact angle, adhesion, and wear behavior, whereas the biocompatibility was assessed by osteoblast (OB) attachment and cell viability via Live/Dead assay. There was no statistical difference found in the wettability as measured by contact angle measurements for the ta-C coated and the uncoated samples of either Co28Cr6Mo or Ti6Al4V. Rockwell C indentation and dynamic scratch testing on 2-10 μm thick ta-C films on Co28Cr6Mo substrates showed excellent adhesion with HF1 grade and up to 48 N for the critical load L(C2) during scratch testing. The ta-C coating reduced the wear from 3.5 × 10(-5) mm(3)/Nm for an uncoated control sample (uncoated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) to 1.1 × 10(-7) mm(3)/Nm (coated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) in reciprocating pin-on-disk testing. The lowest wear factor of 3.9 × 10(-10) mm(3)/Nm was measured using a ta-C coated steel ball running against a ta-C coated and polished Co28Cr6Mo disk

  15. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    : On the basis of five included studies, the ED10 values of aqueous cobalt chloride ranged between 0.0663 and 1.95 µg cobalt/cm(2), corresponding to 30.8-259 ppm. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis provides an overview of the doses of cobalt that are required to elicit allergic cobalt contactdermatitis in sensitized...

  16. Galvanic corrosion in odontological alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesgo, O.; Bianchi, G.L.; Duffo, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion can occur when different alloys are placed in direct contact within the oral cavity or within tissues. Concern has been expressed associated with the coupling of selected restorative materials as well as implant material with various alloys used for restorative procedures. This could be critical if the crown or bridge had subgingival finish line with a metallic zone in contact with the tissue, and the implant was made in titanium alloy. The present work shows the results of galvanic coupling studies done on implants of titanium alloy connected to nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys. (Author)

  17. Cobalt toxicity: Chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandre, C.; Moulin, C.; Bresson, C.; Gault, N.; Poncy, J. L.; Lefaix, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B 12 , but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radio-toxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, 58 Co and 60 Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl 2 ) with or without gamma-ray doses to mimic contamination by 60 Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate gamma-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species. (authors)

  18. Cobalt toxicity: Chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gault, N. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, DSV/IRCM/SCSR/LRTS, 92265 Fontenay aux Rose (France); Sandre, C.; Moulin, B.; Bresson, C. [CEA, DEN, SECR, Laboratoire de Speciation des Radionucleides et des Molecules, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poncy, J.L. [CEA Bruyeres Le Chatel, DSV/IRCM/SREIT/LRT, 91680 Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Lefaix, J.L. [CEA Caen, DSV/IRCM/SRO/LARIA, 14070 Caen (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B12, but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radio-toxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl{sub 2}) with or without {gamma}-ray doses to mimic contamination by {sup 60}Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate {gamma}-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species. (authors)

  19. Cobalt toxicity: Chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandre, C.; Moulin, C.; Bresson, C. [CEA Saclay, DEN, SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Gault, N. [CEA Fontenay Roses, DSV IRCM SCSR LRTS, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Poncy, J. L. [CEA Bruyeres Le Chatel, DSV IRCM SREIT LRT, F-91680 Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Lefaix, J. L. [CEA Caen, DSV IRCM SRO LARIA, F-14070 Caen (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B{sub 12}, but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radio-toxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl{sub 2}) with or without gamma-ray doses to mimic contamination by {sup 60}Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate gamma-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species. (authors)

  20. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  1. Cobalt-Free Permanent Magnet Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    ThC Ferrites (Zn, Mn. Cu, Fe)O A12O. Al TiC Kaolin Al203.Si02-Fe2O3 Fe2O3 Li B4C Spodumene LiAI (SiOs) 2 ThO2 Ni UC Rhodonite NtnO. SiO2 MnOs Fe TaC...minutes. X-ray diffraction pattern indicated the presence of magnetic T phase. Hysteresis loop was measured on the heat treated powder dispersed in wax...fmgei * T phse Hysersi loo was mesue on the. heat - treated ,--". " powder dispersed in wax... The’ result wer as"- follows: • , " • "• . I TABLE 6

  2. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L; Orozco, E; Garibay-Febles, V; Bucio-Galindo, L; Mendoza Leon, H; Castillo-Ocampo, P; Montoya, A

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 μm in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 μm in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process

  3. Characterization of Cobalt F-75 powder for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuraidawani, C.D.; Shamsul, J.B.; Fazlul, B.; Nur Hidayah, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt F-75 alloys is commonly used for surgical implants because of their strength, corrosion resistance, non-magnetic behaviour and biocompatibility. In this paper, gas atomized of Cobalt F-75 powders were selected for evaluation. These powders supplied by Sandvik Osprey Ltd. The characteristics of these powders were investigated by using particle size analysis, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Two different powder sizes (8.8 μm and 11.5 μm) have showed spherical morphology and the value of densities are 7.9 and 7.6 g/cm 3 respectively. (author)

  4. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  5. Predicting the morphologies of {\\gamma}' precipitates in cobalt-based superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    Jokisaari, Andrea M.; Naghavi, Shahab S.; Wolverton, Chris; Voorhees, Peter W.; Heinonen, Olle G.

    2017-01-01

    Cobalt-based alloys with {\\gamma}/{\\gamma}' microstructures have the potential to become the next generation of superalloys, but alloy compositions and processing steps must be optimized to improve coarsening, creep, and rafting behavior. While these behaviors are different than in nickel-based superalloys, alloy development can be accelerated by understanding the thermodynamic factors influencing microstructure evolution. In this work, we develop a phase field model informed by first-princip...

  6. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  7. Volatilization from PCA steel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    The mobilizations of key components from Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) steel alloy have been measured with laboratory-scale experiments. The experiments indicate most of the mobilization from PCA steel is due to oxide formation and spalling but that the spalled particles are large enough to settle rapidly. Based on the experiments, models for the volatization of iron, manganese, and cobalt from PCA steel in steam and molybdenum from PCA steel in air have been derived.

  8. X-ray target with substrate of molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Rotary targets for x-ray tubes are provided comprising a molybdenum base body alloyed with a stabilizing proportion of iron, silicon, cobalt, tantalum, niobium, hafnium, stable metal oxide, or a mixture of the preceding

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel electroplated with zincâ  cobalt allo

    OpenAIRE

    Hillier, Elizabeth M. K.; Robinson, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Slow strain rate tests were performed on quenched and tempered AISI 4340 steel to measure the extent of hydrogen embrittlement caused by electroplating with zincâ  cobalt alloys. The effects of bath composition and pH were studied and compared with results for electrodeposited cadmium and zincâ  10%nickel. It was found that zincâ  1%cobalt alloy coatings caused serious hydrogen embrittlement (EI 0.63); almost as severe as that of cadmium (EI 0.78). Baking cadmium plate...

  10. Analysis of radioactive cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a manual published by Science and Technology Agency, Japan, which prescribes on the analysis method for radioactive cobalt which is a typical indexing nuclide among the radioactive nuclides released from nuclear facilities. Since the released cobalt is mainly discharged to coastal region together with waste water, this manual is written for samples of sea water, sea bottom sediments and marine organisms. Radioactive cobalt includes the nuclides of 57 co, 58 Co, 60 Co, etc., the manual deals with them as a whole as 60 Co of long half life. Though 60 Co analysis has become feasible comparatively simply due to scintillation or semi-conductor spectrometry, trace 60 Co analysis is performed quantitatively by co-precipitation or collection into alumina and scintillation spectrometry. However, specific collecting operation and γ-γ coincidence measurement have been required so far. This manual employs 60 Co collection by means of ion-exchange method and measurement with low background GM counting system, to analyze quantitatively and rapidly low level 60 Co. It is primarily established as the standard analyzing method for the survey by local autonomous bodies. It is divided into 4 chapters including introduction sea water, marine organisms, and sea bottom sediments. List of required reagents is added in appendix. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidi Gian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice

  12. Influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the phase formation in Cu-Zn alloys

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kozana; St. Rzadkosz; M. Piękoś

    2010-01-01

    Influence of the selected alloy additions into copper and zinc alloys was investigated in order to find out the possibility of limiting the precipitation of unfavourable phase . The observation of microstructures and strength tests were performed. The results of metallographic and strength investigations indicate positive influence of small amounts of nickel, cobalt or tellurium. The precise determination of the influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the gamma phase formation ...

  13. Influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the phase formation in Cu-Zn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kozana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of the selected alloy additions into copper and zinc alloys was investigated in order to find out the possibility of limiting the precipitation of unfavourable phase . The observation of microstructures and strength tests were performed. The results of metallographic and strength investigations indicate positive influence of small amounts of nickel, cobalt or tellurium. The precise determination of the influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the gamma phase formation will be the subject of further examinations.

  14. Evaluation of cobalt and nickel base materials for sliding and static contact applications in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.; Chang, J.Y.; Galioto, T.A.; Miller, R.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Whitlow, G.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Johnson, R.N.

    1976-01-01

    The paper covers pertinent metallurgical and tribological aspects of three alloys that are being considered for surfaces that must rub while immersed in liquid sodium coolant within a fast breeder reactor system. The alloys are cobalt-base hardfacing alloy type 6, Tribaloy 700, and Inconel 718. Topics discussed include chemistry and microstructure, hardness, and behavior in high-temperature sodium with respect to dynamic friction, diffusion bonding, and corrosion

  15. Dissolution of manganese and cobalt and their deposition on Type 304 stainless steel in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1989-01-01

    Dissolution of manganese and cobalt and their deposition on Type 304 stainless steel in liquid sodium at 833 K for 3.6 x 10 3 ks were examined using a liquid sodium pot. Manganese was easily dissolved in sodium from the iron-manganese alloy specimen and deposited on the steel to form two kind of deposition particles, α-phase (body-centered cubic) composed of iron and γ-phase (face-centered cubic) composed of iron and manganese, respectively. Cobalt which was less easily dissolved than manganese also deposited on the Type 304 stainless steel, giving an iron-cobalt alloy. These three deposition particles corresponded to the precipitation lines of iron-manganese and iron-cobalt phase diagrams at 833 K, respectively. Therefore, the deposition process of manganese or cobalt in sodium was explained as a precipitation process of iron-manganese or iron-cobalt in the solid region of the binary phase diagram. A sodium chromite (NaCrO 2 ) layer was formed on the steel surface. (author)

  16. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.

    1975-01-01

    This patent describes a sintered product having substantially stable permanent magnet properties in air at room temperature. It comprises compacted particulate cobalt--rare earth alloy consisting essentially of a Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase, where R is a rare earth metal. The Co 5 R intermetallic phase is present in an amount of at least 65 percent by weight of the sintered product and the CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase is present in a positive amount having a value ranging up to about 35 percent by weight of the product. The sintered product has a density of at least 87 percent and has pores which are substantially noninterconnecting and wherein the component grains have an average size less than 30 microns

  17. Cobalt source calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10 5 rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10 5 rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10 5 rad/h to 1.073 x 10 5 rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10 6 to 9.27 x 10 5 . This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10 7 rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe 2+ ions ionize to Fe 3+ . When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate

  18. Unithiol - a cobalt antidote

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkes, A.I.; Braver-Chernobul'skaya, B.S.

    1977-06-01

    The blockade of the sulfhydryl groups of the proteins leads to a disturbance of the normal activity of many enzymes and thus of the functioning of the organs and tissue. The search for antidotes against these substances which inactivate the enzymes led to the synthesis of a large group of thiols in the Ukrainian Scientific Research Sanitary Chemical Institute. The most active is sodium dithiol-2,3-dimercaptonpropansulphonate CH 2 SH-CHSH-CH 2 SO 3 Na x H 2 O, named unithiol. Its antidote activity is discussed in detail, especially concerning cobalt intoxication. (HK) [de

  19. Influence of Cobalt Doping on the Physical Properties of Zn0.9Cd0.1S Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Hari Om

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zn0.9Cd0.1S nanoparticles doped with 0.005–0.24 M cobalt have been prepared by co-precipitation technique in ice bath at 280 K. For the cobalt concentration >0.18 M, XRD pattern shows unidentified phases along with Zn0.9Cd0.1S sphalerite phase. For low cobalt concentration (≤0.05 M particle size, d XRDis ~3.5 nm, while for high cobalt concentration (>0.05 M particle size decreases abruptly (~2 nm as detected by XRD. However, TEM analysis shows the similar particle size (~3.5 nm irrespective of the cobalt concentration. Local strain in the alloyed nanoparticles with cobalt concentration of 0.18 M increases ~46% in comparison to that of 0.05 M. Direct to indirect energy band-gap transition is obtained when cobalt concentration goes beyond 0.05 M. A red shift in energy band gap is also observed for both the cases. Nanoparticles with low cobalt concentrations were found to have paramagnetic nature with no antiferromagnetic coupling. A negative Curie–Weiss temperature of −75 K with antiferromagnetic coupling was obtained for the high cobalt concentration.

  20. Influences of the matrix effect in the sensibility of cobalt measurement by atomic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, L.A. d'.

    1977-06-01

    The interferences caused by iron, aluminium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, copper, nickel, zinc, sodium and potassium in the determination of cobalt by atomic absorption, were studied. The concentrations of cobalt were varied in the range of 1 to 800 μg/ml and the concentrations of the interferents in the proportions occuring normally in soils, rocks, sediments, geological material in general, alloys, caustic liquors etc. To study the flame composition effect, the flame region effect and also the effect of different interferent concentrations on the cobalt for each selected spectral line, an air-acetilene flame was utilized. As an application of this study the effect was shown of 'simulated soil matrices' with respect to the interference of iron on cobalt [pt

  1. Cobalt Cardiomyopathy Secondary to Hip Arthroplasty: An Increasingly Prevalent Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel Tilney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty-year-old man experienced worsening heart failure four years following bilateral complicated total hip replacement. His condition was extensively worked up but no underlying pathology was immediately evident. Given the cobalt-chromium alloy component present in the hip arthroplasties, the raised cobalt blood levels, and a fitting clinical picture coupled with radiological findings, the patient underwent right hip revision. Evidence of biotribocorrosion was present on direct visualisation intraoperatively. The patient subsequently experienced symptomatic improvement (NYHA class III to class I and echocardiography showed recovery of ejection fraction. Cobalt exists as a bivalent and trivalent molecule in circulation and produces a cytotoxicity profile similar to nanoparticles, causing neurological, thyroid, and cardiological pathology. Blood levels are not entirely useful as there is no identifiable conversion factor for levels in whole blood, serum, and erythrocytes which seem to act independently of each other. Interestingly cobalt cardiomyopathy is frequently compounded by other possible causes of cardiomyopathy such as alcohol and a link has been postulated. Definitive treatment is revision of the arthroplasty as other treatments are unproven.

  2. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys.

  3. Interfacial properties of immiscible Co-Cu alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egry, I.; Ratke, L.; Kolbe, M.

    2010-01-01

    Using electromagnetic levitation under microgravity conditions, the interfacial properties of an Cu75Co25 alloy have been investigated in the liquid phase. This alloy exhibits a metastable liquid miscibility gap and can be prepared and levitated in a configuration consisting of a liquid cobalt-ri...

  4. Radio cobalt in French rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrechts, A.; Baudin-Jaulent, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The isotopes 58 and 60 of cobalt present in liquid wastes from nuclear plants or from fuel reprocessing plant of Marcoule are fixed in the different compartments of French rivers. The activity levels of radio-cobalt vary according to the sampled compartments nature (bryophyta > immersed plants > sediment > fish). Elsewhere, laboratory experimentations show that the contamination of fish occurs essentially from the water way rather than from food. Cobalt is mainly fixed by kidneys; muscles is no more than 30 % of the total fish activity. (author)

  5. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  6. Electrocatalysts with platinum, cobalt and nickel preparations by mechanical alloyed and CVD for the reaction of oxygen reduction; Electrocatalizadores a base de platino, cobalto y niquel preparados por aleado mecanico y CVD para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M A [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this research, the molecular oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated on electrocatalysts of Co, Ni, Pt and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi and PtCoNi by using H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5 and KOH 0.5 M solutions as electrolytes. The electrocatalysts were synthesized by Mechanical Alloying (MA) and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) processes. For MA, metallic powders were processed during 20 h of milling in a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. For CVD, a hot-wall reactor was utilized and Co, Ni and Pt acetilactetonates were used as precursors. Films were deposited at a total pressure of 1 torr and temperatures of 400-450 C. Electrocatalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Electrocatalysts prepared by mechanical alloying showed a homogeneously dispersed agglomeration of particles with nano metric size. Electrocatalysts obtained by CVD showed, in some cases, non uniform films, with particles of nano metric size, as well. The electrocatalytic performance was evaluated by using the Rotating Disk Electrode technique (RDE). Electrocatalysts prepared by MA showed higher activity than those obtained by CVD. All electrocatalysts were evaluated in alkaline media. Only electrocatalysts containing Pt were evaluated in acid media, because those materials with Co, Ni and their alloys showed instability in acidic media. Most electrocatalysts followed a mechanism for the ORR producing a certain proportion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. All electrocatalysts, exhibited a fair or good electrocatalytic activity in comparison with other similar reported materials. It was found that MA and CVD are appropriate processes to prepare electrocatalysts for the ORR with particles of nano metric size and performing with an acceptable catalytic activity. PtCoNi 70-23-7% by MA and PtCoNi-CVD electrocatalysts showed the highest activity in alkaline media, while in acidic

  7. Low-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of Fe2VAl with Partial Cobalt Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Morelli, Donald T.

    2012-06-01

    Ternary metallic alloy Fe2VAl with a pseudogap in its energy band structure has received intensive scrutiny for potential thermoelectric applications. Due to the sharp change in the density of states profile near the Fermi level, interesting transport properties can be triggered to render possible enhancement in the overall thermoelectric performance. Previously, this full-Heusler-type alloy was partially doped with cobalt at the iron sites to produce a series of compounds with n-type conductivity. Their thermoelectric properties in the temperature range of 300 K to 850 K were reported. In this research, efforts were made to extend the investigation on (Fe1- x Co x )2VAl to the low-temperature range. Alloy samples were prepared by arc-melting and annealing. Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity measurements were performed from 80 K to room temperature. The effects of cobalt doping on the material's electronic and thermal properties are discussed.

  8. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  9. Polarographic methods for the analysis of beryllium metal and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.M.

    1975-10-01

    This report describes polarographic methods for the analysis of beryllium metal and its alloys. The elements covered by these methods are aluminium, bismuth, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, molybdenum, nickel, thallium, tungsten, uranium, vanadium and zinc. (author)

  10. Comparative metallurgical study of thick hard coatings without cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemendot, F.; Van Duysen, J.C.; Champredonde, J.

    1992-07-01

    Wear and corrosion of stellite type hard coatings for valves of the PWR primary system raise important problems of contamination. Substitution of these alloys by cobalt-free hard coatings (Colmonoy 4 and 4.26, Cenium 36) should allow to reduce this contamination. A comparative study (chemical, mechanical, thermal, metallurgical), as well as a corrosion study of these coatings were carried out. The results of this characterization show that none of the studied products has globally characteristics as good as those of grade 6 Stellite currently in service

  11. A paste type negative electrode using a MmNi{sub 5} based hydrogen storage alloy for a nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Watanabe, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Hoshino, H. [Tokai Univ., Kanagawa (Japan). School of Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Different conducting materials (nickel, copper, cobalt, graphite) were mixed with a MmNi{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloy, and negative electrodes for a nickel-metal hydride(Ni-MH) rechargeable battery were prepared and examined with respect to the discharge capacity of the electrodes. The change in the discharge capacity of the electrodes with different conducting materials was measured as a function of the number of electrochemical charge and discharge cycles. From the measurements, the electrodes with cobalt and graphite were found to yield much higher discharge capacities than those with nickel or cobalt. From a comparative discharge measurements for an electrode composed of only cobalt powder without the alloy and an electrode with a mixture of cobalt and the alloy, an appreciable contribution of the cobalt surface to the enhancement of charge and discharge capacities was found. (author)

  12. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posada, Olga M., E-mail: O.M.PosadaEstefan@leeds.ac.uk [Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, Wolfson Centre, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Gilmour, Denise [Pure and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Strathclyde, Thomas Graham Building, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Tate, Rothwelle J., E-mail: r.j.tate@strath.ac.uk [Strathclyde Institute for Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Grant, M. Helen [Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, Wolfson Centre, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p < 0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p < 0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p < 0.05) in apoptosis after a 48 h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions + debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. - Highlights: • Effects of CoCr nanoparticles and Co ions on U937 cells were investigated. • Ions released from wear debris play an important role in cellular response, • Toxicity of Co ions could be related to NO metabolic processes and apoptosis. • CoCr particles were a more effective inducer of apoptosis after cell

  13. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloys for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskawiec, J.; Michalik, R.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys belong to biomaterials which the application scope in medicine increases. Some properties of the alloys, such as high mechanical strength, low density, low Young's modulus, high corrosion resistance and good biotolerance decide about it. The main areas of the application of titanium and its alloys are: orthopedics and traumatology, cardiosurgery, faciomaxillary surgery and dentistry. The results of investigations concerning the corrosion resistance of the technical titanium and Ti6Al14V alloy and comparatively a cobalt alloy of the Vitallium type in the artificial saliva is presented in the work. Significantly better corrosion resistance of titanium and the Ti6Al14V than the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was found. (author)

  14. Phosphorus introduction mechanism in electrodeposited cobalt films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtchenko, Jean-Francois

    1973-01-01

    The cathodic reduction of hypophosphite, phosphite and phosphate ions was studied using chrono-potentiometry and voltammetry. Then cobalt was deposited at constant current from a bath containing one of these three compounds. The current, while giving an electrodeposition of cobalt, also enhances at the same time a chemical deposition of cobalt. It is shown that high coercive forces in cobalt films are much more related to this chemical deposition than to the simple fact that the films contain some phosphorus. (author) [fr

  15. Embrittlement of nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base superalloys by exposure to hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Five nickel-base alloys (Inconel 718, Udimet 700, Rene 41, Hastelloy X, and TD-NiCr), one cobalt-base alloy (L-605), and an iron-base alloy (A-286) were exposed in hydrogen at 0.1 MN/sq m (15 psi) at several temperatures in the range from 430 to 980 C for as long as 1000 hours. These alloys were embrittled to varying degrees by such exposures in hydrogen. Embrittlement was found to be: (1) sensitive to strain rate, (2) reversible, (3) caused by large concentrations of absorbed hydrogen, and (4) not associated with any detectable microstructural changes in the alloys. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement.

  16. Molecular mechanics calculations on cobalt phthalocyanine dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, J.P.A.; Schipper, E.T.W.M.; Piet, P.; German, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to obtain insight into the structure of cobalt phthalocyanine dimers, molecular mechanics calculations were performed on dimeric cobalt phthalocyanine species. Molecular mechanics calculations are first presented on monomeric cobalt(II) phthalocyanine. Using the Tripos force field for the

  17. Transport of cobalt-60 industrial radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Gibson, Wayne

    This paper will deal with safety aspects of the handling of Cobalt-60, the most widely used industrial radio-isotope. Cobalt-60 is a man-made radioisotope of Cobalt-59, a naturally occurring non radioactive element, that is made to order for radiation therapy and a wide range of industrial processing applications including sterilization of medical disposables, food irradiation, etc.

  18. Corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of magnesium alloys in a simulated physiological environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Sajjad

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have attracted great attention as potential materials for temporary implants in uses such as pins, screws, plates and stents. The usage of Mg alloys is appealing as it avoids the need for a follow-up surgery commonly undertaken when implants are constructed out of traditional materials such as titanium alloys, stainless steels and cobalt-chromium alloys. This reduces health care costs and inconvenience for patients. However, the poor corrosion resistanc...

  19. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-based alloys; Analyse spectrographique d'alliages a base d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudin, G.; Blum, P.

    1959-07-01

    The authors describe a spectrographic method for dosing cobalt in cobalt-uranium alloys with cobalt content from 0.05 to 10 per cent. They describe sample preparation, alloy solution, spectrographic conditions, and photometry operations. In a second part, they address the dosing of boron in uranium borides. They implement the so-called 'porous cup' method. Boride is dissolved by fusion with Co{sub 3}-NaK [French] Uranium-Cobalt: il est decrit une methode spectrographique de dosage de cobalt dans des alliages cobalt-uranium pour des teneurs de 0,05 pour cent a 10 pour cent de Co. On opere sur solution avec le fer comme standard interne. Borure d'Uranium: ici encore on opere par la methode dite 'porous cup', le fer etant conserve comme standard interne. Le borure est mis en solution par fusion avec Co{sub 3}NaK. (auteurs)

  20. Accumulation of cobalt by cephalopods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Motokazu

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation of cobalt by cephalopod mollusca was investigated by radiotracer experiments and elemental analysis. In the radiotracer experiments, Octopus vulgaris took up cobalt-60 from seawater fairly well and the concentration of the nuclide in whole body attained about 150 times the level of seawater at 25th day at 20 0 C. Among the tissues and organs measured, branchial heart which is the specific organ of cephalopods showed the highest affinity for the nuclide. The organ accumulated about 50% of the radioactivity in whole body in spite of its little mass as 0.2% of total body weight. On the other hand, more than 90% of the radioactivity taken up from food (soft parts of Gomphina melanaegis labelled with cobalt-60 previously in an aquarium) was accumulated in liver at 3rd day after the single administration and then the radioactivity in the liver seemed to be distributed to other organs and tissues. The characteristic elution profiles of cobalt-60 was observed for each of the organs and tissues in Sephadex gel-filtration experiment. It was confirmed by the gel-filtration that most of cobalt-60 in the branchial heart was combined with the constituents of low molecular weights. The average concentration of stable cobalt in muscle of several species of cephalopods was 5.3 +- 3.0 μg/kg wet and it was almost comparable to the fish muscle. On the basis of soft parts, concentration of the nuclide closed association among bivalve, gastropod and cephalopod except squid that gave lower values than the others. (author)

  1. Looking for New Polycrystalline MC-Reinforced Cobalt-Based Superalloys Candidate to Applications at 1200°C

    OpenAIRE

    Patrice Berthod

    2017-01-01

    For applications for which temperatures higher than 1150°C can be encountered the currently best superalloys, the γ/γ′ single crystals, cannot be used under stress because of the disappearance of their reinforcing γ′ precipitates at such temperatures which are higher than their solvus. Cobalt-based alloys strengthened by refractory and highly stable carbides may represent an alternative solution. In this work the interest was focused on MC carbides of several types. Alloys were elaborated wit...

  2. Cobalt production in RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, P.D.; Purandare, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    At present in RAPS-1 radioisotope Co 60 is produced by irradiating Co 59 in the adjusters which perform the function of regulation of reactivity, power and xenon override. But the manrem expenditure of the crew handling the charge and discharge of the adjusters is going to be prohibitively high. It is therefore proposed to irradiate Co 59 in the fuel channel positions. The physics optimisation study for such irradiation is presented. The burnup penalty and loss of power are estimated to produce the required quantity of Co 60 after optimising the number of cobalt pencils in a bundle and the positions of the cobalt producing channels in the reactor core. (author)

  3. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  4. Chemical and phase composition of powders obtained by electroerosion dispersion from alloys WC-Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putintseva, M.N.

    2004-01-01

    A consideration is given to the dependence of chemical and phase compositions of dispersed powders on the conditions, the medium of electroerosion dispersing and the content of cobalt in an initial alloy. It is shown that dissociation of carbon from tungsten carbide proceeds even on dispersing in liquid hydrocarbon-containing media (kerosene and machine oil). The phase composition is determined to a large extent by a medium of dispersing and a cobalt content in the initial alloy. In all powders complex tungsten-cobalt carbides and even Co 7 W 6 intermetallic compounds are found [ru

  5. Chemical and Phase Composition of Powders Obtained by Electroerosion Dispersion from WC - Co Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putintseva, M. N.

    2004-03-01

    The dependence of the chemical and phase composition of dispersed powders on the mode and medium of electroerosion dispersion and the content of cobalt in the initial alloy is considered. It is shown that the dissociation of carbon from tungsten carbide occurs even in dispersion in liquid hydrocarbon-bearing media (kerosene and industrial oils). The phase composition is primarily determined by the dispersion medium and the content of cobalt in the initial alloy. Compound tungsten-cobalt carbides and even a Co7W6 intermetallic are determined in all the powders.

  6. Friction behavior of cobalt base and nickel base hardfacing materials in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizobuchi, Syotaro; Kano, Shigeki; Nakayama, Kohichi; Atsumo, Hideo

    1980-01-01

    A friction behavior of the hardfacing materials such as cobalt base alloy ''Stellite'' and nickel base alloy ''Colmonoy'' used in the sliding components of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor was investigated in various sodium environments. Also, friction tests on these materials were carried out in argon environment. And they were compared with those in sodium environment. The results obtained are as follows: (1) In argon, the cobalt base hardfacing alloy showed better friction behavior than the nickel base hardfacing alloy. In sodium, the latter was observed to have the better friction behavior being independent of the sodium temperature. (2) The friction coefficient of each material tends to become lower by pre-exposure in sodium. Particularly, this tendency was remarkable for the nickel base hardfacing alloy. (3) The friction coefficient between SUS 316 and one of these hardfacing materials was higher than that between latter materials. Also, some elements of hardfacing alloys were recognized to transfer on the friction surface of SUS 316 material. (4) It was observed that each tested material has a greater friction coefficient with a decrease of the oxygen content in sodium. (author)

  7. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jigang, A.; Liye, Z.; Yisi, L.; Haifeng, W.; Zhifang, W.; Liqiang, W.; Yuanshi, Z.; Xincheng, X.; Furong, L.; Baozeng, G.; Chunfa, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  8. Cobalt 60 commercial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1985-01-01

    The advantage of using cobalt 60 for ionizing treatment is that it has excellent penetration. Gamma plants are also very efficient, in as much as there is very little mechanical or electrical equipment in a gamma irradiation facility. The average efficiency of a gamma plant is usually around 95% of all available processing time

  9. Noble metal alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1985-10-01

    A review of the comparative characteristics and properties of noble metal alloys used for metal-ceramic restorations has been presented. Selection of an alloy for one's practice should be based on long-term clinical data, physical properties, esthetic potential, and laboratory data on metal-ceramic bond strength and thermal compatibility with commercial dental porcelains. Although gold-based alloys, such as the Au-Pt-Pd, Au-Pd-Ag, and Au-Pd classes, may appear to be costly compared with the palladium-based alloys, they have clearly established their clinical integrity and acceptability over an extended period of time. Other than the relatively low sag resistance of the high gold-low silver content alloys and the potential thermal incompatibility with some commercial porcelain products, few clinical failures have been observed. The palladium-based alloys are less costly than the gold-based alloys. Palladium-silver alloys require extra precautions to minimize porcelain discoloration. Palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys may also cause porcelain discoloration, as copper and cobalt are used as colorants in glasses. The palladium-cobalt alloys are least susceptible to high-temperature creep compared with all classes of noble metals. Nevertheless, insufficient clinical data exist to advocate the general use of the palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys at the present time. One should base the selection and use of these alloys in part on their ability to meet the requirements of the ADA Acceptance Program. A list of acceptable or provisionally acceptable alloys is available from the American Dental Association and is published annually in the Journal of the American Dental Association. Dentists have the legal and ethical responsibility for selection of alloys used for cast restorations. This responsibility should not be delegated to the dental laboratory technician. It is advisable to discuss the criteria for selection of an alloy with the technician and the

  10. TEM INVESTIGATIONS OF WC-Co ALLOYS AFTER CREEP EXPERIMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lay , S.; Osterstock , F.; Vicens , J.

    1986-01-01

    Carbide tungsten cobalt alloys were deformed in compression or in three point bending in a temperature range 1000-1350°C and in a stress domain 30-1000MPa. In these conditions, the stress exponent n of WC-Co alloys is a function of only the cobalt volumic ratio and tends towards n = 1 for pure carbide. The apparent activation energy is 550 kj mole-1. T.E.M. investigations on pure carbide deformed at 1450°C show an extensive intragranular deformation. Analysis of these defects have been perfor...

  11. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investment casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength

  12. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli; Møller, Per; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2010-08-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure. The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items. Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these. This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future. Industries may not be fully aware of the potential cobalt allergy problem.

  13. Diffusion of samarium into cobalt in the reduction-diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Nogueira, P. de; Neto, F.B.; Landgraf, F.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of metallic cobalt in samarium-cobalt powders is a major cause for low magnetic properties in magnets. This paper intends to investigate the effect of time and temperature in the microstructure of powders produced by reduction-diffusion. This process, developed for the production of rare earth-transition metal alloys, consists on the reduction of the rare earth oxide with metallic calcium (or calcium hydride) and its subsequent diffusion into the cobalt particle. In the present work, a mixture of samarium oxide, cobalt powder and metallic calcium was heated to 1100 or 1200 C for 2 or 4 hours in a tubular furnace under one atmosphere of purified argon. The material thereof obtained, a sintered mass is disintegrated by aqueous crepitation. The powder was evaluated in terms of its chemical composition, its samarium yield and the intermetallic compounds present. The samarium, oxygen and calcium content of the powders produced were adequate for magnet production. However, despite the massive formation of the SmCo 5 compound after 2 hours at 1100 C, final homogeneity is attained only after 4 hours at 1200 C, with the presence of SmCo 5 and Sm 2 Co 7 and the absence of the Sm 5 Co 19 compound. Also, metallic cobalt and Sm 2 Co 17 were observed in the materials produced after 2 hours at 1100 or 1200 C. (orig.)

  14. Reductive-sulfurizing smelting treatment of smelter slag for copper and cobalt recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of copper and cobalt from smelter slag using reductive-sulfurizing smelting method was performed in this study. The effects of reductive agent (coke, sulfurizing agent (pyrite, slag modifier (CaO and smelting temperature and duration on the extractive efficiencies of Cu, Co and Fe were discussed. The phase compositions and microstructure of the materials, copper-cobalt matte and cleaned slag were determined. The results showed that copper and cobalt contents in cleaned slag could decrease averagely to 0.18% and 0.071% respectively after cleaning. 91.99% Cu and 92.94% Co and less than 38.73% Fe were recovered from the smelter slag under the optimum conditions: 6 wt.% coke, 20 wt.% pyrite and 6 wt.% CaO addition to the smelter slag, smelting temperature of 1350°C and smelting duration of 3h. The addition of CaO can increase the selectivity of Co recovery. The cleaning products were characterized by XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. The results showed that the main phases of copper-cobalt matte were iron sulfide (FeS, geerite (Cu8S5, iron cobalt sulfide (Fe0.92Co0.08S and Fe-Cu-Co alloy. The cleaned slag mainly comprised fayalite (Fe2SiO4, hedenbergite (CaFe(Si2O6 and magnetite (Fe3O4.

  15. Creep fatigue of low-cobalt superalloys: Waspalloy, PM U 700 and wrought U 700

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, B. N.; Rungta, R.; Hopper, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of cobalt content on the high temperature creep fatigue crack initiation resistance of three primary alloys was evaluated. These were Waspalloy, Powder U 700, and Cast U 700, with cobalt contents ranging from 0 up to 17 percent. Waspalloy was studied at 538 C whereas the U 700 was studied at 760 C. Constraints of the program required investigation at a single strain range using diametral strain control. The approach was phenomenological, using standard low cycle fatigue tests involving continuous cycling tension hold cycling, compression hold cycling, and symmetric hold cycling. Cycling in the absence of or between holds was done at 0.5 Hz, whereas holds when introduced lasted 1 minute. The plan was to allocate two specimens to the continuous cycling, and one specimen to each of the hold time conditions. Data was taken to document the nature of the cracking process, the deformation response, and the resistance to cyclic loading to the formation of small cracks and to specimen separation. The influence of cobalt content on creep fatigue resistance was not judged to be very significant based on the results generated. Specific conclusions were that the hold time history dependence of the resistance is as significant as the influence of cobalt content and increased cobalt content does not produce increased creep fatigue resistance on a one to one basis.

  16. Selected aspects of the action of cobalt ions in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnek, Katarzyna; Terpiłowska, Sylwia; Siwicki, Andrzej K

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is widespread in the natural environment and can be formed as an effect of anthropogenic activity. This element is used in numerous industrial applications and nuclear power plants. Cobalt is an essential trace element for the human body and can occur in organic and inorganic forms. The organic form is a necessary component of vitamin B12 and plays a very important role in forming amino acids and some proteins in nerve cells, and in creating neurotransmitters that are indispensable for correct functioning of the organism. Its excess or deficiency will influence it unfavourably. Salts of cobalt have been applied in medicine in the treatment of anaemia, as well as in sport as an attractive alternative to traditional blood doping. Inorganic forms of cobalt present in ion form, are toxic to the human body, and the longer they are stored in the body, the more changes they cause in cells. Cobalt gets into the body in several ways: firstly, with food; secondly by the respiratory system; thirdly, by the skin; and finally, as a component of biomaterials. Cobalt and its alloys are fundamental components in orthopaedic implants and have been used for about 40 years. The corrosion of metal is the main problem in the construction of implants. These released metal ions may cause type IV inflammatory and hypersensitivity reactions, and alternations in bone modelling that lead to aseptic loosening and implant failure. The ions of cobalt released from the surface of the implant are absorbed by present macrophages, which are involved in many of the processes associated with phagocytose orthopaedic biomaterials particles and release pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and prostaglandin.

  17. Microstructural evolution and creep behaviour of the modified 9% Cr steel with boron and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowakowski, P.; Spiradek-Hahn, K.; Brabetz, M.; Zeiler, G.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study the microstructural evolution of the new 9% Cr with boron and cobalt is shown during creep at 650 o C. The minimum creep rates of the new alloy are significantly lower than those of conventional 12 % Cr steel. This is due to the high stability of M 23 C 6 precipitates with respect to the coarsening and the preservation of high dislocation density in the course of creep exposure. (author)

  18. Vergleichende Untersuchungen zum Verbund von Cobalt-Basis-Legierungen und Metall-Keramik-Verbundsystemen

    OpenAIRE

    Herms-Westendorf, Lea Maria

    2017-01-01

    This thesis aims to answer the question: Does the use of bonding agents and cobalt chromium alloys with variable degrees of rigidity have an effect on the bonding strength of metal fused to ceramic systems? The 3 point flexural test of SCHWICKERATH (DIN EN ISO 9693) served as the basis for the studies. Test samples included omitting or including the bonding agent NP Bond® (VITA) and choosing either a more stable (Wirobond® 280) or more flexible dental alloy (Wirobond® C) (BEGO). The used c...

  19. Effect of cobalt on microstructural parameters and mechanical properties of Ni-base single crystal superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takanobu; Imai, Hachiro; Yokokawa, Tadaharu; Kobayashi, Toshiharu; Koizumi, Yutaka; Harada, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The alloying effect of Cobalt (Co) to microstructural parameters and mechanical properties, such as partitioning ratios of alloying elements and creep strength, of Re-bearing Ni-base single crystal superalloys have been investigated. The second generation single crystal superalloys, TMS-82+, Ni-7.8Co-4.9Cr-1.9Mo-8.7W-5.3Al-6.0Ta-2.4Re-0.1Hf, in mass% (8Co) was compared to a Co-free (0Co) and 15 mass% Co (15Co) alloy which had the same chemical composition as TMS-82+ except that Co was changed. It was shown that the partitioning ratios of alloying elements trend to k(=X γ /X' γ )=1, as the content of Co was increased. Furthermore, it was found that there was suitable content of Co for the creep strength under various temperature-stress conditions. (author)

  20. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co 3 O 4 . The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co 3 O 4 phase.

  1. Recovery of Cobalt as Cobalt Oxalate from Cobalt Tailings Using Moderately Thermophilic Bioleaching Technology and Selective Sequential Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a very important metal which is widely applied in various critical areas, however, it is difficult to recover cobalt from minerals since there is a lack of independent cobalt deposits in nature. This work is to provide a complete process to recover cobalt from cobalt tailings using the moderately thermophilic bioleaching technology and selective sequential extraction. It is found that 96.51% Co and 26.32% Cu were extracted after bioleaching for four days at 10% pulp density. The mean compositions of the leach solutions contain 0.98 g·L−1 of Co, 6.52 g·L−1 of Cu, and 24.57 g·L−1 of Fe (III. The copper ion was then recovered by a solvent extraction process and the ferric ions were selectively removed by applying a goethite deironization process. The technological conditions of the above purification procedures were deliberately discussed. Over 98.6% of copper and 99.9% of ferric ions were eliminated from the leaching liquor. Cobalt was finally produced as cobalt oxalate and its overall recovery during the whole process was greater than 95%. The present bioleaching process of cobalt is worth using for reference to deal with low-grade cobalt ores.

  2. EFTF cobalt test assembly results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlins, J.A.; Wootan, D.W.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility during Cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full power days at a power level fo 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal to produce Co-60, and a set of 4 pins with europium oxide to produce Gd-153, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease Osteoporosis. Post-irradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the Co-60 produced with an accuracy of about 5 %. The measured Co-60 spatially distributed concentrations were within 20 % of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average Co-60 measured activity was 4 % less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes Eu-152 and Eu-154 to an absolute accuracy of about 10 %. The measured europium radioisotpe anc Gd-153 concentrations were within 20 % of calculated values. In conclusion, the hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many Fast Flux Test Facility isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate that the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company are very accurate. (author)

  3. Cobalt accumulation and circulation by blackgum trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    Blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.) trees accumulate far greater concentrations of cobalt in mature foliage than do other species on the same site (363 ppM in ash of blackgum, compared with about 3 ppM by mockernut hickory and about 1 ppM by red maple, tulip tree, and white oak). Cobalt concentrations in dormant woody tissues of blackgum also significantly exceed those in the other four species. Inoculation of six blackgums with 60 Co revealed that cobalt remains mobile in the trees for at least 3 years. Foliar concentrations of stable cobalt increase uniformly until senescence. In late August, foliage accounts for only 9 percent of total tree weight but 57 percent of total tree cobalt. Losses of cobalt from trees occur almost entirely by leaf abscission, and the loss rates of weight and cobalt from decomposing litter are similar. Retention of cobalt in the biologically active soil layers perpetuates zones of cobalt concentration created by this species in woodlands

  4. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  5. Long range ordered alloys modified by addition of niobium and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    A long range ordered alloy composition is described consisting essentially of iron, nickel, cobalt, vanadium and a ductility enhancing metal, having the nominal composition (Fe, Ni,Co)/sub 3/(V,M) where M is the ductility enhancing metal selected from the group Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof. Effective amounts of creep property enhance elements selected from the group cerium, niobium and mixtures thereof sufficient to enhance creep properties in the resulting alloy without adversely affecting the fabrication of the alloy

  6. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Development of Alternative Cu-Be Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    metastable FCC state @ Room temp.  Alloying to suppress martensitic transformation  Significant work-hardening associated with the phase... transformation  Existing CoCr alloy rely upon cold- or warm- work to achieve high strength (size dependent!) ● No equivalent to L12- strengthened Ni... strengthened Copper and Cobalt alloy VIM/VAR melting Homogen- ization Hot working >4” dia. Solution treatment Machining Tempering Processing

  7. Friction and wear behavior of Colmonoy and Stellite alloys in sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoh, S.; Mizobuchi, S.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a series of experiments in sodium environment for the research and development of friction and wear resistant material used for the sliding components of sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. The study relates to the friction and wear characteristics of nickel-base alloy, Colmonoy, and cobalt-base alloy, Stellite, with respect to temperature, load, sliding velocity, sliding mode, and sodium flushing. The friction behavior of these alloys in sodium is compared with that in argon

  8. Solid solution strengthening and diffusion in nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamad ur

    2016-07-01

    Nickel and cobalt-based superalloys with a γ-γ{sup '} microstructure are known for their excellent creep resistance at high temperatures. Their microstructure is engineered using different alloying elements, that partition either to the fcc γ matrix or to the ordered γ{sup '} phase. In the present work the effect of alloying elements on their segregation behaviour in nickel-based superalloys, diffusion in cobalt-based superalloys and the temperature dependent solid solution strengthening in nickel-based alloys is investigated. The effect of dendritic segregation on the local mechanical properties of individual phases in the as-cast, heat treated and creep deformed state of a nickel-based superalloy is investigated. The local chemical composition is characterized using Electron Probe Micro Analysis and then correlated with the mechanical properties of individual phases using nanoindentation. Furthermore, the temperature dependant solid solution hardening contribution of Ta, W and Re towards fcc nickel is studied. The room temperature hardening is determined by a diffusion couple approach using nanoindentation and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for relating hardness to the chemical composition. The high temperature properties are determined using compression strain rate jump tests. The results show that at lower temperatures, the solute size is prevalent and the elements with the largest size difference with nickel, induce the greatest hardening consistent with a classical solid solution strengthening theory. At higher temperatures, the solutes interact with the dislocations such that the slowest diffusing solute poses maximal resistance to dislocation glide and climb. Lastly, the diffusion of different technically relevant solutes in fcc cobalt is investigated using diffusion couples. The results show that the large atoms diffuse faster in cobalt-based superalloys similar to their nickel-based counterparts.

  9. Solid solution strengthening and diffusion in nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Hamad ur

    2016-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt-based superalloys with a γ-γ ' microstructure are known for their excellent creep resistance at high temperatures. Their microstructure is engineered using different alloying elements, that partition either to the fcc γ matrix or to the ordered γ ' phase. In the present work the effect of alloying elements on their segregation behaviour in nickel-based superalloys, diffusion in cobalt-based superalloys and the temperature dependent solid solution strengthening in nickel-based alloys is investigated. The effect of dendritic segregation on the local mechanical properties of individual phases in the as-cast, heat treated and creep deformed state of a nickel-based superalloy is investigated. The local chemical composition is characterized using Electron Probe Micro Analysis and then correlated with the mechanical properties of individual phases using nanoindentation. Furthermore, the temperature dependant solid solution hardening contribution of Ta, W and Re towards fcc nickel is studied. The room temperature hardening is determined by a diffusion couple approach using nanoindentation and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for relating hardness to the chemical composition. The high temperature properties are determined using compression strain rate jump tests. The results show that at lower temperatures, the solute size is prevalent and the elements with the largest size difference with nickel, induce the greatest hardening consistent with a classical solid solution strengthening theory. At higher temperatures, the solutes interact with the dislocations such that the slowest diffusing solute poses maximal resistance to dislocation glide and climb. Lastly, the diffusion of different technically relevant solutes in fcc cobalt is investigated using diffusion couples. The results show that the large atoms diffuse faster in cobalt-based superalloys similar to their nickel-based counterparts.

  10. Cobalt 60 availability for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the steady and significant growth in the application of radiation processing to industrial sterilization has been seen. The principal application of this technology is the sterilization of disposable medical products, food irradiation, the irradiation of personal care goods and so on. At present, more than 70 million curies of cobalt-60 supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. have been used for gamma processing in these applications. This is estimated to be more than 80 % of the total cobalt-60 in service in the world. Commercial food irradiation has an exciting future, and as to the impact of food irradiation on the availability of cobalt-60 over the next ten years, two principal factors must be examined, namely, the anticipated demand for cobalt-60 in all radiation processing applications, and the supply of cobalt-60 to reliably meet the expected demand. As for the cobalt-60 in service today, 90 % is used for the sterilization of disposable medical products, 5 % for food irradiation, and 5 % for other application. The demand for up to 30 million curies of cobalt-60 is expected over the next 10 years. Today, it is estimated that over 150,000 tons of spices, fruit and fish are irradiated. The potential cobalt-60 production could exceed 110 million curies per year. Gamma processing application will demand nearly 50 million curies in 1990. (Kako, I.)

  11. Cobalt allergy in hard metal workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, T; Rystedt, I

    1983-03-01

    Hard metal contains about 10% cobalt. 853 hard metal workers were examined and patch tested with substances from their environment. Initial patch tests with 1% cobalt chloride showed 62 positive reactions. By means of secondary serial dilution tests, allergic reactions to cobalt were reproduced in 9 men and 30 women. Weak reactions could not normally be reproduced. A history of hand eczema was found in 36 of the 39 individuals with reproducible positive test reactions to cobalt, while 21 of 23 with a positive initial patch test but negative serial dilution test had never had any skin problems. Hand etching and hand grinding, mainly female activities and traumatic to the hands, were found to involve the greatest risk of cobalt sensitization. 24 individuals had an isolated cobalt allergy. They had probably been sensitized by hard metal work, while the individuals, all women, who had simultaneous nickel allergy had probably been sensitized to nickel before their employment and then became sensitized to cobalt by hard metal work. A traumatic occupation, which causes irritant contact dermatitis and/or a previous contact allergy or atopy is probably a prerequisite for the development of cobalt allergy.

  12. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedwill, M.A.; Glasgow, T.K.; Levine, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures

  13. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  14. Cobalt sorption onto Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1985-06-01

    A laboratory study of cobalt-60 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that cobalt sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Over a pH range of 2 to 9, the distribution coefficient ranged from 2 to more than 10,000 mL/g. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence cobalt sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect on cobalt sorption. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the condition of water at the bottom of the waste trenches, accounts for part of the decrease in cobalt sorption observed with trench waters. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Effects of cobalt on creep rupture properties and dislocation structures in nickel base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.Z.; Jin, T.; Jia, J.H.; Liu, J.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2015-01-01

    The influences of cobalt (Co) on creep rupture lives and dislocation structures in nickel base superalloys with and without rhenium (Re) are investigated. The creep rupture test conditions were high temperature low stress (1100 °C/150 MPa), intermediate temperature and stress (982 °C, 1010 °C) and low temperature high stress (850 °C/586 MPa). The results show that increasing Co content could enhance the creep rupture lives at low and intermediate temperature, and does not degrade the creep rupture lives of alloys at high temperature. In Re-containing alloys, at high temperature low stress (1100 °C/150 MPa), the effects of Co on the dislocation structures are negligible, while at low temperature high stress (850 °C/586 MPa), stacking faults are generated in alloy with 12% Co, and in alloy with 3% Co and free of Co, gamma prime particles are sheared by dislocation pairs. In Re-free alloys, at intermediate temperature and stress (1010 °C/248 MPa), large quantities of stacking faults appear in alloy without Co, while in alloy having 12% Co, gamma prime particles are sheared by dislocation pairs coupled by anti-phase boundary (APB). The gamma prime sheared by stacking faults or by dislocation pairs coupled by APB depends on the competition of stacking faults energy and APB energy which is affected by temperature and the interaction of Re and Co

  16. Electroless Fabrication of Cobalt Alloys Nanowires within Alumina Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Dadvand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of nanowire fabrication based on electroless deposition process is described. The method is novel compared to the current electroless procedure used in making nanowires as it involves growing nanowires from the bottom up. The length of the nanowires was controlled at will simply by adjusting the deposition time. The nanowires were fabricated within the nanopores of an alumina template. It was accomplished by coating one side of the template by a thin layer of palladium in order to activate the electroless deposition within the nanopores from bottom up. However, prior to electroless deposition process, the template was pretreated with a suitable wetting agent in order to facilitate the penetration of the plating solution through the pores. As well, the electroless deposition process combined with oblique metal evaporation process within a prestructured silicon wafer was used in order to fabricate long nanowires along one side of the grooves within the wafer.

  17. Creep deformation of a soft magnetic iron-cobalt alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Fingers, Richard T.; Coate, Jack E.; Dowling, Norman E.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force is in the process of developing magnetic bearings, as well as an aircraft integrated power unit and an internal starter/generator for main propulsion engines. These developments are the driving force for the new emphasis on the development of high saturation, low loss magnets capable of maintaining structural integrity in high stress and high temperature environments. It is this combination of desired material characteristics that is the motivation of this effort to measure...

  18. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Michel; Lemire, Christian

    2002-01-01

    CANDU reactors can produce cobalt-60 very efficiently and with an interesting return on investment. This paper discusses what is needed to convert a CANDU reactor into a cobalt-60 producer: what are the different phases, the safety studies required, the physical modifications needed, and what is the minimum involvement of the utility owning the plant. The past ten years of experience of Hydro-Quebec as a cobalt-60 producer will be reviewed, including the management of the risk of both incident and electricity generation loss, and including the benefits for the utility and its personnel. Originally a simple metal used for centuries as a pigment, cobalt-59 today is transformed into cobalt-60, a radioactive element of unprecedented value. Well known in medicine for cancer treatment, cobalt-60 is also used to sterilize a wide range of disposable medical products used in hospitals and to sanitize pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. Cobalt-60 is proving to be a new and effective solution, in the food sector, for preserving harvests and controlling food-borne diseases, or to advantageously replace certain gases and chemical products which are suspected of being harmful or carcinogenic. There are also other applications, such as: hardening of some plastics, treatment of sewage sludge and elimination of harmful insect populations. With a half-life of 5,3 years, cobalt-60 is a metal not found in nature. It is a radioactive isotope produced by exposing stable nuclei of cobalt-59 to neutrons. One of the best places to find such an important neutron source is a nuclear reactor. High energy gamma rays are then emitted during the process of radioactive decay, where cobalt-60 seeks again its stable state

  19. In vitro profiling of epigenetic modifications underlying heavy metal toxicity of tungsten-alloy and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Ranjana; Xu, Xiufen; Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Olsen, Cara; Mears, David; Caretti, Giuseppina; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten-alloy has carcinogenic potential as demonstrated by cancer development in rats with intramuscular implanted tungsten-alloy pellets. This suggests a potential involvement of epigenetic events previously implicated as environmental triggers of cancer. Here, we tested metal induced cytotoxicity and epigenetic modifications including H3 acetylation, H3-Ser10 phosphorylation and H3-K4 trimethylation. We exposed human embryonic kidney (HEK293), human neuroepithelioma (SKNMC), and mouse myoblast (C2C12) cultures for 1-day and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures for 1-week to 50-200 μg/ml of tungsten-alloy (91% tungsten/6% nickel/3% cobalt), tungsten, nickel, and cobalt. We also examined the potential role of intracellular calcium in metal mediated histone modifications by addition of calcium channel blockers/chelators to the metal solutions. Tungsten and its alloy showed cytotoxicity at concentrations > 50 μg/ml, while we found significant toxicity with cobalt and nickel for most tested concentrations. Diverse cell-specific toxic effects were observed, with C2C12 being relatively resistant to tungsten-alloy mediated toxic impact. Tungsten-alloy, but not tungsten, caused almost complete dephosphorylation of H3-Ser10 in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with H3-hypoacetylation in C2C12. Dramatic H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was found in all cobalt treated cultures with a decrease in H3 pan-acetylation in C2C12, SKNMC and HEK293. Trimethylation of H3-K4 was not affected. Both tungsten-alloy and cobalt mediated H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation were reversed with BAPTA-AM, highlighting the role of intracellular calcium, confirmed with 2-photon calcium imaging. In summary, our results for the first time reveal epigenetic modifications triggered by tungsten-alloy exposure in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures suggesting the underlying synergistic effects of tungsten, nickel and cobalt mediated by changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis and

  20. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  1. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misencik, J. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The heater head tubes of current prototype automotive Stirling engines are fabricated from alloy N-155, an alloy which contains 20 percent cobalt. Because the United States imports over 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country and resource supplies could not meet the demand imposed by automotive applications of cobalt in the heater head (tubes plus cylinders and regenerator housings), it is imperative that substitute alloys free of cobalt be identified. The research described herein focused on the heater head tubes. Sixteen alloys (15 potential substitutes plus the 20 percent Co N-155 alloy) were evaluated in the form of thin wall tubing in the NASA Lewis Research Center Stirling simulator materials diesel fuel fired test rigs. Tubes filled with either hydrogen doped with 1 percent CO2 or with helium at a gas pressure of 15 MPa and a temperature of 820 C were cyclic endurance tested for times up to 3500 hr. Results showed that two iron-nickel base superalloys, CG-27 and Pyromet 901 survived the 3500 hr endurance test. The remaining alloys failed by creep-rupture at times less than 3000 hr, however, several other alloys had superior lives to N-155. Results further showed that doping the hydrogen working fluid with 1 vol % CO2 is an effective means of reducing hydrogen permeability through all the alloy tubes investigated.

  2. Electron backscatter diffraction studies of focused ion beam induced phase transformation in cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.G., E-mail: helen.jones@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd, Claremont House, High St, Lydney GL15 5DX (United Kingdom); Cox, D.C. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A focused ion beam microscope was used to induce cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in a cobalt alloy, of similar composition to that of the binder phase in a hardmetal, in a controlled manner at 0°, 45° and 80° ion incident angles. The cobalt had an average grain size of ~ 20 μm, allowing multiple orientations to be studied, exposed to a range of doses between 6 × 10{sup 7} and 2 × 10{sup 10} ions/μm{sup 2}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to determine the original and induced phase orientations, and area fractions, before and after the ion beam exposure. On average, less phase transformation was observed at higher incident angles and after lower ion doses. However there was an orientation effect where grains with an orientation close to (111) planes were most susceptible to phase transformation, and (101) the least, where grains partially and fully transformed at varying ion doses. - Highlights: •Ion-induced phase change in FCC cobalt was observed at multiple incidence angles. •EBSD was used to study the relationship between grain orientation and transformation. •Custom software analysed ion dose and phase change with respect to grain orientation. •A predictive capability of ion-induced phase change in cobalt was enabled.

  3. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments. The major application is in the health care industry where irradiators are used to sterilize single use medical products. These irradiators are designed and built by MDS Nordion and are used by manufacturers of surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes and other medical products. The irradiator is a large shielded room with a storage pool for the cobalt-60 sources. The medical products are circulated through the shielded room and exposed to the cobalt-60 sources. This treatment sterilizes the medical products which can then be shipped to hospitals for immediate use. Other applications for this irradiation technology include sanitisation of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials and food irradiation. The cobalt-60 sources are manufactured by MDS Nordion in their Cobalt Operations Facility in Kanata. More than 75,000 cobalt-60 sources for use in irradiators have been manufactured by MDS Nordion. The cobalt-60 sources are double encapsulated in stainless steel capsules, seal welded and helium leak tested. Each source may contain up to 14,000 curies. These sources are shipped to over 170 industrial irradiators around the world. This paper will focus on the MDS Nordion proprietary technology used to produce the cobalt-60 isotope in CANDU reactors. Almost 55 years ago MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada developed the process for manufacturing cobalt-60 at the Chalk River Labs, in Ontario, Canada. A cobalt-59 target was introduced into a research reactor where the cobalt-59 atom absorbed one neutron to become cobalt-60. Once the cobalt-60 material was removed from the research reactor it was encapsulated in stainless steel and seal welded using a Tungsten Inert Gas weld. The first cobalt-60 sources manufactured using material from the Chalk River Labs were used in cancer

  4. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L.; Slack, J.

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  5. Preparation of high purity cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Igaki, K.

    1985-01-01

    A combination of anion exchange separation, electrolytic extraction, floating zone refining and dry hydrogen treatment was used to purify cobalt. The effectiveness of each purification process was confirmed by measurements of the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and activation analyses. Proton activation analysis revealed that all the main metallic impurities except iron were effectively removed by a combination of these processes. The effective removal of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon by dry hydrogen treatment was confirmed by activation analyses using 3 He ion beams, proton beams and γ rays. It was found that the rate-controlling step in the decarburization process was a surface reaction. The maximum RRR obtained for the purified specimen was 334, which is higher than previously reported values. (Auth.)

  6. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.; Joshi, Meenal M.; Tijare, Saumitra N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K.; Rayalu, Sadhana Suresh

    2012-01-01

    of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An elevator for cobalt-60 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zaimin; Liang Donghu

    1990-07-01

    The elevator used for cobalt-60 source is a key device in the irradiation industry. It plays an important role in the safety and control of irradiation operation as well as the utilization rate of radiation source. From 1983 to 1986, Beijing Institute of Nuclear Engineering undertook designing of various size irradiation projects for different uses. Since then a kind of cobalt-60 source elevator suited for the irradiator of wet-source-storage has been chosen. It is reliable in the operation and complete in the function. An automatic control circuit brings the systems of cobalt-60 source elevator into an interlock system which ensures the irradiation operation safety. Besides introducing the structural features and performance of this elevator, the conditions of safety interlocking in raising or lowering the cobalt-60 source is also discussed. The discussion is from the safety viewpoint of operating an irradiator and irradiation technology

  8. Transport properties of cobalt at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radharkishna, P.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1965-01-01

    Measurements are made of electrical resistivity, absolute thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline cobalt between 1.2 and 6 K; results are discussed on basis of inter-electronic scattering.......Measurements are made of electrical resistivity, absolute thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline cobalt between 1.2 and 6 K; results are discussed on basis of inter-electronic scattering....

  9. COBALT COMPOUNDS AS ANTIDOTES FOR HYDROCYANIC ACID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVANS, C L

    1964-12-01

    The antidotal potency of a cobalt salt (acetate), of dicobalt edetate, of hydroxocobalamin and of cobinamide against hydrocyanic acid was examined mainly on mice and rabbits. All the compounds were active antidotes for up to twice the LD50; under some conditions for larger doses. The most successful was cobalt acetate for rabbits (5xLD50), which was effective at a molar cyanide/cobalt (CN/Co) ratio of 5, but had as a side-effect intense purgation. Hydroxocobalamin was irregular in action, but on the whole was most effective for mice (4.5xLD50 at a molar ratio of 1), and had no apparent side effects. Dicobalt edetate, at molar ratios of up to 2, was more effective for rabbits (3xLD50) than for mice (2xLD50), but had fewer side effects than cobalt acetate. The effect of thiosulphate was to augment the efficacy of dicobalt edetate and, in mice, that of hydroxocobalamin; but, apparently, in rabbits, to reduce that of hydroxocobalamin. Cobinamide, at a molar ratio of 1, was slightly more effective than hydroxocobalamin on rabbits and also less irregular in its action. Cobalt acetate by mouth was effective against orally administered hydrocyanic acid. The oxygen uptake of the body, reduced by cyanide, is rapidly reinstated when one of the cobalt antidotes has been successfully administered.

  10. Influence of cathodic current density and mechanical stirring on the electrodeposition of Cu-Co alloys in citrate bath

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Trinta de Farias; Aderval Severino Luna; Dalva Cristina Baptista do Lago; Lilian Ferreira de Senna

    2008-01-01

    Cathodic polarization curves of Cu-Co alloys were galvanostatically obtained on a platinum net, using electrolytes containing copper and cobalt sulfates, sodium citrate and boric acid (pH values ranging from 4.88 to 6.00), with different mechanical stirring conditions. In order to evaluate quantitatively the influence of the applied current density and the mechanical stirring on the cathodic efficiency, the alloy composition for the Cu-Co alloy deposition process, and the average deposition p...

  11. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Permenter

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  12. The influence of various cooling rates during laser alloying on nodular iron surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Marta; Makuch, Natalia; Kulka, Michał

    2018-06-01

    The results of research referring to modification of the nodular iron surface layer by laser alloying with cobalt were presented. The aim of this study was to analyze the possibilities of cobalt implementation into the surface layer of nodular iron in various laser heat treatment conditions (by generating different cooling rates of melted surface layer). The modified surface layer of nodular iron was analyzed with OM, SEM, TEM, XRD, EDS and Vickers microhardness tester. The modified surface layer of nodular iron after laser alloying consisted of: the alloyed zone (melted with cobalt), the transition zone and the hardened zone from solid state. The alloyed zone was characterized by higher microstructure homogeneity - in contrast to the transition and the hardened zones. All the alloyed zones contained a dendritic microstructure. Dendrites consisted of martensite needles and retained austenite. Cementite was also detected. It was stated, that due to similar dimension of iron and cobalt atoms, their mutual replacement in the crystal lattice could occur. Thus, formation of phases based on α solution: Co-Fe (44-1433) could not be excluded. Although cobalt should be mostly diluted in solid solutions (because of its content in the alloyed zone), the other newly formed phases as Co (ε-hex.), FeC and cobalt carbides: Co3C, CoC0.25 could be present in the alloyed zones as a result of unique microstructure creation during laser treatment. Pearlite grains were observed in the zone, formed using lower power density of the laser beam and its longer exposition time. Simply, such conditions resulted in the cooling rate which was lower than critical cooling rate. The alloyed zones, produced at a higher cooling rate, were characterized by better microstructure homogeneity. Dendrites were finer in this case. This could result from a greater amount of crystal nuclei appearing at higher cooling rate. Simultaneously, the increased amount of γ-Fe and Fe3C precipitates was expected in

  13. Ternary cobalt-molybdenum-zirconium coatings for alternative energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, Gulmira; Ved', Maryna; Sakhnenko, Nikolay; Koziar, Maryna

    2017-11-01

    Consistent patterns for electrodeposition of Co-Mo-Zr coatings from polyligand citrate-pyrophosphate bath were investigated. The effect of both current density amplitude and pulse on/off time on the quality, composition and surface morphology of the galvanic alloys were determined. It was established the coating Co-Mo-Zr enrichment by molybdenum with current density increasing up to 8 A dm-2 as well as the rising of pulse time and pause duration promotes the content of molybdenum because of subsequent chemical reduction of its intermediate oxides by hydrogen ad-atoms. It was found that the content of the alloying metals in the coating Co-Mo-Zr depends on the current density and on/off times extremely and maximum Mo and Zr content corresponds to the current density interval 4-6 A dm-2, on-/off-time 2-10 ms. Chemical resistance of binary and ternary coatings based on cobalt is caused by the increased tendency to passivity and high resistance to pitting corrosion in the presence of molybdenum and zirconium, as well as the acid nature of their oxides. Binary coating with molybdenum content not less than 20 at.% and ternary ones with zirconium content in terms of corrosion deep index are in a group ;very proof;. It was shown that Co-Mo-Zr alloys exhibits the greatest level of catalytic properties as cathode material for hydrogen electrolytic production from acidic media which is not inferior a platinum electrode. The deposits Co-Mo-Zr with zirconium content 2-4 at.% demonstrate high catalytic properties in the carbon(II) oxide conversion. This confirms the efficiency of materials as catalysts for the gaseous wastes purification and gives the reason to recommend them as catalysts for red-ox processes activating by oxygen as well as electrode materials for red-ox batteries.

  14. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure.......Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure....

  15. Synthesis of new cobalt aluminophosphate framework by opening a cobalt methylphosphonate layered material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zaarour, M.; Pérez, O.; Boullay, P.; Martens, J.; Mihailova, B.; Karaghiosoff, K.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 5100-5105 ISSN 1466-8033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cobalt aluminophosphate * cobalt methylphosphonate * layered materials * crystallic structure * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2016

  16. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  17. Alloys having improved resistance to hydrogen embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, R.D.; Greer, J.B.; Jacobs, D.F.; Berkowitz, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The invention involves a process of improving the hydrogen embrittlement resistance of a cold-worked high yield strength nickel/cobalt base alloy containing chromium, and molybdenum and/or tungsten and having individual elemental impurity concentrations as measured by Auger spectroscopy at the crystallographic boundaries of up to about 1 Atomic percent. These elemental impurities are capable of becoming active and mobile at a temperature less than the recrystallization temperature of the alloy. The process involves heat treating the alloy at a temperature above 1300 degrees F but below the temperature of recrystallization for a time of from 1/4 to 100 hours. This is sufficient to effect a reduction in the level of the elemental impurities at the crystallographic boundaries to the range of less than 0.5 Atomic percent without causing an appreciable decrease in yield strength

  18. Control of carbon nanotube growth using cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yoon; Green, Malcolm L.H.; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2005-01-01

    We have controllably grown carbon nanotubes using uniformly distributed cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst. Cobalt nanoparticles with a uniform size were synthesized by chemical reaction and colloidal solutions including the cobalt nanoparticles were prepared. The cobalt nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on silicon substrates by a spin-coating method. Carbon nanotubes with a uniform diameter were synthesized on the cobalt nanoparticles by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene gas. The density and vertical alignment of carbon nanotubes could be controlled by adjusting the density of cobalt (Co) nanoparticles

  19. Relationship of microstructure to fracture topography in orthopedic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    Two major alloys used for orthopedic implants are 316L stainless steel and a cast cobalt--chromium--molybdenum alloy similar to Haynes Stellite 21. Another alloy that is just being introduced is Ti--6Al--4V. All three of these alloys are used in different conditions with different microstructures. Standard specimens with typical microstructures encountered in orthopedic applications were loaded to fracture in both overload and fatigue modes. Different rates of loading were also used in some cases. The fracture surfaces of these standard samples were analyzed in the Scanning Electron Microscope. An attempt was made to relate the fracture behavior, as evidenced by the fracture typography, to the microstructure of the alloy as revealed by metallography

  20. Mechanical and tribological properties of newly developed Tribaloy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Liu, R.; Patnaik, P.C.; Yao, M.X.; Wu, X.J.

    2007-01-01

    Outstanding combination of mechanical, wear and corrosion performance has been achieved in Laves intermetallic materials, termed Tribaloy alloys. In these two-phase alloys the solid solution provides high mechanical strength and fracture toughness while the Laves intermetallic phase offers excellent wear resistance. However, conventional Tribaloy alloys usually have low tensile strength and fracture toughness compared with ductile materials due to the large volume fraction of Laves phase, which has limited their application in many cases. The present research is aimed at developing advanced Tribaloy alloys with increasing ductility. Two new cobalt base alloys were developed in this research. The specimens were fabricated with a centrifugal casting technique. The material characterization was performed using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), indentation and ball-on-disc tribological techniques

  1. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  2. Deposition and properties of cobalt- and ruthenium-based ultra-thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lucas Benjamin

    Future copper interconnect systems will require replacement of the materials that currently comprise both the liner layer(s) and the capping layer. Ruthenium has previously been considered as a material that could function as a single material liner, however its poor ability to prevent copper diffusion makes it incompatible with liner requirements. A recently described chemical vapor deposition route to amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films could correct this problem by eliminating the grain boundaries found in pure ruthenium films. Bias-temperature stressing of capacitor structures using 5 nm ruthenium-phosphorus film as a barrier to copper diffusion and analysis of the times-to-failure at accelerated temperature and field conditions implies that ruthenium-phosphorus performs acceptably as a diffusion barrier for temperatures above 165°C. The future problems associated with the copper capping layer are primarily due to the poor adhesion between copper and the current Si-based capping layers. Cobalt, which adheres well to copper, has been widely proposed to replace the Si-based materials, but its ability to prevent copper diffusion must be improved if it is to be successfully implemented in the interconnect. Using a dual-source chemistry of dicobaltoctacarbonyl and trimethylphosphine at temperatures from 250-350°C, amorphous cobalt-phosphorus can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The films contain elemental cobalt and phosphorus, plus some carbon impurity, which is incorporated in the film as both graphitic and carbidic (bonded to cobalt) carbon. When deposited on copper, the adhesion between the two materials remains strong despite the presence of phosphorus and carbon at the interface, but the selectivity for growth on copper compared to silicon dioxide is poor and must be improved prior to consideration for application in interconnect systems. A single molecule precursor containing both cobalt and phosphorus atoms, tetrakis(trimethylphosphine)cobalt

  3. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Encapsulated Nickel/Cobalt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Olefin Migration of Allylarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Buss, Kasper Spanggård

    2017-01-01

    Olefin migration of allylarenes is typically performed with precious metal-based homogeneous catalysts. In contrast, very limited progress has been made using cheap, earth-abundant base metals as heterogeneous catalysts for these transformations - in spite of the obvious economic and environmental...... advantages. Herein, we report on the use of an easily prepared heterogeneous catalyst material for the migration of olefins, in particular allylarenes. The catalyst material consists of nickel/cobalt alloy nanoparticles encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon shells. The encapsulated nanoparticles are stable...

  4. Hydrogen storage alloy for a battery; Denchiyo suiso kyuzo gokin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, N.; Takahashi, M.; Sasai, T. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-11-18

    Cobalt contained in a hydrogen storage alloy has an effect to improve a cycle life, but it gives a problem of inferior discharge characteristics. Moreover, cobalt is a rather expensive constituent and therefore, it is desirable to suppress its use as far as possible. This invention aims to present a hydrogen storage alloy with a long service life and high discharge characteristics for a negative electrode of a hydrogen battery without containing a large amount of cobalt. The hydrogen storage alloy of this invention has a composition of a general formula: RNi(a)Co(b)Al(c)Mn(d)Fe(e), where R is a mixture of rare earth elements and La content in this alloy is 25 to 70wt%, 3.7{<=}a{<=}4.0, 0.1{<=}b{<=}0.4, 0.20{<=}c{<=}0.4, 0.30{<=}d{<=}0.45, 0.2{<=}e{<=}0.4, 0.5{<=}b+e{<=}0.7 and 5.0{<=}a+b+c+d+e{<=}5.1. 1 tab.

  5. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  6. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  7. Snapshot of cobalt, chromium and nickel exposure in dental technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettelarij, Jolinde; Nilsson, Sara; Midander, Klara; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli

    2016-12-01

    It is not fully understood where and how people are exposed to sensitizing metals. Much can be learnt from studying occupational settings where metals are handled. To quantify cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) exposure on the skin and in the air, and urine levels, in dental technicians working with tools and alloys that may result in skin and respiratory exposure. The metal skin dose was quantified with acid wipe sampling in dental technicians (n = 13). Air exposure was monitored by personal air sampling. Spot urine samples were collected for 24 h. Metals were analysed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Before work, Co was detected on the skin of 10 participants (0.00025-0.0039 µg/cm 2 ), and Cr (0.00051-0.011 µg/cm 2 ) and Ni (0.0062-0.15 µg/cm 2 ) on the skin of all participants. After a 2-h period without hand washing, CoCr-exposed participants had more Co on the skin (p = 0.004) than non-CoCr-exposed participants. Co was found in 10 air samples (0.22-155 µg/m 3 ), Cr in nine (0.43-71 µg/m 3 ), and Ni in four (0.48-3.7 µg/m 3 ). Metal urine concentrations were considered to be normal. Dental technicians were exposed to Co, Cr and Ni on the skin and through the air, which was not reflected in the urine concentrations in this study. Cobalt skin doses may potentially elicit allergic contact dermatitis and cause sensitization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Monte Carlo study of MLC fields for cobalt therapy machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komanduri M Ayyangar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An automated Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC system has been developed as add-on for the cobalt-60 teletherapy machines available in India. The goal of the present computational study is to validate the MLC design using Monte Carlo (MC modeling. The study was based on the Kirloskar-supplied Phoenix model machines that closely match the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL theratron-80 machine. The MLC is a retrofit attachment to the collimator assembly, with 14 non-divergent leaf pairs of 40 mm thick, 7 mm wide, and 150 mm long tungsten alloy plates with rounded edges and 20 mm tongue and 2 mm groove in each leaf. In the present work, the source and collimator geometry has been investigated in detail to arrive at a model that best represents the measured dosimetric data. The authors have studied in detail the proto-I MLC built for cobalt-60. The MLC field sizes were MC simulated for 2 × 2 cm 2 to 14 × 14 cm 2 square fields as well as irregular fields, and the percent depth dose (PDD and profile data were compared with ROPS† treatment planning system (TPS. In addition, measured profiles using the IMATRIXX system‡ were also compared with the MC simulations. The proto-I MLC can define radiation fields up to 14 × 14 cm΂ within 3 mm accuracy. The maximum measured leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was 3.4% and interleaf leakage observed was 7.3%. Good agreement between MC results, ROPS and IMATRIXX results has been observed. The investigation also supports the hypothesis that optical and radiation field coincidence exists for the square fields studied with the MLC. Plots of the percent depth dose (PDD data and profile data for clinically significant irregular fields have also been presented. The MC model was also investigated to speed up the calculations to allow calculations of clinically relevant conformal beams.

  9. Electrocatalysts of platinum, cobalt and nickel prepared by mechanical alloying for the oxygen reduction reaction in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5M; Electrocatalizadores de Platino, Cobalto y Niquel preparados por Aleado Mecanico para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno en H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Vargas G, J.R. [lNIN, Depto. de Quimica, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Metallic powders of Pt, Co and Nickel were processed by mechanical alloyed and electrocatalysts were synthesized for the oxygen reduction reaction, applicable in fuel cells. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using X-ray Diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloyed powders formed agglomerates that consist of crystalline particles of nano metric size. Its were obtained polarization curves by the Electrode of Rotational Disk technique in a solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5 M, used as electrolyte, to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of mechanically alloyed powders. Tafel graphics were built to determine the kinetic parameters of each electro catalyst. The PtCoNi alloy exhibited the biggest electrocatalytic activity, with the smallest over potential for the oxygen reduction reaction. (Author)

  10. Assessment of cobalt levels in wastewater, soil and vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Key words: Cobalt level, Kubanni River, soil, vegetable, wastewater. INTRODUCTION. Cobalt is ... metals released into the environment from a variety of anthropogenic activities ..... Heavy Metal Stress in Plants, 2nd Edition,. Springer,. United.

  11. Synthesis and phosphatase activity of a Cobalt(II) phenanthroline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAMONI GARAI

    2017-09-19

    Sep 19, 2017 ... Synthesis and phosphatase activity of a Cobalt(II) phenanthroline complex. MAMONI GARAIa ... tion, cobalt complexes have gained importance because of their application as ... 2.3 Physical measurements. Infrared spectrum ...

  12. The physiological effect of cobalt on watermelon cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Naihua; Jin Yafang; Sun Yaochen; Huang Yiming

    1993-01-01

    Cobalt has essential physiological action on both animals and plants. For the latter it can raise plant's nitrogen-fixing ability and saccharine content. Spray of cobalt mixed with other nutritive elements can improve the germinatit of seeds and the yield of fruit. For specifying the nutritive function of cobalt upon watermelon, isotope 60 Co was mixed into a complex leaf nutritive aqua and the regularity of transferring and absorbing cobalt in the watermelon's body was investigated

  13. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  14. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bonding strength between Co-Cr alloy and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2014-02-01

    Novel techniques for creating a strong bond between polymeric matrices and biometals are required. We immobilized polymeric matrices on the surface of biometal for drug-eluting stents through covalent bond. We performed to improve the bonding strength between a cobalt-chromium alloy and a citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix by ultraviolet irradiation on the surface of cobalt-chromium alloy. The ultraviolet irradiation effectively generated hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alloy. The bonding strength between the gelatin matrix and the alloy before ultraviolet irradiation was 0.38 ± 0.02 MPa, whereas it increased to 0.48 ± 0.02 MPa after ultraviolet irradiation. Surface analysis showed that the citric acid derivatives occurred on the surface of the cobalt-chromium alloy through ester bond. Therefore, ester bond formation between the citric acid derivatives active esters and the hydroxyl groups on the cobalt-chromium alloy contributed to the enhanced bonding strength. Ultraviolet irradiation and subsequent immobilization of a gelatin matrix using citric acid derivatives is thus an effective way to functionalize biometal surfaces.

  15. Nonswelling alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  16. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  17. Perfluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine effectively catalyzes water electrooxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Morlanes, Natalia Sanchez

    2014-12-08

    Efficient electrocatalysis of water oxidation under mild conditions at neutral pH was achieved by a fluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine immobilized on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) surfaces with an onset potential at 1.7 V vs. RHE. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and inhibition studies indicate that phthalocyanine molecular species are the operational active sites. Neither free cobalt ions nor heterogeneous cobalt oxide particles or films were observed. During long-term controlled-potential electrolysis at 2 V vs. RHE (phosphate buffer, pH 7), electrocatalytic water oxidation was sustained for at least 8 h (TON ≈ 1.0 × 105), producing about 4 μmol O2 h-1 cm-2 with a turnover frequency (TOF) of about 3.6 s-1 and no measurable catalyst degradation.

  18. Solubility of cobalt in primary circuit solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.; Joyer, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) was measured in PWR primary circuit conditions, in the temperature range 250-350 deg C, and the results were compared with the ones obtained on magnetite and nickel ferrite. As in the former cases, it was found that, in the prevailing primary circuit conditions, the solubility of the cobalt ferrite was minimum at temperatures around 300 deg C, for cobalt as well as for iron. The equilibrium iron concentration is significantly lower than in the case of magnetite. The results are discussed in relation with the POTHY code, based only on thermodynamic laws and data, used for the prediction of the primary circuit chemistry

  19. Total quality management of cobalt-60 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    Total Quality Management of Cobalt-60 sources by a supplier requires a life cycle approach to source management. This covers various aspects, including design, manufacturing, installation, field inspection, source surveillance and return of cobalt-60 sources at the end of their useful life. The Total Quality Management approach demonstrates a strong industry commitment to the beneficial use of gamma technology for industrial irradiation applications in both developed nations and in those nations who are developing their infrastructure and techniques for the beneficial use of this technology. MDS Nordion continues to demonstrate its support and commitment to the industry by developing and implementing state-of-the-art standards for the safe use of cobalt-60 sources

  20. Preliminary studies of cobalt complexation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, P.; Shaw, P.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A relatively non-invasive method has been used to separate complexed from free cobalt-60 in groundwater, using the weak cationic adsorption properties of Sephadex gels, and a mobile phase of natural groundwater. Results show the kinetics of Co complex formation in groundwater to be slow, and that the equilibrium position is affected by temperature, cobalt concentration and the ionic/organic strength of the groundwater. The addition of DAEA cellulose to the groundwater to remove humic material, also removed the majority of organic species which absorb UV at 254 nm, but 45% of the original total organic carbon remained, and the amount of complexed cobalt left in solution was only reduced to 76% of its former concentration. This suggests that the completed Co species separated by the method described in this paper are a mixture of inorganic and organic compounds, and studies are therefore continuing to establish their exact nature. (author)

  1. Preliminary studies of cobalt complexation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, P.; Shaw, P.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A relatively non-invasive method has been used to separate complexed from free cobalt-60 in groundwater, using the weak cationic adsorption properties of Sephadex gels, and a mobile phase of natural groundwater. Results show the kinetics of Co complex formation in groundwater to be slow, and that the equilibrium position is affected by temperature, cobalt concentration and the ionic/organic strength of the groundwater. The addition of DEAE cellulose to the groundwater to remove humic material, also removed the majority of organic species with absorb UV at 254 nm, but 45% of the original total organic carbon remained, and the amount of complexed cobalt left in solution was only reduced to 76% of its former concentration. This suggests that the complexed Co species separated by the method described in this paper are a mixture of inorganic and organic compounds, and studies are therefore continuing to establish their exact nature. (orig.)

  2. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Huang, Tao [Manorville, NY

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  3. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin

    2016-01-01

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future

  4. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future.

  5. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  6. Radiation induced ligand loss from cobalt complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funston, A. M.; McFadyen, W.D.; Tregloan, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Due to the rapid nature of ligand dissociation from cobalt(II) complexes the study of the rate of ligand dissociation necessitates the use of a technique such as pulse radiolysis. This allows the rapid reduction of the corresponding cobalt(III) complex by a reducing radical, such as the aquated electron, to form the cobalt(II) complex. However, to date, no systematic study of either the mechanism of reduction or the influence of the electronic structure on the rate of ligand dissociation has been carried out. In order to understand these processes more fully the mechanism of reduction of a range of related cobalt(III) complexes by the aquated electron and the subsequent rate of ligand dissociation from the resulting cobalt(II) complexes is being investigated. It has been found that a number of processes are observed following the initial rapid reaction of the cobalt(III) complex with the aquated electron. Ultimately ligand loss is observed. Depending upon the complex, the initial processes observed may include the formation of coordinated radicals and electron transfer within the complex. For complexes containing aromatic ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine the formation of a coordinated radical is observed as the initial reduction step. The kinetics of ligand dissociation of these complexes has been determined. The loss of monodentate ligands is fast and has been indistinguishable from the reduction processes when aromatic ligands are also present in the complex. However, for diamine chelates and diimine chelates spectra of the transient species can be resolved

  7. Effect of cold plastic deformation on the properties of semihard-magnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, P.M.; Khazanov, S.A.; Chernyak, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of pass and overall reduction during cold plastic deformation on magnetic properties of the 25KKh15 and 25KFN14 iron-cobalt alloys has been studied. It has been found out that gamma-α transformation which intensity id defined by the deformation temperature occurs during the 25KFN14 and 25KKh15 alloy cold rolling. The pass reduction decrease fostering complete proceeding of #betta#-α transformation is equivalent to the increase of overall reduction

  8. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  9. Properties of amorphous FeCoB alloy particles (abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, S. W.; Wells, S.; Meagher, A.

    1988-01-01

    -ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements of the saturation magnetization, coercivity, and remanence of the particles have been measured. The transition from the amorphous-to-crystalline state has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomagnetometry up to a temperature of 450 °C (see Fig......Amorphous and crystalline alloy particles (0.05–0.5 nm) of FexCoyBz in which the ratio x:y ranges from 0 to 1 have been prepared by the borohydride reduction of iron and cobalt salts in aqueous solution. The structure of the particles has been studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy and x....... 1). It has been shown that the fraction of boron in the alloys (10–35 at. %) is dependent upon the rate of addition of salts to borohydride and the concentration of cobalt present; this in turn influences the crystallinity and magnetic properties . Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted...

  10. EXAFS Determination of the Structure of Cobalt in Carbon-Supported Cobalt and Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Veen, J.A.R. van; Beer, V.H.J. de; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the cobalt present in carbon-supported Co and Co-Mo sulfide catalysts was studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Co K-edge and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities were used to measure the catalytic properties of

  11. Detonation wear-resistant coatings, alloy powders based on Cr-Si

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.Г. Довгаль

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available  Coatings from composition material Cr-Si-B on steel by detonation spraying method are obtained. Composition, structure and tribotechnical characteristics of coatings in comparison with traditional materials on the basis of Ni-Cr and alloy of tungsten and cobalt are investigated.

  12. Corrosion resistance of Zn-Co-Fe alloy coatings on high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodhi, Z.F.; Mol, J.M.C.; Hovestad, A.; Hoen-Velterop, L. 't; Terryn, H.; Wit, J.H.W.de

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion properties of electrodeposited zinc-cobalt-iron (Zn-Co-Fe) alloys (up to 40 wt.% Co and 1 wt.% Fe) on steel were studied by using various electrochemical techniques and compared with zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that with an increase in Co

  13. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...... thermoelastic coefficients and age hardenable low expansion alloys....

  14. NEW SERDP Project: Copper- Beryllium Alternatives Alloys Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    Nitronic60, HBN 304 stainless steel , as well as low friction coating\\liner systems on PH stainless steel substrates • Compression strength and...ChemistryRefining Lath Martensite : Ms≥200°C Nickel: Cleavage Resistance Cobalt: SRO Recovery Resistance Chromium: Corrosion Resistance σuts > 280 ksi σys...against representative steels ). o Compression testing from each of the Cu- and Co-based alloys will be performed per ASTM E 9 o Pin-on-Disk test per

  15. Coating with overlay metallic-cermet alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A base layer of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet) is arc plasma sprayed onto a substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use. A top layer of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then arc plasma sprayed onto the base layer. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base layer serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top layer and the substrate. Otherwise, the 10 protective top layer would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  16. Martensitic transformation in Co-based ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopeček, Jaromír; Yokaichiya, F.; Laufek, F.; Jarošová, Markéta; Jurek, Karel; Drahokoupil, Jan; Sedláková-Ignácová, Silvia; Molnár, Peter; Heczko, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2012), s. 475-477 ISSN 0587-4246. [International Symposium on Physics of Materials, ISPMA /12./. Praha, 04.09.2011-08.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GAP107/10/0824; GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : microstructure * shape memory alloys * neutron diffraction * cobalt alloys Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.531, year: 2012

  17. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prepared material. It was observed that surface modification such as with silica coating on the cobalt ferrite will have significant effect on the structural and magnetic properties. It is also observed that, silica coated nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications (Hong et al., 2013). In this work we have chosen sol-gel ...

  19. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-07-01

    Nano structured metal oxides including TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 have been synthesized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The photocatalytic activity of nano cobalt oxide was then compared with two other nano structured metal oxides namely TiO 2 and Fe 3O 4. The synthesized nano cobalt oxide was characterized thoroughly with respect to EDX and TEM. The yield of hydrogen was observed to be 900, 2000 and 8275 mmol h -1 g -1 of photocatalyst for TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 respectively under visible light. It was observed that the hydrogen yield in case of nano cobalt oxide was more than twice to that of TiO 2 and the hydrogen yield of nano Fe 3O 4 was nearly four times as compared to nano Co 3O 4. The influence of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sputtering on cobalt with noble gas ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.

    1983-01-01

    Single crystals of cobalt have been bombarded with 80 keV Ar + ions and with 80 keV and 200 keV Xe + ions in the [0001] direction of the hcp phase and the [111] direction of the fcc phase. The sputtering yield has been measured as function of target temperature (20 0 C-500 0 C), showing a reduction in sputtering yield for 80 keV Ar + ions and 200 keV Xe + ions, when the crystal structure changes from hcp to fcc. In contrast to this, bombardment with 80 keV Xe + ions results in an increase in sputtering yield as the phase transition is passed. Sputtering yields for [111] nickel are in agreement with the sputtering yields for fcc cobalt indicating normal behaviour of the fcc cobalt phase. The higher sputtering yield of [0001] cobalt for certain combinations of ion mass and energy may then be ascribed to disorder induced partly by martensitic phase transformation, partly by radiation damage. (orig.)

  1. The solubility of metals in Pb-17Li liquid alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.; Feuerstein, H.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility data of iron in the eutectic alloy Pb-17Li which were evaluated from corrosion tests in a turbulent flow of the molten alloy are discussed in the frame of solubilities of the transition metals in liquid lead. It is shown that the solubility of iron in the alloy is close to that in lead. This is also the fact for several other alloying elements of steels. A comparison of all known data shows that they are in agreement with generally shown trends for the solubility of the transition metals in low melting metals. These trends indicate comparably high solubilities of nickel and manganese in the liquid metals, lower saturation concentration of vanadium, chromium, iron, and cobalt, and extremely low solubility of molybdenum. (orig.)

  2. Alloying effect on martensite transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, A.P.; Shlyamnev, A.P.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of cobalt, nickel, molybdenum on the martensite transformation kinetics in stainless steels containing 9 to 13% Cr has been studied. Cobalt in Fe-Cr base alloys decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points without a considerable decrease of the martensite phase amount after the transformation. Nickel reduces the martensite transformation temperature range, the nickel effect being enhanced in the presence of cobalt, which is characterized by a change of the linear dependence Msub(in)=f(%Ni) for a quadratic one. Molybdenum decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points intensively, thus, substantially increasing the residual austenite amount. In the steels investigated Ni and Co decrease, whereas Mo increases, to some extent, the temperature of the reverse a-γ-transformation. The reduction of chromium content from 13 to 9% stimulates the martensite transformation initiation, that is why, in alloys containing 9% Cr, the increase in the contents of Ni, Co., Mo with the martensite structure maintained is possible. A further alloying of steel containing 13% Cr with these elements is rather limited due to the inhibition of the martensite transformation

  3. Genotoxic Changes to Rodent Cells Exposed in Vitro to Tungsten, Nickel, Cobalt and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bardack

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted.

  4. Synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt-iron/cobalt-ferrite soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro Londoño-Calderón, César; Moscoso-Londoño, Oscar; Muraca, Diego; Arzuza, Luis; Carvalho, Peterson; Pirota, Kleber Roberto; Knobel, Marcelo; Pampillo, Laura Gabriela; Martínez-García, Ricardo

    2017-06-01

    A straightforward method for the synthesis of CoFe2.7/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanowires is described. The proposed method starts with a conventional pulsed electrodeposition procedure on alumina nanoporous template. The obtained CoFe2.7 nanowires are released from the template and allowed to oxidize at room conditions over several weeks. The effects of partial oxidation on the structural and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray spectrometry, magnetometry, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the final nanowires are composed of 5 nm iron-cobalt alloy nanoparticles. Releasing the nanowires at room conditions promoted surface oxidation of the nanoparticles and created a CoFe2O4 shell spinel-like structure. The shell avoids internal oxidation and promotes the formation of bi-magnetic soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires. The magnetic properties of both the initial single-phase CoFe2.7 nanowires and the final core/shell nanowires, reveal that the changes in the properties from the array are due to the oxidation more than effects associated with released processes (disorder and agglomeration).

  5. Magnetic properties of three pseudobinary RCo5 alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The field dependence of the magnetization was measured in the magnetically easy and hard directions as a function of composition and temperature in the pseudobinary systems Pr/sub x-/ Sm/sub 1-x/Co 5 , Y/sub x/Nd/sub 1-x/Co 5 , and Gd/sub x/Nd/sub 1-x/Co 5 . The saturation magnetization was determined and the anisotropy constants K 1 and K 2 were calculated from hard direction magnetization data. It was assumed that the net magnetization and anisotropy of the alloys could be divided into components representing the cobalt-cobalt, rare earth-cobalt, and rare earth-rare earth interactions. Data on YCo 5 was employed to account for the effect of the first interaction and the remaining two interactions were separated by means of some simple and physically reasonable assumptions. The resulting rare earth-rare earth magnetization and anisotropy data was then tested to see if it could be described by the single ion model. It was concluded that the single ion model did not describe the rare earth-rare earth interaction well in these alloys. This conclusion is in agreement with published results on light rare earth metals and alloys. It was further observed that some of the characteristics of the rare earth-rare earth interaction could be accounted for by assuming the existence of a band-type interaction between the rare earth atoms. All the alloys which contained Nd were found to exhibit low-temperature magnetization anomalies which were thought to be due to the existence of relatively strong basal plane anisotropy in these alloys

  6. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sánchez-Marcos, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, E. [Spline Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, ESRF, BP 220-38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  7. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera, S.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Palomares, F.J.; Salas, E.; Arce, E.M.; Herrasti, P.

    2014-01-01

    CoNi alloys including Co 30 Ni 70 , Co 50 Ni 50 and Co 70 Ni 30 were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ B /atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni x Co 100-x alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions

  8. Investigations of carbon diffusion and carbide formation in nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Bongartz, K.; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Nickel, H.

    1989-11-01

    The present thesis describes the carburization behaviour of nickel based alloys in heavily carburizing environments. The mechanisms of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in NiCr alloys with and without ternary additions of iron, cobalt or molybdenum have been investigated. Using the results of carburization experiments, a mathematical model which describes carbon diffusion and carbide formation, was developed. The simulation of the carburization process was carried out by an iterative calculation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in the alloy. An accurate description of the carbon profiles as a function of time became possible by using a finite-difference calculation. (orig.) [de

  9. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: influence of cobalt dispersion and titanium oxides promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azib, H

    1996-04-10

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of Sol-Gel preparation parameters which occur in silica supported cobalt catalysts synthesis. These catalysts are particularly used for the waxes production in natural gas processing. The solids have been characterized by several techniques: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), programmed temperature reduction (TPR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), Magnetism, thermodesorption of H{sub 2} (TPD). The results indicate that the control of the cobalt dispersion and oxide phases nature is possible by modifying Sol-Gel parameters. The catalytic tests in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were conducted on a pilot unit under pressure (20 atm) and suggested that turnover rates were independent of Co crystallite size, Co phases in the solids (Co deg., cobalt silicate) and titanium oxide promotion. On the other methane, the C{sub 3}{sup +} hydrocarbon selectivity is increased with increasing crystallite size. Inversely, the methane production is favoured by very small crystallites, cobalt silicate increase and titanium addition. However, the latter, used as a cobalt promoter, has a benefic effect on the active phase stability during the synthesis. (author). 149 refs., 102 figs., 71 tabs.

  10. Electrocatalytic performance evaluation of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt oxide thin films for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, P. T.; Lokhande, A. C.; Pawar, B. S.; Gang, M. G.; Jo, Eunjin; Go, Changsik; Suryawanshi, M. P.; Pawar, S. M.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2018-01-01

    The development of an inexpensive, stable, and highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for the practical application of water splitting. Herein, we have synthesized an electrodeposited cobalt hydroxide on nickel foam and subsequently annealed in an air atmosphere at 400 °C for 2 h. In-depth characterization of all the films using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) techniques, which reveals major changes for their structural, morphological, compositional and electrochemical properties, respectively. The cobalt hydroxide nanosheet film shows high catalytic activity with 290 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm-2 and 91 mV dec-1 Tafel slope and robust stability (24 h) for OER in 1 M KOH electrolyte compared to cobalt oxide (340 mV). The better OER activity of cobalt hydroxide in comparison to cobalt oxide originated from high active sites, enhanced surface, and charge transport capability.

  11. Control and optimization of baths for electrodeposition of Co-Mo-B amorphous alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prasad

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization and control of an electrodeposition process for depositing boron-containing amorphous metallic layer of cobalt-molybdenum alloy onto a cathode from an electrolytic bath having cobalt sulfate, sodium molybdate, boron phosphate, sodium citrate, 1-dodecylsulfate-Na, ammonium sulfate and ammonia or sulfuric acid for pH adjustments has been studied. Detailed studies on bath composition, pH, temperature, mechanical agitation and cathode current density have led to optimum conditions for obtaining satisfactory alloy deposits. These alloys were found to have interesting properties such as high hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance and also sufficient ductility. A voltammetric method for automatic monitoring and control of the process has been proposed.

  12. A computer controlled tele-cobalt unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A computer controlled cobalt treatment unit was commissioned for treating patients in January 1980. Initially the controlling computer was a minicomputer, but now the control of the therapy unit is by a microcomputer. The treatment files, which specify the movement and configurations necessary to deliver the prescribed dose, are produced on the minicomputer and then transferred to the microcomputer using minitape cartridges. The actual treatment unit is based on a standard cobalt unit with a few additional features e.g. the drive motors can be controlled either by the computer or manually. Since the treatment unit is used for both manual and automatic treatments, the operational procedure under computer control is made to closely follow the manual procedure for a single field treatment. The necessary safety features which protect against human, hardware and software errors as well as the advantages and disadvantages of computer controlled radiotherapy are discussed

  13. Process for obtaining cobalt and lanthanum nickelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapcov, V.; Samusi, N.; Gulea, A.; Horosun, I.; Stasiuc, V.; Petrenco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to the process for obtaining polycrystalline ceramics of cobalt and lanthanum nickelate with the perovskite structure from coordinative hetero metallic compounds. The obtained products can be utilized in the industry in the capacity of catalysts. Summary of the invention consists in obtaining polycrystalline ceramics LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure by pyrolysis of the parent compounds, namely, the coordinative hetero metallic compounds of the lanthanum cobalt or lanthanum nickel. The pyrolysis of the parent compound runs during one hour at 800 C. The technical result of the invention consists in lowering the temperature of the parent compound pyrolysis containing the precise ratio of metals necessary for ceramics obtaining

  14. Cobalt oxides from crystal chemistry to physics

    CERN Document Server

    Raveau, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Unparalleled in the breadth and depth of its coverage of all important aspects, this book systematically treats the electronic and magnetic properties of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric cobaltites in both ordered and disordered phases. Authored by a pioneer and a rising star in the field, the monograph summarizes, organizes and streamlines the otherwise difficult-to-obtain information on this topic. An introductory chapter sets forth the crystal chemistry of cobalt oxides to lay the groundwork for an understanding of the complex phenomena observed in this materials class. Special emphasis is placed on a comprehensive discussion of cobaltite physical properties in different structural families. Providing a thorough introduction to cobalt oxides from a chemical and physical viewpoint as a basis for understanding their intricacies, this is a must-have for both experienced researchers as well as entrants to the field.

  15. Superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to superconductors having high critical currents. The superconductor described comprises an alloy consisting of a matrix of a Type II superconductor which is a homogeneous mixture of 50 to 95 at.% Pb and 5 to 40 at.%Bi and/or 10 to 50 at.%In. Dispersed in the matrix is a material to provide pinning centres comprising from 0.01% to 20% by volume of the alloy; this material is a stable discontinuous phase of discrete crystalline particles of Cu, Mn, Te, Se, Ni, Ca, Cr, Ce, Ge or La, either in the form of the element or a compound with a component of the matrix. These particles should have an average diameter of not more than 2μ. A method for making this alloy is described. (U.K.)

  16. Structural and magnetic characteristics of PVA/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-composites prepared via mechanical alloying method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, S.; Ataie, A., E-mail: aataie@ut.ac.ir

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Single phase CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-particles synthesized in one step by mechanical alloying. • PVA/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nano-composites were fabricated via mechanical milling. • FTIR confirmed the interaction between PVA and magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles. • Increasing in milling time and PVA amount led to well dispersion of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this research, polyvinyl alcohol/cobalt ferrite nano-composites were successfully synthesized employing a two-step procedure: the spherical single-phase cobalt ferrite of 20 ± 4 nm mean particle size was synthesized via mechanical alloying method and then embedded into polymer matrix by intensive milling. The results revealed that increase in polyvinyl alcohol content and milling time causes cobalt ferrite particles disperse more homogeneously in polymer matrix, while the mean particle size and shape of cobalt ferrite have not been significantly affected. Transmission electron microscope images indicated that polyvinyl alcohol chains have surrounded the cobalt ferrite nano-particles; also, the interaction between polymer and cobalt ferrite particles in nano-composite samples was confirmed. Magnetic properties evaluation showed that saturation magnetization, coercivity and anisotropy constant values decreased in nano-composite samples compared to pure cobalt ferrite. However, the coercivity values of related nano-composite samples enhanced by increasing PVA amount due to domain wall mechanism.

  17. Photoionization of cobalt impuritiesin zinc oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivanov, V.; Godlewski, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 9 (2015), s. 1988-1992 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : absorption band * cobalt * photoionization * electron spin resonance * pulsed mode * ZnO Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  18. Speciation studies of cobalt in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Sudersanan, M.; Iyer, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent results on the speciation of cobalt in simulated and actual sea water is reported using ion exchangers. The influence of magnesium ions in affecting the composition of ion exchangers and subsequent interpretation of the results is discussed. The results indicated that Co +2 may predominate in both the simulated and actual sea water and the presence of other constituents in sea water does not affect the nature of complex species present. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  19. Literature study on the physiology of cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzberger, A.

    1986-12-01

    This literature study analyses the metabolism of cobalt in the human body, focussing on its resorption and the influence of various parameters like its chemical form, antagonisms, etc. on the level of resorption rate. The value currently recommended by ICRP for resorption rates (f 1 factor) of 0,3 or 0,05 for man is examined for its confirmation or non-confirmation in literature. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Enhanced magnetocrystalline anisotropy in deposited cobalt clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastham, D.A.; Denby, P.M.; Kirkman, I.W. [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Harrison, A.; Whittaker, A.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-28

    The magnetic properties of nanomaterials made by embedding cobalt nanocrystals in a copper matrix have been studied using a SQUID magnetometer. The remanent magnetization at temperatures down to 1.8 K and the RT (room temperature) field-dependent magnetization of 1000- and 8000-atom (average-size) cobalt cluster samples have been measured. In all cases it has been possible to relate the morphology of the material to the magnetic properties. However, it is found that the deposited cluster samples contain a majority of sintered clusters even at cobalt concentrations as low as 5% by volume. The remanent magnetization of the 8000-atom samples was found to be bimodal, consisting of one contribution from spherical particles and one from touching (sintered) clusters. Using a Monte Carlo calculation to simulate the sintering it has been possible to calculate a size distribution which fits the RT superparamagnetic behaviour of the 1000-atom samples. The remanent magnetization for this average size of clusters could then be fitted to a simple model assuming that all the nanoparticles are spherical and have a size distribution which fits the superparamagnetic behaviour. This gives a value for the potential energy barrier height (for reversing the spin direction) of 2.0 {mu}eV/atom which is almost four times the accepted value for face-centred-cubic bulk cobalt. The remanent magnetization for the spherical component of the large-cluster sample could not be fitted with a single barrier height and it is conjectured that this is because the barriers change as a function of cluster size. The average value is 1.5 {mu}eV/atom but presumably this value tends toward the bulk value (0.5 {mu}eV/atom) for the largest clusters in this sample. (author)

  1. Base-metal dental casting alloy biocompatibility assessment using a human-derived 3D oral mucosal model

    OpenAIRE

    MORAN, GARY; MC GINLEY, EMMA LOUISE; FLEMING, GARRY

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys used in fixed prosthodontics have been associated with type IV nickel-induced hypersensitivity. We hypothesized the full-thickness human-derived oral mucosa model employed for biocompatibility testing of base-metal dental alloys would provide insights into mechanisms of nickel-induced toxicity. Primary oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts were seeded onto Alloderm? and maintained until full-thickness was achieved prior to Ni-Cr and cobalt-chr...

  2. Uptake of radionuclides caesium and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, P.; Foldesova, M.

    1995-01-01

    By means of chemical treatment ammonium, potassium, sodium and H-form of zeolite were prepared. The chemical modifications of zeolite were carried out with: 2M solution of NaNO 3 , NH 4 NO 3 , KNO 3 ; 0,1M solution of HCl; NaOH solution of different concentration. The method of model radioactive solution was used to find the sorption ability for cesium and cobalt every modified zeolite. The model solution were 0.05M solution of cobalt labelled by 60 Co or cesium labelled by 137 Cs. The highest sorption ability was observed for zeolite modified by NaOH. The influence of pH on uptake of cesium and cobalt by modified zeolite was searched as well. The experimental data (leaching tests, compressive strength measurement and porosity) were measured for the case the Cs and Cs from model water solution and radioactive waste water were up taken on chemically modified zeolite and were subsequently incorporated into cement casts on blast furnace cement slags basis. The leachability was tested in water, in basis solution and in acid solution. The leachability in water and basic solution was negligible, in acid solution it was less than 4% which is inside of value of applied measure method. The compressive strength, porosity and leaching experiment are hopefully and show good mechanical stability and good retention of observed radionuclides in samples exposed in leaching solutions. (J.K.)

  3. Uptake of radionuclides caesium and cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukac, P; Foldesova, M [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    By means of chemical treatment ammonium, potassium, sodium and H-form of zeolite were prepared. The chemical modifications of zeolite were carried out with: 2M solution of NaNO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}; 0,1M solution of HCl; NaOH solution of different concentration. The method of model radioactive solution was used to find the sorption ability for cesium and cobalt every modified zeolite. The model solution were 0.05M solution of cobalt labelled by {sup 60}Co or cesium labelled by {sup 137}Cs. The highest sorption ability was observed for zeolite modified by NaOH. The influence of pH on uptake of cesium and cobalt by modified zeolite was searched as well. The experimental data (leaching tests, compressive strength measurement and porosity) were measured for the case the Cs and Cs from model water solution and radioactive waste water were up taken on chemically modified zeolite and were subsequently incorporated into cement casts on blast furnace cement slags basis. The leachability was tested in water, in basis solution and in acid solution. The leachability in water and basic solution was negligible, in acid solution it was less than 4% which is inside of value of applied measure method. The compressive strength, porosity and leaching experiment are hopefully and show good mechanical stability and good retention of observed radionuclides in samples exposed in leaching solutions. (J.K.).

  4. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--cobalt permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high-temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating cobalt--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--cobalt magnets, sprayed from samarium-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million gauss-oersteds and coercive forces of approximately 6000 oersteds. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates. (auth)

  5. The cobalt radioactive isotopes in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    For the year 1993 the total activity released in cobalt is 69 GBq for the whole of nuclear power plants. The part of activity in cobalt for La Hague in 1993 is 8 GBq of 58 Co and 2 GBq of 60 Co. The radioactive isotopes released by nuclear power plants or the reprocessing plant of La Hague under liquid effluents are shared by half between 58 Co and 60 Co. The exposure to sealed sources is the most important risk for the cobalt. The risk of acute exposure can associate a local irradiation of several decades of grays inducing a radiological burns, deep burn to treat in surgery by resection or graft even amputation. A global irradiation of organism for several grays induces an acute irradiation syndrome, often serious. At long term the stochastic effects are represented by leukemia and radio-induced cancers. The increase of probability of their occurrence is 1% by sievert. We must remind that the natural spontaneous probability is 25%. (N.C.)

  6. Cobalt triggers necrotic cell death and atrophy in skeletal C2C12 myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovetta, Francesca; Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Faggi, Fiorella; Catalani, Simona; Apostoli, Pietro; Fanzani, Alessandro; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Severe poisoning has recently been diagnosed in humans having hip implants composed of cobalt–chrome alloys due to the release of particulate wear debris on polyethylene and ceramic implants which stimulates macrophagic infiltration and destroys bone and soft tissue, leading to neurological, sensorial and muscular impairments. Consistent with this premise, in this study, we focused on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of Co(II) ions on skeletal muscle using mouse skeletal C2C12 myotubes as an in vitro model. As detected using propidium iodide incorporation, increasing CoCl 2 doses (from 5 to 200 μM) affected the viability of C2C12 myotubes, mainly by cell necrosis, which was attenuated by necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of the necroptotic branch of the death domain receptor signaling pathway. On the other hand, apoptosis was hardly detectable as supported by the lack of caspase-3 and -8 activation, the latter resulting in only faint activation after exposure to higher CoCl 2 doses for prolonged time points. Furthermore, CoCl 2 treatment resulted in atrophy of the C2C12 myotubes which was characterized by the increased expression of HSP25 and GRP94 stress proteins and other typical 'pro-atrophic molecular hallmarks, such as early activation of the NF-kB pathway and down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation, followed by the activation of the proteasome and autophagy systems. Overall, these results suggested that cobalt may impact skeletal muscle homeostasis as an inducer of cell necrosis and myofiber atrophy. - Highlights: • The effects of cobalt on muscle myofibers in vitro were investigated. • Cobalt treatment mainly causes cell necrosis in skeletal C2C12 myotubes. • Cobalt impacts the PI3K/AKT and NFkB pathways and induces cell stress markers. • Cobalt induces atrophy of C2C12 myotubes through the activation of proteasome and autophagy systems. • Co treatment triggers NF-kB and PI3K/AKT pathways in C2C12 myotubes

  7. Cobalt triggers necrotic cell death and atrophy in skeletal C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovetta, Francesca [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy); Stacchiotti, Alessandra [Institute of Human Anatomy, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Faggi, Fiorella [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy); Catalani, Simona; Apostoli, Pietro [Unit of Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Fanzani, Alessandro, E-mail: fanzani@med.unibs.it [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy); Aleo, Maria Francesca, E-mail: aleo@med.unibs.it [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy)

    2013-09-01

    Severe poisoning has recently been diagnosed in humans having hip implants composed of cobalt–chrome alloys due to the release of particulate wear debris on polyethylene and ceramic implants which stimulates macrophagic infiltration and destroys bone and soft tissue, leading to neurological, sensorial and muscular impairments. Consistent with this premise, in this study, we focused on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of Co(II) ions on skeletal muscle using mouse skeletal C2C12 myotubes as an in vitro model. As detected using propidium iodide incorporation, increasing CoCl{sub 2} doses (from 5 to 200 μM) affected the viability of C2C12 myotubes, mainly by cell necrosis, which was attenuated by necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of the necroptotic branch of the death domain receptor signaling pathway. On the other hand, apoptosis was hardly detectable as supported by the lack of caspase-3 and -8 activation, the latter resulting in only faint activation after exposure to higher CoCl{sub 2} doses for prolonged time points. Furthermore, CoCl{sub 2} treatment resulted in atrophy of the C2C12 myotubes which was characterized by the increased expression of HSP25 and GRP94 stress proteins and other typical 'pro-atrophic molecular hallmarks, such as early activation of the NF-kB pathway and down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation, followed by the activation of the proteasome and autophagy systems. Overall, these results suggested that cobalt may impact skeletal muscle homeostasis as an inducer of cell necrosis and myofiber atrophy. - Highlights: • The effects of cobalt on muscle myofibers in vitro were investigated. • Cobalt treatment mainly causes cell necrosis in skeletal C2C12 myotubes. • Cobalt impacts the PI3K/AKT and NFkB pathways and induces cell stress markers. • Cobalt induces atrophy of C2C12 myotubes through the activation of proteasome and autophagy systems. • Co treatment triggers NF-kB and PI3K/AKT pathways in C2C12 myotubes.

  8. Evaluation and comparison of castability between an indigenous and imported Ni-Cr alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Ganesh; Padmanabhan, T V; Ariga, Padma; Subramanian, R

    2011-01-01

    Since 1907 casting restorations have been in use in dentistry. Numerous companies have been manufacturing and marketing base metal alloys. Gold was a major component of casting alloys. But alloys with less than 65% gold tarnished easily and the increase in cost of gold post-1970s lead to the revival of base metal alloys such as nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys which were in use since 1930s. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the castability between an indigenous alloy and an imported alloy, as imported base metal alloys are considered to be expensive for fabrication of crowns and bridges. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the castability (for the accurate fabrication of crowns and bridges) between an indigenous base metal alloy-Non-ferrous Materials Technology Development Centre (NFTDC), Hyderabad (Alloy A) -and an imported base metal alloys (Alloy B). Castability measurement was obtained by counting the number of completely formed line segments surrounding the 81 squares in the pattern and later calculating the percentage values. The percentage obtained was taken as the castability value for a particular base metal alloy. The percentage of castability was determined by counting only the number of completely cast segments in a perfect casting (81 × 2 = 162), and then multiplying the resulting fraction by 100 to give the percentage completeness. The Student t-test was used. When the castability of alloys A and B was compared, the calculated value was less than the tabular value (1.171 indigenous alloy is on par with the imported alloy.

  9. Measurement for cobalt target activity and its axial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingyuan; Chen Zigen.

    1985-01-01

    Cobalt target activity and its axial distribution are measured in process of producing radioactive isotopes 60 Co by irradiation in HFETR. Cobalt target activity is obtained with measured data at 3.60 m and 4.60 m, relative axial distribution of cobalt target activity is obtained with one at 30 cm, and axial distribution of cobalt target activity(or specific activity) is obtained with both of data. The difference between this specific activity and measured result for 60 Co teletherapy sources in the end is less than +- 5%

  10. Plasma boriding of a cobalt–chromium alloy as an interlayer for nanostructured diamond growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Jubinsky, Matthew; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Metal-boride layer creates a compatible surface for NSD deposition. • PECVD boriding on CoCrMo produces robust metal-boride layer. • Deposition temperature comparison shows 750 °C boriding masks surface cobalt. • EDS shows boron diffusion as well as deposition. • Nanoindentation hardness of CoCrMo substantially increases after boriding. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings can potentially improve the wear resistance of cobalt–chromium medical implant surfaces, but the high cobalt content in these alloys acts as a catalyst to form graphitic carbon. Boriding by high temperature liquid baths and powder packing has been shown to improve CVD diamond compatibility with cobalt alloys. We use the microwave plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD process to deposit interlayers composed primarily of the borides of cobalt and chromium. The use of diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) in the plasma feedgas allows for the formation of a robust boride interlayer for suppressing graphitic carbon during subsequent CVD of nano-structured diamond (NSD). This metal–boride interlayer is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings on a CoCrMo alloy. Migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer is significantly reduced and undetectable on the surface of the subsequently-grown NSD coating. The effects of PECVD boriding are compared for a range of substrate temperatures and deposition times and are evaluated using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Boriding of CoCrMo results in adhered nanostructured diamond coatings with low surface roughness.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of inorganic cobalt and a vitamin B12 supplement in the Thoroughbred horse: Differentiating cobalt abuse from supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, L L; Ridd, Z; Fenwick, S; Hincks, P; Paine, S W

    2018-05-01

    While cobalt is an essential micronutrient for vitamin B 12 synthesis in the horse, at supraphysiological concentrations, it has been shown to enhance performance in human subjects and rats, and there is evidence that its administration in high doses to horses poses a welfare threat. Animal sport regulators currently control cobalt abuse via international race day thresholds, but this work was initiated to explore means of potentially adding to application of those thresholds since cobalt may be present in physiological concentrations. To devise a scientific basis for differentiation between presence of cobalt from bona fide supplementation and cobalt doping through the use of ratios. Six Thoroughbred horses were given 10 mL vitamin B 12 /cobalt supplement (Hemo-15 ® ; Vetoquinol, Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, UK., 1.5 mg B 12 , 7 mg cobalt gluconate = 983 μg total Co) as an i.v. bolus then an i.v. infusion (15 min) of 100 mg cobalt chloride (45.39 mg Co) 6 weeks later. Pre-and post-administration plasma and urine samples were analysed for cobalt and vitamin B 12 . Urine and plasma samples were analysed for vitamin B 12 using an immunoassay and cobalt concentrations were measured via ICP-MS. Baseline concentrations of cobalt in urine and plasma for each horse were subtracted from their cobalt concentrations post-administration for the PK analysis. Compartmental analysis was used for the determination of plasma PK parameters for cobalt using commercially available software. On administration of a vitamin B 12 /cobalt supplement, the ratio of cobalt to vitamin B 12 in plasma rapidly increased to approximately 3 and then rapidly declined below a ratio of 1 and then back to near baseline over the next week. On administration of 100 mg cobalt chloride, the ratio initially exceeded 10 in plasma and then declined with the lower 95% confidence interval remaining above a ratio of 1 for 7 days. For two horses with extended sampling, the plasma ratio remained above one for

  12. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  13. A novel method to synthesize cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires from cobalt (Co) nanobowls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Madhavi, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method suitable for the synthesis of the cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires at targeted regions is presented in this report. Cobalt (Co) nanobowls synthesized by colloidal crystal directed assembly were transformed into Co3O4 nanowires by a simple heat treatment process. Co nanobowls exhibited...... a two phase (h.c.p. + f.c.c.) microstructure while single phase microstructure was observed for Co3O4 nanowires. Ferromagnetic Co nanobowls showed a dependence of coercivity on bowl size while Co3O4 exhibited weak ferromagnetic behavior....

  14. Study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailova, M.M.; Egorova, L.A.; Khamidov, B.O.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel. The condition of cobalt in various rate of oxidation in acrylamide aqueous solutions was studied. The concentration conditions of stability of system Co(II)-Co(III) were defined. The composition of coordination compounds of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel was determined.

  15. Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Laser Synthesized Cobalt Based Powder on Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesina, O. S.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Pityana, S. L.; Oloruntoba, D. T.

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of titanium alloys when used for various dynamic offshore components has been a major concern of titanium drilling risers in deepwater energy extraction. A way of achieving specified requirement is the development of coatings suitable to protect the base material against corrosion. In this work, laser cladding technique which is known as a leading edge due to its distinctive properties and outcomes was used in synthesizing Co-based powder on titanium alloy. The processing parameters used were laser power of 900W; scan speed of 0.6 to 1.2 m/min; powderfeedrate1.0g/min;beamspotsize3mm;gasflowrate1.2L/min.The effects of cobalt addition and laser parameters on corrosion behavior of laser clad Ti6AL4V coating in 0.5M sulfuric medium were investigated using linear potentiodynamic polarization. The changes in microstructure and corrosion behavior were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) while the X –ray diffraction (XRD) indicates the intermetallics in the coatings. Results showed that the coatings displayed good metallurgical bonding with dendritic formations between the coatings and the substrate. The anodic current density increased with lower scan speed. However, the corrosion current densities of laser-clad samples were lower than Ti6Al4V alloy.

  16. Microstructure and tribological property of nanocrystalline Co–W alloy coating produced by dual-pulse electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Fenghua; Huang Ping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The nanocrystalline Co–W alloy coating were produced by dual-pulse electrodeposition from aqueous bath with cobalt sulfate and sodium tungstate. ► The correlation between the electrodeposition condition, the microstructure and alloy composition, and the hardness and tribological properties of electrodeposited Co–W alloy coatings were established. ► By careful control of the electrodeposition condition and the bath composition, the Co–W alloy coating excellent performance of microhardness and tribological properties, can exhibit excellent performances of microhardness and tribological properties. - Abstract: The nanocrystalline Co–W alloy coatings were produced by dual-pulse electrodeposition from aqueous bath with cobalt sulfate and sodium tungstate (Na 2 WO 4 ). Influence of the current density and Na 2 WO 4 concentration in bath on the microstructure, morphology and hardness of the Co–W alloy coatings were investigated using an X-ray diffraction, a scanning electronic microscope and a Vickers hardness tester, respectively. In addition, the friction and wear properties of the Co–W alloy coating electrodeposited under different condition were evaluated with a ball-on-disk UMT-3MT tribometer. The correlation between the electrodeposition condition, the microstructure and alloy composition, and the hardness and tribological properties of the deposited Co–W alloy coatings were discussed in detail. The results showed that the microhardness of the deposited Co–W alloy coating was significantly affected by its average grain size, W content and crystal orientation. Smaller grain size, higher W content and strong hcp (1 0 0) orientation favor the improvement of the hardness for Co–W alloy coatings. The deposited Co–W alloy coating could obtain the maximum microhardness over 1000 kgf mm −2 by careful control of the electrodeposition conditions. The tribological properties of the electrodeposited Co–W alloy coating were greatly

  17. Dosing of anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors with cobalt: Impact of cobalt retention on methanogenic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Fermoso, Fernando G.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of dosing a metal limited anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with a metal pulse on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge has thus far not been successfully modeled. The prediction of this effect is crucial in order to optimize the strategy for metal dosage and to prevent unnecessary losses of resources. This paper describes the relation between the initial immobilization of cobalt in anaerobic granular sludge cobalt dosage into the reactor and the evolution of methanogenic activity during the subsequent weeks. An operationally defined parameter (A0· B0) was found to combine the amount of cobalt immobilized instantaneously upon the pulse (B0) and the amount of cobalt immobilized within the subsequent 24. h (A0). In contrast with the individual parameters A0 and B0, the parameter A0· B0 correlated significantly with the methanogenic activity of the sludge during the subsequent 16 or 35. days. This correlation between metal retention and activity evolution is a useful tool to implement trace metal dosing strategies for biofilm-based biotechnological processes. © 2010.

  18. Cobalt(I) and Cobalt(III) Cyclopentadienyl Complexes with New Silicon-branched Fluorous Tags

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strašák, Tomáš; Čermák, Jan; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Sýkora, Jan; Fajgar, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 159, MAR 2014 (2014), s. 15-20 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1372 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluorous tag * cobalt complex * cyclopentadienyl complex Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.948, year: 2014

  19. The effects of zinc on cobalt deposition in PWRs: summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennet, Peter

    1996-01-01

    An experiment has been performed in a PWR loop of the Halden reactor to investigate the effects of the addition of 50 ppb zinc to the coolant on the incorporation of cobalt into the oxide films on primary circuit constructional materials. This report summarises the results from the three phases of the test. It was shown that zinc addition inhibits the corrosion of both new metal surfaces and surfaces with well-established oxides; this results in thinner oxide layers and reduced incorporation of cobalt into the oxide. Generally, there were no significant differences between the deposition of cobalt-60 onto pre-oxidised and new metal surfaces. In Phase 1 of the experiment, Co-60 deposition rates (normalised to the circulating Co-60 concentration) were lower than those measured in previous experiments in the loop by factors in the range from 5 to 10. In Phase 2, differences were observed in the behaviour of iron- and nickel-based alloys: larger decreases in the deposition rate compared with Phase 1 took place for stainless steel samples (i.e. factors > 20), whilst decreases on nickel-based coupons were generally less than a factor of 5. Co-60 deposition rates onto stainless steel coupons newly installed for Phase 3 of the experiment were greater by an order of magnitude than on coupons which had been exposed for all three phases; i.e. they were similar to those observed in Phase 1. The mechanisms by which zinc acts to inhibit corrosion and the incorporation of activity into oxide layers are not fully understood. More experimental data are required to resolve this issue, including information on the chemical form of the zinc within the oxide layer. (author)

  20. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120 Section 189.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... malt beverages as a foam stabilizer and to prevent “gushing.” (b) Food containing any added cobaltous...

  1. Study to use graded cobalt adjuster in 540 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Manish; Fernando, M.P.S.; Pradhan, A.S.; Kumar, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: There are 17 adjusters in 540 MWe PHWR, which are essentially provided for xenon override function. They also provide flux flattening being in the central region of the reactor core. The present design of adjusters consists of stainless steel tube. The adjuster rods are grouped into 8 banks for movement. Since adjusters are normally fully inserted during reactor operation, they are best suited for production of cobalt 60. The nickel-plated cobalt in the form of either slugs or pellet are used for the design of cobalt pencils. The number of pencils can be varied to optimize the reactivity load and cobalt 60 production requirement. The worth and activity of cobalt adjusters have been worked out considering different pin configuration for the adjuster assembly. To start with we have assumed all adjusters throughout its length are of the same configuration. The flux depression factors within the cobalt pencils have been considered in the estimations of the specific and total cobalt 60 activities. The option of using graded cobalt adjusters, where different pin configuration along the length is considered for better flux flattening

  2. Removal of Cobalt Ions by Precipitate Foam Flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-09-30

    Simulated waste liquid containing 50 ppm cobalt ion was tested by precipitate flotation using a sodium lauryl sulfate as a collector. The effects of initial cobalt ion concentration, pH, surfactant concentration, flotation time, gas flow rate and foreign ions on removal efficiency of cobalt ion were studied. Pretreatment of the waste liquid with 35% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} prior to precipitate flotation made shift of optimal flotation pH from the strong alkalinity to weak alkaline range and made a favorable flotation of cobalt ion in wide range of pH. For the result of this experiment, 99.8% removal efficiency was obtained on the conditions of initial cobalt ion concentration 50 ppm, pH 9.5, gas flow rate 70 ml/min, flotation time 30 min. The simulate ion was formed to be the most harmful ion against removal of cobalt by precipitate flotation of the species which were tested. The presence of 0.1 M of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ion decreased removal efficiency of cobalt to 90% while the cobalt were almost entirely removed in the absence of sulfate ion. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Adsorption Study of Cobalt on Treated Granular Activated Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Y. V. Hete; S. B. Gholase; R. U. Khope

    2012-01-01

    This study is carried out for the removal of cobalt from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon in combination with p-nitro benzoic acid at temperature 25±1 °C. The adsorption isotherm of cobalt on granular activated carbon has been determined and the data fitted reasonably well to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm for activated carbon.

  4. Adsorption Study of Cobalt on Treated Granular Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Hete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is carried out for the removal of cobalt from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon in combination with p-nitro benzoic acid at temperature 25±1 °C. The adsorption isotherm of cobalt on granular activated carbon has been determined and the data fitted reasonably well to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm for activated carbon.

  5. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  6. Potential for cobalt recovery from lateritic ores in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, R.

    2012-04-01

    Cobalt is one of the 'critical metals' identified under the EU Raw Materials Initiative. Annually the global mine production of cobalt is around 55,000 tonnes,with Europe's industries consuming around 30% of that figure. Currently Europe produces around 27 tonnes of cobalt from mines in Finland although new capacity is planned. Co-bearing nickel laterite ores being mined in Greece, Macedonia and Kosovo where the cobalt is currently not being recovered (ores have typical analyses of 0.055% Co and >1% Ni,). These ores are currently treated directly in pyrometallurgical plants to recover the contained nickel and this process means there is no separate cobalt product produced. Hydrometallurgical treatment of mineralogically suitable laterite ores can recover the cobalt; for example Cuba recovers 3,500 tonnes of cobalt from its laterite mining operations, which are of a similar scale to the current European operations. Implementation of hydrometallurgical techniques is in its infancy in Europe with one deposit in Turkey planning to use atmospheric heap leaching to recover nickel and copper from oxide-dominated ores. More widespread implementation of these methods to mineralogically suitable ore types could unlock the highly significant undeveloped resources (with metal contents >0.04% Co and >1% Ni), which have been defined throughout the Balkans eastwards into Turkey. At a conservative estimate, this region has the potential to supply up to 30% of the EU cobalt requirements.

  7. Highly selective cobalt-catalyzed hydrovinylation of styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grutters, M.M.P.; Müller, C.; Vogt, D.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrovinylation reaction is a codimerization of a 1,3-diene or vinyl arene and ethene with great potential for fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. For the first time, enantioselective cobalt-catalyzed hydrovinylations of styrene were achieved with a cobalt-based system bearing a chiral

  8. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  9. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  10. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R.

    1991-01-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 x 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications

  11. Comparison of Corrosion Behavior of Electrochemically Deposited Nano-Cobalt-Coated Ni Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Al-Aqeeli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion behavior of nano-coblat-coated Ni sheet was compared with pure Ni and 20% Fe-Ni alloy sheet using potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization technique in 0.1 M NaCl solution at room temperature. Results showed that corrosion resistance properties of nano-Co-coated Ni sheet were almost same as that of pure Ni sheet, however corrosion resistance of 20% Fe-Ni sheet was decreased significantly. Pitting potential of 20% Fe-Ni sheet was subsequently decreased as compared to pure Ni sheet as well as nano-cobalt-coated Ni sheet. SEM/EDS analysis of the corroded surfaces showed that both pure Ni and nano-coblat-coated Ni sheet did not show any appreciable corrosion however significant corrosion was observed in the case of 20% Fe-Ni sheet.

  12. On-surface manipulation of atom substitution between cobalt phthalocyanine and the Cu(111) substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Kongchao; Narsu, Bai; Ji, Gengwu

    2017-01-01

    On-surface fabrication of controllable nanostructures is an appealing topic in the field of molecular electronics. Herein, the adsorption of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) on a Cu(111) surface is investigated utilizing a combination of photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and density functional theory ...... state environment may offer an encouraging approach towards the artificial engineering of organometallic nanostructures and related properties for surface catalysts, molecular electronics and so on....... and thermal annealing, and the tendency to form Co–Cu alloy at the interface. While CoPc has been successfully utilized in electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications and CuPc is commonly used as a leading material in organic solar cells, this report of interface transmetalation from CoPc to CuPc in a solid...

  13. Future of U.S. cobalt irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouser, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    An examination of future cobalt needs requires us to review our base business, customer trends, technology trends, and people, the human aspect of our business. I am approaching this discussion from the perspective of a contract supplier of gamma irradiation services in the United States. The base business is comprised primarily of the sterilization of medical devices followed by containers, labware, food products, and other items. Since the core business is serving the medical industry, trends observed within medical device manufacturers can impact our growth and the type of services needed to support that industry. (author)

  14. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

    1980-10-01

    In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

  15. Bifunctional cobalt F-T catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.G.; Coughlin, P.K.; Yang, C.L.; Rabo, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results on the catalytic screening of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts containing shape selective components are reported. Catalysts consist of promoted cobalt intimately contacted with Union Carbide molecular sieves and were tested using a Berty type internally recycled reactor. Methods of preparation, promoters and shape selective components were varied and aimed at improving catalyst performance. Catalysts were developed demonstrating high C/sub 5/ + yields with high olefin content and low methane production while maintaining stability under both low and high H/sub 2/:CO ratio conditions.

  16. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  17. Study of Malayaite and Malayaite Cobalt Pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, C.; Arriola, H.; Nava, N.

    2005-01-01

    Calcium tin silicate, CaSnSiO 5 , called Malayaite is synthesized with equimolecular quantities of calcium oxide, silica and stannic oxide followed by a thermic process. In this work, the synthesis of Malayaite and the structure of a Malayaite-based pigment, Sn/Co pink, is investigated by X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. The results indicate Malayaite and Cassiterite formation, but the ion cobalt incorporated in the Malayaite structure, diminishes the Cassiterite proportion and causes larger asymmetry in the environment of the tin atom.

  18. Association between cobalt allergy and dermatitis caused by leather articles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen. Recent studies have recognized exposure to leather articles as a potential cause of cobalt allergy. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between contact allergy to cobalt and a history of dermatitis resulting from...... exposure to leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed: the case group consisted of 183 dermatitis patients with a positive patch test reaction to cobalt chloride and a negative patch test reaction to potassium dichromate; the control group consisted of 621 dermatitis patients who...... did not react to either cobalt or chromium in patch testing. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test, Fisher's exact, and the Mann-Whitney test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations while taking confounding factors into consideration. RESULTS: Leather was observed...

  19. Total body irradiation with a reconditioned cobalt teletherapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael D C; Larouche, Renée-Xavière; Olivares, Marina; Léger, Pierre; Larkin, Joe; Freeman, Carolyn R; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-01-01

    While the current trend in radiotherapy is to replace cobalt teletherapy units with more versatile and technologically advanced linear accelerators, there remain some useful applications for older cobalt units. The expansion of our radiotherapy department involved the decommissioning of an isocentric cobalt teletherapy unit and the replacement of a column-mounted 4-MV LINAC that has been used for total body irradiation (TBI). To continue offering TBI treatments, we converted the decommissioned cobalt unit into a dedicated fixed-field total body irradiator and installed it in an existing medium-energy LINAC bunker. This article describes the logistical and dosimetric aspects of bringing a reconditioned cobalt teletherapy unit into clinical service as a total body irradiator.

  20. Microstructural characterization of low and high carbon CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles produced by mechanical milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, T. A.; Goode, A. E.; Porter, A. E.; Ryan, M. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2014-06-01

    CoCrMo alloys are utilised as the main material in hip prostheses. The link between this type of hip prosthesis and chronic pain remains unclear. Studies suggest that wear debris generated in-vivo may be related to post-operative complications such as inflammation. These alloys can contain different amounts of carbon, which improves the mechanical properties of the alloy. However, the formation of carbides could become sites that initiate corrosion, releasing ions and/or particles into the human body. This study analysed the mechanical milling of alloys containing both high and low carbon levels in relevant biological media, as an alternative route to generate wear debris. The results show that low carbon alloys produce significantly more nanoparticles than high carbon alloys. During the milling process, strain induces an fcc to hcp phase transformation. Evidence for cobalt and molybdenum dissolution in the presence of serum was confirmed by ICP-MS and TEM EDX techniques.

  1. Experimental evidence for cobalt(III)-carbene radicals: key intermediates in cobalt(II)-based metalloradical cyclopropanation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, H.; Dzik, W.I.; Xu, X.; Wojtas, L.; de Bruin, B.; Zhang, X.P.

    2011-01-01

    New and conclusive evidence has been obtained for the existence of cobalt(III)-carbene radicals that have been previously proposed as the key intermediates in the underlying mechanism of metalloradical cyclopropanation by cobalt(II) complexes of porphyrins. In the absence of olefin substrates,

  2. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irshad, M. I., E-mail: imrancssp@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia); Ahmad, F., E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Abdullah, M. Z., E-mail: zaki-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  3. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, M. I.; Mohamed, N. M.; Ahmad, F.; Abdullah, M. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl 2 Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H 3 BO 3 and acidified by dilute H 2 SO 4 to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications

  4. Investigations on the formation of cobalt thiomolybdates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1984-06-01

    The reactions between Co/sup 2 +/ and different thiomolybdate anions (MoS/sup 2 -//sub 4/, Mo/sub 4/S/sup 6 -//sub 15/, Mo/sub 2/S/sup 2 -//sub 7/ and Mo/sub 4/S/sup 2 -//sub 13/) have been investigated by means of glass electrode and conductometric titrations between the reactants at several concentrations. The results provide definite evidence for the formation of CoS.MoS/sub 3/ and 3CoS.4MoS/sub 3/ around pH 7.1 and 5.9, respectively. The titrations of cobalt chloride with Na/sub 2/S.2MoS/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/S.4MoS/sub 3/ failed to provide any dependable results for the formation of the corresponding cobalt thiomolybdates. The accuracy and reproducibility of these titrations are of high order. Analytical investigations of these compounds have also been carried out and substantiate the results of the pH and conductometric measurements.

  5. Spin-dependent transport in cobalt nanocontacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarau, G.

    2007-04-16

    The magnetoresistance response of cobalt nanocontacts with varying geometries formed between two extended electrodes has been experimentally investigated and linked to micromagnetic simulations. The contribution of the nanoconstriction to the measured magnetoresistance signal has been separated from that of the electrode bulk. The different nanocontact geometries exhibit different shape anisotropies resulting in a characteristic behavior of the magnetization at each nanocontact. The magnetization reversal processes are explained on the basis of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and domain wall scattering effects. The domain wall resistance takes positive values, which is in agreement with models based on the spin mistracking inside the domain wall. The 4 K MR measurements are found to be influenced by the exchange bias effect between the ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes and the antiferromagnetic oxidized Co surface. When cooling down in an applied magnetic field, the uniform biased Co layer behaves as if it possesses a unidirectional anisotropy axis along the field cooling direction. In the zero field cooling case, the exchange bias varies locally throughout the sample giving rise to non-reproducible successive MR traces. (orig.)

  6. A spot test for detection of cobalt release – early experience and findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P.; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is often difficult to establish clinical relevance of metal exposure in cobalt-allergic patients. Dermatologists and patients may incorrectly assume that many metallic items release cobalt at levels that may cause cobalt dermatitis. Cobalt-allergic patients may be unaware that they...

  7. A spot test for detection of cobalt release - early experience and findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2010-01-01

    It is often difficult to establish clinical relevance of metal exposure in cobalt-allergic patients. Dermatologists and patients may incorrectly assume that many metallic items release cobalt at levels that may cause cobalt dermatitis. Cobalt-allergic patients may be unaware that they are exposed...

  8. Thermal stability and temperature coefficients of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnets heated in dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnat, R. M. W.; Liu, S.; Strnat, K. J.

    1982-03-01

    Flux-loss characteristics during long-term air aging of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnet types were measured. Irreversible losses and reversible temperature coefficients on heating above room temperature are reported. Purely magnetic and permanent microstructure-related changes during aging were differentiated by measuring hysteresis curves before and after long-term exposure. Three commercial polymer-bonded magnets using different rare-earth-cobalt-transition metal alloys and a solder-matrix magnet with Sm(Co, Cu, Fe, Zr)7.4 were studied. They were cycled between 25 °C and maximum temperatures to 150 °C (25 ° intervals) as applicable. Aging data at 50 and 125 °C for an exposure time of 3300 h are reported. The 2-17 samples have a stability far superior to bonded 1-5. The soft metal binder imparts significantly better aging behavior on precipitation-hardened 2-17 magnet alloys above 100 °C than an epoxy resin matrix.

  9. Investigation of the effects of cooling rate on the microstructure of investment cast biomedical grade Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R; Browne, D J; Williamson, K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the microstructural characteristics of investment cast cobalt alloy as the cross-sectional area is varied, thus changing the local effective cooling rates and solidification times. The extent of published work on the as-cast properties of cobalt alloys is minimal. The primary aim of this work is therefore to extend knowledge of the behaviour of such alloys as they solidify, which will influence the design of new products as well as the industrial optimisation of the casting process. Wedge-shaped parts were cast from a biomedical grade cobalt alloy employing the method of lost wax investment casting. Analytical techniques such as optical microscopy, image analysis and microhardness testing were used to characterise the as-cast parts. Parameters studied include variations in grain structure, nature of the columnar and equiaxed zones and the spread of porosity (both shrinkage and gas). Changes in microstructure were compared to microhardness values obtained. The solidification profile of the alloy through the prototype cast component was investigated based on measurement of the dendrite arm spacings. A discussion on the physical phenomena controlling the microstructural variations is presented.

  10. Low cost AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloys for a nickel-metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Lijun [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Zhan Feng [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Bao Deyou [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Qing Guangrong [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Li Yaoquan [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Wei Xiuying [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China)

    1995-12-15

    The studies have been carried out on utilizing Ml(NiAl){sub 5}-based alloys as a low cost negative battery electrode. The replacement of nickel by copper improved the cycle lifetime to some extent without a decrease in capacity. Using Ml(NiAlCu){sub 5} alloys, hydrogen storage alloys with good overall characteristics and low cost were obtained through substituting cobalt or silicon for nickel. The discharge capacity was further increased by increasing the lanthanum content in lanthanum-rich mischmetal. (orig.)

  11. Determination of tungsten in high-alloy steels and heat resisting alloys by isotope dilution-spark source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Morimasa; Yamada, Kei; Okochi, Haruno; Hirose, Fumio

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten in high-alloy steels and heat-resisting alloys was determined by isotope dilution method combined with spark source mass spectrometry by using 183 W enriched tungsten. The spike solution was prepared by fusing tungsten trioxide in sodium carbonate. A high-alloy steel sample was dissolved in the mixture of sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid together with the spike solution; a sample of heat resisting alloy was similarly dissolved in the mixture of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid. The solution was evaporated to give dense white fumes. Tungsten was separated from the residue by a conventional cinchonine salt-precipitation method. The salt was ignited, and the residue was mixed with graphite powder and pressed into electrodes. The isotope 183 W and 184 W were measured. The method was applied to the determination of tungsten in JSS and NBS standard high-alloy steels and JAERI standard nickel- and NBS standard cobalt-base heat resisting alloys containing more than 0.05% tungsten. The results were obtained with satisfactory precision and accuracy. However, the results obtained for JSS standard high- speed steels containing molybdenum tended to be significantly lower than the certified values. (author)

  12. Effect of long-term aging at 8150C on the tensile properties and microstructural stability of four cobalt- and nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, J.P.

    1976-08-01

    Two heats of Haynes alloy 25 and one heat each of Haynes alloy 188, Hastelloy N, and Inconel 625 were tensile tested after aging for 11,000 h at 816 0 C. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were determined 24, 316, 760, and 982 0 C and compared with typical properties for these materials in the solution annealed condition. Toughness values were determined for these materials from their engineering stress-strain curves. The long-term aging treatment degraded ductility and toughness at room temperature but, contrary to behavior expected for overaging, enhanced them over those for the solution annealed condition in tests at 760 0 C. The tensile properties of the aged superalloys were correlated with mode of fracture and the amounts, identity, and morphology of the precipitates. Aging substantially depleted the hardener tungsten from the matrix in the cobalt-base alloys

  13. Strain aging in tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.; Tauer, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tungsten heavy alloys which are two-phase mixtures of body center cubic (BCC) tungsten surrounded by a face center cubic (FCC) matrix. The matrix is most often composed of nickel and iron in a ratio of 70:30 but, occasionally, the matrix may also contain cobalt or copper. Nickel, however, is always the primary matrix component. The tungsten heavy alloy is fabricated through powder metallurgy techniques. Elemental powders are blended, pressed to shape, and sintered. Depending upon the tungsten content, the sintering temperatures are usually in the range of 1450 degrees C to 1525 degrees C. These temperatures are high enough that, as a result, the matrix is at the liquid phase and the process is known as liquid phase sintering. At the liquid phase temperature, the matrix becomes saturated with tungsten, but this does not change the FCC character of the matrix. The sintering is usually done in a hydrogen atmosphere furnace in order to reduce the oxides on the tungsten powder surfaces and create clean, active surfaces which will enhance the adherence between the tungsten and the matrix. The hydrogen atmosphere also creates the presence of excess dissolved hydrogen in the alloy. It has been shown that the hydrogen degrades the toughness and ductility of the heavy alloy. A post-sintering vacuum heat treatment is generally required to insure that there is no residual hydrogen present. The as-sintered tensile strength of a 90% tungsten, 7% nickel, 3% iron alloy (90W) is in the range of 800 to 940 MPa and can be increased significantly by cold working, usually rolling or swaging. Swaging to reductions in area of 20% can result in tensile strengths of 1250 MPa or more. As the strength increases, the elongation, which may have been 30% or more, decreases to less than 5%

  14. Synthesis of cobalt boride nanoparticles using radio frequency thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapitan, Jr. Lorico DS.; Ying Ying Chen; Seesoek Choe; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Nano size cobalt boride particles were synthesized from vapor phase using a 30 kw-4 MHz radio frequency (RF) thermal plasma. Cobalt and boron powder mixtures used as precursors in different composition and feed rate were evaporated immediately in the high temperature plasma and cobalt boride nanoparticles were produced through the quenching process. The x-ray diffractometry (XRD) patterns of cobalt boride nanoparticles prepared from the feed powder ratio of 1:2 and 1:3 for Co: B showed peaks that are associated with the Co 2 B and CoB crystal phases of cobalt boride. The XRD analysis revealed that increasing the powder feed rate results in a higher mass fraction and a larger crystalline diameter of cobalt boride nanoparticles. The images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) revealed that cobalt boride nanoparticles have a spherical morphology. The crystallite size of the particles estimated with XRD was found to be 18-22 nm. (author)

  15. Nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets: Synthesis, morphology and electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderová, Barbora; Demel, Jan; Zhigunov, Alexander; Bohuslav, Jan; Tarábková, Hana; Janda, Pavel; Lang, Kamil

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical performance of nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets. The hydroxide nanosheets of approximately 0.7nm thickness were prepared by delamination of layered nickel-cobalt hydroxide lactate in water and formed transparent colloids that were stable for months. The nanosheets were deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by spin coating, and their electrochemical behavior was investigated by cyclic voltammetry in potassium hydroxide electrolyte. Our method of electrode preparation allows for studying the electrochemistry of nanosheets where the majority of the active centers can participate in the charge transfer reaction. The observed electrochemical response was ascribed to mutual compensation of the cobalt and nickel response via electron sharing between these metals in the hydroxide nanosheets, a process that differentiates the behavior of nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets from single nickel hydroxide or cobalt hydroxide nanosheets or their physical mixture. The presence of cobalt in the nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets apparently decreases the time of electrochemical activation of the nanosheet layer, which for the nickel hydroxide nanosheets alone requires more potential sweeps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Concentration of radioactive cobalt by seaweeds in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Motokazu; Koyanagi, Taku; Saiki, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    On the pathway of radioactive substances in marine environments, seaweeds play an important role because of their higher concentration factors for many radionuclides and because they constitute a link of food chain in the sea. In the present work, uptake, distribution and excretion of radioactive cobalt were studied on several kinds of seaweeds by radioisotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors were calculated. The concentration factors were also estimated from the results of stable cobalt determination by activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry on seaweeds and seawater, and compared with the results of tracer expts. The seaweeds showed the species specificity for the concentration of stable and radioactive cobalt with diverse values of concentration factors and biological half-lives. The transfer of radioactive cobalt in the food chain from contaminated seaweeds to mollusca was examined by feeding abalones, Haliotis discus, with four kinds of seaweed labelled with 60 Co and observing retention. Absorption rate for radioactive cobalt by abalones calculated at two days after feeding showed diverse values depending upon the species of seaweed, as follows: 47% through Laminaria japonica and Ulva pertusa, 31% through Undaria pinnatifida and 26 through Eisenia bicyclis, respectively. From the results, it was assumed that the accumulation of radioactive cobalt by mollusca is affected by the species of seaweeds as food. A very high concentration of ingested radioactive cobalt in the midgut gland was seen on the autoradiograph of abalone samples. (auth.)

  17. Concentration of radioactive cobalt by seaweeds in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, M.; Koyanagi, T.; Saiki, M.

    1975-01-01

    On the pathway of radioactive substances in marine environments, seaweeds play an important role because of their higher concentration factors for many radionuclides and because they constitute a link in the food chain. In the present work, uptake, distribution and excretion of radioactive cobalt were studied on several kinds of seaweeds by radioisotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors were calculated. The concentration factors were also estimated from the results of stable cobalt determination by activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry on seaweeds and seawater, and compared with the results of tracer experiments. The seaweeds showed the species specificity for the concentration of stable and radioactive cobalt with diverse values of concentration factors and biological half-lives. The transfer of radioactive cobalt in the food chain from contaminated seaweeds to mollusca was examined by feeding abalones, Haliotis discus, with four kinds of seaweed labelled with 60 Co and observing retention. Absorption rate for radioactive cobalt by abalones calculated at two days after feeding showed diverse values depending upon the species of seaweed, as follows: 47% through Laminaria japonica and Ulva pertusa, 31% through Undaria pinnatifida and 26% through Eisenia bicyclis, respectively. From the results, it was assumed that the accumulation of radioactive cobalt by mollusca is affected by the species of seaweeds as food. A very high concentration of ingested radioactive cobalt in the midgut gland was seen on the autoradiograph of abalone samples. (author)

  18. Biocorrosion of dental alloys due to Desulfotomaculum nigrificans bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystkowska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Degradation processes of metallic biomaterials in the oral cavity limit the stability and reliability of dental materials. The influence of environment bacteria Desulfotomaculum nigrificans sulfate reducing bacteria on the corrosion processes of Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys was assessed. After 28 and 56 days of contact of the materials with the bacterial environment, the surfaces of the biomaterials tested were observed by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and their chemical composition was studied using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). Corrosive changes and the presence of sulfur (with medium atomic concentration of 0.5% for Co-Cr-Mo and 0.3% for Ti-6AL-4V) were observed on the surface of the biomaterials. Image analysis conducted using Aphelion software indicated that corrosion pits took up approx. 2.3% and 1.8% (after 28 days) and 4.2% and 3.1% (after 56 days) of the total test surfaces of cobalt and titanium alloys respectively. The greatest number of corrosion pits had a surface area within the range of 1-50 m2. They constituted from 37% up to 83% of all changes, depending on the type of material. An evident influence of the SRB on the surfaces of cobalt and titanium alloys was observed. Significant corrosive losses caused by the activity of microorganisms were observed on the metallic surfaces under study. The results of this study have much cognitive and utilitarian significance.

  19. Smoothing an isolated interface of cobalt-copper under irradiation by low-energy argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stognij, A.I.; Novitskij, N.N.; Stukalov, O.M.

    2003-01-01

    Multilayer film structures, i.e. gold layer-copper-cobalt, are considered. It is shown that the structure, where cobalt surface prior to copper layer deposition was subjected to additional irradiation by a flow of argon ions, features the smoothest surface. The conclusion is made about smoothing out of cobalt-copper interface as a result of multiple collisions of argon slow ions and cobalt atoms during braking within two or three upper atomic rows of the cobalt layer [ru

  20. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  1. Density of liquid NiCoAlCr quarternary alloys measured by modified sessile drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; ZHANG Shu-fang; XIAO Feng; YANG Ling-chuan; DONG Jian-xin; CAO Chun-lan; TAO Zai-nan; K. MUKAI

    2006-01-01

    The densities of liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys with a fixed molar ratio of Ni to Co to Al (x(Ni)-x(Co)-x(Al)≈73-12-15) which is close to the average value of the commercial Ni-based superalloys TMS75, INCO713, CM247LC and CMSX-4, and the mass fraction of chromium changes from 0 to 9% were measured by a modified sessile drop method. It is found that with increasing temperature and chromium concentration in the alloys, the densities of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys decrease, whereas the molar volume of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys increases. And the liquid densities of NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys calculated from the partial molar volumes of nickel, cobalt, aluminum and chromium in the corresponding Ni-bases binary alloys are in good agreement with the experimental ones, i.e. within the error tolerance range the densities of the liquid Ni-based multi-component alloys can be predicted from the partial volumes of elements in Ni-based binary alloys in liquid state. The molar volume of liquid NiCoAlCr binary alloy shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear mixing and the deviation changes small with the increase of chromium concentration at the same temperature.

  2. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Electrochemical performance of cobalt hydroxide nanosheets formed by the delamination of layered cobalt hydroxide in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneiderová, Barbora; Demel, Jan; Pleštil, Josef; Tarábková, Hana; Bohuslav, Jan; Lang, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10484-10491 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-09462P Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : Ray-absorption spectroscopy * Alpha-cobalt * Solvothermal decomposition * Nickel * Nanocomposites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  4. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  5. Activation of cobalt 60 in the LVR-15 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, F.

    1995-12-01

    Cobalt disks were irradiated in the LVR-15 reactor and the relevant cobalt-60 production parameters, particularly the formation rate, were measured. The data were compared with those from previous work by other authors and some discrepancies were found. It is concluded that additional experiments have to be performed in order to obtain reliable data, usable in economic balance assessment with respect to the use of hot chambers for the production of sealed cobalt-60 sources. (P.A.). 4 tabs., 3 refs., 10 annexes

  6. The effect of gaseous ammonia on cobalt perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, L.P.; Men'shikov, O.D.; Borisov, V.V.; Sorokin, S.I.; Krutovertsev, S.A.; Kharkevich, S.I.; Ivanova, O.M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of humid air ammonia mixture on crystal pentahydrate of cobalt(2) perrhenate has been studied by the methods of PES, IR spectroscopy thermal analysis and electrophysical measurements. It is shown that with an increase in ammonia content in gaseous phase cobalt perrhenate successively transforms into diaquodiammine-, tetrammine- and μ-dioxo-bis-(tetrammine) derivatives of cobalt. Reversibility of dioxocomplex formation and a correlation between the change in electrophysical properties of crystal sample and change in ammonia content in gaseous phase are pointed out. 16 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  8. The cobalt radioactive isotopes in environment; Les isotopes radioactifs du cobalt dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    For the year 1993 the total activity released in cobalt is 69 GBq for the whole of nuclear power plants. The part of activity in cobalt for La Hague in 1993 is 8 GBq of {sup 58}Co and 2 GBq of {sup 60}Co. The radioactive isotopes released by nuclear power plants or the reprocessing plant of La Hague under liquid effluents are shared by half between {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co. The exposure to sealed sources is the most important risk for the cobalt. The risk of acute exposure can associate a local irradiation of several decades of grays inducing a radiological burns, deep burn to treat in surgery by resection or graft even amputation. A global irradiation of organism for several grays induces an acute irradiation syndrome, often serious. At long term the stochastic effects are represented by leukemia and radio-induced cancers. The increase of probability of their occurrence is 1% by sievert. We must remind that the natural spontaneous probability is 25%. (N.C.)

  9. Characterization of a Porous Carbon Material Functionalized with Cobalt-Oxide/Cobalt Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.; Rasul, Shahid; Roldan-Gutierrez, Manuel A.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    A nanoporous carbon (C) material, functionalized with Cobalt-Oxide/Cobalt (CoO/Co) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), was structurally and chemically characterized with transmission electron microcopy (TEM) while its electrochemical response

  10. Impurity diffusion of cobalt in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charissoux, Christian; Calais, Daniel.

    1975-01-01

    The sectioning method for investigation of the impurity diffusion of 60 Co in the fcc and bcc phases of plutonium gives the following results: 344-426 deg C: D=1.2x10 -2 exp(-12700/RT)cm 2 /s in delta Pu(fcc); 484-621 deg C: D=1.4x10 -3 exp(-9900/RT)cm 2 /s in epsilon Pu(bcc). Cobalt is a fast diffuser in plutonium; the diffusion coefficient being unaffected by phase changes delta'→delta; delta'→epsilon, the diffusion mechanism is probably dissociative in both phases, the solute becoming interstitial by: solute (substitution) reversible solute (interstitial) + vacancy [fr

  11. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. ► They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. ► They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Assessment of cobalt levels in wastewater, soil and vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carrot, lettuce, onion, spinach, cabbage, tomato and okra) samples collected on seasonal basis from January, 2013 to September 2014 along Kubanni stream channels in Zaria. The results show cobalt levels in wastewater were in the range of ...

  13. Making a robust carbon-cobalt(III) bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; Madsen, Anders Østergaard; Kofod, Pauli

    2009-01-01

    The coordination ion with a well-characterized carbon-cobalt(III) bond, the (1,4,7-triazacyclononane)(1,6-diamino-3-thia-4-hexanido)cobalt(III) dication, [Co(tacn)(C-aeaps)](2+) (aeaps, for aminoethylaminopropylsulfide), has been reacted with iodomethane, and the S-methyl thionium derivative has...... been isolated. The crystal structure of the resulting [Co(tacn)(C-aeaps-SCH(3))]Br(3) x 3 H(2)O at 122 K has been determined by X-ray diffraction techniques to verify the structure. The crystal structure determination shows that the carbon-cobalt bond length is even shorter (2.001(4) A) than in [Co......(tacn)(C-aeaps)](2+) participates in bonding to cobalt(III), having implications for the transformation between the carbon- and sulfur-bound forms of the aeaps ligand....

  14. 46 SPIDER WEBS AS INDICATORS OF COBALT AND LEAD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spider webs were collected from the indoor and outdoor of 120 sampling sites of 10 zones of Kano ... diet, cobalt containing ceramic is administered into ... significant human and environmental health risk. ..... Evaluation of Health Workers.

  15. Ammonia induced precipitation of cobalt hydroxide: observation of turbostratic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, T. N.; Rajamathi, Michael; Kamath, P. Vishnu

    2003-05-01

    Cobalt hydroxide freshly precipitated from aqueous solutions of Co salts using ammonia, is a layered phase having a 9.17 Å interlayer spacing. DIFFaX simulations of the PXRD pattern reveal that it is turbostratically disordered.

  16. A review of cobalt adsorption on transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    This report reviews studies of cobalt adsorption on transition metal oxides, in the context of corrosion product and radioactivity transport in PWR primary circuits. In general, uptake of cobalt increases with pH, with temperature and with decreasing ionic strength. Very little data are available under PWR primary circuit conditions, but the limited data available suggest that cobalt uptake by the zirconium oxide corrosion product layer on fuel pins may be significant compared to that deposited on fuel crud. If fuel crud levels can be reduced in future by coolant chemistry control then uptake by the zirconia will assume a greater relative role. It is planned to use an autoclave to study uptake of cobalt on oxidised Zircaloy surfaces at temperatures up to 593K under PWR primary circuit chemistry conditions. (author)

  17. Valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shijing; Zhang Boping; Zhao Cuihua; Li Songjie; Zhang Meixia; Yan Liping

    2011-01-01

    The cobalt oxide (CoO and Co 3 O 4 ) thin films were successfully prepared using a spin-coating technique by a chemical solution method with CH 3 OCH 2 CH 2 OH and Co(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O as starting materials. The grayish cobalt oxide films had uniform crystalline grains with less than 50 nm in diameter. The phase structure is able to tailor by controlling the annealing atmosphere and temperature, in which Co 3 O 4 thin film was obtained by annealing in air at 300-600, and N 2 at 300, and transferred to CoO thin film by raising annealing temperature in N 2 . The fitted X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the Co2p electrons are distinguishable from different valence states of cobalt oxide especially for their satellite structure. The valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere contributes to the tailored optical absorption property.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of iron cobalt (FECO) nanorods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and characterization of iron cobalt (FECO) nanorods prepared by simple ... shaped by increasing annealing temperature from room temperature to 800 ... Keywords: FeCo nanoparticles, sodium borohydrid, CTAB, chemical synthesis ...

  19. Ion exchange of Cobalt and Cadmium in Zeolite X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava M, I.

    1994-01-01

    The growing development in the industry has an important contribution to the environmental damage, where the natural effluents are each day more contaminated by toxic elements, such as: mercury, chromium, lead and cadmium. So as to separate such elements it has sorbent must have enough stability, and have a sharp capacity of sorption. In this work it was studied the sorption behavior of cobalt and on the other hand, cadmium in aqueous solutions, which along with sodic form of the Zeolite X, undergoes a phenomenon of ionic interchange. Such interchange was verify to different concentration of cadmium, cobalt and hydronium ion. The content of cobalt and sodium in the interchanged samples was detected through the neutronic activation analysis. The results disclose a higher selectivity for cadmium than cobalt. (Author)

  20. Adhesive wear of iron chromium nickel silicon manganese molybdenum niobium alloys with duplex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Deppe, E.; Ambroziak, A.; Melzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Iron nickel chromium manganese silicon and iron chromium nickel manganese silicon molybdenum niobium alloys have a so-called duplex structure in a wide concentration range. This causes an excellent resistance to wear superior in the case of adhesive stress with optimized concentrations of manganese, silicon, molybdenum and niobium. The materials can be used for welded armouring structures wherever cobalt and boron-containing alloy systems are not permissible, e.g. in nuclear science. Within the framework of pre-investigations for manufacturing of filling wire electrodes, cast test pieces were set up with duplex structure, and their wear behavior was examined. (orig.) [de

  1. Sorption of cobalt and zinc from fresh water and seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldus, R.; Weijden, C.H. van der; Das, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption of Cosup(II) and Znsup(II) from artificial fresh and sea water on to clay minerals is studied. The adsorption isotherms are measured at pH-values of 7 and 8. The specific adsorption of zinc is higher than that of cobalt. This is compatible with the higher average residence time of cobalt than that of zinc in the oceans

  2. Recovery of cobalt and lithium fromspent Li-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Busnardo, Natália Giovanini; Paulino, Jéssica Frontino; Afonso, Julio Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The "active mass" (cathode + anode + electrolyte) of spent Li-ion batteries was submitted to one of the following procedures: (a) it was calcined (500 ºC) and submitted to extraction with water to recover lithium salts. The residual solid was treated with sulfuric acid containing hydrogen peroxide. Cobalt was recovered as sulfate; (b) the "active mass" was treated with potassium hydrogen sulfate (500 ºC) and dissolved in water. Cobalt was precipitated together with copper after addition of so...

  3. Bioactivity and mechanical behaviour of cobalt oxide-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tive base glass and cobalt oxide-doped glass were prepared by the addition of cobalt oxide (0, ... and 1 N HCl at 37. ◦. C as compared with the ... SO2−. 4. Cl. −. Simulated body fluid. 142.0. 5.0. 1.5. 2.5. 4.2. 1.0. 0.5. 147.8. Human blood plasma ...

  4. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asha, E-mail: arana5752@gmail.com [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Bhagat Phool Singh Mahilla Vishwavidyalaya, Khanpur Kalan, Sonipat-131305 (India); Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar-125001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  5. Mechanizm of propylene oxidation on modified cobalt-molybdenum catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutyrev, M.Yu.; Rozentuller, B.V.; Isaev, O.V.; Margolis, L.Ya.; Krylov, O.V.

    1977-01-01

    Effect is studied of additions of iron, copper, nickel, and vanadium oxides, introduced into cobalt, molybdate, on oxidation reactions of propylene to acrolein and acrylicacid. The principal parameters determining the activity and selectivity of oxidation of propylene and acrolein on modified cobalt molibdate are the structure, the type of Mo-O bond, and the nature of the electron transitions in the solid under the effect of adsorption of the reaction components

  6. Enhancement of electrical conductivity in gamma irradiated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawpute, Asha A.; Raut, A.V.; Babrekar, M.K.; Kale, C.M.; Jadhav, K.M.; Shinde, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel auto- combustion method, in which L-ascorbic acid was used as a fuel. The effect of gamma irradiation on the electrical resistivity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been studied. The ferrite powder annealed at 550℃ was irradiated by gamma source 137 Cs. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and DC resistivity. (author)

  7. Optimum schedules of difficult-to-form heat-resistant alloys forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majzengel'ter, V.A.; Shuvalov, A.A.; Perevozov, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    The process of manufacturing half finished discs for hydroturbine engines from heat resistant difficulty deformed nickel, iron-nickel and cobalt alloys (EI435, EI868, VZh145-ID, EK79-ID, EK152-ID, EI826, EP648-VI) is described. The recommendations on the modes of forging the single-phase nonaging and double phase aging alloys are developed. The conclusion is made, that the first compressions of ingots shoved be accomplished by small press runs. The subsequent compressions should constituted not less than 8% during one run. The total compression of the ingot during one heating should be within the concrete alloy properties. With the purpose of obtaining uniform fine-grain structure the ingot heating during the last manufacturing cycle should be accomplished within the range of 1100-1130 deg C for the majority of heat resistant alloys [ru

  8. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  9. Removable partial denture alloys processed by laser-sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alageel, Omar; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Alsheghri, Ammar; Song, Jun; Caron, Eric; Tamimi, Faleh

    2018-04-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are traditionally made using a casting technique. New additive manufacturing processes based on laser sintering has been developed for quick fabrication of RPDs metal frameworks at low cost. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanical, physical, and biocompatibility properties of RPD cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys produced by two laser-sintering systems and compare them to those prepared using traditional casting methods. The laser-sintered Co-Cr alloys were processed by the selective laser-sintering method (SLS) and the direct metal laser-sintering (DMLS) method using the Phenix system (L-1) and EOS system (L-2), respectively. L-1 and L-2 techniques were 8 and 3.5 times more precise than the casting (CC) technique (p laser-sintered and cast alloys were biocompatible. In conclusion, laser-sintered alloys are more precise and present better mechanical and fatigue properties than cast alloys for RPDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 1174-1185, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  11. Temperature dependent viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Prashant B.; Somvanshi, Sandeep B.; Kounsalye, Jitendra S.; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Khirade, Pankaj P.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluid is prepared in 0 to 1 (in the step of 0.2) volume fraction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method. The XRD results confirmed the formation of single phase spinel structure. The Raman spectra have been deconvoluted into individual Lorentzian peaks. Cobalt ferrite has cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group. FT-IR spectra consist of two major absorption bands, first at about 586 cm-1 (υ1) and second at about 392 cm-1 (υ2). These absorption bands confirm the formation of spinel-structured cobalt ferrite. Brookfield DV-III viscometer and programmable temperature-controlled bath was used to study the relationship between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity behavior with respect to temperature has been studied and it is revealed that the viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids increases with an increase in volume fraction of cobalt ferrite. The viscosity of the present ferrofluid was found to decrease with increase in temperature.

  12. Changes in phase composition and stress state of surface layers of VK20 hard alloy after ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, G.L.; Leonov, E.Yu.; Anikin, V.N.; Anikeev, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    Titanium ion bombardment of the surface of the hard VK20 alloy is studied for its effect on variations in the phase and chemical composition of its surface layers. It is stated that ion treatment results in the appearance of the η-phase of Co 6 W 6 C composition in the surface layer of the VK20 alloy, in the increase of distortions and decrease of coherent scattering blocks of the hard alloy carbide phase. Such a bombardment is found to provoke a transition of the plane-stressed state of the hard alloy surface into the volume-stressed state. It is established that ion treatment does not cause an allotropic transition of the cobalt phase α-modification, formed during grinding of the hard alloy, into the β-modification

  13. Cobalt deposition in mineralized bone tissue after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing: Quantitative μ-X-ray-fluorescence analysis of implant material incorporation in periprosthetic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael; Busse, Björn; Procop, Mathias; Zustin, Jozef; Amling, Michael; Katzer, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Most resurfacing systems are manufactured from cobalt-chromium alloys with metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing couples. Because the quantity of particulate metal and corrosion products which can be released into the periprosthetic milieu is greater in MoM bearings than in metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, it is hypothesized that the quantity and distribution of debris released by the MoM components induce a compositional change in the periprosthetic bone. To determine the validity of this claim, nondestructive µ-X-ray fluorescence analysis was carried out on undecalcified histological samples from 13 femoral heads which had undergone surface replacement. These samples were extracted from the patients after gradient time points due to required revision surgery. Samples from nonintervened femoral heads as well as from a MoP resurfaced implant served as controls. Light microscopy and µ-X-ray fluorescence analyses revealed that cobalt debris was found not only in the soft tissue around the prosthesis and the bone marrow, but also in the mineralized bone tissue. Mineralized bone exposed to surface replacements showed significant increases in cobalt concentrations in comparison with control specimens without an implant. A maximum cobalt concentration in mineralized hard tissue of up to 380 ppm was detected as early as 2 years after implantation. Values of this magnitude are not found in implants with a MoP surface bearing until a lifetime of more than 20 years. This study demonstrates that hip resurfacing implants with MoM bearings present a potential long-term health risk due to rapid cobalt ion accumulation in periprosthetic hard tissue. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1855-1862, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cobalt Blues The Story of Leonard Grimmett, the Man Behind the First Cobalt-60 Unit in the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Almond, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    For the latter half of the 20th century, cobalt-60 units were the mainstay of radiation treatments for cancer. Cobalt Blues describes the development of the first cobalt-60 unit in the United States and the man behind it, Leonard Grimmett. Conceptually conceived before World War II, it only became possible because of the development of nuclear reactors during the war. Although Grimmett conceived of and published his ideas first, the Canadians built the first units because of the capability of their reactor to produce more suitable cobalt-60 sources. This book tells the story of how Grimmett and others came together at the time that the U S Atomic Energy Agency was pushing the use of radioactivity in medicine. Due to his sudden death, very little information about Grimmett was known until recently, when various documents have come to light, allowing the full story to be told.

  15. Cobalt mineral exploration and supply from 1995 through 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The global mining industry has invested a large amount of capital in mineral exploration and development over the past 15 years in an effort to ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet future increases in demand for minerals. Exploration data have been used to identify specific sites where this investment has led to a significant contribution in global mineral supply of cobalt or where a significant increase in cobalt production capacity is anticipated in the next 5 years. This report provides an overview of the cobalt industry, factors affecting mineral supply, and circumstances surrounding the development, or lack thereof, of key mineral properties with the potential to affect mineral supply. Of the 48 sites with an effective production capacity of at least 1,000 metric tons per year of cobalt considered for this study, 3 producing sites underwent significant expansion during the study period, 10 exploration sites commenced production from 1995 through 2008, and 16 sites were expected to begin production by 2013 if planned development schedules are met. Cobalt supply is influenced by economic, environmental, political, and technological factors affecting exploration for and production of copper, nickel, and other metals as well as factors affecting the cobalt industry. Cobalt-rich nickel laterite deposits were discovered and developed in Australia and the South Pacific and improvements in laterite processing technology took place during the 1990s and early in the first decade of the 21st century when mining of copper-cobalt deposits in Congo (Kinshasa) was restricted because of regional conflict and lack of investment in that country's mining sector. There was also increased exploration for and greater importance placed on cobalt as a byproduct of nickel mining in Australia and Canada. The emergence of China as a major refined cobalt producer and consumer since 2007 has changed the pattern of demand for cobalt, particularly from Africa and

  16. High-speed jet electrodeposition and microstructure of nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Guiying; Jing Tianfu; Wang Nan; Gao Yuwei; Zhao Xin; Zhou Jifeng; Wang Wei

    2005-01-01

    The jet electrodeposition from watts baths with a device of electrolyte jet was carried out to prepare nano-crystalline cobalt-nickel alloys. The influence of the concentration of Co 2+ ions in the electrolyte and electrolysis parameters, such as the cathodic current density, the temperature as well as the electrolyte jet speed, on the chemistry and microstructure of Ni-Co-deposit alloys were investigated. Experimental results indicated that increasing the Co 2+ ions concentration in the bath, the electrolyte jet speed and decreasing of the cathodic current density and decrease of the electrolyte temperature all results in an increase of cobalt content in the alloy. Detailed microstructure changes upon the changes of alloy composition and experimental conditions were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD results show the Ni-Co solid solution was formed through the jet electrodeposition. Phase constitution of solid solution changes progressively under different electrolyte concentration. Alloys with low Co concentration exhibit single phase of face-centered cubic (fcc) structure; The Co concentration over 60.39 wt.%, the alloys are composed of face-centered cubic (fcc) phase and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase. Furthermore, the formation of the nanostructured Ni-Co alloy deposit is investigated. Increasing the Co 2+ ions concentration in the bath, the cathodic current density, the electrolyte temperature and the electrolyte jet speed all result in the finer grains in the deposits. Additives such as saccharin in the electrolyte also favor the formation of the finer grains in the alloy deposits

  17. Creep-Data Analysis of Alloy 617 for High Temperature Reactor Intermediate Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Yong Wan; Yin, Song Nan

    2006-01-01

    The design of the metallic components such as hot gas ducts, intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) tube, and steam reformer tubes of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is principally determined by the creep properties, because an integrity of the components should be preserved during a design life over 30 year life at the maximum operating temperature up to 1000 .deg. C. For designing the time dependent creep of the components, a material database is needed, and an allowable design stress at temperature should be determined by using the material database. Alloy 617, a nicked based superalloy with chromium, molybdenum and cobalt additions, is considered as a prospective candidate material for the IHX because it has the highest design temperature. The alloy 617 is approved to 982 .deg. C (1800 .deg. F) and other alloys approved to 898 .deg. C (1650 .deg. C), such as alloy 556, alloy 230, alloy HX, alloy 800. Also, the alloy 617 exhibits the highest level of creep strength at high temperatures. Therefore, it is needed to collect the creep data for the alloy 617 and the creep-rupture life at the given conditions of temperature and stress should be predicted for the IHX construction. In this paper, the creep data for the alloy 617 was collected through literature survey. Using the collected data, the creep life for the alloy 617 was predicted based on the Larson-Miller parameter. Creep master curves with standard deviations were presented for a safety design, and failure probability for the alloy 617 was obtained with a time coefficient

  18. Lithium alloys and metal oxides as high-capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Chu; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Liu, Yongfeng; Yan, Mi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Progress in lithium alloys and metal oxides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries is reviewed. •Electrochemical characteristics and lithium storage mechanisms of lithium alloys and metal oxides are summarized. •Strategies for improving electrochemical lithium storage properties of lithium alloys and metal oxides are discussed. •Challenges in developing lithium alloys and metal oxides as commercial anodes for lithium-ion batteries are pointed out. -- Abstract: Lithium alloys and metal oxides have been widely recognized as the next-generation anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and high power density. A variety of lithium alloys and metal oxides have been explored as alternatives to the commercial carbonaceous anodes. The electrochemical characteristics of silicon, tin, tin oxide, iron oxides, cobalt oxides, copper oxides, and so on are systematically summarized. In this review, it is not the scope to retrace the overall studies, but rather to highlight the electrochemical performances, the lithium storage mechanism and the strategies in improving the electrochemical properties of lithium alloys and metal oxides. The challenges and new directions in developing lithium alloys and metal oxides as commercial anodes for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries are also discussed

  19. PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-11-01

    the study. These preliminary findings showed that PEEK-OPTIMA ™ gives promise as an alternative bearing material to cobalt chrome alloy in the femoral component of a total knee replacement with respect to wear performance.

  20. PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    preliminary findings showed that PEEK-OPTIMA™ gives promise as an alternative bearing material to cobalt chrome alloy in the femoral component of a total knee replacement with respect to wear performance. PMID:27637723

  1. Gold-supported two-dimensional cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) and multilayer cobalt oxide islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fester, Jakob; Walton, Alexander; Li, Zheshen

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the facile conversion of Co-O bilayer islands on a Au(111) surface into preferentially O-Co-O trilayers in an oxygen atmosphere and O-Co-O-Co-O multilayers at elevated temperature. We characterize and compare the island morphologies with scanning tunneling...... microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and valence band spectroscopy, and show that the cobalt oxidation state changes from Co2+ in bilayers to purely Co3+ in trilayers and a mixture of Co2+ and Co3+ in the multilayer morphology. In contrast to bilayers and multilayers, the trilayer structure...

  2. Magnetic Cobalt and Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles in Hyperbranched Polyester Polyol Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Medvedeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of cobalt (Co and its oxides based nanoparticles were synthesized by using hyperbranched polyester polyol Boltorn H20 as a platform and sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. UV, FT-IR, XRD, NTA, and TEM methods were employed to obtain physicochemical characteristics of the products. The average diameter of Co nanoparticles was approximately 8.2±3.4 nm. Their magnetic properties, including hysteresis loop, field-cooled, and zero field-cooled curves were investigated. The nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetism at room temperature, accompanied by magnetic hysteresis below the blocking temperature.

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of methanol on Pt3Co bulk alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. LJ. GOJKOVIC

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of methanol was investigated on a Pt3Co bulk alloy in acid solutions. Kinetic parameters such as transfer coefficient, reaction orders with respect to methanol and H+ ions and energy of activation were determined. It was found that the rate of methanol oxidation is significantly diminished by rotation of the electrode. This effect was attributed to the diffusion of formaldehyde and formic acid from the electrode surface. Stirring of the electrolyte also influenced the kinetic parameters of the reaction. It was speculated that the predominant reaction pathway and rate determining step are different in the quiescent and in the stirred electrolyte. Cobalt did not show a promoting effect on the rate of methanol oxidation on the Pt3Co bulk alloy with respect to a pure Pt surface.

  4. Ceramic filters for bulk inoculation of nickel alloy castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The work includes the results of research on production technology of ceramic filters which, besides the traditional filtering function, playalso the role of an inoculant modifying the macrostructure of cast nickel alloys. To play this additional role, filters should demonstratesufficient compression strength and ensure proper flow rate of liquid alloy. The role of an inoculant is played by cobalt aluminateintroduced to the composition of external coating in an amount from 5 to 10 wt.% . The required compression strength (over 1MPa isprovided by the supporting layers, deposited on the preform, which is a polyurethane foam. Based on a two-level fractional experiment24-1, the significance of an impact of various technological parameters (independent variables on selected functional parameters of theready filters was determined. Important effect of the number of the supporting layers and sintering temperature of filters after evaporationof polyurethane foam was stated.

  5. Looking for New Polycrystalline MC-Reinforced Cobalt-Based Superalloys Candidate to Applications at 1200°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Berthod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For applications for which temperatures higher than 1150°C can be encountered the currently best superalloys, the γ/γ′ single crystals, cannot be used under stress because of the disappearance of their reinforcing γ′ precipitates at such temperatures which are higher than their solvus. Cobalt-based alloys strengthened by refractory and highly stable carbides may represent an alternative solution. In this work the interest was focused on MC carbides of several types. Alloys were elaborated with atomically equivalent quantities in M element (among Ti, Ta, Nb, Hf, or Zr and in C. Script-like eutectic TiC, TaC, NbC, HfC, and ZrC carbides were successfully obtained in the interdendritic spaces. Unfortunately, only one type, HfC, demonstrated high morphological stability during about 50 hours at 1200°C. The concerned alloy, of the Co-25Cr-0.5C-7.4Hf type (in wt.%, was further characterized in flexural creep resistance and air-oxidation resistance at the same temperature. The creep behaviour was very good, notably by comparison with a more classical Co-25Cr-0.5C-7.5Ta alloy, proving that the interest of HfC is higher than the TaC one. In contrast the oxidation by air was faster and its behaviour not really chromia-forming. Significant improvements of this chemical resistance are expected before taking benefit from the mechanical superiority of this alloy.

  6. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  7. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  8. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava Galve, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  9. Cobalt teletherapy of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamprad, F.; Pfeiffer, J.; Oelssner, W.

    1978-01-01

    Based on results obtained from patients with urinary bladder carcinomas who were subjected to cobalt teletherapy at the Radiological Clinic of the Karl Marx University from 1969 to 1971, the influence of total dumor dose, of single tumor dose, and of nominal standard dose (NSD) on the frequency of radiation-induced vesicorectal changes as well as on the frequency of local recurrences was investigated in a catamnestic study. Under the conditions of a small volume pendulum irradiation there is a considerable increase in the rate of late effects above a total dose of 6,000 rad, with single doses of more than 180 rad per day and with a NSD of more than 1,750 ret. These dose limits should not be exceeded because a further dose increase does not essentially decrease the number of local recurrences. Higher tumor doese, for instance in stationary therapy, result in radiation-induced late effects even after low dosage. Therefore, the limiting values have to be lowered for this type of irradiation. (author)

  10. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, N.L.B.

    1993-01-01

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation

  11. Electronic structure of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenreich, H.; Schwartz, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The description of electronic properties of binary substitutional alloys within the single particle approximation is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on a didactic exposition of the equilibrium properties of the transport and magnetic properties of such alloys. Topics covered include: multiple scattering theory; the single band alloy; formal extensions of the theory; the alloy potential; realistic model state densities; the s-d model; and the muffin tin model. 43 figures, 3 tables, 151 references

  12. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of 001-line oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247. For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta-plus-W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of gamma-prime volume fraction, gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  13. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, B.E.; Roszell, L.E.; Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A.; Demaree, J.D.; Klotz, B.R.; Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E.; Bao, W.; Perkins, E.J.; Dillman, J.F.; Bannon, D.I.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  14. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005‐5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702‐5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  15. Adsorption, Bioaccumulation and Kinetics Parameters of the Phytoremediation of Cobalt from Wastewater Using Elodea canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoarca, Giannin; Vancea, Cosmin; Popa, Simona; Boran, Sorina

    2018-05-01

    Present paper investigates the phytoremediation of cobalt from wastewaters using Elodea canadensis. Bioaccumulation tests were conducted at various concentrations of cobalt ranging from 1 to 15 mg/L. Final concentrations of cobalt in wastewaters, after phytoremediation, were less than 1 mg/L. E. canadensis' hyperaccumulator character with regard to cobalt is emphasised by the amount of cobalt retained: 0.39% ± 0.02% of dry mass at an initial concentration in wastewater of 15 mg/L. After 14 days of exposure to contaminant, the biomass as well as the relative growth rate has increased with the amount of cobalt in wastewaters, the plant manifesting an excellent tolerance to cobalt exposure. Adsorption of cobalt ions by E. canadensis can be well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the pseudo-second-order model equation.

  16. Solvent extractions applications to hydrometallurgy. Pt.III: Nickel, cobalt, manganese and ocean nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, S.

    1981-01-01

    The main applications of solvent extraction to the hydrometallurgy of nickel, cobalt, manganese and manganese rich ocean nodules, which also contain nickel, cooper and cobalt, are exposed. A short description of the processes with commercial applications is made. (author)

  17. Monsoon induced cobalt enrichment in Porites (coral) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.A.S.; Nath, B.N.

    Cobalt concentrations in growth bands of a reef building coral (Porites sp.) collected from Kalpeni Atoll of the Lakshadweep group of islands (Arabian Sea), rvealed that cobalt concentrations and Co/Ca ratios exhibit similar trend. Study indicates...

  18. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S.; Maiti, Tapas K.; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic–osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co"2"+) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP–OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic–osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Cobalt (Co"+"2) doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAp) can be prepared by the wet chemical method. • The concentration of Co"+"2 influences the physico-chemical properties of HAp. • Co-HAp was found to be biocompatible and osteogenic. • Co-HAp enhanced cellular VEGF secretion through HIF-1α stabilization. • The optimum biological performance of Co-HAp was achieved for 0.33% (w/w) Co"+"2 doping.

  19. Heating analysis of cobalt adjusters in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Qiliang; Li Kang; Fu Yaru

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce 60 Co source for industry and medicine applications in CANDU-6 reactor, the stainless steel adjusters were replaced with the cobalt adjusters. The cobalt rod will generate the heat when it is irradiated by neutron and γ ray. In addition, 59 Co will be activated and become 60 Co, the ray released due to 60 Co decay will be absorbed by adjusters, and then the adjusters will also generate the heat. So the heating rate of adjusters to be changed during normal operation must be studied, which will be provided as the input data for analyzing the temperature field of cobalt adjusters and the relative heat load of moderator. MCNP code was used to simulate whole core geometric configuration in detail, including reactor fuel, control rod, adjuster, coolant and moderator, and to analyze the heating rate of the stainless steel adjusters and the cobalt adjusters. The maximum heating rate of different cobalt adjuster based on above results will be provided for the steady thermal hydraulic and accident analysis, and make sure that the reactor is safe on the thermal hydraulic. (authors)

  20. Investigations on bioaccumulation of cobalt by fish eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, U.; Behringer, H.; Kunze, J.

    1978-01-01

    In ionized form cobalt is taken up by fish eggs directly from the water. Accumulation takes place on the chorion where the metal ions are reversibly bound to functional groups of the protein of the envelope of the egg or of the mycosa. To a small extent there occurs a transport of metal ions into the interior of the egg. It could not be clarified within the scope of the studies performed if this process is to be attributed to diffusion. Binding of the cobalt ions to the chorion leads, within hours, to a nearly uncharged final state, an apparent equilibrium, whose position is determined by the cobalt ion concentration of the breeding medium. Foreign ions (electrolytes like Ca 2+ ) lead to reduced uptake of cobalt ions, because they compete with the latter for binding places in the egg's envelope. Complex-forming substances (cysteine) result in lower absorption rates, too, the concentration of available cobalt ions in the water being reduced. (orig.) [de

  1. Relationship between nickel and cobalt sensitization in hard metal workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rystedt, I; Fischer, T

    1983-05-01

    Eight hundred fifty-three hard metal workers were examined and patch tested with 20 substances from their environment, including nickel and cobalt. Nickel sensitivity was found in 2 men and 38 women. 88% of the nickel-sensitive individuals had developed a jewelry dermatitis prior to employment in the hard metal industry or before the appearance of hand eczema. 29% of the hard metal workers gave a history of slight irritant dermatitis. In the nickel sensitized group, 40% had had severe hand eczema which generally appeared 6-12 months after starting employment. In 25% of the cases, nickel sensitive individuals developed cobalt allergy, compared with 5% in the total population investigated. Most facts indicate that nickel sensitivity and irritant hand eczema precede cobalt sensitization. Hard metal workers with simultaneous nickel and cobalt sensitivity had a more severe hand eczema than those with isolated cobalt or nickel sensitivity or only irritant dermatitis. 64% of the female population had pierced ear lobes. Among the nickel allergic women, 95% had pierced ear lobes. The use of earrings containing nickel after piercing is strongly suspected of being the major cause of nickel sensitivity. Piercing at an early age seems to increase the risk of incurring nickel sensitivity.

  2. Contact dermatitis to cobalt chloride with an unusual mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Sevket; Aksan, Serkan; Ucar, Ramazan; Caliskaner, Ahmet Zafer

    2015-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a frequent inflammatory skin disease. A suspected diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, a plausible contact to allergens and a suitable history of dermatitis. Therefore, careful diagnosis by patch testing is of great importance because the patch testing is important to find out which allergen/material causes the complaints. Metallic allergens such as cobalt are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis, but frequencies of contact dermatitis to these allergens may vary in different skin areas. Here, we report an unusual case of cobalt allergy on the skin contact with the prosthetic leg of a 30-year-old female patient. The patient developed maculopapular and vesicular lesions on her contact region of residual limb to prosthetic leg. She underwent standard patch testing, which resulted in a strong positive reaction to cobalt chloride. This case report may serve to remind doctors to be aware of potential allergic reactions to prostheses and to enable them to recognize a metal allergy if it appears. Prosthetists should also be reminded of potential allergic reactions. Cobalt can be used as an accelerator in making a prosthetic socket. Several cases have been reported concerning allergies to components of the prosthetic socket. This is the first report of sensitization to cobalt which is used in making a prosthetic leg. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  3. Effect of Cobalt Supplementation on Performance of growing Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Nagabhushana

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to study the effect of critical supplementation of wheat straw with cobalt on fibre utilization and nutrient utilization in growing cross-bred male calves. Twenty-one crossbred (HF X Local male growing calves of 3-4 months age were fed with wheat straw based diet consisting without (Co0 and with 1 (Co1 and 6 (Co6 ppm cobalt as cobaltous chloride. There was no significant difference in intake of wheat straw, concentrate and DMI between the three groups and the ratio between concentrate and wheat straw was maintained at 40:60 irrespective of dietary level of cobalt. Similarly, average cumulative body weight, net gain in body weight or feed efficiency did not differ significantly between treatments. No significant effect was observed on the digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract and fibre constituents like NDF, ADF, hemicellulose or cellulose by supplementation of 1 and 6 ppm Co to the diet of growing calves. Balance of nutrients such as Nitrogen, Calcium and Phosphorus was similar and positive in all the treatment groups. TDN and DCP values of the experimental diets remained almost similar irrespective of dietary level of cobalt. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(10.000: 299-302

  4. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O.F.

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm −3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe 2 O 4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples. - Highlights: • Substitution by a large number of rare earth elements was investigated. • First reported results on magnetostriction measurements of RE doped cobalt ferrite. • The doped samples presented an increased porosity and a decreased grain size. • Increased magnetostrctive response was observed for several doped samples

  5. Cytotoxicity and ion release of alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Anne; Fuhlrott, Jutta; Loos, Anneke; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that nanoparticles could cause toxic effects in cells. Alloy nanoparticles with yet unknown health risk may be released from cardiovascular implants made of Nickel–Titanium or Cobalt–Chromium due to abrasion or production failure. We show the bio-response of human primary endothelial and smooth muscle cells exposed to different concentrations of metal and alloy nanoparticles. Nanoparticles having primary particle sizes in the range of 5–250 nm were generated using laser ablation in three different solutions avoiding artificial chemical additives, and giving access to formulations containing nanoparticles only stabilized by biological ligands. Endothelial cells are found to be more sensitive to nanoparticle exposure than smooth muscle cells. Cobalt and Nickel nanoparticles caused the highest cytotoxicity. In contrast, Titanium, Nickel–Iron, and Nickel–Titanium nanoparticles had almost no influence on cells below a nanoparticle concentration of 10 μM. Nanoparticles in cysteine dissolved almost completely, whereas less ions are released when nanoparticles were stabilized in water or citrate solution. Nanoparticles stabilized by cysteine caused less inhibitory effects on cells suggesting cysteine to form metal complexes with bioactive ions in media.

  6. Analysis of PTA hardfacing with CoCrWC and CoCrMoSi alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Scheid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available CoCrWC alloys are widely used to protect components that operate under wear and high temperature environments. Enhanced performance has been achieved with the CoCrMoSi alloys but processing this alloy system is still a challenge due to the presence of the brittle Laves phase, particularly when welding is involved. This work evaluated Plasma Transferred Arc coatings processed with the Co-based alloy CoMoCrSi - Tribaloy T400, reinforced with Laves phase, comparing its weldability to the CoCrWC - Stellite 6, reinforced with carbides. Coatings were also analyzed regarding the response to temperature exposure at 600°C for 7 days and subsequent effect on microstructure and sliding abrasive wear. Coatings characterization was carried out by light and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness. CoCrWC coatings exhibited a Cobalt solid solution dendritic microstructure and a thin interdendritic region with eutectic carbides, while CoCrMoSi deposits exhibit a large lamellar eutectic region of Laves phase and Cobalt solid solution and a small fraction of primary Laves phase. Although phase stability was observed by X-ray diffraction, coarsening of the microstructure occurred for both alloys. CoCrMoSi showed thicker lamellar Laves phase and CoCrWC coarser eutectic carbides. Coatings stability assessed by wear tests revealed that although the wear rate of the as-deposited CoCrMoSi alloy was lower than that of CoCrWC alloy its increase after temperature exposure was more significant, 22% against 15%. Results were discussed regarding the protection of industrial components in particular, bearings in 55AlZn hot dip galvanizing components.

  7. Importance of cobalt for individual trophic groups in an anaerobic methanol-degrading consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    Florencio, L; Field, J A; Lettinga, G

    1994-01-01

    Methanol is an important anaerobic substrate in industrial wastewater treatment and the natural environment. Previous studies indicate that cobalt greatly stimulates methane formation during anaerobic treatment of methanolic wastewaters. To evaluate the effect of cobalt in a mixed culture, a sludge with low background levels of cobalt was cultivated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. Specific inhibitors in batch assays were then utilized to study the effect of cobalt on the growth...

  8. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  9. Thermal transport in cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggold, K.

    2006-09-01

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the thermal transport properties of three classes of transition-metal oxides: Cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites. The layered cuprates R 2 CuO 4 with R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd show an anomalous thermal conductivity κ. Two maxima of κ are observed as a function of temperature for a heat current within the CuO 2 planes, whereas for a heat current perpendicular to the CuO 2 planes only a conventional phononic low-temperature maximum of κ is present. Evidence is provided that the high-temperature maximum is caused by heat-carrying excitations on the CuO 2 square lattice. Moreover, it is shown that the complex low-temperature and magnetic-field behavior of κ in Nd 2 CuO 4 is most likely caused by additional phonon scattering rather than by heat-carrying Nd magnons, as it was proposed in the literature. In the cobaltates RCoO 3 with R=La, Pr, Nd, and Eu, a temperature-induced spin-state transition of the Co 3+ ions occurs. It is shown that the additional lattice disorder caused by the random distribution of populated higher spin states causes a large suppression of the thermal conductivity of LaCoO 3 for T>25 K. The effect is much weaker in PrCoO 3 and NdCoO 3 due to the increased spin gap. A quantitative analysis of the responsible mechanisms based on EuCoO 3 as a reference compound is provided. A main result is that the static disorder is sufficient to explain the suppression of κ. No dynamical Jahn-Teller distortion, as proposed in the literature, is necessary to enhance the scattering strength. Below 25 K, k is mainly determined by resonant phonon scattering on paramagnetic impurity levels, e.g. caused by oxygen non-stoichiometry. Such a suppression of the thermal conductivity by resonant scattering processes is e.g. known from Holmium ethylsulfate. This effect is most pronounced in LaCoO 3 , presumably due to magnetic polaron formation. In the doped compounds La 1-x Sr x CoO 3 with 0≤x≤0.25, a large

  10. Study of obliquely deposited thin cobalt films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szmaja, W.; Kozlowski, W.; Balcerski, J.; Kowalczyk, P.J.; Grobelny, J.; Cichomski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The paper reports simultaneously on the magnetic domain structure of obliquely deposited thin cobalt films (40 nm and 100 nm thick) and their morphological structure. Such studies are in fact rare (Refs. cited in the paper). → Moreover, to our knowledge, observations of the morphological structure of these films have not yet been carried out simultaneously by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). → The films of both thicknesses were found to have uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. → The magnetic microstructure of the films 40 nm thick was composed of domains running and magnetized predominantly in the direction perpendicular to the incidence plane of the vapor beam. → As the film thickness was changed from 40 nm to 100 nm, the magnetic anisotropy was observed to change from the direction perpendicular to parallel with respect to the incidence plane. → Thanks to the application of TEM and AFM, complementary information on the morphological structure of the films could be obtained. → In comparison with TEM images, AFM images revealed grains larger in size and slightly elongated in the direction perpendicular rather than parallel to the incidence plane. → These experimental findings clearly show that surface diffusion plays an important role in the process of film growth. → For the films 40 nm thick, the alignment of columnar grains in the direction perpendicular to the incidence plane was observed. → This correlates well with the magnetic domain structure of these films. → For the films 100 nm thick, the perpendicular alignment of columnar grains could also be found, although in fact with larger difficulty. → TEM studies showed that the films consisted mainly of the hexagonal close-packed (HCP) crystalline structure, but no preferred crystallographic orientation of the grains could be detected for the films of both thicknesses. → For the films 100 nm thick, the alignment of

  11. Thermal transport in cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggold, K.

    2006-09-15

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the thermal transport properties of three classes of transition-metal oxides: Cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites. The layered cuprates R{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} with R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd show an anomalous thermal conductivity {kappa}. Two maxima of {kappa} are observed as a function of temperature for a heat current within the CuO{sub 2} planes, whereas for a heat current perpendicular to the CuO{sub 2} planes only a conventional phononic low-temperature maximum of {kappa} is present. Evidence is provided that the high-temperature maximum is caused by heat-carrying excitations on the CuO{sub 2} square lattice. Moreover, it is shown that the complex low-temperature and magnetic-field behavior of {kappa} in Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is most likely caused by additional phonon scattering rather than by heat-carrying Nd magnons, as it was proposed in the literature. In the cobaltates RCoO{sub 3} with R=La, Pr, Nd, and Eu, a temperature-induced spin-state transition of the Co{sup 3+} ions occurs. It is shown that the additional lattice disorder caused by the random distribution of populated higher spin states causes a large suppression of the thermal conductivity of LaCoO{sub 3} for T>25 K. The effect is much weaker in PrCoO{sub 3} and NdCoO{sub 3} due to the increased spin gap. A quantitative analysis of the responsible mechanisms based on EuCoO{sub 3} as a reference compound is provided. A main result is that the static disorder is sufficient to explain the suppression of {kappa}. No dynamical Jahn-Teller distortion, as proposed in the literature, is necessary to enhance the scattering strength. Below 25 K, k is mainly determined by resonant phonon scattering on paramagnetic impurity levels, e.g. caused by oxygen non-stoichiometry. Such a suppression of the thermal conductivity by resonant scattering processes is e.g. known from Holmium ethylsulfate. This effect is most pronounced in LaCoO{sub 3}, presumably due to

  12. Effects of bathing on skin exposed to Cobalt-60 teletherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohannan, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of this study was to determine the effects of bathing or not bathing on the degree of skin reaction occurring in patients receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy to the chest, back, or head and neck. A quasi experimental study was done using a 2 x 7 repeated measures design. Sixty-seven subjects receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy at the Moncrief Radiation Center in Fort Worth, Texas, were randomly assigned to an experimental group who did not bathe during therapy and a control group who did bathe with water during therapy. Observations were made after each 1000 rads of therapy and two weeks after the final treatment. Erythema and pigmentation measurements were taken using the Photovolt 670 and rates were assigned using the Baker-Leith Rating Scale. Findings from the study suggest that bathing the portal of entry with water during the treatment period does not influence the degree of skin response that occurs from Cobalt-60 teletherapy

  13. C-188 cobalt-60 sealed source integrity: source monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defalco, G.M.; Shah, V.

    1995-01-01

    The integrity of C-188 cobalt-60 sealed sources used for radiation processing will be a key factor in the continued industrial acceptance and growth of gamma irradiation technology. Given the public's relatively poor understanding of most nuclear topics and the news media's tendency to sensationalize events, it is appropriate for suppliers and users of gamma technology to be vigilant and conservative regarding the application of cobalt-60 sources to industrial purposes. Nordion's recent decision to extend the optional warranty on its C-188 cobalt-60 sealed source from 15 years to 20 years is based on over 30 years of data generated from its on-going SOURCE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM. This paper presents an overview of the C-188 SOURCE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM. (author)

  14. Cobalt 60 gamma irradiation current status, trends and insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, John T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the current status, trends and insights into the continued, safe use of cobalt 60 gamma irradiation. Also presented are some of the many initiatives undertaken at MDS Nordion. Topics covered include our investment for the future supply of raw materials and the latest news from source production. Briefly presented are the tasks associated with the safe transport of cobalt 60 around the world. Discussed is cobalt 60 usage at the customer site; more specifically maintaining source integrity, source utilization and irradiator design trends. Highlighted are industry trends for North America, Europe and the rest of the world. Finally presented are the challenges and opportunities for the industry. Stressed in the paper is the need to work together

  15. Magnetic and resonance properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles doped with cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyar, S. V.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Bayukov, O. A.; Balaev, D. A.; Dubrovskii, A. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Ladygina, V. P.; Vorotynov, A. M.; Volochaev, M. N.

    2017-03-01

    Powders of undoped ferrihydrite nanoparticles and ferrihydrite nanoparticles doped with cobalt in the ratio of 5: 1 have been prepared by hydrolysis of 3 d-metal salts. It has been shown using Mössbauer spectroscopy that cobalt is uniformly distributed over characteristic crystal-chemical positions of iron ions. The blocking temperatures of ferrihydrite nanoparticles have been determined. The nanoparticle sizes, magnetizations, surface anisotropy constants, and bulk anisotropy constants have been estimated. The doping of ferrihydrite nanoparticles with cobalt leads to a significant increase in the anisotropy constant of a nanoparticle and to the formation of surface rotational anisotropy with the surface anisotropy constant K u = 1.6 × 10-3 erg/cm2.

  16. Absolute measurement of the critical scattering cross section in cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glinka, C.J.; Minkiewicz, V.J.; Passell, L.

    1975-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering techniques have been used to study the angular distribution of the critical scattering from cobalt above T/sub c/. These measurements have been put on an absolute scale by calibrating the critical scattering directly against the nuclear incoherent scattering from cobalt. In this way the interaction range r 1 , which appears in the classical and modified Ornstein--Zernike expressions for the asymptotic form of the spin pair correlation function and is related to the strength of the spin correlations, has been determined. We obtain r 1 /a = 0.46 +- 0.03 for the ratio of the interaction range to the nearest-neighbor distance in cobalt. This result is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Lack of agreement among previous determinations of the ratio r 1 /a made in iron failed to provide a definitive comparison with theory

  17. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III; Brodzinski, R.L.; Marcum, J.

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs

  18. New avenues in cobalt-60 production at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylvaganam, C.K.; Ronchka, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ontario Hydro produces cobalt-60 in the control rods of twelve power reactors. These reactors have a typical flux of 2 x 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 /s, making them efficient producers of cobalt-60. Current annual production is 45 million curies. Since the primary function of these reactors is the production of electricity, their flexibility to meet the needs of commercial cobalt production by the control rod route is limited. Ontario Hydro is therefore developing innovative production techniques, making use of the CANDU reactor's unique ability to be fuelled on-power. These techniques will enable production to better respond to the market's requirements for quantity and specific activity. As it is supplementary to control rod production, annual supply could potentially reach 165 million curies. (author)

  19. Hepatic lipidosis associated with cobalt deficiency in Omani goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E H; Muirhead, D E; Annamalai, K; King, G J; Al-Busaidy, R; Hameed, M S

    1999-06-01

    Livers from 36 of 684 (5.3%) apparently healthy goats examined at an abattoir in the greater Muscat area of Oman exhibited gross pathological findings characterized by extremely pale, friable, fatty livers encompassing the entire organ. Histopathologically, diffuse hepatic lipidosis and occasional bile duct proliferation were observed. Periodic acid Schiff-positive, diastase-resistant pigment was observed in the macrophages lining the sinusoids. These histopathological lesions were consistent with those characteristic of ovine white liver disease. Cobalt analysis revealed that normal livers had six times more cobalt and a 3-fold less fat content than those measured in the fatty livers. This is the first report of an association between cobalt deficiency and hepatic lipidosis in Omani goats.

  20. Temperature and fluence effects in lead implanted cobalt single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Johnson, E.; Steenstrup, S.; Chernysh, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The channeled sputtering yields of the hcp and fcc phases of cobalt depend on the crystal structure and the radiation induced damage. Earlier irradiations of cobalt with argon ions channeled in the hcp direction give sputtering yields higher than expected in the temperature range 100-350deg C. This effect was attributed to a combination of radiation induced damage and a possible implantation induced hcp --> fcc phase transition. Sputtering yields for cobalt single crystals irradiated with 150 keV Pb + ions along the direction of the hcp phase and the direction of the fcc phase have been measured using the weightloss method. The radiation damage and the amount of lead retained in the implanted surface has been investigated by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis. Measured partial sputtering yields of lead ≅ 1 atom/ion indicate preferential sputtering of lead atoms. (orig.)

  1. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg. No...

  2. The corrosion behaviour and structure of amorphous and thermally treated Fe-B-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicheff, R.; Zaprianova, V.; Petrova, E.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of magnetic amorphous alloys Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 , Fe 81 B 13 Si 4 C 2 and Fe 67 Co 18 Bi 4 S 1 obtained by rapid quenching from the melts are investigated in a model corrosive environment of 1N H 2 SO 4 . The structure of the alloys, is, characterized by DTA, SEM, TEM, X-ray and electron diffraction techniques. The dissolution kinetics of the,alloys is studied using gravimetric and electrochemical polarization measurements. It is established that the corrosion rate of the amorphous Fe 67 Co 18 Bt 4 S 1 alloy is up to 50 times lower than that of Fe 78 Bi 3 Si 9 alloy and the addition of cobalt leads to a considerable reduction of the rates of both partial corrosion reactions, while the addition of carbon results only in a moderate decrease (2-3 times) of the corrosion rate. It is also shown that the crystallization of the amorphous Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 alloy (at 700 o C for 3 h) leads to formation of multiphase structure consisting of crystalline phases α-Fe and Fe 3 (B,Si). After crystallization an increase of the rate of both hydrogen evolution and anodic dissolution reactions is observed which results in a considerable (an order of magnitude) increase of the corrosion rate of the alloy. (Original)

  3. Recent experience about the influence of primary coolant and shutdown chemistry on cobalt activity at Beznau NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailand, I.; Venz, H.

    2007-01-01

    The Beznau nuclear power plant comprises two identical 380 MWe PWR units, commissioned in 1969 and 1971. The surfaces of the new steam generator tube material, Inconel 690, are the main source of 58 Co. The 60 Co originates predominantly from the Cobalt alloy, Stellite, which is installed in valves and pump bearings because of the very good hardness of this material. By means of optimised shutdown chemistry it is possible to reduce the amount of NiO on the fuel rods, leading to reduced Co-58 peaks in subsequent cycles. The optimised shutdown chemistry during the past few years and especially the strict separation of acid-reducing phase from the acid-oxidising phase as well as the results of studies and the resulting operational experiences are important basics for the actual operation mode of the Beznau NPP. (orig.)

  4. Removal of Cobalt Ion by Adsorbing Colloidal Flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-09-30

    Simulated waste liquid containing 50 ppm cobalt ion was treated by adsorbing colloidal flotation using Fe(III) or Al(III) as flocculant and a sodium lauryl sulfate as a collector. Parameters such as pH, surfactant concentration, Fe(III) or Al(III) concentration, gas flow rate, etc., were considered. The flotation with Fe(III) showed 99.8% removal efficiency of cobalt on the conditions of initial cobalt ion concentration 50 ppm, pH 9.5, gas flow rate 70 ml/min, and flotation time 30 min. When the waste solution was treated with 35% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} prior to adsorbing colloidal flotation, the optimal pH for removing cobalt shifted to weak alkaline range and flotation could be applied in wider range of pH as compared to non-use of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Additional use of 20 ppm Al(III) after precipitation of 50 ppm Co(II) with 50 ppm Fe(III) made the optimal pH range for preferable flotation wider. Foreign ions such as, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} were adopted and their effects were observed, Of which sulfate ion was found to be detrimental to removal of cobalt ion by flotation. Coprecipitation of Co ion with Fe(III) and Al(III) resulted in better removal efficiency of cobalt ion in the presence of sulfate ion. (author). 14 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Investigation of the production of cobalt-60 via particle accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artun Ozan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production process of cobalt-60 was simulated by a particle accelerator in the energy range of 5 to 100 MeV, particle beam current of 1 mA, and irradiation time of 1 hour to perform yield, activity of reaction, and integral yield for charged particle-induced reactions. Based on nuclear reaction processes, the obtained results in the production process of cobalt-60 were also discussed in detail to determine appropriate target material, optimum energy ranges, and suitable reactions.

  6. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-05-19

    Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged 10 years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, that is, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in nonaqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly, we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts in the

  7. Cobalt Ferrite Nanocrystallites for Sustainable Hydrogen Production Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra S. Gaikwad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite, CoFe2O4, nanocrystalline films were deposited using electrostatic spray method and explored in sustainable hydrogen production application. Reflection planes in X-ray diffraction pattern confirm CoFe2O4 phase. The surface scanning microscopy photoimages reveal an agglomeration of closely-packed CoFe2O4 nanoflakes. Concentrated solar-panel, a two-step water splitting process, measurement technique was preferred for measuring the hydrogen generation rate. For about 5 hr sustainable, 440 mL/hr, hydrogen production activity was achieved, confirming the efficient use of cobalt ferrite nanocrystallites film in hydrogen production application.

  8. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods

  9. Reciprocal interaction between dental alloy biocorrosion and Streptococcus mutans virulent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songmei; Qiu, Jing; Ren, Yanfang; Yu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of dental alloys is a major concern in dental restorations. Streptococcus mutans reduces the pH in oral cavity and induces demineralization of the enamel as well as corrosion of restorative dental materials. The rough surfaces of dental alloys induced by corrosion enhance the subsequent accumulation of plaque. In this study, the corrosion process of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys in a nutrient-rich medium containing S. mutans was studied using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test. Our results showed that the release of Ni and Co ions increased, particularly after incubation for 3 days. The electrochemical corrosion results showed a significant decrease in the corrosion resistance (Rp) value after the alloys were immersed in the media containing S. mutans for 3 days. Correspondingly, XPS revealed a reduction in the relative dominance of Ni, Co, and Cr in the surface oxides after the alloys were immersed in the S. mutans culture. After removal of the biofilm, the pre-corroded alloys were re-incubated in S. mutans medium, and the expressions of genes associated with the adhesion and acidogenesis of S. mutans, including gtfBCD, gbpB, fif and ldh, were evaluated by detecting the mRNA levels using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that the gtfBCD, gbpB, ftf and Idh expression of S. mutans were noticeably increased after incubation with pre-corroded alloys for 24 h. This study demonstrated that S. mutans enhanced the corrosion behavior of the dental alloys, on the other hand, the presence of corroded alloy surfaces up-regulated the virulent gene expression in S. mutans. Compared with smooth surfaces, the rough corroded surfaces of dental alloys accelerated the bacteria-adhesion and corrosion process by changing the virulence gene expression of S. mutans.

  10. Effects of primary dicarboxylic acids on microstructure and mechanical properties of sub-microcrystalline Ni-Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, J.; Mohan, S.; Yadav, S. Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The electrodeposited Ni-Co alloys are mostly used in magnetic sensors and it has good mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. → The effect of dicarboxylic acid leads to preferred (2 0 0) crystalline orientation, this may improve magnetic properties dicarboxylic acid can alter the elemental composition of Ni-Co alloy. → Dicarboxylic acid acts as a good brightner. - Abstract: Nickel-cobalt alloys were deposited from sulfate electrolyte with oxalic, malonic and succinic acids as additives and their microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. The crystal structure, surface morphologies, and chemical composition of coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The crystal structure and surface morphology analysis showed that the addition of dicarboxylic acid leads to (2 0 0) crystal face and the surface were more compact and uniform due to the grain refining. Ni 60 -Co 40 alloy was achieved when succinic acid is used as additive.

  11. Cobalt coatings: deposition on a nickel substrate and electrocatalytic activity for alkaline water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, L. (Inst. de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), Varennes, Quebec (Canada))

    1992-02-01

    The deposition of cobalt on a nickel substrate in 30 wt% KOH aqueous solution containing dissolved cobalt was investigated. The effect of the applied cathodic current density (i{sub a}) and the dissolved-cobalt concentration in the electrolyte on the deposition rate suggests that the rate-determining step is the diffusion of the dissolved cobalt in the solution. The faradic efficiency of the cobalt deposition reaction and the coating morphology are linked to i{sub a}, while the evolution rate of both oxygen and hydrogen in 30 wt% KOH at 70degC is dependent on the coating morphology. (orig.).

  12. Neodymium cobalt oxide as a chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, I. A.; Rahman, Mohammed M.; Khan, Sher Bahadar

    2018-03-01

    Chemical sensing and electrical transport properties of neodymium coblate, NdCoO3, was investigated in this work. It was prepared by using co-precipitation method. Pure neodymium chloride and cobalt chloride were mixing in the presence of sodium hydroxide and the obtained co-precipitated powder was calcined at 850 and 1000 °C. The synthesized composites, as-grown (NdCoO3-I), calcined at 850 °C (NdCoO3-II), and calcined at 1000 °C (NdCoO3-III) were studied in details in terms of their morphological and structural properties. The X-ray analysis confirmed that the synthesized products are well crystalline possessing single phase orthorhombic crystal system of space group Pbnm(62). The crystallite size of NdCoO3-I, NdCoO3-II, and NdCoO3-III is 22, 111, and 338 nm, respectively which reflect that crystallite size is increasing with increase in firing temperature. The DC resistivity was measured as a function of temperature in the temperature range from room temperature up to 200 °C. All NdCoO3 are semiconductor in this range of temperature but showed different activation energy which strongly depends on the crystallite size of the products. The activation energy decreased with increase in crystallite size, 0.798, 0.414 and 0.371 eV for NdCoO3-I, NdCoO3-II, and NdCoO3-III, respectively. Thus resistivity increases with increase in crystallite size of NdCoO3. All NdCoO3 products were tested as chemical sensor for acetone by electrochemical approaches and showed excellent sensitivity. Among the NdCoO3 samples, NdCoO3-III showed the highest sensitivity (3.4722 μAcm-2 mM-1) compared to other compositions and gradually decreased to 3.2407 μAcm-2 mM-1 with decreasing the crystallite size of NdCoO3-II. It is also observed that the sensitivity drastically decreased to 0.76253 μAcm-2 mM-1 in the case of NdCoO3-I. It is introduced an efficient route for the detection of environmental unsafe chemicals by electrochemical approach for the safety of healthcare and environmental

  13. The Role of External Inputs and Internal Cycling in Shaping the Global Ocean Cobalt Distribution: Insights From the First Cobalt Biogeochemical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Hawco, Nicholas J.; Bundy, Randelle M.; Landing, William M.; Milne, Angela; Morton, Peter L.; Saito, Mak A.

    2018-04-01

    Cobalt is an important micronutrient for ocean microbes as it is present in vitamin B12 and is a co-factor in various metalloenzymes that catalyze cellular processes. Moreover, when seawater availability of cobalt is compared to biological demands, cobalt emerges as being depleted in seawater, pointing to a potentially important limiting role. To properly account for the potential biological role for cobalt, there is therefore a need to understand the processes driving the biogeochemical cycling of cobalt and, in particular, the balance between external inputs and internal cycling. To do so, we developed the first cobalt model within a state-of-the-art three-dimensional global ocean biogeochemical model. Overall, our model does a good job in reproducing measurements with a correlation coefficient of >0.7 in the surface and >0.5 at depth. We find that continental margins are the dominant source of cobalt, with a crucial role played by supply under low bottom-water oxygen conditions. The basin-scale distribution of cobalt supplied from margins is facilitated by the activity of manganese-oxidizing bacteria being suppressed under low oxygen and low temperatures, which extends the residence time of cobalt. Overall, we find a residence time of 7 and 250 years in the upper 250 m and global ocean, respectively. Importantly, we find that the dominant internal resupply process switches from regeneration and recycling of particulate cobalt to dissolution of scavenged cobalt between the upper ocean and the ocean interior. Our model highlights key regions of the ocean where biological activity may be most sensitive to cobalt availability.

  14. Microstructure of As-cast Co-Cr-Mo Alloy Prepared by Investment Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Bum; Jung, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Kang Min; Son, Yong; Lee, Jung-Il; Ryu, Jeong Ho

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by an investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants owing to its high strength, good corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from normal industrial environmental conditions. The characterization of the samples was carried out using optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. In this study, the as-cast microstructure is an γ-Co (face-centered cubic) dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as M23C6 carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloy. Other minority phases, such as the σ phase, were also detected, and their presence could be linked to the manufacturing process and environment.

  15. Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron(II and Cobalt(II by Direct, Derivative, and Simultaneous Methods Using 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthaldehyde-p-Hydroxybenzoichydrazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Anusuya Devi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimized and validated spectrophotometric methods have been proposed for the determination of iron and cobalt individually and simultaneously. 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-p-hydroxybenzoichydrazone (HNAHBH reacts with iron(II and cobalt(II to form reddish-brown and yellow-coloured [Fe(II-HNAHBH] and [Co(II-HNAHBH] complexes, respectively. The maximum absorbance of these complexes was found at 405 nm and 425 nm, respectively. For [Fe(II-HNAHBH], Beer’s law is obeyed over the concentration range of 0.055–1.373 μg mL−1 with a detection limit of 0.095 μg mL−1 and molar absorptivity ɛ, 5.6 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. [Co(II-HNAHBH] complex obeys Beer’s law in 0.118–3.534 μg mL−1 range with a detection limit of 0.04 μg mL−1 and molar absorptivity, ɛ of 2.3 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. Highly sensitive and selective first-, second- and third-order derivative methods are described for the determination of iron and cobalt. A simultaneous second-order derivative spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of these metals. All the proposed methods are successfully employed in the analysis of various biological, water, and alloy samples for the determination of iron and cobalt content.

  16. Control of morphology and structure for β-Co nanoparticles from cobalt oxalate and research on its phase-change mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chongqing University of Arts and Science, Chongqing 402160 (China); Xiong, Xiang, E-mail: xiangxiong88@qq.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zou, J.P., E-mail: zoujp@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Deng, Ling [Chengdu Chengliang Tool Group Co., Ltd., Chengdu 610056 (China); Tu, M.J. [Chongqing University of Arts and Science, Chongqing 402160 (China)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Nanoscale precursor β-CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O can be prepared by mechanical solid phase reaction. • Growth mechanism, morphology and crystal structure of β-CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O have been studied. • Internal energy reserves of precursor making it directly generate β-Co in the thermal decomposition reaction. • Martensitic transformation of Co has been studied. • The Co powder will inherit the morphology of its precursor. - Abstract: The face-centered cubic crystal structure β-Co has excellent performance. As the main material to produce high toughness hard alloys and metal cermet, its morphology and structure will have an important impact on the performance of the alloy. This study, based on solid-phase reaction, starting from the crystal structure studied, discussed the effection of the mechanical solid-phase chemical reactions on the morphology of the cobalt precursor structure, researched the cobalt phase change mechanism, and presented a method to prepare nano β-Co. With H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O and Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O as raw materials, nano-crystalline cobalt oxalate powders with nearly spherical shape have been prepared by using solid-phase chemical reactions in high-speed ball milling, and then by decomposing at 400–450 °C, the target was prepared. The thermodynamical and IR analysis has been studied. The microstructure of the powders was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM. It has been identified that a spherical, fcc structure, 100 nm β-Co powders was synthesized successfully, which confirmed the theoretical feasibility of this study.

  17. Heating-induced inner-sphere substitution and reduction-oxidation reactions of the solid phenanthroline containing cobalt (2) and cobalt (3) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palade, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The results of the differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses of solid phenanthroline-containing complexes of cobalt (2) and cobalt (3) in the atmosphere of the air have been analyzed. Mechanism of redox reactions occurring when cobalt (3) complexes are heated has been discussed. It is shown that some of gaseous products of the redox processes appear as a result of secondary reactions and not the processes of the ligands oxidation by Co 3+ . The influence of certain inner-sphere and coordinated anions (of I, inclusively) on cobalt (3) complexes behaviour during heating has been considered

  18. Evora® chromium-cobalt dual mobility socket: results at a minimum 10 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, S; Benoit, J Y; de Rosa, J P; Tallier, E; Leteurtre, C; Girardin, P H

    2013-12-01

    The Evora chromium-cobalt alloy dual mobility socket claims to display a large articulation tribology different from that of stainless steel models, limiting the risk of intraprosthetic dislocation and wear. The present study reports a minimum of 10years' follow-up in a multicenter prospective series of 200 sockets previously reported on at 5years. The use of chromium-cobalt in dual mobility sockets provides a low rate of failure at 10years, especially as regards to osteolysis and intraprosthetic dislocation. Two hundred hydroxyapatite-coated molded chromium-cobalt sockets without titanium interface were implanted without cement in 194 patients with a mean age of 70 years (range, 32-91 years). Clinical results were assessed on Postel Merle d'Aubigné and Harris scores, plain radiographs and survival analysis. At a mean 11 years' follow-up (10-13 years), 56 patients had died and 31 were lost to follow-up. Four underwent surgical revision (3 femoral components, and 1 socket for migration at 9 years with complete disappearance of the hydroxyapatite). A total of 109 implants were analyzable in 107 patients with a mean age of 81 years (55-93 years). At follow-up, the mean Harris score was 90 (75-96) and the PMA score 16.3 (14-18). There were no cases of loosening (except for the case reoperated on at 9 years) and no acetabular radiolucency or cysts. There were 2 cases of non-evolutive femoral radiolucency and 10 of femoral granuloma, involving head size > 22 mm (P<0.0001) and a cemented titanium stem (P=0.004) as risk factors. There were no dislocations in the large or small articulation. Ten-year survival was 99% (95% CI: 97.3%-100%) with socket revision as censorship criterion. The absence of dislocation in both small and large articulations confirmed the efficacy of the dual mobility concept and suggested an advantage for chromium-cobalt sockets in reducing the rate of intraprosthetic dislocation and preventing blockage of the large articulation by a better

  19. Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Montmorillonite K10-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobara, H.M.; Ghattas, M.S.; Henien, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Montmorillonite K10-supported cobalt catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method. The samples were analyzed by XRD, TPR, FTTR and BET characterization techniques. [Three phases of cobalt species were identified namely, cobalt oxide (Co 3 O 4 ), cobalt silicate (Co 2 S 1 O 4 ) and cobalt aluminate (CoAl 2 O 4 ). These species were most probably existing within the inter lamellar spaces of the meso porous montmorillonite K10 support]. The two bands observed at 1385 and 760 cm 1 were characteristic of metal species rather than the support, being mostly of Co - O bond vibration. The hysteresis loop, pore size distribution, pore volume and BET surface area were greatly affected by cobalt loading. The catalyst containing 18 wt% cobalt was the most selective sample for ethylene production from ethanol dehydration.

  20. Development of hierarchically porous cobalt oxide for enhanced photo-oxidation of indoor pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J. P., E-mail: chengjp@zju.edu.cn [Zhejiang University, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Shereef, Anas; Gray, Kimberly A., E-mail: k-gray@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Center for Catalysis and Surface Science (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Porous cobalt oxide was successfully prepared by precipitation of cobalt hydroxide followed by low temperature thermal decomposition. The morphologies of the resultant oxides remained as the corresponding hydroxides, although the morphology of cobalt hydroxides was greatly influenced by the precursor salts. The cobalt oxides with average crystal size less than 20 nm were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, BET surface area, and XPS analysis. The photocatalytic activities of the various cobalt oxides morphologies were investigated by comparing the photo-degradation of acetaldehyde under simulated solar illumination. Relative to their low order structures and reference titania samples, the hierarchical nanostructures of cobalt oxide showed excellent abilities to rapidly degrade acetaldehyde, a model air pollutant. This was attributed to the unique nature of these hierarchical cobalt oxide nanoassemblies, which contained many catalytically active reaction sites and open pores.

  1. Protective coatings for high temperature alloys state of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goward, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings used on nickel- and cobalt-base superalloy blades and vanes in gas turbine engines typify the state of coating technology for high temperature alloys. Coatings formed by interdiffusion of aluminum with the alloys to form layers consisting mainly of intermetallic compounds, such as NiAl and CoAl, were the first systems used for protection of gas turbine airfoils. The protectivity of these systems is derived from the formation of protective alumina scales. In a general way, coating degradation occurs by cyclic oxidation, molten salt hot corrosion and, at higher temperatures, interdiffusion with the substrate. Thermal fatigue properties are governed by the brittle-ductile transition behavior of the intermetallic compounds NiAl and CoAl. Both positive and negative effects occur, depending on the shapes of thermal strain-temperature curves for particular applications. Significant increases in hot corrosion and oxidation resistance have been obtained by the incorporation of noble metals, such as platinum, in aluminide coatings. The so-called MCrAlY overlay coatings, based on nickel, cobalt, iron and combinations thereof with chromium, aluminum and yttrium can be formulated over a wide range of compositions nominally independent of those of substrate alloys. Improved oxidation resistance and, in part, hot corrosion resistance is derived from yttrium which enhances protective oxide adherence. Mechanical properties, principally ductility, and therefore thermal fatigue resistance, can be adjusted to the requirements of specific applications. Incremental improvements in performance of the MCrAlY coatings are expected as research programs define degradation mechanisms in greater detail and more complex compositions are devised. More basic evaluations of mixed metal-ceramic insulative coatings have been initiated to determine if these systems are capable of effecting further increases in airfoil durability

  2. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Consumer leather exposure: an unrecognized cause of cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J.P.; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A patient who had suffered from persistent generalized dermatitis for 7 years was diagnosed with cobalt sensitization, and his leather couch was suspected as the culprit, owing to the clinical presentation mimicking allergic chromium dermatitis resulting from leather furniture exposur...

  5. Cobalt-60 production in the BN-350 fast power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonarev, A.V.; Korobejnikov, V.V.; Matveenko, I.P.

    1994-01-01

    A possibility of Co-60 isotope production in the BN-350 fast reactor was considered. A special irradiating device, which is an assembly with a central hole, where a container containing cobalt and zirconium hydride is placed. The irradiating device tested permits generating 60 Co with specific activity of 100 Ci/g

  6. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiyoun [Sungshin Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  7. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography in recurrent ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Reuck, J; Santens, P; Keppens, J; De Bleecker, J; Strijckmans, K; Goethals, P; Lemahieu, [No Value; Korf, J

    The present study investigates if Cobalt-55 (Co-55) positron emission tomography (PET) allows us to distinguish and detect recent, recurrent strokes in patients who had already suffered a previous infarct in the same vascular territory. Fourteen patients with recurrent strokes underwent a Co-55 PET

  8. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, J. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455-0153 (United States); Arias, N.P. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica y Computacion, Facultad de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Giraldo, O. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Rosales-Rivera, A., E-mail: arosalesr@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-08-15

    Cobalt doped/un-doped manganese oxides materials were synthesized at various doping rates by soft chemical reactions, oxidation-reduction method, which allows generating a metal-mixed oxide. The synthesized materials were characterized using several techniques including chemical analysis, X-rays diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The chemical analysis confirmed the presence of cobalt in the samples. XRD patterns reveal mainly a spinel-like structure and SEM micrographs exhibited morphology with fine aggregate of particles. TGA profiles showed weight loss due to loss of water in a first step, followed by a loss of oxygen from the lattice associated with partial reduction of Mn{sup 4+} to Mn{sup 3+}. VSM was used to measure the magnetization as a function of the applied magnetic field at temperatures T=50 and 300 K. Different magnetic behaviors were observed when cobalt percentage changed in the samples. These behaviors are considered to be related to the size of the particles and composition of the materials. Higher coercive field and lesser magnetization were observed for the sample with higher cobalt content.

  9. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    of cobalt, and also from the initial slope of the cobalt buffering curve. The cobalt accumulation is similar in fed and ATP-depleted cells. The buffering curve for [Co(T)](c) can be fitted by a Michaelis type function with B(max)=24 mmol (l cells)(-1) and half-saturation at 240 µM [Co(2+)](c). The tracer...... reversibly bound, being releasable by excess extracellular EGTA in the presence of A23187, and partly tightly bound, remaining in the cells even at high ionophore concentrations. The tightly bound fraction builds up over time, and is larger and develops earlier in fed cells compared to ATP-depleted cells......-migrate with hemoglobin in Sephadex column chromatography of a lysate of (57)Co-loaded cells. (57)Co also co-migrates with hemoglobin when added to a lysate of unlabeled cells or to a solution of purified hemoglobin, in both cases with a time-dependent development of tight binding. Cobalt is known to bind to the globin...

  10. Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Cobalt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    7

    synthesis methods of shape, size, magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite ... substance was then ground into a fine powder and calcined at 600oC for 10 hours and .... From the particles distribution pattern of CFO nanoparticles in Figure 2(a), it is.

  11. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2012-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry

  12. Cobalt nanoparticles as reusable catalysts for reduction of 4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    33

    active and ordered structures of cobalt nanoparticles. The air stable ... same surfactant was found to reduce p-nitrophenol but lose their catalytic efficiency after recovery. Based on chemical and ... industrial sources.11-13 The US Environmental Protection Agency has reported nitrophenols as one of the most hazardous and ...

  13. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermophysical properties of undercooled liquid cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, X J; Wang, J Z; Chen, M; Guo, Z Y

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with two different embedded-atom-method (EAM) potentials are applied to calculate the density, specific heat and self-diffusion coefficient of liquid cobalt at temperatures above and below the melting temperature. Simulation shows that Pasianot's EAM model of cobalt constructed on the basis of a hcp structure is more successful than Stoop's EAM model in the framework of a fcc structure in predicting the thermophysical properties of liquid cobalt. Simulations with Pasianot's EAM model indicate that the density fits into ρ = 7.49-9.17 x 10 -4 (T- T m ) g cm -3 , and the self-diffusion coefficient is given by D = 1.291 x 10 -7 exp(-48 795.71/RT) m 2 s -1 . Dissimilar to the linear dependence of the density and the Arrhenius dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient on temperature, the specific heat shows almost a constant value of 38.595 ± 0.084 J mol -1 K -1 within the temperature range of simulation. The simulated properties of liquid cobalt are compared with experimental data available. Comparisons show reasonable agreements between the simulated results from Pasianot's EAM model and experimental data

  15. Comparative effects of cobalt, nickel and copper on plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenchley, W E

    1938-11-01

    An account is given of the present position of our knowledge with regard to the distribution and the physiological importance of nickel and cobalt, in relation to plants and animals. Experiments on barley and broad beans were carried out in water cultures with the sulfates and chlorides of cobalt, nickel and copper. In every case a range of low concentrations did little or no damage, but toxic action occurred abruptly above a concentration which varied with the species and with the compound. With barley, copper was the most poisonous element in either compound, but the differences were not striking. Low concentrations of the sulfate were innocuous, but parallel low strengths of the chloride caused a slight, significant depression in growth. With broad beans, cobalt was much more poisonous than either nickel or copper, particularly with the sulfate. No slight depression with low concentrations of the chloride was noticeable with this species. The morphological response to toxicity varied with the element concerned. Copper, in poisonous strengths, caused shortening and bunching of barley roots, whereas nickel and cobalt permitted the growth of elongated roots of a very attenuated nature. The individuality of plant response to poison was frequently shown by the great variation in growth in the borderline concentrations just below those which caused marked depression of growth.

  16. Complications of cobalt plaque therapy of choroidal malanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Char, D.H.; Lonn, L.I.; Margolis, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    We treated a small series of patients with choroidal melanomas with radioactive cobalt plaques. To assess the effectiveness of radiation, we performed radioactive phosphorus ( 32 P) uptake determinations before and after treatment. The 32 P results did not tumor destruction. In five of seven patients with posterior pole melanomas, radiation retinopathy developed after treatment with resultant decrease in vision

  17. and cobalt(III) octahedral monomer complexes: Synthesis and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In compound 2 the central cobalt is in +3 oxidation state while `in' compound 2, the nickel ion is in +2 oxidation state. The two complexes are isostructural with octahedral coordination environment exhibiting helical twist topology. They also display strong H-bonding as well as CH- interactions to generate 1D chain.

  18. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography in ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, HML; Paans, AMJ; Vliet, AMV; VeenmavanderDuin, L; BolwijnMeijer, CJW; Pruim, J; Willemsen, ATM; Franssen, EJF; Minderhoud, JM; Korf, J

    After acute cerebral stroke, the (peri-) infarct tissue is characterized by calcium (Ca)-mediated neuronal damage and inflammatory processes. Monitoring Ca-mediated damage using the isotope cobalt-55 (Go) as a Ga-tracer may enable PET-imaging of this tissue. Since the fate of (peri-) infarct tissue

  19. IN SITU AND POST REACTION COBALT-INCORPORATION INTO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy show that the surfactant is removed by solvent extraction. Cobalt ion incorporation is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. KEY WORDS: Bifunctional periodic mesoporous organosilica, 1,2-bistrimethoxysilylethane, ...

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and magneticproperties of cobalt chromite nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zákutná, Dominika; Repko, A.; Matulková, I.; Nižňanský, Daniel; Ardu, A.; Cannas, C.; Mantlíková, Alice; Vejpravová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2014), 1-14 ISSN 1388-0764 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1250 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : cobalt chromite * hydrothermal method * nanoparticles * size effect * multiferroic materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2014